20 Burst results for "Professor Of Political Science"

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

05:19 min | 7 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Four four for the USA. I take your calls this hour. My apologies, I wanted to wrap that story up about the 2000 meals fact check. I just didn't have enough time, but I was doing this delicate balancing act in my head. I don't like to tease stuff incessantly. 'cause I'm a consumer a talk radio, not just a host here. I listen to rush for 20 years. And others, another great host, and I used to hate it, not them necessarily, but weaker hosts who you tease something the whole show be like, bro, were you just tell the story already? I was really trying to squeeze it and I just didn't have enough time. So here it is. So remember that in 2000 meals movie again was they followed these mules around, carrying ballots from ballot harvesting centers to ballot boxes. So the thesis of the movie is that these votes were likely illegal. Even if the votes were from real people, even if that's a big if, by the way, you're asking that even if that were true, that is not legal in any of the states they analyze this activity. And are we clear? It's not legal for you to take some unknown person's ballot. You don't know and take multiple votes and then drop them in a ballot box late at night. That is not legal. So of course the left instead of analyzing the situation and doing what a journalist would do, right? And saying, hey, well, we're going to look at this. I mean, let's find out who these votes are. The left said, oh, they're probably just family members. Well, that's not what journalism is. Journalism is about going out. And doing a distillation process to get to the bottom and find the truth. To get the bottom of the strain and find out what the facts actually, they did none of that. All they did was attack it and say, because they had no way to refute the premise of the movie, that if this were true, that it would be illegal and these votes would be invalid, which would have altered the course of the election in 2020 because they could not possibly look at that and then say, gosh, Donald Trump was right. What did they do? They attacked the methodology and said, the cell phone tracking they use to track the mules around doing the processing is definitely unaccurate. Here Reuters, I just read it to you before the break. I'll read this sentence again. Talking about cell phone tracking. They say the entirety of the claim wrestling cell phone tracking location data, which doesn't remotely show that people were using drop boxes. They called they note that this professor said this professor political science. It doesn't have the granularity to show that, as opposed to just walking by a driving by. So you see what they're doing here, this scam? The scam they're doing is, well, these mules could have just drove by the ballot box. They didn't necessarily stop there. But that's not how geo tracking works. If you stop in front of a ballot box, the geo tracking data will show that. They don't want to tell you any of that. So just to be clear, their premise here is geo tracking, no good. So this morning I'm putting the show together and you know, I've been talking about 2000 meals. We've had dinesh d'souza and we did practically a whole show on it. And I see this article by Politico, and I'm like, the circle by Politico. And I'm thinking to myself, holy Moses, these people are so stupid on the left, that they just got done giving us a monthlong lecture about how terrible geo tracking is, right? Despite the fact that John Roberts from the Supreme Court said it's the equivalent of an ankle monitor, the military uses it to target enemies and law enforcement's been using forever to follow bad guys. The leftist media nut bags, the Filip bumps of the world, the bill McCarthy's from PolitiFact in the world. Laughingly humiliated themselves and destroyed their credibility saying no good for geo tracking. They're going to have to rewrite that Politico. That tip wrestling paper flip. This morning, Alfred ng. A uniquely dangerous tool is the headline. How Google's data can help states track abortions. So I'm reading this, I'm like, oh, interesting. Now that there's a leftist narrative, not a right leaning narrative that there may have been a problem with the 2020 election with the meals. There's a left wing narrative here now. The left wing narrative is this. Now that roe V wade has been overturned. If you travel from a state that bans abortions to another state, they're going to be able to track you. They're going to find you. They're going to hunt you down. See, that's their narrative. But in order for that narrative to scare you enough, they got to have a means for the narrative to have some backbone to it. They can't just say they're going to track you without saying how, right? How are they going to track you? Oh, well, listen to this. Many of the state's rushing to ban abortion are also the biggest users of a surveillance tool that authorities could use to track women ending their pregnancies. The location data from people's phones, oh. Hey, Fox nation people. There it is. Right there. There it is. They're right there, right? They're in it. There it is right there. I thought you just told us that was no good. I thought you just so wait, just to be clear, again, I know they say that a lot, and it's an annoying verbal tick, but that's okay. Because I really do need to be clear here. When you're tracking a ballot harvester, it doesn't mean anything, because you could have just driven by the box and it's not that accurate, even though it is. But when you're tracking someone in an abortion clinic, if I say not on, they didn't go to an abortion claim. They Joe Biden. No, no, no, they're going to use it. It's accurate right into the door. Isn't that kind of weird how they change their story based on the narrative? It's almost as if these people are entirely full of stuff.

wrestling bill McCarthy Donald Trump Alfred ng USA dinesh roe V wade Reuters souza John Roberts Politico Supreme Court Google Fox Joe Biden
"professor political science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:45 min | 8 months ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In fact is really pretty strongly behind him Biden gave a big press conference just last week or so where he basically was very clear He said Jay pal this is your job Federal Reserve and I'm not going to interfere Really almost something almost to the T what Reagan had said to Volcker publicly But there's no doubt right Congress has forced the fed to be far more transparent and certainly there's 24/7 watching an expectations knowing what an anticipating what the fed is going to do If Powell indeed moves to increase rates more now than was originally expected Would that surprise you professor considering what we know about Vogler's approach Well I think what's surprising here is that the fed works today Well unlike Volcker in many ways the Volcker fed was sort of the man behind the curtain right Today monetary policy the fed works by telegraphing what it's going to do right No surprises right Communication Bernanke the last two times ago fed chair He said you know when monetary policy is it's talk 98% talk And so if there's a surprise here the possibility that the fed goes to three quarters of a percent hike rather than a half a percent that's a surprise and maybe it works to the fed's advantage but it will also raise some concerns right Is the fed so far behind the ball that it has to shock us Is it really really trying to catch up And should we be more worried But so if telegraphing if being transparent about this is the play or at least that's what we think the player was going to be if as you said these rates go up higher than expected I mean that sounds like it would spook everyone Well I think that's probably why we saw what seems to have been sort of a very careful perhaps to The Wall Street Journal Which surmised this week that three quarter point increase was possibly on the table There's at least some speculation around town and around the fed that that could happen And that does suggest just as you said Look if the play is to forecast and predict where we're going no surprises then that suggests they're finding themselves at a much worse point economically than they thought they were the last time they met You said President Biden is fully behind Jerome Powell just going to stay out of things But how much power does Powell have as far as navigating this crisis Well I think the way we should think about the power of the fed and the ability of the fed is the degree to which it sustains public support right The public has to think and markets and financial participants and businesses and households They have to think the fed is going to do what it says it's going to do which in this case is to tame inflation But in that's why political support matters right And that's what pal really needs to keep A couple of times ago he started out as press conference Just speaking I want to speak to the American people Does he do that again He needs to keep public support thinking and knowing that the fed has the credibility to slay inflation Sarah bender professor political science at George Washington University and co author of the myth of independence how Congress governs the Federal Reserve professor thanks Sure Thanks for having me Southern Baptists are gathering for their annual meeting in Anaheim California and the sex abuse revelations in the church are looming large In particular the widespread silencing of victims Blake farmer of member station N reports The nation's largest Protestant Christian denomination has acknowledged sexual abuse by ministers for years but not like this outgoing president Ed litton opened with an apology to victims Many of them have suffered much And we honor them and we honor their pain and suffering Some victims are in attendance this week Last year Southern Baptist church representatives demanded an outside investigation into how leaders have handled sexual abuse claims That investigation revealed in striking the tale that the denomination was keeping track of known abusers even while saying it didn't have the ability to help churches keep from hiring a pastor who'd been credibly accused I'm a sex abuse survivor and I'm a pastor I'm mentioning the report Brad eubank of pedal Mississippi was abused as a child by a minister of music I plead with you on behalf of survivors who love our convention and love our churches Please let's start the healing process today The abuse report contained two starter recommendations one creates an organization to oversee reforms across the denomination the second creates a public database much like the one the denomination was keeping in secret Several representatives spoke against the idea Mark Carpenter with a church in Franklin Tennessee says he's not convinced the hundreds of accused ministers are all that big a deal in the denomination that still claims more than 13 million members It strikes me that the burden of proof is upon those who say that we have a dreadful problem that needs to be met But the vote was overwhelmingly in favor of the proposals and other resolutions are being debated today They ask state legislatures to increase criminal penalties for abuse by pastors and a shield churches from liability They say that would make churches more likely to share what they know about abusive pastors For in fairness I'm Blake farmer.

