19 Burst results for "Professor Of Pediatrics"

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 4 months ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret <hes> and <hes> the reason he got into the news was because <hes> we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of <hes> discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived <hes>, but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did <hes> in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more <hes>. And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was <hes> supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that <hes> endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and <hes> they raise funds for <hes>. Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division <hes>. It was <hes>. It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and <hes> and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said <hes> supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so <hes>. My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. <hes> research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital <hes>, and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so <hes>. They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics India Indiana University Ryan White Professor Nigeria Michigan Medical School Riley Marty Medical School University of M Bangladesh founder Stewart Madison Africa
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 4 months ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Indiana Ryan White United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine India New England Director Of The Division Of In Riley Marty Founder Stewart
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:03 min | 4 months ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret <hes> and <hes> the reason he got into the news was because <hes> we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of <hes> discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived <hes>, but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did <hes> in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more <hes>. And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was <hes> supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that <hes> endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and <hes> they raise funds for <hes>. Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division <hes>. It was <hes>. It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and <hes> and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said <hes> supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so <hes>. My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. <hes> research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics India Indiana University Ryan White Professor Nigeria Michigan Medical School Riley Marty Medical School University of M Bangladesh founder Stewart Madison Africa
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:03 min | 4 months ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital

Ryan White Indiana United States Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine Director Of The Division Of In New England India Riley Marty Founder Stewart
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Think there were a few there's a handful of articles that have reported health effects linked to secondhand beeping exposure through certainly art should be because i mean these are aerosols that are going to be available to summer mild and they're going to be inhaled by the person next to the vapor so <hes> <hes>. It's not been investigated enough. It's a really really good question. Don't you present factly right. Most likely there is going to be a link because because there are ultra fine particles which are going to be released with the raping and if you are next to that person absolutely okay. I believe that there will be issues with that down the line but <hes> so you believe that we do. We don't yet have conclusive studies around that. It's it's an area not not yet but it is common sense that if you are weeping and there is the smoke coming out with all these <hes> chemicals emiko's in it the person who is next to you will be inhaling it to okay so. I believe that there will be issue. I want to sneak one last call in here. Camello l. is calling from baltimore maryland camille. You're on the air. We've got about thirty seconds to see if we can get your your your comment in here. Hi very briefly my nineteen year also experienced a situation where he was vaping with friends. He passed out had a sustained heart rate of one hundred and seventy beats per minute per minute in the e._r. For seven hours it was it's quite scary and the doctor said he would have gone into cardiac cardiac arrest had we not been there to catch him when he passed out and call nine one nine one one so so from a parent perspective is quite alarming and there needs to be increased education <hes> pertaining to what you're getting a lot of times. These kids don't know what they're smoking right. It's a great point. Thank you so much for calling. I hope your son's doing alright. Professor jaspers got thirty seconds left here. What do you what do you think about camille said yeah. I hear you're absolutely absolutely right on. There's been actually a study that came out where with the questionnaire and they actually questioned you know the the demographic that you're that her son is in whether <music>. I'm you know what they're vaping about. Forty percent of the kids basically answered no. I'm just vaping flavors and water <hes> your their urine analysis show that they had high <hes> ah nicotine metabolite so a lot of kids don't even know that they are vaping high nicotine products and slowly actually pretty rapidly become addicted to nicotine well. Meanwhile as i mentioned we're seeing a lot of states raising the e cigarette buying asia twenty-one and just very recently michigan michigan became the first state to ban those flavored e cigarettes so a lot of attention to this on the state and federal level professor ilana jaspers professor pediatrics microbiology and immunology at the university of north carolina chapel hill. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you for having dr melody presider chief of pediatric pulmonologist at n._y._u. Winter possible on long island dr prada thank you you thank you meghna chucker bardy. This is on point..

nicotine Professor jaspers professor michigan ilana jaspers camille Camello l. baltimore university of north carolina c maryland thirty seconds Forty percent nineteen year seven hours
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

"We'll build a few more over much of the bay area, and we might even get a little bit of rain mainly in the north bay other than that we shouldn't experience much rain at all in the north bay going into tomorrow afternoon. Just a weak little weather system that's going to be passing overhead, and because of that the temperatures will cool down a few degrees tomorrow. So daytime highs tomorrow will come in the mid to upper seventies from most locations across the bay and mid eighties inland, and then once we're done with tomorrow. Things are going to start warming up. In fact, it's going to be the warming trend that really starts to make the headline in the forecast from now all the way through Tuesday and Wednesday of next week by the time we get to the weekend temperatures inland or in the upper eighties. And then we should start hitting some low nineties for KCBS. I'm meteorologist Aaron peck with your KPI export cast, traffic and weather together on the it's on all news, one of six nine AM, seven forty KCBS a DJ DIGI dot com searching for a new or used car be happy, and visit DIGI DIGI dot com. KCBS news time seven fifty endeavoring Ingersoll at the key CBS editor's desk, as your Newswatch continues, the pediatric endocrinologist, says teen addiction to video games is affecting their brain development KCBS, Mike Cogan says the World Health Organization recently recognized gaming disorder as a mental health condition. Professor, pediatrics Robert lusty said playing video games, gives one a dopamine high, but it also kills brain cell neurons once those neurons have died, they're not coming back. And that's one of the reasons why addiction is so hard to treat. Because now you're ability to generate a dope responses now inhibited, it's been attenuated because you've lost those neurons, eighteen-year-old park land shooting survivor Cameron Caskey was attending Silicon Valley conference said teams like playing video games because it makes them feel like a winter when I defeat somebody in a video game I feel victory over them the way, I would, if I defeated them in sports, if I defeated them in intellectual conversation, and people really connected that Jim stiers CEO of San Francisco.

