19 Burst results for "Professor Joa"

"professor joan" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:12 min | 3 weeks ago

"professor joan" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"And professor of gender and sexuality studies at usc during saif and the co host of the waiting to exhale podcast. Welcome to the show karen. It's my pleasure to be here. Yes i'm excited to have a real in the flash chair to talk about the chair. It's going to be very fun. I mean you know the funny thing about it. Is that the setup of the show of santa rosa character. Gene kim is the first woman of color chair of the english department in one hundred. Seventy nine years at the fictional pembroke university and i was the first woman of color to be promoted to the rank of full professor in my english department in one hundred and forty years. So yeah you are perfect for this. This is great so when does show begins at jian. Kim played by sandra as karen. Just said has just become the first woman to chair. The english department at pembroke university. Which is a fictional university. And june is determined to usher in this new era. But she's almost immediately saddled with a bunch of unexpected challenges for one. The dean played by david. Morris informs her that because of low enrollment she has to convince three of the older tenured professors whose performance reviews have dwindled in recent years to go into retirement. She also wants to make yeahs mckay a younger more progressive. Black professor played by nana mensah it distinguished lecturer but she faces resistance from the dean and on top of all that her sometime love interest. Professor bill dobson played by jay. Do blasts becomes the center of a campus culture war after making a controversial statement during one of his classes which results in student protests so rounding of up the cast are bob alabam as professor elliott. Rents and helen taylor as professor joan handling both veteran. Educators who must reckon with being considered out of touch by their students and every cargo. Nila plays juju jeans young adopted daughter with whom she struggles to connect. Amanda p in any julia wyman created a chair while posters as an executive producer..

Gene kim fictional pembroke university karen pembroke university saif usc santa rosa nana mensah Professor bill dobson sandra Kim Morris mckay bob alabam helen taylor david jay elliott joan Nila
"professor joan" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | 1 year ago

"professor joan" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. . Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. . The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. . Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, , and by the end of the month, , the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, , but Michigan came through the curve bent. . Now, , the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, , there was the outbreak last month that. . Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. . The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, , and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. . No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. . Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, , educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, , every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, , , in East Lansing, they're , exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, , and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. . The kit costs around three dollars a piece, , and as you can see, , it's pretty simple. . You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, , which maybe you've heard about recently, , the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. . Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, , you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. . Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. . They're going to step further than that. . Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. . Two teams. . You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, , or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. . The point is if two pools come back with positive results, , it can only mean one thing. . The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, , and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. . It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. . That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. . Now, the , third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. . Communities, , Wastewater Michigan State, , professor, , Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. . Since April she says, , they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. . For the testing this fall, , the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their , work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, , even at the level of individual buildings. . So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. . Diagnostic testing. . But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, , it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. . If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. . Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? ? Lipton. . Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. . Thank you for being with us. . We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it <hes> it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. . What would you think about <hes> full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that <hes> is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. . Bright. . But we're not a multinational corporation. . So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. . <hes>. . have. . More. . More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So . in this case, , if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing <hes>, , if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, , then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, , and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, , we save a lot of time. . So if you can save time and you can save supplies, , you're going to <hes>. . Yeah. . Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. . This works 'cause you're not expecting <hes> a large proportion of people to have this thing right. . So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, , we'll come out negative. . Right. . <hes> pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. . Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. . The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. . Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. . If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, , most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. . So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. . So <hes> the this actually could have broader implications <hes>. . There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, , but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. . If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. . Test an additional five, , hundred thousand to one million samples a day. . Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results <hes> in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You . can see things early and intervene. . Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. . The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each . one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done <hes>, , if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, , we can be. . Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. . Wow. . That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, , Hey, , what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, , a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea <hes> resources all over the country <hes> run by different people but the the government of the United States <hes> providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. . If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. . If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. . We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new <hes> new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which , is what our laboratory did during during April <hes> we can marshal all of these resources all. . Know How that exists in order to <hes> to. . Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. . Lifting. . There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, , but I have to tell you after this conversation. . I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is <hes> finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. . Dr. . Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I . don't even know what that is. We'll . talk about that another time at Michigan State University. . Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. . State, , we'll stay on top of this with you. .

Michigan Michigan State University Florida ABC News Wastewater Michigan State Professor Lipton Arizona professor Governor Gretchen whitmer New York New Jersey DHS Department of Homeland Securit Harper East Lansing MSU Miami Dolphin Mississippi Seattle Minnesota California
Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:27 min | 1 year ago

Michigan tries new approaches to coronavirus testing

"Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, and by the end of the month, the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, but Michigan came through the curve bent. Now, the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, there was the outbreak last month that. Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, in East Lansing, they're exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. The kit costs around three dollars a piece, and as you can see, it's pretty simple. You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, which maybe you've heard about recently, the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. They're going to step further than that. Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. Two teams. You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. The point is if two pools come back with positive results, it can only mean one thing. The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. Now, the third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. Communities, Wastewater Michigan State, professor, Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. Since April she says, they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. For the testing this fall, the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, even at the level of individual buildings. So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. Diagnostic testing. But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. If it works the plan could help Michigan State and it's sixty seven thousand students stay on campus and have something like a semester. Joining us now is the aforementioned Dr Jack? Lipton. Of Translational Neuroscience at Michigan State University Dr Lipton. Thank you for being with us. We've heard about pool testing I want you to tell us a little more about it and why it it specifically helpful in this instance what what about Michigan State makes it a perfect candidate for the pooling of spit. What would you think about full testing end and Michigan state one of the things that you're that is really important to understand that the resources that we have is that university are fairly limited. Bright. But we're not a multinational corporation. So funds are limited resources are limited and pooling allows us to. have. More. More test being done with the same amount of resources or with less resources. So in this case, if we're dealing with supply chain issues with testing if we can test ten people with reagents that we would need to test one person, then we are were saving a lot in terms of of supplies, and if we don't have to run ten tests and we can run one test, we save a lot of time. So if you can save time and you can save supplies, you're going to Yeah. Ultimately conserve and that's really what our goal is and this. This works 'cause you're not expecting a large proportion of people to have this thing right. So generally speaking a bunch of these pools, we'll come out negative. Right. pools if you if you have about ten people in a pool in your expectation is maybe seeing two or three out of a hundred people. Show up positive than most of your pools are going to be negative. The more the prevalence increases the more the rates of infection increase. Then you're going to have more and more positive bulls. If one out of every ten people are positive than a pool of ten, most likely is going to have a positive individual in it. So you have to really balance pool size and prevalence together in order to come up with the right balance to save resources and save time. So the this actually could have broader implications There's a Wall Street Journal op-ed that you wrote about a previous test not this one that we're talking about, but it was a concept of pulling in you set across the United States tens of thousands of similar academic research labs have the expertise and equipment to help the country test for covid nineteen. If even one tenth of these labs joined the effort we could. Test an additional five, hundred thousand to one million samples a day. Your larger point here is that there are ways to get to more people and and then figure it out early rather than what we're in right now where there are some places where people are waiting in excess of seven days for typical test results in a in a concentrated environment like Michigan state you can. You can see things early and intervene. Absolutely and I think it's really important to note when you're talking about the pet that we put together. The vast amount of resources and know how that existed the academic laboratories universities across the country. Each one of the things that we've proposed was to develop biomedical National Guard and utilize all of these individual laboratories across the country and have them be organized through the federal government in order to be able to respond to pandemics or other natural disasters with biomedical know-how and that if we could get something like that done if the next administration is interested in doing something like that, we can be. Proactive instead of reactive in these kinds of situations. Wow. That's incredible because you just answer the question I was going to ask I was going to say, Hey, what can government do to take advantage of these kinds of resources and you just answer that I just want to say that again, a biomedical National Guard what a great simple idea resources all over the country run by different people but the the government of the United States providing the centralization for the data and the distribution. If you think about all of the laboratories and universities that were shut down as a result of the pandemic so many people were were sitting home like I sitting home on on zoom all day. If we have opportunity to come back into the laboratory and help. We can do so much in terms of trying to not only develop new new treatments and and working on new methods of detection, which is what our laboratory did during during April we can marshal all of these resources all. Know How that exists in order to to. Attack this problem in a concerted and coordinated way. Lifting. There's not a lot of great news about Krono virus, but I have to tell you after this conversation. I'm optimistic that there are people like you around this country who are actually in this moment while everything looks as grim as it is finding solutions that are going to help us see the other side of the coronavirus. Dr. Jack Lift Lipton is the chair and professor of translational neuro size. I don't even know what that is. We'll talk about that another time at Michigan State University. Thank you for all that you are doing and good luck to you at Michigan. State, we'll stay on top of this with you.

