20 Burst results for "Professor Of Political Science"

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:55 min | 2 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"People who have natural immunity are like 12 to 27 times more protected against the disease That's only people in Israel Tom Arabs think it is right We have no idea whether it would have whether it would apply to a Presbyterian All right we are almost out of time But real quickly because here's my thing I think Biden you know I don't think this is good politics for him I don't I think it's going to I mean listen he could have sat down with these Republican governors and said listen hey we've got a because they're all pro vaccination I mean they are all right They're trying to protect freedoms for their people but they are urging people to get vaccinated Aza Hutchinson and Arkansas all these folks he could have sat down with him and said listen we've got to get these folks vaccinated What can we do How can we work together What do you think is going to work How can we work together with Satan federal to get these unvaccinated people onboard and get them vaccinated Is that what he chose to do He chose to do the opposite which was basically demonize these folks and say I'm going to do it You guys are get out of the way Why didn't he do that First of all he was elected to do exactly what you have suggested right I mean that's what people voted for They didn't vote for a mandate in Hector and demonize They voted for a let's work together approach I think that the whole idea is that he thinks his own presidency could be in danger if they can't get the pandemic under control and it's preemptive blame shifting All right well we shall find out obviously this is the story We're going to be talking about for a long long time But we got to leave it there Charles lips and professor political science university Chicago Charles always great to have you Great to talk to you Tom All right we're going to take quick break Be right back after these words The pandemic September is the most birthday packed month of the year so chances.

12 Tom Israel Tom Arabs Charles Biden Arkansas Republican Aza Hutchinson September 27 times Chicago First federal Satan
"professor political science" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:43 min | 5 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"On it. Someone can't 123 go 123 go. That is how they run the assembly in California. Okay, Dad, right. The Republicans or the poor guy saying rule there. There's no rules in a knife fight, and Democrats say somebody got 123 Go. What did they go? That's the end of it. That's how they're trying to handle this recall. And so more than likely he'll be saved because they made it so there's no way he can't be saved So once again what the people want, It doesn't really matter. It's what the party once That matters. And what's interesting is You have people, speaking from University of California, Berkeley. Political science people. Let's just be honest. These are not people that you're going to find going to the Republican National Convention. Here's one science professor political science professor at U. C. Berkeley, said. They're trying to create a situation that's most favorable for the partisan outcome that they want. No, really. He said. The calendar changing the Canada threatens to reinforce the narrative that politicians will do whatever they want to stay in power, and that's exactly what they're doing right now. Now one recall elections expert and I pointed this out. God knows what would we do without experts said. You know this effort could backfire could give Democrats less time to motivate their voters. Republicans already have almost two million signatures to remove him. So imagine there'll be a little bit more motivated. But you know, bottom line is Gavin Newsom came out last week and said, We're going to pay everybody's back Rent, So if you haven't paid your rent For the last. However, many months.

Gavin Newsom California Republican National Convention University of California Democrats last week Republicans C. Berkeley one Berkeley two million signatures one recall Canada U. 123
"professor political science" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KCRW

"Newsday got thiss points and started, eh? No, I'm trying to get to school. Thousands. Something about the Me. Something about All the guns and upset My heart is not With me. 00 Oh, Come on. You must That my friends is body there and getting remixed by case UW zoon Jeremy Soul sounds, Jeremy. You are listening to KC Ho W's power in numbers Drive. I Man'll. It's here with you until noon that coming up at 11. We're going to check in with Madeleine brand to find out what's coming up at noon, press play. Is always a lot of great music for you. And I know we're on countdown time to the election, and this is a music show and you shouldn't We just talk about the music, But the election is something that's obviously front of mind for everybody. Election. Just the world is front of mind for everybody, and we've got something special for you plan tonight. If you're interested. Kcpw wants to help you get your ballot together. You conjoined us for greater and lay presents. What else is on the ballot? California? So this is tonight, Steve. Take this is your host along with guests. Jan Perry, Who's a former member of the L. A City Council representing downtown in south L. A. Fernando Grayer Aguirre, professor political science and director of the Center of the Study of the study of Los Angeles at Loyal, a Merry Mount, and Dan Schnur, professor of politics and communications at USC and a performer, Republican strategist. Now these experts are going to guide you to take a deeper look at all the various county and state measures. So if you want to cast your Ballot here in Los Angeles County and know that you have your finger on the pulse of everything that's going on on the ballot..

How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:40 min | 2 years ago

How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

"Begin today a little piece of audio you a mere twelve seconds. Not Too long won't be too painful but inside it. There is a whole lot to digest. Here you go. I believe that monetary policy is and a good place and should continue to support sustained growth a strong labor market and inflation running close to are symmetric two percent objective. Those those of you recognize that to be a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Not too tough really given the subject matter. Go to the head of the class. If you identified the Speaker as Richard Clara the vice vice chairman of the Fed a gold star to you. Now why are we starting with him. A couple of reasons honestly number one because the Fed has been taking some heat it lately for having gotten a lot of its economic forecasting wrong. Hello inflation number. Two because Clarita said today and chair Powell says often the really the economy's pretty good number three because pugh is out with a study today. That says not everybody out in the actual economy agrees with the fat so so two interviews with which to test those premises. I about the Fed Sarah Bender. She's a professor of Political Science at George Washington University where she studies the Fed. Welcome to the program. Thanks thanks for having me. What do you make of the vice chairman speech today and more importantly how the feds sort of is positioning itself in this economy right now? Well the Fed is saying saying so far. So good The comedies on a good track Congress's given us a dual mandate of low sustainable unemployment and low inflation Kevin. And we're hitting him. He's not telling us really where things are going in the future. He's saying data dependent meeting by meeting. But he's telling telling us the economy is on a good course he Said and and chair. Paul says this all the time that they're going to you know work to keep the expansion going as as long as they can and one of the things chair Paul says and Clark said it today was that You know the longer expansion goes the more it helps people at the bottom. How much can the Fed really do though for the people at the bottom of this economy but the fence so far is doing a lot by keeping a monetary policy not so loose and accommodative right and you see wage gains at the lower end of the economic spectrum at a certain point though? There's only so much that monetary monetary policy can do and absent fiscal policies. That might say deal with job training or job relocation or healthcare. There's is only so much weight that can be put on monetary policy makers. Let me carry that forward to an interview. We're going to have here in a couple of minutes with A upholster from pugh who has a new study out today about economic inequality in this country. What can the Fed do on economic inequality which consistently ranks pretty high in terms of what what people are worried about in this economy? Well the best contribution they can make is to keep an eye on employment and do as much as they can to Stoke job growth but without sparking inflation keeping an eye on the health of the financial system so that people have access to quality and so forth at the end of the day though. It's really the limits of what monetary policy makers can do. The really simple line is heading into an election year. Right is. It's the economy stupid frame that for me in terms of the Federal Reserve and the role of the economy in the next eleven months of of our common experience. Well Congress gives the Fed to commands. Keep inflation low keep jobs growing. That's what the Fed is aiming to do. Oh here and the extent that they're successful it means the economy's growing and on an even keel in. That's what helps incumbents get reelected Sir Bender under she's At Brookings also Professor Political Science at George Washington University professor. Thanks for your time. Am I appreciate sure. Thanks for having me okay. So all of that said interview number two now from the Pew Research Center who study out today shows as I said that not. Everybody agrees that the economy is all sunshine and Light Ruth Galmoc. She is a senior researcher at Pew Rookie to have you on for having me if I say that seventy percent of respondents to this Survey that Y'all did if if I say that they believe the economy is rigged. Is that too strong word. I would say that. They think that the economy is unfairly favouring powerful special interests interests so we asked whether the economy was generally fair or whether it unfairly favored these powerful interests and seven and ten Americans that they did not think it was fair. We should point out. There's as a partisan divide here as with most things in this country now that's right. Republicans are about evenly split with about half of Republican. Same economy is generally fair and half of the economy saying unfairly early favors these special interests whereas Democrats overwhelmingly say that the economy is not fair. okay so Brass tacks your who's got the power so we asked Americans who they thought had too much power and influence in today's economy and about eight and ten or more American said that politicians Titians corporations and people who are wealthy had too much power we also had majority saying health insurance companies banks and other financial institutions and tech companies had too much cower Let me ask you then who doesn't have the power or is parallel. I suppose another way to put it. Yeah we asked to people. Apple felt did not have enough power and Americans pointed to people who were poor the middle class and interestingly small businesses. Yes say more about that because when I read this in small all businesses came up I was. That's the thing that got me on the phone with you to be honest. Yeah I'm and one interesting thing was we saw a partisan divide and how Democrats and Republicans on looked at a number of these groups. Republicans were less likely than Democrats to say that large corporations had too much power but when it came to small businesses Democrats and Republicans were largely in agreement that that small businesses did not have enough power. Today's economy. So what else do people need to know about this. I mean as they read this and they hear that you know seven ten people think the economy is is unbalanced. Silence shall we say instead of rigged. What are they supposed to do that information? It's hard to say What people are supposed to do? In this survey we did sort of dive into what Americans think about economic comic inequality in general and while most Americans say that there's too much economic inequality in the country. They didn't rank particularly highly as an issue. So it's hard to sort they how that will play out Raquel Nick. She's a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. Thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thanks for having me

