13 Burst results for "Professor morrison"

"professor morrison" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on JDHD | A Podcast for Lawyers with ADHD

"I. Remember it quite clearly that's aside Combo would stay up late and write this thing. It was a full on. You know it had graphics now would go to Kinko's to get a printed and I had no margin at all and so I remember that Conlon the first couple of weeks was brutal and so I would go into Professor Morrison's classroom and he is a brilliant brilliant man and a brilliant mind. You also has a voice that tends to lean toward the monotone. And I was dying and I fell asleep eighty four times in a row in the class and on the on this day in particular that I remember I had my hand kind of on my hand and I fell asleep and my head fell out of my hand in it literally hit the desk. And I remember looking up and no one was even looking at me and I was like. Have I actually fallen asleep so many times that they've all stopped paying attention, and so it occurred to me that that was funny. So I laughed, and now everyone has with me and so what I did in my rational mind was this is literally the most embarrassing thing is ever happened to me and I need to feel very deep shame about it, and so I got up packed up my things and I left and I didn't come back until the final. And you didn't come back until when the final examination that all or nothing and of semester you've. GotTa nail it or you're dead thing. Yeah. I did then you pass the class, you know that's one way of looking at it. That is a pocket of land the people who don't have. Shame and embarrassment and what my wife calls the Itty Bitty Shitty Committee in their head all the time. That is just an embarrassing mortifying concept of like. You know. Have a little bit of grace figure out a way be rational and get it sorted out and and instead of very emotional and ultimately, quite detrimental reaction that you know to this day I maybe I can look back on be amused but I think about that all the time like that is the thing that I carry around with me every time and that is part of my adhd. It's part of the shame and so you touched on that is this idea that it is not just. That these folks haven't built the scaffolding around them, it's not just that they haven't be taken the steps that ideal law student would have taken to master an examination at the end of the first semester. It is also that when they don't and when they realized that they haven't it isn't just a matter of being rational and coming up with the right choice. It is literally how do I pulled myself out of this shame spiral that is going to lead to a bunch of other really bad decisions. Right, and so that that for me that really resonated when when he talked about that. And there's so much shame around the manifesto of Adhd in terms of the things that are left than done things that were started but not finished and it it has. There's a good reason why hd so highly correlated with. And oppression in a lot of people and I think understanding that there is it's not just a functional issue. It's also an emotional issue is so critical.

Professor Morrison Conlon
"professor morrison" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

09:30 min | 10 months ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The disorder and the challenge and the politics and the two nations or two ideologies or two visions the blue and the rad the nationalist and the globalist there are other ways to divide us and recently the word division is commonplace Michael very good evening to you I remind everyone that Michael and I are carrying dual personalities like the United States these days there are Michael and John the two Christian names here in the twenty first century and we're also to you guys me and dramatic as Michael on the shores of the Thames in ninety A. D. to equestrian class meeting farmers who don't work we own enjoying our Cup of wind in a wine shop and reflecting about how the we didn't really need that Republic after all in the empire is exactly the right thing we need though we're at the end of the empire here in Britain however because we're reflecting on history both guys in Germanicus and Michael and John look for historical models and that's exactly what the three distinguished professors look to Michael a very good evening to you what we have here is a search for we've been here before what's going to happen at an attempted a crystal ball that history can give let's begin with professor Morrison of Norse of northwestern what do you see that's compelling and near to the mark and his observations about the disorder in America good evening to you good evening John you bring up the it's like the search for the the the challenge you know the holy grail in the sense that what kind of lands and what kind of filter on that lands will will give us the clarity to see what is happening to us right now is we change and go through these transfiguration and Morrison takes the more classically historical approach and because he's steeped in Russia in the late nineteenth century at the end of the I'm sorry S. O. C. O. regime there he is able to focus on I know people that occurred not so long ago it's only a hundred and twenty years ago that we will well nineteen seventeen is is a hundred years ago but I mean Russia in this period all the way back into the eighteen eighties and certainly into the eighteen nineties and and after was in a pre revolutionary period it was pretty clear and it was it was under tremendous strain and they were there actually you know several sars was fascinated by bomb throwers there was an actual early revolution in nineteen oh five after the rest of Japanese war and then there was the big revolution in nineteen seventeen now he he makes a powerful point about the leaks I mean it's no question that Russia was far more inequitable far more unstable and and had been in two wars the rest of Japanese in World War one really drag Russia into degradation so there was a basis for revolution that just isn't here today but what he he keys on is the fact that that Russia had a middle class and small one and a bubble the league in the later nineteenth century very highly refined highly educated thought highly of themselves producing great writers and great composers Dostoyevsky Tchaikovsky Stravinsky but that bubble lead was committed from the eighteen nineties on overthrowing the old system the old system that gave them everything they had and they cared not a whit for the consequences of overthrowing it so in that sense I think if we look at antifa or black lives matter and and the protests that we call riots these days and and how deeply state today are in upper middle class spoiled children of the elite we can see okay a really interesting resonance with with them you know late imperial Russia and I think this is is right on target and and if you want to take that one single element I think that's of great concern because the elite it does not have any idea of social cultural consequences it's completely swept up in its own vanity and its own annoying kid so called idealism Boeing is not recognizable Michael we were educated to be that'll lead we're senior now but boy is it recognizable is the word exhausted Michael or is it still got energy what what what the for the elite are they exhausted is that is that why the indifference or early our lead is is played out in the sense and I'm I'm going to be kind to us not so much to our progeny is that they don't have the same level of of education and insight I think then that we did but they do have the same believe in there are you know noted role in history and and and so I think you know whereas the the the yuppie or boomer a lead of the seventies was just as revolutionary in its own mind it quickly shifted into money making home hood and an engine of growth whereas this believe is really more like the faded Russian a lead in the sense that it's really quite committed to overthrowing the system but that's the system that spoiled them that nurtured them and that still cobbles them so I think I think this but by just comparing our generation with there is we can see how ideas have been played out to the point where if you look at AMC I mean she can't discuss the problems of any single idea that she raises and and I think that you see this kind of dissipation of of every addition of of reading a kind of it is kind of like the air coming out of the tires of the elite class that's a bad sign okay let's move to tackle some of George Mason it too short for the short version here is that he's discouraged because he sees violence and he sees the possibility of more violence in the event of an extra constitutional illegal move by the president ministration following the election in November in other words we're looking at a disorder at the skate world scale of a coup in some fashion it that's imaginable on really gloomy days Michael well I I I I think a crisis is going to flow from the selection either over the election itself or or after January in April a blue administration that that seeks to actually push through a kind of breathtaking Hundred Days ledger blue administration led by someone who participated in an attempted coup of the present defeated administration I mention that calving out which will come up routinely well it's all coming out now the now the problem here with live Goldstone obviously is that the is of a blue stripe and so he is his narrative is it's all about trump he is the the evil autocrats the one who's who who single handedly has intervened to potentially derail American democracy and what is not able to say is that the the color revolution that he's talking about is all but guaranteed if blue wins the election and that looks quite highly right now he's playing G. the orange rival orange color revolution of Ukraine you might recall it many years ago this is when there was intervention from the outside to complain about the transition between the Soviet years and Ukraine years this is before the crisis of twenty fourteen one but the prices of twenty fourteen capped with the flight of Jana coverage we're looking at the year and that the United States being torn in half that's what he's looking at which is not unimaginable Michael well the fact that you had several crisis in Ukraine beginning in two thousand four then culminating not just in twenty fourteen but continuing to today is somewhat like the ark the U. S. has been in since two thousand when we had a perilous hello electoral decision bush V. gore but it's now cold really out of control what I think you would see in a blue administration a plus the Senate plus the.