Michigan Michigan State University Dr. Jack Lift Lipton Wastewater Michigan State Professor Governor Gretchen Whitmer United States Harper Dr Jack MSU Biomedical National Guard East Lansing Translational Neuroscience Miami Dolphin Wall Street Journal Seattle Minnesota Joan Rose
"professor joan" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"professor joan" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"Every sixty seconds yesterday a person with corona virus died in this country, the death toll climbed by another fourteen hundred people yesterday in American dying once every minute. Was the highest single-day day death toll since May and the trend line is pointing up not down in Florida and Mississippi and Arizona today those three states each reported a record high number of new corona virus related deaths, not a record since May an all time record. This is the third day in a row that Florida has broken through. Previous death toll record. The number of coronavirus deaths in Florida is up one hundred and seventy, six percent since last week. We have, of course been following the contours of the crisis in hard hit states like Arizona Florida California Texas as infections rise hospitals are overwhelmed but hotspots are emerging all over the country. ABC News has obtained an internal document distributed by the Department of Homeland Security which maps out ninety eight corona virus hotspots across thirty different states. Twenty one of those outbreaks are just beginning to take off DHS calls them new emerging hotspots. Now. ABC News has reprinted the locations of just a handful of those corona virus hotspots. Here we do not know the location of the dozens of other government designated hotspots because that's not information our government has chosen to share with us. Instead, we've learned dribs and drabs through leaks to the press, but it is information that would be nice to have right. Wouldn't it be nice to know if you're living in one of these hot spots if you're thinking about whether to send your kid back to school in one of these hot spots. It would be nice to know that. Your town is a hot spot. But your government disagrees they have not made that information public. So parents, teachers, kids, college students, they're all flying blind this fall as they're faced with the demands of creating and adapting with life or death consequences. The search for how to open school safety takes safely takes us tonight to a university in Michigan where they are exploring away of watching their campus for outbreaks. You will not see the story anywhere else. It's coming right up stay with us. Outside of New York New Jersey and Connecticut Michigan was one of the State's first at bat against a huge outbreak of corona virus. Michigan hit its peak in April reporting a high of more than eighteen hundred new cases on April. The third new cases remained above fifteen hundred for days that month Governor Gretchen whitmer declared a state of emergency by April first she closed all schools throughout the academic year hospitals were overrun even as workers faced layoffs and paycuts thousands. Of medical workers came down with the virus as they struggled to treat patients, and by the end of the month, the state ranked third for the highest number of coronavirus fatalities in the country Michigan struggled to bend the curve, but Michigan came through the curve bent. Now, the question is whether Michigan can stay out of the red zone and the state has seen a few smaller waves since the worst of it this spring, there was the outbreak last month that. Harper's bar the popular haunt for Michigan State University which reopened to an unexpectedly large crowd on June. The eighth local reporters found young patrons lining up less than six feet apart, and then packing the dance floor like they would on an ordinary non pandemic night. No masks to see in that picture state health officials later link that bar nearly two hundred new infections and today Michigan posted one of its higher totals of statewide new cases for the past couple of. Months and that's concerning especially because everywhere in the country right now, educators are trying to figure out how to get education going again it's basically every state and in some instances, every school district or even school for themselves at Michigan, State, in East Lansing, they're exploring a combination strategy that's going to be new to them, and that might be new for anyone else and it starts with a spit test developed at the university by neuroscience professor named Jack Lipton this man. The kit costs around three dollars a piece, and as you can see, it's pretty simple. You can do this in the privacy of your own apartment or dorm room you put your sample in the vial with the Little Barcode you seal it in the bag and Wallah your part is over the lab at Michigan State will take your sample and combine it with others in what is known as pool testing, which maybe you've heard about recently, the idea behind pulled testing is that it can help labs do more way more with weight less instead of having each person take their own. Separate test you pull the samples from a small number of people about a dozen and you run a single test on that pool of the pool turns up positive only then do you need each person in the pool to take a test but if the pool turns up negative, you're done the single test covered a dozen people in a place where you expect a lot of negatives. Pool testing is remarkably efficient at Michigan state. They're going to step further than that. Each volunteer who takes a spit test goes into separate pools of about ten or so people so think about it like. Two teams. You're Miami Dolphin and a Seattle Seahawk, or you're Houston rocket and in Minnesota Timber Wolves choose your metaphor. The point is if two pools come back with positive results, it can only mean one thing. The lab just finds the person who belongs to both pools using a handy grid like this one, and then recommends that that person get a follow up diagnostic test. It's like playing Bingo be six Bingo you might have corona virus. That's what Professor Lipton plans to do with samples from MSU volunteers testing two thousand of them every day and referring any apparent positives for an individual diagnostic test. Now, the third and most unusual part of this plan has to do with sewage scientists are discovering that they can spot a rising rotavirus cases early on by texting. Communities, Wastewater Michigan State, professor, Joan Rose and her team have been testing the campus wastewater. Since April she says, they noticed a peak in the virus that lined up with the news about an outbreak at a college hang out which demonstrated that there sewage diving expeditions worked I made that up I don't know if they're actually diving. For the testing this fall, the idea is to sample the wastewater from different places on campus so that they can get hyper local data if they can get good enough at sampling and turning around their result in a timely fashion, their work could act as an early alert system for Michigan State perhaps, even at the level of individual buildings. So you've got the pool testing with the affordable spit kits you've got expanded. Diagnostic testing. But literally just for those people who appear to be positive or just playing turn-up sick and then you've got the wastewater testing which increasingly looks like a functioning means of getting a warning in time to react if the plan works, it could help the university find and contain outbreaks. If.