Federal Reserve Democrats Pew Research Center Vice Chairman Congress Sarah Bender Pugh George Washington University Senior Researcher Federal Reserve Board Of Gover Professor Of Political Science Pew Rookie Richard Clara Raquel Nick Stoke Clarita Paul Ruth Galmoc Apple
"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Engineer Carlos Contreras who is old enough <hes> he was among the people who was ridiculed in the chat in there it in that Chad came out so I don't it doesn't look like it's an outgrowth in that direction what would solve this constitutional crisis would be a simple nomination by <hes> the governor especially somebody that's a public figure that most people know that wouldn't have to go through a long process confirmation and there are a couple of people people who could fill that spot but the governor says he's keeping the country hostage for personal reasons he he's trying to avoid prosecution mission so that is really he's game. Not Jose Joe's game right now is he wants something like what Gerald Ford did to President Nixon He wants a pardon of every and any time that he may have committed during his term Jorges is this uncertainty over who's going to be the next governor. Puerto Rico GonNa drag on passes Friday and if it does Hausa territory gonNA function with a power vacuum well there is a line of succession succession so somebody will formally take like the position but the potential scenario is that the governor forces the hand to to a degree in which there is nobody or there appears to be did not available and he has no choice but to stay so I hope he doesn't do that because then he would really sink in our serious this constitutional crisis in a political crisis that we've never seen Jorges Schmidt NATO professor political science at the University of Puerto Rico. Thank you very much for your time. My Pleasure Asia finally today. President trump's push for a border wall got a boost last week. The Supreme Court gave the go-ahead to divert two point five billion dollars in military funding funding for wall construction. The president welcomed that decision but some artists are working on a different project literally straddling the Border Wall itself the World Sarah ironbound unbound reports when you think of trump's border wall which sounds come to mind is it this build that wall aw build that wall build that wall build that wall or maybe this migrants rushing towards the border fence this guy or this children separated from their parents but what if it were this it's children playing and at one place along the border for this moment at least that is what's happening. The California Architects Ronald L. and Virginia San Fratello have threaded three hot pink see-saws through a section section of steel border fence near El Paso Texas and C O Dodd Juarez Mexico. One side of the seesaw is on the American side. The other on the Mexican inside and kids are actually see sighing through the wall while the purpose of the wall is to keep people apart and away. It's actually bringing people pulled together and some really remarkable ways right l.. Explain the idea for the project at a Ted talk last year the best way to illustrate the mutual relationship that we have have with Mexico and the United States is by imagining a teeter totter where the actions on one side had a direct consequence on what happens on the other side Loyd because you see the border itself is both a symbolic and literal full chrome for U._S.. Mexico relations and building walls between neighbors severs those relationships Don gips the project functions on literal level it literally straddles the divide it functions on a symbolic level it transforms an obstacle the wall into a site of collaboration and play but it also functions on a visual level when you look at an aerial view of the border fence without the see-saws ause. It looks like a dark line cutting through a barren landscape. The Wall is cold gray steel then when you look at an aerial view of the installation you see these three hot pink horizontal lines spanning the grayness connecting the two sides the the pink is whimsical and fun but it also reminds you a blood vessels life and those pink Valentine's Day candies and for a second

