17 Burst results for "Professor Of Sociology"

"professor sociology" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:51 min | 7 months ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Who are who are purchasing toys. That's a great question. I think some of the changes like we're seeing from lego. Mattel has made some similar changes in the past couple of years. Those are really about money right as they understand that the parents of today have a lot more progressive attitudes about gender than parents. You know ten years ago perhaps so they recognize that this is going to be profitable for them. But it shouldn't be left to the goodness of companies heart. You know whether it's profitable for them to make sure that our products are good for our kids. So in that way i think the legislation is incredibly important and the legislation. California's really aimed at You know at the retail side so making sure that That there is an option for a gender neutral toy. I'll even if the rest of letroy aisles are kind of pink and blue but the toys themselves are still very heavily gendered so we need to address both the way that toys are sold but also the way that toys are made and marketed. Elizabeth sweet is an assistant professor sociology at san jose state university professor sweet. Thank you so much for joining us. It's been such a pleasure. Thank you so.

Mattel lego Elizabeth sweet California san jose state university
"professor sociology" Discussed on Apologetics Live

Apologetics Live

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on Apologetics Live

"I told you about my science psychology professor sociology professor. They're they're? They're in their own fiefdoms. They have their own their own ideologies, and you're not allowed to question it. But when you come down from that. And you've heard that indoctrination for four years plus. And that's all you've heard. And then before that all you've heard in his as an atheist, worldview of one plus one equals, two were really certain of that because of evolution and you, you know that mathworks because of evolution and we know everything is absolutely no sustainable in factual, and tomorrow will be like today, and and the next day we can trust because of you know the certainty of evolution, and when you talk about indoctrinated thought, humble clay says it right there. You talk about the indoctrination it comes in. Where are they hearing this from their hearing? This from professors and teachers that have told them what Marx and Kant and gold, and all these others have taught and told them. That humans don't matter that we are supposed to rise up and cause the world to fear us. And their defender s because what makes us matters are force our power our unity together. To dominate and to cause people to come to fear. So, so we have this, this question is Can you see if you can get Angie pop and again? I would really rather not now is, it's actually. No actually we are going to have Andrew pop back again. I'm going to be bowing out early tonight to jump on another podcast and about fifteen minutes, so you'll be graced with with Andrews presence again. Here. real soon. There's a twilight zone. Okay, so environmental conditions. Let let me just say this really quick before we move onto to the next point is that. Is that environmental conditions if we want to look facts. More carbon emissions come out of a volcano. And or earthquake. Then we get in all the cars combined in the world in a year. That's where our primary source of carbon emissions go, and so whether people want a debate or not, if car I I, don't believe global warming I. Don't believe Global Cooling I. Don't believe in climate change from an environmental perspective. I don't believe that at all I. believe that there are certain cycles within our. Within within our solar system with our son, but it has nothing new the environment. At least from humans in our consumption of fossil fuels, now having having said all that. What's really interesting as God has? As a wonderful designer, the perfect designer when we look at countries that are third world, countries or countries that have do have been doing a lot of industry like our old industrial revolution places like South America and China. Where they're putting lots of carbon into the atmosphere, guess what we see in their lands, their trees, and their farms, doing really really really well compared to other place in the world. Why because you're putting the food that trees and plants suck in. In order for them to do their do their thing right so so the trees are of force are proliferating in the areas where we have. Lots of carbon emissions. having settled that. This has no business being in a In. A black lives matter movement, but for being a leftist radical agenda. voting rights and suppression. The the the Latte badly creeping almost looks like he has like half half shirt on.

professor Andrew Angie clay Marx South America China Kant
"professor sociology" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

Christian Podcast Community

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on Christian Podcast Community

"You can't get there in a in an atheist world so therefore you must surrender and submit to the Christian God the Christian worldview. Right. So environmental conditions, I have no idea with this. What this is with black lives matter. Environment I. Mean I don't know what any of these do but I don. Your mental environmental conditions. This is probably a topic for a different show. I would I would say. But. Well, but think about it, no, no, but in all honesty. They think about it. If you're agenda comes out of what you've been taught at Berkeley. Yell at Harvard, Princeton and all the other Ivy Leagues, and then it's it's matriculated all the way down to the to the small little universities in college and a little little little places of higher learning from the teachers who are unquestionable. I told you about my science psychology professor sociology professor. They're they're? They're in their own fiefdoms. They have their own their own ideologies, and you're not allowed to question it. But when you come down from that. And you've heard that indoctrination for four years plus. And, that's all you've heard. And then before that all you've heard in his as an atheist, worldview of one plus one equals, two were really certain of that because of evolution and you, you know that mathworks because of evolution and we know everything is absolutely no sustainable in factual, and tomorrow will be like today, and and the next day we can trust because of you know the certainty of evolution, and when you talk about and doctrinaire thought, humble clay says it right there. You talk about the indoctrination it comes in. Where are they hearing this from their hearing? This from professors and teachers that have told them what Marx and Kant and gold, and all these others have taught and told them. That humans don't matter that we are supposed to rise up and cause the world to fear. US. And their defender s because what makes us matters are force our power our unity together. To dominate and to cause people to come to fear. So so we have this. This question is Can you see if you can get Angie pop and again? I would really rather not now is. It's actually. No actually, we are going to have Andrew pop back again..

professor US Princeton Angie Berkeley Harvard Andrew clay Marx Kant
"professor sociology" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Shockwaves in American society. So you think about Moments like the uprising in Ferguson. In Baltimore that help. To sort of catapults black lives matter onto onto the national agenda. The numbers didn't do not you know they're not particularly impressive. Numbers but symbolically and politically. The impact of these protests could not be overstated and. They really forced the agenda to come to terms with something that had been silenced and that had been pushed off the collective political Nicole radar has the US in terms of the political and Corporate establishment historically been successful at keeping certain people from joining mass movements. I think we should understand that the the US political system was not set up to mobilize people who is set. Up to two largely demobilized people in favor of something like stability so the Supreme Court the role of the Senate and others and we've also seen that play out in history when movements get too strong. We shouldn't carry through this program without without mentioning just the repression of the civil rights movement. The harassment of Dr King The targeted assassinations directed toward The Black Panther Party and harassment estimate by the FBI's Colin Program which speaks to what happens when these movements I think are seen as too radical even when we may look back and say the demands. We're actually very straightforward and not radical at all and so we see this over and over again. This plays a huge role in demobilising people. It doesn't permanently de mobilize them of of course it certainly didn't silence those struggling for racial justice who are often on the frontlines of US protest movements. And so of course again Ferguson in Baltimore Black lives matter later surging fourth as key movements in our time but it makes it difficult to On the one hand create a unity among different kinds of movements that experience very different levels goals of repression and it operates as a barrier to people thinking that they can actually intervene on the streets and create change. Even if that's really the only thing that's ever created created significant change Dana. There's a quote in your article at Time magazine. History shows us that when activism gets more disruptive and Confrontational Institutional National Power respond basically. This question of violence usually is not sparked by people who go to the streets to be violent. Sometimes that happens most of time. The initial intention is to be peaceful and disobedient right so you sit down in the middle of the street you refuse to to move to the back of the bus and and then when confrontation turns violent is when there are repressive tactics taken by institutional power in most cases the police but what happens when people continue continue. Doing it is not only do the people who are protesting get more confrontational and more in institutional powers face with the hope of pushing for change. But those who are trying to get us back to a stable period without confrontation those people also are gonNA push back harder. Dana Are Fisher a professor sociology at the University of Maryland and the author of American resistance from the women's March to the blue wave and George Ciccarelli Omar visiting scholar at the decolonizing humanities project at the College of William and Mary. Thanks to you both. Thank you for having your. We asked you if you've ever protested and what it meant to you. Here's here's what a few of you had to say. Hi this is Susan the Kate from rush on Washington. I have marched for women's rights. And they have marched for black lives matter. I am not convinced that these movements mm-hmm and truly moved to people who are currently in power in fact. These demonstrations are often ignored by legislators and the administration. I do think mass demonstrations can affect that voters. Hi This is Laura from San Rafael California. I've marched for women's right and healthcare and will continue to March. I think showing up is part eighteen and once we stopped showing up we give up our power. I traveled to Washington. DC to protest. When something is clearly wrong immoral I feel? It's my duty as a human being to protest got people Evanston Illinois this valley stream. I went on my first. I protests in two thousand three during the lead up to the war in Iraq and As I marched in New York City thousands and thousands of keep marching and there were just a marches in London and Paris and Los Angeles and San Francisco. I was hopeful. I thought we could maybe stop a war but since then I kept marching because silence implies consent my name is Mark Calling from Trumbull Connecticut growing up in South Africa. I protested against a Potett. Really make a difference well eventually but only a small part of a much larger protest which unfortunately involves it's much violence and killing by antibiotics. Eight seven seven eight. My take is our number it's the takeaway.