"professor morrison" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

09:30 min | 10 months ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Disorder and the challenge and the politics and the two nations or two ideologies or two visions the blue and the rad the nationalist and the globalist there are other ways to divide us and recently the word division is commonplace Michael very good evening to you I remind everyone that Michael and I are carrying dual personalities like the United States he stays there Michael and John the two Christian names here in the twenty first century and we're also to guy asked me and dramatic as Michael on the shores of the Thames in ninety A. D. to equestrian class meeting farmers who don't work we own enjoying our Cup of wind in a wine shop and reflecting about how the we didn't really need that Republic after all in the empire is exactly the right thing we need though we're at the end of the empire here in Britain however because we're reflecting on history both guys in Germanicus and Michael and John look for historical models and that's exactly what the three distinguished professors look to Michael a very good evening to you what we have here is a search for we've been here before what's going to happen that an attempt at a crystal ball that history can give let's begin with professor Morrison of Norse of northwestern what do you see that's compelling and near to the mark and his observations about the disorder in America good evening to you good evening John you bring up the it's like the search for the the the chalice you know the holy grail in the sense that what kind of lands and what kind of filter on that lands will will give us the clarity to see what is happening to us right now is we change and go through these transfiguration and Morrison takes the more classically historical approach and because he's steeped in Russia in the late nineteenth century at the end of the czarist regime there he is able to focus on I know people that occurred not so long ago it's only a hundred and twenty years ago that we will well nineteen seventy is is a hundred years ago but I mean Russian this puree it all the way back into the eighteen eighties and certainly into the eighteen nineties and and after within a pre revolutionary period it was pretty clear and it was it was under tremendous strain and there are there actually you know several sars was fascinated by bomb throwers there was an actual early revolution in nineteen oh five after the rest of Japanese war and then there was the big revolution in nineteen seventeen now he he makes a powerful point about the leaks I mean it's no question that Russia was far more inequitable of far more unstable and and had been in two wars the rest of Japanese in World War one really drag Russia into degradation so there was a basis for revolution that just isn't here today but what he he tees off on is the fact that that Russia has a middle class of small one and a bubble elite in the later nineteenth century were very highly refined highly educated thought highly of themselves producing great writers and great composers Dostoyevsky Tchaikovsky Stravinsky but that bubble lead was committed from the eighteen nineties on overthrowing the old system the old system that gave them everything they had and they cared not a whit for the consequences of overthrowing it so in that sense I think if we look at and teeth or black lives matter and and the protests that we call riots these days and and how deeply state today are in upper middle class spoiled children of the elite we can see eight a really interesting resonance with with you know late imperial Russia and I think this is is right on target and and if you want to take that one single element I think that's of great concern because the elite it does not have any idea of social cultural consequences it's completely swept up in its own vanity and its own annoying to those so called idealism Boeing is not recognizable Michael we were educated to be that a leak we're senior now but boy is it recognizable is the word exhausted Michael or is it still got energy what what what the for the elite are they exhausted is that is that why the indifference or early our lead is is played out in the sense and I'm I'm going to be kind to us and not so much to our progeny is that they don't have the same level of of education and insight I think then that we did but they do have the same believe in there are you know unlimited role in history and and and so I think you know whereas the the the yuppie or boomer a lead of the seventies was just as revolutionary in its own mind it quickly shifted into moneymaking home hood and an engine of growth whereas this lead is really more like the faded what Russian a lead in the sense that it's really quite committed to overthrowing the system but that's the system that spoiled them that nurtured them and that still cobbles them so I think the I think the but by just comparing our generation with there is we can see how ideas have been played out to the point where if you look at A. O. C. I mean she can't discuss the problems of any single idea that she raises and and I think that you see this kind of dissipation of of every addition of of reading a kind of it is kind of like the air coming out of the tires of the elite class that's a bad sign all right let's move to tackle some of George Mason eight two short verse the short version here is that he's discouraged because he sees violence and he sees the possibility of more violence in the event of an extra constitutional illegal move by the president ministration following the election in November in other words we're looking at a disorder at the skate world scale of a coup in some fashion if that's imaginable on really gloomy days Michael well I I I I think a crisis is going to flow from the selection either over the election itself or or after January in April a blue administration that that seeks to actually push through a kind of breathtaking Hundred Days ledger blue administration led by someone who participated in an attempted coup of the president defeated administrator and I mentioned that calving out which will come up routinely well it's all coming out now the now the problem here with with Goldstone obviously is that the is of a blue stripe and so his his narrative is it's all about trump he is the the evil autocrats the one who's who who single handedly has intervened to potentially derail American democracy and what is not able to say is that the the color revolution that he's talking about is all but guaranteed if blue wins the election and that looks quite highly right now he's playing G. is the orange rival orange color revolution of Ukraine you might recall it many years ago this is way and there was intervention from the outside to complain about the transition between the Soviet years in the Ukraine years this is before the crisis of twenty fourteen one but the prices of twenty fourteen capped with the flight of Yanukovych we're looking at the year is that the United States being torn in half that's what he's looking at which is not on a magical Michael well well the fact that you had several crisis in Ukraine beginning in two thousand four then culminating not just in twenty fourteen but continuing to today is somewhat like the ark the U. S. has been in since two thousand when we had a perilous hello electoral decision bush V. gore but it's now coldly out of control what I think you would see in a blue administration a plus the Senate plus the.

