11 Burst results for "Professor Of Health Policy"

"professor health policy" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Dr. Ted. Dr. Ted Brower, Doc. Welcome to show So much of me on this one. It's quite a blessing for you and weigh about way above your pay grade will be on something this classy. I love am radio You and Well, everyone else has died. But you could get us on podcast. People listen that way. And anyway, Brussels is not going to allow five g. No way. They say it's not feasible with radiation. Standard stock. You've done the studies. You've read the research. How bad is this? And my friends Start to say, I got the new five g, and I'm starting to see these towers everywhere. Some say there's an ulterior motive to all of this, But what are your thoughts on it? Well, five very slow rollout of very intensive literally millions of towers on the refrigerator. Try looking things, but, you know, you know, telephone poles all over the place. This is this a millimeter wave system It's used in DARPA, developed by the new defense systems of through the military is also use an active crowd denial of dispersal systems. That's a microwave technology, of course, in just a different band with And it's very, very detrimental, according to the initial studies that I've seen on human health and on human life, and it's going to use that ties into the Internet of things to give everything up P address so to speak to allow our cellphones, little track us to allow these towers a little track US. Something we call Scaler Wave technology, and that sounds real fancy, but it's not basic that's taken to radio waves, laying them on top. Each other, creating a longitudinal wave detained, taking to longitude always lay them on top of each other, creating a scaler wave. They could literally track you or targets you. Yes, if you want from a DARPA Wait, Doc. Doc, hang on a second. Okay. First taken already track us with our cell phones. What you're talking about? I remember they had these giant trucks on what? Few riots in America and they were knocking people on their ass. And people were doubling over and puke ing and they have these sounds that they can send out these towers that are all over our city. Now I'm going to be all over everywhere Could they be used to really just control the crowd? Yes, if missed stuff you want to hear again Get the podcast at w dot com from a 90. W l s Welcome back. This is the bench, joining some line Inspector Marty McCarey, surgeon professor health policy at Johns Hopkins University, also the editor in chief of med pager today and The New York Times. Best selling author of the Price that we Pay Dr Macari great to talk to again. Good to see you, Ben. So obviously the big news of the day remains that President Trump has been diagnosed with covered eyes Melania Trump, said Senator Mike Lisa McDaniel, the head of the RNC, So let's obviously focus in on the president of the United States. Let's say that the president were your patient. What exactly would you be doing? If you don't have his medical records on you? But from the outside? What would you be doing to treat the president or not treat the president since he is 74 obviously overweight, for example? Well, First of all, I would encourage him. You know, people often need some sort of moral support. And the reality is there's a lot of reasons to be hopeful is overall survival rate I would put at 99.4%. That is, That's his cure rate If he does absolutely nothing. That's the reality of applying the Big UK study, which is the largest epidemiological study we have that looked at people between age 70 and 75. With one co morbidity. Their case fatality rate was 3.4%. Now that was back from the primitive days of therapy of margin April were 80% better. We've lowered mortality by 80%. You cut that 3.4% mortality down by 80%. It's about 800.6 Point, 7%. So his cure rate is 99.4%. I'd encourage him I would tell him Stay hydrated. Let your bodywork let nature take its course. You know, stay active. Don't get discouraged, and then you could consider a couple things. One is we generally believe rendez severe, and we generally believe that monoclonal antibodies work earlier. You give them in the question illness. Now the studies are ongoing in the pre hospital setting. But if they work in the hospital, we could probably work before the hospital Steroids a little different because you're actually slowing the sight of kind response. The inflammatory response to the body and you don't want to slow down your own immune response early in the infection. So I think if they decide to give him rum disappear and monoclonal antibodies, I wouldn't have a problem with it. It's certainly not standard of care, but it's a special situation and those areas thinking therapies. So right now, people are attributing transmission to hope Hicks. We don't actually know at this time. Whether it was hope actually transmitted it to the president. We know that she was in close contact with him and that she had it. And now there's a lot of talk about various people who have been at events with the president. Possibly getting it can give us sort of an explanation of their been two new studies had about super spreaders this idea that a small number of people in 10 to 20% of people who have Covic And it's spreading nearly all of it and that a huge number of people basically and it's getting very little of it. What's the latest research on super spreaders? Well, we know that the super spreading phenomenon is the real driver of outbreaks, and that it is Essentially an indoor congregate settings, sometimes driven by poor ventilation but definitely exacerbated by prolonged speaking especially loud for a long period of time. So there's been a study of 33 outbreaks, and they identified only two of them to be associated with outdoor activity. The rest were all indoor. The latest thought is that even if people wear masks in these settings, even if they wear masks Say it a debate. Then it is reducing the amount of viral aerosolized particles being admitted. That may mean that those who get infected on average, you're getting infected with a lower viral burden. And when people get infected of the lower viral burden, maybe they don't get a sick and there's been one study from Wayne State University that shows You die in a much lower rate that is mortalities much lower. Another study from Italy supports that. And if we look at what's happening in Europe right now, which is having a clear cut second wave they have very high case rates 77,000 cases per day. And very low mortality is not because mortality is lagging, but because the viral burden may be much lower, and that is a really telling finding, because there's no other way to really explain why we're seeing cases so high and mortality so low even when it's lagging. So, looking at, you know, there's been a lot of political talk about basically Trump bring this in himself. He's obviously he has been very somewhat confused about his messages unmask. Sometimes he seems like he's for it. Sometimes he seems like he's against it. He seemed skeptical that mask wearing in general is particularly effective. He's put particular focus on people miss wearing masks, which obviously is a thing. I mean people definitely touching their mass putting in their pocket and wearing it blow their nose, for example. So what exactly is the evidence at this point when it comes to masks? When should people wear masks and he made fun of Joe Biden in debate? I asked 200 ft away from somebody else s. So what? What is the evidence unmasked at this point. Some masks really should be mandatory in indoor settings when social distancing cannot be achieved. That means 6 ft historically, but you could double that distance. If you want to say be extra safe because somebody's particularly vulnerable..

president Dr. Ted Brower US DARPA Brussels Melania Trump Joe Biden Dr Macari UK Inspector Marty McCarey Johns Hopkins University RNC America Europe Hicks The New York Times Wayne State University Italy editor in chief
"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"To learn now any other tips yeah once in a while I have to go to my office to bring in something I and I try to avoid touching well I look at a university so it's pretty empty so I don't have content with any people so my kids is that I didn't even make sense for those of you who live in a high rise building will look in a high rise building here's a tip from actually I didn't invent that out people in Hong Kong early in January they demanded that because most people and I'm gonna leave in a high rise and walk in a high rise so you have to touch the elevator right don't touch the bottom of the home collected invented a very very small way you'll find a very cheap ballpoint pen with a cap every time you need to touch the elevator button you pull out double point and pull out the pen from the cap use the pen tip to touch the bottom and then put it back to the cap so it's a safe these are great tips and I'm sure my listeners are taking notes here professor I hope they are let me ask you this and that's the obvious questions South Korea and the United States we both learned of our first coronavirus case on the very same day since then they've been on a program to eradicate it they're about to open up their sports leagues and the country's returning to what's as close to normal as might be these days but look at us we're months away from it what's the difference between the way we handle this and South Korea handled well we are a little bit slow to respond because as I mentioned not only adequate testing but also in adequate preparation in terms of stockpiling testing kit South Korea as soon as they they got there the first cases in January all the F. pharmaceutical industry stock to massively produced as stockpiling that testing kit so in terms of the the the proportion to population testing South Korea is number one until last week they tested over two hundred twenty thousand yeah always intense testing you know who's infected who's not L. similarly Thailand also as it has been doing not just intensive testing but very strict quarantine so most school in telling us to open as a regular they they still have a guideline for school closures if you know what one homeroom class one student or teacher infected the Holman class will be suspended for a week if they had to student or teacher infected in the school the whole school suspended for a week and then if the they have to score the suspended a full week in a city the whole school district suspended a professor a week ago you were warning us of some pretty dire economic results of this coronavirus has are are sheltering in place have the moves we've made mitigated that little bit in your mind yes we are economy already being affected so now the question is is not quite that but to what degree and if we we meaning the government and everyone every and every citizen and then raised in the country you can look together and doing our job to in our power to slow the spread of the disease that we can significantly reduce the negative impact Y. con all right so it's it's a wait and see a game right now wow professor as always you are captivating and lightning and we appreciate you being here tron wait she professor the global health program school of biological and population health sciences professor health policy program school of social and behavior health sciences director.