KCBS DIGI Aaron peck Cameron Caskey Robert lusty Jim stiers World Health Organization Mike Cogan San Francisco dopamine CEO Ingersoll Professor CBS editor eighteen-year
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Where we're headed in states like California, where if this same law firm or others like them start to bring these kinds of lawsuits against other companies, then they might have to carry those warning signals at all. And as I said to you a criminal at appears in lots of things that we cook. It's just for some reason Dave decided to attack coffee. I know some cynics will say that's because they are looking for a quick payday or perhaps a settlement or or a way out of this. But this kind of law leaves a lot of gray area where yes almost everything could eventually be labeled as causing cancer. I think we should sit down with every two year old and set them down and say life causes death. Exactly. There's a great. There's a great, quote an article I read where somebody said well since living cells are much more likely to get cancer than dead cells. Exactly what you're saying life causes cancer. That's what we're getting the sun causes cancer. That doesn't mean that we should never go outside. It means that we need to be reasonable about what we're doing. There's really almost no evidence that that the criminalizing coffee. Or at anything else? The reading is near the quantities that will be dangerous and continuing to make us always afraid of food is not doing anyone any good. Well, it seems on one hand you look at the USDA fifty. It's you could argue that they they let big agriculture does things we don't like on the other hand you have the opposite effect, which is the slightest tinge of chemical that occurs naturally when you he carbohydrates over two hundred fifty degrees. We have to put a warning label on on your your Dunkin donuts is there no middle ground in this country. That's the thing is I would actually call the middle ground. Even I I mean, there are some substances that even processed food companies add to the food that they are selling which arguably is not necessarily maybe as potentially dangerous in huge amounts. But all of the evidence shows us that safe and people th-, right or wrong. We'll pick it against that. But in this case were arguing about something that occurs naturally when we cook. And just because it's being cooked in a coffee roaster versus. I'm roasting. The coffee at home doesn't mean that it needs a warning label at some. Point. We're going too far in what we're worrying about is inside the food. We're eating I have never heard you this exercise, you're gonna you need to take him because that was really eating to get back and vacation just to talk about this dodge, Aaron Carol. That's the latest update on warning labels on cups of coffee. Thank you. Thank you. Doctor Erin, Carol professor pediatrics at Indiana University school of medicine also frequent contributor to the New York Times of shock coming. Dr Aaron Carroll likes to punch conventional wisdom in the face or put another way he likes to simply look at the facts. It turns out that the latest scare caulking cancer. Is yet another example of cherry picking medical? Studies would seem that the facts don't matter when it comes to the truth about wine coffee sugar, fat, margarine and many other ingredients. So instead of pin bowling from one scare to the other. Maybe we should sit back and take the time to simply enjoy our food, and that's not going to.