Disorder
"professor morrison" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

05:29 min | 11 months ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Ready for him when he comes home, so but not depreciating citizens crime, and he definitely is not a threat to the community which resides how many other former black panthers still remain behind bars, and we have about seventy that we represent. Talking about the National Jericho movement which I am. The chairperson of that would be guess as soon the out of Coley, who is also had pro hearing that he was denied parole, and that is working its way through the courts. And plans are being made to file also for the urgent release, due to the fact that he himself being eighty three, or so is definitely a a high risk for the Kobe nineteen. We have other brothers, says part of the different movements related to the Path Party. You know we have mature so core doffed materialistic core who is has stays, three cancer, and also high risk Kobe nineteen. And he would be have a Veronica bowers. We have in Kabeer Ed Poindexter Romaine Chips Ju on the West Coast, so we have a few brother still remaining in mind, you know. These individuals have been five decades in to incarceration remand. Jamila means formerly a member Black Panther Party we have a lot of activity going on with his case now with a petition online. There's some real seriously grievous activities. Going on on his case has come to light with this informs oldest Jackson coming to the front. And then we have always Mumia abu-jamal. Who successfully got off of death row? But now they had his death sentence is translated into life forever, and so these are some of the brothers citizen, the movement as far as still struggling for their freedom. And their voice on the outside is the movement you guys? How do people get in touch with you? The Jericho moment dot com just up, and has the histories and the byles and most of the updates on these brothers and other individuals that are political prisoners, particularly from the movements of the seventies Rachelle McGee land. Appel tear your online linemen and build them have other prisoners. That's awful Bianco, they if you're not familiar with the names that we. We have little BIOS and their case histories of who they are on our website, www the Jericho movement, and always there's opportunities for people to be able to support them. If only by sending them twenty dollars for their commerce, you address and how to do that is on there so that they can survive in prison, or you can align yourself with rendering support usually when a person goes up for parole. The Glenn is not calling for letters of support. Calling in to the Attorney General's office or to the pro boy. You know to show that people are supporting them. And that they are welcome in now communities, so that avenue and that method and how you can help, bend support to these Luke I there. You can have programs that are writings in your community where you can sit in and people can. Families can write these students because being political prison myself. Getting a letter from people is, it doesn't immense amount of good for persons wellbeing until the then know that the sacrifices that they have made. The cost them to be in prison for so long now has not been forgotten, and that people are still getting benefits from their life by knowing about the matter of fact I would say one of the most live ways that you can attest to movements of the past. It's not to a reading a book, which is all very important reading as essential, but one of the most live active ways is supporting freedom fighter, who was actually involved in those movements and giving them direct support while they're still alive so anybody. Anybody wants to put these brothers including. Jalil is just to be tuned to what was being said on on the website, and the focus now is to try to get out on parole, and even before that to try to what we're waiting now you know holding our breath on hearing. Witches attorneys did a very very remarkable job arguing in the courts for his release, he meets all the requirements as a human being the time serve is a health good prison record as we used to say as we look at it. All those things that's happening for him United States just holds the record for holding people so long probably more than any country in the world, not only the length of time a person does prison often signs and solitaire can find it, but the number of people that's imprisoning to it beats everybody number for number and per capita, so the United States has a dismal bleak and racist record when it comes to that particularly to push rate of people color little being one of them, so we just asking for justice. That's all we ask him for not a favourite just justice to be done hard Abdul mid up the Jericho movement. Slavery may have been abolished more than a century ago, but black women still battled for the right to full ownership of their own bodies. Jill Morrison is director of the women's law and Public Policy Fellowship at Georgetown University where she is a law professor. Morrison has written an article titled Resuscitation The Black Body Reproductive Justice. As resistance to the states, property interest in black women's reproductive capacities, title is actually attributed..

Kobe Jill Morrison United States Black Panther Party Mumia abu-jamal panthers Veronica bowers Ed Poindexter Romaine Coley Path Party Rachelle McGee Jamila Appel Bianco Abdul West Coast Jackson Glenn Attorney Jalil
"professor morrison" Discussed on PM Mood

PM Mood

08:10 min | 1 year ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on PM Mood

"Welcome to PM mood the no talking points. No Bullshit podcasts. That takes you behind the curtain off the red carpet and to the frontlines of progress with change makers and innovators that are doing the work to shift our culture and expand our social impact. I am so excited to welcome two. Pm Mood Toshi. Regan musician curators. And in my soothsayer amazing soulful rocker. Who has had the foresight the brilliance to pay one of our treasured authors. In the African American Community Sci fi writer the late Octavia Butler's parable of the sower to audiences to opera to bring it to life. You do a better job Toshi. And we've known each other for quite some time and if it hadn't been for you five years ago I would have never read the series. I would've never had my eyes open to the beautiful work. An Art of Octavia Butler. But tell us about the book. And then why you wanted to turn it into an opera sure Octavia e Butler's parable in the sewer is a part of what was going to be a trio of books so she wrote parable the sewer and she wrote parable the talents and the third will she never finished on. Which would have been parable of the trickster and this book takes place in the year. Two Thousand Twenty four and it came out in one thousand nine hundred ninety three zero. It was a look forward of about thirty years into our future and I read it in like ninety seven or ninety eight and I was like no way in this. Our Future and on the novel tells the story of a whole planet really but a focus on community right outside of La out of around Pasadena. It man where we have become so destructive our everyday living in our governing in our collaboration. Ask neighbors in everything we allowed. Basically what we're actually in excess of now where the middle class not a middle class economic wealth is being pulled out in. You have this huge gap in the county and you have really severe climate crisis. Then add to that our usual human tendencies towards each other of violence and you know bigotry and you get a pretty devastating situation and like a kind of a perfect storm of everything socio-economically economically. That could go wrong. On top of extreme climate change and then a government that has got it all social safety net agencies and is incredibly right wing and steeped in right wing Christian ideology. Yeah so the current moment yes exactly and but you can't leave out people right so we actually have an opportunity to be a big part of this and then the story a somewhat in our own behaviors. We allow it to happen in. You know we don't censor ourselves as citizens in a relationship with our government. We don't vote. We don't build you know leadership from the ground up. You know we are short. This is so we need something to happen tomorrow instead of thinking. We're like let's build over time and have a long game. We don't fight for everything we deserve. We don't fight back when they start literally stealing our money and then there's just consistent systemic attacks on particular communities where it's almost impossible like you're just trying to keep your head above water and those communities that really really really are just constantly over generations. Chind to does exist. We don't go in and lift them up so all of that ends up everybody in that same dangerous position of just trying to exist no matter who you are. That's the novel in conditionally but inside of it is a story of a girl who's fifteen years old her name is Lauren. All Amina has created a belief system called or see where she sees that as changed the only lasting should and so the story is about Lauren inside of her community with this new belief system. Actually trying to bring it to life and bring it or inhabit habit. Be An actual practice of existence. And I think what was so interesting to me as I was reading. The book one is that I can maybe count on one hand the number of books that I have read that had a black woman as the lead right. Who IS THE HERO? Who is going on? Because parable to me is really the hero's journey and the journey of us all coming into ourselves and figuring out when everything has been obliterated what can you create out of that right? How do you rebuild out of a decimation of what you thought? Were SOCIETAL NORMS. About how we treat each other about how we exist with each other and she has this young black woman creating this community in building out like this existed it was so amazing to read and experience. Because I've never had it and I think that for many people I'm a writer not in that way more political writing analysis but just understanding the ways in which black women see the world view the world view their power to create changed in the world. It was a very beautiful thing to experience. While following Lauren on this journey what stood out to you about like her particular journey and struggle and how she was coming to life in the book. What I really love about Lauren. Is Lauren educated herself so thoroughly like she didn't know the everything but her belief system is based on that she wouldn't know the everything's but what she could no? She read all the books about plants she wanted to know. Like what could I eat? She wrote in a journal. She kept track of everything in her time. The radio was the way that she got information and she had a view to the entirety of the universe. Though she actually didn't see like what was in front of her was the only thing in existence She saw us as a part of the entire universe in that our destiny was live amongst the stars and I think that idea like see such a wide issue. Her gave her like something to work towards. And I think if your picture is like you know if I can't wake up in this house tomorrow then I have nothing and she just really her steered in her mindset about like taking the next step and taking the next step and she took the practical things she took Matt's on paper and you know she had the tangible things that could actually like help you get from one place in another that she valued greatly. That's what I love about her. I think that's the epicenter of her success. Understanding the tangible Swat made you after reading this in so many years ago right you said that you the book came out in Nineteen ninety-three you righted about nine hundred ninety seven. What made you want to turn this into an opera? You know a Mama I I put music to this story at Princeton or one of Toni. Morrison's Princeton Italian so this is like a semester long workshop that she would invite in artist to lead an she asked my mom. My mom does a lot of things so she is like a curator Estonian. I'm she had her group. Sweet honey in the rock. I don't think she was teaching at American University at Lights. She just always had a lot of jobs To-to Professor Morrison may be Toshio. Teach half the classes and we gave each other horrible for Christmas one year in new. My mom read it in I. I read pages. I'm not shot because it's so much so much that was like I can't nothing but you know when we did that.