Border Wall Carlos Contreras president trump Puerto Rico Gerald Ford Jorges Schmidt NATO President Nixon Jose Joe Asia Engineer Mexico University of Puerto Rico Chad Supreme Court Don gips California Sarah ironbound Dodd Juarez Mexico Virginia San Fratello
"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The muscle power so in the case of mainland China these are usually unemployed people. Oh <hes> former security agents security guards people who do not have proper security training so it could be anyone on the street. Try members would suggest that the more organized but it's not necessarily the case got it right so so in the case of Russia in other countries visas of activities is usually associated with underground criminal activities but in the case of China is not necessarily the case it could be any in a loosely organized. Why the white t shirts do they carry any significance or symbolism? No there's no significant but they were wearing masks. I think that was significant that the to not want to be seen publicly yeah. I do not want to be known I mean China has one of the largest who's police and security forces in the world. They are fearsome. Why why does it need to outsource is kind of coercion for the simple reason really to evade responsibility right to evade accountability so people might suspect that it is the authorities who actually sent the box walks in but there's no way to trace responsibility so in allows the government to maintain a veneer of legitimacy behind these sucks plausible deniability plus deniability? We've been talking as if the thugs must have been directed by Beijing but is it possible that somebody in the Chief Executive's office could have sent them out. It is possible but Chief Executive Carolina has publicly denounced the violence. It is also possible that eighty businesses says who do not want the protest gone any further might have sent people right. We can't really rule it out so it could be from a number of authorities or even businesses. What does it signal in terms of what could be a new and possibly more more dangerous phase for the protesters in Hongkong Linda? I suspect that the government is pretty desperate in warding off for the protests and short of rolling in the military tank as an outsource violence. It's a very effective means of wearing the protests to sell. They have tried killed us. It hasn't worked. I think violence also violence it is it is going to be very effective because it will intimidate people. It will stop people from coming out left. Lynette is associate professor political science at the University of Toronto. Thanks for your time. Let's take a minute before the break to tell about what's coming up on the show tomorrow as special counsel Robert Mueller's about to testify before Congress later this week we'll take a look at efforts to prevent foreign meddling in the twenty twenty election. It's a sort of interference that muller accused Russia of carrying out in two thousand sixteen there were multiple systematic efforts to interfere in our election and that allegation deserves the attention of every American so what are federal agencies and local governments doing to hack proof the twenty twenty race this election security expert says they're taking steps in the right direction but there's much much more we can do to make sure that we are taking a whole of government approach here like improving intelligence sharing within the government about active threats says this election official from Florida. If things are happening that we need to be made aware of that are are being held in a classified environment. The government needs to find a way to declassify that information for us. That's all coming up here tomorrow. The world is supported by Express V._p._N.. Express V._p._N.. Secures an an anonymous as your Internet.

China Russia Chief Executive Carolina Chief Executive Lynette Beijing Hongkong Linda Robert Mueller Congress University of Toronto special counsel muller Florida official
"professor political science" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KOMO

"He was just flat to get back to work today. Eric stark says, he's starting back, slowly, his doctor agreed to up to four hours shift. He says he was a bit nervous. About what happened on March twenty seventh when a gunman shot him through the windshield killing two people and wounding another woman stark. A former pastor says he has some pain from his injury, but his faith keeps them going to continue driving the bus. I'd be okay with me. That's really how I deal with trauma. He says he looks forward to driving the seventy five on Sandpoint. We again, that's the rowdy was on the day of the shooting superman. Komo news that accused of going on the shooting rampage in Lake City in March has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him. Investigators say that tad. Michael Norman told them he drank so much. He blacked out doesn't remember the shooting. Norman had no criminal record before the shooting will be back in court in August. You made it clear you want lawmakers to make all their records public now that fight has reached the state supreme court. Komo's Ryan Harris has more attorney for the state legislature. Paul Laurence tells the justices that unlike state agencies which can't make laws lawmakers have the constitutional authority to decide which of their records are subject to public disclosure. It's a forty to do. And you find that not in the of agency. You find indefinite records. Michelle Earl Hubbard attorney for the Associated Press and other agencies that brought the case as the term agency isn't some magical term pointed out in our opening brief all the times in the state of Washington, where governmental entities list, as an agency, the legislature, the Senate and the house is just a common turn. It's a complex case that might require the justices to fill in some blanks in our state's public records law. So it'll be sometime before we hear their decision. Ryan Harris, KOMO news continue to make new planes at Boeing seven thirty-seven factory in Renton, but no one's buying them. The company says, nobody ordered new max jets for the second straight month. Experts say the drop in orders is not only because of the grounding of it's seven thirty seven max fleet but because of the huge back order of the plane analysts will be keeping a close eye on orders next week at the Paris air show since November two thousand sixteen. Eighteen the Seattle city council has passed more than a dozen nonbinding resolutions opposing moves by the president and congressional Republicans. But why komo's Jeff Pohjola looked into it. Most of the resolutions, put the city council on record against things like the travel ban the president's border wall in a repeal of Dhaka, none of them have any material effect on city law. But nearly all of them were sponsored by Llorente Gonzales, a former civil rights attorney and second term council member. She declined to talk to us about her reasoning, but you don't professor political science, Mark. Alan Smith says she could be positioning yourself to run for higher office. One reason for this, or, or maybe she's just wanting to position Seattle as, as a player in those national debates Gonzales isn't due for re election to the city council until twenty twenty one. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. The fire danger in the eastern part of the state is moderate right now here in western Washington. The dangerous, low Barich Burke of eastside fire and rescue says that could change in an instant safari departments are getting ready for a busy summer..

Komo Michael Norman Llorente Gonzales attorney Ryan Harris komo Jeff Pohjola Seattle Eric stark president supreme court Barich Burke Lake City Washington Alan Smith Paul Laurence Michelle Earl Hubbard Paris Renton Associated Press
"professor political science" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KOMO

"Police. Investigate the shooting death of his mother. We learned in court, the baby just feet away when it happened. The boy's grandfather also the woman's father prosecutors now accused of shooting her to death at close range in the face here, and the Renton apartment, I just made my heart over to knowing that officers protecting him in not safeness that he needs. The gripping image. Now, coupled with this jailhouse court hearing, the man accused no-show in court waiving his right to appear. Police say what ended in tragedy began as a domestic violence incident. Investigators still don't know yet. What led up to the shooting Monday evening at the Brighton rich apartment complex. But police said the father called nine one one afterwards and surrendered to arriving officers without incident. Judge found a reason to keep the accused man in jail. He's being held a million dollars bail due back in court on Thursday. Since the election of Donald Trump, the Seattle city council has passed more than a dozen resolutions opposing moves by the president and congressional Republicans. None of them have any material affect on city law, and most have been sponsored by Lorena Gonzalez. She declined to talk to us about why but it's a tactic often used to build name recognition before a campaign, according to Mark, Allen Smith professor political science at the university of Washington. Really focused on. Those complicated policy. Details that might help to improve the transportation system and not get that much attention for it. Whereas when she does this, she is getting attention. Gonzalez is due for re election to the Seattle city council until twenty twenty one Seattle police are investigating death threats made against a candidate for city council in a Facebook post airy Hoffmann says he's received a number of antisemitic threats through the website eight Chan which is known for its lax regulation, many of the post threatened violence and even death Hoffman's running for city council district to seeking the seat being vacated by Bruce Harrell. The owner of a now, defunct Kent sports team is charged with rape almost ten years after the case was I closed by police for lack of evidence. Komo's Eric Heintz says the update you on URL faces a second degree. Rape charge for an alleged attack on massage parlor worker, in Kirkland in two thousand nine the time supports the case was reopened in two thousand seventeen after Earl was arrested earlier that same year in Arizona on a sexual assault charge involving two babysitters girl, wants the owner of the Kent impact soccer team history, rain, June twenty four th and King County superior court, but not expected to actually attend the hearing as ear Maine's in jail in Arizona court documents in the Kirkland case do not specify. Why Earl is being charged now. Eric Heintz, KOMO news. Number gray whales dying, along the west coast continues to grow today. We learned that the whale found dead in every last month died of starvation since the beginning of the year, thirty gray whales have washed up on the beaches here in Washington. The most recent was found just two days ago in will obey. Seattle landlords went up against the city's fair chance. Housing ordinance today and arguments before the state supreme court. Komo's Carleen Johnson reports rental housing association of Washington, and three landlord sued Seattle over the part of the law that bans rental restrictions based on criminal records. Attorney for the landlords, Brian Hodges government.