Michigan Michigan State University Florida ABC News Wastewater Michigan State Professor Lipton Arizona professor Governor Gretchen whitmer New York New Jersey DHS Department of Homeland Securit Harper East Lansing MSU Miami Dolphin Mississippi Seattle Minnesota California
"professor joan" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

Coffee House Shots

14:06 min | 1 year ago

"professor joan" Discussed on Coffee House Shots

"Hello and welcome to coffee. Shot spectators daily in these days. David unto two weeks weeks now until polling day and the Tories are still in the lead and people this week which got Westminster. Very excited suggested the Tories had there been an election this this week. We've won a majority in the region of sixty eight however as phrases hasn't as Telegraph column as we discuss on this podcast. There was still plenty of time for the Tories to blow it and there are some early signs as if you look at the days ahead that there are some obstacles they are going to have to and we will now go free. There's various ones but I think to begin with. That's just took fast about Bruce. Johnson and television appearances and scrutiny. Now openly on Thursday night we had a situation from abortions did not do the channel climate leaders debate instead. The Tories did organize a stunt of the rain. which went some way too distracting from this by sending Michael Grove data trying to get onto the stage not being allowed to do so and now there's another on about whether or not? Boris Johnson is going to face Andrew. Neil in the one to one lead interviews interviews every other mainly has agreed to this. And there's some talk that Berge can be bought from gay on the Angie safer until he agrees to this phrase raise. It has a slight with a twenty seventeen. Doesn't it in terms of Theresa. May's reluctance to go on. Various stages do set piece events. Boris Johnson's since allies would say we'll actually know how many things he's done already but if you take them in succession is not the best. Look no it's notes. I mean I do understand logic nick for a prime minister not doing these debates they tend to benefit the Challenger and the prime minister is ahead in the polls he would say look. What do I have to gain by stepping into this arena arena? I can also understand the logic saying look you journalist. You just want these debates for your own entertainment in your TV ratings. It's not to do with democracy. He is just all about you but the thing is we are. We are with these campaigns. The leadership debates have become a fairly big staple elections now over the course of his decades since David Cameron introduced them ten years ago. No so far. We've seen leaders debates. I haven't been that eliminating but we had the one to one interview and Renew Jeremy Corbyn Andrew Nicholas Sturgeon that were lot more illuminating allowed for follow up questions wherever leaders will through through the mincer. And it's always interesting to see how they fare. It looks a little bit cowardly. I'm afraid to save for Boris Johnson. To say okay let Corbin go through that Minster. Let Nicholas George. But I am not going to do. It's because I just didn't fancy it and the risk is that it can lead to the impression that you're taking the election victory for granted that you are adopting a safety first strategy and that you don't really think you've got to go out there to earn the votes of the people who are thinking thinking of you to support. IMA general election. The risk is that could backfire embarrassed that he looks lazy for looks complacent and he looks as if he's afraid of offer scrutiny. Rivals subjected themselves to James During the leadership contest. Boris Johnson did have a one on one interview. Angie Neal he still became came leader at Torrey Party and prime minister. So what's the difference in approach here. I think he was scheduled quite late in the process off. Most of the post-war it's out but I think he should do the interview for the simple reason this which is both Jeremy Corbyn and Nicholas Sturgeon had a tough time holding tweet but it was much less bound for Nicholas version than it was Jeremy Corbyn cushy made not perfect but much better fister defending her position and and then he wanted to be promised with United Kingdom. You'll be confident that you can get a half an hour interview defending you'll positions on a whole series issues. I mean these half an now in twos expose in a way. Were leaders debate. Don't because they allow forensic follow ups is weakness in position. You couldn't watch the android into into Nicholas Sturgeon and not. Come away from it thinking the S&P don't really have a proper answer to for currency question. You can watch animals into Jeremy Kuban. No come away the whole series the Ford about the fact that Germany doesn't seem to realize that government bonds government debt. But he seems deeply confused about what he would do a situation where you can take out what you could potentially take out the leader of terrorist groups such as Islamic state and that he he doesn't point you obviously doesn't really realize the scale and the gravity of the problem that we talked about Anti Semitism awesome. News is how the Rings not apologize but he denied that the problem has got worse since he became leader. I think Boris Johnson should be confident that he he is standing on a decent decent a pretty decent perspectives to become prime minister. And the only thing you can defend that perspectives in a half an hour or two and tonight we will not be seeing Boris Johnson on our television screens either but this is a preplanned non-attendance in the BBC's multi-party debate and you pay labour and the Tories sending on representatives who you need the Kuban Johnson's. Rebecca Long Baby Food Labor anniversary soon. ACT The conservatives James because leaders are not involved in this it does feel as though this is is perhaps less high stakes but you think there is still important in a debate like this for the Tories and is holding the line. There are so many parties in this he did in. The sense is going to be difficult for anyone to really is home to win a seven way debate similar similarly if we the other night the the Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn it was quite scrappy because of the format. I mean this is going to be even crappier because you're going to have seven people trying to speak up and make their case that points. I think the a big event is that is this time next week when we have the final. Boris Johnson. Jeremy Corbyn head to head debate on the BBC of the remaining TV debate as indefeasibly. Yeah that is the big the big moment say phrase of what else can go wrong. In the time we have left because he looked that Emma peephole this week yes yes. The Tories strategy in the mountains north seems to be paying off in winning some of these seats but the fractions at tiny as you look at some of these percentages one percent hair in that could really change a labor. She GonNa take these seats now. Professor Joan Curtis is that he thinks Arizona and is chance at being at Labor majority. But that's not talking about a Labor minority government propped up by SMP. Well it's funny. How often near zero percent? Chances Come true. I remember in twenty 2016 Princeton University. This model which is had predicted the two thousand twelve. US presidential election correctly and therefore there was a one percent chance of Donald Trump winning which he did Vernon Twenty fifteen. You had populous. Who came along with with what? They called the predictor. Not just an opinion pollster. They said it was lots of socio. Economic mkx data plugged into it. And they calculate your abilities to a fraction of a decimal point so you would have said zero point. Five percent chance of David Ever Cameron winning a majority a couple of weeks later. And that's exactly what he did so I think we ought to remember that opinion. Pollsters are still trying to adjust adjust to the new voting patterns were seeing on both sides of the Atlantic and until they get at least two elections right. I think we should all be rather cautious about their claims to have invented new technology. That can get the next election right and in fact during the seven days it took you. You got to do this. Pools the Tory lead went down by. I think sixteen seats. They had to knock off until they got to sixty eight. It doesn't take that much more of this trend continuing for the Tour de Majority to evaporate and slip through the prime minister's fingers quite quickly Jamison in response to this. What do you think the Conservative's strategy for the final part of the campaign is going to be doubling down or is it trying to actually change the pivot or pivoting different approach? Anything's everything's trying to make sure people too so I mean the first bit of us. Russia is desperate attempt to get Donald Trump. Not to say anything on his visit. Here today are very telling the boy shorts in this morning was basically saying to Donald Trump. Please stay out of our election. Remember how Barack Obama's intervention in two thousand sixteen referendum campaign backfire. I mean this was very public. Diplomacy please please. Don't say anything I I mean to feed them. We noticed that he was developing campaign cold. which could be the best defense given trump's Germanophobia against trump trying to get too close to the NATO summit offering the Tory message? The campaign is going to be we've gotTA GET Brexit. Don's country can move forward. That was a female surprising. Exactly the vows the theme of their press conference today and also it's going to be very like two thousand fifteen and this is where the you Goalpara. It provides them a problem which is going to be. It's I've Ashura hung parliament and if it's a hung parliament it's going to be the scholars nationalist calling the shots. Do you want that. I think we're GONNA see those. These two messages driven home relentlessly in the final week get brexit. Done is enough though. I mean sure that we never the BREXIT party voters. But what if they've really squeeze he's as much as they're going to add to that particular action and that right now as twenty seventeen people were thinking of domestic questions and finding which recent of much to say because I think they have have a decent argument but if next year is about another referendum. You won't get. I mean the twenty messages at its strongest when it's get brexit done so we can do X. Files Not oh hearing much of excellent point manifesto and say will would all you panting Steve because it has been but I've asked remarkable for its lack of ambition in many areas. Though I think the reason the manifest they seem so ambitious is exam done quite a lot in the first hundred days on an H.. Schools funding all. Those things. I think is interesting is wealth remembering how how the narrative changes which is a few weeks ago. Everyone was talking about. How can a fiscally reckless the Tories were? We've always big spending commitments now. Everyone's run saint by very ambitious in porn is because Labor's commitments all so bold so out there. Everything else pales in comparison Fraser. Razer is one potential issue. There isn't that because yes the narratives changed if the touristic more steak. Describe one of the things that leave every tapped into the referendum. Was this this idea of change and if the to restart look like perhaps not to us twenty seventeen the stable choice. That isn't necessarily going to get your high turn of non natives. People who don't know mediate t gallon. Vote for the Conservative Party. Your remember Lynton crosby saying in the two thousand fifteen campaign with the Tories triumphed..

Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Andrew Nicholas Tories Donald Trump Jeremy Corbyn David Ever Cameron Boris Johnson Jeremy Corbyn Labor Angie Neal BBC Nicholas George Jeremy Kuban Bruce Neil Berge Conservative Party Lynton crosby Michael Grove Nicholas Sturgeon
"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Junk. Shusha professor and director of the center for latin american studies shall hide university so professor joan. The latest eight is too rainforest in the road the largest rainforest during the road to winnow the zone isa veto carbon store that slow down the pace of global warming so what what will happen to the local people and the earth's either the fire continues in the region well as you said that <hes> this region amazon is very the important for brazil for sauce america you vote for the world because many people believe that <hes> so called a rain enforce things that region is the land of the world <hes> at the end of the earth so if the land is seeking it can then the climate change you will become the worst now we want to ask. What are the root causes of these kind. The five well samara has a he own argument but <hes> some other people were something else because you know oh for the pasta similar they there has been kind of a debate regarding how to prevent this region on on one hand. We need to protect the land over the earth. Okay i'll be on the other hand. We need to be it careful about the degree of development because the region is good for performing for four growing all kinds of product crohn's so over the years. That'd be debate. Some people say we should have protecting the land of the earth. I but some other people say no. We need to develop the region so that the people in this area can and get rid of poverty as fast as possible so before we can sit down just kind of debate that there will urban fire in the future as you said actually scientists say the rainforest has suffered a loss at <hes> accelerate ray to sing <hes> <hes> bozo naro to call facing january so naro brushed off the latest data saying you was the rate is what's the season of a former using fire to clear land. So how do you understand his reactions. Over exploration or arson by saying non-governmental organizations had a sad didn't fire well. I was before narrow <hes> as you former presidents. <hes> on brazil had always been argue that well. We should have developers this region. Okay the n._g._o. From outside of brazil should not uncriticised brazil for its sovereign rights developer region so i will say that tomorrow. Zero is not the first the president in brazil to criticize all kinds of different criticism okay so now as i said it does now we need to argue that that whether or not people in brazil ten have the right to develop this region alseid we should say brazil has that right but all we need to protect the red imported <hes> thanks thanks. That's young shusha professor and director of the center for latin american studies show hi university. That's all time for a we have for this addition road wrote today. A quick recap of today's headlines who has a federal deficit grows faster than we expected. Meanwhile trombone is tricia plans to an end limits on child in detention u._n. Security to hold emergency meeting on the u._s. meese. Oh lunch and you're listening to today. Thank you so much for joining us <music>..