Lauren Octavia e Butler writer Professor Morrison Toshi African American Community Sci American University La Chind Amina Pasadena Princeton Matt Toni
"professor morrison" Discussed on Consumer Finance Monitor

Consumer Finance Monitor

14:09 min | 1 year ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on Consumer Finance Monitor

"And if you like our podcast please let us know about it You can leave as review on Apple. Podcast Google play or whatever other platform. You use for your podcast. So let's turn to today's subject and it's a timely indeed Today I am very pleased to be joined by professor. Alan Morrison Allen is Associate Dean at the George Washington University Law School where he teaches constitutional law and civil procedure. He has extensive litigation experience in the field of separation of powers. Which is the subject of what we're going to be talking about today. That is we're going to once again. I really on the eve of the oral argument in the. Us Supreme Court in the seal log case. We're GONNA DELVE INTO THAT. Case and ED by the end of the PODCAST Hopefully you all have a better idea of what you think. The court may do to resolve the case. First of all. Let me welcome you. Professor Morrison. And if you don't mind we'll call you Allen says I can call you Allen you can call me Alan. Okay good and we're going to confuse our audience today with two Allen's On the show okay So let's do a little bit a level setting here for those in our audience Allen who may not be as familiar with the seal a law case as certainly you and I are so tell us what that case What the issue is and what the procedural history in the posture today. Well it's a little bit of a wind up so let me go back to the Dodd Frank. Act in two thousand and ten in which The congress was trying to deal with problems arising out of the great recession. And as part of the Dodd Frank Act Congress enacted an idea that was now senator Elizabeth Warren's brainchild to consolidate all the financial services regulation of consumer financial matters into a single agency the House of Representatives originally put that into the bill and had it as a multi member agency that it was headed by. I believe three individuals all appointed by the president with the advice and consent of the Senate subject to removal. Only for 'cause when the matter got to the House we got to the Senate. The Senate changed the form of the Agency. But not its mission. It turned it into a single member agency headed by director also appointed by the president with the advice and consent of the Senate and also subject to removal only for cause in addition the financing for this agency was set so that the money came directly from the Prophets of the Federal Reserve System in Congress. Didn't have anything to do with it. And it had very few other limitations on the ability of the director to carry out the mission in other words. Caguas wanted this job done. They wanted a financial regulator not tied to the banking industry who would regulate on behalf of consumers. This idea was subject to a lot of criticism not specially at the time of the legislation but as soon as the law was passed and people started to realize that there was going to be a new tiger in town that would becoming after a financial institutions in ways that had not happened before and shortly thereafter various challenges were were brought to actions by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as it came to be known and one of those cases went to the DC circuit now justice and then judge. Cavanaugh was one of the dissenters who believe that the arrangement for the organization was unconstitutional. And I'll get to that in just in just a minute. That case did not go to the Supreme Court But meanwhile other cases were winding their way through the court including now Seila Law Seattle began with a demand by the CFP. Be as it's known for certain records and certain other information and a seal. Aw gave them some. But then resisted and so the CFP be went to court in the CA- in California a federal court to enforce their demand and seal objected on among other reasons on the grounds that the agency was unconstitutional. There are two aspects of potential agency unconstitutionality. A here a one of which is not in the case which is a fairly common challenge and that is to the appointment of the appointments clause of the constitution sets up principal officers and inferior officers and then below them our employees and there has been a fair amount of litigation over the status of those officers. Everybody agrees that the director here is a principal officer and that he now a she was properly appointed what the dispute is about. And this is the issue before the court is whether the limits on the ability of the president to remove the director except for cause is unconstitutional restriction on the power of the president. When the case was filed in the District Court the Bureau was allowed by statute to represent itself and it defended the constitutional challenge on the merits. When the case got to the Court of Appeals it agreed and the night circuit agreed that the law was constitutional largely relying on the DC circuit case. That upheld it over a divided. Vote a seal. Aw then filed a petition for Sharara and after taking an extension the government came in now represented not by the bureau but by the Solicitor General on behalf of the president who said that the restriction on the removal was unconstitutional as a limitation on the power. The president to take care of the laws be faithfully executed at this point in the briefing. The government suggested that the court appoint a an make us to argue in favor of the constitutionality as soon as that happened. The House of Representatives filed a motion for leave to follow NECAS. Brief out of time saying it would defend the constitutionality and I filed amicus brief at that stage arguing first that because of the agreement between the parties on the merits there was no active. Case or controversy in the court should not decide the case and in addition that brief argued that the seal law had no standing to object to restrictions on the power the president that only the president could act and that the proper way to get that issue before the court was the president to fire somebody in this case the director of Seila and if that person contested as it happened in two earlier cases then the president could have his case. Controversy in the court could decide the case properly. The court has now appointed an meekest. Paul Clement a former solicitor general and one of the top advocates in the Supreme Court to defend the law I filed an additional brief amplify my prior arguments at the merits stage and the House of Representatives has also come in to defend the case both the House and Park lament have argued that there is no standing here. The case is not in the proper posture for this challenge and they urged the court not to reach the merits of they do not embrace my somewhat larger argument that there's no case or controversy In this case as well so that's where we stand and the argument is all set for the third of March right Okay Thank you Excellent job in Succinctly summarized in where we are today wasn't I'm sorry it wasn't more succinct but there's a lot of procedural steps that. Oh Yeah Yeah. There's certainly is so Let's dig a little deeper into Into the case and let's focus first on standing And your argument And the argument that Paul Clement has made that. The House is made that there is no standing and I like you to explain that in more detail. Sure the law standing which is in particularly in this court a quite restrictive law that is it generally does not a wide ranging set of issues that allowed people to challenge actions by the government focuses on whether there has been an injury to the plaintiff from the unlawful or unconstitutional. Act of the of the defendant in this case. The director usually comes up. This case is a little bit odd because the standing issue arises with respect to a defense that has been raised by Seila law a Nazia laws original claim and the argument is very simply that a person is not entitled to rely on a constitutional defect here the method of removal of the director unless that person is injured by that constitutional defects and in our view. The only person who is harmed by that restriction is the president of the United States and that Seila law has can show no connection between the harm suffered by the president and any harm that hit. It has suffered in the in this case. This is not a case in which they're claiming director was not properly appointed. See Look concedes that the director was properly appointed and that would be a claim for which it has standing but we argue that the court only has standing in a case in which someone has been fired and the president argues that the firing was lawful and the president of the employees or the officer argues that it was unlawful because the statutory restriction the president then counters and says that restriction is unconstitutional among other things. Of course it assures us that we have all the facts and circumstances of the firing to see whether in fact there might have been caused whether it otherwise complied with the statute and we honor the principle of constitutional avoidance which is that we courts especially the US Supreme Court should not decide cases if there are adequate other means of deciding them That do not raise a standing problems such as we have here. Okay so Let me let me push back a little bit. Alan on that So you argue. Seila law doesn't have any standing to challenge the removal provision because it hasn't suffered an injury resulting from the fact that the director couldn't could be couldn't be removed at will by the president. How do you respond to seal a laws argument that it did suffer such an injury because any action taken by an unaccountable director was void? And it doesn't have to show that a hypothetical accountable director would have taken a different action. Well one of the things about sealers. Brief I it's only in their reply. Brief that you find that and by the way the government doesn't say that seal is that the CFP B.'s. Actions were void governments. Very careful not to say that but void is a very capricious term and. I don't think that everything that the director has done since. The beginning of time is unconstitutional. And therefore no matter whether anybody objected or not No matter what the action was that because there is this defect in the removal provision. That everything that's happened is illegal. That's a very far out position and I don't believe it's warranted. The court has been very careful in other contexts to be sure to not use the term void except the most extreme cases. And it's hard to imagine that that this action has been taken is void in the sense that the court has used it I think what they're doing is they're saying well yes. We can't show any connection but we don't have to show any connection and I don't think that the courts requirements of traceability and redress ability are met understanding doctrine in this case either and that the injury is only to the president. A perhaps it'd be better better example. Suppose that today of the CFP be withdrew the.

