13 Burst results for "Professor Shepherd"

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Their home, But I guess people must just be taken that step. There's a matter of fact. I was talking with the family on yesterday, and they just knew that these people, you know they're the temperature in their home was 32 degrees, and it's life or death. I mean, when you think about it, So what they did was they brought the people in and they all had their mask and gloves on and The individuals in one side of the house while they were on the other side of the house, and you know that was survival. And that's that's what we do in times like the Michael Evans has mayor of Mansfield, Texas. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much, and good luck to you. People watching. This week's weather include Marshall Shepherd, who is director of the Atmospheric Studies program at the University of Georgia. Professor Shepherd. Welcome back the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really, really cold weather in a region that does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change? Yeah, that question always gets asked, But I always start the answer that question with a reminder that it is winter and it is February and so can get cold outbreaks. Naturally, This is a case where that word the polar vortex has resurfaced. Typically, it's zord of keeping that cold air up in the Arctic, but occasionally it can be breached or weakened and you get these disruptions in the polar vortex. And then you can get this cold, dense air to use down into the lower 48. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently, and so that we may see more of these types of events, but it would be sort of scientifically irresponsible toe link this specific event toe climate change, but we know that there may be a connection. Going forward with these types of events appreciate the frankness there. There has been some research suggesting that Arctic warming is weakening the jet stream, which might change the kinds of air that come down. To the United States. Does that seem to be happening? Yeah, that's that's what I was alluding to. With this direct disruption. The polar vortex. There's something called Arctic amplification whereby the Arctic regions warming a bit more intense than we are down in the lower 48. There are science, the papers that suggest that that causes a much wavy or jet stream pattern with more high amplitude ways. If you think back to high school physics, and so we get these really cold events But we also get these really warm events during the warm season as well. So this isn't an unprecedented Cole. We've seen it before. But as my colleague Judah Cohen has often talked about these things that used to happen less and frequent less frequently, but it seems that they're happening yearly now, which is something we're keeping an eye on seems to be happening more frequently, and I just want to underline another thing blindingly obvious, But sometimes when it's super cold, you get On Internet troll, saying something about everybody says it's global warming. Look how cold it is. Climate change means extreme weather, right? Not just warm weather. Well, I I often say whether is your mood and climate is your personality. Your mood today doesn't tell me anything about your overall personality. And nor does a day of cold weather or hot weather for that matter, or a week of it. So that's ah, very sort of poor framing that we do get often on Twitter and in various places. When I see someone saying that it clearly sort of illustrates that that person doesn't understand perhaps the difference between weather and climate, and the other thing I would say is because our winters have been so warm as our climate changes. When we do get extreme cold weather. It feels that much worse because we don't experience their extreme cold. As much as we used to. So suppose somebody an official from Texas called you up and asked for advice and said, You know where upgrading the infrastructure. We're rebuilding the infrastructure. We don't want to experience like this week to happen.

Judah Cohen Marshall Shepherd 32 degrees United States Michael Evans Texas yesterday February today Mansfield, Texas This week Twitter University of Georgia Shepherd Arctic Professor Cole one side week 48
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

"Into their home, But I guess people must just be taken that step. It does matter. Factors talking with the family on yesterday, and they just knew that these people, you know they're the temperature and their home was 32 degrees, and it's life or death when you think about it. So what they did was they brought the people in and they all had their mask and gloves on and The individuals in one side of the house while they were on the other side of the house, and you know that was survival, and that's that's what we do in times like these. Michael Evans is mayor of Mansfield, Texas. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much, and good luck to you. People watching. This week's weather include Marshall Shepherd, who is director of the Atmospheric Studies program at the University of Georgia. Professor Shepherd. Welcome back the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really, really cold weather in a region that does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change? Yeah, that question always gets asked, But I always start the answer that question with a reminder that it is winter and it is February and so we can get cold outbreaks. Naturally, This is a case where that word the polar vortex has resurfaced. Typically, it's sort of keeping that cold air up in the Arctic, but occasionally it can be breached or weakened and you get these disruptions in the polar vortex. And then you can get this cold, dense air to use down into the lower 48. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently, and so that we may see more of these types of events, but It would be sort of scientifically irresponsible toe link this specific event toe climate change, but we know that there may be a connection. Going forward with these types of events appreciate the frankness there. There has been.