Dave Dr Aaron Carroll Dunkin donuts California Aaron Carol USDA Indiana University school of m Doctor Erin New York Times professor two hundred fifty degrees one hand two year
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Seven forty KCBS coming up on KCBS hurricane Florence downgraded now to a category two storm, but still considered extremely dangerous and life threatening an update from CBS news straight ahead. And I'm Rebecca chorale local scientist is glad the FDA has finally colleague out e cigarette makers for appealing to underage users. Good evening, I'm Larry Sharoni. KCBS news time eight thirty one the latest from CBS news CBS news update. North Carolinians getting ready ahead of hurricane Florence which has just been downgraded to a category two storm, but it's still poses a threat, which is why Michael Barbas of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina is leaving talking about a whole lot of rain and flooding, and it's gonna break all the windows, and it's going to be frightening. Florence is now located three hundred twenty five miles east southeast of Myrtle Beach, and now has maximum winds of one hundred ten miles per hour. Meteorologist Meghan Glenrothes in North Carolina. We're talking about the potential for thirteen to fifteen foot storm surge when that floods over this entire area. It won't look the same. Once it receives back into the ocean. So we're essentially looking at a major situation, but now for a longer distance for the coastline, the Hurricane Center says the center of Florence will approach the coasts of north and South Carolina tomorrow and then move near or over the coast of southern North Carolina and eastern South Carolina into Friday CBS news update. I'm that piper. Meanwhile, the Hawaiian islands being hit by tropical. Storm olivia. Forecasters say the storm could dump five to ten inches of rain with some places getting as much as fifteen inches Maui. Mayor Alan are all Kawhi is urging residents Serta store drinking water and warned that they should plan for power outages landslides, high surf fallen trees and flooded roads, the massive efforts of the health community parents teachers lawmakers and the kids themselves paid off reducing tobacco use among teens by half in the past decade. But KCBS is Rebecca corral tells us now a tiny high-tech tool threatens to destroy all of that. No, more clouds of stinky, smoke and stained fingertips, no choking, when you inhale and delightfully cute flavors like popcorn mango and cotton candy have made e cigarettes the darling of the teen set we worked so hard to get kids to find smoking unsexy. And now this new product comes along that's reintroducing nicotine into the lungs of teenagers. UCSF professor pediatrics doctor Mark Rubinstein says e cigarette. Are so appealing to young people even low risk kids. The ones who normally wouldn't consider substance abuse are flocking to devices like the jewel, high tech and sexy and has fruit flavors like mango. So he's relieved the FDA is finally calling out e cigarette makers threatening to pull them off the market if they don't reduce underage use of the devices within sixty days, Dr Ruben says he realizes the Joel could be useful for adults trying to kick the habit, but there's a lot we just do not know about these products. We do know that he cigarettes in vaping are now more popular than smoking traditional cigarettes among teens, Rebecca chorale KCBS the much debated debate between California's gubernatorial candidates, John Cox and Gavin Newsom is finally happening Republican challenger and the democratic Lieutenant governor will face off on the morning of October eighth in the bay area, Mike Madrid and Republican strategist at the firm, grassroots lab tells Kennex are all news sister station. That Cox is probably fortunate. It to get Newsom to agree to even one debate. Yet. The reason why Gavin Newsom didn't wants to debate right? Somebody who's so far out front with so many institutional systemic advantages really can't be helped by debate. Like this John Cox courses asking for five for fifty debate. He's got to get in there. He's got an either way. So knockout punch, but he has to have the front loader. Stumble. Stumble pretty badly. The odds of that. Of course, are not very good Madrid expense Newsom to hang Donald Trump on John Cox early and often during the debate like many middle income workers. Teachers are finding it increasingly difficult if not impossible to afford to buy a home here in the bay area. KCBS has been reports. Some help is not coming from the bay area host committee for next year's college football playoffs at Levi stadium. Students and teachers had reason to cheer at oak grove high school where the forty Niners and the host committee for.

Gavin Newsom KCBS John Cox CBS Florence South Carolina North Carolina hurricane Florence Rebecca corral Mark Rubinstein FDA Myrtle Beach Larry Sharoni Hurricane Center scientist Meghan Glenrothes area host oak grove high school UCSF
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Holly flung CBS apple unveiling a new line of iphones today during its annual big September events KCBS is Mike HOGAN says upgrades were also announced for a host of apple products. Three new iphones were unveiled apple senior. Vice president Phil Schiller, including the iphone ten s the iphone ten s is not just one. But two sizes of display the five point eight inch in a new six point five inch super retina display. This is the biggest display ever on an iphone. It isn't all that display as well. Three point three million pixels four hundred and fifty eight pixels per inch. Again, apple chief operating officer. Jeff Williams unveiled the new fourth generation apple watch it has a larger display and curved corners. The speaker has also been completely redesigned. It's fifty percent louder which is great for phone calls and walkie-talkie or Syria. Request. You just won't believe the sound you get out of such a small device. The new watch starts at three. Ninety nine four ninety nine with the new iphone ten s is priced at nine ninety nine ten ninety nine for the ten s max and seven forty nine for the budget version, ten are by Colgan KCBS an eighteen month old girl died after she was accidentally left in a hot car by a family member yesterday in Moraga ficials say they responded to a medical call and the first block of hardy drive around four PM the dispatcher reported. There was somebody screaming and crying on the nine one one call investigators believe it was an accident and the family member called for help immediately after finding her it was eighty degrees outside at the time of efforts of the health community. Parents teachers lawmakers and the kids themselves paid off reducing tobacco use among teens by half in the past decade. But as KCBS is Rebecca corral reports a tiny high tech tool threatens to destroy all of that. No, more clouds of stinky, smoke and stained fingertips, no choking when. You inhale and delightfully cute flavors like popcorn mango and cotton candy have made e cigarettes the darling of the teen set we've worked so hard to get kids to find smoking unsexy. And now this new product comes along that's reintroducing nicotine into the lungs of teenager UCSF, professor pediatrics Dr Mark Rubinstein says e cigarettes are so appealing to young people even low risk kids. The ones who normally wouldn't consider substance abuse are flocking to devices like the jewel. Hi, tack and sexy and has fruit flavors like mango. So he's relieved the FDA has finally calling out e cigarette makers threatening to pull them off the market if they don't reduce underage use of the devices within sixty days, but Rubinstein says he realizes the could be useful for adults trying to kick the habit a lot. We just do not know about these products. We do know that e cigarettes in vaping are now more popular than smoking traditional cigarettes among teens, Rebecca chorale KCBI. CBS CBS news time four twenty five now from the small business pulse. Bay.