US Dana Ferguson Washington harassment Institutional National Power Baltimore Time magazine Black Panther Party American society Nicole radar Senate Supreme Court FBI Dr King DC Potett San Rafael California Evanston
"professor sociology" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

09:23 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"For every dollar white man makes native women make fifty eight cents Latino women make fifty three cents. We are joined now by Julie Suck Professor Sociology Graduate Center Cuny. She's also Dean for Master's programs. Welcome to democracy now. It's great to have you with us so you're here in the city. The city of the Canyon of heroes where the ticker tape parade took place the women's soccer team exultant and A. and defiant as the head of the U._S.. Soccer Federation addressed the crowd at City Hall he was met by chance of equal pay equal pay. What does this movement? What does this call by the women's soccer team yes in the realm of soccer mean for this country for women around the country? Well I think they're victory is a testament to some of the successes of title nine in this country since the nineteen seventies and title nine is very distinctive as antidiscrimination law in this country because it not only prohibits discrimination it actually requires gender parody explain what exactly title nine is so title nine is a statute that was passed in one thousand eighteen seventy two around the time that the equal rights amendment was being sent to the states for ratification and it's a statute that prohibits not only discrimination in educational programs receiving federal funding <hes> but also prohibits the exclusion from participation on account of sex and what that has meant in practice because of the way that it's been interpreted through policy guidances is that it's not enough just to say we're not discriminating on the basis of gender institutions universities actually actually have to equalize conditions so that we've been in men really have an equal athletic opportunity in sports programs and this has made a huge difference to the ability of women <hes> to participate in sports and eventually to excel over generation Asian so as to win the women's World Cup and does that apply only to universities it doesn't apply to schools high schools. Oh it applies to all recipients of federal funding and do you agree that the soccer the women's soccer team won because precisely Lee of this of title nine and what it enabled for women athletes I do because I think that what title nine shows is that if we're really committed on the ground to actual equality between men and women and have a very robust understanding what that means <hes> it means that we can unleash women's full potential and they're so much talent that I think is not allowed to come out when we have unequal pay practices or when we have various practices on the ground that exclude women one way or another uh-huh and what kind of legislation do you think is necessary to ensure a more equal pay for men and women well currently we do have title seven in employment and the equal pay act of nineteen sixty sixty three and those are statutes that the <hes> women's national team is invoking in their lawsuit that was filed that you mentioned and those statutes do not go far enough because even though they require equal pay for equal work work there are a lot of exceptions including if you base if you pay men and men and women unequally based on any other factor other than sex that's legal under the equal pay act many other countries in recent years have passed asked more robust equal pay laws exempt for example in France. They now have an equal pay index so that large employers will have to measure certain things like the pay gap between men and women in the company the number of women who have gotten raises after after a maternity leave those kinds of things and they get a certain score and if their score falls below a certain level they have three years to fix it and if they don't fix it they could get fined up to one percent of payroll so that's something that I think that's very robust that you're seeing in other countries other countries that also have gender equality in their constitutions and talk about the state of pay and also of wealth the disparity between men and women in the United States well. I think it's a very complicated thing I'm one figure that we have is that women make eighty cents on the dollar and it's due to a large rain writers so yeah. Let's all women that's all women but if you break it down of course then you get a lower percentages as compared demand but <hes> but I think that a lot of the factors have to do not only with discrimination because of gender stereotyping and exclusion of women in certain programs <hes> from education all the way up to the workplace it has a lot to do also with the effects of <hes> gender roles on women's careers and they're they're earning abilities <hes> including the fact that many women <hes> take career breaks <hes> in order to raise children and because in this country we don't really have meaningful paid <hes> parental leave for men or women and this tends to have a pretty bad effect on women's earning ability over their careers so that eighty percent is something that's complicated it represents not only discrimination in the context of underpaying women for the exact same jobs but broader disadvantages that have to do with the gender roles that that women and men play in our society and how do you think in fact that compares to the extent that of course it's true that the U._S. has among the O._C._D.. Countries among the worst <hes> provision for maternity and paternity leave to what extent is that in fact a reflection of <hes> how far we are here <hes> from gender equality because it kind of says something about how the role of the mother and the father but principally the mother given what you've said about gender roles <hes> how much that's valued and how much space is made for it absolutely economists who have studied the gender. Underpaid gap have suggested that if you control for maternity the gender pay gap actually narrow significantly so if you control so that's to say that women who are not mothers make almost as much as men whether their the fathers are not and so so you're absolutely right that our lack of accommodation for working mothers in this country including our lack of a federal policy of paid parental leave <hes> right now only I believe eleven or twelve percent of American workers have access to paid parental leave and the why and when the leave is not paid that is we have a family and medical leave act that authorizes unpaid leave up to twelve weeks but when families have unpaid leave <hes> the time that you have a baby is really not a good time not to be making any money and the what this usually means is that men continued to work <hes> and women take <hes> as <hes> as short a time period of time off as possible they don't have access to paid leave and this also has very bad effects on maternal health and infant mortality and finally how does cheinal nine how does equal pay in particular how would these be affected by the passage passage of the equal rights amendment and explain what that is so the equal rights amendment is an amendment to the U._S.. Constitution which was proposed almost one hundred years ago that says equality of rights shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex so it prohibit the government from discriminating on the basis of sex and what it would do is <hes> that it would make the government responsible and accountable for a a wide range of governmental failures <hes> in the context of gender inequality <hes> so obviously they would not be able to actually exclude women from any government programs or public educational programs on the basis of sex but I think it could mean something more more that is if you're not a bridging <hes> equality of rights it means that when when we systematically fail to provide equal opportunities on the ground that the government is somehow responsible and I think that it it would make sense than to have the kind of robust understanding of non-discrimination that you see in the context of title nine which has really produced results and what would it take to pass equal rights amendment D._R._A.. Right now we're so close because <hes> what it would take right now is one more state legislature to ratify the equal rights amendment <hes> what what happened when the equal rights amendment was sent to the states for ratification was that we got thirty five states <hes> before the deadline in one thousand nine in eighty two and we need thirty eight and <hes> since twenty Seventeen Nevada has ratified and Illinois has ratified and so if we have one more state will have thirty eight states well. I WanNa thank you very much for being with us. We'll certainly continue to follow that movement Julie's suck professor of Sociology Graduate Center at Cuny the City University of New York. She's written about the I._R._A.. And gender equality and constitutions across world when we come back Labor Secretary Alex Kosta faces calls to resign Weiner's handling of the Jeffrey Epstein Serial Sexual Child Sexual Assault case Costa's being criticized for cutting the budget to fight international sex trafficking by eighty percents. Stay with US.

United States soccer Julie Suck Professor Sociology City Hall Master Soccer Federation Jeffrey Epstein Illinois Julie Seventeen Nevada Secretary Assault City University of New York Lee Alex Kosta professor Sociology Graduate Center France
"professor sociology" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Okay. Google. And. Now we mentioned Google for the first time on the show. He was born. Nineteen eighty nine hundred eleven so he missed he missed all of this. As of the internet now. Yeah. Without without trying to foresee it he foresaw. So I'm gonna bring up as I often do on this show. One of my favorite we've got to get her on the show. Xena up Tewfik to fix to see. Sexy to Feqi. I don't know how she's a Turkish name. And of course, we're inevitably. Yeah. Wonderful professor sociology article this week in on wired the internet has made dupes and cynics of us all she is become the kind of Paul revere of the internet era. But what she's talking about in here? I thought maybe is kind of timely professor at university of North Carolina Chapel Hill. Is this notion of trust that in peop- that if we have been in the past in the United States, a high trust society, low corruption, you could pretty much trust. With people said, but that in the internet era, we become increasingly a low trust society, fake reviews on Amazon Russian Botts on Twitter conversational a is posing as humans in. Of course, a political class that seems to be corrupt endlessly. Corrupt Mauer in your computers ad for click fraud and on and on and on. And she warns that this is a this is a bad trend is trend becoming a low trust society. She says the internet is increasingly a low trust society one where an assumption of pervasive, fraud is simply built into the way many things function. She says people do adapt to low trust societies. Of course, world of mouth recommendations from familiar sources become more important doing business with family and local networks started taking precedence, but also mafia-like organisations, spring up imposing a kind of accountability to brutal brutal cost,.