"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Show professor from wintry Oregon State University his credentials go on and on and on professor of the global health program school of biological population health sciences professor health policy program school of social and behavior health sciences director of the center for global health college of public and health and Human Services you understand how these viruses spread and just another reminder as to why we are being asked to work from home and stay indoors as much as possible okay earlier I mentioned in the previous NDC official one of the most challenging or scary part of this virus is roughly twelve to twenty percent of the people who are infected I have absolutely no symptoms yet they can spread the virus so defect in regional carriers we don't know a list we we we we need dramatic expand testing out that we don't know otherwise we don't know who is spreading the disease it could be a close one your friend your colleague are you a classmate etcetera and on top of that there's another between thirty to fifty percent of people who are infected I have very much L. Simpson that looks just like through an open time is mistaken for flu yep they left get deadly combat and this people also also contagious so the issue of staying home is because we don't know who potentially can spread that on top of that this is my research is extremely tough we videos it can stay in the in the in the federation you can stay here any center east between a few hours up to ninety so for example when when I'm I'm I'm staying home in order a grocery delivery for the after I had during those foods I immediately have to wash my head because you don't know I don't fool you you order or packaging there might be my at the summit so even stay home I I encourage our audience to practice extreme caution on anything you touch that deliver to you while I'm you know I'm I'm sitting here thinking of if you drive out you get some gasoline in your car the guy the hands you the receipt are you are you saying we should be thinking every thing every interested we have went wild let me give me an example the other day I had I I feel my my gas because I need to need to be prepared that I don't want to feel the gas fell open and so I I I he said I don't need the receipt and then when when the the federal food delivered me my credit card I used the tissue paper to recieve it and I don't touch my credit card at all and and when I get home I use soap to wash my credit card well what I I do this is from an expert in this field so okay let me let me ask you this if I had just washed my hands just wash them okay did my twenty second sang the Happy Birthday song and then I you know I touch something a receipt that somebody else handled within let's say ten minutes in my still protected or is it do I have to wash again if you are in your home you are safe why is it is important to avoid going outside and I I do know that people who have to go out to work all day and then image it typically off that job you still have to go out yes when you have it because of your work you have to even contact you if you go to grocery shopping assuming everything you patch potentially could have wow is the standard hand sanitizer that says is kills ninety nine point nine percent of germs on the on the front of it is that protection most of them you have to you have to look at the label yeah hi B. if it's safe it contains sixty percent or higher alcohol yes but there's also the issue of the proper way of using hand sanitizer you have to grab your hand for a few seconds let just just to to to to to put on your hand I saw somebody at the store the other day and they were shopping and they had gloves on a little latex gloves are you the proper proper safety major no kidding wow is because you touch things you put them in your car you're going to take him into your car you put your hands on the steering wheel you could be affecting your car not know it yes and when I when I pick up my mail from my mailbox I need them on the floor that way they can get from the sun unless it's something urgent I don't open them right away you just leave them in the sun for a while yes be polite I I touch them again and of course when I every time I die because my mail I need to understand and then I wash my hands that is that's remarkable and that's and that's great advice and it's something that I'm sure most people wouldn't think of professor but what a great tip you know provided we have sunshine you know throughout the year even if we don't have vision even deviate for if it's not urgent even for a date hopefully the the the the most matters will be a key democratic another important tip for people who still have to go out and about especially people who commute and left you have to go to work this advice if you came from temas commenced into his talent has said the golden standard of controlling everything when you when you.

professor Oregon State University
"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Mason show my friend it's Friday it's been a week but let me get to the meat of the show today I mentioned we have professor Chen Wei chih on the show he's here with us right now the professor of the global health program school of biological and population health sciences professor health policy program school of social and behavior health sciences director center for global health college of public health and human sciences at the Oregon state university and he is with us he's allowed us to tap into his thoughts today professor Chen Wei chih welcome back to the mark Mason show it is my pleasure professor we had you on last week and it was sobering to say the least but in a week's time I can't believe it's only been a week of the NBA was was shut down just a week in a couple of days ago but we have been asked a lot as the public and we are now doing what we can to shelter in place even though we're not required to but I I thought I would check in with you and as first question would be how are we doing a week later is this having an effect on the spread of coronavirus it's not her agency so far if you look at the nature of statistics are one thing we noticed is we are catching up on testing the last time I mention the USFL holds me behind testing and now with the new testing kit how widely available we're catching up so I just check the statistics about ten days ago the total confirmed cases in U. S. that last week I watched nine hundred ninety four to date we are at fifteen thousand six hundred fifty so that just in ten days time that we expended about fifteen times and I would say part of those new cases are expected because we were not testing so we didn't know they were out there but part of them a new cases meaning because we did not did a thorough testing screening back in January February by the way U. S. head first cases on January fourteenth two cases and then we did not do much testing so we let those unknown in fact a person walking around keep spreading the virus so part of now we're at fifteen thousand six hundred fifty bottle them up those already there part of the word new cases because we did not mention that people who are highly contagious so they continued to spread the diseases so we should be expecting this number continued to jump so for example on March March tenth the newly confirmed cases west two hundred ninety on March eighteenth the newly confirmed cases west two thousand eight hundred eighty four and then yesterday the newly confirmed cases last four thousand fans it's thirty and so on the one hand this is alarming but as the same time we should not be panic because this is anticipated because we're catching up with testing at the same time I think we need to step up our control manager and I think many Americans are already doing that my wife and I we have been doing kind of a semi locked out because we don't even go to grocery shopping we we order online and we need to do more effort one of them one of the the general principle I think they'll be I'll be honest all right in college I will I'll give to consider is yes it's extremely inconvenient our life our world has been disrupted but we need to sacrifice for short term in order to gain a long term recovery because if we don't do this now this is going to drag on for a long time and then more people will be suffering and our economy with staff at president so professor the governor brown K. brown has danced around the edges of a shelter in place and health experts around the state they're all weighing in summer Ford so mark where you won this does Oregon need to go on lockdown the whole state from number of people who are living in very rural area do you have pretty much isolated cells at the same time I would recommend kind of complete shelter you it is it should be very safe to go out in the open space there's no crowd and I think that people need that to get sunshine well we still have fun before the the range isn't coming to have some healthy outdoor activity other than that I think people need to avoid any indoor I'm gonna be home indoor activity including big family gathering I think a few days ago there was a big family gathering in passing in in New York or New Jersey left and that intensity in that family gathering I think seven people kind of confirmed cases and three died the hell in a big family we should avoid that kind of gathering because of again we are still behind testing so we have to do to be alerted that many people we know we acquainted friend relative they might have been infected but we don't know we're talking with professor Chen Wei chih at Oregon State University let me ask you about the testing I understand we got to it late and there's a lag time now between testing and what's being reported while we all wait and shelter in place for these results is there a possibility that this comes back and it's and I know this is what some of my listeners are thinking it's not as bad as we thought I am skeptical of that I didn't resent also behind apple under testing back in February what we let it spray unknown and we still don't know how bad the situation is but we are catching up and as I mentioned in just ten days trying that we we we reached over fifteen thousand nine hundred ninety four of them and the one thousand to over fifteen thousand and I would not be surprised it's not election day we will reach thirty thousand okay professor you use that number thirty thousand and I know what some of my listeners are thinking right now and they're thinking Hey I'm in the whole totality of the United States thirty thousand doesn't sound like a lot yes it's not a big number per se are the other figure I'm watching closely is that so far our our first test I started in February twenty nine that that the first test within United States and then yesterday we had a total of two hundred and seven this hour tragedy people don't have to die but that they did die but in terms of numbers we S. still at low number and to be mindful for every test the the other number we didn't see if there are at least a hundred of them are hospitalized so that means was two hundred that we nationwide we might have been seeing nearly twenty thousand people who work for the hospital action the issue and real concern is to protect our health care facility and capacity and like that I think I'll be in my have heard and read that and to keep ourselves safe is also to protect our healthcare system M. I wouldn't have seen that recently many physicians nurses they have posted pictures see I I stay here for you and please stay home for me let's explore that more in our next segment professor Chen Wei chih is agreed to stay with us here professor of the global health program school of biological and.