Seattle city council Lorena Gonzalez Seattle Komo Eric Heintz supreme court Washington rape KOMO Renton Donald Trump Brighton rich Earl Arizona university of Washington Bruce Harrell Kirkland Facebook Brian Hodges
"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"That's got as as a billion and said the other day on this program. You know, bar intercepted the football and scored and scored a touchdown. And the Republicans are all dancing in the end. And most of all, of course, President Trump he'll says mentioned by the way that he thinks that the the whole thing could turn, and they could be you know, enormous backlash. But if it's just it's just assuming the worst what would Bosmo natives be for doing what many accusing accusing him and doing would it be. To save the Republican brand ahead of twenty twenty. I kinda magin even though he's appointed by Bush by Trump and and audition for the job he seems to have come from that school. And so does Malla and said as Registan of conservative Republicans, they come from the school, you know, more like, the Jeb Bush school, and the Donald Trump, you know, nothing kind of Republican party, right? So I just have to say prepatory it pains me to assume the worst of of Bill Barbara let me answer your question on its merits. Yeah. The the thing that people are most troubled by, but I think is not too likely some kind of personal service to salvage Trump himself. I see that as far as being, you know, it's one of the reasons I thought he would be a good picky. He would not toady in that way. There could be some kind of, you know, save salvation of party idea behind. He is. A strong Republican that would be also improper and with pain me. There could be some kind of, you know, Gerald Ford moment of we have to end this national nightmare and save the Republic, if that's his view in my it. You know, it sounds enlightened. But I don't think it would be it's real at this point, the Watergate analogy Watergate played out that and we knew the story, and then and he was a closing chapter that had already been read here. We all know the story, we have to know the story, if that's what's in Bill buys mind than there's, you know, it's it's at best a, you know, wrong headed, those are the things I can think of and then there's some, you know, possibility that this is just his reading of the law that he really did have to make a judgment. He really thought Muller should have. But I that seems tenuous to me. So, you know, I know. People like on on this done talking petScom. We offer opinions, but this really is an abiding mystery. And sometimes you have to say it, and we need to see those. They some not to mention the rest of the report in order to judge just this question and know, what kind of problem we have on our hands, but just in closing general Nadler in the chair of the of the House Judiciary committee. He's not wrong as insane that the that these reports would normally ago to the house because the house under the country Shen has the responsibility for impeachment if indeed it's warranted. One of the army said I find about this is that the DOJ rigs that people are complaining about will set up because of the abusive, Ken Starr, who just went just dumped everything and on the open with all. Salacious and tendentious material about Bill Clinton's private sex live, and they decided they didn't want that to happen again. Because it's an irony that at former prosecutor dumped damaging material to destroy the presidency of a democrat who was impeached, and now you've got material being held up by special prosecutor, and many people think it's the to protect a Republican president who might well be guilty of of of crimes that could impeach him. So I see that as an irony. Yeah. Well, putting on my hat as a democrat. And I am at democrat. It does seem like the party's gotten the, you know, crap kicked out of it for twenty years. But by losing these extremely narrow a whole series of you know, of games in overtime the short answer to your question on Nadler though and starting to say, it's not so. Simple. The star report as you say was under a different regime and Watergate there's a fight about that. What was the basis for its release that the court will probably decide this ultimately, the DC circuits just ruled two days ago that you can't go outside the four corners of the the law that gives specific sections. You can't just do who seek to see these this'll discretion. The good news, though, is they read one of the exceptions to say, you probably can turn it over to congress. And I do think that will happen there other than national intelligence. Okay. But you can turn it over to the heads the ongoing investigation. Okay. But that'll be small and then this fourth category seems to have been made out on early. You know, prejudicial to uncharged parties the real big ticket item. Here is the grand jury info. And I, you know, it's it will be a battle. It'll take time and time is on the them is not on. At them side. But I think they should all mentally win. Well, how I think very much for joining us here today. Always a pleasure. Thanks. Thank you. Again. I've been speaking with Harry Littman who's a former United States attorney appointed by Bill Clinton. He's was also a deputy assistant general in the Justice department. He's currently professor political science at the university of California San Diego, and he has an update of the Washington Post release the multi summaries now take a brief station breaking sess Trump's vow. The Democrats will never see his tax returns..

Donald Trump Bill Clinton Nadler president Republican party twenty twenty Bill Barbara sess Trump Bosmo Bill football prosecutor Gerald Ford Bush Jeb Bush school DOJ Justice department Ken Starr Malla House Judiciary committee
"professor political science" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"I'm very excited about this next couple of segments. We have a special guest here. If you don't know who he is having read his books, you're in for a treat. It is. Professor Paul kangol K E N G O, professor political science at grove City College an amazing institution author more than fourteen books and visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution. But in his bio, I love it. He uses the full name of the Hoover Institution, and I'm gonna use it the Hoover Institution on the war, revolution and peace. That's a much better. Descript, professor, kangol welcome aboard. Hey is great to be with you. It's an honor to be on yourself. Thank you for joining us. You have a book that people have been praising to me left, right and center called a pope and a president. I will be reading it. But also, thank you. I have to mention your politically. Incorrect guide to communism because I think that's going to be the theme of our segments with you. I'm just going to play you an audio cut from last win was it. It was Friday morning. Joe Scarborough who didn't like what I have to say at CPAC about communism. Let's play cut eleven burgers. Guess Hitler wanted to take away your pastrami?.