Tewfik Google Mauer professor university of North Carolina C Amazon Russian Botts Feqi United States Paul revere peop Twitter
"professor sociology" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

06:48 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Beach Monterey peninsula. Chilly out there fifty. It is. It's a public. Yeah. Anybody you go there and stay you can play it costs pretty penny, but you can go there in the lodge great rooms in it. Yeah. If you've got a reserve a spot, I mean it's always busy. You can even drive a cart on it. It's a public course it's owned by Arnold. Palmer will his state. Now, the bunch of people came in and bought it bunch of big time golf people and have a board of directors. That runs it, but it's always been public spike, glasses public Poppy Hills, go down the road to Cyprus point. That's not Cyprus point, you have to get permission to be seen within ten miles at a place. But all these others their public, and it's really if, if you play golf, and you haven't played Pebble Beach, you really I'm sure you want to. It's that well known the vistas there are particularly that, of course to me begins on the seventh hole. Well, six six is Mark. But when eight through thirteen those holes have the, the great views and vistas, and then, of course, seventeen and eighteen the finishing hole. They also happen to be the hardest holes number eight through twelve thirteen four twelve. Through fifteen is not an easy when they're even the short one hundred and five yard par three number seven. Depending on the win. You know, most people will hit a thin wedge maybe gap wedge. But I heard I heard what was. Curtis Strange say yesterday. He one time during a tournament there had to hit a six hundred and those guys at six iron two hundred yards two hundred five yards and the wind was in the face so strong that six iron to get it the land of the green one hundred yards away, but they put the pin placement in that green makes. Yards. That's an automatic part, no surrounded by bunkers and the pin placements or really tough. But not yet is chilly chilly, at Shinnecock last summer for the US open up rather Long Island. And I guess I guess it's global warming. Let me get started here with this. Stanford center on poverty, and inequality. A study by researchers at Stanford found that American millennials face challenges, unlike any previous generation, and their struggles are likely signs of mounting issues due to decades of rising economic inequality. Millennials people born between nineteen eighty and two thousand earn less money without college degrees, than their predecessors, and they're more likely to die by suicide or drug overdose than any other generation. David Gretzky professor sociology and director at the Stanford center on poverty, and inequality said in a statement, millennials are the first generation to experience a full throttled way, the social and economic problems of our time. We can think of them as Canaries in the coal mine, who revealed just how toxic those problems are, by assembling a report that provides a comprehensive understanding of the situation millennials face we can all go beyond the usual patchwork policy and begin to address underlying problems. The study examined comprehensive data explaining integral factors in economic success or struggle, including education, employment and income health occupational segregation economic mobility debt and poverty rates racial, and. Gender identity social connections housing and incarcerate. No wonder they're going nuts and depressed. That's the stuff that measuring. What are we this again? The study examined comprehensive data an integral factors in economic success or struggle, you one of those factors are here. They hear the factors millennials supposedly face. In economic successor struggle education. Yeah. That's new haven't had that problem before. Employment and income. Yeah. Nobody's had pressure that area before. Health. Yep. Yep. This is the first generation against sick. Occupational segregation. Yeah. Yeah. The millennials, they're the first people to ever be separated. I don't know how to deal with it. Economic mobility. I don't know what that means to being forced to move, and they don't want to move. But whatever I guess it's the first generation evidence had to deal with it. Debt, you know that millennials are the first generation that have to deal with debt. What's what it says here? Comprehensive data explaining integral factors in economic success struggle debt. Remember, the story millennials face the greatest hardship from toxic economic conditions, and they are debt poverty rates poverty never been better. I mean, the poverty rate, we've never had fewer people in poverty people in poverty doing well better than they have, I guess millennials in poverty are on the sidewalk. I don't know. Racial and gender identity. Now, this I will admit could be something unique to millennials. Not knowing if you're white black Brown red male, female, or both. That could be unique and it might be a problem. You don't know your man or woman, you don't know if your child or adult, you don't know if you're Caucasian or black, Rachel Dulles all you don't know. If you're part of Indian like Elizabeth focus. You, you don't know if because you have Jamaican roots that you haven't Tennessee opioid abuse. There's a whole lot. You may not know. That you're told. Let's see what else. Social connect. Oh, by all means millennials are the first. Generation to have to face the daily possibility that they are insignificant because of social media. None of us ever before ever had a deal with inferiority complexes. I'm sure right. Anyway, just getting warmed up on this folks. So hang on the junk and Kelly.

golf Beach Monterey peninsula Stanford Curtis Strange Stanford center drug overdose Poppy Hills Shinnecock Palmer Arnold US Pebble Beach Mark Long Island Rachel Dulles Kelly
"professor sociology" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:02 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on KTOK

"To die by suicide or drug overdose than any other generation. David Gretzky professor sociology and director at the Stanford center on poverty, and inequality said in a statement, millennials are the first generation to experience full-throttled way, the social and economic problems of our time. We can think of them as Canaries in the coal mine, who revealed just how toxic those problems are, by assembling a report that provides a comprehensive understanding of the situation millennials face we can all go beyond the usual patchwork policy and begin to address underlying problems. The study examined comprehensive data explaining integral factors in economic success or struggle, including education, employment and income health, occupational segregation economic mobility. Debt and poverty rates racial, and gender identity. Social connections, housing and incarcerate. No wonder they're going nuts. Depressed? That's the stuff that measuring. What do you read this again? The study examined comprehensive data explaining integral factors in economic success or struggle, those factors are here. The air, the factors millennials supposedly face. In economic successor struggle education. Yeah. That's new. I haven't had that problem before. Employment income? Yeah. Nobody's head pressure not before. Health. Yep. Yep. This is the first generation it gets sick. Occupational segregation. Yeah. Yeah. The millennials I people to ever be separated. I don't know how to deal with economic mobility. I don't know what that means. They're being forced to move or they don't wanna move, but whatever I guess it's the first generation ever had to deal with it. Debt. Do you know that millennials are the first generation to have to deal with debt? What it says here. Comprehensive data explaining integral factors economic success struggle debt. Remember, the story millennials face the greatest hardship from toxic economic conditions and they are debt poverty rates poverty. Never been better. I mean, the poverty rate, we've never had fewer people in poverty of people in poverty doing well better have, I guess millennials in poverty are on the sidewalk? I don't know. Racial and gender identity. Now, this I will admit could be something unique to millennials. Not knowing if you're white black Brown red male, female, or both. That could be unique and it might be a problem. You don't know your man or woman, you don't know if your child or adult, you don't know if you're Caucasian or black, Rachel Dulles all you don't know. If you're native Indian, like Elizabeth folk. You don't know if because you have Jamaican roots that you haven't tended opioid abuse. There's a whole lot. You may not know. That you're told. Let's see what else. Social. Oh, by all means millennials are the first generation to have to face the daily possibility that they are insignificant because of social media. None of us ever before ever had a deal with inferiority complexes. I'm sure right. Anyway, just getting warmed up on this folks. So hang on.

drug overdose Stanford center David Gretzky Rachel Dulles opioid abuse professor director
"professor sociology" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:31 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on KTRH