Mason professor professor Chen Wei
"professor health policy" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Hosted by the Manhattan institute Peter Thiel's a founder of PayPal joined by Paul singer whose chair of the board at the Manhattan institute she's been radio couples you see is from Washington one of the Washington journal we talked about healthcare promoting the Kerry he is the a professor health policy Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore also a surgeon there and author of several books his latest is the price we pay what broke American healthcare and how to fix it morning doctor McCarron welcome we're here to pick a tipping point for healthcare in America and where you saw the first break where would that be well really if you have to identify the issues that are driving our affordability crisis that nobody is talking about that we need to talk about it is number one pricing failures number two the middle man industry and three in appropriate medical care collectively there is broad consensus in America about addressing these issues but unfortunately our discussion has been side tracked into this sort of false choice that we have as to whether or not you're pro versus con healthcare look the I don't have yet to meet somebody who thinks that any industry has gone from non transparent pricing the transparent pricing and that's right you know this is a bad idea let's go back to hiding prices people are getting hammered out there people are getting crashed and they are hungry for honest pricing right now in healthcare it's ironic you know I'm a surgeon and I do pancreatic surgery for most of my career I could tell you five hundred things about pancreatic surgery except for one the price of the operation I mean people now need to know what the prices are when they ask when services are predictable into in terms of pricing you do you think that similar among your colleagues both at Hopkins and more broadly that doctors surgeons are generally on a where the pricing structures yes and it's not because we've got bad people it's just that we're focused on taking care of the patient so when somebody comes in we like to take care of people that's what we do now we've relied on our hospitals are billing department our administration to handle the billing process sees and I'll tell you they're not bad people either but we've inherited this crazy system in health care where we marked up prices for the purposes of offering secret insurance discounts secret and selective insurance discounts why do we have an army of staff negotiating discounts off of artificial inflated prices I mean this is the crazy game that has resulted in hundreds of hospital leaders and insurance executives calling me after the book came out saying look I'm a part of the system I agree with you it's insane I can't say this publicly but it's insane dialing up prices for the sake of our free secret internet this helps us understand how you did your book you you you went out and interviewed people I knew you spoke by phone obvious in some cases but you went out into the field and as you point out the book you like a doctor you did your rounds of these places what type of places do you visit what type of people that you see yeah I mean in the same way that we as doctors do rounds on patients and collect information I thought it's time to DO rounds on this issue as a professor of health policy at Johns Hopkins we hear a lot of different opinions we hear a lot of pockets of stories of outrage and gouging and healthcare but I really wanted to take a comprehensive approach to identifying the leading drivers of our affordability crisis and what I did is talk to insurance executives hospital leaders doctors nurses patients who few people I talk about a lot of people getting rich in healthcare but not the one stake holder of the patients and so it talking to farm mind small hospital leaders large academic centers I really try to put together a sort of basic healthcare literacy box so we can create a common language and really unite people by appealing to the best in them you know going to health care at every level out of a sense of compassion people going to hospital administration people would go to work in any aspect of healthcare insurance company they work in any level for the purpose of contributing to society we've got to appeal to that to the best in people and remember why we went into the field price gouging today if we can call a spade a spade is threatening the great public trust right now in American hospitals Dr Marty we Kerry is our guest so we'd like to hear from you we're talking about fixing the US healthcare system talking about his his new book but that's the the top would like to.