brazil professor and director latin american studies professor crohn amazon samara arson tricia president developer one hand
"professor joan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Disappointed in the UK if that was your crop. But actually, it's quite close to the global average, and then further down the field you see different combinations of inorganic nutrients and the best ones yield pretty much the same as the new. But you don't hear the best yielding crop is manure with a little bit of nitrogen. So the wolves another kind of Malthusian crisis off to the second World War. When people said, family is going to become a part of everyday life, unless we do something we had a technological revolution, then, but that was very focused on productivity. It was completely focused on productivity on all we were concerned about it was the top five or six centimeters of the plant, which is all the green is. A bunch of amazing technologies were developed in a sense. I science is one of the most successful sciences and delivering a solution to a problem. The issue has been whole bunch of unintended consequences, which will living with that is what we're going to do with in the rest of the program. So professor Joan Crawford. Thank you very much data will be hearing more from you later. So the great advances of the past century have led to what has been described as paradox of productivity crop yields of vastly increased but not necessarily of the food we should be eating. Well, Tim Benton is a professor of population ecology at Leeds University here in the UK and visiting fellow at the lustrous international affairs think tank, Chatham house. His job is to think about how the world can sustainably feed population, set hit more than ten billion people by the end of this century. The of productivity is affecting as we focus, primarily on driving up, we end up, then forming a very large scale, y that encourages those crops, that you can form in that way to crowd out the rest, so you end up with concentration on a relatively small family of crops, those crops will become relatively cheap it becomes economically rational to throw away. So a third of the lost, or wasted. It becomes economically rational to them. And so because wrote calorie nutritious, you, then end up with an obesity crisis. And because there is nothing stopping us if polluting degrading environment, which is them, you end up driving environmental degradation. It's the major cause of loss et cetera et cetera. So the paradox as we've grown the productivity of agriculture, we have made the food system less efficient, and you can amend delivering useful calories, too. In terms of the number of people healthily and sustainably input. Put not the amount of we grow per acre, so we have a kind of decision point to make much like with climate change about whether we go down the road of businesses, usual industrialization of foaming very large scale, providing lots of calories, the wrong of calories that might people ill done solve problems environment worse. But might some people profits versus trying to reconfigure the system and transform it into something, which is more regenerative, delivering nutrition. And so on. It's pretty clear, I think, from your characterization of these two of where you stand. But first, let's dig in a little I mean what is wrong with the current cultural system? After all, the end of the second World War, we expected famines to be commonplace, actually, there was amazing food revolution that created a world of plenty, and we still basically live in that world of plenty figures for malnutrition and hunger, have broadly of the last few decades fallen very dramatically the figures for under nutrition full. The figures of nutrition in the form of obesity and associated, I've gone up gone from shortage of food access, which arguably is, we should congratulate the food industry on creating cornucopia, which is this new problem that we got too much of the stuff. So I think we're producing too much food now and it's the wrong sort of food. So seventy five percent of the world's calories come from eight crops fifty percent of the world's calories come from three cups would reach? We've always wieght and maize. And if you look at what the world should be eating healthy diets, we produce about a quarter of the amount of fruits vegetables, we should produce produce about fifty percent too much grain. We don't eat the grain, we feed the greater animals, with the animals and there in lies a whole issues as well. So a lot of the grain is now cheap enough to feed to livestock, makes lots cheaper, which means that beef and other room mate is more freely available. But the downside of that is that a country to health problems, also. Driving environmental issues three climate change. So my question few is, what structure of world culture, you arguing the issue is given the rising healthcare costs of diabetes, and be, and so on with less than fifty percent of the world's population being healthy weight, diets becoming the number one drag on healthcare systems around the world really feels to me the food debate now is like smoking in the seventies eighties, that we know the trajectory we're on is taking us into more difficult territory of faster. And what changes is the evidence built up people feel that they are not being well served by the system. They changed their habits and I suspect the growth of diabetes and the healthcare costs associated with that will drive a change in the way that the markets function. What happened? This change does map. My view is that in a sense, we have to change diets to avoid climate change. And if we don't change diets climate change will force us to change diets because we'll be in a situation if we have three or four degrees of climate change by the end of the century, the chances are, that would probably be able to grow enough food for seven, or eight billion, people might be ten or eleven billion people on the planet there in lies, a whole host of social issues and potential for war and conflict. And so on that if we rational about planning for the future that we wouldn't want to be in..

UK obesity professor diabetes Joan Crawford Tim Benton Leeds University malnutrition Chatham house visiting fellow fifty percent seventy five percent six centimeters
"professor joan" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Locally the Rhode Island community in prayers for Paris as the historic fedral burned yesterday, Kim Clooney from eyewitness news, a celebration of mass in providence. While thirty five hundred miles away the start of holy week marked by morning in Paris, tragic loss for the people of France and Paris, I think for the whole Catholic world. I felt like I was already going into morning in the middle of providence college art history. Professor Joan brenham stunned by the images coming out of France on Monday. She had just visited Notre Dom earlier this year, it is prominent everyone sees Notre Dom. It is probably the most recognizable monument their heart of Paris. This is the heart attack. That's taking place right now Burke of foot began his love affair with France. As a child has first trip to Notre Dom at age twelve. And the closest thing we have in English is I am brokenhearted. Now, the world awaits news of what can and cannot be salvaged from the iconic structure hopeful that it will rise again. Notre Dom is not going to go away because it's too important ability to great place for us to ever believe, it was ceased to exist, and you might remember back in nineteen eighty to a fire consumed. A Notre Dame church much closer to home. The Notre Dame church in Fall River that fire ignited by construction workers a similar 'cause may be to blame in Paris concluding from eyewitness news. It's now six forty NewsRadio nine twenty four seven FM. Lana sunshine out there you remember the shades in. Here's John hamlet. John's report is brought to us spy. Let's see here. Discover pretty strong son Blair this morning coming up from where we can Cranston doors, but we're good to go from one seventeen pass through ten in Cranston. For the lane shift going on servers avenue traffic east too much looking good of the Washington bridge. Brag a bridge in Fall River checking out to with your southern New England traffic, I'm John hamlet. Discover alerts you if they find your social security number on anyone of thousands of risky websites..

Paris Notre Dame church France John hamlet Professor Joan brenham Fall River Cranston providence Rhode Island Kim Clooney Washington bridge Burke Blair Lana fedral New England
"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Down from your orbit the sideways and just lines wherever convenience you have to almost like prop the the. Orbit vertical straight down, and that's much more difficult. Well, MAURICE what do you see as the most difficult part of lending on the far side of the moon? I get the most difficult part. It's not so much the communications delay with the fact that the Landa estimated own decision in the final part of the landing, and the fact that the mood is very rough and it has to lookout for object, which like big boulders that could tip it. And so it's a very active. The Landa has has to make its own mind off and has to avoid object. I think that's probably the most dangerous part of the mission just finding his place to land. He this reminds of people of that famous moon speech by John F Kennedy, which used to go to the moon and do other things not because they are easy because they are hard. But we know that time this is more about the struggle for hegemony between the US and Soviet Union. Professor Joan why does China now choose to go to to go with this difficult task to explore the far side of the moon? Well. I guess part of it is the time astray capabilities and build up capabilities. I hope they're using this as an opportunity to to that that outpost I was talking about. And also the front side of the moon is in explored by other nations. I'm by China already. So you wanna go to places where there's more geologically, interesting stuff particular style. They chose geologically very interesting. And also you want to you want to pay sickly samples exploring, right? You wanna go to places where it hasn't been? Maurice? What do you think? I think that China is living many different purposes Luna program. I mean, exploration its strengths times and technology presidential the world stage and those who stage for big in the future like sending sample return mission to the moon, eventually sending Chinese Estelle this. So. There's been new single. But for why China's doing it. Well, MAURICE we know that the jungle Ford probe actually blasted off nearly a month ago on December as and it took only four days for to enter into the orbit, then why the lending take so many days. The London took a long time because they wanted to wait for the moon to be in the right one one normal length of daylight, the moon moss moss for about two weeks. And what that means is that depending on the angle of sun, you've got angles of shadow walked McRae's it. And so you want to tie a precise time to land on the moon when you have enough shadows that you can pick up rain features when you're trying to lend, but you also have enough daylight so that the Rover can operate for several days and charge battery, and then hopefully, I get enough works on for the devised balloon Anais and start off again. So I think it's all because of the angle sun the angle of the shadow and the length of of they life will have you know, after land. Joe is the join us lunar calendar actually could be consulted. When deciding the the appropriate time of lending is that really the case whether they actually use it, but probably make sense 'cause describes the lighting conditions on the moon. That's more that that's a very important thing. So full park things yet. Tell us more about these scientific research that it is going to conduct on the far side of the moon. It would it would it. You thing it has grown penetrating radar to probe underneath and see what kind of structure rocks underneath. But interestingly it's also carrying a low frequency radio wave detective, so meter meter wave wave to detect radiation from some from other planets in our system, don't tell us something about inner workings of this natural objects. And the reason why you're doing on the moon instead of on. There's is because earns hasn't I own there that that you basically just blocking us awhile. And even if those things competitor it down, those frequencies, if actually the radio broadcasting frequencies, so instead of hearing the song a scope on there that would would just just hear us tacking, basically. Well, more is on where where does this energy come from? It is reported that it will also use the nuclear energy is that kind of breakthrough. During the Rosa get most of their energy from solar panels there..