"Welcome back the line Friday. Rush Limbaugh, half my brain tied behind my back, just to make it fair. I got an Email Russia. I'm watching the US open looks really cold out there. It is. It's like. Fifty five degrees. Not a whole lot of wind which helps the nights chilly, fifty-five Pebble Beach Monterey peninsula. Chilly out there fifty. It is. It's a public. Yeah. Anybody you go there and say, you can play it costs pretty penny, but you can go there in the lodge great rooms in. Yeah. If you've got a reserve a spot, and it's always busy. You can even drive a cart on it. It's a public course it's owned by Arnold. Palmer his state. Now, the bunch of people came in and bought it bunch of big time golf people and have a board of directors that runs it, but it's always been public. Spy glasses public Poppy Hills go down the road to cypress point. That's not Cyprus point, you have to get permission to be seen within ten miles at a place. But all these others they're public. And it's really if you play golf, and you haven't played Pebble Beach, you really I'm sure you want to. It's that well known the vistas there are particularly that course to me begins on the seventh hole. Well fix six sixes mar, but when eight through thirteen those holes have the, the great views and vistas, and then, of course, seventeen and eighteen the finishing hole. They also happen to be the hardest holes number eight through twelve thirteen four twelve. Fifteen is not an easy when they're even the short one hundred five yard par three number seven. Depending on the win. You know, most people will hit a fan wedge, maybe cap wedge, but I heard I heard what was the Curtis Strange say yesterday? He one time during a tournament there had to hit a six hundred and those guys had six iron two hundred yards two hundred five yards and the wind was in the face, so strong six iron to get it. The land of the green one hundred yards away put the pin place that green makes. Yards. That's part no surrounded by bunkers in the pen placements really tough. But not yet is chilly. Chilly, chenecocs last summer for the US open, nothing out routed, Long Island. And I guess it's I guess it's global warming. Let me get started here with this. Stanford center on poverty, and inequality. A study by researchers at Stanford found that American millennials face challenges, unlike any previous generation, and their struggles are likely signs of mounting issues due to decades of rising economic inequality. Millennials people born between nineteen eighty and two thousand earn less money without college degrees, than their predecessors, and they're more likely to die by suicide or drug overdose than any other generation. David Gretzky professor sociology and director at the Stanford center on poverty, and inequality said in a statement, millennials are the first generation to experience a full throttled way, the social and economic problems of our time. We can think of them as Canaries in the coal mine, who revealed just how toxic those problems are, by assembling a report that provides a comprehensive understanding of the situation millennials face. We can all go beyond the usual patchwork policy and begin to address underlying problems. These study examined comprehensive David explaining integral factors in economic success or struggle, including education, employment and income health, occupational segregation economic mobility. Debt and poverty rates racial and gender identity social connections housing and incarcerated. No wonder they're going nuts. Depressed? That's the stuff they're measuring. Read this again. The study examined comprehensive data explaining integral factors in economic success, or struggle factors are here, the air, the factors. The Leno supposedly face. In economic successor struggle education. Yeah, that's new. I haven't had that problem before. Employment and income. Yeah, nobody's had pressure not area before. Health. Yeah. This is the first generation against sick. Occupational segregation. Yeah, yeah. The leno's first people to ever be separated. I don't know how to deal with economic mobility, I don't know what that means are being forced to move, or they don't wanna move, but whatever I guess it's the first generation ever Lieutenant deal with it. Debt. Do you know that millennials are the first generation have to deal with debt? Let's what it says here. Comprehensive data explaining integral factors economic success struggle debt. Remember, the story millennials face the greatest hardship from toxic economic conditions and they are debt poverty rates poverty. Never been better. I mean, the poverty rate, we've never had fewer people in poverty of people in poverty doing well better than they have, I guess millennials in poverty are on the sidewalk. I don't know. Racial and gender identity. Now, this I will admit could be something unique to millennials. Not knowing if you're white black Brown red male, female, or both. That could be unique and it might be a problem. You don't know your man or woman, you don't know if your child or adult, you don't know if you're Caucasian or black Rachel Dulles on you don't know. If you're part native Indian, like Elizabeth folk. You don't know if because you have Jamaican roots that you haven't tendency to opioid abuse. There's a whole lot. You may not know that you're told. Let's see what else. Social connect. Oh, by all means millennials are the first generation to have to face the daily possibility that they are insignificant because of social media. None of us ever before ever had a deal with inferiority complexes. I'm sure right. Anyway, just getting warmed up on this folks. So hang on the network. Your breaking news station, NewsRadio seven.

US Leno golf David Gretzky Pebble Beach Monterey peninsul Rush Limbaugh Stanford Russia Stanford center drug overdose Pebble Beach Poppy Hills Arnold Long Island Rachel Dulles opioid abuse
"professor sociology" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:06 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on KGO 810

"Know, the phrase critical mass when in something cheese point where you really can't go back any more. It's built up. And we were right now we don't know where that point is with climate change. But in a social structure, it's hard to tell when you reach a point, like a tipping point, Malcolm, glad will writes in his book, and I wonder that about the Trump presidency. Okay. So I mean most of the stuff most of the changes brought about by Trump and today's sycophants and the Republican party, we assume or fixable I mean a lot of markets legislation. It's fixable, you know, and some even some of the stuff without a sunset clause, we can go back and we can we can get rid of it. But Trump, there's a good chance again. I told you Henry Olsen piece in the Washington Post, you should read it because it will blow your mind, the Trump, you know, his incumbency and the fact that, you know, the he can take credit for this economy, even though he nothing he's done. Port and a battle anybody on that you look at this, and you say, well, you know, if he's not elected if he excuse me, fears elected, there's no way that Ruth Bader Ginsburg is going to be able to last another four years. So there's going to be another appointment there. And it could you could have to. I mean he could change not only the again McConnell McConnell wins in Kentucky. Right that the bringing that altogether is powerfully. Negative thing for I think for the country as evidenced by almost the set nine hundred prosecutors that said the guys violated the constitution. He's broken laws. Paul stars written a book called entrenchment wealth power in the constitution of democratic societies. At sounds like something dry, but it's not the Atlantic called it the book and said that the effects of, again, the Atlantic article that entitled Trump's second term. It's more likely than most people think and pay for the first time, it's affects would be far more durable. It should scare the hell out Paul joins us right here on Keijo Paul, you know, title this book. Oh my God. You know, I mean and I'm not I'm not a an anti Republican progressive. I mean, I, I've, I've been that down that way through talk radio over the years and visited market side economics, and all, but this is Janet Yellen said, this guy doesn't have any idea of the big picture, and that really frightens me why I think voters in two thousand twenty need to understand what historic stakes. There are in this election because what I'm arguing in that in that article in the Atlantic. Is that a second term for Trump would matter a lot more than the first and he was saying, you know, we could probably reverse or offset a lot of the stuff that Trump has done so far. But with another four years, eight years. We're going to see changes that are very hard to undo you mentioned the supreme court, and, you know, I think that point really has to be highlighted when you have a five four court five four conservative majority. You sometimes get a loan to center. It used to be Anthony Kennedy and so things are still close just just recently Justice, Kevin sided with the liberals and, you know, you so things came out the other way. But if you go to seven to why think it's going to be a much more radical wing court, and it's gonna last for a long time, and that is that is it's going to be a historical turning point. I tell people right now. Okay. And my favorite are you from you're from Princeton, right? So you appreciate this, east coast guy when it snows the thin veneer of civilization, disappears, people decide, I can go through red lights, and stop sign. It's just all those away people like. Go to the store, and they buy hundreds of, of, of milk and toilet paper and and, and bread, the truth is, if you're drinking that much milk and eating that much bread, you're not going to need the toilet paper. But the point is, it's really not we're not that civilized as we think. And when Trump does things like he tried to intervene in the Johnny Walker sentencing release something he has no business doing. And he also has now decided he is willing to ignore subpoenas knowing that, or hoping that Roberts will assist them in the supreme court, because the Justice Department's not going to do anything because bar believes in a strong executive branch. I mean, this is the perfect storm for creating, I guess, for backing Jefferson's thing about every four years, tearing up the constitution and starting over. Yeah. Well, there's been a whole coarsening of, of American life in the process. And, and, you know, I think one of the other things that would happen with another four years. If Trump is reelected, is that it would validate all the forces that had gathered behind, you know, and, and really strengthen those for the long term, and that's something that really don't see. I mean, written down anywhere. Right, people can talk about the facts to our constitution into the process supreme court. But it's basically a message like look America supports what the president stands for what he says, and what he does, it's, it's a support a populism, which is already arou- around. It's now in Australia, they, they elected a conservative prime minister in Australia. So I mean populism is an anti intellectual. Kind of scream at the, the powers that be without thinking of the consequences of that. So you mentioned the climate change just a moment ago. And I think really this is one of the other things, which will be affected in the most serious way. If Trump is reelected. Because if we don't start doing anything about climate change until the mid to late two thousand twenties. It's going to become increasingly difficult for us to summon the political will to overcome the obstacles here. And again, this is this is this is the moment of really where the stakes are historic, and some things really matter, more than others and climate change, and the supreme court are among those. Let me tell everybody again, Paul stars professor, sociology, and public affairs at Princeton and co founder and co editor of American prospect magazine of which I'm a big fan of anyone the Pulitzer prize for general nonfiction. And you've written a ton of books, one about the media, the creation of the media, freedoms power and remedy and reaction. I wanna ask you a question about that in a minute. But the, the what are the forces that put Trump in this position is it an accident? Isn't is it just one of those horrible, serendipitous nightmares, or is a reflection of, of a deeper thing this populism? The darker populism. Well, I think a number of things have come together in the United States and in some other countries as well. And I think a lot of this has to do with the backlash against racial and cultural change. That's taking place. Those last tap century, really and then change in gender relations. All of this is I think, really set off fears among many people, especially white men about the fundamental changes in, in Newman relations that are taking place. We've seen that. We've seen that throughout the centuries to social media and media make it different in a way. Yeah. I think there have been affects there too. But I think I think under I think the backlash has has been real really fundamental to all this and.