Peter Thiel founder PayPal Manhattan institute Manhattan
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Of course I've got a lot of tools in the new box yeah I I think the other woman here too is there's that Andy a they make you sign in operating agreement to and when you're signing it let's say you go to the ER there's some there's there's a piece of paper signed that you know you're going to be one hundred percent responsible for any payment you have to sign that. well let me tell you as a surgeon do not sign your financial life away when you come to the emergency room do not give your credit card you don't have to answer any questions hospitals are required by law the laws called him calling E. M. P. L. A. L. A.. required by law to take care of any urgent or emergency patient regardless of their ability to pay you don't have to sign these financial forms when you're vulnerable and second you've gotten him an emergency okay if you do if they want to sign it you right on that line did not read on the signature line if you can write was sloppy handwriting nobody's going to notice and just get them off your back you know the idea that you're financially hostage. he can get a lien on your home because you have appendicitis it that violates the public trust yeah I mean I I have no problem paying her around I guess a fair share here but again Dr Martina Kerry surgeon and professor health policy Johns Hopkins University thanks again for the time good luck with the book it is absolutely amazing thing to me and I get it you know we we have an expensive healthcare system why we allow this to continue look with the clowns in Washington talk about collusion elections that we had the story yesterday about the guy with the opiates right truck driver that was nope it's a got a truck driver who instead of trying to get on opiates because he had bilateral need knee surgery winds of using CBD oil to help alleviate his pain so I can continue to work to provide for his family pay for his truck and pay for his mortgage and he wants a testing positive for for marijuana which of course is trace amounts of that in the end of the CBD which shot doesn't have the psychoactive ingredient THC does not the C. B. day guy loses his job probably lose his house loses truck was his livelihood he's like in his forties. no one talking about that no one in Congress would do anything about that. same thing here we we complain and **** and moan about how bad health care is an American yet listen to some of the stories how is it in this country is prosperous is we are the half of more than half of breast cancer patients already gone through hell on earth are are going to be changed by bill collectors how do we get to the point where. you sign your life away when you're under duress in an emergency I don't get a point we have these pharmacy benefit managers who don't really do anything they shuffle paper around and they take a a bulk of the money when it comes to prescriptions which is why we pay so much for prescription. it'd be a rather simple fix to say alright starting tomorrow if your employer you're no longer allowed to offer health care is a benefit you got to get it on the you gotta get on the market just like you do auto insurance just like you do your homeowner's insurance just like you do any other form what other form of insurance besides maybe a modest life insurance policy. if your employer picked up any could probably even do away with that right. but the you know we we don't want to do that because it be too radical change well how radical is what we have right now I'd say that's pretty radical. to frame it once again we have the most advanced medical knowledge the world's ever know. it's always been that we always been getting better. I I pointed this out the beginning in every I brought this up a few times before on the shelf. back in nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty. they predicted the amount of medical knowledge would double by the year two thousand. everything we knew about medicine worldwide for nineteen fifty to two thousand what double in a fifty year period. now the modern medical knowledge doubles every seventy two days less than ninety days the amount of information we have doubles your gun that can't be right it is right. so we have cutting edge science there but but look how archaic look a broken the healthcare system has here in America Anna Republicans say they have a plan of the doubt Democrats say they have a plan and they don't there's one plan the plan is blow up the model the way it is right now get rid of employer sponsored health care and let's figure this thing out because that's really what's drive up the cost intermediaries. Scott Fleischer seven hundred WLW seven hundred W. L. W. scaffold seven hundred WLW. as you just heard with doctor McCarty it it's it's troubling to say listen I I bring this up to with the broken healthcare system we have in this country we have the cutting edge science and technology to the a FAQ or doubles are medical knowledge doubles every seventy two days in the world insane right in and you can't find out how much a procedure at a clinic or hospital is gonna cost. as a doc said where else what other product whether they're sure risky get re okay how much gonna cost I have no idea we'll just bill you when it comes in still getting bills from a monster my mom. as you may or may not know developed a non Hodgkin's lymphoma and there wasn't a great care over at the Jewish hospital. at the a blood cure cancer center for cancer center there at Cincinnati and it say how wonderful physicians and arm still of this day from a Medicare and like still getting bills come out of the house saying okay this year already sent the thing is that she's passed but you know and that's someone who got out of attacks technically paying the bill by done. sadly there are people out there more than half of people women with a stage for breast cancer who are being hounded by by debt collectors because that document you signed when you went into for your procedure that said here's your stack of papers you know you're ready worried about the procedure word about cancer your about your life and it's almost like it's the only place well under duress you can execute a contract. and get and they get away with it because you you typically can if you're under mental stress to see that there's a way out legally for that but in a hospital you sign he said on one hundred percent response we don't have to sign that document. which is I I think for a lot of people myself included cycle yeah I guess you know what you're right you don't you can't be denied care. and I got that they have to make their money have to pay for things but this is another reason the many reasons why the system is so so awful and broken. now we've got news on the way in just about a minute here on seven hundred W. O. W. in that when we return. I want to take a little bit of time this morning now eighteen years removed from the. John dropping tragedy unspeakable tragedy of September eleventh two thousand one if I may take you back to that day eighteen years ago because we often said and it was a catch phrase never forget well it seems like we have forgotten I don't think that's a bad thing I think that's how it's supposed to go but Erin could turkeys in New York all tall talk about what they're doing there and and some of the things you may not have heard about to just ahead as we remember nine eleven on the Scotts lawn show seven hundred W. although I'm sandy Collins seven hundred W. O. W. dot com the contract between the United auto workers union and General Motors expired at midnight last night and union vice president cherry did this says that auto workers are walking off the job we do not take this lightly. this is our last resort it represents great sacrifice and great courage on the part of our members and all of us when General Motors was facing bankruptcy. our members and the American taxpayer. stood up and made the hard choices and sacrifices. and save this company. it is says workers felt they had no choice Iranian officials are denying that they're behind drone attacks against a pair of giant oil facilities in Saudi Arabia yesterday the fiery attacks knocked out more than half of Saudi Arabia's oil output ABC news contributor Steve Gaillard who served both in the marine corps and at the state department looks at how the trump administration could respond when the oil market will market open tonight they're gonna be roiled we may see something around a ten dollar increase in the price of by a barrel of oil but I think what we have here is something where the administration's gonna want to calm the waters make sure that the global economy doesn't get roiled by this event but it will be the first time that we see what is the new trump administrations approach to the rest of the world without John Bolton. and here's one that's hard to believe a San Diego bride to be Janet Evans dreaming of her fiance having a dream that we were on a cargo train and it was a dangerous situation and Bobby told me you know you have to swallow your ring that's right swallow your ring then when I woke up and it was not in my hand I knew exactly where it was an X. ray confirming her fears that she swallowed her engagement ring while she was sleeping she had to have surgery to get it back I feel very grateful that I got it back and that it does and does the happy funny story well we are to Evan says now she takes the ring off at night remember for news anytime on demand at seven hundred W. O. W. dot com I sandy Collins is radio seven hundred WLW. I.

General Motors Saudi Arabia sandy Collins John Bolton. Andy United auto workers union America Anna Republicans Janet Evans Scott Fleischer vice president Cincinnati W. L. W. scaffold Steve Gaillard Scotts Erin McCarty
