21 Burst results for "Professor Of Political Science"

"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

03:39 min | Last month

"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

"As with my folks, the other day about will maybe we'll go to Hebrew. We could have can have tropical storm Dalit who knows. Of Not. And Deed Eric. Burgers. A meteorologist with Space City. Eric. Thanks again. My pleasure. Have a good day you. Up. Next the president's back in the White House but still recovering from covid nineteen, we explore the political implications of his coronavirus diagnosis and the number of other White House officials who contracted in our political roundup was Houston matters continues. This is Houston matters. I'm Craig Cohen. President trump says he's looking forward to next week's debate with former vice president Joe Biden as scheduled this despite his hospitalization over the weekend after testing positive for Kovic nineteen while staying at Walter Reed he needed oxygen on multiple occasions and has taken several doses of both standard and experimental treatments for the coronavirus. It's hard to separate fact from fiction when it comes to any president's medical condition with mixed messages coming from the White House and the president's doctors over the last week and from an administration and president who have a habit of regular false statements. It's especially hard to know what to take at face value to discuss the political implications of the president's condition and comments about his condition we are joined in today's political roundup. By Beth's associate professor political science at the University of Houston and Toronto Cortina Associate Professor Political Science and Associate Director at the Center for Mexican American. Studies at UH also hosts news eighty, eight, seven party politics program Beth or Automo-. Welcome to Houston matters good morning running a wide. Let me start with you Harare from the President's perspective. Is it so important to project this idea that he's recovering or recovered quickly from covid nineteen? Well. The main reason is that Paul Dawson sued very well with voters recent poll that we did for example, among Latino voters National poll we'd samples here in. Texas, shows Latinos for instance, are four times more likely to vote for Joe Vitamin when they have been affected by Covid so the president wants to give a message of reassurance message that you know could say you know I'd beat to the the the the virus single handedly he's not that dangerous I'm well, you can do it yourself therefore trying to get a little bit more of distraction against away from the I guess mismanagement of the federal government regarding covid nineteen, Beth. What are the political implications if either he should have to postpone next week's debate which doesn't seem likely at this point Or if he goes ahead with it and it turns out, he's not really fully recovered by then. Yeah. That's an interesting thing I think almost the game is chicken I think he's Possibly banking on the fact that Biden's going. And that you know he's I think he's trying to forced biden his hand he pushing this narrative that Oh your mask is a prop. You're hiding behind it. You're you're week you're fragile. You're scared I. THINK HE'S In some ways that Biden will be the one that says, no, we're not going forward with this. because yeah. I. If he goes and shows up at a debate stage and that breath or. Not Himself. That's certainly going to raise a lot of question. Hirano..

president Joe Biden Toronto Cortina Associate Prof Houston Beth Joe Vitamin vice president White House Walter Reed covid University of Houston Craig Cohen Eric associate professor Space City Harare Paul Dawson Texas trump
"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

02:48 min | 3 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

"An how many of our kids have not seen the wizard of Oz? I. Mean Classic Movies. Ghostbusters Fun. Movie Spiderman Black Panther. These are movies that I think almost everyone will be happy to take their whole family to go see. So I think this is a great idea and I wish Walmart well, and I which families will going to see these movies and take home. Amber Yay crag you gave us something that I can use the word good for. This is great i. love that someone's doing something. This is innovation we talk about innovation as it relates to like technology. Or big advancements in medicine and teleportation. But something as simple as turning a large parking lot into a drive in movie theater during Global Pandemic is very innovative to me and it's very feel good and gives families and people a chance to get out of the house and feel safe to do something and watch something. Awesome like a really good classic movie. So I know Walmart gets a lot of flack but. More power to him I, love this idea. Ambrose is the founder and CEO of Ambrose McDowell communications with Ashley, is the editor of Texas, leftist Com, and hosted the aggressive voices podcast and David. Brennan is a Professor Political Science and Cherif Social. Sciences at the University of Houston Downtown Amber Wayne David. Thanks very much. Thank you Craig. Thanks for hosting us. Thanks Craig. y'All..

Walmart Amber Wayne David Ambrose McDowell Craig Oz Ambrose Cherif Social founder and CEO Professor Political Science University of Houston Brennan Ashley Craig. editor Texas
"professor political science" Discussed on Power Corrupts

Power Corrupts

09:10 min | 9 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Power Corrupts

