17 Burst results for "Professor Of Psychiatry"

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"Reductions and Depression and anxiety from a single high-dose experience and similar to that where earlier stage research for doing some pilot work right now with breath depression outside of cancer and then there's this line of smoking cessation research this is picking up on the older research using LSD and addiction that was largely in treatment of alcoholism but there was also a study with heroin addiction. That looked promising. And if you look you need digits cultures. There's all kinds of case reports of addiction recovery. So there seems to be this this kind of suggestion that these compounds have brought. AC applicability not not specific to one form of drug addiction or another so given that we decided to look at cigarette smoking which is something that I had had experience researching searching tobacco and nicotine. So we've had some some really good initial success there in an open label pilot study very high success. Rates Biologically confirmed eighty percent in our small sample confirmed abstinent at six months about sixty percent two and a half years after their target date so we followed that up with a randomized Trial comparing it to nicotine patch and that we've got a few other studies around the edges but and have done survey work looking at potentially positive and negative effects out there in the population when people use these things in the wild so to speak but that that's kind of a quick trip around the world. I think that what has captured. The imagination of a lot of people is the concept except that when people are diagnosed with cancer. It's really scary. And they often have a lot of fear a lot of anxiety exciting and sometimes some pretty severe depression. Can you summarize very briefly. what some of that research has revealed so so as I said substantial reductions in depression and anxiety have been observed from a single high dose. The other major finding is that consistent consistent with multiple lines of evidence from our laboratory those long term clinical improvements were not just predicted it by getting the suicide and does nor were they Simply predicted by having a strong drug effect they were more specifically related to having had this mystical type experience unfold after the session. So that's that's sort of highlights this idea that what we're really looking at. Is a medication facilitated therapeutic process. It's not just about some simple interaction at a receptor level. Even though clearly pharmacology is involved in instigating this experience it is very the improvements are very much related to what that experience is not just having suicide and you're listening to Dr Matthew Johnson Associate Professor Psychiatry and associate the Director of the Center for Psychedelic and consciousness research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr Johnson referred to the research experience. I went through in in nineteen sixty eight in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine at the New Jersey neuropsychiatric institute.

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"The trump lawyers are coming back and <hes> and trying to use the fact that there was some delay here as a reason to not have the court move properly to provide these documents my concern as you know has been that under the procedure indeed under what the committee has outlined we will never see these returns this year because mr trump will exhaust lost every possible appeal and i hope that they can be obtained before the end of this congress the cars move for you. Go i want to talk about the situation on impeachment now in the house and this is very very interesting. Turn this week where three members three members have come out this week so far and it's only wednesday using the impeachment proceedings and all relying in one case entirely and the others mostly on volume one of the report and that seems like a change in focus in the house representatives well. I'm encouraged that we now have a true majority of our caucus plus a courageous justin amish out what they're saying that we need an impeachment inquiry and i think from everything chairman nadler has said that inquiry is currently underway. It does need to explore article one just because <hes> bob muller didn't find that there was a basis for a criminal conspiracy. There doesn't mean that the trump administration didn't act in unpatriotic unpatriotic way a way that may constitute high crimes and misdemeanors and welcoming in practically begging for all the russian interference that he could get in order secure that white house carbon lloyd doggett. Thank you very much again tonight. Always appreciate it. Thank you thank you and when we come back any honest conversation conversation about the president's performance this week should include a psychiatrist. That's next. The president is a raving lunatic. He is not well. Those are not my words. Those the words of andrew gillum informed democratic mayor of tallahassee who came in second last year's race for governor in florida he was echoing. What has become mainstream thinking now about the mental health of the president of the united states during a week in which the president has said he is the king of the jews the second coming of god the chosen one one is the same week in which even though he sees himself as a king god's chosen one denmark somehow found the strength to defy him and refused to sell greenland to the united states and so the president the king the god says he canceled the trip to denmark even though he probably canceled the trip to denmark because he knows president obama is scheduled to go to denmark a few weeks after what would have been the trump trip in president obama would surely get a much more positive reception from a much much bigger crowd than donald trump could have mustard in denmark. All of that sounds pretty crazy to sober. Careful politicians like andrew gillum <hes> who have never before called a political opponent a raving lunatic well. We told you so one month into the trump. Presidency we had our first discussion of the presence mental health on this program with psychologist. John gartner and former professor psychiatry at harvard medical school lance dot us us. If we could construct a psychiatric frankenstein monster we could not create a leader more dangerously mentally ill than donald donald trump. He's a paranoid psychopathic narcissist who was divorced from reality and lashes out impulsively at his imagined enemies he lies because of who sociopathic tendencies that gartner was talking about that he lies in the way anybody who's scams people that does he's trying to sell an idea or a product by telling you something that's untrue. There's that lying. There's also the kind of lying he has that is way more serious that he has a loose grip on reality. If he who is a paranoid schizophrenic and he was wearing tin foil hat then he wouldn't be elected president but he's just sane enough as it were to pass but actually detached from reality doctor dodo said so that what is real is fluid. It's totally <hes> <hes> now available..