fed Volcker Jay pal Volcker fed Powell President Biden Jerome Powell Vogler Biden Congress Sarah bender Bernanke Reagan Ed litton The Wall Street Journal Southern Baptist church George Washington University
"professor political science" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Okay, we've lathered a lot and we come back. We've got a guest. Our friend from grove city college Paul kanger don't go away. And you know what we feel. And you know what will happen. In case you haven't been paying attention, the Biden administration has caused a financial crisis and they have no clue how to fix it. Oil prices have skyrocketed and when oil prices go up the cost of transportation and shipping spikes leading the prices of goods to rise. And when we're already seeing record inflation that's the last thing we need, our economy is in trouble and you need to take steps to protect yourself. If all your money is tied up in stocks, bonds and traditional markets, you are vulnerable. Gold is one of the best ways to protect your retirement. No matter what happens, you own your gold, it is real, it is physical, it's always been valuable since the dawn of time, legacy precious metals is the company I trust for investing in gold. They can help you roll your retirement account into a gold backed IRA where you still own the physical gold. They can also ship gold and precious metals safely and securely to your house called legacy at 8 6 6 5 two 8 1903 or visit them online at legacy, p.m. investments dot com. Folks, as promised, yes, promises made, promises kept. I coined that phrase and it was stolen by the 45th president of the United States. But you know what? I'm going to let it go. Promises made promises kept. We promised Paul kenger. You've heard of him. He is a professor at grove city college and he's professor political science. He's also the head of the institute for faith and freedom. He's someone who's been on this program before. In my thinking, he's a hero. And we're thrilled to have him on Paul. Welcome. Well, you're too kind. Thank you very much, Eric. No, no, no. I'm just kind enough. Which is very different from being too kind. I would never be too kind. You listen, you, you're a stalwart for faith and freedom. You're somebody who represents those things in the academy, which is a huge thing. We've got at least three things to talk about with you. So I want to frame them before we leap into it. Number one, I want to talk about the legacy of doctor king. I want to talk about critical race theory and how that's antithetical to doctor king. And I want to talk to you about what we were discussing with Josh avatar, I guess it was last week about what's going on at grove, a city. So where should we start? Let's start there with asking you where we should start. Well, sure. I guess we should start with with Martin Luther King, given that this is MLK day. And this is something that I'm hearing increasingly from the religious left, right? Which is this idea that we need to teach critical race theory in order to teach about the nation's past with discrimination. Jim Crow laws, slavery, bigotry and everything else. And one thing that I've said, I wrote a piece that's posted on institute for faith and freedom website today called teach MLK, not CRT. And I mean, we teach Martin Luther King Jr. at grove city college. But in fact, we added a western sieve course to our curriculum, which shows how distinctive growth city colleges Eric, right? I mean, most colleges are hey hey, Ho Ho, western civ has got to go. They're eliminating western sip. We actually added a western sip course. So we read the Birmingham jail speech. We don't cut out the part about Aquinas, augustin, biblical law, natural law. And as I note in this piece that if you really want to teach, how did Martin Luther King Jr. accomplish what he did without critical race theory? Well, the answer is he didn't need critical race theory, critical race theory is this very modern, narrow, almost legalistic view based in critical theory, critical theory has origins in the Frankfurt school, which was a Marxist school. And it was critical theory is a totally different other thing altogether. Grew out of the academy in the 70s, Derek bell at Harvard. Kimberly Crenshaw, Richard Delgado. Today, Robin Deangelo, ibra X candy. It really kind of starts to flourish in our universities last 20 or 30 years. And as I say in this article, you know, how did king do what he did without CRT? How did Rosa Parks do what she did without CRT? How did Harriet Tubman? Frederick Douglass, the freedom riders, right? John Lewis, how did all these people do what they do without CRT? Easy, because they didn't need it. And I would actually go farther than that. Not only didn't they need it. CRT is antithetical to what they knew was right and true. And I think we want to say that, that it's not that CRT is an add on, maybe we can use it maybe not, maybe we don't need it, but we choose to use it. If you choose to use CRT, if you go along with CRT, you're working against what these heroes, these actual heroes of in the civil rights world, what they believed and what they taught and what they lived out..

grove city college Paul kanger Biden administration Paul kenger institute for faith and freedo Martin Luther King Jr. Josh avatar Eric Jim Crow United States Ho Ho Paul Kimberly Crenshaw Richard Delgado Robin Deangelo augustin Aquinas Derek bell Birmingham Frankfurt
"professor political science" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WTOP