Trump Paul Atlantic Princeton Ruth Bader Ginsburg Malcolm Republican party McConnell McConnell Janet Yellen Henry Olsen Keijo Paul Australia Washington Post Kentucky Anthony Kennedy Newman Pulitzer prize
"professor sociology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:05 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We're talking about the synagogue shooting in Pele and also gonna talk about the Sunnyvale crash both in being investigated as hate crimes. In fact, seems pretty clear that what happened in Pelly. Now, according to officials definitely was a hate crime. But we wanna talk with Sarabi low who is the executive director of the council on American Islamic relations here in the San Francisco Bay area and welcome to forum too heavy with us. Chris thanks for having me wishes consensus better I wish they were too. And I'm so sorry for what is what has happened in your community and the tragedy in the wake of that. Let's find out first what actually happened talking about a man who tried to run down eight people because at least according to reports he thought they were Muslims these where eight people very diverse ethnic background really Representative of the bay area actually who works near a sprouts grocery store in Sunnyvale. And he intentionally mowed them down with his car during several leaving really sadly thirteen year old girl. Still in a coma. I can't even begin to imagine. What it's like for for her family to be dealing with this crisis in this way with their child. This is terrible and on unconscionable and one has to wonder whether this at this point. Let sort this out with you because we're hearing is investigating this as a hate crime. And at this point attorney is saying he doesn't hate Muslims. It has nothing to do with the talking about him having a history of mental illness and having been in the middle hospital having PTSD from being a veteran enough ghanistan, how do you sort through this? We've heard conflicting reports is definitely heard the concerned about mental illness and at the same time, I make sure to not mitigate the reality of hate violence our country. I always attributing it to the DA's office, and the FBI are taking this theory. Seriously. There are reports that he said himself that he did this because he thought that they were Muslim. And so where encouraged by the fact that law enforcement continues investigate that angle you been charged with eight thousand attempted murder, but it's important to I said if there's enough evidence to substantiate a hate crime enhancement at that the added because when you commit a hate crime in this way, you're not just attacking the eight people there or the people at the synagogue. You're also talking massive communities who are looking over their shoulder who are asking how do I dress? Do I pray, and I say to be myself in this country where we say that we want everyone to feel safe. I'm reading about many young Muslim women who are thinking, maybe not wearing coverings. And in fact. The burqas were outlawed and tree Lanka after that tragedy. Right. I mean, you know, you never want the government telling people how to wear whether it's to dress her dress. And of course, that's that's a challenge for women faced but Muslim women are of their own volition thinking about their safety and asking, you know, should I wear my has some families are asking. Should I go to the and we're in courage and people to continue to unapologetically and unafraid practice their face. The really sad thing about the Sunnyvale incidents as you may know is none of the people in the group that were move down. We're actually fun he perceived them to be Muslim. And that would be enough. If he actually if that's what we learned he perceived them to be Muslim and some of downs that's enough for a hate crime. But it also communicates to me. The people that would attack are talking for our skin color are tacking because of what they perceive him. So whether or not we wear religious articles of clothing or in a place of worship or not. Hate violence in America is increasing across the board. And that's what we need to be focused on this was we should mention a week before Ramadan. But it does according to the Sunnyvale police chief appear to have been intentional targeting of Muslims. Let me get a call her on with Don. Join us you're on the air. Yes. On this state of mind of the driver. He wanted days like right after he crashed into that. He thing. On over again. Thank you. Thank you Jesus. I think that we should logically analyze them to determine how he was instigated to do this by atmosphere of hate in this country against Muslims, especially at Masirah, which is promoted by Don, Tom, you actually witness what happened in Sunnyvale. I did. I was on. I was in the car right at the at the sidewalk, and I saw the bodies lying via that one right in front of my car must have been pretty horrifying. I'm sure oh, you you can't believe what you're seeing think it's like something out of a movie, but I mean, this is actually happening. But the it's not about that any that's been reported. What it's about is the state of mind of that individual. And why somebody who came from a religious family with? No prior convictions. Suddenly went and did this, and it it's it's instigated by the atmosphere of hate against Muslims and promoted by Donald Trump and the white supremacist who him he's there by and this is this is I think also with regard to. Anti Jewish actions. And and and companies not is not. And he is responsible. I think indirectly for a lot of stories that done. I thank you for that. Caller, wanna get the response from Zara billow who executive director of the council on American Islamic relations here in San Francisco Bay area. Again, we're hearing the name of Donald Trump, and all this can I get you Cummins r everything that we said was possible as a negative consequence of hate rhetoric is is coming to life right now. Just a few weeks ago. We were really concerned that he was inciting violence against Muslims by juxtaposing out of context words, l HANA Omar versus images of of nine eleven those videos are posted on the White House page on his Twitter account and receive tens of millions of us. It's no surprise that in the in the days and weeks, although as he's sticking anti-muslim sentiment, anti semitism, and so on that we would see these kinds of the tax. There was the attack in sunny out. And I know that you talked about the attack in synagogue episode dog in San Diego. Ego, which was committed by someone who also attempted arson at a Moscow and San Diego. And so we are we are seeing that what we said is true that his language is leading to violence. I thank you for joining us. Appreciate your being with us and condolences to all who have been affected by this continue to be affected by this in your community. Appreciate your being with us. Let me now. Go to peach me who is also with us this morning. He's professor sociology Chapman university, author of a book called American swastika inside the white power movements hidden spaces of hate and Pizzini. Welcome to the program. Good to have you with us. Thanks for having me. I I was talking before with Abby from the Jewish community Relations Council about things that seem to come up over and over again with a lot of these young men, and they almost men who are tracked to the to the white power movement. And I know you actually interviewed quite a number of them after they had fell away or became apostates. I suppose by the lights of the movement itself and discovered certain commonalities certain things that really clustered tech about that. Sure. Yeah. We've interviewed both current and former members extensively conducting what we call life history interviews and tracing earliest experiences to the present at the time of the interview. And what we find in terms of some of these common denominators, and it doesn't apply to all individual cases. But, but we do find some pretty common themes in terms of individuals during their childhood experiencing certain kinds of traumas like physical or sexual abuse, parental neglect of various kinds of family dysfunctions in terms of there being substance abuse within the family or other types of disruptions. And by the time, they get to add a leci- their their life is kinda starting to spiral out of control. They begin to engage in misconduct. Generic types of things like, you know, the Lincoln activities their own substance use, and then a Venturi these kind of owner dole these build up. And so when they do eventually come in contact with this kind of extremist propaganda. They've kind of become susceptible to the attractions that the the movement provides in terms of being able to be part of something almost kind of the many ways, they kind of see it as a stabilising, you know. An opportunity to stabilize their lives have spiraled out of control and be part of something have commodity and social support. Young men who are women join gangs. I mean, they certainly have an affiliation identity. Maybe even feeling family. Yeah. Yeah. A lot of similarities there are a lot of similarities in terms of their backgrounds. What we find more generically with violent crime individuals who become involved in a kind of generic violence. So I think there are some important similarities, but then, you know, I think there are some important differences, which is the the ideological aspects that that really underpins once they do become involved in these groups, whether it's online or off line or some combination and that that ideological part really does kind of set them apart in that because they become part of this movement that has a long history in a long tradition in advocate, certain kinds of strategies, then that begins to direct them in in terms of their their actions, including their violent actions say long tradition and a long history. I think you're emphasizing and tell the fact that many people feel that this is. The new phenomenon but this has been going on for quite some time. And what I'm struck by in terms of your research is eighty percent have actually experienced some form of childhood trauma. And a lot of them are desensitize right within their home. They're almost primed for kind of white nationalism or white bigotry, whatever you wanna call it. They hear the N word a lot that sort of. Yeah. You know, one of the dirty secrets we don't like to talk about is how prevalent what you might call ordinary or everyday racism and other forms of bigotry continue to be in our country. And so, yeah, the individuals that we've interviewed prior to getting involved they were growing up at helpful where they were hearing racial slurs and jokes and so forth that were you know, kind of providing that foundation if you will. So that when they did become exposed to more extreme gonna propaganda in groups. It wasn't as big a leap for them. You know, as compared with they've been raised in a family that was promoting tolerance and and working together and celebrating. Versity and so forth. So that that that really is the underpinning for this kind of extremist ideology is this more ordinary kind of acceptable in some ways bigotry continues to really be a problem in our society, but what can be done, and what have you done? I mean, we get into that whole conundrum here, especially when we think about social media and the way create silos for some of these young people to pretty much exist on their own identify with white identity and movements and all the rest of these kind of nationalistic movements, which are sort of funded on mired and bigotry. Right. Yeah. I think there's a, you know, the social media is is critical of we've got to do more to try and get a handle on that. That means, you know, exploring different types of potential regulations. I think that's that's that has to be on the table. I think the tech companies themselves need to become much more proactive in regulating themselves. Really starting to ask them difficult questions about some of the underlying issues that are promoting kind of anger and hatred on their platforms that have to do with the algorithms and the business model really that underlies these platforms in many cases. And then I think really education is critical. You know, it's it's not just social media. But it's also getting to kids at much earlier age in having them starting to think about and discuss their feelings, and their beliefs that are really for me as early as three to five years old in terms of kind of racial, and ethnic identity and preferences and. We're just waiting wait too long to intervene in a formal level in terms of our educational institutions with children to have these difficult discussions and you've seen what five year olds saluting Hitler and having cakes for birthdays and things like that those kind of activities..