donald donald trump president trump andrew gillum denmark nadler lloyd doggett bob muller obama justin amish John gartner tallahassee chairman united states florida professor greenland one month
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Companies expect every employee to behave professionally in the workplace, but that doesn't always happen lack of professionalism by worker can cause a wide range of issues. Not only to the bottom line, performance of the employees, but also to his or her co workers, and to the business, he can be particularly disrupting in the healthcare field. That's why impart the Perelman school at medicine here at the university of Pennsylvania started a professionalism, campaign designed to address the problems that occur in, in the high stress world of medical care joining us here in studio. Dr Jodie Foster, who's a clinical professor psychiatry and chair of the department of psychiatry at the university of Pennsylvania hospital. She serves also as vice chair for clinical operations in the department of psychiatry and is executive clinical director of the professionalism, campaign here at Penn medicine. Great to see. Again, thanks for coming in so much for having thank you. It is been two years since we talked to you as you were. One of the co-authors on, on your fantastic book, that, that we talked about about the office muck that would be around and this place off of that a little bit because this is this is a significant concern in so many fields. You look at it in the medical field, but across business as a whole you find these people that, that, that are very disruptive within their particular their particular landscape. Right. I, I look at it actually in all fields because this is an absolutely ubiquitous issue, and it's become much more of the cultural conversation these days. So what was the tell us about the campaign and what was really the driver behind it? So as I mentioned, you know, the culture's changing, and you really can't read an article or or, or hear the news without hearing something about somebody's behavior in some way lately. And so it's the, the national threshold and medicine. Another settings just the cultural threshold for tolerance of incivility. And lapses and professionalism is really just dropped. And our dean, Larry Jameson was, I believe reviewing some of the comments from our medical students about their experiences on some of the clinical rotations. And in reading some of the comments it really, I think drove home for him that professionalism is an issue, right here at home and that we need to really address it in, in a structured way. So when did this all started and how, how is it playing out right now? So the announcement of the campaign came back in may. And as part of the campaign, there was a decision to have an assistant dean for professionalism. And, and I was happily chosen to take on that role. And we've been doing number of things to just try to lay the foundation and the structural scaffolding to, to build a professionalism structure that will over time, change our culture. One of those things is, you know, basically value statement. What is what is? Professionalism. Penn medicine, what is our code of conduct. You know, and I think code of conduct can be a little funny because obviously, when you're about to act out in some way, if you're going to do something terrible, you don't say, hey, let me check the code of conduct conduct you this thing. You don't. You don't do that at the same time having it sort of lays out what, what you believe in what your value system is, and this becomes important in pretty much every aspect of work eve, particularly, you're bringing someone into an organization, the clearer, you are when you're interviewing somebody about what your culture and what your value system is the more able, you're going to be to convey, that, you know, those essentially rules of engagement of what does it mean to be here, and in so doing your go to able to convey to the people who are interviewing for jobs at your organization that, oh, this is a place that, that mel's with who I am or does not, and it helps people make better decisions about fitting themselves inappropriate cultures and that alone can bypass. A number of the conflicts that come up in the workplace. So is it at that point, the HR point that, that this really starts for the entire company, I would say that, that this cultural misfits are a big reason for conflicts that occur in the workplace. And that's just one part of our campaign for professionalism. But it's, it's a super important part, it's so important that we are in the process of developing something that we're calling a success profile where we've collected like the five or six top lapses or breaches of professionalism, that occur, and we're taking them because they, you know, these are stories that are over and over and over again, and we're turning it on its side and saying, okay, well, if this is what behavior that we don't support looks like what is behavior that we want to encourage glacier, and we're creating us success profile template based upon that so that when we're thinking about promoting someone thinking about giving war to somebody we can say, you know the, the. This person really does and body or exemplify these, these qualities because again, and we discussed this when we were talking about the book last time, I was on the show, certainly my belief. And I think an appropriate belief is that, you know, people are not inherently malicious people don't set out to be disruptive. People are people and we all have traits. We all have characteristics and we bring those characteristics around with us all the time and moment work, whatever. And if we have inadvertently found ourselves in a culture where the way that we navigate the world doesn't work, we are gonna have conflicts and so again. Yeah, the front door is a really important place where picking up some of these things becomes very important. But then you think about some of the other components that many companies try to, to put in place these days like you see so many companies now with personal wellness programs to try and improve the physical side of the employees, but to degree. I think there's also the element of improving the mental side as well. Well, I mean, I think improving impr-. Proven wellness by design will improve the, the mental side. I mean work is inherently stressful depending on what you're doing. I mean, it's, it's the very lucky person whose work is just, you know, nothing but joy and relaxation all day long. So, you know, even even just the the, the statement made by paying attention to wellness by paying attention to incivility by paying attention to the things that, that drag a person down at the workplace, it's so important because it is, these little itty bitty things that taken together make up the work day. And the work, you know, collections of workdays, make up a work life. And, and this has to do with our feelings about a job, but the understanding of many of these components around professionalism vis as we mentioned obviously is important when you're talking about the HR process, but it goes all the way up the corporate ladder, all the way all the way to the sweet, and obviously with some of the new stories that we've seen in the last decade or so for the recession. On. We understand that at times, the professionalism, even of the cease wheat is not where it needs to. And that's exactly right. And that's why it's so important for there to be a bought into code the an ethical, code and accountable social contract, that this is how we behave here, and, yeah, if the if the CEO or someone in the suite is not behaving that way, and they are continued to be propagated amidst, you know, statements to the contrary. Well, that's going to undermine the entire it's going to undermine the entire process. It's like having zero tolerance policy for behavior. And then when somebody breaches it saying, oh, okay. Just this once it just doesn't work, right? We're joined in studio by Dr Jodie Foster. The Perelman school of medicine here at the university of Pennsylvania. Your comments are welcome at eight four four Wharton. Eight four four nine four two seven eight six six or if you'd like send us a comment on Twitter at biz radio one thirty two or my Twitter account, which is at damn Loney. Twenty-one there. Also the components of because. Because of the fact that so many businesses want to see teams doing projects there is the, the issue of teamwork and trust that, obviously plays into this, this need for professionalism, as well. Right. And we're teamwork comes in is that we have to create what, what we call psychologically safe cultures where if something's occurring in the team or with a co-worker wherever it is that is upsetting disruptive difficult. Whatever it is. We have to create environments where it's safe to simply say, you know, I don't like that, or that doesn't work for me or I don't like what you just did. Because all of the noise that occurs around incivility and, and professionalism, a lot of it has to do with the fact that we simply don't directly, intervene with one another, in the moment, when these things come up. So if you have a team where there's sort of this, a sore thumb, who's really disrupting various aspects of the flow of the team, and nobody feels safe enough or able to give feedback or to intervene, or to. You know make structural changes around it. You're gonna have a problem. It's going to bring the whole team down. How let's take this into the realm of of your world into medicine. And how prevalent are some of these issues within the scope of a hospital and, and kind of the medical industry as well. So the, the issues are ubiquitous, and I would say are as ubiquitous in the medical industry as everywhere else. Okay. The thing about the medical industries that the stakes are higher because if there is behavior that, that the terminology, we use undermines a culture of safety. Then people on edge were taking care of other people are more apt to make mistakes. And then it becomes dangerous. And that's why it's such a big issue in healthcare. So how, how do how do hospitals have to I mean, I would imagine a lot of the components that you, you want to approach are similar in the hospital setting than they would be in any other business completely. And, and, you know, I I always joked about the book that. When it was time to decide what to call the book, we called it the schmuck in my office. But it could just as easily have been the schmuck in my doctor's office. Schmuck in the schmuck in my bedroom. This schmuck and my doctor's office in my church. Whatever it is. It doesn't matter where but, but these, these situations are, are everywhere. The expectation is that as, as smoothly as an operation may run that you're going to come across at some point somebody that is just stirring, the pot that is that disruptor and is not going to in many cases. Follow the normal path. Right. And that and an interesting data point on that is, is that person who is being perceived as a disruptor it, so many, the cases, does not even have awareness that he or she is a disruptor. And the data shows that in about eighty percent of cases, if you simply confront somebody with their behavior, they will say, oh, I didn't know and they'll stop. And so what we do is we don't intervene, because it's uncomfortable. Let the things spiral, which is an implicit statement to the bad actor that the behavior is fine. And that's how these things grow like viruses, and somebody will probably if they have switched jobs and they were the bad actor in one job. They will probably carry a lot of those traits over to the new job, even if they don't fit in with the culture correct, correct?.