"Declared states of emergency The CDC is now recommending that you wear quote the most protective mask you can like N95s to help slow the spread of COVID-19 CBS News correspondent Michael George With Yale Macron variant on the move a new ban on large gatherings is in effect in Northern California Sonoma county It's definitely a here we go again kind of feeling Experts like Ali mock dot of the University of Washington remain on alert for other COVID strains on the horizon But for now omicron is crowding out the field On the ground is not allowing anything else to spread Meanwhile the CDC is offering new guidance on masks that offer the best protection On its website the CDC says loosely woven cloth masks provide the least protection and well fitting respirators including N95s offer the most Russia continuing to deny what American intelligence agencies are reporting a false flag underway in Ukraine UCLA political professor political science professor Daniel treisman gambles especially when he's in a difficult situation as he was here with a situation in Ukraine which he was uncomfortable with thinking that the time was not on his side that things were moving against Russia He simply creates a crisis and tries to see how that can be directed into a path that will suit Russia's interests Russia continuing to deny it but it's designed to give Russia a pretext to invade the country American Queen voyages unites the North American continent from sea to shining sea with river lakes and ocean expedition cruises Visit AQ voyages dot com for details 7 O three on this Saturday January 15th 2020 Excuse me 2022 It is 23° in the district Good evening I'm Sarah Jacobs with the top local stories we are following this hour Republicans have taken the reins in Richmond business executive Glenn young and sworn in as the 74th governor of Virginia From parades to music to flyovers There was a lot of pomp and circumstance for Virginia's new Republican governor Glenn youngkin We celebrate the sound of freedom During his first speech he promised more funding for police and to protect qualified immunity for officers on education he acted signing an executive order that banned the teaching of critical race theory in schools he says another order allows parents to decide if their students need to wear masks while at school He also did away with a vaccine mandate for state employees We can do this.

CDC Russia Ali mock Michael George Daniel treisman CBS News Ukraine Sonoma county Northern California University of Washington river lakes Sarah Jacobs UCLA Glenn young Glenn youngkin Virginia Richmond
"professor political science" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"That 52% of Americans believe democracy is facing a major threat Of course it is It's the Democrat party While 85% of Americans believe it's very important the United States remain a democracy AKA republic I assume 52% believe American democracy is facing a major threat according to the newest edition of the Grinch college national poll The results of the poll were released yesterday The concern that American democracy is facing a major threat is driven by Republicans 71% In those aged 65 and old or 70% Only 35% of Democrats say they fill democracies facing a major threat Now why would that be Only 35% because they're in control of culture The government The media the narrative The schools So you know I'm just shocked that 35% They feel democracy is facing a major threat Oh it must be January 6th I guess The sense that democracies under threat is characterized by deep partisan polarization with Republicans rather than Democrats describing our democracy is facing a major threat said Danielle lucier granello associate professor political science It appears as though baseless accounts of fraud and stolen 2020 election have sharply eroded confidence our system among Republicans and created a sense that democracy is facing a crisis Now I would tell this associate professor To read the book rigged By Molly Hemingway moreover just read All the dark money that flowed into that campaign all the dark money that float in a Mark Elias and Perkins cooey the left wing Democrat hack law firm Yes All the changes and laws that took place including what I've been talking about a half hour ago But you know it's what's the name of the grinnell Have you ever had a grinell mister producer Chess Rick renal exactly One in four of both those under the age of 35 in those identifying as non white indicate remaining a democracy is only fairly somewhat or not at all important Well there you go One in four of those under the age of 35 and those identifying as non white So under 35 non white Don't give a damn before a democracy or not One have had anything to do with immigration system Let's see the poll shows incredibly few American 7% of high trust in the federal government all for good ideas to solve problems Well that that's exactly why the Democrats want to centralize all decision making about all aspects of your life Of course Because 7% know that the federal government will do a good job And that's all that matters Even among Democrats whose party currently holds The White House and the majority in both houses of Congress only 14% say the I trust in the federal government This is what's so bizarre This is what sobers are But these people who have little or no trust in the federal government they go to the polls and they vote for the Democrat party Why They want freebies That's why They want freebies Americans were some of more likely to have high trust and state governments 25% City or county elected leaders 19% Trust in political institutions is the glue that holds democracies together and allows them to weather crises over time says professor lucier Really Well the American Marxist movement is all about undermining our republic pulling down monuments burning our books trashing our founders and our founding documents Isn't that a problem No not at all No no no January 6th that's the problem Democrats and Republicans trust different groups to offer good ideas to solve problems Did somebody get paid to actually write this Doctors scientists public school teachers are highly trusted by Democrats Republicans doctors are highly trusted By only 48% scientists 28% teachers 31% But Republicans place high trust and police officers Only 65% only 22% of Democrats So here's my thinking on this 65% of any police force should respond to and protect Republicans 22% respond to protect Democrats Why not Make sense to me But then again almost two and three Americans agree that ordinary people elected office would do a better job of governing than professional politicians 51% of Republicans strongly agree Only 17% of Democrats agree So Democrats want lifetime politicians Now why do they want lifetime politicians Freebies Like I said before Now there's disagreement on individual liberties The whining division within the country they write is further evidenced by the value placed on individual liberties Among a key set of issues Democrats and Republicans had sharply different views on the kinds of freedoms of Americans should have Activities that a majority Republicans feel should be absolutely free include refusing vaccines 78% punishing their children as they think appropriate 67% openly carrying a gun wherever and whenever you want 58% and being exempt from rules and regs that conflict with sincerely held religious beliefs 55% Majority I knew this would be right at the top A majority of Democrats believe you should be able to get an abortion during the first 15 weeks of pregnancy 82% How about the last 15 weeks of pregnant Use mera marijuana recreationally whether it's legal or not 65% and joining public protests that block city street 61% Now look at that That block streets abortion and marijuana That's freedom to the Democrats That's freedom.

federal government Danielle lucier granello Democrat party Molly Hemingway Perkins cooey lucier Really American Marxist movement Elias
"professor political science" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Things right all the time and to have this cacophony of subpoenas and doubts and death. Threats thrown at you constantly is wearing on the people who are the stewards of democracy. And i think that's actually the big problem. Imagine anybody trying to do their job honestly and having your boss or having somebody in the next cubicle or somebody just down the street yelling at you constantly. What are you going to do. You're going to get out of there and and that's what we worry about. Is that in the long term. This process could very will run out of the elections business. People who have been conscientious people who you root for one team or the other you know in their spare time. But when they're on the job they do their job will and they do it as well as they can't according to the law and i think that the big story here is that they are in you know in the crosshairs. I that that's a. That's a bad term to use. But i mean they're they're being targeted and i worry that people who are who've been trying to do the right thing going to be replaced by folks who are less experienced at best and have wrong motives at worst it's a really important reminder that these systems that we talk about and that we treasure and depend on and think of as our political inheritance to these are systems that are only made up of people and that people are susceptible to all these pressures and they need to be protected. Mit professor political science charleston. With a third fresh stewart. It's a real honor to have you with us. I said thank you for taking time. Thank you for having all right much. More claim stay was. Hey everyone it's msnbc's mainly when my podcast into america. I explore what it means to be black in america this episode..