"professor political science" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I because the whole point of the story is to blame Republicans for the nasty attitude in America, right? The next day, Nicole Wallace. She is to be a fake Republicans. She worked for wishy washy Republicans, and now she's at MSNBC, and she's just completely gone over to the North Korean side there. The next day Nicole Wallace, a former Republican operative turned MSNBC commentator and Trump critic, that's how you get the jobs at MSNBC and CNN you've been anti-trump Republican they'll hire you put on all day long played a clip of degenerate commentary during her show, she's got a show and agreed with him. Although she placed the blame squarely on the President Trump. She said green lit a war in this country around race is that really Trump did that by saying what they're not sending their best or when it comes to tearing down confederate statues all of Democrats, by the way, they're good people on both sides. They've been misrepresenting that ever since. I'm sorry. Trump green lit the the war on race around race. That's what the Washington Post says. They can't just. Type this stuff. You know? It's it's good. That might be it. He says, and they go on and on with all this stupid stuff. They got to Robert rice, shoes a lifelong Democrat Clinton guy. Now, he's at UC Berkeley as you might expect. Where else would you go probably terrorizing children and trying to trample their free speech rights and praising violent attacks by left us is a terrible little man said the way Mr. Trump and his defenders are behaving. It's not absurd to imagine serious social unrest rights wrote in the Baltimore Sun. This is how low he's taken us say now, it's it's all their fault. Now, they go to Barbara Walters. A professor political science at San Diego State UC, San Diego, rather. But the US is starting to show that it is moving in that direction, meaning civil war countries with bad governance are the ones that experience these wars, and they they say the Washington Post violence is most likely to occur according to one of their phony experts when political leaders used quote, dehumanizing language, and quote to describe opponents now with that said the human the dehumanizing language from. Politicians? What was I put in mind? I was of course, put in mind of of what else well of Hillary Clinton's deplorables comment, just for one thing where she described half of America's deplorable racist. Some Affleck this dehumanizing language by the left is pretty much pretty much out of control. And and it is a bad thing. We're having a technical difficulty here. So I'm going to have to take a pause, and we're gonna come back with some audio. That's going to make sense to then the whole thing is going to make sense. That's what's going to make sense. So oh, we're gonna go along that we're gonna do. Okay. All right. Well, then in that case, the Washington Post and their Sunday story on the looming civil war, which is all the fault of the Republicans. So I'd like to just get into a couple of audio soundbites. Let's go to because this dehumanizing language. First of all, let's go to number eighteen because Hillary Clinton is like LeBow from Hogan's heroes. She's crawling out. Tunnels smoking. Cigs. Unshaven with a smelly black leather jacket on she's part of the French resistance. Now back to being activists citizen and part of the resistance. Resistance..

Mr. Trump Nicole Wallace Washington Post Hillary Clinton MSNBC America UC Berkeley San Diego State UC Barbara Walters San Diego Baltimore Sun US CNN Robert rice Affleck President professor
"professor political science" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Pissed off. What is it that has you? So angry. The attackers. But it's also the attacks psych at first it was a thing of like, listen, if I tell the truth, then that's it because it's too. Then it became. Oh, how can you doubt? That like how do you? How do you not believe that it's the truth? And then it became a thing. It's not necessarily that. You don't believe that? This is the truth. You don't even want to see the truth. It's almost like he's fashionable actor. That was just small it in his interview with Robin Roberts. Joining us is professor Wilfred Riley, professor political science at Kentucky state university and his new book out called hate crime hoax. Professor, thanks for hanging with us. We talk wasn't. We hear from the left all the time is and everyone just says it at if it is gospel. We know hate crimes are on the rise in America is that true. It depends. What you mean? So that's often called the Trump surge with kind of an ominous tones in the voice and you'll hear these statistics like hate crimes have risen more than seven percent under the current president. This is America in twenty nineteen the reality. First of all is that America is not a very interracially violet country interracial crime overall is pretty rare. If you look at murder eighty five percent white remember victims on ninety four percent of black murder victims are killed by someone of the same race. Usually that they knew the person most likely to kill you is your ex wife. I just added note or your husband, not, you know, five minutes of different ethnicity that jump out of an econoline van and beat you to death. So that narrative overall is false it's worth noting to when interracial climbs does occur. It's actually about seventy percent minority on white which is never discussed. But moving on from that. I mean in terms of hate crimes specifically, they're only about seven thousand reported hate crimes at a typical year. And again as I demonstrated using data fair number of those are hoaxes that's reports that's not convictions whatnot. But even just looking at that data this total surgeon hate crimes under Trump has been about four or five hundred. So in two thousand fourteen hundred Mr Obama, you had a six thousand five hundred eighteen incident. Last year, you had seven thousand one hundred seventy five incident. So the surge if it existed his say four hundred cases in a country of three hundred forty million people, and it's questionable how much of that Israel. So there's there's not much distinguishing between hate crimes committed against sort of what you think of a standard minority victims, for example, and hate crimes committed against conservative white right of I hate crimes targeting. Whites has risen to something. Like twenty two percent of all hate crimes. So we might be seeing part of that might be a surge in attacks on Trump's supporters or just a surgeon interracial fistfights, prosecuted hate crimes that aren't necessarily one size faltered the other. And again, a lot of these cases don't seem to be you don't wanna say true. But at least prosecutable the conviction rate for hate crimes is quite low. So I don't know how much of a surge in hate crimes were actually I mean, maybe an additional hundred or so real felony cases per year. If that, right. Well, the book is hate crime hoax. The author is professor Wilfred Riley, sir. Thank you so much for your time with us. We really appreciate it and congratulations on a very very timely publication. Seven fifty one on wwl mail. Message and data rates may apply. Please don't text while driving. If you've been in business more than twenty minutes, you've probably printed your logo on all kinds of promotional products. We all know logos work because they're on everything from the top.