Dr Jodie Foster Penn medicine university of Pennsylvania Twitter university of Pennsylvania hos Perelman school vice chair Perelman school of medicine clinical professor department of psychiatry assistant dean Larry Jameson Wharton mel clinical director executive CEO
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Walking the Shadowlands

Walking the Shadowlands

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Walking the Shadowlands

"Tank. Helping you knew. Been kind of Asian who simply your imagination must reincarnation past life pursuit can agree that there are some fake to sit really suggest cases of reincarnation some of these when children or doubts naturally instantaneousl- without hypnosis, prompting of any sort Klein term but past lives some memories, a so clear, and vivid that they are able to remember who they were with left and people in Austin that belong to them very often. These people will also have the same interests desire or emotions of the pace in that past life. These memories can be full will simply snippets and often the emotions attached to that life OSA felt by the season. Some say that pass laws can exist through hypnosis Pistilli of really mixed feelings about using hypnosis Charlie's past life memories. Feel it needs to be used very carefully. And with someone who is really well trained in this field. So that the natural bodice of the hypnotist doesn't influence the pace in being hypnotized. Hell we it can be very useful to get three to five years. People may be suffering in the slot. And sometimes actually the physical sawn set a from pass loss such as Mott's on the body. We facial wounds occurred. The two theories that some research as Mata Graham which could explain this phenomena. The Pfister said themes, the feary fit reincarnation doesn't exist. But that people have tined information pass laws, but extrasensory methods such as slip Z who Cleveland's the sicken Siri is that the poss lasette children others claim Tremaine, but arms true. And that they are experiencing this memory stories of freeing, kinda Asian not limited. Geographically, coach relly they occur in corners of the planet, and among people of coaches as these previous stories of Noni Lieven reincarnation such east, but is any scientific evidence that can Beck up the claims of reincarnation. Similarly, there are many scientists that have done extensive research on the subject of the try and disprove to try proof reincarnation possibly in most recent tons one of the most respected researches was Dr Ian, state and son his little background on doctor Stephenson. Dr Stevenson was a Canadian born you is soccer trust. He would for the unified of Julia school of medicine full fifty years as the chief of the department of psychiatry from nineteen fifty seven to nineteen sixty on Kelsen, professor of psychiatry from nineteen sixty seven two thousand one and research. Professor psychiatry from two thousand two until his death in two business..

Dr Stevenson professor of psychiatry Klein Mata Graham Professor Austin Beck Pfister Mott Julia school of medicine Dr Ian soccer Cleveland Pistilli Tremaine Charlie doctor Stephenson Kelsen fifty years five years
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"To society. And I would argue even to themselves Jesse. It's a big topic. Thanks a lot for the call. So is the thought provoking the things you bring up? It's twenty two minutes past the hour. We'll be back. How do we fight misogyny in our culture is it is it possible? Is this a generational thing? Our millennials less misogynistic for less bias, shall we say a little less inflammatory word than than previous generations. when we when we look at this situation when we look at this this fundamental reality. Getting back to the old the old quote from from my friend, the Harvard psychology, professor psychiatry professor that testosterone is the most dangerous drug in the world. This this this idea misogyny is technically literally the hatred of women. And I think that that's kind of the extreme end. Just like, you know, overt racism is the extreme end of of hate based on race. But in the middle of the area, which is the largest area, there's simply gender bias just like there's racial bias. And this is like, you know, real stuff. I think if you there's a remarkable study that was published fact, I've got the. Got the story on it on. It's over there. Anyhow, these researchers. Had they put together an experiment where I it was testing, for empathy in rats. And they had white rats and black rats lab rats. But some were pure white somewhere pure black, and they took a white rat and put him near a body of water as I recall, you know, in lab and put a another white rat in the water. So that he was in distress. He needed some help and the white rat. Who was okay would help out his buddy. The other white rat. But when they put a black rat in the water drowning the white rat didn't help. So then they flip that around and did the same thing with the black rat. And basically what they found was that the black and white rats wouldn't save the other kind of rat. Period. Now, these were white rats and black rats that have been raised with their own kind, essentially. So then they then they bred some white rats black rats and at birth through them all together in the same litter. So they literally grew up with each other, the white rats and black rats, and they ran the experiment again. And now all that racial bias as it were all that color bias. I, you know. MS you can call it a race of rats vanished. And the black rats were saving black rats, and they were saving white rats in the white rats receiving white rats, black rats and everybody was saving everybody and everybody just realized we're all just rats here. This makes you know at the level of race. It makes a strong case for things like. Integration in the United States and explains how people who grew up in a segregated culture can carry racial bias to the point of it becoming racial animus, but I think that this lesson also teaches us about the, you know, the relative roles of men and women the more as a society, we segregate women, and we did this for years and years and years. I mean, I, you know, I remember the nineteen seventies running my first business and putting in, you know, looking at the help wanted ads in the paper, and there were two sections help wanted men help wanted women if you wanted a secretary you put it in the help water and women if you wanted a factory worker, you put it in health wanted men. I mean, there were these clear segregations of roles. Legally. I mean, just routinely part of our culture. And I suspect that as we go forward, and we see more and more women in roles of leadership. There will be there will be backlash. But I think it's going to start eroding that that misogyny or that that.

testosterone professor Jesse United States secretary twenty two minutes
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Reading today from Justin Frank, Dr Justin Franks, book, Trump on the couch inside the mind of the president. He's the guy wrote Bush on the couch and Obama on the couch. As a psychiatrist professor psychiatry in Georgetown in Washington DC, and in the book just came up. This is from the introduction. There's no question that Trump is mentally unfit in ways that make him unsought psychologically unsuited for the presidency. That in itself is a truly alarming term of a turn of events. And I'd write the entire book in all caps. If I thought that would better convey the sense of urgency with which it is written and should be read any number of troubling, mental illness diagnoses and character evaluations can be in have been accurately applied to Trump. Both can vary from analysts analysts, however without necessarily sacrificing any of the accuracy more to the point the true value of a diagnosis is to determine an appropriate course of treatment. And there's no indication that any sort of treatment is a viable option. Trump in the couch then seeks now simply to make the case that Trump is not well, but rather to show how he is unwell in ways that would have been a particular interest to the applied psychoanalysts who. Whose investigation likely preceded our own the Russians, and perhaps even their American allies your counterparts who in the long tradition of intelligence gathering examined. Trump's psyche and found an opportunity for exploitation Trump's presidency caps a lifetime of dysfunction and disorder. That is not likely to be healed. While he is an office just as Trump's ascendancy among voters gives expression to longstanding trends and the American electorate psyche that are not going to be easily addressed, however, if we can identify certain aspects of these disorders and trends that may have contributed to Trump and his voters fusing into a shared belief system. And we have a better chance of fostering, the kind of honest, cultural discussion that will be necessary in order to contain and repair the damage that has already been done. Understanding Trump calls for a consideration of a psycho dynamics almost certainly more rigorous than he has ever embarked upon on his own Trump dismissed psychotherapy as a crutch in two thousand four play. Interview years later talking about argue for Michael DEA Tonio Antonio he described in greater detail, a generalized aversion to introspection beyond the therapeutic setting, quote, I don't like to analyze myself because I might not like what I see he told Diene Tonio, I don't like to analyze myself. I don't like to think too much about the past and of quote, even armed or the detailed family history. We can't capture Trump in action with only the tools of applied psychoanalysis like some of the most disturbed patients. I've worked with Trump is so a Radic constantly changing. The topic elevating the stakes and raising the volume the one doesn't know what to expect from him next. It's hard to imagine him in treatment. Even as the subject of a supply of applied psychoanalytical investigation. He behaves like a patient who is simultaneously banging consulting room window rattling on this door ringing, the phone and texting and tweeting his demands for attention Trump presents so many troubling affects that it's hard to remember them. All. In the final weeks of the first year of Trump's presidency, Michael Wolfe and David Johnston published accounts of the Trump white White House that present a president with a startling number of disturbing characteristics. Any one of these demonstrable and suspected traits would raise calls for a psychoanalytic investigation. If it was done on a layperson in a president and aggregate, they are truly caused for Larmer. The list of worrisome of worrisome evident and alleged attributes that emerge in these and other portraits is long narcissist liar. Racist, sexist adulterer baby hypocrite, Chesler tax, cheat, outlaw psychopath, paranoid fraud, ignorant. Vengeful delusional arrogant, greedy, contemptuous, unsympathetic learning disabled, cruel, obstruction of Justice, the right to the constitution traitor. The list is so long that it can be overwhelming. It's a challenge to remember the beginning by the time you make it to the end. There are times when I wish someone would help us. Remember all the troubling aspects of Trump's character and behavior past and present in a way that would encourage recognition of the totality of his path rather than its component parts which individually. Ause alarm before being temporarily forgotten when the next emergency presents itself. As an applied Psychoanalyst's. My task is not only to appreciate the full list. But also to ignore the big picture and focus on a single pathology at a time. Practitioners of applied psychoanalysis approach subject as both theoretician and clinician the theater theoretician endeavors to piece things together to figure things out while the clinician tries to approach each session capable of being surprised as if his mind were a blank slate. The analysis in the following pages aspires to accomplish both goals reviewing Trump's record with the clinicians. I preparing to be surprised by the unexpected observation and assembling these findings into a more comprehensive portrait the image of hypothetical patient. Trump rattling. Excuse me rattling the consulting room door. Banging on the window reminds us that President Trump doesn't want us to see the entire list at once not only that but patients I treated who are reminiscent of Trump cannot tolerate being inside the consulting room either. They leave my office whenever they feel unable to think through an anxiety provoking, inter inter predation, much the way.