president director US Supreme Court Alan Morrison Allen Supreme Court Court of Appeals Senate CFP House of Representatives Paul Clement United States congress George Washington University L Google Apple District Court the Bureau DC officer Consumer Financial Protection
"professor morrison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Demonstrate in the streets shall he live on the spokespeople defeat evil U. S. government keep repeating that we stand beside a run into people you are lying even if you are standing beside Iran in people it is just so that you can stop with your poison doctors god is great to America to England it's an infidels death to Israel let's get some analysis of that professor Morrison Maloney is executive director of the center for strategic and diplomatic studies what did he make of the speech today it is significant because in the eyes of many Iranians a new chapter has been opened in the Iranian internal politics as well as its regional politics and that is mostly because of the targeted killing a casa misspelling money and the tragedy of shooting down a Ukrainian airline so why do you think he felt the need to make such a speech today what was it about do you think for him is it about shoring up support for the regime the speech of the boys vantage of harmony and they re defined man who essentially double down on his strategy of defying the United States up resisting the US and the west and in my judgment the most important message of that in car sermon part of which was delivered in Arabic was to say that we are not going to change our strategy and to consolidate power but hard liners it was a clear message that he is not in the mood to have any kind of reconciliation with his opponents I'm with the protesters and that he wanted to insure that the popular base of support he has is consolidated compared this with this speech that the former Shah of Iran mate two or three months before he was overthrown at that time he delivered a major speech television speech in which he said he had heard the voice of the Iranian revolution and that he wanted to move toward before three months later he was overthrown it seems to me the message that the Islamic Republic has taken from that historically speech by deport Michelle is not to show any weakness when you are attacked and that was the most important message that are to le hominy delivered and he his sermon was not only targeting gay Wanyan population it also target it the population in the rock and eleven on any other places because specially in the part of the speech which was delivered in Arabic he essentially made the point that there is a western conspiracy a US conspiracy to reignite a civil war in Iraq and to divide up Iraq that is a very important point because as you know there is internal opposition against the presence of US forces in Iraq and I told the harmony is trying to send a message that the struggle the have against the U. S. is beyond a Romanian border it has become creature and that's why he delivered the speech in Arabic just one final thought and I guess we're we're probably in the realms of speculation but the fact that he had to to to come out to make the speech today and lead Friday press does it suggests the toll that the supreme leader is acknowledging that this has pain I'm pops continues to be a moment of danger for the clerical establishment perhaps but even more important part of this is speech is that Michael how many believes right to your long that's the belief of the supreme leader of the wrong that the killing of posthumously money and the Iranian missile attack on American bases in New York which resulted in no death and I'm very happy about this our game changers in the Middle East he said that today in his speech that what we get the shattered invincibility of the US in the region by attacking their base in a way then he's trying to go back to the days immediately after the killing of awesome is sorely money so we are engaged in a war of two opposing narratives which is the really run the run up to protesters or Dave on so millions of people who took to the streets in my judgment they both represent the wrong but in the judgment of Ayatollah Khomeini it's only those who have mourned the death of awesome is solely money who represent the authentic keep on going and the overwhelming majority of I disagree with that terrorist professor Meissen Maloney speaks to me just before we came on the air let's turn to China now with the latest official figures showed that the economy in twenty nineteen grew at the slowest rate for almost thirty years the sound it then Donna Bivens the building he hook by with the head of China's national bureau of statistics giving details at a news conference in Beijing it will still growth of six point one percent to write the most countries can only dream of and with an official Chinese targets for the economy's been back to buy several had wins including weak consumer spending and the trade dispute with the United States I've been talking to professor of finance at Peking university Michael Patterson whether this could on paper figure actually means healthy gross no it was generated but once again as as has been troops last for years it's been generated by even faster increases in debt and the the non writing down of Smith I think real growth rates are probably around three percent the debt that you mentioned how much of a problem is that and could be in the future it's a huge problem we know what because we've seen this many times before in history that one was really driving growth in the economy is even faster increases in debt they're not some point you have to resolve that in the process of resolving the debt can be really really painful it can occur in the form of a crisis which is pretty unlikely in the case of charter or as in Japan after nineteen ninety in the form of a long drawn out of stagnation loss decades or whatever you wanna call the political problems ahead for the Chinese government if growth is slowing quite markedly and and they cannot satisfy people's expectations well China has to do two things at Scott to bring down it's very high level of investment because much of this investment is pouring in to stop the China just doesn't need in Japan in the nineteen eighties we used to call it the bridges to know where and and charm you've got the equivalent and it needs to rebalance the economy away from investment and more towards consumption not what that means is that after thirty years in which GDP grew much more quickly than household income the rebalancing means that household income has to grow more quickly than GDP so even though GDP growth I expect is going to slow very significantly up well below three percent household income growth doesn't have to slow nearly as much it depends on on how Beijing manages this adjustment process so in principle they can manage it in such a way that how schools don't suffered that much but the cost of the adjustment is borne by local governments and by the local elites which is why it's it's politically so difficult to do but in principle but it's possible and I think that's what they're trying to do that we have in the coastal to about the trade war with the U. S. that reproach mall that we've seen say Fossum's stage one of some sort of deal is that gonna improve things for the Chinese economy it might do so a little indirectly by boosting confidence basically the direct consequences of the trade war I think are not nearly as important as the indirect consequences on on confidence so presumably the resolution of the trade conflict and it's a resolution that's gonna last about two months on much longer will give a little boost of confidence before the Chinese New Year but I I don't think it makes that much difference a slightly different issue at another store today about the the birthright being the lowest for I think about seventy years in China I mean it's trying to heading for demographic time bomb where is to become a fool to look off to all people and that's going to make real problems for the economy well I think there's there's almost no way around that China has a population that's about four times the size of the US but it's working population is roughly five times the size of the US so it's actually much better than it looks but this is after several decades of what a real demographics sweet spot which are going to reverse so that well before the middle of the century China may have perhaps three times the population of the US but it may only have two to two and a half times the working population in other words there's going to be a huge group of retired workers in China may be the biggest well certainly in numbers the biggest in the world and it's a really big problem the point however is that that's a long term problem China has a very difficult short to medium term problem of rebalancing its economy and it's got to get that done first before can even start worrying about the demographic problems Michael practice you're listening to news it is the BBC news hour on WNYC in New York mayor blood heels away so there's no ask the mayor this week on the Brian Lehrer show but you can speak to the speaker when city council speaker Cory Johnson joins Brian plus the latest on the impeachment and a look at the psychological and emotional pull the earthquakes have taken on.