"I imagine the many of you are stuck at home at the moment or finding yourself with a bit more time on your hands but that time can be spent more productively with the great courses plus an educational streaming service that makes learning easy and accessible. Whether you're on the go or at home. And you can use the great courses plus to learn about just about anything you could imagine todd directly by experts. Who really know what they're talking about. I've been social distancing while listening to the course on forensic history crimes frauds and scandals. It's got everything from the corruption that played Warren G. Harding's presidency to history's most notorious killers. Like Jack The ripper or the bizarre story of the tylenol killings and they linked those stories to new developments in technology to show how forensics can help solve crimes from the past power corrupts listeners. Now can get a full month for free learning about everything from the rise of Rome to honing your cooking skills and everything in between just go to the special url for power corrupts listeners. The great courses plus dot com slash power. That's the great courses plus dot com slash power. We're now going to stay in Asia. But we're going to move to one of China's neighbors Myanmar and here to help us understand this strange story of miscalculation based on a dictators. Lucky number. Is Michael Peel. I'm the European diplomatic correspondent of the Financial Times and the author of a new book called the fabulous. The world's new rules that myths in the struggle against them. It's a great book by the way if you're interested in understanding the new wave of lying authoritarian leaders who have come to power in recent years this is the product of ten years or more of being able to reports and having had been fantastic opportunities to report from different places in the world including West Africa the Middle East and Southeast Asia and Michael is going to introduce us to one of the stranger characters of politics in the post World War Two era. Nay Win a dictator who made many miscalculations and today we're going to focus on just three of them. Nay Winn was the man who took over Myanmar's military dictator in the nineteen sixties an army officer increasingly dominated. The country took it in Burmese way of socialism and with the country. Ten on itself of what's hockey basically and became increasingly personally erratic in his decision making as well and so developed into a cult. Not just of the military dictatorship but of the one man and they wins in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. Nay Winn was welcome to Washington for a state visit where he gave a speech along the then president Lyndon Johnson Mr President first of all especially you and Mrs Johnson and do the American people Heartfelt thanks for the RAHM welcome extended to me and my wife and the members of my party as a side note. Myanmar was known as Burma until Nineteen eighty-nine back in the nineteen sixties seventies and eighties. Nay Winn had nearly complete control over what happened in Burma. And so one day. On December sixth nineteen seventy. He decided to make a change. Myanmar for quite some time Drove on the left hand side of the road but there was an arbitrary decision During the dictatorship to suddenly change it to drive on the right hand side of the road as usual there was no reason given for this and possible. Explanations have varied from a that? It was an attempt to distance from the colonial era because of course the British drive on the left to some kind of superstition that they win or his aides had been told that the they ought to change it for some kind of astrological reason. The effect of this was that a lot of cars on the roads are not suited drive on them because they a cars that are driving on the right hand side of the road but they are right. Hand drive cars. The astrological explanation may well be true because as we'll come to in a moment astrology is very important in Myanmar but regardless of why. The change happened as you might expect. There were some unintended consequences. Consequences that are still in place because to this day. Myanmar mostly imports cars made for the other side of the road. It makes overtaking extremely dangerous essentially. Especially if you're behind truck it's you as the passenger who has to look out and see if there's a car coming the other way and until the driver to go and you have buses which have doors which a mentor opened onto the sidewalk but of course because the records it configuration. They they open into the middle of the carriageway and it's just a small example but also a deadly one of how dictators whims can echo through. And have all kinds of destructive effects on society from that point on. He became a basically authoritarian leader from that point on anti nineteen eighty-eight so new one was quite instrumental in introducing Burmese wish to socialism here to help us understand. Nay Win a bit better is a professor from my Alma Mater Carlton College in Minnesota. Are you recording yet rolling? Yes we are there only okay. Good someone who grew up in Myanmar and who played an important role in its history. My name is torment and Associate Professor Political Science and Environmental Studies Caulton and one of the biggest miscalculations that Nay winn made an office happened in the late nineteen eighty s which will get to in a moment but first you have to understand that astrology numbers in days of the week. Have all played a big role in Burmese politics now before we think that. That's super weird. Let's keep in mind that superstitions persist in a big way in the West to take these ample of the thirteenth floor review the company. Otis elevators in two thousand two found that roughly eighty five percent of buildings in the. Us that are taller than thirteen stories. Don't actually have thirteenth floor. The just go from twelve to fourteen in order to avoid an unlucky number but in Myanmar numbers and days of the week play an even bigger role critical in. Who did -sition off beeper even whether you should go to school today or whether you should take exam today whether you start your business today so based on these astrology and although the day that Monday to Sunday yeah future perdition about based on your past and position of the Sun Stars and things like this. The creation of Burma as an independent state was on January. Fourth Nineteen forty eight and the time of day. Slated for independence was four twenty in the morning which was viewed as an auspicious time. It was at an early are specially chosen by Burmese. Astrologist that Rangoon. Mark them as full assumption of independence in place at the Union. Jack the Burmese national flag was hoisted with all Jewish settlement. And there's the days of the week which are viewed as central to someone's future so much so that they're tied to names such that. If you hear someone's name you can tell whether they were born on a Saturday a Sunday or Tuesday. One look growing up. I was born and raised in small village in remote area. Burma numbers were less important than days like Monday to Sundays the day. You're on the deal. You are going to do. Something is far more important than whether you're doing number nine number eight number seven if you bought on Saturday. You resented by Dragon Sundays at Cologne. Which is Mythical bird who would actually equally fight with the dragon which will be sentenced Saturday. If you hear my name or my name is tune start with Tut Tut dead and not? Which is Burmese abets. Todd did not represent the Saturday. So if you hear a Burmese name stop would talk tune. Then you know that prison is born on Saturday. So that is how important the dates are so if you hear cacak again not which would be resenting Monday if you he assembly named Carol Cat. Oh Cathy all comment or come yet or Kaku gone not sound that would be. You can tell that person must be pulling on Monday and ninety percent ninety nine percent all the way you be right. They win was even more superstitious than most. He was said to have practiced a sort of arcane belief in something called. Yodaya in one instance when he was apparently told by his astrologer that he would be assassinated. The dictator bought a bunch of meat. Put it in front of a mirror stopped on it with his feet and then shot his own reflection in the mirror. The idea was that the phony bloodshed that he created would ensure that the prophesized real bloodshed never came.

Myanmar Nay Winn Michael Peel todd Warren G. Harding Rome Asia Financial Times Associate Professor Political China hockey Rangoon Lyndon Johnson Kaku Minnesota Union Cologne Carol Cat Washington Middle East
"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