Trump Trump white White House president Justin Frank Obama Michael DEA Tonio Antonio Bush professor Diene Tonio Washington Georgetown Dr Justin Franks fraud Larmer Michael Wolfe David Johnston
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Reading today from Justin Frank, Dr Justin Franks, book, Trump on the couch inside the mind of the president. He's the guy wrote Bush on the couch and Obama on the couch. A psychiatrist and professor psychiatry Georgetown in Washington DC. And in the book just came up. This is from the introduction. There's no question that Trump is mentally unfit in ways that make him unsought psychologically unsuited for the presidency. That in itself is a truly alarming term of a turn of events. And I'd write the entire book in all caps. If I thought that would better convey the sense of urgency with which it is written and should be read any number of troubling, mental illness diagnoses and character evaluations can be in have been accurately applied to Trump. Both can vary from analyst to analyst however, without necessarily sacrificing any of the accuracy more to the point the true value of a diagnosis is to determine an appropriate course of treatment. And there's no indication that any sort of treatment is a viable option. Trump in the couch, then seeks not simply to make the case that Trump is not well, but rather to show how he is unwell in ways that would have been a particular interest to the applied psychoanalysts who's. Investigation likely Bruce preceded our own the Russians, and perhaps even their American allies are counterparts who in the long tradition of intelligence gathering examined. Trump's psyche and found an opportunity for exploitation Trump's presidency caps a lifetime of dysfunction and disorder. That is not likely to be healed. While he is an office just as Trump's ascendancy among voters gives expression to long trends, and the American electorate psyche that are not going to be easily addressed, however, if we can identify certain aspects of these disorders and trends that may have contributed to Trump and his voters fusing into a shared belief system. And we have a better chance of fostering, the kind of honest, cultural discussion that will be necessary in order to contain and repair the damage that has already been done. Understanding Trump calls for a consideration of a psycho dynamics almost certainly more rigorous than he has ever embarked upon on his own Trump dismissed psychotherapy as a crutch in two thousand and four play. Interview years later talking to biographer Michael DEA Tonio Antonio he described in greater detail, a generalized aversion to introspection beyond the therapeutic setting, quote, I don't like to analyze myself because I might not like what I see he told Diene Tonio, I don't like to analyze myself. I don't like to think too much about the past and of quote, even armed or the detailed family history. We can't capture Trump in action with only the tools of applied psychoanalysis like some of the most disturbed patients. I've worked with Trump is so a Radic constantly changing. The topic elevating the stakes and raising the volume the one doesn't know what to expect from him next. It's hard to imagine him in treatment. Even as the subject of a supply of applied psychoanalytical investigation it behaves like a patient who is simultaneously banging consulting room window rattling on his door ringing the phone and texting or tweeting his demands for attention Trump presents so many troubling affects that it's hard to remember them. All. In the final weeks of the first year of Trump's presidency. Michael wolfe? David Kay, Johnston. Published accounts of the Trump White House that present a president with a startling number of disturbing characteristics. Any one of these demonstrable and suspected traits would raise calls for a psychoanalytic investigation. If it was done on a layperson in a president and aggregate they truly cause for alarm list of worrisome of worrisome evident and alleged attributes that emerge in these and other portraits is long narcissist liar. Racist, sexist, adulterer, baby hypocrite churches, ler tax cheat, outlaw psychopath, paranoid fraud, ignorant. Vengeful delusional arrogant, greedy, contemptuous, unsympathetic learning. Disabled, cruel obstructors. Of Justice threat to the constitution traitor. The list is so long that it can be overwhelming. It's a challenge to remember the beginning by the time you make it to the end. There are times when I wish someone would help us. Remember all the troubling aspects of Trump's character and behavior past and present in a way that would encourage recognition of the totality of his path Olivetti rather than its component parts which individually caused alarm before being temporarily forgotten when the next emergency presents itself. As an applied Psychoanalyst's. My task is not only to appreciate the full list. But also to ignore the big picture and focus on a single path Allah g at a time practitioners of applied. Psychoanalysis approach this subject as both theoretician and clinician the theoretician endeavors to piece things together to figure things out while the clinician tries to approach each session capable of being surprised as if his mind were a blank slate. The analysis in the following pages aspires to accomplish both goals reviewing Trump's record with the clinicians. I preparing to be surprised by the unexpected observation assembling these findings into a more comprehensive portrait the image of hypothetical patient. Trump rattling. Excuse me rattling the consulting room door. Banging on the window reminds us that President Trump doesn't want us to see the entire list at once Natalie that patients, I've treated who are reminiscent of Trump cannot tolerate being inside the consulting room either. Elite my office whenever they feel unable to think their way through an anxiety. Provoking interpretation much the way Trump.