apple Colgan KCBS KCBS Dr Mark Rubinstein CBS Phil Schiller Vice president Syria Mike HOGAN Holly chief operating officer Jeff Williams Moraga ficials vaping UCSF Rebecca corral nicotine professor
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Big things the Genesis communications network for making the show happen was, working. The dials Vic thanks. For tuning in we really. Do appreciate it don't forget to follow, us on Twitter Facebook that. After Dali show so how do we get the no cancer gene that elephants have apparently less than five percent of elephants die? From cancer researchers think they figured out why this was a study that came from the university of Chicago and elephants. Produce zombie jeans they call it can help protect the. Animal from cancer Now where do USA today they break it down they say humans and other. Animals carry one copy of a master tumor suppressor gene So we. Have one copy of this tumor suppressor so when. We, see us a cell? Go rogue a cell. Start to kind of go AWOL we've been Ken suppressant without a gene for that Elephants oh I've twenty copies scientists. Found that gene can trigger a quote zombie gene To, come back to life with a new purpose killing cells in, damage DNA Yeah. I'm a little confused by that deal I zombie I think of Walking Dead I, guess what they're saying is If there is a cell or a. Gene that, may not be active okay. Maybe a repressed or suppressed gene It could turn it into. Something that turns around and I, guess has a new sort of mission so that that's a concept of zombies zombies. Are humans that were fine then it's coming back from the dead and then turning around and. Then a nuisance that's kind of what. They're talking about here except not a nuisance and something that we want, we want cancer cells killed so cords Vincent Lynch and assistant professor human genetics at the university of Chicago, saying this is beneficial because of accident response to genetic mistakes or errors made when the DNA is being repaired. Getting rid of that cell to prevent a subsequent cancer scientists say the gene also ops elephants enjoy long lives they believe they came to existence. Twenty. Five to thirty million years. Ago And they say there were groundhog. Sized ancestors of modern elephants I don't remember my Evelyn class same elephants, pods but they said there yeah I took an evolution class I did the credits I wasn't my favorite, class 'cause I had a real tough time balancing bible and and evolution but it was cool I'm like okay. Well you know I could see how things I see the pictures again But still. Not my favorite class so researchers want to conduct more studies to find out how exactly the. Genes of elephants kill off the cells, and damage DNA then it can help humans and if we. Can figure out how to make, our body turn, around and fight off. Cancer, better in the lead to. Obviously better strategies to. Prevent entry cancer they say seventeen percent of people worldwide die of cancer and the statistics I've. Heard is one out. Of every, two. People, get some, sort of cancer now that doesn't mean died from it But one out. Of every two people we'll have, something turn cancerous whether it's little skin. Lesion whether it's breast colon prostate that's. Assuming they live long enough passed a heart attack so according to Joshua Schiffman. Professor pediatrics at the university of Utah he's an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute he's as we can understand how these genomic changes are contributing to cancer, resistance then we can able to start, thinking about how do. We translate this to, our patients okay so you're, probably listening to this coin or. How do I for cancer I don't want cancer I don't want does ambi- Jean I just want to live my life I don't want to need medicine. Later I definitely don't want to have to deal with the after effects of that so mayo clinic has seven tips to reduce your risk of cancer and a, lot of, you guys already know this and you don't. Believe it when I when I tell you I don't smoke you gotta eat right you don't. Believe it but let me explain why Okay What we talk, about don't use. Tobacco we know smoking's leaked to larynx, cancer pancreatic, cancer and bladder, cancer lung, cancer and kidney, cancer cervical, cancer all sorts of. Stuff. Right Chewing tobacco to when. I tell you. To not use tobacco I I mean, I mean, avoided even second, even third, hand don't breathe, in something, that you don't need to If, someone's vaping near you get away from that, if someone's smoking a joint get away from that If there's a smoker in. The house tell them to, like leave quit smoking I. Can't tell you how many secondhand or, how many cancer cases or from secondhand You know you may not want to quit for, you well you know because I want to keep my. Weight, down and you know I like my habit and. I've lived a full life yeah but you got other people you're going to hurt So? Whether, you vape whether you smoke. Whether. You to keep in mind, new could, be causing cells to go rogue, so then you're, eating a healthy diet. Everybody hates to be told us, we got, eat healthier, you gotta healthier what does that mean well. Obviously, more fruits and vegetables okay and we're not talking potato you know we're, talking the green leafy vegetables the bright peppers that kind. Of, stuff they also found that the less the better But. The big thing is is the processed foods The more we eat. Processed foods parents the World Health Organization has found, we do have a slightly it a slightly. Higher increased risk of getting, certain types of cancer You know they said women who, eat a vegetarian diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil and. Mixed nuts may reduce the risk of breast cancer. We also know that the Mediterranean diet. Up the heart so, we really, need, to opt for fish over red. Leaves we need to choose healthy fats.

cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute university of Chicago Twitter Genesis communications Dali Vic university of Utah USA World Health Organization mayo clinic Ken Joshua Schiffman Vincent Lynch assistant professor Professor Jean investigator
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Things the Genesis communications network for making this you'll happen Is working the dials and Vic thanks for tuning in we really appreciate it don't forget? To follow us on Twitter and Facebook that after Dolly show so how do we get the no cancer gene that. Elephants have apparently. Less than five percent of elephants die from. Cancer researchers think they figured out why this was a, study, that came from the, university, of Chicago and elephants produce zombie jeans they call them it can help protect the animal from cancer Now are USA today they break down they say humans and. Other animals carry. One copy of a master tumor suppressor gene So we have. One copy of this tumor suppressor so. When we see us cell go rogue, a cell, start to kind of go AWOL we've been can't suppress gene for that Elephants though have twenty copies sides that. Gene can trigger a quote zombie gene To come, back to life with a new purpose killing cells in, damage DNA Yeah I'm a little confused by that too I think of Walking Dead I, guess what they're saying is If, there is a cell or gene that. May not be active okay. Maybe a repressed or suppressed gene It could turn it. Into something that turns around and, has a, new sort. Of mission say that that's a concept of zombies zombies are humans that were about you know we're fine then it's coming back from the dead and then. Turning. Around and then being a. Nuisance That's kind of what they're talking about, here except not a nuisance it's something that we want. We, want cancer cells killed Vincent Lynch and assistant professor human. Genetics at the university of Chicago say this is Ben official because it acts in response. To genetic mistakes or is made when the DNA is being repaired getting, rid of, that cell. To prevent a subsequent cancer now scientists say the gene also ops elephants enjoyed long lives They believe. They, came to existence twenty five to thirty million years ago And they say there were groundhog sized amp sisters of modern elephants, I don't remember my. Evolutionary, class Saint elephants with the. Size of groundhogs but. They said there yeah I took an evolution class I did the credits I wasn't my, favorite class because I. Had a, real. Tough, time balancing, bible and evolution but it was cool I'm like. Okay, well you know I could see how things I see the pictures again But still not my favorite class so researchers want to conduct more studies to. Find out how exactly the jeans and elephants kill off the cells damage DNA then it can help humans and. If we can figure out how to make our body turn around and, fight off cancer better. Than, the lead to obviously better. Strategies to prevent entry. Cancer they say seventeen percent of people worldwide die of cancer and the statistics I've heard, is one out of. Every two, people. Get, some sort, of cancer now that doesn't mean we die from it But one out of every two. People we'll have something turn cancerous whether. It's a little skin lesion whether it's. Breast colon prostate that's assuming they live long enough pass a heart attack so. According to Joshua Schiffman professor pediatrics at the university of Utah he's an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute these as we can understand how these Genova changes, are contributing to cancer, resistance then we, could able to start. Thinking about how do, we translate this to our, patients okay so you're probably listening. To this going or how do I predict there I don't want design be gene I just want to live my life, I don't want to need. Medicine later I definitely don't want to have to deal with the after effects of that so male clinic has seven tips to reduce your risk of cancer and, a lot, of you guys already know this and you. Don't believe it when I when I tell you I don't smoke you gotta eat right you. Don't believe it but let me explain why Okay What we talk, about don't use. Tobacco we know smoking's leaked to larynx, cancer pancreatic, cancer and ladder, cancer lung, cancer and kidney, cancer cervical, cancer all sorts of. Stuff. Right chewing tobacco to when I tell you to not use. Tobacco I I, mean I mean avoided even. Secondhand even third, hand don't breathe in something that you don't need. To If someone's vaping near you. Get away from, that if someone's smoking joint get away from that If there's a smoker in the. House tell them to, like leave quit smoking I can't say how many secondhand or, how many cancer cases or from secondhand You know you may not want to quit for you well you know because I want to keep. My, way down and I like my habit and I've. Lived a full life yeah but you got other people you're going to hurt So whether you whether? You, smoke with you to keep. In. Mind you could be causing, cells to, go rogue so then you're eating a healthy. Diet, everybody hates to be told us when you got eat healthier you gotta healthier well what does that mean well obviously. More, fruits and vegetables okay and we're not talking potato We're talking, the green leafy. Vegetables, the bright peppers that? Kind, of stuff they also found. That. The less obese the better But the big thing is is the processed foods, the more we eat processed foods apparently the. World Health, Organization has, found we do have a slightly, it a slightly higher. Increased risk of getting certain types of cancer you know they. Said women who eat a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin. Olive oil mixed nuts may reduce the risk of breast cancer. We also know that the Mediterranean diet could up. The heart so we really need to. Opt for fish over red meat, we need to, choose.