Michael Evans Marshall Shepherd 32 degrees February yesterday Mansfield, Texas Arctic University of Georgia This week Shepherd one side Professor 48 Studies
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KCRW

"Into their home, But I guess people must just be taken that step. There's a matter of fact. I was talking with the family on yesterday, and they just knew that these people, you know they're the temperature and their home was 32 degrees, and it's life or death when you think about it. So what they did was they brought the people in and they all had their mask and gloves on and The individuals in one side of the house while they were on the other side of the house, and you know that was survival, and that's that's what we do in times like these. Michael Evans has mayor of Mansfield, Texas. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much, and good luck to you. People watching. This week's weather include Marshall Shepherd, who was director of the Atmospheric Studies program at the University of Georgia. Professor Shepherd. Welcome back the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really, really cold weather in a region that does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change? Yeah, that question always gets asked, But I always start the answer that question with a reminder that it is winter and it is February and so can get cold outbreaks. Naturally, This is a case where that word the polar vortex has resurfaced. Typically, it's sort of keeping that cold air up in the Arctic, but occasionally it can be breached or weakened and you get these disruptions in the polar vortex. And then you can get this cold, dense air to use down into the lower 48. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently, and so that we may see more of these types of events, but it would be sort of scientifically irresponsible toe link this specific event toe climate change, but we know that there may be a connection. Going forward with these types of events appreciate the frankness there. There has been.

Michael Evans Marshall Shepherd 32 degrees yesterday February Arctic Mansfield, Texas This week University of Georgia Shepherd Professor one side 48 Studies
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Into their home. But I guess people must just be taken that step. There's manufactures talking with the family on yesterday, and they just knew that these people, you know they're the temperature and their home was 32 degrees, and it's life or death. I mean, when you think about it, So what they did was they brought the people in and they all had their mask and gloves on and The individuals in one side of the house while they were on the other side of the house, and you know that was survival, and that's that's what we do in times like these. Michael Evans is mayor of Mansfield, Texas. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much, and good luck to you. People watching. This week's weather include Marshall Shepherd, who is director of the Atmospheric Studies program at the University of Georgia. Professor Shepherd. Welcome back the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really, really cold weather in a region that does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change? Yeah, that question always gets asked, But I always start the answer that question with a reminder that it is winter and it is February and so can get cold outbreaks. Naturally, This is a case where that word the polar vortex has resurfaced. Typically, it's zord of keeping that cold air up in the Arctic, but occasionally it can be breached or weakened and you get these disruptions in the polar vortex. And then you can get this cold, dense air to use down into the lower 48. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently, and so that we may seem or these types of events, but it would be sort of scientifically irresponsible toe link this specific event toe climate change, but we know that there may be a connection. Going forward with these types of events appreciate the frankness there. There has been.

Michael Evans Marshall Shepherd 32 degrees yesterday February Arctic Mansfield, Texas University of Georgia This week Shepherd Professor one side 48 Studies
"professor shepherd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Into their home, But I guess people must just be taken that step. As a matter of fact, I was talking with the family on yesterday, and they just knew that these people, you know they're the temperature in their home was 32 degrees, and it's life or death when you think about it. So what they did was they brought the people in and they all had their mask and gloves on and The individuals in one side of the house while they were on the other side of the house, and you know that was survival, and that's that's what we do in times like these. Michael Evans is mayor of Mansfield, Texas. Thank you, sir. Thank you very much, and good luck to you. People watching. This week's weather include Marshall Shepherd, who is director of the Atmospheric Studies program at the University of Georgia. Professor Shepherd. Welcome back the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really, really cold weather in a region that does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change? Yeah, that question always gets asked, But I always start the answer that question with a reminder that it is winter and it is February and so can get cold outbreaks. Naturally, This is a case where that word the polar vortex has resurfaced. Typically, it's sort of keeping that cold air up in the Arctic, but occasionally it can be breached or weakened and you get these disruptions in the polar vortex. And then you can get this cold, dense air to use down into the lower 48. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently, and so that we may see more of these types of events, but It would be sort of scientifically irresponsible toe link this specific event climate change, but we know that there may be a connection. Going forward with these types of events appreciate the frankness there. There has been.