charleston stewart msnbc america
"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"People who have natural immunity are like 12 to 27 times more protected against the disease That's only people in Israel Tom Arabs think it is right We have no idea whether it would have whether it would apply to a Presbyterian All right we are almost out of time But real quickly because here's my thing I think Biden you know I don't think this is good politics for him I don't I think it's going to I mean listen he could have sat down with these Republican governors and said listen hey we've got a because they're all pro vaccination I mean they are all right They're trying to protect freedoms for their people but they are urging people to get vaccinated Aza Hutchinson and Arkansas all these folks he could have sat down with him and said listen we've got to get these folks vaccinated What can we do How can we work together What do you think is going to work How can we work together with Satan federal to get these unvaccinated people onboard and get them vaccinated Is that what he chose to do He chose to do the opposite which was basically demonize these folks and say I'm going to do it You guys are get out of the way Why didn't he do that First of all he was elected to do exactly what you have suggested right I mean that's what people voted for They didn't vote for a mandate in Hector and demonize They voted for a let's work together approach I think that the whole idea is that he thinks his own presidency could be in danger if they can't get the pandemic under control and it's preemptive blame shifting All right well we shall find out obviously this is the story We're going to be talking about for a long long time But we got to leave it there Charles lips and professor political science university Chicago Charles always great to have you Great to talk to you Tom All right we're going to take quick break Be right back after these words The pandemic September is the most birthday packed month of the year so chances.

12 Tom Israel Tom Arabs Charles Biden Arkansas Republican Aza Hutchinson September 27 times Chicago First federal Satan
"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"That should be a no brainer and yet a police spokesman said last friday that forty seven percent of new york's uniformed and civilian employees have been vaccinated. Just forty seven percent vaccination. Expert dr peter. Hotels explains quote if you look at new york. In terms of vaccination rates seventy nine percent of residents. Eighteen order have gotten at least one dose of vaccine that means members of the police department are more vaccine has in the general population. Well yeah rather than do more to protect its officers in the people. They serve the nypd. Largest police union has vowed to sue over possible vacc- mandate but the los angeles and san francisco. Sheriff deputies unions have protests protested vaccine mandates. Well the head of chicago's largest police. Union said this. And i'm going to quote a for you and just listen up. This is the head of the chicago police. You were in america. God damn it. We don't want to be forced to do anything period. This ain't knocks. Nazi echoed expletive germany. Where they say keep listening. Step into the expletive showers. The pills won't hurt you. what the expletive. i'm not. That's not a rando with nine followers on the internet that i just quoted that's the head of chicago's biggest police union. Comparing a safe and effective vaccine that will likely saved the lives of members of the police and the public they interact with to nazi gas chambers. And he didn't pull out of the air. The metaphor is not unique to him. It's all over the right. Republican member of congress thomas massie of kentucky tweeden image. Saying quote if you have to carry a card on you to gain access to a restaurant venue or event in your own country. That's no wonder free country and then a an arm with what appears to be a concentration camp tattoo cumbersome marjorie taylor green georgia had to apologize for comparing mask mandates the holocaust although that has not stopped her from making more inflammatory comments at the same tenor. I mean think about this ticket. Step back for a second. The notion that police officers are given the power to kill by the state with very little recourse accountability. In fact protected from some of the lawsuits are legal oversight. That other folks would have right. that's not problematic. From the perspective of freedom tyranny and self-determination but a requirement that people frequently interact with the public get vaccinated as akin to the third reich. Getting these are not fringe views. This is a huge part of current conservative. Ideology it's not specific police but they are a part of it because of their proximity to the engine of right wing misinformation reaction that is right now the key repulsive force in accelerating in continuing the death and destruction of this pandemic adam serwer is a staff writer for the atlantic his latest piece titled the absurdity of police comparing backseat mandates to nazi germany professor political science at university of maine co author of at war with government how conservatives weaponized distrust from goldwater to trump and ataman start with you. I thought your piece on this. I have been thinking a lot about this. And i don't think i'm not shocked by it but i still find it deeply deeply troubling of what it means to have this segment. Workers police officers react in this way. The vaccine will it's an expression of the sort of underlying ideology police unions. Which is that. Their behavior does not need. should not be restricted under any circumstance. But you have to do whatever they say when they want you to say it. And they're also cross pressured. Look police unions are aware that covert is killed. Far more police officers violence violence something like six hundred police officer is in the last. Two years have been fell by kovic or since cova emerged at six hundred. Police officers had been shot dead in the street. The country might be under martial law but because police officers are lean conservative Their membership is an anti vaccine ideology. Become a part of the conservative political beliefs. The unions do not want to encourage their members To get the vaccine but they're going to oppose any mandates despite the fact that people don't have choice if they interact with police. If a cop stops you you don't get to say well. I guess i'm just not going to talk to him. Because i don't know if he's vaccinated or not so. This is something that should be required for all public facing employees. Not just police officers but something that police unions are opposing because they understand how trumpy their membership is professor. Do you think this is. This is distinct in new. What we're seeing this sort of the kind of rightwing backlash it seems to me. Intensifying growing in certain ways. Even as we're getting lots of folks with all sorts of ideological backgrounds getting vaccinated day-by-day luckily but the resistance is really there and i and i wonder what you what framework you view it. Through what would i say.

dr peter Largest police union chicago thomas massie marjorie taylor new york nypd adam serwer germany ataman san francisco los angeles kentucky kovic university of maine congress america georgia
"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