Sunnyvale San Francisco Bay Donald Trump executive director Don Pelly coma San Diego Chris PTSD FBI Sarabi Representative White House America Venturi attorney
"professor sociology" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Press. Yes. So I would I would also like to clarify a little bit about our demands. Because I think they kind of work in response to what this trustee is saying, which is we're we're asking for overall transplant radical transparency, which none of this financial information was clear to members of the Hampshire community prior to January fifteenth. And if it was made in any sort of way known it was it was not to the degree at which we're being told about it. Now, I'm so everyone was kind of blindsided. I think by the fact that all of a sudden the school could not go on without without not accepting an incoming class and without. Making these changes. We also asked for shared governance, which there are two. There are were to vacate seats on the board. And we ask that to students be elected onto that board. And we also ask there's an options committee, which is a search committee for the potential strategic partner that might be coming in to help us. And we asked for two elected students to be on that on that options committee to students were appointed by Miriam Nelson. But they were not elected by the students and. And there were and we were declined to have two students added to the board of trustees that were elected and then our third overall equity was to protect programs like the James Baldwin scholarship program office of accessibility resources, the cultural center and other sort of Finnity spaces that have been prioritize and in our last meeting around our demands with Miriam Nelson have with claiming she was claiming to have met some of those demands which she had not, and she even said that the overall equity demand, those affinity based programs were important to the college, but they were not non-negotiable in the strategic. We're gonna do this discussion post posted online to contrived senior at Hampshire college member of Hampshire rise up Margaret's Rouleau. Professor sociology infamous studies at Hampshire college than there for forty years and Bill no Hampshire college trustee. I'll be speaking at in Denver at east high school on March fifteenth that's Friday night at seven o'clock. Check our website at democracy now dot org. We also have an immediate job opening fulltime junior systems administrator here in New York. Check democracy now dot org. Was produced by my Berkane, governor mcshea Carla wills Tammy were enough. I'm outcome. John Hamilton grabby. Karen, Honey Masud David Pru door tamer studio. I mean, he couldn't important him solace.

trustee Miriam Nelson Hampshire college Hampshire community Hampshire John Hamilton James Baldwin partner David Pru east high school Karen Denver New York Carla Professor Finnity Margaret Bill Tammy
"professor sociology" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Size. We're beginning to understand that weight isn't just about individual choices. How fat you are is also determined by environment as well. As genetics research suggests that for some people genes can account for as much as seventy to eighty percent of the predisposition to be overweight. But even if it was on the personal control is public shaming really the way to help people lose weight shaming people about their weight, reminding them that they're not good enough that they're that they're not socially acceptable. Because of their weight has not been shown to have any positive implications. In fact, it's been shown to have all sorts of negative implications. This is Abigail ski professor sociology at the university of California. Professor ski thinks talk about an obesity epidemic has reinforced weight based discrimination. The term obesity was coined in the middle of the twentieth century as a concerted effort by medical doctors to say, this is a medical issue over which we have authority and an expertise what we only see happening later in the nineteen nineties is this move to say, this isn't just a medical problem for individual people. This is a public health crisis because we're seeing the population rates of. Wait are skyrocketing. And so all of a sudden, this is not just your personal problem that maybe I shouldn't interfere with. But it's a collective problem and everybody should be involved. So an individual problem becomes society's problem. One in which we all have a stake and that for some people justifies being anti fat. Is he abusively argument just an excuse masking deepeset of prejudices, we tend to think at least in the western world, a fat people as personal failures as moral failures. This is Chris Crandall professor of psychology at the university of Kansas. He studies prejudice people tend to think of fatness as an indicator of laziness of overindulgence of a lack of moral fiber, an unwillingness to take a hold of your own life. We as everyday Americans and westerners in general tend to think that it's a personal attribute. It's a thing that you do to yourself. And as a result, you are deserving of scorn, and certainly not deserving of special privileges like a good job a good education. And so on. And inevitably this is gendered. Research shows that the larger.

obesity professor professor of psychology university of California university of Kansas Chris Crandall Abigail eighty percent
"professor sociology" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:54 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin Colin Kaepernick legal battle with the NFL is over the former forty Niners quarterback who's decision to take a knee during the national anthem in two thousand sixteen to draw attention to police misconduct sparked protests throughout sports as well. As a fierce backlash has signed a confidential agreement with the NFL the agreement which included former teammate Eric Reed, settles claims that team owners conspire to blacklist them for their activism, but the debate continues about the effectiveness of such a protest and the way forward to talk more about this. We've professor Harry Edwards. Professor emeritus at the university of California Berkeley, who's been one of the country's most influential thought leaders on the role of athletes in society. We called him at home in Fremont, California, professor Edwards. Thanks so much for talking with us. Thank you so much for having. I know that you've advised a Colin Kaepernick at various points throughout the way as well. As good buys a number of other athletes who've wanted to take stands on issues of concern. I know we don't know the terms. Of the deal this we don't know. But what do you think of his decision to settle? I think it's important that this be gotten off the road one. The movement itself is in decline these types of movements out the life of about six years. And if you go from twenty twelve when the Miami, Heat, and the Wade and LeBron I put on hoodies up until two thousand eighteen you can see that pattern persist. So I think one the movement itself is in steep decline to I think that it's an interest of all involved that this be resolved. So that one the league can go back doing assessment of how this situation was managed in preparation for the inevitability of other issues coming over the stadium wall in a league that by the middle of this next decade would be we'll be somewhere between eighty two and eighty five percent black. And Secondly, I think that Colin has made a heck of a contribution. And I think that he should be able to exercise. Full range of his options. It's interesting that you seem in a way to have sort of foreshadowed this because you wrote a piece last may arguing that athlete activists should move beyond protests. Why do you say that these types of movements are on the clock? The black power movement lasted for six years from nineteen sixty six to approximately nineteen seventy-two and if you're going to move beyond drama to actual substantive achievement. You have to begin early on to come up with plans to come up with perspectives that will allow you to move from protests to policies and programs on progress. If that doesn't happen then you get into a cycle of just protesting and that most certainly is not conducive to substantive change. You first of all been a consultant to the forty Niners. You I know that you know, Capra naked I wondered if you anticipated and if he was. Repaired for just how much backlash that he got and other players who wanted to support him. I mean. Some of the fans, you know, screaming at people, you know, during the games, the people burning people's jerseys. Of course, not even to mention now, President Trump and candidate trumps. Very heated conversation about this and very heated attacks on the players. I wanted to did you see all that coming? And did he see all that coming? Well, we talked about issues that will probably never it's called the protest rather than a picnic because it tends to upset people. So I'm quite certain that he was prepared for that. He knew what he was getting into in that regard. Nobody could have been dissipated Trump, but we talked about Muhammad Ali we talked about Smith and Carlos we talked about people like Bill Russell who. At one time was called Felton ex in the press because he criticized some of the racial practices of cities that the Boston Celtics late in. So he was very much aware of that. Now, it's one thing to be aware of it. And then it's another thing to actually live through it. It's a very difficult thing to deal with because it involves not just you. But everybody you associated with and they are going through this at the same time. So at the end of the day, he was aware of all of that. We discussed it and he determined that. It was an important enough issue for him to move forward. And I think that history will absolve him the NFL and the player's coalition negotiated a deal worth nearly ninety million dollars. This is money, which is supposed to be devoted toward addressing the issues that Colin Kaepernick, and and others were trying to address you've said that the devil is in the details. It's in the delivery. What do you think about the plan? I mean are there plans for this money so far do you? What do you know about what they're intending to do with it? And do you think it's going to be meaningful? Ultimately, the deliverables take place on several levels one. What did they materially produce and deliver in terms of impacting, the issues and problems and challenges that the players coalition is concerned about and Secondly is there a conversation continuing over how best to manage these circumstance. Dances that come over the stadium while they do not emerge within the context of the game or the operations of the game. But that come over the stadium all going to the demographics of the locker room. And I think that that's as an important as important a deliverable as the ninety million dollars, which to a large degree is something that has yet to materialize in total. That is professor Harry Edwards emeritus, professor sociology at the university of California Berkeley, and he was kind of to join us from his home in Fremont, California. Professor edwards. Thanks so much for talking to us. Thank you so.