Michael Evans Marshall Shepherd 32 degrees yesterday February Arctic Mansfield, Texas This week University of Georgia Professor Shepherd one side 48 Studies
"professor shepherd" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:43 min | 2 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"People watching this week's weather include marshall shepherd who was director of the atmospheric studies program at the university of georgia professor shepherd. Welcome back to the program. Thank you for having me. I just want to start with the obvious. We have really really cold weather in a region does not normally expect it. Can we connect that to climate change. Yeah that question always gets asked. But i always start the answer. That question with a reminder that it is winter and it is february and get cold outbreaks naturally This is a case. Where that word. The polar vortex has resurfaced typically. It's sort of keeping that cold air up in the arctic but occasionally it can be breached or weakened you get these disruptions in the polar vortex and then you can get this cold dense air news down into the lower forty eight. That's what we're seeing there. There is some evidence in the science literature that these disruptions will happen more frequently and so that we may see more of these types of events. But it'd be sort of scientifically-responsible to link this specific event to climate change. But we know that there may be a connection Going forward with these types of events. Appreciate the frankness there. There has been some research suggesting that arctic warming is weakening the jet stream which might change the kinds of air that come down to the united states. Does that seem to be happening. Yeah that's that's what. I was the looting to with this disruption of the polar vortex. There's something called arctic amplification whereby the arctic regions warming a bit more intense than we are down in the lower forty eight and there are signs. The papers that suggests that that causes a much wavier jet stream pattern with more high amplitude ways if you think back to high school physics so we get these really cold events but we also get these really warm events during the warm season as well so this isn't an unprecedented coal. We've seen it before. But as my colleague judah cohen has often talked about these things that used to happen less than frequent less frequently. But it seems that they're happening yearly. Now which is something. We're keeping an eye on. Seems to be happening more frequently and i just want to underline another thing blindingly obvious but sometimes when it's super cold you get. I internet troll. Maybe even the former president saying something about everybody says it's global warming look how cold it is Climate change means extreme weather right. Not just warm weather. Well i i often say whether as your mood in climate is your personality. Your mood today doesn't tell me anything about your overall personality. And nor does a day of cold weather or hot weather for that matter or a week of it. So that's a very sort of poor that we do get off and on twitter and in various places when i see someone saying that. It clearly sort of illustrates that that person doesn't understand perhaps the difference between weather and climate and the other thing i would say is because our winters have been so warm as our climate changes when we do get extreme cold weather at feels that much worse because we don't experience their extreme cold as much as we used to. So suppose somebody an official from texas called you up and ask for advice and said you know we're upgrading the infrastructure we're rebuilding the infrastructure. We don't want an experience like this week to happen again. And of course because we're doing infrastructure we wanna think twenty years ahead thirty years ahead fifty years ahead. What kind of advice would you give texas atmospheric scientists. I really don't think as much about the resiliency an infrastructure. But what. I would say this first of all. Let's kill the sort of misinformation out their own renewable energy and wind farms. Because it's clear that that's not the sole issue here. Wind farms operated much colder and icier places. The deck is in fact. I'm reading that. It was a combination of various things involving natural gas. When and resilient planning. So what i would say is that we need to move from being a reactive society on these extreme compound weather events to more proactive. What i often say these days is hope or waiting and seeing is no longer acceptable acceptable weather. Risk mitigation plan. Our weather models are good enough that we can plan ahead ten days ahead months ahead and so i would. I would ask these power companies to build in more resiliency in the short term and long term because we can pretty much tell you what's going to happen now. From a weather perspective texas did have some advance warning in one question is why they were not able to take advantage of it. And i'm just going to note. Also we are reporting elsewhere in today's program. Just what you said. The texas has had problems with every kind of energy source in this cold weather. James marshall shepherd of the atmospheric science program at the university of georgia. Thanks so much. Thank you for.

texas James marshall judah cohen one question this week today twitter twenty years university of georgia united states fifty years thirty years february forty eight georgia first university of
"professor shepherd" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on Here & Now