professor America Wilfred Riley Trump us murder Kentucky state university Mr Obama Robin Roberts president Israel eighty five percent ninety four percent twenty two percent seventy percent twenty minutes seven percent five minutes
"professor political science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:33 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome back to all of it. It's two thousand nineteen and somehow we are still talking about black face in our pitch meeting. We sort of jokingly said, hey, let's do a segment called black face for dummies. But here's the deal. It's it's not a joke in reality. Only a dummy would do black face. That's not at a Tory. Oh, by the way. That's just fact the this conversation was reignited because of Virginia governor that is as of twelve thirty one on February thirteenth Ralph Northam. He's continuing to fight for his job after it was revealed his medical school yearbook. There was a page featured his page with a man in black face and another in Klan hood, while he ultimately denied that he is either of the men in the photo he admitted to wearing black face on a separate occasion. As part of a Michael Jackson, costume Virginia. Attorney general Mark herring. Also admitted to wearing black face in college. The whole thing has a lot of people asking what the what? While others are asking, are you really that surprised to see this in a state that was home to the capital of the confederacy? A real head scratcher is the fact that Gucci had a sweater and it stores which had to pull because it heavily resembled flat black face and singer, Katy Perry pulled a pair of shoes. At were you get the idea from students at the university of Oklahoma to poly prep here in New York. Some seem to feel the need to do black face. It seems that even in two thousand nineteen a whole lot of people. Still don't understand why it is so abhorrent. We think it is time for a history lesson. Joining us now is Dr Michael fought ROY and associate professor political science at Howard University to walk us through the history of black face in America. Which means there will be some language, folks. Some real talk language just letting you know. Thanks for being with us. It's my pleasure. Thank you. All right. So let's go back to the very beginning. Many people associate black face with the south. But the actually the practice began in New York and northern cities. Why? Well, it appears that it started there because there were there were literally performers out there looking for ways to entertain people. And then as now mocking black people is is a form of entertainment for some people shortly after that took place in New York. It began to move and make its way to the south. And that's where it just one of exploded and became the sort of rooted itself in our American identity and pervades itself. Even to this day who are often the people performing in black face. Well, they were primarily menstrual performers, and they did so again because they're trying to figure out how to put together an act that can can draw draw crowds. And so. They hit on this black face piece which began before the civil war, and it traffic than some of the most racist, vile stereotypes that that you can imagine, you know, black people are lazy black people are dimwitted. Black people are cowardly black people are, hyper sexual, and what's notable in my view is that those stereotypes then are very much the way many people who don't have any real sustain contact were black people view black people now, and it speaks to the permanence of culture and embedding in certain people views about others that they don't know. Do we know if there was any political aim to black face? Well, you know, I'm a political scientist almost everything in the context of politics. You know, if you can literally dehumanize people, which is what black face was initially doing. And currently I think you should say I think one can say if you can dehumanize people in devalue people, then you can make it easier to keep people enslaved and to resist the abolitionist movement. There was developing which was saying, no, no, no black people human beings to and should be afforded the same rights as everyone else and some of the reading I didn't. And please correct me if I'm wrong there were some some poor whites were often doing black face as a way to sort of separate themselves from black people. One of the really interesting side notes in American history is while black people were enslaved and and treated about as poorly as as you as human beings can be treated poor white had only a slightly better existence in some in some respects and for them to utilize black face was sort of. A way for them to make themselves feel better about their own situations in that if at least I'm not black at least, I'm not them. And if I can engage in these same markings that they're lazy dimwitted cowardly and hyper sexual then I can elevate myself socially, and perhaps even socio economically above this group of people. My guest is Dr Michael ROY associate professor of political science at Howard University were talking about the history of black face. How did did black entertainers ever use black face? Sadly, yes. And and it's it's also partly a reflection of the reality of that time as you can imagine a black entertainment and entertainers in that period did not have very many options. Some of them did did you live black face as a as a way of? Sort of keeping busy if you will if a way of a way to work and. They were they did what they could in the context in which they were operating, and it's a sad truth that they by doing that helped to affect your weight and perpetuate racial stereotypes. How did black face influence advertising? Well in a number ways. But let me broaden effort just a moment of because advertising is part of a larger sort of communication visuals sphere. So as you get into their early twentieth century, you see a number of of American actors people like Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland and Shirley temple revered figures in American cinema who used black face in movies. All right. So if they use it in movies, and it sells movies, then why wouldn't advertise seem to use it to sell whatever product they thought it was appropriate to use. And so in that regard bug face became a mechanism to sell products. Across a full range of. Of examples. So at what point you mentioned Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland at what point did people finally begin to say, this has no place in entertainment and advertising in culture. You know, that's a that's a it's difficult to sort of put a finger on particular period of time. But I think as you look at the civil rights movement of the nineteen sixties. You know? We often view it in the context of public policy, and rightfully so it actually wasn't attempt to up the entire American system of racism, and that included the movement that we saw in the entertainment industry entertainment industry to reinforce many of these images. So it was also calling not just for pump changes in public policy, but changes in our cultural mores, and you began to see African Americans getting very limited. But in some respects, very significant roles in television, and in movies, and at that point people began to move away from black face now as we as we consider it in the context of what's going on with elected officials now, many of those elected officials are of an age in which they were at least culturally and politically socialized and appeared in where it's black face. Is still very much acceptable. But as you move forward with younger people, you see that that's just not acceptable anymore. The articles. I've read noted that there was a bit of a resurgence of black face in the nineteen eighties. Do you understand? Why? I I have about that. So Regina, governor Ralph nor them. In his nineteen Eighty-four medical school yearbook. And by the way, I didn't even know medical schools had you, but nineteen Eighty-four is a really pivotal year. Ronald Reagan's running for reelection. There's the king holiday Bill controversy in in November of nineteen Eighty-four the free South Africa movement launches Jesse Jackson's running for president in nineteen Eighty-four. There are a lot of things happening in the country at around the same time. And that's also about when you saw the resurgence of black face in some respects. And I think that was used as a sort of cultural pushback to some of the changes that were beginning to occur in America at that time. I have to read you a text. My my niece grew up in Richmond Virginia, and she went to Dartmouth and got a degree in African American studies. And we've been texting about this. And this is what she texted me about Virginia. She said what a mess all around. Let me just say this. If we're saying north them in a state AG need to resign for wearing black face when they were in med school and college respectively, which to be clear they one hundred percent should resign for wearing black face that I wanna see the receipts for the rest of the state legislature. I'm positive at nearly all the white men in the state legislature. Have worn black face at some point in time. And they've all got to go. We're cleaning house, y'all. And they give you let me give you a personal anecdote because in nineteen eighty four. I started undergraduate school have Hampton university in Hampton Virginia. I am very familiar with the Commonwealth, and I will tell you. She's a thousand percent, and it helps to explain it really does help. Explain why there's been relative silence from the elected officials in the Commonwealth over this. Because many of them know that if a yearbook picture gets out people friends from college or wherever start to talk, then they're going to have problems too. Yeah. She went on. I wanna see everyone's yearbooks because it was anarchy in the world. Yearbooks back in the day. Maybe it's like. She goes like a new requirement, maybe tax returns and yearbooks. Yeah. Listen. So the yearbooks. The are sort of memorialize racism, if you will and it serves as a time capsule of what is going on at a particular school at a particular time. I haven't seen governor Northerns medical school yearbook. But I'm told by people who reporters in the area, we've covered this story that they're the pages all through the thing with of this kind of thing. And there's an irony that many of those folks in there practicing physicians providing healthcare to people all over the Commonwealth and elsewhere, and it makes you wonder my guess is Dr Michael font ROY associate professor political science at Howard University. It's interesting. A lot of the black face were seeing is kids getting dressed up for Halloween. There seems to be this issue that people somehow feel like Halloween is okay. A recent Pew Research poll found that one third of Americans or at least the ones asked this question in this poll, say black bases. Okay. If it's part of a Halloween costume. Him. Can you explain why someone would think that's okay? No. Why did he react that way? I think because they don't understand the history of an and they don't take it seriously. So I think that we have to remember that relatively young people have noticed oracle context. All right. And so they they don't get it. They don't understand it and people human beings have a tendency to not have a lot of regard for things they don't understand. And so I I can understand in that regard that I would think it's all right. But it's hard to explain to somebody to his his Harper. Somebody to hear the history of black face. And the fact that along with Ku Klux Klan Hood's confederate flags and confederate monuments in some respects, re represents some kind of visual terrorism for black people. That's omnipresent all the time that his hard at that point for people understand that. And then say it's ok unless they just don't care. My that's what we have some some some regard here. Dr Michael font rise been my guests, he associate professor political science at Howard University. Thank you, sir. For joining us today. We really appreciate your help. My pleasure. All that. We'll be back after a break with a new PBS documentary about black memorabilia, materials collectibles, antiques and items still produced today that embody a racist representations of.