China MAURICE Landa Soviet Union US John F Kennedy Professor Joan Ford Anais Joe London McRae four days two weeks
"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Discrimination just can Natalie I'm gonna. Ask you even really patient here. I just wanted to get a lot of those additional stories, but I'm gonna ask you to stand by for one more minute here because I want to introduce Joan Williams into the conversation. She's a professor of law at the university of California Hastings and director of the center for work life law there, and she joins us today from San Francisco, Joan Williams, welcome to on point. So the big question here now after we've heard the extensive reporting from Jessica Natalie in those three stories from women who just called us is what rights do pregnant women have in the workplace to ask for combinations. I mean, there is a there is a law from nineteen seventy eight on the books. What does that law purportedly do? Actually to odds native women far more rights than people. Typically, no, they have the pregnancy Discrimination Act, which is the law from the seventies says that if you accommodate people who aren't pregnant very often you have to accommodate people. Well, always you have to accommodate people who are and that may give you additional rights, but the other law is the Americans with disabilities. Act. Now, the pregnancy is not a disability. But a lot of the conditions instant pregnancy are disabilities, for example, lots of women get carpal tunnel as a result of pregnancy. So it doesn't make any sense that you have to accommodate women with carpal tunnel, which is a known disability so long as they it's not incident to pregnancy. So for many of the kinds of conditions that women typically need accommodations. They're entitled to combinations under the americ-. With disabilities. Act. Even if the pregnancy Discrimination Act doesn't help, but what about the cases of Jessica and Natalie reported where women were told they were at risk of miscarriage, and that that risk was exacerbated because of the nature of the the highly physical labor they're doing I mean, that's not necessarily a disability. It's a risk. So what rights did they have? It depends on the medical condition. And this is exactly why we need a federal law that addresses directly the need the women's need for accommodations. It's it's been proposed. It's called the pregnant workers fairness act, but depending on the specific conditions they had they might well have been entitled to accommodations eat one under one of these existing laws. The problem is it's a patchwork. It's very complicated. We actually have a website at work. Nice law to help it's called pregnant at work to help pregnant women know what their rights are. And we have a website to help doctors get them disability. Disability leave or disability accommodations if they need it. But it's really complicated. That's why we need the law. Jessica Natalie just got about thirty seconds here before the break, but as far. As I understand it. The major loophole laws. It stands right now is if a company doesn't offer a combination to anyone they don't have to accom- offer accommodations to pregnant women. That's right. Yeah. I mean and the women in the warehouse, you know, they didn't have any specific condition. They were just told that the having. I mean, in some cases, they had high risk pregnancies some had given birth Preterm before. But these were women who were in a workplace that did not accommodate anyone. So that workplace had no obligation under federal law to accommodate them will Nedley kitchen with Jessica silver Greenberg. And professor Joan Williams hang on here for just a second. We gotta take a quick break. We're talking about pregnancy. Discrimination in the workplace. We'll be right back. I make a chocolate bar. This is on point..

Jessica Natalie Joan Williams Natalie I professor of law Jessica Jessica silver Greenberg San Francisco university of California Hasti director accom professor thirty seconds
"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Discrimination just can Natalie I'm gonna. Ask you even really patient here. I just wanted to get a lot of those additional stories, but I'm gonna ask you to stand by for one more minute here because I want to introduce Joan Williams into the conversation. She's a professor of law at the university of California Hastings and director of the center for work life law there, and she joins us today from San Francisco, Joan Williams, welcome to on point. So the big question here now after we've heard the extensive reporting from Jessica Natalie in those three stories from women who just called us is what rights do pregnant women have in the workplace to ask for combinations. I mean, there is a there is a law from nineteen seventy eight on the books. What does that law purportedly do? Actually to odds native women far more rights than people. Typically, no, they have the pregnancy Discrimination Act, which is the law from the seventies says that if you accommodate people who aren't pregnant very often you have to accommodate people. Well, always you have to accommodate people who are and that may give you additional rights, but the other law is the Americans with disabilities. Act. Now, the pregnancy is not a disability. But a lot of the conditions instant pregnancy are disabilities, for example, lots of women get carpal tunnel as a result of pregnancy. So it doesn't make any sense that you have to accommodate women with carpal tunnel, which is a known disability so long as they it's not incident to pregnancy. So for many of the kinds of conditions that women typically need accommodations. They're entitled to combinations under the americ-. With disabilities. Act. Even if the pregnancy Discrimination Act doesn't help, but what about the cases of Jessica and Natalie reported where women were told they were at risk of miscarriage, and that that risk was exacerbated because of the nature of the the highly physical labor they're doing I mean, that's not necessarily a disability. It's a risk. So what rights did they have? It depends on the medical condition. And this is exactly why we need a federal law that addresses directly the need the women's need for accommodations. It's it's been proposed. It's called the pregnant workers fairness act, but depending on the specific conditions they had they might well have been entitled to accommodations eat one under one of these existing laws. The problem is it's a patchwork. It's very complicated. We actually have a website at work. Nice law to help it's called pregnant at work to help pregnant women know what their rights are. And we have a website to help doctors get them disability. Disability leave or disability accommodations if they need it. But it's really complicated. That's why we need the law. Jessica Natalie just got about thirty seconds here before the break, but as far. As I understand it. The major loophole laws. It stands right now is if a company doesn't offer a combination to anyone they don't have to accom- offer accommodations to pregnant women. That's right. Yeah. I mean and the women in the warehouse, you know, they didn't have any specific condition. They were just told that the having. I mean, in some cases, they had high risk pregnancies some had given birth Preterm before. But these were women who were in a workplace that did not accommodate anyone. So that workplace had no obligation under federal law to accommodate them will Nedley kitchen with Jessica silver Greenberg. And professor Joan Williams hang on here for just a second. We gotta take a quick break. We're talking about pregnancy. Discrimination in the workplace. We'll be right back. I make a chocolate bar. This is on point..

Jessica Natalie Joan Williams Natalie I professor of law Jessica Jessica silver Greenberg San Francisco university of California Hasti director accom professor thirty seconds
"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Revamped version of the Trans-Pacific Partnership has come into force the eleven country trade deal took effect on Sunday for Australia New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Mexico, and Singapore VN is set to follow on January fourteenth Brunei Chile, Melissa and Peru will start sixty days after they complete their ratification process. Ninety percent of tariffs on Gouze in. I six contracts are set to have been scrapped in the first round of cuts with more on this. Mike colleague, ding hone was earlier joined by her tongue in author and columnist and professor Joan gone from university of international business and economics. I not on you start. Whether you those agreements is non as CPT p p. Without a United States unless be Frank. Do. You think it is a big deal? Well, it is. I mean you start looking at the numbers. It's still thirteen point five percent of the world's GDP has about five hundred million people. This is a big deal because what it does is it puts especially leaving nation like Japan on much more even footing with the United States in China. So this is a very good example of how countries are getting together regionally in order to try to get away from you know, the the gyrations between China and the US. So young. How would you love cats? The steel do you think the deal is meaningful given the facts that we have a lot of trades tension going on across the world have a lot of protectionism. Of course. I mean, there's still is initially by the United States. But it's unfortunate that the Trump administration has decided to pool all auto steel on. This is Linda market, then actually this trade agreement is very high quality to grievance in terms of terribly action. In terms of the nation of other now tariff barriers and also in terms of other issues that have not traditionally been covered by trade agreement possible shoes and also respect to investment issues. So this is a really align. Danta Machi anymore Pinon. John sats. The steel represents a lot of high quality.

United States Japan Singapore VN Brunei Chile Pinon China Peru Gouze Danta Machi John sats Australia New Zealand professor Joan Melissa Trump administration Canada university of international Mexico Linda market Frank
The Science Of Being Transgender

Science Vs

09:39 min | 3 years ago

The Science Of Being Transgender

"Know? One. What makes us the gender that we are. While science doesn't know for Shaw, we do know that a lot of this is now Janes and the best evidence. We have tells us that this is not a choice, you are the gender. And sometimes it doesn't match you genitals to if a kid says they're transgender. What should you do? Well, let you explore who they are. If they want the hair or let it grow out, that's fine. And if they're about to puberty, so the adult about puberty blockers and three if you decide to change you body with homeowners and surgery will you regret it the best evidence? We have says that very few people regret getting surgery or taking homes. There is one big risk though. And that's t Phillipi particularly for canes who go straight from puberty blockers to home owns. Still though while they might be some risks with changing body with home owns scalpels 's something much scarier is looming over transgender, folks. And that's suicide a survey of molten thirty thousand transpeople found that forty percent had attempted suicide in their lifetime. That's way, high than the general population. It's nine times higher. He's cocoa. Maya the transgender population has the highest rate of suicide attempts of in the demographic in the United States. And what we're learning. Now is that being transgender in itself doesn't seem to be bad for your mental health? Tens out what is bad via mental health is the way trans people are often treated, they get bullied kicked out of their home and attacked and the science is telling us that this mistreatment. That's the biggest problem for transgender. People. It's not homeowners or surgery. Not surprisingly when people don't get treated like garbage and makes a big difference. I think the best thing about transition was having my family and friends support me all the way through it. And having my priest from the small town, Texas, write me a letter about how brave I was and say, I was always welcome in church. Yes. Hormones are important and awesome. But in terms of like why I'm doing so? Well, and so happy is because of all the sources of support that I got. That science Fasces. Hello. I Delhi Ruben high wind high Maryland, Hello. How many citations episode is over one hundred and thirty citations a hundred and fifty and Delhi. If people wanna read way, could they citations they can find them on our website. They can find a full linked to the script yet. I really recommend. If you do have any questions you want to know more about any of the topics. We've mentioned to the script check out the citations. Thanks, guys. This episode was produced by Adelie, Aruban and Merrill, Hawn along with me. Wendy's come in and rose rimless. I'll senior producer is Caitlin story. Edited by Blythe, Terrell editorial assistant by Rebecca cling. And by the way, if you wanna Hugh more about these topic you've got to listen through bekker's podcast. It's called the Trans-Pacific Partnership podcast Trans-Pacific Partnership podcast. It's great will link shooting in the show nights. You've really gonna listen fact checking is done by Michelle, Harris, Merrill, hone and rose rim. Mix and sound design by 'em among music written by 'em among and Bobby Lord. Thanks to all of the research is we got in touch with for this episode, including Dr Jack Tobin professor and faster stilling assistant professors cement the Busa associate professor, Susan Straka. Dr Katrina cock as this professor Neil episode in Poland, Nara, professor, Michelle foresees, and professor Joan garden, and thank you to all the transports who shed this store. With us. We really really appreciate it. Plus, thanks to come and family and Joseph Lebel Wilson next week is the final episode of the season following a cold case. A man has been found dead with a stolen identity. The police don't know what to do can science save the day. I'm wendy's. In fact, you next week. Hey, Wendy hia. And you're about to how special post show extraordinary on the Mike series web producing in partnership with Cole Haan Cole Haan is the brand that champions extrordinary people who passionate about the Korea's. So recently, I met up with few of my extraordinary colleagues to talk about how passions let us to where we on now hosting podcasts in the studio. We have Eric Eddings co host the not what's up and host of startup. Lisa chow. Hello. I was especially curious about leases career pot. So I asked her a question that ended up being kind of revealing. Lisa. What would you tell you'll youngest south when you starting out your career? What are you tell my younger self? You know, it's funny because when I saw when I became a journalist I feel like I went in with my eyes wide open because I graduated and I was an applied. Math major and I had really investigated all different types of jobs to go into. I actually did forty informational interviews. Yeah. With different alumni from my college from accounting to investment banking consulting, the UN working at the State Department being a teacher just a whole range of careers. And then the journalists like connected most to. Yeah. I really liked the journalist I talked to. And then one guy was just, you know, hey, you know, I can call an editor that I worked with twenty years ago to see if you would be willing to offer you a job and he did that. And then I went up to New Hampshire. The job was at a small newspaper New Hampshire, and I never written an article basically for my college newspaper or anything like that. And I went up in interviewed with him. And he gave me the job. Yeah. What was the fest article you wrote full them? Oh, jeez. It was probably about some board meeting because I was covering six towns in New Hampshire and Maine, and the I think I probably went to a meeting and covered a traffic light. So you a debate on whether we should put a traffic light at this intersection. And it was a community that had very few traffic lights. So it was incredibly contentious. I mean, what are you thinking at that point? Yeah. No. It was crazy. I loved it. I don't know. It's just like the small gears in public discourse. It was fascinating to me. It was it was very strange. I mean, I was probably was the only Asian within a thirty mile radius. But yeah, I loved it. I loved it. It was crazy. I was just felt like I was in a foreign land. But I was just in Hampshire. So what would you tell your youngest self than I think, I would just say enjoys a ride. It's exciting. Fun. And you're gonna learn a ton. That's the thing as journalists. It's like you learn so much. It's like you have the luxury to ask any question. You want of anyone? That's crazy. It's amazing. Eric has happened to you. Somewhat at you like, wow, I get us this question. Yes. We had lavar Burton on the show, and he told us he was proud of us, and like that was probably one of best career moments of my life. And I don't know lavar Burton that will you know. I mean, I like to think we know each other now. Clearly. But to be in a situation where I get to talk to someone who I have lived up to into have that person. Not only appreciate that interaction. But also say that they're proud of your work was mind blowing. It's kind of extrordinary way, you'll passions can lead you to you more about compensation produced in partnership with called Han. Go to extraordinary on the Mike dot com. And don't forget to check out Lisa and Eric's extraordinary shows Stott up and the naught you can also finally send me on season one of this poster. That's right mole once again at extraordinary on the Mike dot com. Thanks again to our sponsor give well give well is dedicated to evaluating the most outstanding charities. So you can see where your donation will do the most good you could find give wells shortlist of top charities and rate. It's full reports at give well dot org. Thanks to our sponsor Merrill, Lynch from Lata making robots to the price of money. The Merrill Lynch perspectives podcast exports, the often, unexpected issues trends, and ideas that are shaping our world their experts, go beyond the headlines and the numbers to help. You better understand how these changes could impact you and your financial life subscribed today to the Merrill Lynch perspectives podcast.