"McDonald's faces a new racial discrimination lawsuit fifty, two black former franchisees accused the company of pushing them into less profitable locations and treating them unfairly an internal reviews. The news comes after the fast food giant pledged to recruit more diverse franchisees even as the number of black operators has declined Robin. Farzad is host of public radio's full disclosure and he joins us now and Robin, the plane argue that McDonald's didn't give them the same opportunities that other Franchisees got house Oh. Yeah by the allegation is that McDonald's corporate steered black franchisees toward poor performing stores in more challenge neighborhoods which I mean. If you put income aside, they're already more costly to operate in these lower income neighborhoods because of their higher security expenses and insurance expenses. So the plaintiffs are pegging the kind of the opportunity cost the missed opportunity about four to five million per location on average. So it's not just the arousing her. Interesting, the National Black McDonald's operators association keeps track of the number of black franchisees and their data shows that it's declined over time. How has the company responded to these allegations? What MacDonald is enormous there north of fourteen thousand stores in the US and it's really had to over the past decade right size its relationship with Franchisees I. Remember some very upset when it. Did the whole breakfast all day thing it's pretty much a love hate relationship between the mothership in Illinois and that thousands and thousands of franchisees across the country. So the corporation I mean they're insisting that the total number of owners declined because a Franchisee attrition and consolidation but that black owners is a fraction of about two thousand US restaurant owners that that's largely unchanged. there's also something else. So McDonald's had a black CEO from twenty twelve to twenty fifteen but black leaders have left since then to black executives even sued the company this year for Racial Discrimination what did they allege? That systemic discrimination, a culture of this commission I mean even as McDonald's has its first black CEO, as you mentioned from two, thousand, twelve to two, thousand, fifteen other execs are alleging purge of executives of color a hostile work environment I'm you. Passively. Aggressively push people out by unfairly grading their locations and marking down their franchise value. So the complaint is pointing out that the number of McDonald's black operators actually hit a high of three hundred and seventy seven back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight. Now you have about half that. You think McDonald's franchise model the model itself makes it harder to get ahead in the company overall I think. If you step from this. This is a brutal time for the restaurant industry overall and in a corporation in in a conglomerate as sweeping and as large as McDonalds. The chances are going to favor franchisees that are already well capitalize. It already have locations that can bump out. For example, drive-thru capacity. They could pivotal pivotal ubereats and other aspects in a time of disruption for the industry. So those I think the plaintiffs in this case, there are alleging they've already had their hands tied behind one hand behind their back. It's just harder to innovate. It's harder to move up. It's harder to make a dent as a Mega Franchisee who then Is looked at as somebody who might be promoted within the ranks to become a C. level executive of there's a lot of alerted about. That is Robin Farzad host of public radio's full disclosure. I'm often asked is there one thing you wish you could cover more in this extraordinarily packed new cycle and I say, yes, climate change. So here we go a recent report concluded that a total of twenty eight, trillion tons of ice. Yeah. Trillions has disappeared from the earth. Surface in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four finding that shocked even the researchers conducting the study in the UK. They analyzed satellite images of the planets, ice covered surfaces, everything glaciers, mountains polls. The first study to look at ice melts from every region of the planet researcher Andrew. Shepherd is the director of Leeds University's Centre for Polar observation modeling he was integral to this study professor shepherd. Welcome. Hello thanks for having me on the program. And could you just tell us first this is catastrophic when she discovered when you first realized the totality of this, how much ice had melted you know your thoughts and we are a family friendly programs. So choose your words carefully but. What what did you say? What did you? What did you think? Well, it was really quite a surprise to to see how much ice has been lost. When we looked everywhere, my t have looked different parts of earth, Christ, fear on different occasions in the past we tend to specialize in Antarctica and sometimes in Greenland. But when we added everything together, we saw similar amounts of is being lost in every corner of the planet actually, and so that multiply dope what we'd be looking out for Montauk loan, for instance, to a number that was much much bigger and really quite worrying. Kit Can you put it into some sort of and so that we can picture it what twenty three, trillion tons of ice would look like. Well, it's a huge number and it's really hard for people to get the head around what that actually means. The reason we report the actual turnage is so people can remember the simple amount that's being lost today it's. About a trillion tons each year and so that's an easy number that people can remember might be hard for them to visualize actually means. But if you spread all of that ice on the UK, for instance, where I live, it would be one hundred stake three, hundred, thirty feet, right? I. Mean That's a thick layer of ice in the UK's not a small country. In the past we've looked to is loss from Antarctica and agreement we've converted straight into sea level rise because that's where the water ends up when it melts from birth ground. But ask the looks at the two different types of ice on earth the ice that's on the ground that we can see when we go to mountain ranges for instance, but also the ice that's floating in the sea and that doesn't. Convert straight into sea level rise because it's already part of the ocean, but it's just as important to earth because it keeps US cooler than we otherwise would be well, and let's talk about why. But start with the sea level rise this ice that's normally above land and is melting into the sea and causing it to rise. You say that every centimeter of sea rise that's about a third of an inch. means a million people will be displaced? We've turned to think about sea level rise being a problem for low lying islands in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and that's Some more of a convenience displacement tactic because it makes people think they may not be affected. The it's become increasingly apparent that the bigger threat to our lifestyles.

McDonald Robin Farzad US UK Pacific Ocean CEO McDonalds Illinois Mega Franchisee MacDonald hostile work environment Leeds University Montauk Greenland researcher Shepherd executive
"professor shepherd" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on This Week in Science

"We have observations second. Tell us where we stand with those. This is a team of ninety. Six scientists from fifty international organizations they produced but these days the most complete picture of greenland ice loss to to date the findings published in nature so the Greenland has lost three point eight trillion tons of ice since nineteen ninety two which they estimate is enough to push global sea levels by ten point six millimeters at the rate of ice loss has risen from what was thirty three billion tons a year in the ninety s to two hundred fifty billion a billion times per year in the last decade which is the seven fold increase within within just three decades. Now Uh this is a professor shepherd as a rule of thumb for every centimeter rise in global sea level. Another six six million people are exposed to coastal flooding around the planet our current trends remained the ice melting will cause is a hundred million people be flooded each year by the end of the century. So four hundred million in total due to all sea level rise so yeah things aren't improving. They're getting worse fun. Fat Okay maybe five. Okay well maybe not fun but still if all of Reims ice were to melt or not even completely completely mount but just left off into the ocean as iceberg. The world's oceans are estimated. They would be rising by seven in point four meters. which if you're not familiar with meter seven point four meters is over twenty four feet of sea level rise which would impact the majority of the humans on the planet? Hold on. Can we just acknowledge for a second that the first time in in in my history on the show.