cancer Huntsman Cancer Institute Gene university of Chicago Twitter Chicago USA Genesis communications skin lesion Facebook Vic university of Utah Vincent Lynch assistant professor Joshua Schiffman Ben official professor investigator
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"But with respect to fresh vegetables, unless we're willing to cook which we're not going to do with lettuce, there's really no way to kill it before we get there. So. Okay. The obvious question then, is you get the lettuce home and you want to wash it or use some sort of bleach or something to reduce the potential for contamination? Does any of that actually work or not? It works a bit, but not nearly as much. As we would hope to get it to zero in other. In other words, they will talk about soaking it or using vegetable rinses, but even that because of the way that these things get trapped sort of within the lettuce, especially with with green leafy vegetables and get into crevices, they're almost impossible to reach. It's very hard to get the risk disease. And again, this is one of those where it's not. I'm not saying this in order to panic people. I mean, certainly don't avoid vegetables. The benefits are far greater than the potential harms, but it is one of those. Why think it's important that people do pay attention to the news and recognize the when there are these unfortunate recalls the just have to throw the stuff away. There is no way to to protect yourself. Once the contamination is there, we can continue to try to reduce this at the source, but the best thing people can do is just be vigilant and keep watching the news. If I'm buying from a major chain which is being sourced by major growers, is that potentially a higher risk than buying from a small local organic or non organic farmer. If we're buying organic where they're not pouring it in the fields, which unfortunately is what's happening with a lot of this mass produced Romain lettuce that could theoretically reduce the risk of contamination that we're seeing with this specific outbreak. But unfortunately, that's just the way that most Romain lettuce at this point is harvested. If you bug greens with the roots intact that would be a below risk overall, I suppose, might it's fun. It's interesting because I've seen no one advocate that we do that snow. I'm not sure that it would reduce it enough to sort of warranted. Certainly it would slow production in such a way that it might raise the cost. And again, this is all trade-offs. It probably would raise the cost more than the benefits in terms of risk. Well, it sounds like as these outbreaks continue and grow, we should bring back the taster, right? I mean, kings had taste use his need someone to taste your romaine for a couple of days before just always buy the bags. Hold onto. It went to see if anyone else gets sick. I thank you so much. You didn't give us much hope to in terms of avoiding the problem, but at least we know it is a problem. Thank you anytime. Dr. Carol is a professor pediatrics at Indiana University school of medicine, and also regular contributor to the New York Times upshot column. My interview with chef Brasilia's in Oscar restaurant in Brooklyn, made me wonder about tasting menus. The problem with tastings is that when you get something you really like, you don't get enough of it is like speed dating, you wanna deeper relationship. You know what tasting menu allows the para pathetic diner to just move on, but a regular menu forces one to experience. The consequences of one's two sessions sounds a lot like

chef Brasilia Dr. Carol Romain Indiana University school of m New York Times Oscar Brooklyn
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To be healthy strong and it's critical for their immune development just shocked and appalled and extremely disappointed but clearly there are times and i think part of the the as i understand that part of the rationale in the us team on this controversy was that it didn't want to sort of have women stigmatized who for whatever reason money or physical health could not breastfeed and needed to require or rely on formula and they didn't want them to feel like secondclass citizens you don't buy that though no not at all particularly in developing countries the formula company and breast milk substitutes companies have had very very aggressive campaigns to convince women that they shouldn't breastfeed it's ironic to me that when i go to developing resource poor countries the poor breastfeed and the rich have been convinced that they should formula feed well here the inverse is true but there's public health there's tons of science that shows that breast is best particularly in these settings stigma is not a problem but they important of the w h o is to armed governments and give them the ability to fight back these formula companies they're very very aggressive in these countries akin to tobacco companies and are tying up when countries have tried to pass legislation to content curtail what these companies are saying completely inaccurate fake the truth fake news that they take them to court and this was just so glad that eventually something was passed but it's extremely disappointing so more women breastfeeding here in the us so these companies are having to go to other countries and and get the formula sold their yes i mean breastfeeding rates are going up because women are being educated and they're always looking for new markets and to be clear what exactly does the research show breastfeeding does for the developing child that formula feeding brats does not it protects them and they setting for many infectious diseases which is the major cause of infant mortality specifically diarrhea and pneumonia and the first few years of life more and more evidence here showing that appropriate immune development is depends on children receiving breast milk in our neonatal intensive cares the introduction of breast milk as opposed to formula has just revolutionized our karen cut down on the incidents of necrotizing enter colitis is the formula better now than it used to be you know the formula companies are the one group that recognize the press just best so they're always trying to copy mother nature but you know it's better than it used to be but it's still not as good we did a randomized trial in zambia with hiv and infected women and you know again showed incredible mortality for women who had been randomized to stop breastfeeding and that's even in the context of hiv infection so in the poor malnourished children do much better on mother's milk than they do on these substitutes start to grace preventing professor pediatrics said ucla henman knx indepth continues some of the stories you may have missed but we did.