07:18 min | 10 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Anything else. That's next so so I got a chance to talk to a bunch of voters in New Hampshire including folks came to the show. Thank you when I was there for the primary bunch of folks who are undecided. Some late deciders. Things really struck me one. Is that people really have strong and positive feelings about multiple Democratic candidates that came up time and time again to the thing that people are obsessed with and this is born out by the data is beating President Donald Trump. Of course they're obsessed with the idea. There's a single correct answer. The question who is the best to take on trump and a lot of voters like it is their job to figure out the answer that question. NBC News Exit. Polls sixty three percent of New Hampshire Democratic primary voters said the most important thing was the nominee can be trump only a third that it was more important than nominative agree with their views but the evidence when it comes to who is the best to be trump. Who is the most quote electable candidate is just? And I'm telling you this having portable this very muddled and not really we clear so is this electability focused driving democratic voters. Insane joining me. Talk about what is going on. Is Nick Compassi. Natural investigator reporter from New York Times and Christina Career Career Associate Professor Political Science University was a fascinating and very well time new piece focused on electability in the daily beast titled Black Voters turned to Mike Bloomberg. Let's let's start. Are there because you wrote this piece. The day before a bunch of national polls came out that showed Bloomberg surging with black voters. And you said I'm picking this up among people on talking to what is is your understanding of the calculation. That's happened there. Among certain black voters who are sort of leaning towards Bloomberg right so to be clear. This is not an endorsement of Bloomberg. Just having conversation script exactly and so so I felt like you in a multi class series of conversations. There are a lot of people who are saying. Well you know. Bloomberg versus Buddha achieved Bloomberg Bloomberg versus Choose Bloomberg and so I felt like the conversations were having were black folks in twenty twenty sort of the year voting for Bloomberg number reminded me of sort of white folks in two thousand sixteen sort of quietly supporting trump but not feeling like they could say it in mixed company because it just wasn't the right thing to just say that is because of calculations about his ability against trump that because we know that black voters are not single issue of course right but the single issue that seems to keep emerging is to donald trump and that seems to be as Michael Bloomberg sort of picks off mayors left and right who understand local politics who understand the electorate who are galvanizing pastors and galvanizing. We can define that however we need to find that financially or as far or as policy is concerned but it seems as though he's building a grassroots effort in as Joe Biden appears to be declining before our very eyes Kluber charn Buddha judge judge a relatively unknown. It sort of seems like it's creating this window for Bloomberg to make inroads with black community even with this past record of stop and Frisk and so many other things in the city of New York but to me the Joe Biden experienced thus far as an illustration of some of the perils of the conversation and this is not to say like Joe Biden is still very much in the race. We've only done to a fifty five contests the two states. That voted are ninety percent white and represent the diversity of the Democrat coalition. So I'm not saying like I'm not writing any epitaphs but there was this idea idea. Like oh Joe. Biden is the most the best to take on trump and then voters that got to see him. Up Close came to a different conclusion. I think it's fair to say and the now the question is we're the pundits wrong. Was the polling wrong or the voters of the early states wrong and the answer is I who knows because you're not shooting at a target. Because brand was I can win rush and if your brain is I can win you keep losing. It's not GonNa hope for very long. I think voters have been chasing their own tails on this question. Their own James Carville. They look the same poll numbers and say well. Well he's best in head to head matchups there debate performance while he's still leading and then all of a sudden people see him. Take a beating in these two states now like well I guess someone can be them. What now and this is this to me is part of what's driving Bloomberg? There is electability sense that I think a because he's on the early early part of this sort of hype. Scrutiny decline. That happens it happens. Every candidate candidates get hyped. They get scrutinized. They come down a little bit. We've seen multiple cycles that for some candidates but but there's also this way in which the money spending is a message he's sending. It's not just that he's on the air with three hundred million dollars. He's saying to people the Democratic Party wouldn't wouldn't it be nice to have a billionaire on your side. Wouldn't it be nice for a guy to roll in here in maybe spend a few billion to be trump. Wouldn't you like to see that. And that itself is a message talk about his own electricity. That's part of the message but also he has been in so many of these states since Thanksgiving or right and so it's also the power of suggestion if I hear your message time and time again if I see your face and the only thing that I'm hearing are the positives and the policy perspectives. That had been detailed. Just ask for me. He has been targeting specific voters and in particular states very specifically and so for those of us who are New York from two thousand one to twenty twenty thirteen. We know we saw those Bloomberg adds when our lobbies were littered with Bloomberg literature. That was just for US specifically. I think that that also parents suggestions really strong book. I think there are people who say that by the election and they're mostly sanders and weren't voters. I think the vast majority Democratic voters these said right now. He can buy the election for you tomorrow. They would say God please by the way. I think that he's like twenty twenty eight more conflict than you're giving credit for for. I'm just saying I think the people are so focused on beating him right that the idea that they'll say on principle as far as his money being spent on their behalf I think is hard to but this this this gets to the mental models. People have it was so fascinating to me. The Quinnipiac had these head to heads the other day. The top two performers are the two polar opposites in the field like Bernie Sanders and Mike Bloomberg. So what is that like. How do you make sense that data and then down at the bottom? We're like was he j- I think a lot of people and for totally defensible reasons. Think because like very electable. And he's got good centers credit and he's a fresh face and he's coming from the Midwest like there's arguments remained on behalf of his ability but no no one has a model that like very regretfully explained that we're asking everyone to be political science in their own Hatton. Well I think there are few problems. We haven't seen South Carolina but Bloomberg's not in South Carolina right so now we have just sort of wait until Super Tuesday to see if this Bloomberg influx actually works. But also I mean I I when and you said that you know people were like please by today. I think people are of two minds. That's like a long-term and short-term Hustle election today to get this maniac out of the White House but we're setting really bad to say billionaires coming by election in the future if he builds a shadow party history shows that it sticks around and the things with later. I will just say that if you come from came from another planet or from another country to study America's society and you saw Donald Trump presidency followed by Michael Bloomberg presidency. Your conclusions clues about the strength and vibrancy of American democracy would not maybe Donald Presidency and the Donald Trump presidency might have this question at Compass Orient Christine greer. Thank you both for being with me. That does.

Bloomberg Bloomberg Bloomberg President Donald Trump Michael Bloomberg Joe Biden New Hampshire New York Bernie Sanders NBC Democratic Party Midwest James Carville New York Times Donald Presidency South Carolina Nick Compassi US Christina Career Career Associ
How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:40 min | 11 months ago