Iran
"professor morrison" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

SF Ballet Blog

15:50 min | 1 year ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on SF Ballet Blog

"So today we're GonNa talk a bit about the history of Cinderella ballet and as a musical score discuss the story of Christopher Williams Cinderella Ella which draws equally from the original peril tail as well as from the brothers Grimm. And then shot a bit about what to look out for as you watch so for the first time in two thousand twenty. Let's get to the point as with many fairytale the version of Cinderella. That we'll be talking about today. Wasn't the first the earliest Bali versions seem to have been made the romantic era around the early eighteen in Vienna and London with the first notable version choreographed eighteen. Ninety three by a dream. Team of Mariusz Papa. Levana and Enrico Kathy to score by Baron. Boris fit and tough Shell for the Marian Ski Ballet. Interestingly the thirty two turns that have now now become a conic in Swan Lake. Those were I quit graft for this version of Cinderella in eighteen ninety three a few years before they were put into Swan Lake. But I'm I'M GONNA confess. I've never heard the fitness. Shell score and honestly. I doubt anyone living has. Despite the talent associated with the production it was never performed again after eighteen o one and the score wasn't published so that pepys long gone that means by the time composer Sergei per coffee of took on the score her in nineteen forty. There was plenty of room for creativity or was there. The nineteen forties in the Soviet Union weren't really known for their vast amounts of creative eight of freedom and indeed for coffee of was a bit wary about taking on another ballet after his Romeo and Juliet. which will ultimately a success had gone through a variety of political critical and logistical delays? On its way to the stage. We'll talk more about Romeo and Juliet later this season when we get to help you Thomas version of that ballet and may but today let's talk a bit about dot who sergey prokofiev was before diving more deeply specifically into Cinderella has a note. Most of my coffee of INFO is coming from two bucks by Princeton professor. First Time Morrison I his two thousand nine tax. The People's artist for coffee of Soviet years and second his twenty sixteen history of the Bolshoi Ballet Bullshit. Confidential Professor Morrison will actually be here in San Francisco and May as this year's San Francisco ballet visiting scholar given a few presentations to the public. Including at least one that will be free free and open to the public at the Opera House on May sex you there anyway. Back to Prokofiev by nineteen forty per coffee had already composed several ballets including the potus hottest ca on the nipper the bright stream and Romeo and Juliet none. Without their complications. He had left Russia in nineteen eighteen spending several years abroad in Paris and in the United States dates before agreeing to return eighteen thirty five when the Marian Ski Theater offered him the UN turned down a commission to create an opera or ballet on the subject of his choice. He he didn't really intend to stay permanently. In the Soviet Union unlike many other artists prokofiev been allowed fairly free passage back and forth between the USSR and and the rest of the world during the nineteen twenties but it became clear that such privileges were about to come to an end unless he moved his home base from Paris to Moscow he did bringing his wife and two children with him and thinking it'd be able to continue his international career but that wasn't really to prove the case indeed. Although prokofiev himself managed to skirt the aetiological aetiological purchase of the late nineteen thirties. They hit close to home. librettist Adrian Petrovsky with whom he'd worked on. Romeo and Juliet was convicted of treason for tenants. Pennants his apartment building disappeared and his by then estranged wife. Lena was arrested in nineteen forty eight and sentenced to twenty years hard labor of which she served eight. It's against this backdrop that prokofiev takes on the Cinderella Commission as well as in the midst of this history that the ballet is written for though it was first announced in the press in early nineteen eighteen forty one. The ballet didn't premiere until November of nineteen forty five meetings also work of the Second World War musically. The ballet became as Morrison says both with and against Prokofiev's desires the fourth Tchaykovsky ballet adhering closely to traditional ballet forms. The composer wrote that quote. I see Cinderella as an updated classical ballet with its particular forms like the product shown GRANDPA and so forth and no less than two or three full-scale waltzes but it's musically modern as well with the contemporary rhythms and chromatic shifts that characterize prokofiev's music. This scenario was produced by Nikolai Volkov based largely on the sixteen ninety seven Charles Peril tail but that caused immediate conflict with Prokofiev he preferred to take on the darker rendition by Russian author Alexander Pharmacy of once the war began the bulk of coffee of partnership ended. And details of the plot reverted back to prokofiev theater directories of odd scheme and the choreographers domain and there were indeed several choreographers attached the project. First Volk tongue troubled kiani who most contributed to nailing down. The plot and who who in a charming story had to dance the entire second act of the Bali for Prokofiev before a single note had been written as per coffee of wanted to be sure that no one would tamper with his scorch accommodate. The Choreography Raffi. So the dance had to come first next constant and Sergei of wants Prokofiev and the evacuated to perm in nineteen forty-three as the war intensified. It was there that rehearsals actually began. After that Rostislav Zakharov premiered the ballet the Bolshoi ballet in nineteen forty. Five both poor Sergei of premiered his version in Leningrad in nineteen forty six since then valid at versions of Cinderella have abounded perhaps most notably internationally and Frederick Ashton's nineteen in forty-eight take on prokofiev score and in San Francisco and Michael Smolin an Lu Christian since nineteen seventy-three version. That version was televised by. CBS inmates eighty-five with Kermit. The Frog and miss piggy providing color. Commentary the tradition of the choreographer fiddling with the plot continued when Christopher wielded took on the story in two thousand twelve wilderness. No Stranger to stories and artistic associate at the royal ballet known for its attention to narrative and the Tony award-winning who director of the musical. In American in Paris and the choreographer of several full length story ballets Wilton really knows how to transform an idea into a compelling evening of work part of that of course is about bringing in the right collaborators for this ballet that meant Julian Crouch do sets and costumes Basel Twist to work on puppets. Yes puppet and Daniel Brody to do projections listening to me. Talk is not going to give you any sense