milk
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To be healthy strong and it's critical for their immune development but just shocked and appalled and extremely disappointed but clearly there are times and i think part of the as i understand that part of the rash chanelle in the us team on this controversy was that it didn't want to sort of have women stigmatized who for whatever reason money or physical health could not breastfeed and needed to require or rely on formula and they didn't want them to feel like secondclass citizens you don't buy that though no not at all particularly in developing countries the formula company and breast milk substitutes companies have had very very aggressive campaigns to convince women that they shouldn't breastfeed it's roenick to me that when i go to developing resource poor countries the poor breastfeed and the rich have been convinced that they should formula feed well here the inverse is true but there's public health there's tons of science that shows that breast is best particularly in these settings stigma is not a problem but the importance of the whol so is to armed governments and give them the ability to fight back these formula companies they're very very aggressive in these countries akin to tobacco companies and are tying up when countries have tried to pass legislation to content curtail what these companies are saying completely inaccurate fake the truth fake news that they take them to court and this was just i am so glad that eventually something was past but it's extremely disappointing so more women breastfeeding here in the us so these companies are having to go to other countries and interrogate the formula sold their yes i mean breastfeeding rates are going up because women are being educated and they're always looking for new markets and to be clear what exactly does the research show breastfeeding does for the developing child that formula feeding does not it protects them and they setting for many infectious diseases which is the major cause of infant mortality specifically diarrhea and the monja and the first few years of life more and more evidence here showing that appropriate immune development is depends on children receiving breast milk in our neonatal intensive cares the introduction of breast milk as opposed to formula has just revolutionized our karen cut down on the incidents of necrotizing enter colitis is the formula better now than it used to be you know the formula companies are the one group that recognize the breast is best so they're always trying to copy mother nature but you know it's better than it used to be but it's still not as good we did a randomized trial and zambia with hiv infected women and you know again showed incredible mortality for women who had been randomized to stop breastfeeding and that's even in the context of hiv infection so in the poor malnourished children do much better on mother's milk than they do on these substitutes start to gray sound preventing professor pediatrics that ucla henman knx indepth continues some of the stories you may have missed but we did not well international soccer tournaments might try nothing rallies the world together like chicken wings so we're doing our part to bring nations together with five traditional wings for just five dollars during.

milk five dollars
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Dr carol thank you so much anytime that was dr eric carol professor pediatrics at indiana university school of medicine also frequent contributor to the new york times upshot com okay i admitted i don't like artificial foods but what i liked even less are fraudulent foods how about air thoughts crab meat it's actually made from the pulverise paste of white fish flush with saab is often made from horseradish mustard and cream food colouring and those bacon bits that are actually vegan their me from textured soy flour caramel colors so when it comes to artificial sweeteners i have one good thing to say at least they're not frauds they have to say right at the package that they are artificial thanks for listening this week if you just tuned into mr show you can listen to our podcast on apple podcast itcher tune in google play or spotify remember to subscribe to the show go automatically get every single show download it to your phone week if you wanna learn more about milk street had to one seven seven millstreetcom you can download each weeks recipe subscribed to our magazine watch our first season millstreet television or order the milk street cookbook we'll be back next week thanks for listening limited it at a little too christopher kimble's milk street radio is produced by knock street in association with wg bh executive producers melissa ball dino and stephanie sender producer amy padilla associate producer carly helm attacked senior audio engineer douglas sugars senior audio editor melissa allison with help from vicky merrick in sydney lewis audio mixing by j allison at atlantic public media production help debbie patrick r c music is by two bub crew additional music by george brandel o'clock christopher kimble's milk street radio is distributed by p r.

professor debbie patrick audio editor douglas engineer amy padilla executive spotify google apple indiana university school of m Dr carol dr eric carol george brandel sydney vicky merrick melissa allison carly helm producer christopher kimble saab new york times milk
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"For economic radio is supported by the size syms foundation since 1985 supporting progress in education science and the arts information at size syms foundation dot org for 'economic radio is supported by rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life and that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage it lets you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident that you're getting the rate mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash freak in the 1930s a dutch pediatrician named willem deka began to study mysterious often fatal disease that was a flip his patients children were losing weight and becoming malnourished despite consuming plenty of calories the symptoms were intense and widespread the damages intestine really this is a systemic disease it does not spare any tissue or organ your body that's a less fasano on professor pediatrics must general hospital for children we'll indica suspected the illness was somehow related to the children's diet but it wasn't until years later that he found the proof he was looking for it came in the form of a grotesque natural experiment produced by the second world war in nineteen forty germany had invaded and occupied the netherlands in 1944 dutch railway workers held a strike in support of the allies this prompted the nazis to cut off food shipments to dutch civilians this was called the hunger winter that's allen levin of a religion scholar a james madison university it was horrific children everywhere were starving some people resorted to eating grass or tulip bulbs thousands died of starvation but willem dick a noticed something strange.