"The recent rise of cova was also the justification governor. Abbot cited in his executive order calling on state troopers to stop vehicles suspected of transporting migrants a federal judge. El paso tuesday issued a temporary restraining order. Stopping the governor from carrying it out a justice department attorney argued into hearing monday that the governor was unlawfully creating his own quote immigration regime. Usurping the federal government Brandon did the governor really think this was going to fly or was this just more red meat for the conservative base in reelection campaign. You know it's a good question making a little bit. Both is clear that the governor is trying to play to the right here and it's been a pretty consistently home to tune by the governor and his office but Obviously there were also issues. Here that the governor would like to be able to put back into texas camp they wanna be able to stay there insurance immigration policy because that lets them have more control over what happens and that gives them a political issue but to be honest even in losing the issue. They can still win politically because to show that they are taking on the federal government. Let's the base note that day care about the issue. Even if they don't win her animals. We were discussing with judge. George just a few minutes ago. Ford ben county raised its covert threat level and the judge wants county employees. To wear masks mayor turner's memo to city employees houston to mask up is now underway. Both both are using language that maybe stops touch short of mandate or maybe doesn't depending on how you read it Council member tiffany thomas On this show characterized mayor. Turns directive is reinforcement of practices already in place. Is that how it reads to you. I think Local governments municipalities county. Cd's zones for a limited by governor savage executive orders so basically they cannot Go against those orders. So a public officials especially those in charge of like county judges and mayors had to be very creative in terms of incentivizing people to moscow p- or to get vaccinated without mandating without gaining into into trouble on dive applies to an independent school district zone and so forth. So i think eventually you know is is this issue about Individual responsibility and common sense but as they say common he's the less common of the census sometimes so they have to be creative in order to try to stop these new delta variant. This is houston matters. I'm craig cohen. We're talking with political analyst. Sorrento cortina and brandon rotting house about recent developments in politics. They are the co host of party politics here on news. Eight seven hirano isn't associate professor political science at the university of houston and associate director of the center for mexican. American studies brandon rotting houses a producer. Or excuse me..

cova federal government ben county mayor turner Abbot El paso tiffany thomas Brandon houston texas Ford George craig cohen Sorrento cortina moscow brandon rotting house hirano center for mexican university of houston brandon rotting
"professor political science" Discussed on CFR On the Record

CFR On the Record

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on CFR On the Record

"Relations still mira formerly imperial relations of the web continues to be concentrated in the industrialized not and the consumption is also relying not largely and frankly most of the reno's missions accurate historical emissions off from the industrialized right now. China leading immigration reno's gas emissions. But historically it's been not america and western europe. So we do. we do. Try to make the not just the international student but osborne's aware of the disparities and the need for engaging responsibility with these these essentially what are discriminations. so yes that is We do take that seriously Having done idea. I'm still working on broadening this to Departments on his next question from lisa. Glidden who is a professor political science and director sustainability studies minor at suny oswego. Can you talk about your campus. Mild to address climate issues. You have a general education or core required. Sustainability course on in what kinds of commitments from the administration residential life academic. Here affairs have helped. Move your campus forward toward its goals. Yeah so right now. The the really hardcore commitment is only on the operation side so carbon neutrality target and then transitioning do renewable-energy most likely geothermal. That is our major major commitment at this point on the curriculum side. We don't have any hot in boston. Admits with their departments. Do there what i would say. You know enlightened leadership like campus dining over there. They have set internal targets. Gordon you know not necessarily zero waste but reduce there waste drastically Some environmental studies program. Here is frankie pretty radical. So they have their own internal targets. Thumbs up what they expect to. God's student outcomes and so on and so forth debt is an emphasis on sustainability. But it's not yet daniela to the point where we say know. These are the explicit targets for such and such a siphon the you've ever go in terms of working with are sharing. Best practices with other colleges. Are there specific colleges that you're consulting with and You know is regional are are there..

suny oswego mira Glidden western europe reno osborne China lisa america boston Gordon frankie daniela
"professor political science" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Fights on it. Someone can't 123 go 123 go. That is how they run the assembly in California. Okay? Yeah, right. The Republicans or the poor guy saying rule there. There's no rules in a knife fight, and Democrats say somebody got what you drink. So what do they go? That's the end of it. That's how they're trying to handle this recall. And so more than likely he'll be saved because they've made it so there's no way he can't be saved. So once again what the people want doesn't really matter. It's what the party once That matters. And what's interesting is You have people, speaking from University of California, Berkeley. Political science people. Let's just be honest. These are not people that you're going to find going to the Republican National Convention. Here's one science professor political science professor at U. C. Berkeley, said. They're trying to create a situation that's most favorable for the partisan outcome that they want. No, really. He said. The calendar changing the Canada threatens to reinforce the narrative that politicians will do whatever they want to stay in power, and that's exactly what they're doing right now. Now one recall elections expert and I pointed this out. God knows what would we do without experts said. You know this effort could backfire could give Democrats less time to motivate their voters. Republicans already have almost two million signatures to remove him. So imagine there'll be a little bit more motivated. But you know, bottom line is Gavin Newsom came out last week and said, We're going to pay everybody's back Rent, So if you haven't paid your rent For the last. However, many months even have been a.

Gavin Newsom California Republican National Convention last week Democrats University of California Republicans one science professor Berkeley U. one Canada C. Berkeley almost two million signatures 123
"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Here on 93. W IBC Our guest today is our good friend, Dr Laura Wilson on his professor. Political science at the university. Annapolis. So on the sports like we were just talking about America. Sort of what works where we can Maybe clear things up a little bit. Uh, Dr Laura, one thing I always want to pick your brain on social media. Because I'm thinking there is any division this country social media contributes to it because always said social media is how the misinformed people reach the uninformed people. Am I crazy? No, You are correct. I love Social media, and I love to hate social media. And sometimes I hate to love social media. But it's the challenge of social media. A lot of times of people find their echo chambers and that there is more information out there than ever before. And there's more misinformation. It's harder to verify authenticity or to know what is true with been doctored What's exaggerated with completely fall With the echo chambers to me are probably the most interesting and in part because I hope I say this with a little bit of positive, but I hope I hope most people if they take the time they can verify or authenticate is this fake has a you know there's some stuff that's hard to identify. But sometimes you can do that. But the worst thing and especially with social media is for us to only follow people who agree with us and only friend people who have the same ideas. And so were never exposed to the other side. And I always tell my students you cannot possibly articulate a strong counter argument to something if you don't know what you're arguing in the first place. It was there were only surrounding ourselves with people who think and act and speak and feel like us. We're missing the larger picture and minimum for empathy. And I'm not saying you have to follow all kinds of people on social media. You got to change your mind. They might actually reaffirm. I believe faith of questioning. I think patriotism is challenging. Regardless of where you come out on the other end. You get us in for okay. That's why that person thinks like that. That's why they feel like that. And I think that's the to me the biggest challenge with social media, and sometimes it gets worse and worse because you don't like what someone says. You don't like what they post. Male, and even if you like, that's wrong, it's say it's fake. It's fat. You know, it's not a fact. If you unfollowed, then you one friend. Then you like them or whatever. You're no longer minimum being exposed to that side, even if sometimes it's not always accurate or true or correct because I argued that because I argued, pretty, basically, the exact same thing is that number one Um, You don't believe everything you read. That's that's kind of point number one and number two. If you have to click more than it's like the old Mr Al. How many licks does it take to get to the tips? Rosen emergency pop, and he looks so real popular 123, and then he bites it. It's like it takes you more than three clicks Get to the actual story. It's probably Bs, So that's kind of point point number one. Uh Go ahead. I was big and whenever someone says, but it's only reported in one spot. Why do you think that is, if it's a good story? If it's a genuine story, everyone's going to report it and maybe not immediately but within an hour Every source will be honest. I get really sketchy, and I think it's skeptical when someone says, Oh, I just found it in this one spot. Yes, there's probably a reason. Yeah, exactly. Number two. The other thing is about social media is I think it's contribute to the coarseness of our society because there are things that people will say to each other online that they would never, ever even dream of saying that somebody sitting arrived sitting right across the table from them. Oh, it is and that that's probably the saddest part of it and the Internet as a whole. There's a sense of anonymity. You don't have to face someone face to face. But you can, you can say as you said, just all these awful things, And that part worries me the most because I also think about the generations that are growing up like young people today that have never known a time before Social media and so To them. That's their level of social discourse. That's acceptable that's appropriate. Um it's kind of re informing and every enforcing rather all the things that we we don't want to depend the worst. In our society, despite the fact that can bring out a lot of good and it has a lot of potential and the opportunity. We have to use it wisely, and I have generally not just sort of society but as individuals being thoughtful. And you know the golden rule treating others like you want to be treated. I don't want anyone saying mean things to me and on social media, and I take great care if I have a bad word to say, just keep it to myself. My mind muttered out loud whatever I do not Don't type it I don't share in that way. It's going to be positive. It's not going to be helpful. It doesn't. It's not productive. Dr. Laura Wilson with us on the program today for a few more minutes, as we're just going to talk about America on this fourth of July weekend, uh, Dr Laura want to change gears a little bit and get into like the policy perspective of the political world that you and I both live in. Um what would you say is one thing if you get if you had a magic wand And you could fix our political system. What would you do or how would you do it? Oh, I think I get rid of political parties. Abdul I I I would because I feel like they reinforce the division and that is nothing against people who are in the parties. The parties or support the parties are the leaders of the parties. I know many of them as you do, and they're great people overwhelmingly and the the politicians..