whatsoever of just how fantastical productions ends or the end of the first act in particular so rather than try. I'm just GONNA say come see the show or in the meantime follow us on any kind of social social media account or on our website to see some glimpses of these remarkable sets and costumes. Cinderella was a CO Commission of San Francisco Ballet and the Dutch national ballet and increasingly creasing common arrangement. That's making a new story. Ballets a major financial undertaking for any company Wilton made the dancing on both organizations bringing principal dancers from Amsterdam damnedest Francisco and from San Francisco to Amsterdam to work on the piece. Many current company members were around for that rehearsal process and fun fact new soloist. Sasha Mukhamadiev created the role of the Russian princess when she was with the Dutch National Valley like Prokofiev Wilton found the Pearl story a little sweet and turn in addition to the tale published by the brothers Grimm in eighteen. Fifty seven notable in the brothers Grimm story is the lack of a fairy godmother instead. Cinderella asks her father to bring her back the first twig that brushes says against his hat on his ride home from affair. She plants the twig on her mother's grave and it grows into a Hazel tree which she visits daily. A White Bird watches her and whenever she expresses this is a wish the bird will toss down which asks for when the matter of the ball comes up. She asks for address and shoes and the blige's but that's all getting ahead of ourselves a bit although it's a familiar tale let's chat through the bally's plot as a whole pointing out some fun additional characters along the way and some things to look for in wilderness choreography. The first act opens as so many fairy tales. Do with a mother's death after all the whole crux of tail is that Cinderella has a step mother and step siblings. Yeah and apparently seventeenth century. France wasn't super into the whole divorce thing so death by consumption it is perhaps suspecting that her father isn't cut out for the single apparent life four fates arrived to watch over Cinderella kind of like that bird in the brothers Grimm tale and a tree grows from her mother's grave. One of the great pleasure pleasure of Wilton Cinderella is that everyone is so crisply drawn even the evil characters whom we promptly meet Hortensia evil stepmother and it does make you question. Cinderella's his father's judgment that he would marry her and Clementine and Edwina Cinderella's to new mostly though not always filed stepsisters the report. Heroin tries it I to stand up to these mean girls. Her father's enamored with the new wife and demands. She playmates an interesting twist. Wilbon Cinderella doesn't cave because she's meek or subservient but rather in a moment of spite a kind of if you're not gonNA take my side than I'm going to show you just how docile I can be kind of moment. And if that seems counterproductive. Well it is and to be honest doesn't work out that well for Cinderella in the long run seem change and now we're at the palace where we we meet a young prince cume and his best friend Benjamin who are growing up under the watchful eyes of King Albert and Queen Charlotte. Let's just say that being royal though it has its advantages advantages. Also seems to come with its downsides and Yomas perhaps a bit more of the Prince Harry than the Prince William Model despite his name but like all royal royal gentleman. He does need to marry a nice girl. Preferably one with a large dowry Standing Army or navy and a decent amount of land or at least an appropriately pedigrees a noblewoman. King Albert insists that ems throw a big party to meet all of the eligible young ladies in the village or in the country. I suppose and sometime out with Benjamin and to hand deliver the invitations. He does have one trick up his sleeve however he has Benjamin pretend to be a prince while he pretends to be a beggar as they go door to door quite homeric way to see what's going on in a household when they get to Cinderella's home her stepsisters treat the beggar poorly and the prince light well a prince and Cinderella. Despite her stubbornness is tweet the beggar This is actually a callback. To this scenario the original scenario oh end to a detail that Ashton incorporates into his ballet or the fairy godmother first appears at the house in the guise of a.

Prokofiev Wilton Cinderella San Francisco Ballet Marian Ski Ballet Wilbon Cinderella Romeo Cinderella Commission Juliet. Wilton Cinderella San Francisco sergey prokofiev Professor Morrison royal ballet Christopher Williams Sergei Frederick Ashton Paris Edwina Cinderella Mariusz Papa
"professor morrison" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome to words matter with katie barlow and joe lockhart last week we lost one of the most influential and celebrated novelists in american literary history tony morrison a novelist essayist. They ask 'em princeton. Professor morrison wrote nine major novels all of which earned extensive critical acclaim as oprah winfrey said after her passing last week she was a magician with language who understood the power of words she used them to royal us to wake us us to educate us and help us grapple with our deepest wounds and try to comprehend them a woman who certainly understood that words matter among dozens of other awards and achievements she won both a pulitzer prize and american book award in nineteen eighty eight for her novel beloved and in nineteen ninety-three tony morrison became the first black woman of any nationality to win a nobel prize the citation for her award in literature declared declared morrison to be an author who in novels characterized by visionary force and poetic import gives life to an essential aspect of american can reality in two thousand twelve tony morrison was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by president barack obama and during her commencement address at rutgers university in two thousand eleven tony morrison encouraged graduates to seek a meaningful life something she herself had certainly achieved so so this week we give american treasure toni morrison the final word i have often wish that jefferson had had not used that phrase the pursuit of happiness as the third right although although i understand and the first draft was life liberty and the pursuit of property of course i would have been one of those properties one had the right to pursue so i suppose happiness is is an epochal improvement over a life devoted to the acquisition of land acquisition -sition of resources acquisition of slaves still i would rather he had written life liberty and the pursuit of meaningfulness or integrity or truth. I know that happiness has been the real if covert goal of your labors here i know that it informs your choice of companions the profession you will enter but i urge you. Please don't settle for happiness. It's that's not good enough. Of course you deserve it but at that's all you have in mind happiness. I want to suggest to you that personal success devoid of meaningfulness free three of a steady commitment to social justice. That's more than a baron life. It's a trivial one.