willem deka fasano world war netherlands size syms foundation professor germany allen levin james madison university willem dick
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on WWL

"He's also recorded an announcement that he's out too we're expecting a statement today from another possible candidate for mayor franks kerr like after prosecutors raise charges against him to assault scarlato was arrested in may and booked on a lesser charge of obstructing a public place police accused hamma bumping an officer during the protest surrounding the removal of the jefferson davis monument scarola told the new orleans advocate that the charges were an example of quote typical louisiana politics skirl cast not qualify for the mayor's race yet two people a three people have been charged gulf port regarding a sexual assault that was shared on facebook live nineteen year old haley hudson wanted on a charge of sexual battery being held on a four hundred thousand dollars bond she'll be charged as an adult aboard he'll be about bob as he john johnson who has seventeen will be charged as an adult to dr fabian booker also charged with felony kidnapping and sexual assault a half dozen more candidates signed up so far to attorney general jeff sessions today announcing the results of a nationwide law enforcement action targeting healthcare fraud saying four hundred twelve people including fifty six doc others have been arrested in sessions spoke about part of the operation that involved opioid treatment centres among those defendants announced today one hundred and twenty have been charged with opioid related crimes making this also the largest opioid related fraud take down in american history do research suggesting when children are exposed to negative experiences it affects both their mental and physical healthy retire live wwl michele southern rebel assaf ski professor pediatrics.

fraud professor law enforcement attorney dr fabian booker john johnson bob jefferson davis monument scaro franks kerr scarlato kidnapping haley hudson facebook assault louisiana new orleans officer hamma four hundred thousand dollars nineteen year
"professor pediatrics" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on WWL

"Potala these across america a chilling effect he says on recruit most are achieved sheriff i've spoken to tell me they are recruiting numbers are down by about half of what they normally our number one cause officer potala traffic related incidents jim taylor cbs news do research suggesting when children are exposed to negative experiences bit affects both their mental and physical health their entire life wwl shall southern reports jealous asky professor pediatrics in psychiatry at ellis he helped new orleans says stress can lead to physical problems for young kid is in get report showed more headaches and stomach aches younger children you can dj increase dan respiratory a issues sometimes related strasky says the brain is fully developed at a young age and it can be hindered by negative experiences on wall street before the hour the dow down five points nasdaq down three and oil futures up forty two cents at forty five dollars ninety one cents a barrel look at wwl sports with steve geller knicks nixon rockets are reportedly getting close to swing a deal that will saint carmelo anthony to houston and the pelicans could wind up getting involved to help facilitate the trade the rockets are said to be looking to move power forward ryan anderson blood jake madison verbal shots dot com he says don't expect day reunion in new orleans i don't think you mccurry wake with it anthony david the market because we believe wing ing guard play as opposed to a big contract is in a good fit either mr anger since still has three years sixty million dollars left on his current deal steve geller wwl sports today on sports talk with bobby hebert develop via the sec isn't consider summer has a certain here the kind of vibrancy you can feel and almost here and sam adams summer aol with renew colors with one great taste captures the colors the summer perfectly there's the yellow of the rising day the orange of a he reckoned afternoon.

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"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"professor pediatrics" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Very first thing food number one articles used for food or drink for man or other animals so like you're talking about how you could have a nutritious founding sawdust i can imagine that could easily fit within fda regulation fda guidelines them it avenues for food it's it's really hard to answer a question like the one you just post to may i mean sugar is intrinsic to many food products sell it's not gonna be regulated in the same way that at completely exaggerated this additive to a food product can be regulated in but so technically the categories under which sugar falls however are food additive an gras john regarded as safe and not food itself correct well this is my point and i am not going to answer your question is it has a don't have my lawyers here but on now i mean you know there's there are sugars in fruit and vegetables their sugars in in dairy products there sugars in various grasses that that people consume on on so you know it's its intrinsic till the food product itself book before cents let's get back to chocolate milk from and as we said it's got 24 grams of sugar per one cup serving more than some soda but regular old milk without the chocolate as about twelve grams of sugar naturally sweet from the lactose then there's the sugar is added to many foods products that you think are actually very healthy you know yogurt the levels of sugar are astonishingly high things like barbecue sauce and spaghetti sauce and soup to actually have much higher levels of sugar than you would ever imagined not to mention you know the levels that are in um you pies and cakes an icecream and things where you would expect to see sugar so how much sugar overall do we actually consume to right now we are about sixty to sixty five percent over our limit and that's average that's robert busted him professor pediatrics path university of california's san francisco school of medicine most of a member of their institute for health policy studies and i'm also the president of.

food products president professor university of california san francisco school of medici milk sixty five percent twelve grams 24 grams one cup