Laura Laura Wilson Abdul Annapolis today both America one spot fourth of July weekend more than three clicks one friend Rosen an hour two one thing Mr Al. first place point one point number one
"professor political science" Discussed on WORLD OVER

WORLD OVER

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on WORLD OVER

"The world over award winning actor and philanthropist. Gary sinise joins us to celebrate the tenth anniversary of islam dacian. And it's worse serving our nation's veterans and first responders china's been under communist rule for one hundred years this july but people have any cause for celebration given their human rights and religious liberty record notre dame professor political science victoria way is here with analysis and grammy winning recording artist. Jose feliciano tells us the story of his inspiring single. I'm america finally plastic world over interviews with american heroes. Remind us of the cost of freedom and power. Faith and lieutenant general hal more admiral jeremiah. Denton a very important world over begins right now now raymond arroyo a warm welcome to all of you joining us in the united states and the world over happy independence day. We've got a terrific show for you tonight. If you'd like to comment send me a tweet. Him at raymond. Royal lots to cover. Let's get right to it. My first guest was nominated for an oscar for his role as lieutenant. Dan in the nineteen ninety-four blockbuster forrest gump. He's an emmy winner. A family man musician. Philanthropist working on behalf of our nation's fighting men and women he and.

Gary sinise admiral jeremiah Jose feliciano raymond arroyo grammy united states china Denton hal raymond oscar forrest gump Dan
"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Was that split. Also largely along party or political lines Pretty sharply though not quite as much but for an interesting reasons so if you break down our over overall we found that texans were evenly divided. Thirty seven percent said that the increasing racial diversity was a cause for optimism. Thirty four percent said it was a cause for concern. Twenty nine percent said they didn't know didn't want to express an opinion You know democrats not surprisingly given the composition of the parties Democrats were were much more optimistic. That five percent of democrats said they were optimistic. Twenty-eight percent said it was a cause for concern republicans. Were almost almost a mirror image of that but with an asterisk so twenty four percent of republicans said that it was a cause for optimism. Forty percent said it was a cause for concern and and more than a third of republicans. Said they didn't know didn't have an opinion. So you know. I think we also as i said earlier have to. We have to factor that into concerns about immigration. I think there's no two ways about that. I is there. Can we tell from this date anyway. A clear link between texas voters answers to that question and the attitudes that you described about the importance of immigration and border security. Well i mean. I think the clearest link that we have there is that in the past we've also asked about the amount of legal immigration in weather People thought that the us let in you know too many too few Or about the right amount of legal immigrants and you find a majority of republicans saying that we're letting in too many Too many legal immigrants. And so i think that has to you know that. That's at least a plausible link in my mind between the two. Because you know one of the you know one of the the discussions that we hear recur in the in the discussion of republican policies on immigration and border security particularly those restrictive policies is that this is about law and order and legality that. It's not a matter of of cultural politics but i think when you add the issue about legal immigration and in those attitudes about legal immigration into that You know it leads me to question. Just how how far you can go with the law and order description. James hansen is the director of the texas politics project at ut austin. Jim thank you very much. Thanks for having me. I appreciate it and joining us. Now is toronto. Cortina associate professor political science and associate director of the center for mexican american studies at the university of houston. He's also the co host of news. Eighty eight seven party politics program..

texas James hansen us center for mexican american st Cortina austin Jim toronto university of houston
"professor political science" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"professor political science" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"The break. We look ahead to tomorrow's badly and spend by-election we'll be right back. Welcome back to politics weekly. I'm just gal got now. We turn our attention to yorkshire the place where i was born and the constituency of battling spin tomorrow voters will go to the polls to cheesy. They would like to see replace tracy brabin. His stood down in may after being elected mayor of west yorkshire candidates include. Labor's can lead better the sister of the murdered mpg. Cox and the former labor impeach george. Calloway who's throwing a spanner in the works to get their reading the situation on the ground. My colleague umbrella groti spoke to guardian columnist in jones the fulmer labor and people sheriff and j angry professor political science and british politics at oxford university. Let's start with you by looking at the last few days of campaigning. I say they've been incredibly tense with labor targeted by fake leaflets. And the party was also accused by one of its own. Mp's of using doc whistle racism to win votes. What stood out to you. When you've is the seat well actually visited badly and spend now. Well we can a half ago in an in politics. A lot could happen as we know in a week. And i think that's been the case on the ground and butler and spend that have been communicating with canvassers mostly labor conferences on the ground. And it's clearly very tense tense. Anyway because we've got to remember. There are several far right candidate standing in that constituency and as we know joe cox of course was murdered by a far-right extremists just over half decade ago. So itself in lens and inflammatory character to the by election but clearly Galloway is a very demagogic character with a pretty record when it comes to campaigning. In terms of labour's leaf is interesting leaflet. Which law of people have focused upon. There's a lot of debate about it now. Stephanie treat out for example at my own low clem p for stockport has has come out and condemned leaflet which labor issue which spoke out about conservative islamaphobia but also highlighted the conservative closeness to moody the extreme hindu nationalist at leader of india. Of course now. He believes that they actually is dog. Whistle racism is not me as white person to start intervening on this it has called through into constituency at light barley instead. All the things As well which is why that annoyed. Some searches kissed on withdrawing from an if dr because one of the muslim speakers out if tar supported boycotting olives from israeli settlements now that has very in about way but nonetheless as lethal has antagonized lots of people but for very different reasons but clearly a very tense in the streets about china won't continue next. there have obviously been accusations of dirty tricks campaigns. How might those influence voters and ain't what we have to do when we think about in span is look at the boorda context..