How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

"Begin today a little piece of audio you a mere twelve seconds. Not Too long won't be too painful but inside it. There is a whole lot to digest. Here you go. I believe that monetary policy is and a good place and should continue to support sustained growth a strong labor market and inflation running close to are symmetric two percent objective. Those those of you recognize that to be a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Not too tough really given the subject matter. Go to the head of the class. If you identified the Speaker as Richard Clara the vice vice chairman of the Fed a gold star to you. Now why are we starting with him. A couple of reasons honestly number one because the Fed has been taking some heat it lately for having gotten a lot of its economic forecasting wrong. Hello inflation number. Two because Clarita said today and chair Powell says often the really the economy's pretty good number three because pugh is out with a study today. That says not everybody out in the actual economy agrees with the fat so so two interviews with which to test those premises. I about the Fed Sarah Bender. She's a professor of Political Science at George Washington University where she studies the Fed. Welcome to the program. Thanks thanks for having me. What do you make of the vice chairman speech today and more importantly how the feds sort of is positioning itself in this economy right now? Well the Fed is saying saying so far. So good The comedies on a good track Congress's given us a dual mandate of low sustainable unemployment and low inflation Kevin. And we're hitting him. He's not telling us really where things are going in the future. He's saying data dependent meeting by meeting. But he's telling telling us the economy is on a good course he Said and and chair. Paul says this all the time that they're going to you know work to keep the expansion going as as long as they can and one of the things chair Paul says and Clark said it today was that You know the longer expansion goes the more it helps people at the bottom. How much can the Fed really do though for the people at the bottom of this economy but the fence so far is doing a lot by keeping a monetary policy not so loose and accommodative right and you see wage gains at the lower end of the economic spectrum at a certain point though? There's only so much that monetary monetary policy can do and absent fiscal policies. That might say deal with job training or job relocation or healthcare. There's is only so much weight that can be put on monetary policy makers. Let me carry that forward to an interview. We're going to have here in a couple of minutes with A upholster from pugh who has a new study out today about economic inequality in this country. What can the Fed do on economic inequality which consistently ranks pretty high in terms of what what people are worried about in this economy? Well the best contribution they can make is to keep an eye on employment and do as much as they can to Stoke job growth but without sparking inflation keeping an eye on the health of the financial system so that people have access to quality and so forth at the end of the day though. It's really the limits of what monetary policy makers can do. The really simple line is heading into an election year. Right is. It's the economy stupid frame that for me in terms of the Federal Reserve and the role of the economy in the next eleven months of of our common experience. Well Congress gives the Fed to commands. Keep inflation low keep jobs growing. That's what the Fed is aiming to do. Oh here and the extent that they're successful it means the economy's growing and on an even keel in. That's what helps incumbents get reelected Sir Bender under she's At Brookings also Professor Political Science at George Washington University professor. Thanks for your time. Am I appreciate sure. Thanks for having me okay. So all of that said interview number two now from the Pew Research Center who study out today shows as I said that not. Everybody agrees that the economy is all sunshine and Light Ruth Galmoc. She is a senior researcher at Pew Rookie to have you on for having me if I say that seventy percent of respondents to this Survey that Y'all did if if I say that they believe the economy is rigged. Is that too strong word. I would say that. They think that the economy is unfairly favouring powerful special interests interests so we asked whether the economy was generally fair or whether it unfairly favored these powerful interests and seven and ten Americans that they did not think it was fair. We should point out. There's as a partisan divide here as with most things in this country now that's right. Republicans are about evenly split with about half of Republican. Same economy is generally fair and half of the economy saying unfairly early favors these special interests whereas Democrats overwhelmingly say that the economy is not fair. okay so Brass tacks your who's got the power so we asked Americans who they thought had too much power and influence in today's economy and about eight and ten or more American said that politicians Titians corporations and people who are wealthy had too much power we also had majority saying health insurance companies banks and other financial institutions and tech companies had too much cower Let me ask you then who doesn't have the power or is parallel. I suppose another way to put it. Yeah we asked to people. Apple felt did not have enough power and Americans pointed to people who were poor the middle class and interestingly small businesses. Yes say more about that because when I read this in small all businesses came up I was. That's the thing that got me on the phone with you to be honest. Yeah I'm and one interesting thing was we saw a partisan divide and how Democrats and Republicans on looked at a number of these groups. Republicans were less likely than Democrats to say that large corporations had too much power but when it came to small businesses Democrats and Republicans were largely in agreement that that small businesses did not have enough power. Today's economy. So what else do people need to know about this. I mean as they read this and they hear that you know seven ten people think the economy is is unbalanced. Silence shall we say instead of rigged. What are they supposed to do that information? It's hard to say What people are supposed to do? In this survey we did sort of dive into what Americans think about economic comic inequality in general and while most Americans say that there's too much economic inequality in the country. They didn't rank particularly highly as an issue. So it's hard to sort they how that will play out Raquel Nick. She's a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. Thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thanks for having me

Federal Reserve Democrats Pew Research Center Vice Chairman Congress Sarah Bender Pugh George Washington University Senior Researcher Federal Reserve Board Of Gover Professor Of Political Science Pew Rookie Richard Clara Raquel Nick Stoke Clarita Paul Ruth Galmoc Apple
"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"U._s. from Taiwan as a kid the very same question <music> married to the immigrants national says some were to say to her. She should go back her country because criticism federal policies considerably since attack well sector transportation came here at age eight legally not speaking of word of English is realized the American dream and I think all of us think that this is a process of renewal. That's gone on this country for very long time and is good for America. We ought to continue it so we find ourselves once again with the fundamental reality of the man in the White House Donald Trump no matter what your interpretation is of the Constitution's provision of high crimes and misdemeanors what that means technically one thing is clear. It has been clear from day one. The man is fundamentally unfit for the office that he holds joining me now Christine Associate Professor Political Science University and Josh Marshall Editor Publisher of talking points to me. The most exhausting thing is the gas lighting around like we all know and ever Mitch McConnell. No all these people know right like no one's protect. Everyone who's pretending they don't know is pretending they don't know they know better but the problem is we're dealing with the man who has no shame and we're now seeing that the Republican Party and all of the members of his an administration who support him don't have any shame either. I mean you all the footage. You showed some of it with Lindsey Graham saying this man is absolutely not qualified. He doesn't respect the office he cannot be president and we don't know what this person has on the senator because he has made it direct one eighty and he's now calling for sitting members of Congress Communists Socialists and worse so unfortunately the norms of our institution that we're supposed to uphold respect this president of common blown out with water and the Republican Republican Party is silent. I mean this vote with only four Republicans saying that this is inappropriate language behavior unfit of the presidency. I mean the fact that only four Republicans have the two of those retiring in practice. It's like just it's shameful and what really frustrates me in angers me is that the level of fear that this president evokes in American citizens you know their stories about local New York stories about parks this weekend that were completely emptied India desolate the anxiety I grew up under Reagan and I think I'm a political scientists now because he frightened me as a child the voice the things he said how my community felt whenever he was on television. There's a whole generation of children. Now we're going to look at the roll the office of the presidency and have a certain level of anxiety. He's calling rapists murderers you saying that they should be banned. He's saying that the country of origin the flags that they probably have on their walls in their homes. Don't believe him there. They don't belong there. I mean he is a white white nationalist and I don't know when we're GONNA start sort of putting that out there and being very clear about like a white supremacist vision of this country in twenty nineteen cannot stand and they're far too many Americans who are saying why not GonNa vote for him but I'm not going to tell my relatives that vote for them and I'm not gonNA say anything. That's someone else's private private things when they go into the voting booth we cannot do that. I mean we if this man gets another four years. We will be lucky if the Republicans stands. I think that part of it too is that mm-hmm the its silence is just complicity at this point the complicities and old story but every time he gets ratchet up a little bit to me. It's a little like breaking someone into a criminal gang where you have them do the that you like. They're getting there that thing..