Howard University associate professor Virginia New York Commonwealth Ralph Northam Dr Michael America Michael Jackson Mickey Rooney university of Oklahoma associate professor of politic Mark herring Judy Garland Ku Klux Klan Hood Attorney Katy Perry Dr Michael ROY
"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:18 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"On ninety three WIBC our guest today is our good friend, Dr Laura Albright, plus professor political science over at the university of Indianapolis, Lauren. I teach just about a block away from each of them in the school of business. She's in the school of political science. But it's always good to have her on when we are looking at things from a national perspective as they sort of dominated the news as of late blow or something in the national headlines. A little closer to home has been up south bend mayor p Buddha sort of announcing an exploratory committee for president of the United States thirty seven years old. So you'd be the youngest person if if he made ever elected president also a mayor David veteran also a member of the community married from the midwest was a contender for taking over the DNC. These is Buddha judge that that guy that nobody saw common. He could be I think he doesn't have a lot of national recognition. I think he will certainly get that. As we go through the process and either help be successful and is the top or he won't alternately drop out. He's a really interesting candidate because he checks a lot of boxes of you mentioned on thirty seven and credibly young to run for president. He's been in public office for quite some time. I believe he took mayor position in two thousand eleven he's gay. So that, you know, being unique he served in the navy has armed forces experience. I mean, if you just go down the list, he really different as a can. Of course, it's exciting because he's from Indiana, and he's a mid western candidate for the Democrats that would be appealing the blue wall didn't stand in two thousand sixteen. I'm sure the party's reassessing that and how how strong they can be there. I I don't know how long have candidacy year where it will take us. But I'd say as far as kids go, he's he's on a more, exciting and an unusual. I say candidates that are out there right now. And there's a lot of them trying to run for president for the democrat animals. Interesting to also about. Peter Budaj and to a lesser degree. Some of the other folks who've run up, for example, Kamala Harris announced Allah, Calif, alad, California, say what you will about their respective politics. The fact that you have here on one hand African American female at least for now a serious contender for the presidency gay man, a serious contender. It shows that America's an entirely different place in two thousand eighteen the no say Bill even back in two thousand, but this these were this would have been unheard of like I said this regardless of the of the politics at the very least from the once again mode sort of more glass barriers being broken. Yeah. Oh, absolutely. I think it's kind of what's exciting about the candidates coming out of the woodworking as people are declaring UCLA lot more diversity and not just in the typical sense of the word. We'll say the one thing they all of us very well educated and love to see some big ten or SEC SEC grad somewhere in there. They they tend to come from the I've you still but nonetheless, you have. More of a variety candidates. And I think as you said it speaks to the changing politics the time, I think it speaks to a change in voters interests. Now, people are are more interested. They're ready for that in terms of a candidacy, and you definitely see that. When people are declaring we'll get back to someone like Pete Buddha. Judge like I said beyond visit somebody from Bob small, medium size midwestern city, south bend, Indiana is still a very very red state. How does somebody like footage breakout against some of the bigger names? You'll look the Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren to have declared and the likely juvenile folks like Joe Biden into lesser Bernie Sanders who may declare later, oh, he has to find a national platform, and that's critical because everyone else you've mentioned, they are known nationally. Of course, it helps if you're in the Senate because it's a national institution. I think I'm Buddha judges characterized us as an underdog project, and that's a really apt characterization because he's a he's a mayor from the city in a state, but people know, but have occasionally accused us being flyover country. I couldn't. Degree on that more. It still finding a way to have a national platform. And so whatever is he's standing out for in terms of what he stands for as a candidate. If there's a way that he can get more of a national spotlight. I think one of the things that Kamala Harris did very strategically and very well. She's one of the first people to speak at the cabinet hearings. And I I knew when she did that a very clear she was interested in Ryan for president because she was aware that the Senator most people don't watch these span, but they were paying attention to those hearings. And she wanted to be clear like this is how she stands on this. She wanted to introduce herself informally to the American public and get her name, and those kind of conversations I think that's the challenge that Buddha. Judge has is figuring out a way absent of belonging to federal institution. An absent of being in DC. How can he get his name and his platform out there on a national level? So people outside Indiana and outside. The midwest are also talking about him our guest for a few more minutes on the program. Today is our good friend. Dr Laura Albright, professor political science at the university of Indianapolis. And also we teach together just like I said just getting a little caught up on some of the national things, even though the universe of Republicans Democrats at the national level. Starbucks CEO, Howard Schultz, apparently has raised eyebrow. Or to this week American businessman talk about an independent run for the presidency that having a lot of Democrats all worked up, basically say, no if you run you'll take votes from you'll you'll split the anti Trump vote and Donald Trump will be elected to another term. I don't necessarily buy that. Because if you go back and look at now Ross Perot and Bill Clinton than than happening who paid attention to what was going on. But what does what does that tell you when someone like Howard Schultz now is America ready for a quote unquote third party candidate? It always seems to me that the third party candidate somebody people like to date or maybe got a couple of times, but not necessarily the one they want to. When when the rubber hits the road, and you know, what the system set up to save party system. It really is from a seat level in terms of weathered party candidate has to do just to get on the ballot. Let alone to get voter so them and from a fundraising perspective, it's a very two party system. I think that makes it hard for third party candidate to win. There's the questions of could they spoil the race for somebody else. But I was looking at it from a democratic perspective as more opportunity and understanding is very difficult for a third party candidate. They will likely not be successful in winning. But people have different names for running in the first place, and it might not be a victory. I think this tells you right now, there's no designated candidate. There's no one person that we're looking to like oh yet. This is going to be the person elected. I'm the president said he's been around again. But if he chooses notch, I think there are a lot of Republicans that are interesting for Tunde. The I think it shows you there's a deep bench on both sides and in many. Different ways deep bench for both parties and even those who don't go on. So I think it's also important duck Laura's, we get ready to wind down here that in the modern era since nineteen sixty there's only been I think maybe a couple of times where a president who was elected did not win a second term Jimmy Carter and one thousand nine hundred eighty and George Herbert Walker Bush in one thousand nine hundred two other than that. The odds tend to favor the incumbent. Oh, absolutely. And there have been times when the incumbent has chosen not again, if you look at LBJ, for example, considering a second terminals designing against it. So overwhelmingly incumbency advantage matters in this country. But also requires the incumbent to want to participate, and I just I know he said he wants against I don't mean to undermine President Trump. But I'm saying I think there'd be other people out there very interested in the position. If you decide that one term in four years was was all he needed. All right. Where our guest today has been our good friend, Dr Laura all right since professor political science at the university of Annapolis kind of gives us up to speed on some of the big national, news items that we've all seen this week, Laura. My friend always going to chat with you. Thank you, very very much for being with us. We'll talk to you soon. I enjoy it so much. Thank you. I'll do house. House was not that busy this week. So we're going to skip over that. But turn our attention to some matters local because nobody got municipal elections coming up. So I wanna make sure that we keep you covered in that area as well. You're listening to the weekend edition of a Dula large here on ninety three WIB's.