Trump Trump White House president Justin Frank Washington DC Obama Bush professor Michael wolfe Diene Tonio analyst Bruce Dr Justin Franks David Kay fraud Michael DEA Tonio Antonio Natalie Johnston
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Reading today from Justin Frank, Dr Justin Franks, book, Trump on the couch inside the mind of the President Bush on the couch and Obama on the couch. He's a psychiatrist and professor psychiatry in Georgetown in Washington DC, and in the book just came up. This is from the introduction. There's no question that Trump is mentally unfit in ways that make him psychologically unsuited for the presidency. That in itself is a truly alarming term of a turn of events. And I'd write the entire book in all caps. If I thought that would better convey the sense of urgency with which it is written and should be read any number of troubling, mental illness diagnoses and character evaluations can be in have been accurately applied to Trump. Both can vary from analyst to analyst however, without necessarily sacrificing any of the accuracy more to the point the true value of a diagnosis is to determine an appropriate course of treatment. And there's no indication that any sort of treatment is a viable option. Trump in the couch. Then seeks not simply to make the case that Trump is not well, but rather to show how he is unwell in ways that would have been a particular interest to the applied cycle analysts whose investigation likely Bruce preceded our own the Russians, and perhaps even their American allies are counterparts who in the long tradition of intelligence gathering examined Trump's psyche and found an opportunity for exploitation. Trump's presidency caps a lifetime of dysfunction and disorder. That is not likely to be healed. While he is an office just as Trump's ascendancy among voters gives expression to standing trends and the American electorate psyche that are not going to be easily addressed, however, if we can identify certain aspects of these disorders and trends that may have contributed to Trump and his voters fusing into a shared belief system. And we have a better chance of fostering, the kind of honest, cultural discussion that will be necessary in order to contain and repair the damage that is already been done. Understanding Trump calls for a consideration of a psycho dynamics almost certainly more rigorous than he has ever embarked upon on his own Trump dismissed psychotherapy as a crutch in two thousand four playboy interview years later talking to biographer Michael DEA Tonia Antonio he described in greater detail, a generalized aversion to introspection beyond the therapeutic setting, quote, I don't like to analyze myself because I'm. Might not like what I see he told de Tonio. I don't like to analyze myself. I don't like to think too much about the past and of quote, even armed or the detailed family history. We can't capture Trump in action with only the tools of applied psychoanalysis like some of the most disturbed patients. I've worked with Trump is so a Radic constantly changing. The topic elevating the stakes and raising the volume the one doesn't know what to expect from him next. It's hard to imagine him in treatment. Even as the subject of a supply of applied psychoanalytical investigation it behaves like a patient who is simultaneously banging consulting room window rattling on his door ringing the phone and texting and tweeting his demands for attention Trump presents so many troubling affects that it's hard to remember them all in the final weeks of the first year of Trump's presidency. Michael Wolff, David Kay Johnston. Published accounts of the Trump White House that present a president with a startling number of disturbing characteristics. Any one of these? Demonstrable and suspected traits would raise calls for a psychoanalytic investigation. If it was done on a layperson in a president and aggregate, they're truly cause for alarm. The list of worrisome, worrisome evident and alleged attributes that emerge in these and other portrait's is long narcissist liar racist, sexist adulterer baby hypocrite, she's ler tax cheat, outlaw psychopath. Paranoid fraud, ignorant. Vengeful delusional arrogant, greedy, contemptuous, unsympathetic learning. Disabled, cruel obstructors of Justice, the to the constitution traitor. The list is so long that it can be overwhelming. It's a challenge to remember the beginning by the time you make it to the end. There are times when I wish someone would help us. Remember all the troubling aspects of Trump's character and behavior past and present in a way that would encourage recognition of the totality of his pathological rather than its component parts which individually caused alarm before being temporarily forgotten when the next emergency presents itself. As an applied Psychoanalyst's. My task is not only to appreciate the full list. But also to ignore the big picture and focus on a single path Allah g at a time practitioners applied psychoanalysis approach their subject as both theoretician and clinician the theoretician endeavors to piece things together to figure things out while the clinician tries to approach each session capable of being surprised as if his mind were a blank slate. The analysis in the following pages aspires to accomplish both goals reviewing Trump's record with the clinicians. I preparing to be surprised by the unexpected observation and assembling these findings into a more comprehensive portrait the image of hypothetical patient. Trump rattling. Excuse me, rattling the consulting room door and banging on the window reminds us that President Trump doesn't want us to see the entire list at once Natalie that but patients I've treated who are reminiscent of Trump cannot tolerate being inside the consulting room. Either leave my office whenever they feel unable to think there we through an anxiety. Provoking interpretation much.

Trump Trump White House president Justin Frank Obama professor Washington Michael Wolff Bush analyst Georgetown de Tonio Dr Justin Franks fraud Bruce Michael DEA Natalie Tonia Antonio David Kay Johnston
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Reading today from Justin Frank, Dr Justin Franks, book, Trump on the couch inside the mind of the President Bush on the couch and Obama on the couch. Psychiatrist and professor psychiatry in Georgetown in Washington DC, and in the book just came up. This is from the introduction. There's no question that Trump is mentally unfit in ways that make him psychologically unsuited for the presidency. That in itself is a truly alarming term of a turn of events. And I'd write the entire book in all caps. If I thought that would better convey the sense of urgency with which it is written and should be read any number of troubling, mental illness diagnoses and character evaluations can be in have been accurately applied to Trump. Both can vary from analyst analysts, however, without necessarily sacrificing any of the accuracy more to the point the true value of a diagnosis is to determine an appropriate course of treatment. And there's no indication that any sort of treatment is a viable option. Trump in the couch, then seeks not simply to make the case that Trump is not well, but rather to show how he is unwell in ways that would have been a particular interest to the applied analysts whose investigation likely preceded our own the Russians, and perhaps even their American allies are counterparts who in the long. The tradition of intelligence gathering examined Trump's psyche and found an opportunity for exploitation Trump's presidency caps a lifetime of dysfunction and disorder. That is not likely to be healed. While he is an office just as Trump's ascendancy among voters gives expression to standing trends and the American electorate psyche that are not going to be easily addressed, however, if we can identify certain aspects of these disorders and trends that may have contributed to Trump and his voters fusing into a shared belief system. And we have a better chance of fostering, the kind of honest, cultural discussion that will be necessary in order to contain and repair the damage that is already been done. Understanding Trump calls for a consideration of a psycho dynamics almost certainly more rigorous than he has ever embarked upon on his own Trump dismissed psychotherapy as a crutch in his two thousand four playboy interview years later talking to biographer Michael DEA Tonia Antonio he described in greater detail agenda. Realized aversion to introspection beyond the therapeutic setting, quote, I don't like to analyze myself because I might not like what I see he told Diene Tonio, I don't like to analyze myself. I don't like to think too much about the past and of quote, even armed or the detailed family history. We can't capture Trump in action with only the tools applied psychoanalysis like some of the most disturbed patients. I've worked with Trump is so a Radic constantly changing. The topic elevating the stakes and raising the volume the one doesn't know what to expect from him next. It's hard to imagine him in treatment. Even as the subject of a supply of applied psychoanalytical investigation. He behaves like a patient who is simultaneously. Banging it consulting room window rattling on his door ringing the phone and texting or tweeting has demands for attention Trump presents so many troubling affects that it's hard to remember them all in the final weeks of the first year of Trump's presidency. Michael wolfe? David Kay, Johnston. Published accounts of the Trump were white, right? White house. That present a president with a startling number of disturbing characteristics. Any one of these demonstrable and suspected traits would raise calls for a psychoanalytic investigation. If it was done on a lay person in a president and aggregate are truly cause for Larmer the list of worrisome of worrisome evident and alleged attributes that emerge in these and other portraits is long narcissist liar racist, sexist adulterer baby hypocrite, she's ler tax cheat, outlaw psychopath, paranoid fraud, ignorant. Vengeful delusional arrogant, greedy, contemptuous, unsympathetic learning. Disabled cruel, obstruction of Justice threat to the constitution traitor. The listened so long that it can be over. Well. Mean it's a challenge to remember the beginning by the time you make it to the end. There are times when I wish someone would help us. Remember all the troubling aspects of Trump's character and behavior past and present in a way that would encourage recognition of the totality of his pathology rather than its component parts which individually caused alarm before being temporarily forgotten when the next emergency. Prove it presents itself as an applied Psychoanalyst's. My task is not only to appreciate the full list. But also to ignore the big picture and focus on a single pathology at a time. Practitioners of applied psychoanalysis approach their subject as both theoretician and clinician the theater theoretician endeavors to piece things together to figure things out while the clinician tries to approach each session capable of being surprised as if his mind were a blank slate. The analysis in the following pages aspires to accomplish both goals reviewing Trump's record with the clinicians. I preparing to be surprised by the unexpected observation and assembling these findings into a more comprehensive portrait the image of hypothetical patient. Trump rattling. Excuse me rattling the consulting room door. Banging on the window reminds us that President Trump doesn't want us to see the entire list at once not only that but patients I treated who are reminiscent of Trump cannot tolerate being inside the consulting room either. They leave my office whenever they feel unable to think there we through an anxiety provoking enter interpretation much.