president Republican Republican Party Donald Trump Mitch McConnell America Lindsey Graham Taiwan Christine Associate Professor White House Josh Marshall New York Reagan senator Editor India Publisher four years
"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

"A somewhat more reduced rate than those countries because we've had this immigration, which tends to be younger immigrants tend to be younger than the population as a whole, and you know, they're fertility is a little higher. Saying good because we need them for the jobs, but not every state had a decline main for instance, recorded more deaths than births, but then their population overall decline because they saw an uptick in people moving in so talk about the different ways that population has affected the states, and how that ultimately affects our politics because it affects ultimately representation. Yes. I mean, it's still the case that the sun belt, I still the solar the states had growing the most rapidly. I mean, Nevada, Idaho, Utah and Arizona where the four fastest growing states last year. A lot of that has to do with people moving there from other parts of the United States some immigration to those states. But because people have moved to those states that that makes those populations younger movers tend to be younger who so they get more children than immigrants are starting to come to those places to from abroad on the other hand, we're nine states this time that actually lost popular. The biggest ones where New York and Illinois in terms of the number of people that they lost. But we're seven other states that also showed declines in their population. But when you see a state like Illinois, which has now actually lost population not just out-migration, but actual loss population for five straight years and bigger numbers each year. You know, then that says something about you know, you need to look into what's going on there. How the Connie's changing wise in his in a big of an attractive state is as it had been in the past number of senators, but representatives get portioned in the house of representatives, and according to Brandon Ronning house, who's a professor political science at the university of Houston states, losing a seat would be Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania Rhode Island, Minnesota Michigan state's that might gain seats. Arizona, Colorado, Florida, North Carolina. Do you agree with that? Yes. I think that's right. I mean, Texas, I think will either gain two or three seats and they. Gained three seats last time on the census was taken. So, you know, the growth to Texas both migration and immigration, and so forth is paying off for them politically. But a lot of these other states again, largely in the south and in the west or making those those states more politically powerful, I guess I could see lawmakers in, you know, Michigan saying come on people. Let's go get our population up. William fry a demographer at the Brookings Institution on the new census numbers Bill. Thanks so much. Sure. I really enjoyed it..

United States Illinois Texas Arizona New York William fry Brookings Institution Brandon Ronning Nevada Michigan Pennsylvania Rhode Island university of Houston Connie Minnesota Michigan professor Idaho Utah North Carolina
"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

"A somewhat more reduced rate than those countries because we've had this immigration, which tends to be younger immigrants tend to be younger than the population as a whole, and you know, they're fertility is a little higher. Saying good because we need them for the jobs, but not every state had a decline main for instance, recorded more deaths than births, but then their population overall decline because they saw an uptick in people moving in so talk about the different ways that population has affected the states, and how that ultimately affects our politics because it affects ultimately representation. Yes. I mean, it's still the case that the sun belt, I still the solar the states had growing the most rapidly. I mean, Nevada, Idaho, Utah and Arizona where the four fastest growing states last year. A lot of that has to do with people moving there from other parts of the United States some immigration to those states. But because people have moved to those states that that makes those populations younger movers tend to be younger who so they get more children than immigrants are starting to come to those places to from abroad on the other hand, we're nine states this time that actually lost popular. The biggest ones where New York and Illinois in terms of the number of people that they lost. But we're seven other states that also showed declines in their population. But when you see a state like Illinois, which has now actually lost population not just out-migration, but actual loss population for five straight years and bigger numbers each year. You know, then that says something about you know, you need to look into what's going on there. How the Connie's changing wise in his in a big of an attractive state is as it had been in the past number of senators, but representatives get portioned in the house of representatives, and according to Brandon Ronning house, who's a professor political science at the university of Houston states, losing a seat would be Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania Rhode Island, Minnesota Michigan state's that might gain seats. Arizona, Colorado, Florida, North Carolina. Do you agree with that? Yes. I think that's right. I mean, Texas, I think will either gain two or three seats and they. Gained three seats last time on the census was taken. So, you know, the growth to Texas both migration and immigration, and so forth is paying off for them politically. But a lot of these other states again, largely in the south and in the west or making those those states more politically powerful, I guess I could see lawmakers in, you know, Michigan saying come on people. Let's go get our population up. William fry a demographer at the Brookings Institution on the new census numbers Bill. Thanks so much. Sure. I really enjoyed it..

United States Illinois Texas Arizona New York William fry Brookings Institution Brandon Ronning Nevada Michigan Pennsylvania Rhode Island university of Houston Connie Minnesota Michigan professor Idaho Utah North Carolina
"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Here & Now

"A somewhat more reduced rate than those countries because we've had this immigration, which tends to be younger immigrants tend to be younger than the population as a whole, and you know, they're fertility is a little higher. Saying good because we need them for the jobs, but not every state had a decline main for instance, recorded more deaths than births, but then their population overall decline because they saw an uptick in people moving in so talk about the different ways that population has affected the states, and how that ultimately affects our politics because it affects ultimately representation. Yes. I mean, it's still the case that the sun belt, I still the solar the states had growing the most rapidly. I mean, Nevada, Idaho, Utah and Arizona where the four fastest growing states last year. A lot of that has to do with people moving there from other parts of the United States some immigration to those states. But because people have moved to those states that that makes those populations younger movers tend to be younger who so they get more children than immigrants are starting to come to those places to from abroad on the other hand, we're nine states this time that actually lost popular. The biggest ones where New York and Illinois in terms of the number of people that they lost. But we're seven other states that also showed declines in their population. But when you see a state like Illinois, which has now actually lost population not just out-migration, but actual loss population for five straight years and bigger numbers each year. You know, then that says something about you know, you need to look into what's going on there. How the Connie's changing wise in his in a big of an attractive state is as it had been in the past number of senators, but representatives get portioned in the house of representatives, and according to Brandon Ronning house, who's a professor political science at the university of Houston states, losing a seat would be Illinois, New York, Pennsylvania Rhode Island, Minnesota Michigan state's that might gain seats. Arizona, Colorado, Florida, North Carolina. Do you agree with that? Yes. I think that's right. I mean, Texas, I think will either gain two or three seats and they. Gained three seats last time on the census was taken. So, you know, the growth to Texas both migration and immigration, and so forth is paying off for them politically. But a lot of these other states again, largely in the south and in the west or making those those states more politically powerful, I guess I could see lawmakers in, you know, Michigan saying come on people. Let's go get our population up. William fry a demographer at the Brookings Institution on the new census numbers Bill. Thanks so much. Sure. I really enjoyed it..