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"And I'm sure you heard this or at least what the headline anyway. is it the a share of uninsured Americans rise for went up for the first time in a decade the proportion of Americans without health insurance went up last year and that's the coverage under obamacare that's eroding now under president trump and if you're a fan of it you're gonna always I am most Americans actually don't mind it but but it's part of a bigger problem right regardless of where you stand on obamacare and affordable Care Act is the path how do we get to the point of America where we have so much science the amount of medical knowledge in the world will double maybe this one will double every seventy two days. it's incredible we we have all this advancement but they can't tell you how much it'll cost for an operation for procedure and how do we get to the point to when if your pharmacist you can't tell a patient what's in their best interest it is a remarkable disconnected puts us all in harm's way joining me Anne cute hearing centers dot com hotline is Dr Martina carries a surgeon professor health policy John Hopkins university Dr morning how are you great to be with his got good. I don't know about that I'm good did you be based on what I did the picture I just painted here to fewer Americans and ethnically decreasing number Americans are being insured and at the same time we have all these great medical advances which you know well is that these are great times to be in need of health care because of the quality care is just so damn good in the ads we have so much confusion in there and and we pay a big price all of us do the doctors you taken out the Hippocratic oath you treat a patient and then we find out for example if you suffer from metastatic breast cancer stage for breast cancer for the majority of of all women who are breast cancer patients that category stage four are being pursued by collection agencies for their medical bills how is it possible I we get here you know the Mets money games and predatory billing in healthcare today. are threatening the great public trust in the medical profession it's a disgrace okay now medical costs are very hard to manage I explain exactly how we do it in this book the price we pay but let me tell you something. who wrote obamacare they tried to do something good I actually believe that good intentions and never some good patient protections that came out of pre existing conditions and kids on their parents plan to look twenty six and getting rid of buy time capsule there were some good things let's be honest but its goal to lower healthcare costs it failed in that goal okay that's not my opinion and that's because it did not address the root problems politicians talk about how to finance the broken healthcare system we need to talk about how to fix it we need to get at the root problems of middlemen pricing failures and an appropriate care now let's talk about that and let's start with the inappropriate care aspect eight in in you know in some cases you know you kind of document this to that you go in like a dentist for example there there's a drop you can give silver a fluoride drops could stop cavities and yet the doctors are still Dennis also gonna draw a tooth and put a filling in and and what winds up happening is it doesn't really help the patient outcome but it helps the bottom line for the for the doctor for the dentist in this case because that's where the money is that there's more labor drilling is lucrative business silver fluoride it isn't and that's really what's also driving this to write things like that yeah why don't we paying us us doctors look I'm proud to be a doctor and I think we should be paid but while we getting paid based on pure quantity not quality one of the exciting things and I have I've profile in the book the price we pay is this new there is a relationship based clinics where people spend time and get at the root issues and talk about treating back pain with ice and and physical therapy instead of surgery and opioids and they're managing diabetes with cooking classes and we're spending time with people instead of holding in billing and typing in these rushed ten fifteen minute appointments it is ironic you know my nephew. had that had a small cavity in the doctor the dentist wanted to drill it and I said no no I once over dynein fluoride as an option and when he trash that we went to two other Dennis until we found one who said that's a reasonable option here let's do it you never needed a trailing. and so how many and I'm sure we have studies on this or maybe you have information on how many unnecessary procedures does the average person go through their lifetime not based on need but based on whether or not it's good for the bottom line of the physician well our Johns Hopkins study and surveying doctors found that eleven percent of all medical procedures are unnecessary according to the voice of doctors nationwide doctors sample average person might have seven to nine different medical procedures in our lifetime almost everybody will run the risk of having it done people maybe get second opinions they need to be informed I wanted to create healthcare literacy and that's why I wrote this book we people need to know that most doctors are trying to do the right thing but there's a fraction that are responding to a perverse incentives and a consumerist culture demanding things yeah and the doctor a Martina carries on the acute hearing centers dot com hot lines a surgeon he's a professor of health policy Johns Hopkins University and the book is the price we pay what broke American health care and how to fix it how did it you know we could kind of touch on but getting to this point right here if you go back in history once and this was during World War two when you had wage fixing they said okay well how to Wheeler better employees we gotta pay everyone the same the same right as a guy across the street how about we stop start offering health benefits as an assignment the the whole problem began with that in my pin is where it started maybe you have a different view on that. well it is crazy that your employer insurance is tied to who you work for and we've got people in America who are afraid to change jobs because of a chronic condition that's crazy that's insane look what American medicine has an incredible heritage when American hospitals were built most by churches by the way they had a mission dedicating man to serve the sick and injured regardless of their ability to pay or race or creed that is our great medical heritage and today these money games and the price gouging and the middle men are threatening that great public trust in the medical profession yes I am because I'm old out doctor and I watch sports and and a lot of history Hitler channel and some documentaries and it was American experience and they did a thing on the Mayo Clinic I don't know this but that's a man that it's in Minnesota rural Minnesota Mayo Clinic tells me there is a chain telemedicine work because before it used to be almost like lawyers right you guys a drum up your own business you're on patients and and be competitive in if you came up with a a better way to treat someone that would be proprietary you John hot I'm sorry of of the Mayo Clinic basically said Hey look you know we're gonna do we're gonna hire doctors and put him on staff and paid a salary and now it's gonna be a think take it's gonna be the incubator and that really changed about us. I was a game changer by the way that is a great documentary and it's on the Mayo Clinic right you know we have this great heritage and now people you know as use alluded to. can hospitals are sort of the bastion of scientific genius but we can't even give you a price hello bursting is that you want to deliver babies we give you the run around for fifty years possible to be saying we can't give you a price we want to airlines build you after the flight you think they give you a good price well they gal G. right because the lack of transparency enables price gouging that's exactly what we have yeah we also have the the vaunted middle man to we're trying to learn more about the physician benefit managers P. B. M.'s our pharmacy benefit managers rather in how they control eighty five percent of the U. S. market you know they're looking at things like Google and other entities is saying well you know what there may be a monopoly here what about the whole PBM scheme wise in Congress looking at that. well to be very honest with this guy they're all paid by the PBM okay we. and stock Chrissy an oligopoly in Washington DC it's a swamp controlled by the special interests and in healthcare out which as of last year became the number one business in America by the numbers. a lot of people are making a ton of money I mean we've created tens of thousands of millionaires who are not patient facing in this industry we need good managers lead by March have good people but the system is broken with this fragmented way where each stakeholder fights for more money and everybody's making a lot of money except for one stay colder and that's the patient yeah give me some numbers on that the pharmacy benefit manager and and how they inflate the cost and what what is it they do and and and how what what school first of all what what's the title what do they do what they actually do in and how much money they take out of the system. in the book which I try to make like the big short for health care to explain things I say that a PPM is like a someone who comes to your business and says I want to sell girl scout cookies and provide those benefits to your employees they charge the employee a copay for the girl scout cookies and they charge the employer some money and the gal Jeannie players because I'm like statements were you know the roughly five to nine Bucks no one has any idea what these meds are in the doses and frequencies and by a similar to other gal she mean players and they've employers don't even know what they're paying for and so I try to show people the tools on how to get a better deal write a better contract and we're watching businesses save half a million dollars over night just by re doing their PVM I getting a different PBM company about restoring medicine dot org I list some of the P. B. M.'s people can use that are more honest in their practices Dr Martina carries on the show a surgeon he's a professor at Johns Hopkins University the price we pay what broke the American help what broke mereka health care how to fix or talk about obviously that this morning scouts on show here seven hundred W. although to it one of the other elements this is and this is fascinating to me is that you sign your life away I thought the law was this that that that hospitals and care providers cannot come after you for money you don't have meaning that they can't hit your credit they can't go after you they can't garnish your wages and the like to get there to get their money today we have people that mention half of more than half of metastatic stage four breast cancer patients United States being pursued by collection agencies hospitals some of them are garnishing wages and the like to at this point the dactyl where is it still the law that they can't do that what happened. it's worse than it ever been hospital suing patience is alive and well and I profile this massively growing trend in America in the book and what I found was one hospital about an hour from my house that is to twenty five thousand people in a small town that has only twenty eight thousand people in it by census data and I went to the hospital you know when I said this is a disgrace what you're doing you're violating the public trust you pay no taxes I'm gonna let the United States Senate know that because the IRS laws need to change well guess what that hospital did overnight they said they're gonna stop all lawsuits against but it's alive and well around the country we need public accountability talk to your doctor if you get a bad bill go to the website restoring medicine dot org and look at the twenty ways you can buy your medical bills we put him up there and.