Trump president Justin Frank Obama Michael wolfe professor Diene Tonio Washington analyst Bush Georgetown White house Dr Justin Franks David Kay fraud Michael DEA Tonia Antonio Johnston
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Today from Justin Frank, Dr Justin Franks, book, Trump on the couch inside the mind of the president. He's the guy wrote Bush on the couch and Obama on the couch. As a psychiatrist and professor psychiatry in Georgetown in Washington DC, and in the book just came up. This is from the introduction. There's no question that Trump is mentally unfit in ways that make him unsought psychologically unsuited for the presidency. That in itself is a truly alarming term of a turn of events. And I'd write the entire book in all caps. If I thought that would better convey the sense of urgency with which it is written and should be read any number of troubling, mental illness diagnoses and character evaluations can be and have been accurately applied to Trump. Both can vary from analyst to analyst however, without necessarily sacrificing any of the accuracy more to the point the true value of a diagnosis is to determine an appropriate course of treatment. And there's no indication that any sort of treatment is viable option. Trump in the couch, then seeks not simply to make the case that Trump is not well, but rather to show how he is unwell in ways that would have been a particular interest to the applied psychoanalysts who. Investigation likely preceded our own the Russians, and perhaps even their American allies are counterparts who in the long tradition of intelligence gathering examined. Trump's psyche and found an opportunity for exploitation Trump's presidency caps a lifetime of dysfunction and disorder. That is not likely to be healed. While he is an office just as Trump's ascendancy among voters gives expression to long standing trends. And the American electorate psyche that are not going to be easily addressed, however, if we can identify certain aspects of these disorders and trends that may have contributed to Trump and his voters fusing into a shared belief system. And we have a better chance of fostering, the kind of honest, cultural discussion that will be necessary in order to contain and repair the damage that has already been done. Understanding Trump calls for consideration of a psycho dynamics almost certainly more rigorous than he has ever embarked upon on his own Trump dismissed psychotherapy as a crutch in two thousand and four play. Interview years later talking about augur for Michael DEA Tonio Antonio he described in greater detail, a generalized version to introspection beyond the therapeutic setting, quote, I don't like to analyze myself because I might not like what I see he told DNA Tonio, I don't like to analyze myself. I don't like to think too much about the past and of quote, even armed or the detailed family history. We can't capture Trump in action with only the tools of applied psychoanalysis like some of the most disturbed patients. I've worked with Trump is so a Radic constantly changing. The topic elevating the stakes and raising the volume the one doesn't know what to expect from him next. It's hard to imagine him in treatment. Even as the subject of a supply of applied psychoanalytical investigation. He behaves like a patient who is simultaneously banging consulting room window rattling on his door ringing the phone and texting her tweeting his demands for attention Trump presents so many troubling affects that it's hard to remember them. All. In the final weeks of the first year of Trump's presidency. Michael wolfe? David Kay, Johnston. Published accounts of the Trump White House that present a president with a startling number of disturbing characteristics. Any one of these demonstrable and suspected traits would raise calls for a psychoanalytic investigation. If it was done on a layperson in a president and aggregate, they're truly caused for Larne the list of worrisome of worrisome evident and alleged attributes that emerge in these and other portraits is long narcissist liar racist, sexist adulterer baby hypocrite, she's Lert tax cheat, outlaw psychopath, paranoid fraud, ignorant. Vengeful delusional arrogant, greedy, contemptuous, unsympathetic learning. Disabled, cruel obstructors. Of Justice threat to the constitution traitor. The listen along that it can be overwhelming. It's a challenge to remember the beginning by the time you make it to the end. There are times when I wish someone would help us. Remember all the troubling aspects of Trump's character and behavior past and present in a way that would encourage recognition of the totality of his path Olivetti rather than its component parts which individually caused alarm before being temporarily forgotten when the next emergency presents itself. As an applied psychoanalyst. My task is not only to appreciate the full list. But also to ignore the big picture and focus on a single pathology. At a time practitioners applied psychoanalysis approach their subject as both theoretician and clinician the theoretician endeavors to piece things together to figure things out while the clinician tries to approach each session. Capable of being surprised is mind were a blank slate. The analysis in the following pages. Aspires to accomplish both goals reviewing Trump's record with the clinicians. I preparing to be surprised by the unexpected observation and assembling these findings into a more comprehensive portrait the image of hypothetical patient. Trump rattling. Excuse me rattling the consulting room door. Banging on the window reminds us that President Trump doesn't want us to see the entire list at once not only that but patients I've treated who are reminiscent of Trump cannot tolerate being inside the consulting room either. They leave my office whenever they feel unable to think their way through an anxiety. Provoking interpretation much the way Trump.