Colin Kaepernick professor Edwards professor NFL university of California Berke Fremont California Michelle Martin Colin Kaeperni President Trump NPR Niners Harry Edwards Eric Reed Boston Celtics Capra Miami consultant Bill Russell Felton
"professor sociology" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

11:44 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Now democracy now dot org. The Warren peace report, I'm Amy Goodman with Ron Gonzales. We end today show with the trial of walking Chapo Guzman. Notorious Mexican drug kingpin who has been on trial in New York City for eleven weeks. Federal jury headed into deliberations yesterday after more than two hundred hours of testimony at the federal district court in Brooklyn revealed the inner workings of the Sinoloa cartel. The major drug trafficking organization run by El Chapo, fifty six. Witnesses took the stand with stories of murder violence spying widespread corruption and even one tale of the drug Lord escaping arrest in two thousand fourteen by climbing naked through a sewer alongside a former lover Chapo faces ten charges, including leading the criminal enterprise and could receive life in prison in the United States. If convicted before being extradited to the US was mon- had escaped from jail. In Mexico twice. More than a dozen of his former associates struck deals to cooperate with US. Prosecutors who say goose mom traffic, tons of cocaine heroin marijuana and meth. Methamphetamines into the United States. Over two decades. The trial has implicated the Mexican government and the cartels corruption was one witness alleging that former Mexican president got NATO accepted, a one hundred million dollar bribe from drug traffickers NATO has denied the claim the trial concludes as President Trump continues to call for a wall on the US Mexico border, which he claims will help combat drug trafficking. However, several former Sinoloa cartel members testified during the trial, they primarily smuggle drugs through the legal ports of entry and trucks cars, trains, and fishing boats. US government data also shows most of the hard narcotics seized by customs and border protection. Come at legal ports of entry not from people trying to secretly cross the southern border. Well for more. We're joined by guests. Chapeau sensational trial is obscuring the truth about the so-called war on drugs Christie Thornton is an assistant. Professor sociology and Latin American studies at Johns Hopkins University her recent article and Jacob Ben is headlined, El Chapo, and the narcos spectacle. And its she writes Chapas trial is quote, a last gasp effort to salvage the reputation of failing war that's cost hundreds of thousands of lives. Professor thornton. We'll come back to democracy. Now talk about the revelations in the trial, and how you feel they've been misrepresented or distorted by the media. Well, I think it's a really interesting question in the early parts of the trial. We saw a situation in which both the prosecution that is the US government and the judge really worked hard to try and keep evidence of the US government's complicity with the Sinoloa cartel and its activities out of the courtroom over the course of the trial itself. Many of the documents that reveal some of those communications between for instance, the DA and the lawyers for El Chapo, and the Sinoloa organization have come out have been unsealed. And that's largely thanks to the really. Diligent work of journalists such as those from the vice news and from the New York Times who've worked really hard to get that information out from under seal. But one of the important things is that it was made very clear to the jurors who now are entering their second day of deliberation that as the prosecution put it the US government is not on trial. The Mexican government is not on trial. They are there to decide the guilt of El Chapo. And so these questions about the complicity of US government actors the complicity of Mexican government actors, those are sort of off the table. And that is I think a much broader question than the one that's being considered by the jury right now as we speak in that courtroom, and in Brooklyn Christie Thornton, what are some of those revelations in terms of the complicity of the United States with with the cartel. Yeah. There things that will not be a surprise to people who have been Mexico watchers their things that have been revealed in the Mexican media, particularly by the investigative journalists Annabel Hernandez for some time. We know for inst-. Lawyers for the organization met with the DA over a period of more than a decade. And agreed to give information about rival traffickers. The question that arises is whether those agreements to provide information on rival organizations also included promises of immunity from prosecution and one of the main cooperating witnesses of the Zomba family who is the son of the partner of and chapeau the son of L, Maya samba testified and he was under the impression when he was finally arrested that he'd been given immunity from the DA the courts and the DA denied this. They said that that had never been the case. But in the course of making that argument it was entered into the court record. These documents that show that Sinoloa lawyers were meeting with the DA for more than a decade from at least two thousand five twenty fifteen and so in that way. US officials have been very much aware of the trafficking activities. Now there have. Mexican investigations published that allege essentially that the allowed Sinoloa to continue its activities as long as it was providing information on rival kinds of drug trafficking organizations that is that remains unclear but those allegations were out there and were stricken from the record that the jury will see and so that won't be part of the case against the chapel. But it's definitely part of the context here. And that's in addition, of course, to the vast collaboration with aspects of the Mexican state the federal security forces local security forces and this allegation and all the way up to the presidency itself. And those allegations if true would not be the first time because decades ago when the drug war was focused on Columbia. They were all Gatien's back, then that US government officials cooperated more with the Cali cartel as long as they were able to go after the Medellin cartel and Pablo Escobar, so there's always sort of been a seems a history of US drug enforcement agencies seeking to play one cartel off against another in this so-called war on drugs. Yeah. I think that's really important. And the reason that that's the case is because the prosecution strategy in a case like this is to prove a conspiracy. So they are trying to prove a conspiracy to traffic drugs to commit murder all of the various charges and in order to prove that can conspiracy. They have to build a case about the structure of these cartels to come up with the story about the structure of these cartels that they are verdict. Integrated that there is a kingpin at the top the idea that they take out the kingpin, they will decapitate the organization and therefore make it no longer function that whole story comes from that prosecutorial strategy. And so we see the intelligence gathering right aligned to that strategy. And that tells a particular kind of story about drug trafficking about how drugs are moved into the United States that I think actually completely obscures what modern day drug trafficking. Looks like we're not talking about the kind of vertically integrated family Al Capone structures that we get from mafia stories anymore. We haven't said these very flexible ad hoc networks that are able to come together and come apart based on market opportunities and threats, and so we really see a kind of Neo liberal just-in-time organization of these drug trafficking organizations that just doesn't comport with this prosecutorial strategy that revolves around the kingpin and the conspiracy. So in order to prove the case, they have to continue to tell an outdated story about how drugs. Trafficking works and in order to make that case they have to do this kind of intelligence gathering that gives them a story that they need in order to get a conviction. According to one of the witnesses who testified at El Chapo trial. Former Mexican president Rick opinion, yet accepted one hundred million dollar bribe from drug traffickers, the allegation coming from former associated El Chapo, the Colombian drug Lord Alex appointees via has not responded to claim, but has previously denied charges of corruption. What's your response to this? Well, you know, it's hard to know if this bribe actually happened there have been allegations that Mexican presidents have been on the payroll of this drug trafficking organization for decades now when El Chapo escaped from federal prison, supposedly being wheeled out in a laundry cart, the investigative journalists. Annabel Hernandez says that the former president under the pond Vicente Fox he knew about this. He authorized this this release. So allegations. Against going all the way up to the Mexican president are something that have been a part of the drug war since it really began. And so that in itself is not especially surprising. The question is what it says about the structure of the cartel. The defense for El Chapo has tried to make the case that it was not as Chapo who gave this bribe. But because if he did that then obviously it didn't work he was captured and extradited, but instead El Chapo is partner at Maya samba who is still at large who has never been imprisoned. And that is noteworthy according to the defense of El Chapo, if this one hundred million dollar bribe to the Mexican president did indeed happen. It's noteworthy that the other partner in this drug trafficking organization is still at large is still theoretically in charge of the organization and still trafficking drugs. And what do you make of the fact that the chapel's attorneys mounted virtually no defense other than the cross examining the prosecution witnesses. It was a record short defense portion of this trial. Yeah, it was a very lopsided defense portion of the trial after you said after about three months of the prosecution laying out their case, we got basically a day of testimony in the defense with the case that the defense is really trying to make is that as Chapo is not sort of the singular kingpin of the cinema cartel that he is one in a group of people who have led this drug trafficking organization, and that in fact, he has been set up by his partner mile samba to sort of take the fall, and so in the closing arguments, we saw and chapel was lawyer make this argument again, and again almost to the point of reproach from the judge because this case also relies on he very much intimated things about the cooperation between the Mexican government, the US government, and the Sinoloa organization that rely on the fact that L Myo is still out there at large. And so that has very much been the strategy of the chapel is defense to just say. He's not the only kingpin. He's not the only guy there at the top you shouldn't let him take the fall for this broader sort of structural set of circumstances that involve both governments and other traffickers instant Aloha during the trial. The jury her testimony blaming El Chapo sons for the murder of the Mexican journalists. Heavier Valdez who died in may of two thousand seventeen after who is dragged out of his car and shot twelve times less than a block from the office of the newspaper. He co founded in the Mexican state of Sinoloa a former Lieutenant in the Loa drug cartel, testified at El Chapo trial. That does was murdered after he ignored death threats by Chapa sons against publishing an interview in March of two thousand seventeen after one of his colleagues was assassinated have evolved as said, quote, let them kill us. All if that's the death sentence for reporting, this l this hell, no to silence all days would be assassinated, just two months later. Chris is among he's among this whole group of journalists who have lost their lives in Mexico..