Mayo Clinic John Hopkins university Dr Dr Martina America trump president professor Anne eighty five percent ten fifteen minute seventy two days million dollars seven hundred W eleven percent fifty years
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"B. M.'s people can use that are more honest in their practices Dr Martina carries on the show a surgeon he's a professor at Johns Hopkins University the price we pay what broke the American help what broke American health care how to fix or talk about obviously that this morning scouts on show here seven hundred W. although to it one of the other elements this is and this is fascinating to me is that you sign your life away I thought the law was this that that that hospitals and care providers cannot come after you for money you don't have meaning that they can't hit your credit they can't go after you they can't garnish your wages in the like to get there to get their money today we have people that mention half of more than half of metastatic stage four breast cancer patients United States being pursued by collection agencies hospitals some of them are garnishing wages in a like to at this point the decal where is it still the law that they can't do that what happened. it's worse than it ever been hospital suing patience is alive and well and I profile this massively growing trend in America in the book and what I found was one hospital about an hour from my house that is to twenty five thousand people in a small town that has only twenty eight thousand people in it by census data and I went to the hospital CEO when I said this is a disgrace what you're doing you're violating the public trust you pay no taxes I'm going to let the United States Senate know that because the IRS laws need to change well guess what that hospital did overnight they said they're gonna stop all lawsuits against but it's alive and well around the country we need public accountability talk to your doctor if you get a bad bill go to the website restoring medicine dot org and look at the twenty ways you can buy your medical bills we put him up there and of course I've got a lot of tools in the new box yeah I I think the other woman here too is there's that NDA they make you sign in operating agreement to and when you're signing it let's say you go to the ER there's some there's there's a piece of paper signed that you know you're going to be one hundred percent responsible for any payment you have to sign a. well let me tell you as a surgeon do not sign your financial life away when you come to the emergency room do not give your credit card you don't have to answer any questions hospitals are required by law the laws called in Cali E. M. P. L. A. L. A.. required by law to take care of any urgent or emergency patient regardless of their ability to pay you don't have to sign these financial forms when you're vulnerable and steak and you've gotten him an emergency okay if you do if they want to fight you right on that line did not read on the signature line if you can write was sloppy handwriting nobody's going to notice and just get them off your back you know the idea that you're financially hostage if he can get a lien on your home because you had appendicitis it that pilots the public trust yeah I mean I I have no problem paying her around I guess a fair share here but again Dr Martina Kerry surgeon and professor health policy Johns Hopkins University thanks again for the time good luck with the book if it is an absolutely amazing thing to me and I get it you know we we have an expensive healthcare system why we allow this to continue look with the clowns in Washington talk about collusion elections that we had the story yesterday about the guy with the opiates right truck driver current was nope it's a got a truck driver who instead of trying to get on opiates because he had bilateral need knee surgery wind up using CBD oil to help alleviate his pain so I can continue to work and provide for his family pay for his truck and pay for his mortgage and that he wants a testing positive for for marijuana which of course is trace amounts of that in the end of the CBD which are doesn't have the psychoactive ingredient THC does not the C. B. day guy loses his job probably lose his house with his truck was his livelihood he's like in his forties. no one talking about that no one in Congress would do anything about that. same thing here we we complain and **** and moan about how bad health care is an American yet listen to some of the stories how is it in this country is prosperous is we are the half of more than half of breast cancer patients already gone through hell on earth are are going to be changed by bill collectors how do we get to the point where. you sign your life away when you're under duress in an emergency room how do you get a point where you have these pharmacy benefit managers who don't really do anything they shuffle paper around and they take a a bulk of the money when it comes to prescriptions which is why we pay so much for prescription. it'd be a rather simple fixes a alright starting tomorrow if your employer you're no longer allowed to offer health care is a benefit you got to get it on the you gotta get on the market just like you do auto insurance just like you do your homeowner's insurance just like you do any other form what other form of insurance besides maybe a modest life insurance policy. if your employer picked up any could probably even do away with that right. but the you know we we don't want to do that because it be too radical change well how radical is what we have right now I think that's pretty radical. the frame it once again we have the most advanced medical knowledge the world's ever know. it's always been that we we've been getting better. I I pointed this out the beginning in every I brought this up a few times before on the show. back in nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty..

Johns Hopkins University Dr Martina professor B. M. one hundred percent seven hundred W
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

10:10 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Hundred WLW. and I'm sure you heard this or at least what the headline anyway. is it the a share of uninsured Americans rise for went up for the first time in a decade the proportion of Americans without health insurance went up last year and that's the coverage under obamacare that's eroding now under president trump and if you're a fan of it you're gonna always I am most Americans actually don't mind it but but it's part of a bigger problem right regardless of where you stand on obamacare and affordable Care Act is the path how do we get to the point of America where we have so much science the amount of medical knowledge in the world we'll double ready for this one will double every seventy two days. it's incredible we we have all this advancement but they can't tell you how much it'll cost for an operation for procedure and how do we get to the point to when if your pharmacist you can't tell a patient what's in their best interest it is a remarkable disconnected puts us all in harm's way joining me Anne cute hearing centers dot com hotline is Dr Martina carries a surgeon professor health policy John Hopkins university Dr morning how are you great to be with his got good. I don't know about that I'm good did you be based on what I did the picture I just painted here to fewer Americans and ethnically decreasing number Americans are being insured and at the same time we have all these great medical advances which you know well is that these are great times to be in need of health care because of the quality care is just so damn good and yet we have so much confusion in there and and we pay a big price all of us do the doctors you taken out the Hippocratic oath you treat a patient and then we find out for example if you suffer from metastatic breast cancer stage for breast cancer for the majority of of all women who are breast cancer patients that category stage four are being pursued by collection agencies for their medical bills how is it possible that we get here you know that met money games and predatory billing in healthcare today. are threatening the great public trust in the medical profession it's a disgrace okay now medical costs are very hard to manage I explain exactly how we do it in this book the price we pay but let me tell you something. who wrote obamacare they tried to do something good I actually believe that good intentions and there was some good patient protections that came out of pre existing conditions and kids on their parents plan until the twenty sixth and getting rid of by time caps there were some good things let's be honest but its goal to lower healthcare costs it failed in that goal okay that's not my opinion and that's because it did not address the root problems politicians talk about how to finance the broken healthcare system we need to talk about how to fix it we need to get at the root problems of middle man pricing failures and an appropriate care now let's talk about that and let's start with the inappropriate care aspect eight in in you know in some cases you know and you kind of document this to that you go in like a dentist for example there there's a drop you can give silver a fluoride drops can stop cavities and yet the doctors are still Dennis also gonna draw a tooth and put a filling in and and what winds up happening is it doesn't really help the patient outcome but it helps the bottom line for the for the doctor for the dentist in this case because that's where the money is that there's more labor drilling is lucrative business silver fluoride it isn't and that's really what's also driving this to write things like that yeah why don't we paying us us doctors look I'm proud to be a doctor and I think we should be paid why are we getting paid based on pure quantity not quality one of the exciting things and I have I've profile in the book the price we pay is this new there is a relationship based clinics where people spend time and get at the root issues and talk about treating back pain with ice and and physical therapy instead of surgery and opioids and they're managing diabetes with cooking classes and we're spending time