Trump Trump White House president Justin Frank Michael DEA Tonio Antonio Obama Bush professor Michael wolfe Washington analyst Georgetown Dr Justin Franks David Kay Larne fraud Johnston
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"MacOS tonight is comedian Mak Hirschson, Matt, welcome back. Hey, you host a podcast called most likely science. Is that what is probably science, the name, kneeling. You always do this also have an old time friend of star talk, Heather Berlin. He's a neuroscientist and professor psychiatry at Mount Sinai hospital here in New York. The also hosted several educational programs over the years. So you got your you street cred in what we're doing here because we're discussing eight, my recent interviews with Alan Alda. So Alan and I sat down together for one on one chat at the ninety. Second street y, which is a community center in the upper east side of Manhattan, and we had a lot of fun on stage talking about his book and about science communication. So let's check it out. Tonight. Keep the applause when you get them. Yeah, might as well stay run with that. I just wanted to comment that 'lustration of you has slightly more hair than you currently have. I usually do my interviews on the radio where I still have my. So it is. It is an honor and a privilege to be on the stage with you, your native to the area, right? Your homegrown, New York, going in Manhattan on thirty seconds street and third avenue. Okay. Like was I got a hand for being born. So in in k. through twelve, did you have any particular science influences a good or bad experience with a math teacher or science? Well, I got polio when I was seven, and so I have to that. I had to have a tutor for awhile on my parents can't be tutored until the seventh grade, and I had a teacher. I didn't like too much. This is in scientific except for the fact one day I was drawing a nude figure for the pleasure of the person. Next to me. And he for the person next him? Yes. Register with out of my hand, and I was really pissed it that you know. So when April fool came around April Fools day. I prepare my my prepared sandwich deep. And luckily my goldfish had just died. So I put the goldfish between two slices of wonder, bread and gave him a snack. I didn't expect them to actually eat it. I thought he'd lifted up and look at it and say, oh, April Fools, but he put it in his mouth and bid on it. And now I'm looking at him and he's got this tail hanging out. And I thought I gotta tell him before he swallows that. And then I remembered the picture and I thought I screw. Kind of like a science experiment, it really would what to do with a dead goldfish. But I did do experiments as a kid. You know, when I was six years old, I had a card table where it would mix things mixed. My mother's face outer and pays is see if I could get it to blow up. What did you then put it either back in the toothpaste tube or back in the powder tube? No, nobody wants opened up her watch to see how it worked inside. What made the hands go around and I couldn't get the case back on. So I bid it to try to squeeze back together and I left tooth marks. So she knew who did it. Good scientists, but not a good criminal. Yeah, I think regardless of what the results of an experiment turn out to be. What matters is the curiosity that led to it. Chip away goes, isn't this right as the scientists, which whether it goes the way you hoped it would or not, you've made some progress along some path and you've kept your curiosity alive. That was great. I loved the start of the clip because you could see the struggle that I believe always goes on in your mind between genial host and scientists. 'cause you're like on the one hand, you're like, welcome guest. On the other hand, I observed that you are bold. It's up the amount of hair he had. It's just the comparison, the actual amount of hair to it's more important scientific analysis is his hair over time. Yes, the variation, yes. Yes, but that's a current book. So I think just lying..

Manhattan Alan Alda Matt Mak Hirschson Heather Berlin Mount Sinai hospital New York professor thirty seconds six years one hand one day
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"You're listening, to k next in-depth long Charles Feldman Mike Simpson and reminder after, news and traffic at the bottom of the hour we will be talking with. The, former White House chief of staff and head of the CIA Leon Panetta. About President Trump and a whole lot more right now though new research. Shows military personnel who've had a impact head injury. Show brain changes similar to those of retired football players with CTE joining us now Dr Gary small. Professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA longevity center. A doctor tells a little bit more about what this, research has found we looked at football players a few years ago we found a pattern that differed from what we see in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal people and these are scans that are done in living individuals when we looked at this new group of military personnel we'd never. Studied before we found the patterns. Are very similar to what we saw in the. Retired football players who Who are at risk for c. t. so in the In terms? Of the military personnel, how do they get their injuries Renault that football, players it's because they're very vigorous in. What they're doing but heads? A, lot even with helmets what about these military people well about fifteen to twenty three, percent of military service members suffer mild traumatic brain injury but their injuries tend to. Be different from. What we, see in sports related injuries many of them in fact some studies showed that up to fifty or sixty. Percent, of them have what we call explosive blast injuries now these injuries result from a, rapid transmission of an acoustic wave through the, brain tissue and this creates tremendous force. On the brain and it occurs very quickly within microseconds does this kind of broaden the understanding? Of who could potentially be affected by bringing in this this other group Clearly it's not just sports related injuries head trauma affects people in a lot? Of different situations And the military is a huge number of. Individuals who are at risk for head injury and could be at risk for CT and future and our goal is to try to develop a test so we can detect the problem early in people in order to test new treatments, to protect a healthy brain rather than wait until there's extensive damage I was gonna ask you did? We, learn anything from the experience of. Football. Players that could be carried over and help military You know I think that what we're learning is. That there are certainly certain types of injury that put people at risk that result? In, a constellation of symptoms it make us, suspect that this could be now keep in mind that she. T. at this point can only be diagnosed, at autopsy but we're trying to move forward so we can make a diagnosis before, people progressed autopsy because you. Really want to help people while they're still alive these scans you're looking, at in this kind of a way of doing, things is that a pretty big step towards towards doing a diagnosis while someone is alive well we take it certainly is a step but. We have more work to do in this military paper we only had a small number of subjects and we also need to look at individuals who have undergone head trauma and injury but they don't have symptoms and I think that, it's not only going to be the head trauma but there's going to be genetic factors and other Factors. That contribute to an individual's risk okay Dr Gary small professors psychiatry director of the? UCLA, longevity center doctor thanks Mike you saw, the presidential tweets this weekend in all upper case all caps. All caps president very upset with Iran also, very upset apparently some former officials intelligence officials in the Obama administration wants to get, rid of their clearance sell. When Cain Nixon depth continues we will have a talk with former CIA, director and White House chief of staff Leon Panetta This is southern California's only. Twenty. Four hour local news and traffic station KNX ten seventy NewsRadio good. Evening, I'm. Nathan Roberts.

Football chief of staff Leon Panetta Charles Feldman Mike Simpson CIA director Professor of psychiatry President Trump UCLA longevity center White House Dr Gary small Nathan Roberts Alzheimer's disease KNX Cain Nixon Dr Gary California UCLA
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"You're listening to KNX in, depth long Charles Feldman Mike Simpson and reminder, after news and traffic at the bottom of the hour we will, be talking with the former White House chief of staff and head. Of the CIA Leon Panetta about President Trump and a whole lot more right. Now, though new research shows military personnel who've had a impact head injury show brains changes similar to those of retired football players with CTE joining. Us now Dr Gary small professor of psychiatry and. Director of the UCLA longevity center doctor tells a little bit more about what this research has found. We looked at football players a few years ago. We found a pattern that differed from what we see, in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal people these are scans that are done in living individuals when we looked, at this, new group of military personnel, we'd never studied. Before we found. The patterns are very similar to what we saw in the retired football players Who are at risk for CTE so in the In terms of? The military personnel how do, they get their injuries we know that football players, it's because they're very vigorous and what they're. Doing the butt heads a lot even with helmets what about these military people about fifteen to twenty three percent, of military service members suffer mild traumatic brain injury but their injuries tend to be. Different from what. We see, in sports related injuries many of them in fact some studies show that up to fifty or sixty percent. Of, them have what we call explosive blast injuries now these injuries result from a rapid, transmission of an acoustic wave through the brain, tissue and this creates tremendous force on. The brain and it occurs very quickly within microseconds does this kind of broaden the understanding of who could potentially be affected by sea to bringing in this. This other group Clearly it's not just sports related injuries head trauma affects people in a lot? Of different situations And the military is a huge number of individuals. Who are at risk for head injury and could be at risk for CT in the future and our goal is to try to develop a test so we can detect the problem early in people in order to test new treatments, to protect a healthy brain rather than wait until there's extensive damage I was gonna ask you did? We, learn anything from the experience of. Football. Players that could be carried over and help military You know I think that what we're learning is that there are certainly certain types of injury that put people at risk that. Result in a constellation of symptoms it make, a suspect that this could be now keep in mind that. C. t. at this point can only be, diagnosed at autopsy but we're trying to move forward so we can make a diagnosis, before people progressed autopsy because. You really want to help people while they're still alive these scans you're, looking at in this kind of a way of, doing things is that a pretty big step towards towards doing a diagnosis while someone is alive but we think it certainly is a step but. We have more work to do in this military paper we only had a small number of subjects and we also need to look at individuals who have undergone head trauma and injury but they don't have symptoms and I think that, it's not only going to be the head trauma but there's going to be genetic factors and other Factors that, contribute to an individual's risk okay Dr Gary small professors psychiatry director of the UCLA longevity center doctor thanks so Mike you saw the presidential tweets this. Weekend in all upper case all caps all caps president very upset with Iran also very upset apparently some former officials intelligence officials in, the Obama administration wants to get rid of their clearance sell when Cain Nixon depth continues we will have a talk with former CIA director and White House chief of staff Leon Panetta right now the news in brief here's rob Archer thanks guys some of the stories we're covering right now is Tom transmit telling. You Ellie county fire crews are battling a, second alarm fire in the Santa Clarita area the fires burning. In the hills along PICO canyon in the, Stevenson ranch area no structures are threatened at this time water dropping helicopters are being, used to get the fire..