Reims professor
"professor shepherd" Discussed on GONE

GONE

10:58 min | 2 years ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on GONE

"The conclusion of our story. Our third and final theory is that for some reason, or another, the once famous and feared ninth Roman legion willingly, deserted before ultimately disbanding, and being lost a history, what could lead them to such a drastic shift in loyalties. Consider the fact that after the ninth was nearly destroyed in eighty to see the remaining force would have been smaller, and thus it would have been much easier for those who remain to desert without much fanfare. A big part of this mystery is the idea that five thousand Roman soldiers vanished, but that likely didn't happen. Most of the legion was killed off in the battle of Caledonia in eighty two c and whatever was left was a much more insignificant force. Meaning the men of the ninth who were left could actually disband and desert without it being a big deal in Rome. Recall that as Rome expanded into an empire. It was not uncommon for a Roman soldier to spend years or even decades away from their homeland by one twenty c e the ninth legion had been stationed in Britannia for round seventy years, it wasn't unheard of for soldiers to marry and settle with the people that they conquered. So there's a possibility that the soldiers of the ninth intermingled with Braganza tribes, as they integrated them into Roman societies, these soldiers would have children, who though they would be official Roman citizens would likely see Britannia as the real homeland, so after seventy years, it's entirely likely that whatever remained of the ninth legion was tired of fighting for a distant empire that they had little personal connection to this theory is further supported by the fact that the ninth had at least in one occasion. Defied orders from Rome in eighty three see the Roman Senate censured the ninth for maximum inva- Leedom or weakness, the legion had been ordered to help reinstate a pro Roman Braganza choline that had been ousted, but they refused the fact that the ninth, which had once honorably served under Julius Caesar would fail to follow direct orders from the Roman capital would seem to indicate a shift in allegiance, or at least a severe decline in discipline. This theory supports the idea that at some point, what was left of the ninth, departed Britannia and therefore it was taken over by the sixth, legion. The catalyst for this theory was discovered in nineteen fifty nine when Dutch archaeologist jewels. Bo. Hus- excavated a tile stamp from the ruins of legionary fortress at Novi Dunham or present day Nyman in the. Evelyn's the tile was stamped with the phrase leg. Nine hisp excavations of the area revealed that a garrison of Roman troops had occupied the fort beginning in one, oh foresee e over one hundred tiles stamped with the phrase vex Brit were also found in the area vex Brit indicated a detachment of the larger Roman Britannic legion, which would have included the night Bojaya's presented his findings in nineteen sixty four at the international limes congress for Roman studies. In Germany one particularly odd relic Bojaya's found was a ceramic mixing bowl with a stamp of the ninth legion. The Roman army wasn't known to manufacture its own dish, wear, and the bulls existence indicated that the legion had taken up pottery this intern could imply that the legion had retired from. War and set out to build their own town in peace, Oxford archaeology, professor shepherd freer assessed Bo. Haass's findings and theorized that the ninth may have willingly withdrawn from Britain between one, oh wait and one twenty to see and perished at some unknown time shortly after that Bo. Haas partially. Agreed. He too concluded that the ninth must have resided at the fortress Nyman, if only for brief time during that time they clearly took up building and pottery in nearby settlements. Perhaps as part of a plan to build a more permanent town. There's a lot of evidence to support this, but the broader historical context of the time, does raise additional questions, it seems highly unlikely that the ninth could have just deserted their duties without either being hunted down, or otherwise forced back to serve in the Roman army discipline was everything to the Roman soldier. It seems quite unlikely that the ninth would have been able to retire to their settlement without consequences. Let's revisit the time line to see what we can make of this, some detachment of the ninth likely did live at the fortress in Nyman for a time. But considering the location, it's also possible that the ninth was actually just stationed there briefly on their way to serve in the second Dacian war at some point in one, oh, five or one, six B, C E, if this is true, then it may play into the n-i-l-l-a-s in theory, the ninth could have stayed in nine Mahan before marching. Off to a war in which they were wiped out. This can only ever be speculation though as the tile works found at the side, have not been carbon dated. It's even possible that the tiles were brought there later by some other unknown party in carelessly, left behind only to confuse historian centuries later this last theory gets particularly muddled because it can't account for whether or not the survivors of the ninth split into smaller sections that branched out, or if some combination of all three theories were actually. True. So let's revisit our three main theories regarding the possible Nyalali. There are a few major conflicts that match the time line with the ninth could have been totally wiped out. It's unlikely that the ninth was summoned all the way to Judea. So we can likely rule out the second Jewish revolt. There were a series of wars between Rome, and the partying empire going on from. One thirteen to one seventeen see that the ninth may have been involved in. But again, if the ninth had fallen in such a battle, it's likely more people would know about it a series of minor skirmishes, in York still seem like the most likely event. If the ninth really was wiped out, maybe even the few survivors, made their way to Nyman before they deserted or returned and resuscitate recruited into another legion. But even this one has its flaws, the ruins of the fort that still stand today indicate that there was no major structural damage, which surely would have been the case. If the ninth was the victim of so many attacks all in all none of the annihilation theories, totally work. But even if the ninth were annihilated, it's very odd that Rome, wouldn't have verified their fates and included. It in the record, the lack of historical reference to the ninth in ancient Roman doc. Comments could indicate that they did something to warrant their removal from history. As we've said, that, too seems unlikely, though, there's not much written about the ninth in the ruins of ancient Rome. There are still some significant relics, which certainly would not have lasted if there was an order of dumb naughty. Oh, memoria win. Legion is dishonored. Even the tiles bearing their names are raised historians are only aware of the practice because of the third August legion, which was disbanded and sentenced to Dom naughty. Oh, memoria in two thirty eight C E. The third legion was eventually reinstated, and thus the new record of it made note of that blank spot in its history. But in the case of the ninth, legion, there still enough evidence left to cast doubt on this theory. There are still tiles featuring the signature of leg nine his so that. Theory seems unlikely. So if the ninth wasn't completely annihilated, and it wasn't intentionally struck from the record, then it could be possible that they simply disbanded Iliescu Artie hones- road of Roman soldiers in the Germanic lands sneaking out of their war camps to visit friends in the native tribes, as emperor Hadrian prepared to build his wall. He could have discovered that many soldiers in the ninth or actually marrying into the same tribes that they were supposed to be fighting. He could have quietly dissolved the ninth merging, the loyal soldiers into other legions and exiling the deserters away, these deserters,.