tracy brabin umbrella groti Calloway west yorkshire yorkshire oxford university Cox joe cox islamaphobia jones george butler Galloway stockport Stephanie india china
"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Democracy is also a way by which majority in post to the minority of course in this sense great attention. In in this case allowed to increase also the public also perception off some minority some migrant groups had cetera that's sort of at contradictory effect of direct democracy at the moment oscar. Matzo laney is a professor political science at the university of zahn in switzerland. Speaking with me about how a controversial referendum banning face coverings recently passed their professor. Thank you very much thank you. We'll be right back. You're listening to the world. Hello marco here. This past year listeners continued to show their unwavering support for the world together. We raised over one hundred thousand dollars. Thanks to the following people that helped us reach our goal tie cameron james george michael wagner jane schmitz carry hoffman the fail malachi colin hamilton. Meghan johnson linda hill and tom miller. Thank you all for helping us. Bring human center journalism to listeners. All around the world microsoft has been hacked. The company says cybercriminals from china are to blame is just the latest in a series of worrisome cyberattacks aimed at us targets security experts. Say we need better defense. The most important thing that everyone should be doing is operating at assumption that someone is already inside. What the industry calls assumed. Breach mentality that story's ahead on the world. I'm.

microsoft tom miller marco Meghan johnson Matzo laney linda hill jane schmitz china switzerland michael wagner over one hundred thousand doll This past year cameron george james zahn university malachi colin hamilton oscar hoffman
"professor political science" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"professor political science" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"To see you, Jeff, My producer, Jeff Car looks like a completely different guy during the day. Who are you that we keep the club music going on. You know, that's great. Keep the energy up, right? Really Throw people I've wait. It's 5 30. This sounds like nine o'clock. In that first segment. I talked with you versus Cincinnati professor political science professor David Nevin about this U S Senate race for Rob Portman. See which I want to say next year, but, hey, it's already really well under way. The election's not until next year. But the positioning that's going on. There were huge news this week in that race, and with Amy acting doctor Amy acting stepping down from her private sector job in Columbus. Too, and acknowledging publicly for the first time that yes, she is considering a run for the U. S Senate and then hire a Republican Party chairwoman Jane Timken, resigning from that seat yesterday. Tolo continue to explore. A run for the U. S senate on the Republican side that is in his David Nevin point out. This is extraordinary step, Tomo quit your job. To you really look at and consider running for the seat when Yeah, Nothing's guaranteed. And maybe you don't end up running after you explore it some more. But it's It's really unique and politics to see that, as he mentioned usually it's the other way around. You want to stay in your job? To continue to try to get your name out there or you know, but a lot of times that's usually you're in a political job. Jane Timken probably would have liked to have stayed in her job. But the bylaws of the Ohio Republican Party said. You can't run for office and also hold the chair the chair of the party, so she had tol leave that job to consider this runs. I'm gonna Go out of. I don't think it's going out on a limb, but I think Jane Timken runs now. Is Amy Act and run that Z a really Intriguing question in Ohio politics right now, and really, a national politics is You know, all eyes so far have been on this race. It's an open seat in Washington. A Senate obviously is 50 50. And even though the Washington Democrats and you know, usually your national folks are looking at Ohio more like it's Indiana these days instead of like Pennsylvania, Michigan, it's no longer a swing state. Because the national Democrats have said, you know they look at. Hey, we're we are east Indiana here in Ohio now, and they're taking their money and resource is and going toe. You know the new the new kids on the block, so to speak when it comes to swing states and Georgia Texas, Arizona. But Amy acting, I think is caught their attention. They're being the national you know, the National Democratic Party and the national donors And if she jumps into this race, um Even though she will be an underdog. I think you're going to see a lot of outside money pouring in, whereas the outside donors and the National Democratic Party, the DNC has said. Yeah. This is going, I think, Get them to take another look at Ohio Now. My question to you is your turn. Do you think Dr Amy Act and runs and if so? Would you vote for? If not, or would you not vote for what I find interesting is, you know Dr Acting Left her job as the state health director last summer, and she become Such a Yeah, I hate it. So ever used a cliche, A lightning rod. But I mean, just beloved. On one hand by fashion of Ohioans or a large group of Ohioans and then but then the fervent Trump supporters in Ohio, which there are plenty of in a state that he's won. By eight points. Both of his elections just cannot stand her for all the the shutdowns and the push for shutting down small businesses during the pandemic. So what do you think? Should Amy act and run? Do you think she runs? Can she win? Can't she win? 749 7000 5137491 7808 432441. Pounds 780 90 And you know what I just wanted I don't I want I want you use is your chance to sign off on politics so much going on? Maybe something else is weighing on you. I'm here to listen. Get your take on politics. Get your take on Dr Amy Act and potentially running. For the U. S. Senate. Take a break news radio 700 wlw. It's how we.

Dr Amy Act Ohio Jane Timken U. S. Senate Republican Party National Democratic Party David Nevin U. S Senate Jeff Car Washington Democrats Dr Acting Rob Portman Washington Cincinnati producer Amy Indiana Columbus professor
How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

06:40 min | 3 years ago

How Is The U.S. Economy Doing?