Football chief of staff Leon Panetta Charles Feldman Mike Simpson CIA Dr Gary professor of psychiatry Director White House president UCLA Alzheimer's disease Trump PICO canyon Ellie county Stevenson ranch Santa Clarita Cain Nixon director Iran
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fair number of cases because i didn't know going in at all what do they were anything they were very violent murderers and some were serial killers this is james fallon james fallon professor psychiatry and human behavior university california irvine school of medicine well through the book called the psychopath inside it has a longer title but the psychopath inside will get you there james is a scientist who studies the brains of psychopaths he lives uncalled attack on the uc irvine campus he married his childhood sweetheart when i got there he was preparing to go to a hockey game of his son the people he studies feel a million miles away from here for legal reasons james can't reveal any details about the psychopaths but some of them were famous for how heinous their crimes were james's job was get inside the minds of these killers i started receiving pet scans from the early nineties and those included killers who are psychopaths and so i looked at him and then took notes on what areas of the brain were kind of dysfunctional turns out that the psychopaths on this pattern i don't want all man thickens for neuro anatomist like me seeing patterns is everything and so when i saw that is not medicine pattern nobody had ever really talked about it busily which aim saw were these big dark spots in the brain places where there was little or no activity these were the areas where things like moral reasoning and impulse control come from the place where we manage our most base instincts there are also dark spots for empathy originates that sad feeling you have when you see someone you love crime psychopaths don't get that feeling james studied these minds for years piecing together this puzzle climbing patterns then one day james was at his desk in his office i was sitting in my office medical school surrounded by piles of printouts printouts were different types of scans all these analyses that i've been looking at murders james had a lab of tax and students working with them on this on this day one of them came to his office with a pet scan attack was confused about something this brain was supposed to basically be a healthy brain scan should have been glowing with activity noor colored red and blue and they've yellow they have green and.

scientist james fallon professor california irvine school of me uc irvine hockey one day
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Welcome back sunday a newcastle wyoming a sunday what's on your mind today you don't you always see that uh it's an excuse to cook the crane mental illness for these atrocities that are happening well no it's auto susan there there is a clear association between mental illness and mass shootings the problem is the uh had the mentally ill people not had access to guns and i i found the story it was it was the new town schutte when when when by think it was thirty three kids were killed in newtown there were thirty kids who were stabbed in china in and outside of beijing by a by a crazy man ran into a school so on the exact same day you had roughly the exact same situation none of those children in china died all of those kids in newtown died the difference was the gun aside from map i think what's happening in do mental elham had dr vote your round burden here at the public article on site a crumb p four fifty two b six pathways that's a genetic test and a person that is deficiency or has a nonexistent two two d6 pathway it affects the way they metabolize drugs not just illegal drugs but all drugs including over the counter drugs and people can react badly it can cause suicides or killings people that internalize blamed 10 to commit suicide those who externalise blame tend to do these killings and so with the pharmacies supplying all the drugs and the news media constantly keeping the fear factor in play there's a synergistic effect that just kind of builds up and i think that's what's creating the mentality of pro nra stuff just it's i agree with everything he said except the very last part i think what's creating the mentality pro nra is the pro is that the nra is spending hundreds of millions of dollars to promote their agenda include an blind politicians but know your point is really well taken in fact this morning i asked louise as a do you think we should get peter bragging back on his psychiatrist to professor psychiatry the author of numerous books and he he takes the position that.

newcastle china beijing newtown nra louise wyoming peter professor
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"But new research in mice has found something different a protein debts linked to alzheimer's has been found to be able to travel from other parts of the body to the brain where it can build up become toxic and inflict damage dr way hong song professor psychiatry from the university of british columbia who led the study suggested in the future treatments of alzheimer's may start in other parts of the body dr song welcome to the program thank you bob for having me if you found that alzheimer's does not originate in the brain where else could start seoul alzheimer's disease obviously is a burned disorder so what we are saying is that his amyloid beta the bad approaching produce also developer and could also contributed the some of the disease pests genesis we'll tell me about this protein that's associated with alzheimer's so the major than europe has olives yours the alzheimer's disease burn chancy is the amyloid a protein butyl up and to foreman's o'clock we called a protein clumps enes appearance that needed to damage officer burn sales uh controls a learning and memory needing to dementia so this protein expressed everywhere you the bodies not just in the brain but also in the all set of upper and like a younes us muscle sale scheme plus two and kidney levers so obviously the alzheimer's disease a burned disorders the protein produced in the perrine the amyloid beta contribued the majority of the plock formation in the alzheimer's disease of brence so you're saying that this amyloid beta protein is is produced throughout the body indian muscles kidney some whatever so what happens then does it actually spread to the brain.

alzheimer developer foreman officer perrine professor university of british columbia bob alzheimer's disease europe
"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"professor psychiatry" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And i think that you know all maintain and i have a man burma vote on white supremacists i can tell by in facebook coalition and it's don't know what you do he's he's good tonight grandkids graham i mean that i i'm going to china i'm on my way to treat man and then when i get them and join the movement in the reserve fence and do what i can but then when he iraq and i get drunk and then turning much on trump fat yeah santer you're not allowed uh we had we've had uh dr justin frank whose professor psychiatry at georgetown university in wrote the book uh uh obama the couch bush on the couch is work out a book right now trump on the couch uh we had a psychologist i don't remember name i'm sorry but uh she was here is a guest back three or four months ago and both of them said that their own personal practices not sure if dr frank has a personal practice but their own personal practices and the psychological psychiatric psychotherapeutic practices a pretty much every do they know our exploding and uh my regular physician uh just made the comment to me that more and more people are asking for sleeping pills and antidepressants i you know it's if people are freaked out people in legitimately freaked out so sandra i i wish you the very best and getting sober and getting clean it's a really important thing to do for yourself and your kids and and uh there's a lot of good ways and you're you're you're talking about going right down the though the appropriate road to to deal with the anxiety in the angst coming out of the trump administration of that is to get politically active sandra i have to move will i would thank you for the call and i wish you the very very best michael in brookline massachusetts say michael what's up ivo tom i hope you're you're doing well listen vecer.

dr justin frank georgetown university bush michael massachusetts burma facebook china iraq professor obama sleeping pills brookline four months