Legion Rome Nyman Roman army Britannia Roman Senate Bo fortress Nyman Caledonia Germany Julius Caesar Bojaya Evelyn Iliescu Artie Haas Hus official Haass
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

"There is strong support can well says it's not just about protecting land and water but about protecting the recreation economy, which is worth nearly nine hundred billion dollars a year nationwide. Makers of a very popular weed killer, which studies have linked to cases of non Hodgkin's lymphoma says some university of Washington research can't be trusted. Komo's Ryan Harris says the response from one of those researchers lawsuit from Duval landscaper against Monsanto in its new parent company. Bayer sites the UW analysis which looked for an elevated cancer risk in information from existing studies on people at the highest exposures. Bayer called that cherry picking the data which Dr leeann shepherd with the UAW school of public health tells me simply isn't the case our hypothesis was we were going to pick exposure groups. And so that's what we did. So I don't call that cherry picking when it's consistent with your pre specified approach. Professor shepherd says they did include data from thousand eighteen agricultural health study from the national institutes of health which previous analyses have not. And she says they'd love to have newer data beyond what's available but shepherd says it's not in Monsanto's best interest. Commissioned. A study Ryan Harris, KOMO news medicines doing damage control. After personally identifying information of nearly a million patients six posed online university says, no medical information or social security numbers were exposed. And it was just things like names and file ID numbers, but security expert, Pam Dixon, with the world privacy forum says that's enough if you even know what healthcare provider that that person that name is attached to that's really enough to commit the crime. She's referring to medical identity theft in which someone gets access to drugs or medical services in your name. You'd have medicine has not responded to our request for comment. Jeff pohjola. Komo news. San Juan county judge's order. The release of courtroom surveillance video after charges are dismissed in a criminal case. The judge says San Juan county sheriff Ron Cribb's Wisconsin using security cameras to zoom in on defense documents. And jurors notebook an attorney for the sheriff tells the Seattle times has client denies doing anything wrong. Judge Eaton explained the. Release is necessary for the public to understand why he dismissed assault and trespass charges against Lopez island resident gave sheriff Krebs the chance to present a redacted version of the video that would exclude anything sheriff believes might compromise courtroom security. Komo news time is ten forty and from the Harley exteriors sports desk. Tough losses and severe injury. Couldn't stop one young woman for playing husky basketball. More from komo's Bill Swartz talking dogs. We have a team of Justin believers, you know, everyone doubts us by we see the potential in Montana. Hagstrom is determination personified leading bellevue's Samantha's highschool to its first state tournament basketball appearance. More than twenty years. She gave up hoops temporarily to focus on a university of Washington career that could lead her to become an orthodontist. I don't know. I feel like.