with people instead of holding in billing and typing in these rushed ten fifteen minute appointments it is ironic you know my nephew. had that had a small cavity and the doctor the dentist wanted to drill it and I said no no I once over dynein fluoride as an option and when he trash that we went to two other Dennis until we found one who said that's a reasonable option here let's do it you never needed a trailing. and so how many and I'm sure we have studies on this or maybe you have information on how many unnecessary procedures does the average person go through their lifetime not based on need but based on whether or not it's good for the bottom line of the physician well our Johns Hopkins study and surveying doctors found that eleven percent of all medical procedures are unnecessary according to the voice of doctors nationwide doctors sample average person might have seven to nine different medical teachers in our lifetime almost everybody will run the risk of having it done people need to get second opinions they need to be informed I wanted to create healthcare literacy and that's why I wrote this book we people need to know that most doctors are trying to do the right thing but there's a fraction they're responding to a perverse incentives and a consumerist culture demanding things yeah and the doctor a Martina carries on the acute hearing centers dot com hot lines a surgeon is a professor of health policy Johns Hopkins University and the book is the price we pay what broke American health care and how to fix it how to it you know we could kind of touch on about getting to this point right here if you go back in history once and this was during World War two when you had wage fixing they said okay well how do we were better employees we gotta pay everyone the same the same right as a guy across the street how about we stop start offering health benefits as an assignment the the whole problem began with that in my pin is where it started maybe you have a different view on that. well it is crazy that your employee insurance is tied to who you work for and we've got people in America who are afraid to change jobs because of a chronic condition that's crazy that's insane look what American medicine has an incredible heritage when American hospitals were built most by churches by the way they had a mission dedicating them to serve the sick and injured regardless of their ability to pay or race or creed that is our great medical heritage and today these money games and the price gouging and the middle men are threatening that great public trust in the medical profession what was it yes I am because I'm old out doctor and I watch sports and and a lot of history Hitler channel and some documentaries and it was American experience and they did a thing on the Mayo Clinic I don't know this but that's it meant that it's in Minnesota rural Minnesota Mayo Clinic tells me there is a chain telemedicine work because before it used to be almost like lawyers right you guys a drum up your own business here on patients and and be competitive in if you came up with a a better way to treat someone that would be proprietary you John hot I'm sorry of of the Mayo Clinic basically said Hey look you know we're gonna do we're gonna hire doctors and put him on staff and paid a salary and now it's gonna be a think take it's gonna be an incubator in that really change about us. that was a game changer by the way that is a great documentary and it's on the Mayo Clinic right you know we have this great heritage and now people you know as use alluded to. can hospitals are sort of the bastion of scientific genius but we can't even give you a price we held bursting is that you want to deliver babies we give you the run around for fifty years possible to be saying we can't give you a price we what if airlines build you after the flight you think they give you a good price well they gallons you right because the lack of transparency enables price gouging that's exactly what we have yeah we also have the the vaunted middle man to we're trying to learn more about the physician benefit managers P. B. M.'s our pharmacy benefit managers rather in how they control eighty five percent of the U. S. market you know they're looking at things like Google and other entities is saying well you know what there may be a monopoly here what about the whole PBM scheme wise in Congress looking at that. well to be very honest with this guy they're all paid by the PBM okay we. and stock Chrissy an oligopoly in Washington DC it's a swamp controlled by the special interests and in health care which as of last year became the number one business in America by the numbers. a lot of people are making a ton of money I mean we've created tens of thousands of millionaires or not patient facing in this industry we need good managers lead by and large have good people but the system is broken with this fragmented way where each stakeholder fights for more money and everybody is making a lot of money except for one stay colder and that's the patient yeah give me some numbers on that the pharmacy benefit manager and how they inflate the cost and what what is it they do and and and how what what school first of all what what's the title what do they do what they actually do in and how much money they take out of the system. in the book which I try to make like the big short for health care to explain things I say that a PPM is like a someone who comes to your business and says I want to sell girl scout cookies and provide those benefits to your employees they charge the employee a co pay for the girl scout cookies and they charge the employer some money hello calgene employers because I'm like statements were you know the roughly five to nine Bucks no one has any idea what this med star in the doses and frequencies and by a similar to other gal she means lawyers and they've employers don't even know what they're paying for and so I try to show people the tools on how to get a better deal write a better contract and we're watching businesses save half a million dollars over night just by re doing their PVM I getting a different PBM company about restoring medicine dot org I list some of the P..

John Hopkins university Dr America Dr Martina trump president professor Anne eighty five percent ten fifteen minute seventy two days million dollars eleven percent fifty years
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Of course I've got a lot of tools in the new box yeah I I think the other woman here too is there's that Andy a they make you sign in operating agreement to and when you're signing it let's say you go to the ER there's some there's there's a piece of paper you sign that you know you're going to be one hundred percent responsible for any payment you have to sign that. well let me tell you as a surgeon do not sign your financial life away when you come to the emergency room do not give your credit card you don't have to answer any questions hospitals are required by law the laws called in Cali E. M. P. L. A. L. A.. required by law to take care of any urgent or emergency patient regardless of their ability to pay you don't have to sign these financial forms when you're vulnerable and sick and you've gotten in an emergency okay if you do if they want to sign it you right on that line did not read on the signature line if you can write was sloppy and writing nobody's going to notice and just get them off your back you know the idea that you're financially hostage if he can get a lien on your home because you had appendicitis it that violates the public trust yeah I mean I I have no problem paying her around I guess a fair share here but again Dr Martina Kerry surgeon and professor health policy Johns Hopkins University thanks again for the time good luck with the book it is absolutely amazing thing to me and I get it you know we we have an expensive healthcare system why we allow this to continue look with the clowns in Washington talk about collusion elections and we had the story yesterday about the guy with the opiates right truck driver current was nope it's a got a truck driver who instead of trying to get on opiates because he had bilateral need knee surgery wind up using CBD oil to help alleviate his pain so I can continue to work and provide for his family pay for his truck and pay for his mortgage and that he wants a testing positive for for marijuana which of course is trace amounts of that in the end of the CBD which shot doesn't have the psychoactive ingredient THC does not the C. B. day guy loses his job probably lose his house with his truck was his livelihood he's like in his forties. no one talking about that no one in Congress would do anything about that. same thing here we we complain and **** and moan about how bad health care is an American yet listen to some of the stories how is it in this country is prosperous as we are that half of more than half of breast cancer patients already gone through hell on earth are going to be changed by bill collectors how do we get to the point where. you sign your life away when you're under duress in an emergency room I don't get to a point where you have the pharmacy benefit managers who don't really do anything they shuffle paper around and they take a a bulk of the money when it comes to prescriptions which is why we pay so much for prescription. it'd be a rather simple fix to say alright starting tomorrow if your employer you're no longer allowed to offer health care is a benefit you got to get it on the you gotta get on the market just like you do auto insurance just like you do your homeowner's insurance just like you do any other form what other form of insurance besides maybe a modest life insurance policy. if your employer picked up Hey you could probably even do away with that right. but the you know we we don't want to do that because it be too radical change well how radical is what we have right now I think that's pretty radical. to frame it once again we have the most advanced medical knowledge the world's ever known. it's always been that we we've been getting better. I I pointed this out the beginning in every I brought this up a few times before on the shelf. back in nineteen fifty and nineteen fifty. they predicted.