United States Illinois Texas Arizona New York William fry Brookings Institution Brandon Ronning Nevada Michigan Pennsylvania Rhode Island university of Houston Connie Minnesota Michigan professor Idaho Utah North Carolina
"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Dr Laura Wilson, professor political science, the university of Indianapolis doctor. I think everybody is breathing a collective sigh of relief that is ugly. Primary. Over Mike von battling it out with Joe Donnelly in November. So the first question I have for you is do you think the voters pit the candidate that's most likely to defeat? Donnelly is this the guy that's going to do it. I think bronner's great and to be fair to the other candidates repeat on Messer would have had a great chance as well. I think the thing we saw last night that might Brown connected with voters very much like Donald Trump was successful in Indiana and two thousand sixteen Mike Brown had this empty the swamp narratives outsider appeal really resonated with the voting. I think you're gonna have to influence and and really had to us coming up in general action. If he wants to be Donnelly, he's this trend the candidates that ran has outsiders generally, do they do. Well. Sure. They haven't on. Well, I'd say two thousand sixteen through the things that we thought were traditional let me say, oh, well, this is how it works. It's the playbook and one of those is the experience it used to be all you have political experience you have to climb the political ladder. And I think of Donald Trump did anything to redefine American politics. And the political culture we have to say, you know, what maybe you don't have to have that experience, obviously, very appealing to voters to come from outside of the political arena. And blonde is a great example of this training with Dr Laura Wilson from the university of Indianapolis, Dr Jason hammer here, I'm seeing a little bit of a trend here of guys that have a large amount of money attempting to for maybe a poor choice of words here, by their way into the political discussion some would say President Trump..

Joe Donnelly Dr Laura Wilson President Trump university of Indianapolis Dr Jason hammer Mike von professor bronner Messer Indiana
"professor political science" Discussed on WWL

WWL

06:21 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WWL

"And one zero five three wwl FM eight twenty seven we are thirty three minutes away about from the beginning of the cavenaugh. Afford hearings will carry it live for you here at wwl. We're talking to genie's Zeno our guest, professor political science at I own a college. Senior adviser to applied Technomic will also take your calls at two six one eight seventy. I don't know if they've surveyed this or not genie or pulled it. But when it comes to Dr Cavanaugh when it comes to. I'm sorry, I keep messing that up when it comes to Dr Ford judge Cavanaugh is primarily viewed through a partisan prism. And and if if you're conservative you make a case for Dr Cavanaugh for cavenaugh, and you make a case against Ford and the other way around. Yeah. I haven't seen numbers to your point. I haven't seen a study that supports that. But I do think we suspect that that is the case. Although I think there are people on both sides somebody that, you know, for example, if Email who may be Republican and naturally support the judge who has experienced this kind of of of trauma may be more inclined to believe Dr forward and vice versa. But I do think we see this through a partisan lens because let's not forget what this is. You know at at its heart. This is a fight over the future of the supreme court. This is not a criminal trial. And of course, what loose so large is the fate of real v. Wade. And so, you know, liberals are have four forty years then fighting to retain the the the right to an abortion. And of course, conservatives for the same period of time have been fighting to protect life. And so this is a battle for the future of the court, and you know, because we have a court in which one person can make a difference between a right being kept or or taken away. So two questions. First of all when it comes to wildcards on a Republican side Murkowski Collins flake, maybe Sassi or Sasso every say it and corker. We yeah. Those are the five I think, yeah. I say fast, and I don't know how he says it, but I think you've got you've got this three gentlemen. The. Named on the Republican side. You know, when you look at somebody like Jeff flake or somebody like a Bob corker retiring, and you know, may not be beholden to the party and the way other senators might be and then of course, you've got Murkowski in Collins, the two females the two more moderates. They haven't been the subject of intense pressure from the other side on this. I mean, there's been numerous reports in some cases vicious attacks on Senator Collins of Maine in terms of people trying to you know, going so far as to sender. I can't remember the number, but hundreds of of of hangers suggesting, obviously that if she supports cavenaugh we're going to be back to the day when a woman has to go to a doctor using a hanger for for for an abortion. So the tax in the pressure both sides of the vicious, and I think really Murkowski and Collins are the key. But if all Democrats vote against him Republicans can only afford to lose one of those five if they lose to his nomination. Is over as you talk about coat hangers and right to life and so forth. Does that even factor into this? Or is this just about whether or not he assaulted this woman thirty five years ago. I mean, it should be about whether you know, whether he was engaged in this activity, and then of course, or this assault going actively. And of course, whether you know, the senators judge him to be, you know, capable of serving for life on the court, but I think at the heart of it. This is about the politics of the core in it is, you know, about these key rights and abortion is key amongst them one thing, Democrats and Republicans agree on is this nomination much more than the Gorsuch nomination is important because he is filling the seat of the swing vote just judge Kennedy. And so if he gets on his single, though could change the future of abortion in this country, and that as we all know, something people feel very strongly about one way or the other alert our stations down the line go a little bit long here. But the reason is this is not going to be less supreme. Court nominee. It's not going to be less confirmation hearing, what does this portend of the future in term of payback setting, a new standard, etc. It this is very tough. And we're already in a payback mode. If you will right one of the things that you keep hearing Democrats say is Republicans, you know, we're willing to hold Merrick garland nomination for over a year. So what's the rush with this nomination? Why not take the time to investigate? So there's a sort of payback if you will there. And of course, it was the Democrats who led the charge to get you to get rid of the filibuster. And so, you know, we've seen this increasingly on the court. I would put it at about the the Robert Bork's unsuccessful nomination. Well, unsuccessful confirmation when he was nominated by Reagan, and we've been experiencing this ever since. And I think the real danger here is that it is going to just never going to be what it was in the past. Which was a president has the right to nominate and the justices look at issues. Like is this person qualified to serve not necessarily will. They change the future of the court on one issue or another and getting into these partisan battles. That are so incredibly personal. I think the chief Justice said it accurately a few weeks ago or a few months ago when he said he looks at some of his colleagues who've been on for some time by and large. They were concerned by overwhelming numbers, the last two people confirmed the votes have been very very close because the partisanship on this has just gotten so out of hand. Now, we really do have to go. But do you think the vote will take place tomorrow morning or not? I do not think it will. But that, you know, anything goes, I don't I don't think it will it all goes back to counting votes. I guess right. That's right. That's right. And they can't lose two Republicans. Thank you, gene. Appreciate your time. Genie's professor political science at Iona college senior advisor, replied, Technomic twenty seven minutes from now the hearing begins between or of Dr for judge Cavanaugh will carry it live for you here. If we ever get to WWL, I. News. Let's do it right now with David Blake from our Jefferson.