president Kamala Harris Indiana President Trump professor Dr Laura Albright university of Indianapolis Howard Schultz America Bill Clinton p Buddha United States Peter Budaj Pete Buddha Senate House Starbucks Dr Laura DNC Lauren
"professor political science" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Welcome back to the town hall review. I'm Hugh Hewitt. Carol Swain is the founder and president of be the people project. She was a professor political science and law at Vanderbilt University. She's also conservative than black. And it's that combination. That has some people strangely upset. She spoke with Salem host Dennis Prager. So you have quite a journey there mean black southern woman's journey. To freedom. So where did you begin? What were you go up by the evil people perch me all the time? And they wanna know how it is that I became a Republican and I decided. Right. Something you know, for the people that were asking me. And when I started thinking about it, I really have to thank hard because I didn't know why Alison democrat, you know, all of my life. And I realized that, you know, it's very complicated. But I understand that why so many blacks in the Democratic Party and just how hard it is to break free. Good. So then in a nutshell explain that, I asked all the time. Why are so many Jews on the left, and I have a very different answers. I think with blacks and Jews give it given the failure of the Democratic Party to improve the lives of blacks as mayors congressmen, etc. Why do blacks keep voting democrat? I believe that goes back to the Civil Rights Act of the nineteen sixties. And the fact that Lyndon Johnson Santos act, and in my book, I talk about having been.

Carol Swain founder and president Democratic Party Hugh Hewitt Alison democrat Lyndon Johnson Santos Dennis Prager Vanderbilt University Salem
"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Which a lot of people speculated. And they've suggested that he prefers the safe confines of the federal prison to be possibility. A straight needle in central park. I find my best sense than now. I mean, he's scenes when you see and read them utterly broken and pathetic kind of figure, and I see that possibility the sort of John parade. I I my better gas is that he's just a completely down on his luck. Former swashbuckling gambler who just has no confidence anymore and has veered back and forth. Very imprudently. Right. I mean in that situation what you would want. Someone to do is pick your pick your poison take it, and you know, are you can cooperate with. Are you going to aim for the pardon, but not go back and forth? So the the suggestions that maybe he's a Kremlin agent to me have always. Provided. No real answer to well. Why? Then did he decide to call in the first place and go through this sort of cooperation and only the works back? I just think he's a mess. He's you know, feels he's gonna die in prison. He thinks he wants to try to be show loyalty at the end of his life, or at least not be a school Wheeler. But he he has gone back and forth ingest pursued inconsistent strategies that I you know, I understand is not fully satisfied explanation. But we're dealing implausibility because any way you slice it. He's his conduct for a pardon for Russia for all our has has been irrational and imbecilic because he's welcomed up kind of not not. Being in anybody's favor. We'll Harry, and I thank you very much for joining us today. Oh, always always get to be here. Thanks very much. Thanks a lot. How to and again. I'm speaking with Harry is a former United States attorney and deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice department is currently professor political science at the university of California, San Diego. We'll take a brief station. Breaking back looking into how it appears that Trump is poised to take a radical action on the border by declaring a national emergency..

Harry Wheeler Trump Kremlin deputy assistant attorney gene San Diego Justice department John Russia United States attorney university of California professor
"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And forth? So the the suggestions that maybe he's Kremlin agent to me have always. Provided. No real answer to why. Then did he decide to call operate in the first place and go through this sort of cooperation and only the works back? I just think he's a mass. He's you know, feels he's gonna die in prison. He thinks he wants to try to be show loyalty at the end of his life, or at least not be a a school healer, but he he has gone back and forth and just pursued inconsistent strategies that I you know, I understand is not fully satisfied explanation. But we're dealing implausibility because any way you slice it. He's his conduct for a pardon for Russia for Muller has has been irrational and imbecilic because he's wound up kind of not not. Being in anybody's favor. We'll Harry lemon. I thank you very much for joining us today. Oh, always get to be. Thanks very much. Thanks a lot happening again. That'd be speaking. With Harry Littman is a former United States attorney and deputy assistant attorney general in the Justice department is currently professor political science at the university of California San Diego, we take a brief station. Breaking back looking into how it appears that Trump is poised to take a radical action on the border by declaring a national emergency..

Harry Littman Harry lemon Muller deputy assistant attorney gene Trump Justice department university of California San D United States attorney Russia professor
"professor political science" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Are. So we can move forward. And to the extent congress can move forward and define that. That would be something. I'd welcome with open arms. Even if it didn't have all the perfect policies that I wanted it at least if there was purpose to the policies. I think that would be helpful with a divided congress though. I mean, do do you think that that's possible? You know, there are overlaps, and it's really interesting as where we could see some some compromise. Although no, I'm not up to missed. You asked me what I want? This is a wish. Well, I think I was just hacked by the Chinese, but I talked about China do get taken out of the program. Okay. Well, well, you have returned to us. Thank goodness. I stick. Let me turn to you. The one thing that you wish would or will happen in two thousand nineteen. I'd like to see thirteen Republicans senators suck it up and say what they actually think about policy questions that come before them. I think that would be enough. I'm not interested so much as I said before impeachment but enough to put the country back in a direction where the country starts to see Washington is capable of identifying and addressing problems and in in which if those problems are dressed plane is clearly put where it belongs, which is on the current president that kind of a small change would have an enormous effect on the the way the country responds across the board. But and so I'm wishing for. For a small small change in PA as possible that would have as many big payoff. I end just briefly ask you, I mean, you talked about Republican regarding regarding that policy haven't they already been doing that. And in fact, maybe a lot of the thing is a lot of them do agree with the policies. The president is issuing. I don't think that that's true. I think of course, some centers that's true. But many it's not, and you can tell from those who are resigning at retiring and speaking their mind, I by the way, don't think this will happen unless the president's pulling numbers ago below thirty. Well, Beverly gage last thought goes to your hope for twenty nineteen. Okay. Well, I'll offer to they're both smallish. But I think with big impacts potentially one I would like to see a generational shift in leadership of the Democratic Party and the others. I would like to see more teachers strikes because that hasn't been something pretty remarkable to watch. It's brought new. And different kinds of people into politics. I think it's had a dramatic impact. And it has the potential to do something that is both small and over the long term possibly transformative. Well, I wanna thank all three of you for joining us this hour, and for helping us think begin to think through what twenty nineteen might have in store for us, Beverly gage historian and professor and director of the program and grand strategy at Yale University. Beverly thank you so much. Thank you. And I unless day professor political science at the university of Pennsylvania. I, and it was a pleasure to have you. Thank you. Thank you. And Diane Swonk chief economist and managing director of the consulting firm. Grant, Thornton always a pleasure to speak with you. Diane. Thank you. So very much. Thank you. And by the way, folks, you.

Beverly gage president congress China professor and director Diane Swonk PA Democratic Party Washington Yale University professor chief economist university of Pennsylvania Grant managing director Thornton
Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 3 years ago

Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang
Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 3 years ago

Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang