17 Burst results for "Professor Of Computer Science"

"professor computer science" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

05:02 min | 3 months ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"Twenty twenty. The following interview was broadcast in december of twenty twenty as part of our version. five point. oh conference welcome back to reimagine twenty twenty hawk average day. I'm glad you joined by mutant severe founder and ceo at avalanche and offs professor. Computer science at cornell. Thanks so much joining us. Thank you so much for having me on all right. Well it's it's great to have you for those viewers of ours. Who who might not be familiar with who you are. You wanna give a little background kind of you who you are and how you got into blotchy store of very quickly. I got into blockchain way before it was a thing way before the term was coined in two thousand and one thousand two. I started building a system called karma so that's seven years or six or seven years before bitcoin. i was working on a cryptocurrency proof of work. Minting in it's i believe it's the first cryptocurrency that minted coins via proof of work. So was doing something. She like things before though she was around except you know he came along six years later he improved on On a substantial portion of of what i had worked on You didn't know about my work. That's okay all the academics about my work. In case so when bitcoin start going big i looked into that further call. I found a with all of the post. Doc at cornell i worked with on for this or we found the biggest known flaw in subtle. She's consensus for something called selfish mining a scheme by which you can make more money than your fair. Share is a minor in bits going. After that i worked on the safety of coins at rest of with things. Like covenants are i worked on All of other things. layer two protocols on characterizing scale ability on characterizing decentralisation but most recently the most exciting thing that i've been working on is for the last few years i've been working on the new system called avalanche and at the core of avalanche lies a new consensus protocol. The likes of which has never been experimented with before that is a far far faster than everything else and we just went main that with avalanche about two months ago with a coin cold of ox and i'm i'm having a blast And my goal now is to just work up the layers to show the world of equivalent breakthroughs at every layer of the stack. Both the consensus layer the da- player and the layers of so. It's been a fun ride for me. Well it's quite quite the resume you have there and before we dive into what you're doing now and where you'd gotten let's talk about where you came from. You mentioned that you had a karma that was two dozen that was before even she before bitcoin and you mentioned he made some improvements upon and i just wanna ask know what..

one thousand two thousand two dozen six years later december of twenty twenty six Both two months ago last few years two five point Twenty twenty seven years cornell years two protocols first cryptocurrency about seven twenty
"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

"Go! These other drives would be very useful once you do. Get up into space where you don't have to have considerations of escaping the planet's gravity or battling its atmosphere in order to maneuver right, because the think about about these chemical drives is that they are extremely wasteful in a grand universal kind of game that you have to carry a lot of fuel, they pack a lot of power, but you have to carry an awful lot of. It's not terribly efficient. So. They wouldn't last very long in the grand scheme of things. If you're talking about trying to travel vast different distances, not differences, but distances then the chemical rockets end up, being really heavy and that limits how much you can carry, which in turn limits how far you can go without just coasting like for example, the the voyager satellites. Which Hey, just left the solar system. Actually they didn't. Come back. Slept something on Pluto. That was that was a little bit of a missing misquote in the press Oh nice yeah. I'm glad you caught up on that because I obviously did not. Failed to tweet about it, so that. Hey, no, it's okay. You cut it on the podcasts so now our listeners can say Vogel Bom she keeps Strickland on task so one the was we talked about ion engines right now I on engines are using ions is the charged particles You know think of an atom? That's either. Either has an excess of electrons or a deficit in electronic so either way either got a negative or positive charge plasma is. Gas. So it's a gas that has these free ions moving through. It means that you can actually pass electric current through the gas itself right? That's what a plasma is impossible of. Course is the most plentiful of the the states of matter in the universe as far as we are aware and and so the ion US electric fields rather than chemical reactions to create propulsion, and they're not as powerful as chemical engines, so they don't give you that the chemical engines do. They are way more efficient, and so they can last ages and these solar energy to provide that. Yeah, they they get the solar energy to provide electricity to help. Create these reactions that will creepy ions that that propel it, so they have. These big solar panels that will unfold from the spacecraft. We've already launched some spacecraft using ion engines, The dawn spacecraft, which launched on September twenty, seven, th two thousand seven, has ion engines and uses these solar panels to get the electricity its destination ahead to actually but the second destination the destination is a dwarf planet series, and it's scheduled to arrive there in February two thousand fifteen so visiting the. The NASA pages about this space craft. I saw some interesting figures. One was that it is a six point, three billion kilometer journey, and just to that you get an idea of how far that is compared to a light year layers nine point four trillion kilometers six point three billion kilometers still nowhere near a light year, so it assuming that it arrives on the I if I, I worry in two thousand fifteen, which. I just took an arbitrary. It will have flown for seven years five months and two days to go those six point three billion kilometers so I did some did some silly little math, which said. Six million six point, three billion kilometers, being six three trillion meters, and then you have to figure out how many seconds are seven years five months in two days, so I did two, hundred, thirty, six, million, eight, hundred, seventy, two thousand eight hundred seconds, so if you do the math, and that means that the average speed, and this is you know just average because it does. Change is twenty, six, thousand, five, hundred ninety seven meters per second based on the information that I was able to find so as shabby, not shabby, the still nowhere near the. Falcon but I also use about uses the dawn's engine used four hundred fifty kilograms of Cenon fuel. On being neutrally charged. US that the solar ray to ionized. Nuts. And the Solar Ray at one astronomical unit provided about ten point. Three kilowatts of power an astronomical unit by the way is one, hundred, forty, nine, million, five, hundred, ninety, nine, thousand, eight, hundred seventy one kilometers, and you might say well. What the heck kind of measurement is that well? That's the mean distance between the earth and the sun. because. The distance actually changes throughout the earth's rotation around the Sun. It's not always exactly that far away. That's the mean. So. That's what we decided to define as an astronomical unit, and I'm sure any aliens will be happy to take us up on discussion of why that's very human centric. Yeah, Yeah I. Just an astronomical unit is exactly this is your star and your planet really enlightened guys. They'll really take onto. Yup, nope right up there. I, I was having this discussion with my buddy eight percents ago. Like Oh, come on. Like. Hey, I i. know how this goes. Because I watched your star wars documentary, so I'd the maximum Russ Don I on engine expands about point two five kilograms of xenon per day, and that produces a thrust of ninety two millions, which Nassar explains is about the amount of force. You feel when you put a piece of paper on your open hand. That's the amount of force. So incredibly unimpressive when you right but. in the in the environment of space. Plenty enough, and so it says that the the thrust changes the spacecraft's velocity about Oh ten to the negative five meters per second every second, and after about a thousand days it would achieve a velocity of thousand meters per second, so because there's dragon stays exactly yeah. So anyway, yeah, about thousand meters. The second one thousand days so that that that speed I gave you the twenty six, thousand, five hundred ninety seven meters per second obviously again. That's a that's just averaging it out over the full distance. In fact, it's constantly accelerating not always at that particular speed, but it will be or that particular rate. I shouldn't say it's accelerating at that speed, totally misleading, but at that rate so yeah, that's that's one of the ones that we're looking at now. There's also other forms of propulsion have been propose like solar sails. Again not something that's going to get you from Earth's solar system to distant solar system anytime quickly, it's more of a very efficient means of travel by harnessing photons at the photons hit the solar sail, and that's what provides the propulsion to move the craft forward. which sounds kind of incredible? You think about that. You know hell much kinetic energy can a photon have and may surprise some of you to know that photons have kinetic energy, but the true the earth actually. When the sun is hitting you, you weigh a little more because the light is actually machine. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's why I never go outside I. Don't like getting pushed around. By nobody and so. Then I wanted to mention. There's a theoretical engine. There's there's a few theoretical engines. Yeah, the one that I came across was A. Electromagnetic gravity drive by Yokneam houser just a guest because I don't know how to pronounce that name. I do not either. That sounds great to maple. He's a physicist and a professor computer science at the University of Applied Sciences in assault, gator, and and then he worked with vaulter. Drescher, who is an Australian Patent Officer. And they came up with an idea that would use them electromagnetic essentially A. Ring of superconducting coil, and then they would pump a lot of electricity through the coil which would then create a magnetic field because we know about the re the relationship between coils..

US NASA Nassar Yokneam houser Drescher Vogel Falcon University of Applied Sciences Australian Patent Officer assault Strickland physicist professor
"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

"Go! These other drives would be very useful once you do. Get up into space where you don't have to have considerations of escaping the planet's gravity or battling its atmosphere in order to maneuver right, because the think about about these chemical drives is that they are extremely wasteful in a grand universal kind of game that you have to carry a lot of fuel, they pack a lot of power, but you have to carry an awful lot of. It's not terribly efficient. So. They wouldn't last very long in the grand scheme of things. If you're talking about trying to travel vast different distances, not differences, but distances then the chemical rockets end up, being really heavy and that limits how much you can carry, which in turn limits how far you can go without just coasting like for example, the the voyager satellites. Which Hey, just left the solar system. Actually they didn't. Come back. Slept something on Pluto. That was that was a little bit of a missing misquote in the press Oh nice yeah. I'm glad you caught up on that because I obviously did not. Failed to tweet about it, so that. Hey, no, it's okay. You cut it on the podcasts so now our listeners can say Vogel Bom she keeps Strickland on task so one the was we talked about ion engines right now I on engines are using ions is the charged particles You know think of an atom? That's either. Either has an excess of electrons or a deficit in electronic so either way either got a negative or positive charge plasma is. Gas. So it's a gas that has these free ions moving through. It means that you can actually pass electric current through the gas itself right? That's what a plasma is impossible of. Course is the most plentiful of the the states of matter in the universe as far as we are aware and and so the ion US electric fields rather than chemical reactions to create propulsion, and they're not as powerful as chemical engines, so they don't give you that the chemical engines do. They are way more efficient, and so they can last ages and these solar energy to provide that. Yeah, they they get the solar energy to provide electricity to help. Create these reactions that will creepy ions that that propel it, so they have. These big solar panels that will unfold from the spacecraft. We've already launched some spacecraft using ion engines, The dawn spacecraft, which launched on September twenty, seven, th two thousand seven, has ion engines and uses these solar panels to get the electricity its destination ahead to actually but the second destination the destination is a dwarf planet series, and it's scheduled to arrive there in February two thousand fifteen so visiting the. The NASA pages about this space craft. I saw some interesting figures. One was that it is a six point, three billion kilometer journey, and just to that you get an idea of how far that is compared to a light year layers nine point four trillion kilometers six point three billion kilometers still nowhere near a light year, so it assuming that it arrives on the I if I, I worry in two thousand fifteen, which. I just took an arbitrary. It will have flown for seven years five months and two days to go those six point three billion kilometers so I did some did some silly little math, which said. Six million six point, three billion kilometers, being six three trillion meters, and then you have to figure out how many seconds are seven years five months in two days, so I did two, hundred, thirty, six, million, eight, hundred, seventy, two thousand eight hundred seconds, so if you do the math, and that means that the average speed, and this is you know just average because it does. Change is twenty, six, thousand, five, hundred ninety seven meters per second based on the information that I was able to find so as shabby, not shabby, the still nowhere near the. Falcon but I also use about uses the dawn's engine used four hundred fifty kilograms of Cenon fuel. On being neutrally charged. US that the solar ray to ionized. Nuts. And the Solar Ray at one astronomical unit provided about ten point. Three kilowatts of power an astronomical unit by the way is one, hundred, forty, nine, million, five, hundred, ninety, nine, thousand, eight, hundred seventy one kilometers, and you might say well. What the heck kind of measurement is that well? That's the mean distance between the earth and the sun. because. The distance actually changes throughout the earth's rotation around the Sun. It's not always exactly that far away. That's the mean. So. That's what we decided to define as an astronomical unit, and I'm sure any aliens will be happy to take us up on discussion of why that's very human centric. Yeah, Yeah I. Just an astronomical unit is exactly this is your star and your planet really enlightened guys. They'll really take onto. Yup, nope right up there. I, I was having this discussion with my buddy eight percents ago. Like Oh, come on. Like. Hey, I i. know how this goes. Because I watched your star wars documentary, so I'd the maximum Russ Don I on engine expands about point two five kilograms of xenon per day, and that produces a thrust of ninety two millions, which Nassar explains is about the amount of force. You feel when you put a piece of paper on your open hand. That's the amount of force. So incredibly unimpressive when you right but. in the in the environment of space. Plenty enough, and so it says that the the thrust changes the spacecraft's velocity about Oh ten to the negative five meters per second every second, and after about a thousand days it would achieve a velocity of thousand meters per second, so because there's dragon stays exactly yeah. So anyway, yeah, about thousand meters. The second one thousand days so that that that speed I gave you the twenty six, thousand, five hundred ninety seven meters per second obviously again. That's a that's just averaging it out over the full distance. In fact, it's constantly accelerating not always at that particular speed, but it will be or that particular rate. I shouldn't say it's accelerating at that speed, totally misleading, but at that rate so yeah, that's that's one of the ones that we're looking at now. There's also other forms of propulsion have been propose like solar sails. Again not something that's going to get you from Earth's solar system to distant solar system anytime quickly, it's more of a very efficient means of travel by harnessing photons at the photons hit the solar sail, and that's what provides the propulsion to move the craft forward. which sounds kind of incredible? You think about that. You know hell much kinetic energy can a photon have and may surprise some of you to know that photons have kinetic energy, but the true the earth actually. When the sun is hitting you, you weigh a little more because the light is actually machine. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's why I never go outside I. Don't like getting pushed around. By nobody and so. Then I wanted to mention. There's a theoretical engine. There's there's a few theoretical engines. Yeah, the one that I came across was A. Electromagnetic gravity drive by Yokneam houser just a guest because I don't know how to pronounce that name. I do not either. That sounds great to maple. He's a physicist and a professor computer science at the University of Applied Sciences in assault, gator, and and then he worked with vaulter. Drescher, who is an Australian Patent Officer. And they came up with an idea that would use them electromagnetic essentially A. Ring of superconducting coil, and then they would pump a lot of electricity through the coil which would then create a magnetic field because we know about the re the relationship between coils..

US NASA Nassar Yokneam houser Drescher Vogel Falcon University of Applied Sciences Australian Patent Officer assault Strickland physicist professor
"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on TechStuff

"Go! These other drives would be very useful once you do. Get up into space where you don't have to have considerations of escaping the planet's gravity or battling its atmosphere in order to maneuver right, because the think about about these chemical drives is that they are extremely wasteful in a grand universal kind of game that you have to carry a lot of fuel, they pack a lot of power, but you have to carry an awful lot of. It's not terribly efficient. So. They wouldn't last very long in the grand scheme of things. If you're talking about trying to travel vast different distances, not differences, but distances then the chemical rockets end up, being really heavy and that limits how much you can carry, which in turn limits how far you can go without just coasting like for example, the the voyager satellites. Which Hey, just left the solar system. Actually they didn't. Come back. Slept something on Pluto. That was that was a little bit of a missing misquote in the press Oh nice yeah. I'm glad you caught up on that because I obviously did not. Failed to tweet about it, so that. Hey, no, it's okay. You cut it on the podcasts so now our listeners can say Vogel Bom she keeps Strickland on task so one the was we talked about ion engines right now I on engines are using ions is the charged particles You know think of an atom? That's either. Either has an excess of electrons or a deficit in electronic so either way either got a negative or positive charge plasma is. Gas. So it's a gas that has these free ions moving through. It means that you can actually pass electric current through the gas itself right? That's what a plasma is impossible of. Course is the most plentiful of the the states of matter in the universe as far as we are aware and and so the ion US electric fields rather than chemical reactions to create propulsion, and they're not as powerful as chemical engines, so they don't give you that the chemical engines do. They are way more efficient, and so they can last ages and these solar energy to provide that. Yeah, they they get the solar energy to provide electricity to help. Create these reactions that will creepy ions that that propel it, so they have. These big solar panels that will unfold from the spacecraft. We've already launched some spacecraft using ion engines, The dawn spacecraft, which launched on September twenty, seven, th two thousand seven, has ion engines and uses these solar panels to get the electricity its destination ahead to actually but the second destination the destination is a dwarf planet series, and it's scheduled to arrive there in February two thousand fifteen so visiting the. The NASA pages about this space craft. I saw some interesting figures. One was that it is a six point, three billion kilometer journey, and just to that you get an idea of how far that is compared to a light year layers nine point four trillion kilometers six point three billion kilometers still nowhere near a light year, so it assuming that it arrives on the I if I, I worry in two thousand fifteen, which. I just took an arbitrary. It will have flown for seven years five months and two days to go those six point three billion kilometers so I did some did some silly little math, which said. Six million six point, three billion kilometers, being six three trillion meters, and then you have to figure out how many seconds are seven years five months in two days, so I did two, hundred, thirty, six, million, eight, hundred, seventy, two thousand eight hundred seconds, so if you do the math, and that means that the average speed, and this is you know just average because it does. Change is twenty, six, thousand, five, hundred ninety seven meters per second based on the information that I was able to find so as shabby, not shabby, the still nowhere near the. Falcon but I also use about uses the dawn's engine used four hundred fifty kilograms of Cenon fuel. On being neutrally charged. US that the solar ray to ionized. Nuts. And the Solar Ray at one astronomical unit provided about ten point. Three kilowatts of power an astronomical unit by the way is one, hundred, forty, nine, million, five, hundred, ninety, nine, thousand, eight, hundred seventy one kilometers, and you might say well. What the heck kind of measurement is that well? That's the mean distance between the earth and the sun. because. The distance actually changes throughout the earth's rotation around the Sun. It's not always exactly that far away. That's the mean. So. That's what we decided to define as an astronomical unit, and I'm sure any aliens will be happy to take us up on discussion of why that's very human centric. Yeah, Yeah I. Just an astronomical unit is exactly this is your star and your planet really enlightened guys. They'll really take onto. Yup, nope right up there. I, I was having this discussion with my buddy eight percents ago. Like Oh, come on. Like. Hey, I i. know how this goes. Because I watched your star wars documentary, so I'd the maximum Russ Don I on engine expands about point two five kilograms of xenon per day, and that produces a thrust of ninety two millions, which Nassar explains is about the amount of force. You feel when you put a piece of paper on your open hand. That's the amount of force. So incredibly unimpressive when you right but. in the in the environment of space. Plenty enough, and so it says that the the thrust changes the spacecraft's velocity about Oh ten to the negative five meters per second every second, and after about a thousand days it would achieve a velocity of thousand meters per second, so because there's dragon stays exactly yeah. So anyway, yeah, about thousand meters. The second one thousand days so that that that speed I gave you the twenty six, thousand, five hundred ninety seven meters per second obviously again. That's a that's just averaging it out over the full distance. In fact, it's constantly accelerating not always at that particular speed, but it will be or that particular rate. I shouldn't say it's accelerating at that speed, totally misleading, but at that rate so yeah, that's that's one of the ones that we're looking at now. There's also other forms of propulsion have been propose like solar sails. Again not something that's going to get you from Earth's solar system to distant solar system anytime quickly, it's more of a very efficient means of travel by harnessing photons at the photons hit the solar sail, and that's what provides the propulsion to move the craft forward. which sounds kind of incredible? You think about that. You know hell much kinetic energy can a photon have and may surprise some of you to know that photons have kinetic energy, but the true the earth actually. When the sun is hitting you, you weigh a little more because the light is actually machine. Yeah, yeah, yeah, that's why I never go outside I. Don't like getting pushed around. By nobody and so. Then I wanted to mention. There's a theoretical engine. There's there's a few theoretical engines. Yeah, the one that I came across was A. Electromagnetic gravity drive by Yokneam houser just a guest because I don't know how to pronounce that name. I do not either. That sounds great to maple. He's a physicist and a professor computer science at the University of Applied Sciences in assault, gator, and and then he worked with vaulter. Drescher, who is an Australian Patent Officer. And they came up with an idea that would use them electromagnetic essentially A. Ring of superconducting coil, and then they would pump a lot of electricity through the coil which would then create a magnetic field because we know about the re the relationship between coils..

US NASA Nassar Yokneam houser Drescher Vogel Falcon University of Applied Sciences Australian Patent Officer assault Strickland physicist professor
"professor computer science" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"I'm a visiting Professor Computer Science at the Open University in the UK visiting professor of practice at the Library Science Faculties the University of North Carolina. An MIT media lab affiliate. And I'm a dad and I write fiction novels. Boy Do you ever. Yeah Okay so you and I were chatting a little bit early and we have a similarity in that. We both grew up listening to. Cbc HIS DAD would turn on the radio in every room of the house in the morning. My kids they have my radio on my phone every morning. My phone's just going with me. Everywhere with CBC blasting so. I wanted to know what your reaction was. And you found out that you're going to be part of candidates twenty twenty. I mean this Canadian as possible in the circumstances joke but you know there is no one quite so. Canadian is a Canadian outside of Canada. You know and and one of the Great Canadian national sports anxiety about whether you're Canadian enough and so it did feel unbelievably validating to have the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation pick my book for Canada reads. I was like I am actually still Canadian. Felt very very good. Well we're very glad that your book chosen. Let's get to it. Sure and as we mentioned there are four novellas and we're going to start with unauthorized bread. It was loosely based on something. That actually happened here in British. Clumpy a bit about well. It does have its origins in something. That British Columbia pays a pretty important start. Pardon way back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight bill. Clinton signed a law called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. It was probably the worst technology law the decade. And that's really saying so. There's a terrible decade for technology laws and section twelve. One of the DMC makes it a felony to bypass copyright lock even if you don't violate copyright so originally that was to like stop you from D regionalizing your DVD player which is dumb because buying a DVD abroad and watching it at home. It's the literal opposite of a copyright violation. But what happened? Was that a software metastasized into more and more embedded systems and two devices suddenly manufacturers woke up and realized hey if we put a copyright lock in the device and design it so that using it in a way that displeases our shareholders requires you to remove the copyright lock then displeasing our shareholders will become a felony felony contempt to business model so fast forward to twenty eleven when a local. Mp James More from Coquitlam was with Tony Clement. Ushering Canada's version of this which repeated all of the sins of the American version and in possibly made it worse and to make incredibly stupid mistakes about technology in one thousand. Nine hundred is just barely possibly justifiable in as much as we had lots of weird ideas about technology and nine hundred ninety eight but to do it in two thousand eleven is really just felony stupid and I picked a fight with James more on twitter and I said look if I buy an IPAD. Why shouldn't I be able to decide which software using it? I'm an adult it's mine. It's my property and he said if you don't want Steve Jobs to tell you which software to run on your IPAD. You just shouldn't buy an IPAD and like don't Tories believe in private property anyway. I kicked his ass. He made it. He made his twitter account private but he did pass the bill. So this is a gift to Canada. This unbelievably terrible law. That is still on our books today. Thank you very much on behalf of the rest of Canada so it was the genesis of an so unauthorized. Bread is a story about people who live in Thank you for getting me back on the subject. It's a story about people who live in refugee housing. Housing is designed to pick their pockets. The washing machine will only wash your laundry if you use closed from a special store that charges a little extra and the dishwasher only washes authorized dishes and of course the toaster only toes authorized bread and this may sound ridiculous but if you think about it the idea that company in Cupertino guests to tell you which software you put on your distraction rectangle is no weirder than the idea that you know kitchenaid. We'll get to tell you who's who's carbs you could put in your toaster and As they begin to jailbreak these devices led by a young Libyan refugee named Salima. They conceive of a new relationship to each other to the technology in their lives and to the world and they gradually become a force to be reckoned with become part of a global movement. That's seizing the means of computation. Kind of technological resistance that starts with something as mundane deciding. How how you use your toaster but moves all the way up to technological self determination and he told me a little bit about the bad technology adoption curve. Yeah I use a word that we shouldn't use on the radio for that instead of bad but we'll call it the bad technology adoption curve for tonight so if you have a terrible idea about technology you can't make rich privilege. People use it at first because they complain people listen to them so you have to find people who when they complain. No one listens to them. And so every terrible idea with technology we I inflict on Refugees Prisoners Kids. Blue Collar workers people mental institutions people on benefits welfare. And we use those people first of all to knock the edges off of it and kind of figure out which parts make people really angry and kind of San them down a little but also to normalize it but then we work that technology up the privileged gradient until eventually like rich people are using it. So you know twenty years ago if you were eating dinner and there was a little video camera watching 'em recording it because you're in a supermax prison today. It's because you were unwise enough to buy an apple Google home product and you can really see how that works prisoner ankle cuffs. And now we've got mobile phones that track our locations. It's really a a universal pattern and I'm very skeptical of the idea that science fiction writers can predict the future. But I do think that if you want to get a glimpse of the DYSTOPIA and technological future that awaits you unless you do something you can just look at what we're doing to kids in prisoners and people on Welfare and that's where you will be in twenty years if you don't intervene the other powerful lesson of course. Is that what you do to the least among us? You do to me to that. That the thing that is being inflicted on people who have a lot less power than you is really just being done to you over a time lapse and that you have solidarity with those people or you sync with them. We'll talk onto a move onto model minority church second-story Superhero Story and I love me a good superhero story. But this one's definitely different. He he punches racism. Yeah so it's a story about a thinly veiled Superman allegory. The American Eagle who intervenes in a fictionalized version. The what what was not in the story but in real life the fatal beating of Eric Garner by the New York Police Department in Staten Island. And he kind of gets to this beating. It's not the first time he's been. He's been in conflict with the police or been witness to human rights abuse but he decides enough is enough he is after all a Superhero. And he's going to stop it and he very quickly learns that his acceptance into Whiteness and maleness and then ultimately the human race where all provisional on him being on the side of white supremacy. And that as soon as he defected from the consensus all of those things where offer grabs. All of those things could be could be taken away. He also learns that his old pal. Bruce Wayne is the military contractor provided the the predictive policing tools. That sent the cops there and he discovers that in fact. He can't save anyone that people save themselves that the project of fighting white supremacy of fighting racism fighting fascism is not a project of as Superman was kind of Gholam who interposes himself between bad people in the world. It is a collective act collective action project. Superman was was created by a couple of Jewish kids one from Toronto Joe Shuster. My parents used to live on Schuster way. Who watched the unfolding horror of Nazism across the Atlantic and thought? If only there was a superman if only we could send someone to punch Nazis. And that's not how we defeated the Nazis right. There were individuals who engaged in extraordinary acts of bravery and self sacrifice but it was the largest collective action project in the history of the human race that ultimately overcame it. So this is another thing that the superman character has to come to gross within finally asked to come to grips with the people who he thinks he saving asking where he's been all this time right. Where were you for the last? It's not like this just happened yesterday right. I know that you had your road to Damascus moment. But where were you one hundred years ago? Where were you fifty years ago? Where were you twenty years ago? Where are you ten years ago and I think anyone who fancies himself an ally needs to be prepared to answer the question? Why weren't you ally five? Ten Twenty fifty seventy years ago and the story does address police violence as well. And I'm wondering with your time living in the the United States why you chose to address that particular kind of violence. Well you know I am through no virtue of my own largely immune to it because I'm Pale male and stale and so I have very little to worry about in that regard and and you know that of course affords me the the intellectual distance to look at other people who definitely are on much greater risk of it than I am. You Know I. I grew up in the protests moving in Ontario and I had seen cops do pretty violent things to people who are engaged in nonviolent protests but duck the scale and impunity of police violence Against racialist people especially realize people who are protesting that kind of double whammy Is so much greater than anything that I ever experienced. And in a way. You know the the Ferguson moment was the moment where it it became undeniable in the same way that in the US there had been a lot of people who sort of kitted themselves about the police reaction to the protest movement until nineteen sixty eight until the Chicago Democratic convention. Which I think we're about to have a rerun of Milwaukee when cops started hitting reporters reporters for the first time started putting up footage of what the cost of doing to everyone else and suddenly the whole nation out to confront it in this weird element in which in my of my origin story. That depends on this. Because Judith Merril who was a great feminist critic and writer an anthology I was in Chicago at the time and she left and moved to Toronto. Took the kids divorced. Frederik Pohl. Her husband was also science. Fiction writer took their books to Toronto and went into voluntary exile and then donated her books to the Toronto Public Library System. They became the nucleus of. What's now the largest science fiction collection in a public library in the world and she became the writer in residence. And when I was a kid I used to go and show where my manuscripts and that's how I became a writer. She put me in a workshop with Carl Schrader and Peter Watson a bunch of other writers. And that's how we all met each other. She was a force of nature. So yeah I mean the police violence and and the Chicago events have never been far from my mind. Well Okay we're GONNA move onto radicalized. The namesake story of the book and IT TAKES ON INSURANCE AND HEALTHCARE. And it's a story that would hit home for a lot of people it's about a man he gets on into the dark web. His wife is diagnosed with Terminal Cancer. And there is a possible cure and the insurance company says no way. Yeah yeah so it's about message. Boards where angry men whose loved ones have been sentenced to slow? Painful deaths by insurance companies. Who REFUSE THEIR TREATMENT? Nominally provide each other with support but actually etched into becoming suicide bombers who kill healthcare executives and It it was inspired in part by another Canadian story. The woman who coined the term in-cell Was a Canadian woman who started a message board for people who were situated Kerr who were lonely and who felt great shame about the fact that they had never been in a physical relationship with someone and she realized over time that everyone who got better. Everyone figured it out left. It's unlike say a message board for people who've successfully treated their alcoholism and who are on a message board and they stick around and when someone falls off the wagon they said..

Canada Canadian Broadcasting Corporat writer us twitter Toronto Chicago MIT Superman Professor Computer Science Open University UK James Cupertino Steve Jobs visiting professor Google
"professor computer science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Do you think that's true? Well, I think there's very strong connections because the mindset is often the same. It's what we call the maximalist mindset, which is if there's any value. This thing might bring me be it, you know, an old birdhouse in my garage or an app that occasionally is useful. I better have that in my life because I don't want to lose that value. And that's the mindset that leads to overstuffed houses as well as overstuffed phones. How can we learn from social media professionals about minimizing social media use? Well, they don't use it on their phone. This is this is the most the starkest difference. I can see between the people who make a living using social media and the way that social media investors. Make a fortune off of everyone else is that social media on the phone is entirely about consumer facing compulsive use. They've engineered these apps to make you wanna look at them all the time people who use social media, professionally let's say on behalf of major brands or on behalf of their company. It's on their desktop. They often have pretty complicated tools that they used it mediates their experience. They have schedules of when they post and how they post they have advanced methods for doing searches to keep their hands on what's important, and what's not. But it's also just very intentional. And so if you're using let's say a professional justification for why you're looking at your social media feed one hundred times a day. There's probably a little bit of a story that you're telling yourself. My guess is Georgetown, professor of computer science Cal Newport. The name of his book is digital minimalism. What about for people? I know a lot of people I know are in the news and the media business, and basically they have to be connected on their phones. There is some sense of they need to be checking Twitter or various news websites are looking at their alerts. Some of them off and feel like they have to respond emails twenty four hours a day. What advice would you give to someone who professionally needs to be tied to these things, but doesn't want it to feel so out of control? Well, journalists have it really bad. This is something I've learned during this book tour is they're not happy with how much they have to for example, be on Twitter or the degree to which their Twitter followers might actually be quantified into their contracts. So it is a problem. I think for example, the idea that let's say journalists needs to be following breaking news on Twitter themselves is a gross misallocation of cognitive. Resources. I think every newsroom in this country. Like one of the first things you do if you're an internet of newsroom is you're in charge of monitoring Twitter. So that the journalists can then be told, hey, by the way, something is breaking you need to know. But they don't have to fragment their intention the entire day just in case that comes along. And so I think we're going to see more of that in the workplace not that we're not going to use these tools, but the idea that everyone has to be on these tools all the time is just not an efficient allocation of these cognitive resources, we can produce more value. If we concentrate and systematize how we get information off these platforms and delivered to the people who need it, my guess has been Georgetown, professor, computer, science cow, Newport, he is the author of digital minimalism choosing a focus life in a noisy world. Professor newport. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. Coming up after the break a visit with Andy Lancet WNYC's chief archivist, he's bringing some very interesting.

Twitter Georgetown Newport professor of computer science Cal Newport professor Andy Lancet chief archivist twenty four hours
"professor computer science" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"Part of it was fear of looking stupid, which I don't care about. The other part is legit fear for their lives. Actually. They were dealing with a lot of things strength. Another friend, Kia American documentary film maker. I wanna do a documentary on this. I want to do documenting your sister and he calls Jackson, I can't do it too scared. He was too scared. And then another guy who was brilliant. He was like, I talked to my wife about this and how dare you ask me to do this. Right? And I again, I felt totally loan, and I go to Twitter and I forgot about the magic of Twitter. When Twitter does workout and people across America. Complete strangers took it upon themselves to because of my sisters memo dig into these numbers themselves. Play American started crowd sourcing and criminal Dion groups, and and I and I was calling the computer scientists who had warned us about this during the election. And one of them sent me his grad student who was talk, you know? And so I was like bundling the research that was coming up at Twitter to the computer scientists who were like begging, Hillary campaign. The Clinton campaign is step board and call recounts the states and and to everybody that I called electric election. Data scientists had just talked to Marc Elias, the lawyer for the Democrats and Obama and Hillary or John Podesta. So the Clinton campaign was looking into this and we were like making so much noise on Twitter. 'cause we needed Hillary Clinton forward and call a recap because he's numbers were so widely as legitimate reason to ask you. All your questions. It's not normal election. So we were causing on the phone like, who did you talk to you? What did you hear? My sister, God bless her calm throughout all of this. All of this in the Intel that she was collecting from all types of experts who are also everybody was calling everybody like I was talking like so many Republican operatives. Very, yeah, that was the other day. Lay both talking to all these Republic. That child, because if you can find someone who understood Russian history understood the that, that this really could get this bad at saying, he'll be checked the people who I trust the most or the ones that realize this was extremely abnormal that the normal kind of limitations and regulations were not going to hold that Trump would get in. He would rewrite the laws that would only be about enhancing them that he wouldn't care here. Those are the people I trusted in, didn't matter what kind of party. The originally from there. Often people I disagreed with on every other facet for years. Computer scientists have been telling us, we have to do something about election security. Our election systems are vulnerable to hackers. Here's Alex Haldeman, professor computer science and the university of Michigan. Just days before the election. In an interview with voice of America, we were able to develop a voting machine virus that would silently spread from machine to machine going from a single point of infection to compromise an entire county. Maybe even an entire state. Alex Haldeman is. Computer science professor at the university of Michigan. He's been studying electric voting machines for more than a decade. When I started working in election systems, the concern was somewhat academic. Someone could hack in tamper with votes. But over the last ten years, the rise of nation, state attackers has really upped the ante and attackers don't have to steal votes to taint an election. He adds in two thousand fourteen in Ukraine, attackers linked to Russia hacked into the central election counting system and tried to make it. So they'd report the wrong results in order to discredit the election, that's a realistic threat here to or hackers could tamper with voter, rolls, preventing registered voters from casting ballots. I just hope the election isn't close, but all's in Ohio. And some other battleground states are close as election day nears nearly three weeks now after election day and the recount set to begin Wisconsin and perhaps two more battleground states, Michigan and Pennsylvania. A little more than one hundred thousand votes in those three states deciding this election ABC's David. Wright is in Madison with president-elect outraged over the recount and the Clinton team very careful to point out. They are not leading this charge. We were really trying to stop him from taking office because we saw were we were all headed, obviously..

Hillary Clinton Twitter Alex Haldeman Trump university of Michigan America John Podesta professor Jackson Marc Elias Intel Ohio Dion Michigan Obama David Wisconsin president-elect
"professor computer science" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Great to see the the nuts. And? Bolts behind this presentation right what would be a smooth? As we, can take us. Take our. You've got props. Oh yes l. Israel. Visuals This A. Day I've got these ten round coins and the trae as you see the, trade the coins with one and the trae is of length five and with two and I can lay the, ten the ten coins on the tray in two rows of, five and they fit very snugly in the Trey is clearly no room for any. More and the same happens if I make it ten times as long as the trays fifty long by, two then I can put one hundred coins on the tray and no room for any. More the things get really interesting when it gets rather. Bigger if I have a trade that is five hundred by, two then I can put not only a thousand coins on, there but I can fit a thousand and one Which is strange and let me. Just emphasize that I'm really talking about putting non overlapping circles. In a rectangle has nothing to do with funny shaped coins or coefficient of, thermal expansion this is a geometric problem right that has that is a very very nicely roundly explained puzzle today, Martha back in London almost certainly already done it people hair, busy working away at it nice to talk to you Mike Patterson marriages professor computer. Science care the university I'll just put away my curfew of thermal expansion I've been playing with here it's, nine minutes to seven how ready are.

"professor computer science" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Acquired

"Exactly it was like a commerce software solution for selling things online and one of the i ended up hugh so i think that was the mid nineties when when he started that and his co founder was was robert robert morris and so they started up in boston and ends up getting acquired by yahu in nineteen ninety eight for about fifty million dollars and then trevor trevor blackwell had worked for them at via web and so when when yahoo acquired the company trevor moves out to silicon valley goes to work for yahoo robert wealth pg bounces around a bunch robert is actually a professor at mit professor computer science in addition to being co founder of multiple companies he stays in cambridge paul eventually comes back to cambridge he's living in cambridge and he starts he starts dating jessica and jessica is working in marketing at an investment bank in boston and she's not super happy with banking i know how that goes and the culture there and so she she starts interviewing at vc firms about coming on and being won't be particular about being the director of marketing at the vc firm and one night paul and jessica are out at dinner and they're talking about jessica's interview process and the vc firm in typical vc firm fashion is like taking forever to get back to her totally dragging their feet the process is super opaque and one thing about pd that anybody who certainly has read any of his essays or knows of his reputation he's he's kind of nothing if not opinionated as they're walking back from dinner and he goes off on visa in general and their practices and how they operate remember this is two thousand five so like the concept of quote unquote founder friendly is still years away at this point on the on the side and he says you know what screw it let's start our own vc firm and he's a he's been thinking about this for a while he's ever since he he writes about this ever since the.

co founder boston trevor trevor blackwell yahoo professor cambridge jessica paul founder hugh robert robert morris mit director of marketing fifty million dollars
"professor computer science" Discussed on From Scratch

From Scratch

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on From Scratch

"Sure so i always taught in just straight engineering classes right but you know after tenure and i had some had some flexibility i started teaching with other professors who had just my friends and we knew that the university john hennessy is really big on multidisciplinary teaching i would bring a business school professor computer science and we would teach and their students would come with them i start to see the students is light up as we do this and so we said i went to the university and said look we should we should by this i mean i think there's a big deal and we should start teaching in the system attic way and have an institute where people were students would come from all around the university and that eventually became the diesel what's an example of big problems that you felt were were falling in between the silos of the specialized fields it's big stuff it's all you know it's like you know healthcare and transportation sustainability k twelve i mean that's the stuff that we started working on those are the laboratories at eventually ended up at the school once you decided you wanted to institutionalize this can you explain how you got the funding for it one day i was in the office of hasso plattner who's one of the founders of sap big german software company and i idea was doing a project for him in we were we were kind of done with the business meeting we were talking about things that we enjoy doing you know and he was talking about sailing and form the one racing and stuff he was involved i was really interested and he said you know what are you interested in i said well i'm really interested in this multidisciplinary teaching thing that i've been dreaming of and make a long story short he said we'll help you with that so i'm back to stanford or when i got back to stanford i was telling the story and the people at stanford you know in a billionaire says he's willing to help should probably call him right back so he he wanted whole thing he put up thirty five million dollars three million i mean he said to me the other day he put his arm around me and said this is one of the most important things i've done in my life and needless to say it's one of the most important.

john hennessy sap professor stanford thirty five million dollars one day
"professor computer science" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"The products ficci male exactly it's become so normalized that we don't even consider that this is potentially very dangerous and if at some point in the future a very powerful government comes in that wants to abuse the fact that they have all of the data on us we will have nothing to do about it my name is cory dr oh i'm a science fiction novelist a visiting professor computer science at the open university in one of the founders of the uk pressure group the open rights group i'm also a special consultant for the american grip the electronic frontier foundation and i'm one of the owners and editors at the website blamed going this idea that some demagogue will come to power if you want a choice of the future imagine a boot stumping on a human face forever and then force us all to put surveillance technology into our sitting rooms you know the telescreen that never switches off and that uh through that there will be a conduit for complete control whereas in huxley's can you imagine that the sweet lure of entertainment rich beem enjoy your will get us to consume propaganda that makes us all happy and content with this state as it's running things being enjoy yourself what's happening here is it ruper semi more on epsilon that are going on in nature nausea reinforcement field trip to i can see them i meant which taking so long you want me the jackboot if you have enough persuasive technology at your fingertips ladies and gentlemen the distinguished author a star aldous huxley brave new world is a fantastic parable about the dehumanization of human beings into negative utopia described in my story man has been subordinated to his own inventions and it turns out that you don't need to choose right you can have entertainment technology and entertainment law that brings these screens into our house and then you can have the full power of the state brought to bear to make sure that you never reconfigure that technology to serve you instead of serving the manufacturer or the state that is allied with the manufacturer the price of liberty and even of common humanity he's eternal vigilence are you happy are are happy new or.

cory dr special consultant aldous huxley visiting professor uk nausea
"professor computer science" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Data is powerful that shines a light can improve hold accountable make more efficient and lead to innovation yes the hazards and the human capability for evil and stupidity are there but overall history does suggest that information sharing promotes scientific advancement better pricing and knowledge of what to build next you name it yeah this is potentially informationsharing at a velocity no one's ever seen before and i think i think i thinking way as that will make for all sorts of better equities better markets as you say more efficiency and and it helps discount if tackle things like corruption i mean fundamentally the data on you know eight all extractive industries they just give you an idea about what the inputoutput function looks like eating should you worry and have also seen the rise of open data languages and technologies and organisations that work in an open framework including one my employer google purchased recently k goal which still runs independent data analysis contests have those been very impactful and you think that's something that will continue to develop yeah i think they are i mean i i think they they also have this very strong appeal to across the spectrum so to say several society as well as the public sector as well as i would say potentially the private sector if you want to think of one open data example that has been transformational think of the human genome that was a time when there was serious when it walls of four ip licensing the actual structure the information a brave act of politics and of struck that down it took some money out of the valuation of companies that they were going to bet on having those things lockdown for their own exploitation the value that has been added by that being an openlyavailable information for the world the human gene no basic endowment has been transformation you're listening to world affairs the weekly broadcast of the world affairs council i'm jane wales c e l we're hearing from sir nigel shed bulte's professor computer science at oxford university this event was recorded in san francisco before world affairs audience and now back.

google human genome bulte computer science oxford university san francisco professor
"professor computer science" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

Ear Biscuits

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on Ear Biscuits

"It's a heartfelt moment just like the intro thatremm link may be dead people grow in the shona could albany again suit um welli've always said to you time and time again your greatest skill as just talking to people and this is a podcast yepwell first of all thank you very nice if taught some people into some really odd thing your horrible of well a horrible but some wildthingzia and you're always lake sure all call that snake charmer him the ask him if he does lizard zero you never know until you have um so i attritional airbus gets we go way back your umii have a list of things that i know about you facts that i know one of the facts that i think everyone knows is that you're from michigan you went to michigan near you love michiganyou wear michigan hat all the time i you have parents in michigan give you have a brother who was from michigan stole area tummy tell me about your family life tell me about a alex in michigan uhmichigan was a great place to grow up um my whole family slow michigan my sister lives in michigan as well she's a nurse a brother who is a doctor we're talking about city like urban michiganwe're talking about cornfield markfields cornfields everywhere or cornfield in front of my house a cornfield behind my hiding srs right i'd serious cornfield to the right of my house a cornfield tool of mouse swear other round invite australia picture unlike googlemaps after this view zoom in it's just cornfields in the my house did you have anything deal with current you'll know so here's what happened my dad is a professor computer science and engineering.

airbus michigan googlemaps computer science albany australia professor
"professor computer science" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on KPCC

"Going out take hold the benefits of dna they can fuck necessity small the called and told the pressure of sequence in synthesizing and taking care rather than us actually caring dna we know around the city country how we got to make this cheaper i make a practical teams yeah i mean i think that's probably the million dollar question right right now where on order a million both to planted on the offensive side and we have seen dropped that hurt very large invite algae in and their ways to think about getting to such drops but you know if that's a long way from here to there getting to know about a million four dropping well gets a weird one is your vision for their future look like believe that it's going to be a long road ahead a agree vick's three ideally i would like to see a dna flash memory because i think that is the dna on a lot of a flash memory because that would be the first thing we we could hope for and the technology is very close to allowing us to do something like that except for the cost and i think agree victory again that you need to drive the cost of synthesis and the delay off sequence in dom in order to make this plausible going to get one quick call i went from being in manhattan i a mean talk you know wondering can you need to worry about i couldn't be an eight game hack and and and what the if that fo correcting that can it we think that like like like the canyon hakon so you can go to the hockey it's not the living organisms it's like thinking about your coffee in the morning that you're doing to me look and there was did they off collins some all beast in a sticking over the over you this is just the more the cool that to you cannot pretty the hockey total to living organisms so yeah i don't think there's any risk over here okay that's about this is for quite fast and he wants to revisit this in the barrel because assistant professor computer science in competition on biology at columbia university and new york all gates him a like a bitches professor of electric on computer engineering at the university of illinois at their bennett champaign and shriek _o_c were kosar reid is assistant professor.

vick flash memory manhattan hockey collins computer science columbia university kosar reid assistant professor professor university of illinois million dollar
"professor computer science" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Get so what what is your vision for their future look like believe that it's going to be a long road ahead i agree that serie ideally i would like to see a dna flash memory because i think that is so the in a and all of a flash memory because that would be the first thing we we could hope for in the acknowledged is very close to allowing us to do something like that except for the costa nicely agree victory again the you need to drive the cost of synthesis and the bill layoffs sequence single or to make this plausible going to get when quick calling from a me in manhattan high aiming talk i would wondering can you need to worry about i couldn't be an eight game pack and and what the it felt correcting mechanism that that that that's why quick and you hakon so you can go to the hockey it's not the living organisms it's like thinking about your call from the morning that you're doing to me look and there was did they off collins some all beast in a sticking over the over you this is just him all the cool but you can not believe the hockey total to living organisms so yeah i don't think there's any reese go for here okay that's about it quite fast enough to revisit this in the barrel because assistant professor computer science in confrontational by allen team at columbia university and new york all gets a melancon bitches professor of electric on computer engineering at the university of illinois at their bennett champagne and streak _o_c were kosar reid is assistant professor via oh chemistry had to use eli and the los angeles thank you all for joining us today thank you thank you for having us you're welcome a one last thing before we go to our fans in florida we are coming your way mark the calendar tuesday march twenty eighth at the bob car theater in orlando we'll talk about by yannick arms and robots that will mind the moon a whole lot of other kiki futuristic stuff join us one night only in orlando.

kosar reid los angeles university of illinois allen yannick arms orlando bob car theater florida eli assistant professor flash memory professor melancon new york columbia university computer science reese collins hockey
"professor computer science" Discussed on KSCO 1080

KSCO 1080

02:55 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on KSCO 1080

"Great interesting these this week from carnegie now when where at carnegie millman art official intelligence beat our top poker pros which was a first another milestone in artificial intelligence another game that the guys do better than humans yeah no now the humans again have all these free time you don't get good games again yeah that's something that humans again is playing games or not is can is the robots will elite ai yeah or perhaps the robots will teaches to be even better poker but like libres is the couple in practice and scenario i developed by the kind of you know when university's defeated four of the world's best professional poker players in a marathon a hundred and twenty thousand hands of his up no linda texas holding poker played over twenty days yeah and so now a lead brightest joins the blue which is so great interest watch in and alpha go is major milestones ai the game twenty i think it's amazing that like dryness apparently wind more than one point seven million dollars in ships and he should have been for contests yeah yeah yeah was held of the rivers casino in pittsburgh from january eleventh a thirtieth they had a competition call brains versus artificial intelligence up in the anti they're the professor computer science and no brown james work for us this year in for a the new capital and then we all however and playing relies make many for us that we can do it everyone yeah i mean after off i mean these things are these machines are just going to keep getting smarter and this is opponent on a line of actually gentry which is like let's face it folks it's fitting in one direction where they're hitting better the machines yeah so once again we have to figure out how we're back to what we can do that to make things even more interested so.

carnegie artificial intelligence pittsburgh computer science carnegie millman official linda texas professor seven million dollars twenty thousand hands twenty days
"professor computer science" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"professor computer science" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"Cal from time to time on the show we like to get people homework i know that you've written about deep or how to do focused deep work is there attempt that you could get people if they want to twenty pit super distract ability of life today and and do some deeper work no one's adjusted i had about books that a lot of my readers thought was useful was a do an experiment where you stop away from social media for thirty days but the case you don't tell anyone in your life to your stepping away from soest me he just stop using it and then after thirty days you ask yourself was my life much worse because i didn't have a that claim portend that anyone notice for care that i wasn't there cause i i think a lot of what she says attracted to social media is that in in in accept this this is the strain of that and he we have a vs audience that really cares what we have to say and they want to hear our thoughts about things but the reality is a lot of is just people trading likes back and force of that everyone sort of feels gone so if you do the started experiment it can provide a lotta clarity that you know what but people but it really care what i'm saying on here at actually my life was quite a bit better dustin it all this time on here so i don't think i'm going to go back on again so great acquaint takes thirty days when step back and say the my better offer my worst cow thanks so much for your perspective on this well thank you know enjoyed it county port is an associate professor computer science at georgetown university so cal wants you to stop it with a social media already the what about a more radical approach to and plucking from today's busy connected world for that let's go to the mountains of china with greater access to the global economy many young adults in china have access to technology material goods and a wide range of lifestyles like never before so why are some chinese millennial sort leading all that behind to take up the her mets life in the mountains.

Cal social media dustin computer science georgetown university china global economy associate professor mets thirty days