Dr Cavanaugh cavenaugh wwl Bob corker professor Senator Collins supreme court Dr Ford Senior adviser Technomic Jeff flake Murkowski Merrick garland Ford Robert Bork Wade assault Iona college
"professor political science" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Mutual carrying and love, for this country that seems. To disappeared from a lot of minds around. Here, Tom so many people both Democrats and Republicans over the weekend have shared. Some some amazing stories about their interactions with, John McCain because he could be very fiery could be in your face but despite all, that they say that he was he was a lovable gentleman he can, be very much Lee at times Are there any was there a certain story a time you spent with him that comes to mind a good memory of John. McCain oh I you know I remember sitting with him in numerous radio interviews. And watching him trying to control his temper And it was an amazing. Thing to watch because he. Had a really really, fast strong temper and part of his evolution was putting that, temper under control and, recognizing that it was alienating. People and. That he could not succeed in terms of what he wanted in this country unless he controlled that temper some of those stories I probably could not recite on, the air as a result but he worked very very hard to do that. All right that's Tom voles you their former mayor of, Tucson professor political science at, the university of Arizona coming up in just about two four minutes when, KNX in-depth continues President Trump announces a trade. Deal with Mexico and what this means, for California, we're not sure? It's actually possible to wear, a GPS but if anyone ever does it might just be one of our next reporters? Mining,.

John McCain Tom university of Arizona Mexico President Trump Tucson Lee California professor KNX two four minutes
Are today's primaries safe from hackers?

KNX Programming

01:47 min | 2 years ago

Are today's primaries safe from hackers?

"The state's primary system is getting tested as the top candidates will advance but it may not turn out the way the parties had hoped it could price if you have too many times that's spreading your votes to thin can potentially be very costly that's dr ingredient injured addressing is professor professor political science at the university of california riverside he tells knx and you see it in a number of district that topic democratic candidates quite unbalanced two republican candidates type democrat you know if you don't have a clear from turner among the democratic candidates have becomes tricky for the voters system was developed to get more moderate candidates involved but with somebody candidates at the max the noise drowns about he adds that could turn out the two republicans running against eight democrats at a democratic district could result in the two republicans getting the most votes and facing each other in the fall it's all to whole new line strategies with so many stories about foreign countries trying to hack the us election system ration systems things like that california's voting system is more secure and reliable than many other states but alexander also points out that much of our equipment is old and when it breaks down some components can't be updated and parts are not easy to find chris edens knx ten seventy newsradio knx is providing some quick tutorial.

KNX Turner United States California Alexander Professor University Of California River Chris Edens
"professor political science" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WTVN

"On the need for redistricting reform for congressional seats that's the subject of state issue one which is on the ballot today the broader question that addresses about trying to clean up gerrymandering and make rational districts cleaner based on county and city boundaries as opposed to splitting them up appeals to a lot of people and i think as a result it should pass tom sutton's professor political science at baldwin wallace university voters in the lincoln county village avella andrea though could wipe their community off the map today supporters of the disillusion measure say the government isn't doing enough for their tax dollars and becoming part of saint albans township would promote new development critics fear the community would lose its identity and be followed up by new albany or granville pulse across ohio or open until seven thirty tonight from abc news i'm sherry preston nobody is above the law governor andrew cuomo talking this morning about the abuse allegations and possible charges against new york's attorney general hours after eric schneiderman resigned governor andrew cuomo called the allegations shocking and disturbing i thought it was a very powerful and damning setbacks the women described at the new yorker physical and verbal abuse during what we're supposed to be romantic encounters these women should have their day in court the solicitor general takes over the office until the state legislature names an interim replacement for schneiderman who denied the allegations but resigned effective at the end of the day aaron katersky abc news new york executives from five big drug companies are facing questions right now about the opioid crisis on capitol hill texas republican joe barton sits on the house energy and commerce subcommittee in his questions were solid there is no logical explanation the week and find for wia town of approximately four hundred people would receive nine million opioid pills in two years or why a single pharmacy in a town of eighteen nine hundred people would receive nearly seventeen million opioid pills in a decade president trump's decision on the iran nuclear deal is coming up at about three hours abc's karen travers with more from the white house hasn't in trump waive sanctions on iran in january as required under the nuclear agreement but he warned it will be the last time he did that unless congress in europe address what he called the flaws of.

europe president texas aaron attorney andrew cuomo sherry preston abc albany saint albans lincoln county baldwin wallace university tom sutton congress iran white house karen travers trump
Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang
Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 2 years ago

Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang
"professor political science" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WREK

"This is the best of our knowledge i'm bob barrett our guest today is nncholas tampico and associate professor political science at fordham university in new york and the author of the new book common core national education standards and the threat to democracy in the book you don't just talk smack about the common core you also go after other standards that aren't part of the common core the national sexuality education standards the the advanced placement us history which you call it the de facto standard so it's not just common core that you object to know i mean my i'm political scientist the political theorist and part of what i do in my book common core is make a argument about how education authorities should be distributed in a democracy and the if if the constitution was to identify education as a federal power it would have done this in article one section eight but it is not mentioned in the constitution and according to the tenth amendment powers under numerate it in the constitution belong to the states and the people so for much of american history education has really been a local matter with maybe just some data collection by state authorities that's a little bit more complicated but by and large up till the middle of the twentieth century education has largely been a local thing and for the past fifty years we've seen this increase of federal power and with this increase of federal power and increase federal spending we see more strings attached to federal funds and so what we're at the cusp of right now we're not actually there is that we are coming up with national education standards in literacy numeracy social studies and science and you can look on the horizon and you could make an argument that sex ed could also come along the way and what i do in.