Professor morrison toni morrison oprah winfrey american literary history barack obama pulitzer prize nobel prize katie barlow joe lockhart princeton rutgers university president jefferson
"professor morrison" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

"You're the house go ahead why don't you guys always lead on me you know well you're on the banner like the traffic cop in here oursel birth morrison thursday oh show without you guys a true that's true so port other beer and let's toast to you guys without whom there would be no program all right all right i wanted to see do we all give that a six yes yeah i think that's the first time that's ever happened unanimously no no now you're gonna tweeting i really like it he's to give it like four point five no i i will go from my five and a half to a six based on peer pressure okay good reason why started drinking to begin with why the five and a half in the first place i you know i mean six is perfect and i you know one of those those my teacher i never given a well given a minor exactly that guy it was us you'll see some assistant professor morrison is that guy that guy the assistant professor these dave you're such a day a professor he's a professor dave the worst professor ally never gives an disclaimer off that commercial now and say don't be real dave dave dave dave so we all love the love hunter richard wave david as a very common name you haven't heard the commercial break no no not her that commercials you listen to the radio or what parentally on my way in on thursday a quarter of oh my yeah have you smelled this hey honey could you pick that grapefruit for me please exactly right in there this is the opposite of the bright colors and shining crazy visions exactly why i don't like it looks like it looks like a generic brand it's very much it's it's.

professor morrison assistant professor professor david dave dave dave dave
"professor morrison" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on WDEL 1150AM News Talk Radio

"Guys always later me you're not well your name the braille there in the banner traffic cop in here it's it out ars albert horace narrow favours ler survey the evidence will show without you guys a tree that's true so port other beer unless toast to you guys without whom there would be no program all right all right i wanted to see do we all give that a six yes yes i think that's the first time that ever happened unanimously when it no no no you're going to grow and add archer really like it he's going to give it like a four point five no i uh i i will go from my five and a half to a six based on peer pressure okay good reason that's why is there a drink with the why the five and a half in the first place uh i you know at me at six is perfect in one of those those like i remember that professor and he was my teacher i never give an a here rene mina there was an exactly that guy it was use you'll see some you know assistant professor morrison is that gcc that guy the assistant supervisor old were are you blame these dave you're gain you're such a day upper gave a professor dave worse professor ally never gives in to get the disclaimer off that commercial announce a bumpy real dave move dave w dave dave so we all love the love lovehate i like richard no wave david a very common name as a lame who has a direct comedy the body i wonder if they were if you haven't heard the commercial burke assignment it yet no no other not her that commercial you listen to the radio or what apparently not on my way am on thursday a quarter of twelve god almighty is an ipa and a half smell this hey hunting could you pick that grapefruit forming please oh yeah zack this was the rate in there i believe as ground the rules here this is the opposite of the bright colors and showing that crazy this is exactly why i don't like what looks like it looks like a generic brand does it's very much it it's good monocromatic all marketable blue who made his policies peak by organic brewing company army addressing harrying new england style.

professor professor morrison supervisor dave albert horace richard david burke england
"professor morrison" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on About to Review

"Her committing suicide on television um and she owns that movie and she's in every scene and she is phenomenal and it's one of those movies where you see the performance and you go this is lost worthy nomination performance emile like she should be getting attention for this but because the movie was tiny the studio was tinier and it doesn't have traction people look at it again they took the dvd and they go away what's a smear mmhmm i'll get to that and they never watch it so now she comes back around again and she's in this another relatively tiny movie like i i don't know i mean there's more budget behind it it's definitely more more pudge him yeah um but it's it's not like it's not winning the box office this weekend ran so it's it's got a little bit of an uphill climb and she plays the his wife liu kevin's wife professor morrison's wife elizabeth marsh the and she his phenomenal in this race g the movie constantly so there's another supporting role by bella heathcote and plays in all of your olive burned she's terrific too but the movie kind of always a although it always sort of resides on the side of the ledger of the female because for necessary reasons and telling the story it all sort of drives through through the prism and the scope of rebecca halls character if so all of the lake sort of the the framing around all of this the deals with anxiety in nervousness and acceptance and tolerance and should all those different elements the play into this relationship outside of the fact that.

emile liu kevin professor morrison bella heathcote elizabeth marsh rebecca halls
"professor morrison" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"professor morrison" Discussed on KOMO

"Komo news thanks marionnette partly cloudy this evening little low around forty saturday partly sunny day highs in the mid50s and then sunday we'll start out with fog in them will end up with a mostly sunny day and a high near sixty one degrees currently in seattle partly cloudy and 52 twenty minutes of nonstop news continues on komo news one thousand fm ninety seven seven and komonewscomfire hits three 46 charlie harger is at the editor's desk stacey black is our technical director gop house speaker paul ryan says poor ricoh needs a lot of help speaking in san juan today ryan noted the strength of the human spirit this is first and foremost a humanitarian disaster what we've seen is people coming together working together to help victims to rebuild communities ryan led a congressional delegation on a trip to assess federal relief efforts after hurricane maria this weekend at the movies and incredible true story awaits that's full of surprises komo scott cardi joins us now with a look at what's in the theaters this weekend scott all eliseo we begin with professor morrison and the wonderwomen this is one of my favorite surprises of the year it stars luc evans rebecca hall and bella heathcote and this is the true story of the man who created the wonder why and character marston was a professor at harvard he created the lie detector test as well and you lived in a pollyannaish relationship why don't you right wonderwoman at aerial as mr americans had a low opinion of comic writers and something else i knew nothing about this guy i knew nothing about him either but it is a fascinating story and you really get to see what he's a true love story emulates it's fascinating see it but it's also very emotional now another note this week is marshall and that's.

professor morrison marshall bella heathcote rebecca hall house speaker gop technical director harvard professor marston seattle scott cardi san juan ricoh paul ryan stacey black editor charlie harger komo 52 twenty minutes sixty one degrees