Komo Dr leeann shepherd komo Monsanto San Juan county Ryan Harris basketball Bayer Judge Eaton Samantha university of Washington Hodgkin UW sheriff Krebs Jeff pohjola Ron Cribb Pam Dixon Duval
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

"At bringing the Bill next week potentially would come up on suspension, which means come straight to the floor and would have higher threshold for votes. But we might have those votes to be able to do that because there is strong support. Cantwell says it's not just about protecting land and water but about protecting the recreation economy, which is worth nearly nine hundred billion dollars a year nationwide. Makers of a very popular weed killer, which studies have linked to cases of non Hodgkin's lymphoma says some university of Washington research can't be trusted. Komo's Ryan Harris has the response from one of these researchers lawsuit from a Duval landscaper against Monsanto in its new parent company. Bayer sites the UW analysis which looked for an elevated cancer risk information from existing studies on people at the highest exposures. Bayer called that cherry picking the data which Dr leeann shepherd with the w school of public health tells me simply isn't the case our hypothesis was we were going to pick exposure groups. And so that's what we did. So I don't call that cherry picking when it's consistent with your pre specified approach. Professor shepherd says they did include data from two thousand eighteen agricultural health study from the national institutes of health which previous analyses have not. And she says they'd love to have newer data beyond what's available but shepherd says it's not in Monsanto's best interest to come. Mission. A study Ryan Harris, KOMO news. Now woman disqualified from working in child care because of a decades-old conviction for purse snatching may get another chance under a split ruling from Washington supreme court. Crystal fields was a twenty two year old homeless domestic violence victim in nineteen Eighty-eight when she tried to steal a woman's purse to support her drug addiction. She pleaded guilty to attempted secondary robbery which automatically barred her from being approved to work with children, but in two thousand six fields entered king county's drug court program, then began working at a Seattle daycare in two thousand thirteen six months later state barred her from continuing the justices ruled five to four that it was unconstitutional for the state to automatically deprive fields of the ability to work in childcare, solely based on her old conviction. U dub medicine is doing damage control. After personally identifying information of nearly a million patients was exposed online. University says no medical information or social security numbers were exposed. And it was just things like names and file ID numbers, but security expert, Pam Dixon, with the world privacy forum says that's enough if you even know what healthcare provider, the person dot name is attached to that's really enough to commit the crime. She's referring to medical identity theft in which someone gets access to drugs or medical services in your name. You'd have medicine has not responded to our request for comment. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. A San Juan county judge has ordered the release of courtroom surveillance video after charges are dismissed and a criminal case. Judge says San Juan county sheriff Ron Cribb's was caught using security cameras to zoom in on defense documents. And a jurors notebook an attorney for the sheriff tells the Seattle times his client is doing anything wrong. Judge Eaton explained the. The releases necessary for the public to understand why he dismissed assault and trespass charges against a Lopez island resident he gave a sheriff Krebs the chance to present a redacted version of the video that would exclude anything the sheriff believes might compromise courtroom security. Komo news time is eight forty tonight Gonzaga beat Pepperdine ninety two to sixty four and right now from the Harley exterior sports desk. Tough losses and a severe injury couldn't stop one young woman from playing husky basketball. More from komo's Bill Swartz talking dogs. We have a team of just believers, you know, everyone doubts us like we see the potential in us Montana. Hagstrom is determination personified leading bellevue's Samantha's high school to its first state tournament basketball appearance in more than twenty years. She gave up hoops temporarily to focus on a university of Washington career that could lead her to become an orthodontist. I don't know. I feel like one smile can change.