fordham university new york scientist bob barrett nncholas tampico associate professor fifty years
"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Be speaking which as it flounces of professor political science at the university of oregon and an expert on conservatism the tea party social movements the gop race and elections he's the author of from the new deal to the new right race and the southern origin sobotin conservatism and coeditor of race and american political development we could it could be station breaking back examining the unsettled political landscape in arizona which has been up ended by sheriff joe a pires announcement he's running for the us senate oh man bag ray all all who played them now oh man great ricki welcome back ibn monsters and this is background briefing available twenty four seven a background briefing dot org and joining us now donna hamm a retired judge who's.

the new deal arizona us professor university of oregon gop joe a pires senate donna hamm
"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Be turning those up a lot at this evidence it looks like we had mueller found it you hear the democrats defending him by saying well he took peter struck off the case yes but he should inform people that there was a real problem here and win this information that came out about uh mckay boots office people in the number two person if the fbi talking about an insurance policy in case uh trump might be elected that has to set off alarm bells and i got to say that mccabe himself uh had some conflicts of interest namely his wife received seven hundred thousand dollars in campaign donations at this time from a key uh hillary clinton bill clinton supporter namely the governor of virginia terry mcaullife uh for her state run tiem pain it it's an unprecedented a male he should be removed himself uh early on he did not do so until bat became public so much sense is that people who think uh the deep state was a current which first used about turkey to refer to the military and i never thought it would be used about the united states but i i think that what we've seen uh uh the uh the irs do and what we've seen the fbi do and what we saw uh have seen some of the be okay du has led people to make varity legitimate uh uh uh to raise very legitimate concerns that the permanent bureaucracy is trying to make fundamental policies do so in ways that override the will of the people and they are doing so with out any legislative permit to do it now all right we're gonna leave it there chose lives in professor political science of universes chicago thanks for joining me thank you all right are going to take a quick break when we get back the tax bill the republicans are on the verge of passing this thing get in its trump's desk will talk to game darken our congressional corresponding about that in just a few seconds stick around who's this next but first the weather channel forecast mostly cloudy skies showers overnight with you and i low about thirty eight now is your wake up your monday cloudy skies to us start the workweek partly cloudy later in the day with a high forty five tuesday mix of clouds and sun in near fifty by wednesday mix of sun and clouds and cooler highs in the upper thirty's from the weather channel i'm craig ross wlsam 890 another update in thirty minutes at the nation's busiest airport tens of thousands are stranded atlanta's hartsfieldjackson international walloped.

professor chicago du virginia bill clinton hillary clinton mueller atlanta craig ross wlsam democrats irs united states bat mccabe insurance policy fbi peter seven hundred thousand dollars thirty minutes
"professor political science" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have to forcibly conclude this discussion we will continue to follow new military strategy for afghanistan that as i said was announced last week by president true president trump promising to send more us troops to train and support afghan security forces let me thank you steven dental professor political science international says the george washington versi the to have you with us appreciate your being with us by pleasure and thank you enter wilder and while this vice president of asia programs of the us institute of peace to have you with us thank you thank you and we are coming up on another form segment dan tamin is going to join us in the segment of heads assessors energy uc berkeley who resigned in a at classic it said impeach from being science on the way to the us department of state we'll hear from him when we return stay to a michael krasny stay with us for more of the rebroadcast of this morning's form program after a traffic update from knee with jim technical wise we are getting reports have northbound eight eighty delays and hayward just as you head towards sami andraos interesting section athens down the nimitz this evening through that stretch in north chinese in fact it at the moment other backup is highly seventeen southbound brake lights in gas theory at the reservoir and there are also some northbound construction delays on that sats and kitchen which from kqed that report was brought to you by unbound nick had our has a message for his fellow billionaires wake up wake up the pitchforks will come for us and our says america is starting to look a lot like france before louis the 16th literally lost his head what should the wealthy due to ease income inequality before things get ugly nick had our next time on one eight one a follows forum tonight at eleven o'clock support for kqed comes from san francisco comic con which is coming to mosconi west this weekend september first through third featured will be comic books toys costumes.

president mosconi west san francisco kqed hayward michael krasny us institute of peace vice president of asia program george washington us afghanistan france america nick nimitz dan tamin professor
"professor political science" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Cell for cbs twelve news truck if you isolated showers through this wednesday afternoon it's a thirty percent chance for isolated shower otherwise mostly sunny to partly cloudy with a high near 90 and like east windsor tend to fifty miles an hour tonight's low eighty thursday rate likely scared of numerous showers and thunderstorms thursday a 60 percent chance of rain the high eighty seven in welcome back and of course as always we uh we find these stories and we like to go directly to the source to find out all the particulars so i have invited associate professor political science miriam f elman dr el men from i'll let me finish is a columbia graduate my daughter's alma mater but i believe that that she is currently employed ads let's see the the political science maxwell school of citizenship and public affairs at syracuse university a doctor all and a you with me i am thanks for having me on the show no well thank you this is a subject it's very near and dear to my heart i've been involved in a couple of projects down here in south florida where first i was apparent in an educator and then i of course took it to my talk radio career textbooks that were being used in our public schools that were just ridiculous i mean they they lacked any american history in them any any kind of broadbased religious viewpoints other than islamic and i couldn't figure it out at the time and apparently you've been on the case in this matter as well perhaps you could tell us a little bit about sherry pug leo so where this all began in newton massachusetts sure um wa i wrote recently acropper pieces about what happened in newton massachusetts one you know uh a school district to high school and free year they have been 22 overtly biased got an unabashed propaganda um and went on for years with by tech book material downloaded from the internet material from biased back op at harvard university um you know anti western anti us anti israel uh and you.

east windsor associate professor syracuse university south florida newton massachusetts harvard university israel thirty percent 60 percent