Andy one hundred percent
"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"professor health policy" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Went up last year and that's the coverage under obamacare that's eroding now under president trump and if you're a fan of it you're gonna allow it I am most Americans actually don't mind it but but it's part of a bigger problem right regardless of where you stand on obamacare and affordable Care Act is the path how do we get to the point of America where we have so much science the amount of medical knowledge in the world will double maybe this one will double every seventy two days. it's incredible we we have all this advancement but they can't tell you how much it'll cost for an operation for procedure and how do we get to the point to when if your pharmacist you can't tell a patient what's in their best interests it is a remarkable disconnected puts us all in harm's way joining me Anne cute hearing centers dot com hotline is Dr Martina carries a surgeon professor health policy John Hopkins university Dr morning how are you great to be with his got good not that I'm good did you'd be based on what I did the picture I just painted here to fewer Americans and I had to click decreasing number Americans are being insured and at the same time we have all these great medical advances which you know well is that these are great times to be in need of health care because of the quality care is just so damn good and yet we have so much confusion in there and and we pay a big price all of us do the doctors you taken out the Hippocratic oath you treat a patient and then we find out for example if you suffer from metastatic breast cancer stage for breast cancer for the majority of of all women who are breast cancer patients that category stage four are being pursued by collection agencies for their medical bills how is it possible I we get here you know the Mets money games and predatory billing in healthcare today. are threatening the great public trust in the medical profession it's a disgrace okay now medical costs are very hard to manage I explain exactly how we do it in this book the price we pay but let me tell you something. who wrote obamacare they tried to do something good I actually believe that good intentions and never some good patient protections that came out of pre existing conditions and kids on their parents plantilla twenty six and getting rid of by time caps there were some good things let's be honest but its goal to lower healthcare costs it failed in that goal okay so my opinion and that's because it did not address the root problems politicians talk about how to finance the broken healthcare system we need to talk about how to fix it we need to get at the root problems of middlemen pricing failures and an appropriate care now let's talk about that and let's start with the in a proper care aspect eight in in you know in some cases young and you kind of document this to that you go in like a dentist for example there there's a drop you can give silver a fluoride drops could stop cavities and yet the doctors are still Dennis also going to drill a tooth and put a filling in and and what winds up happening is it doesn't really help the patient outcome but it helps the bottom line for the for the doctor for the dentist in this case because that's where the money is that there's more labor drilling is lucrative business silver fluoride it isn't and that's really what's also driving this to write things like that yeah why don't we paying us us doctors look I'm proud to be a doctor and I think we should be paid but why are we getting paid based on quantity not quality one of the exciting things and I have I've profile in the book the price we pay is this new there is a relationship based clinics where people spend time and get at the root issues and talk about treating back pain with ice and and physical therapy instead of surgery and opioids and they're managing diabetes with cooking classes and they're spending time with people instead of holding in billing and typing in these rushed ten fifteen minute appointments it is ironic you know my nephew it. had that had a small cavity in the doctor the dentist wanted to drill it and I said no no I once over dynein fluoride as an option and when he trash that we went to two other Dennis until we found one who said that's a reasonable option here let's do it you never needed a trailing. and so how many and I'm sure we have studies on this or maybe you have information on how many unnecessary procedures does the average person go through their lifetime not based on need but based on whether or not it's good for the bottom line of the physician well our Johns Hopkins study and surveying doctors found that eleven percent of all medical procedures are unnecessary according to the voice of doctors nationwide doctor sample average person might have seven to nine different medical procedures in our lifetime almost everybody will run the risk of having it done people need to get second opinions they need to be informed I wanted to create healthcare literacy and that's why I wrote this book we people need to know that most doctors are trying to do the right thing but there's a fraction they're responding to a perverse incentives and a consumerist culture demanding things yeah and the doctor a Martina carries on the acute hearing centers dot com hot lines a surgeon is a professor of health policy Johns Hopkins University and the book is the price we pay what broke American health care and how to fix it how did it get a week we kind of touch on but getting to this point right here if you go back in history once and this was during World War two when you had wage fixing they said okay well how to Wheeler better employees we gotta pay everyone the same the same right as a guy across the street how about we stop start offering health benefits as an assignment the the whole problem began with that in my pin is where it started maybe you have a different view on that. well it is crazy that your employee insurance is tied to who you work for and we've got people in America who are afraid to change jobs because of a chronic condition that's crazy that's insane look what American medicine has an incredible heritage when American hospitals were built most by churches by the way they had a mission dedicating them to serve the sick and injured regardless of their ability to pay or race or creed that is our great medical heritage and today these money games and the price gouging and the middle men are threatening not great public trust in the medical profession what was interesting I sigh because I'm old now doctor and I watch sports and and a lot of history Hitler channel and some documentaries and it was American experience and they did a thing on the Mayo Clinic I don't know this but that's it meant that it's in Minnesota rural Minnesota Mayo Clinic tells me there is a chain telemedicine work because before it used to be almost like lawyers right you guys a drum up your own business you're on patients and and be competitive in if you came up with a better way to treat someone that would be proprietary you John hot I'm sorry of of the Mayo Clinic basically said Hey look you know we're gonna do we're gonna hire doctors gonna put him on staff and paid a salary and that's gonna be a think take it's gonna be an incubator in that really change about us. that was a game changer by the way that is a great documentary and it's on the Mayo Clinic right you know we have this great heritage and now people you know as use alluded to. and hospitals are sort of the bastion of scientific genius but we can't even give you a price without bursting is that you want to deliver babies we give you the run around for fifty years possible seven saying we can't give you a price we want to airlines build you after the flight you think they give you a good price now they'd gallons you right because the lack of transparency enables price gouging that's exactly what we have yeah we also have the the vaunted middle man to we're trying to learn more about the physician benefit managers P. B. M.'s our pharmacy benefit managers rather in how they control eighty five percent of the U. S. market you know they're looking at things like Google and other entities is saying well you know what there may be a monopoly here what about the whole PBM scheme wise in Congress looking at that. well to be very honest with this guy they're all paid by the P. B. M.'s okay we. and soccer see an oligopoly in Washington DC it's a swamp controlled by the special interests and in healthcare out which as of last year became the number one business in America by the numbers. a lot of people are making a ton of money I mean we've created tens of thousands of millionaires or not patient facing in this industry we need good manager Selena by and large have good people but the system is broken with this fragmented way were each stakeholder fights for more money and everybody's making a lot of money except for one stay colder and that's the patient yeah give me some numbers on that the pharmacy benefit manager and how they inflate the cost and what what is it they do and and and how what what first of all what what's the title what do they do what they actually do in and how much money they take out of the system. in the book which I try to make like the big short for health care to explain things I say that a P. B. M. as like a someone who comes to your business and says I want to sell girl scout cookies and provide those benefits to your employees they charge the employee a copay for the girl scout cookies and they charge the employer some money and the gal wishing the employers because I'm like statements for you know the roughly five to nine Bucks no one has any idea what these meds are in the doses and frequencies and biosimilar southern gal she means lawyers and they've employers don't even know what they're paying for and so I try to show people the tools on how to get a better deal write a better contract and we're watching businesses save half a million dollars over night just by re doing their PBM I getting a different PPM company about restoring medicine dot org I list some of the P. B. M.'s people can use that are more honest in their practices Dr Martina carries on the show a surgeon he's a professor at Johns Hopkins University the price we pay what broke the American help what broke mereka health care how to fix our talk about obviously that this morning scouts on show here seven hundred W. although to it and one of the other elements this is and this is fascinating to me is that you sign your life away I thought the law was this that that that hospitals and care providers cannot come after you for money you don't have meaning that they can't hit your credit they can't go after you they can't garnish your wages and the like to get there to get their money today we have people that mention half of more than half of metastatic stage four breast cancer patients you know it's it's being pursued by collection agencies are hospitals some of them are garnishing wages and the like to at this point the decal where is it still the law that they can't do that what happened. it's worse than it's ever been hospital suing patience is alive and well and I profile this massively growing trend in America in the book and what I found was one hospital about an hour from my house that is to twenty five thousand people in a small town that has only twenty eight thousand people in it by census data and I went to the hospital CEO when I said this is a disgrace what you're doing you're violating the public trust you pay no taxes I'm gonna let the United States Senate know that because the IRS laws need to change well guess what that hospital did overnight they said they're gonna stop all lawsuits against but it's alive and well around the country we need public accountability talk to your doctor if you get a bad bill go to the website restoring medicine dot org and look at the twenty ways you can buy your medical bills we've put him up there and.

trump America president eighty five percent ten fifteen minute seventy two days million dollars seven hundred W eleven percent fifty years