"Begin today a little piece of audio you a mere twelve seconds. Not Too long won't be too painful but inside it. There is a whole lot to digest. Here you go. I believe that monetary policy is and a good place and should continue to support sustained growth a strong labor market and inflation running close to are symmetric two percent objective. Those those of you recognize that to be a member of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Not too tough really given the subject matter. Go to the head of the class. If you identified the Speaker as Richard Clara the vice vice chairman of the Fed a gold star to you. Now why are we starting with him. A couple of reasons honestly number one because the Fed has been taking some heat it lately for having gotten a lot of its economic forecasting wrong. Hello inflation number. Two because Clarita said today and chair Powell says often the really the economy's pretty good number three because pugh is out with a study today. That says not everybody out in the actual economy agrees with the fat so so two interviews with which to test those premises. I about the Fed Sarah Bender. She's a professor of Political Science at George Washington University where she studies the Fed. Welcome to the program. Thanks thanks for having me. What do you make of the vice chairman speech today and more importantly how the feds sort of is positioning itself in this economy right now? Well the Fed is saying saying so far. So good The comedies on a good track Congress's given us a dual mandate of low sustainable unemployment and low inflation Kevin. And we're hitting him. He's not telling us really where things are going in the future. He's saying data dependent meeting by meeting. But he's telling telling us the economy is on a good course he Said and and chair. Paul says this all the time that they're going to you know work to keep the expansion going as as long as they can and one of the things chair Paul says and Clark said it today was that You know the longer expansion goes the more it helps people at the bottom. How much can the Fed really do though for the people at the bottom of this economy but the fence so far is doing a lot by keeping a monetary policy not so loose and accommodative right and you see wage gains at the lower end of the economic spectrum at a certain point though? There's only so much that monetary monetary policy can do and absent fiscal policies. That might say deal with job training or job relocation or healthcare. There's is only so much weight that can be put on monetary policy makers. Let me carry that forward to an interview. We're going to have here in a couple of minutes with A upholster from pugh who has a new study out today about economic inequality in this country. What can the Fed do on economic inequality which consistently ranks pretty high in terms of what what people are worried about in this economy? Well the best contribution they can make is to keep an eye on employment and do as much as they can to Stoke job growth but without sparking inflation keeping an eye on the health of the financial system so that people have access to quality and so forth at the end of the day though. It's really the limits of what monetary policy makers can do. The really simple line is heading into an election year. Right is. It's the economy stupid frame that for me in terms of the Federal Reserve and the role of the economy in the next eleven months of of our common experience. Well Congress gives the Fed to commands. Keep inflation low keep jobs growing. That's what the Fed is aiming to do. Oh here and the extent that they're successful it means the economy's growing and on an even keel in. That's what helps incumbents get reelected Sir Bender under she's At Brookings also Professor Political Science at George Washington University professor. Thanks for your time. Am I appreciate sure. Thanks for having me okay. So all of that said interview number two now from the Pew Research Center who study out today shows as I said that not. Everybody agrees that the economy is all sunshine and Light Ruth Galmoc. She is a senior researcher at Pew Rookie to have you on for having me if I say that seventy percent of respondents to this Survey that Y'all did if if I say that they believe the economy is rigged. Is that too strong word. I would say that. They think that the economy is unfairly favouring powerful special interests interests so we asked whether the economy was generally fair or whether it unfairly favored these powerful interests and seven and ten Americans that they did not think it was fair. We should point out. There's as a partisan divide here as with most things in this country now that's right. Republicans are about evenly split with about half of Republican. Same economy is generally fair and half of the economy saying unfairly early favors these special interests whereas Democrats overwhelmingly say that the economy is not fair. okay so Brass tacks your who's got the power so we asked Americans who they thought had too much power and influence in today's economy and about eight and ten or more American said that politicians Titians corporations and people who are wealthy had too much power we also had majority saying health insurance companies banks and other financial institutions and tech companies had too much cower Let me ask you then who doesn't have the power or is parallel. I suppose another way to put it. Yeah we asked to people. Apple felt did not have enough power and Americans pointed to people who were poor the middle class and interestingly small businesses. Yes say more about that because when I read this in small all businesses came up I was. That's the thing that got me on the phone with you to be honest. Yeah I'm and one interesting thing was we saw a partisan divide and how Democrats and Republicans on looked at a number of these groups. Republicans were less likely than Democrats to say that large corporations had too much power but when it came to small businesses Democrats and Republicans were largely in agreement that that small businesses did not have enough power. Today's economy. So what else do people need to know about this. I mean as they read this and they hear that you know seven ten people think the economy is is unbalanced. Silence shall we say instead of rigged. What are they supposed to do that information? It's hard to say What people are supposed to do? In this survey we did sort of dive into what Americans think about economic comic inequality in general and while most Americans say that there's too much economic inequality in the country. They didn't rank particularly highly as an issue. So it's hard to sort they how that will play out Raquel Nick. She's a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. Thanks a lot. I appreciate your time. Thanks for having me

Federal Reserve Democrats Pew Research Center Vice Chairman Congress Sarah Bender Pugh George Washington University Senior Researcher Federal Reserve Board Of Gover Professor Of Political Science Pew Rookie Richard Clara Raquel Nick Stoke Clarita Paul Ruth Galmoc Apple
Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 5 years ago

Q and A: What does the Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang
Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

The John Batchelor Show

02:21 min | 5 years ago

Q and A: What does Iran deal mean for North Korea?

"I'm john batchelor with thaddeus mccotter wjr and our colleague gordon chang of the daily beast and we all three welcome bruce bechtel bruce is importantly the author of a new book north korean military proliferation in the middle east and africa enabling violence and instability bruce's the professor political science at angelo state university retired marine once a marine always a marine the author of several books about north korea the trouble north korea however tonight on the eve of the announcement by the trump administration about the iran deal i begin with this bruce proliferation in the middle eastern africa and there's a wonderful illustration on your book and i think i see iran inside that little star there all right so the iran deal what does this mean for north korea that the iran deal is likely to be canceled does this affect north korea's ability to rest money from the hands of the mullah's good evening to you good evening john and good evening all it certainly didn't affect the steady flow of a lot of money every year about two to three billion every year from aranda north korea when the sanctions were on all that lifting the sanctions did was make it easier to get that money to north korea but north korea iran and syria have such extensive illicit banking financial networks in both europe and asia and the middle east and frankly and countries in africa like mozambique and easy oprah that it it just it you know unless we go after those specific banks and those front companies which those sanctions don't cover or the ones that didn't were not covered under the ranch sanctions were never really going to slow the flow of cash between iran and north korea or the flow of weapons for north korea to iran status bruce well it means that you know our president donald trump you know put out a formal policy we talked about it on this show several months ago last fall where he talked about a pressure campaign against north korea.

Donald Trump President Trump Mozambique Asia Europe Syria Africa Middle East Thaddeus Mccotter Wjr John Batchelor Oprah Iran Aranda North Korea North Korea Angelo State University Bruce Bechtel Bruce Gordon Chang