El Chapo United States Mexican government Chapo Guzman US government president DA Mexico murder Sinoloa Brooklyn partner Annabel Hernandez Chapas New York City Amy Goodman Professor thornton
"professor sociology" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"There's there's a lot of speculation and people wondering if this is sustainable by who not gonna drive this right off the cliff. And so, you know, I'm sure that I'm sure that there is there's some discontent, and, you know, support even though he has given over the military many goodies. Yeah. Maneuver support is is not a slam dunk in harassing very much. A question that we're just enclosing the intelligence service being rested one way to recently. And then they let him go. And it seems like he may sounds like a talked his way out of it. He's very young. But he's apparently quite charismatic and very popular. What's your sense of where the Madurai painting him as a child? But do you think he's a real threat to Madeira? Absolutely. I mean, I think actually having someone his age of a different generation is is long overdue and the opposition. I think I think they had done this a couple years ago and can had somebody as president of the national assembly who was from this more recent generation of politicians of things would have gone better for them. But the thing is they have these older faces that have always doing things, and that's what's made them much less effective. Could have been so. Yeah, I mean, I think he's not a season politician. But he brings something new he certainly captured attention of people he has he has he has a summer tour abilities. And so I I absolutely think that he he is a real threat to a mature government. I think there's that. I also think that within government through there. There's some real issues. I think you mentioned arrested by the sort of short one hour rest. I think that was a clear indication that their divisions within the government. No more higher lighters wanted to arrest. Why no ten days ago? And I think that started to roll and some of the more moderate people on the inside said, wait a minute. Now, we can't do this. Let's let this movement go and burn out. And so they released him go. I think it's a clear clear indication of divisions within the government. And I think even today, you know, you look at through speeches in their rhetoric, and they're not quite sure what to do. They're not announcing clearly what they're gonna do. And and I think they're not sure how to approach this this this sort of. The situation that they've never confronted before. Well, Davis, Molly. I thank you very much for joining us here today. Okay. Thank you. And again, I be speaking with David smile D. Who's a senior fellow at the Washington office of Latin America, specializing in Venezuela and a professor sociology at Tulane university. Professor smallest research Venezuela for the past twenty five years and lived there for total of fifteen years during which time he told the university developed and the Universidad Catolica under a spell. He moderates the blog Venezuelan, politics and human rights and has an article at the conversation Venezuelans reject Madero presidency, but most would oppose foreign military operation to oust him. We're gonna take a break. We're back looking into the tit for tat between. That's your Pelosi end on Trump over where he delivered his state of the union now that it appears Trump is looking for alternative venues..

Venezuela Davis Trump Professor smallest research Ve Madurai Tulane university Universidad Catolica David smile D. Who president Latin America Washington Pelosi Madero senior fellow professor Molly twenty five years fifteen years one hour
"professor sociology" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"professor sociology" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Some. Level of kind of patriotic rejection of this wrecking crew. Well, I think there is. No, I think there is especially the lower down, you know. And if you think of the different military rebellions occurred on the past couple of years, basically at lower levels, no of sergeants and. And. You know, lower level soldiers that that uprising the uprising on Monday was basically lower level soldiers. And and of course, they have very little chance of succeeding in doing anything. But these are the people that themselves suffer and their families suffer. I think when you get up to the higher level some of the officers. I mean, I think some of these are the best times in their making huge comes and are doing really, well, we could probably support their extended family and so. You know, it's not uncommon to go into restaurants and cut Akerson and see a big long table, you know, with with three or four military officers and all kinds of family there again, they're wining and dining and so. You know, I think clearly as we saw has been spiracy last year among some military officials in it. And I do think there's some discontent. I think more than anything else. There's there's a lot of speculation and can people wondering if this is sustainable by Lewis not going to drive this right off the cliff. And so, you know, I'm sure that I'm sure that there's there's some discontent. You know, my daughter support, even though he has given over the military many goodies. Maneuver support is is not a slam dunk. And I think there's very much a question that we're just in closing the intelligence service Sabine rested one way to recently. And then they let him go. And it seems like he may sounds like he talked his way out of it is very young. But he's apparently quite charismatic and very popular. What's your sense of where the Madurai painting him as a child? But do you think he's a real threat to Madeira? Absolutely. I mean, I think actually having someone his age of a different generation is is long overdue and the opposition. I think I think they have done this a couple of years ago and had somebody as president of the national assembly who was from this more recent generation of politicians of things would have gone better for that. No. But the thing is they have these older faces that have always doing things, and that's what's made them much less. Effective, and they could've been so. Yeah. I mean, I think he's not a season politician. But he brings something new he certainly captured attention of people he has he has he has a summer tour abilities. And so I I absolutely think that he he is real threat to. Government. I think there's that. I also think that within government through there are some real issues. I think you mentioned the rest of this sort of short one hour arrest. I think that was a clear indication that their divisions within the government. No more hardliners wanted to arrest. Why no ten days ago? And I think that started to roll and some of the more moderate people on the inside said, wait a minute. Now, we can't do this. Let's let this movement going burnt out into they released him go. I think it's a clear clear indication of divisions within the government. And I think even today, you know, you look at through speeches in their rhetoric, and they're not quite sure what to do. They're not announcing clearly what they're gonna do. And and I think they're not sure out approach this this this sort of the situation they've never confronted before. Well davis. I thank you very much for joining us here today. Okay. Thank you. And again, I be speaking with David smile D. Who's a senior fellow at the Washington office of Latin America, specializing in Venezuela and a professor sociology at Tulane university. Professor smallest research Venezuela for the past twenty five years and lived there for title of fifteen years during which time he told the university and the university under spell, oh, he moderates, the blog Venezuelan, politics and human rights and has an article at the conversation Venezuelans reject Maduro presidency, but most would oppose foreign military operation to oust him stace break. We're back looking into the tit for tat between Nancy Pelosi end on Trump over where he delivered his state of the union now that did appears Trump is looking for alternative venues..

Venezuela Tulane university Trump Professor smallest research Ve Madurai Akerson Sabine Nancy Pelosi Lewis David smile D. Who davis president Washington Latin America senior fellow Maduro professor twenty five years fifteen years