Komo Dr leeann shepherd San Juan county Monsanto Ryan Harris Judge Eaton Bayer komo Samantha Washington supreme court university of Washington basketball Cantwell Hodgkin Ron Cribb king county Washington Pam Dixon
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

"Moon. Lander in the Clark county school district in Nevada says schools closed because of snow the first significant snowfall in a decade. Brian Clark ABC news. Komo news one thousand FM ninety seven seven now the top stories from the KOMO twenty four seven news center. You medicine is doing damage control. After personal information of nearly a million patients was exposed online. The university says no, medical information or social security numbers were exposed. And it was just things like names and file ID numbers, but security expert, Pam Dixon, with the world privacy forum says that's enough if you even know what healthcare provider that that person dot name is attached to that's really enough to commit the crime. She's referring to medical identity theft in which someone gets access to drugs or medical services in your name. You'd have medicine has not responded to our requests. For comment. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. The makers of a very popular weed killer, which studies have linked to cases of non Hodgkin's lymphoma. Say some university of Washington research cannot be trusted. Komo's Ryan Harris has the response from one of those researchers the lawsuit from Duval landscaper against Monsanto in its new parent company. Bayer sites the UW analysis which looked for an elevated cancer risk information from existing studies on people at the highest exposures. Bayer called that cherry picking the data which Dr Lee and Shepard with the UAW school of public health tells me simply isn't the case our hypothesis was we were going to pick the exposure groups. And so that's what we did. So I don't call that cherry picking when it's consistent with your pre specified approach. Professor shepherd says they did include data from two thousand eighteen agricultural health study from the national institutes of health which previous analyses have not. And she says they'd love to have newer data beyond. What's? Available but shepherd says it's not in Monsanto's best interest to commission. A study Ryan Harris, KOMO news. The local chapter of the N double ACP says it condemns the alleged hoax by actor jussie. Smollet Hackney is one of the group's leaders. And he tells KOMO he's appalled that small. Let me faked and attack with racist and homophobic overtones. He says the Chicago PD acted appropriately Mr. small as case very seriously treated him as a victim until the evidence identified in the investigation suggested Hackney says this apparent hoax takes attention away from actual cases, happening nationally and locally. Charlie. Harger, KOMO news. Well, a humpback whale spent the day swimming in Puget Sound and the will had some company if you alliance sea lions alongside Cascadia research tells KOMO news. There's been one humpback whales swimming around the area for the last two weeks with sightings from Al Qaeda Tacoma and toward Olympia. I was five. By west.

Komo KOMO Smollet Hackney Monsanto Ryan Harris Bayer Professor shepherd Clark county school district Brian Clark Nevada Moon. Lander Pam Dixon Jeff Pohjola university of Washington Puget Sound Harger
"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"professor shepherd" Discussed on KOMO

"The university says no, medical information or social security numbers were exposed. And it was just things like names and file ID numbers, but security expert, Pam Dixon, with the world privacy forum says that's enough if you even know what healthcare provider that that person dot name is attached to that's really enough to commit the crime. She's referring to medical identity theft in which someone gets access to drugs or medical services in your name. You'd have medicine has not responded to our request for comment. Jeff. Oh, Gelo, KOMO news makers of a very popular weed killer, which studies have linked cases of non Hodgkin's lymphoma says some university of Washington research cannot be trusted. Come was Ryan Harris has the response from one of those researchers the lawsuit from Duval landscaper against Monsanto in its new parent company. Bayer sites the UW analysis which looked for an elevated cancer risk information from existing studies on people at the highest exposures. Bayer called that cherry picking the data which Dr leeann shepherd with the UAW school of public health tells me simply isn't the case our hypothesis was we were going to pick exposure groups. And so that's what we did. So I don't call that cherry picking when it's consistent with your pre specified approach. Professor shepherd says they did include data from two thousand eighteen agricultural health study from the national institutes of health which previous analyses have not. And she says they'd love to have newer data beyond what's available. But shepherd says it's not in Monsanto's best interest to commission. A study Ryan Harris, KOMO news. Komo news time four thirty three. With Elisa Jaffe, I'm Tom Glasgow. The local chapter of the N double ACP says it condemns the apparent hoax by actor. Jesse smolin? David Hackney is one of the group's leaders. And he tells KOMO he's appalled that smell. Let me faked in attack with racist and homophobic overtones. He says the Chicago PD acted appropriately Mr. small as case very seriously treated him as a victim until the evidence identified in the investigation suggested otherwise Hackney says this apparent hoax takes attention away from actual cases, happening nationally and locally. Charlie. Harger, KOMO news a net. Nanny operation in Thurston county ends with twenty two arrests. We're told the operation was carried out between February fifteenth and the twentieth with undercover officers using various websites and apps to make contact with the suspects. Investigators say all were arrested after travel. To meet with undercover detectives posing as underage children some as young as six years old intending to engage in sex. This is the fifteenth such operation in Washington state combined olive resulted in nearly two hundred and fifty arrests as well as the rescue of more than thirty children in less than four years balloon, Neil. Komo news coming up the latest on Roger stone's day in court. Komo.

KOMO Dr leeann shepherd Jesse smolin Monsanto Ryan Harris David Hackney Pam Dixon Bayer university of Washington Roger stone Jeff Charlie Elisa Jaffe UW Hodgkin Harger