Lisa Chow Eric Eddings Wendy Hia Merrill Merrill Lynch Professor Lavar Burton New Hampshire Michelle Cole Haan Cole Haan T Phillipi Shaw United States Janes Bobby Lord Texas Dr Jack Tobin Delhi Ruben Delhi Joseph Lebel Wilson
"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"And of course, this is coming at the time that other terrorists have been raised in. Sponsor to the Trump administration's tariffs. But the the the Chinese tariffs have come down in a number of areas. Not just not, of course as much perhaps for US as for other countries, but even for some US transactions. I think that there have been reductions and terrorism I think that that that among other simulative affects that the government has taken has encouraged the growth of imports in the past month. Despise several rounds of US duties this year. It seems China's exports have remained resilience. And I think professor powers has already touched. The phone does. Basically a lot of companies are ramping up shipments before tougher. US tariffs are set to take place are set to take a fact so on how so going forward. What is your projection? What is your what what is your date of China's imports of China's export rather over the long term over the over over the term. I think especially let's tariff increase. I mean for twenty billion dollars worth of exports from China to the United States. The terrapin is ten percent. And I think this is easily offset by the I'm the depreciation. We have about five percent depreciation so far and and the difference. I think can be acquire. Either absolved by companies Golvin the tray. So I think the overall impact on end customers end-consumer, it's probably quite minor. This I think in welfare to keep in mind that a lot of experts from China Tanada states is closely pipe to the global battery shin, especially in American companies operating China, they I was gonna jump for me do. Indeed. Yeah. So so a lot of trade is actually associated with that kind of global labor division global capital division, and it's very difficult to disentangle the couple a terrif-, you know, may have impact China span factual in competitiveness, but the it's just very difficult to cut it off as some people in the United States. Some issues are want. It's not gonna happen time soon these value chain. There for many years and of it's not going to happen overnight. Even if companies want to move these offers out of China, so it's gonna take some time. So that's why I think the exports from China to states still is resilient. It's it's not gonna happen. The kind of doctrine expect it's not gonna have overnight at some time. Now, professor Joan gone from university of international business and economics and Michael powers. But seeing how university speaking with Sierra sting hone coming up in other news, pressured rose on DACA Berg to attend face to attend Facebook committee, hearing Canada is running out of marijuana just weeks after its legalization. You're listening to today's stay with us. The great effort made a by the doll today. Become one of their great platform policy, debate and information is seven nation. And I wish today have even brighter and greater tomorrow..

US China China Tanada professor DACA Berg Sierra Facebook Golvin professor Joan marijuana Canada Michael powers university of international twenty billion dollars five percent ten percent
"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Risk and finance which inquire university and professor Joan gone from university of international business and economics analyst had only expected and eleven an eleven percent increase for for exports last month. A why as we as we have seen exports grew so strong. I think there are several reasons one of them, and perhaps the most obvious possibility is that in anticipation of the tariffs as part of the the trade war between the US and China that there were pre-ordered pre-ordered good that. It is good that were ordered a head of time in anticipation of of uncertainties. And so we're now seeing those continue those early ordered goods continue to boost the export figures. I also think that it important to keep in mind that prior to in the context of the trade war. There has been growth in many national economies around the world, including the US economy. And so there is demand for Chinese products in these many countries. And Finally, I think that probably there's a minor affect from the weakening of the Chinese renminbi. But I think that that benefactor is fairly minor compared to the other affects that that. I just described do have something to add like the currency devaluation. Professor powers has just talk about how much like how much. Does the Tober trade that especially on the on the on the exports frowns have to do with the currency devaluation of of of Yuan? I concur with professor policy. I think the impact of currency, very minor. Variation is this minor in my opinion? I think it affect the fundamentals of the world economy. I think we still into this booming cycle. I think demand for China schools are still our straw on the bottom, I the communists students are well, United States and also opinion. So the the fundamental demand driven by Sean Connery. I think experience a lot of the increase an anticipated increase, you know, accidents. So I think it's most of the fundamental economy. So professional analysts had forecast fourteen. Cents role foreign imports. So what was behind the strong imports of rove? I think China's imports has a lot to do with government positions reflecting those big owners from state owned companies are active being the import sector. I think might be driven. Polly by the government's overall policy to increase imports coast, the soco Skaff we have a separate scalpels about how Trittin Donald last year. And so we inputs have to has to grow faster than exports. I think that's one of the reasons another thing I can think of is as Pabst driven. Also by anticipation of higher commodity prices. I think especially in you know, there's a lot of expectation that oil price is going to keep rising given that the Trump administration's determined. And a policy to to impose trading against Iran and could be possible. Another reason that you know, the celery to imports as happening anticipation of oil price that maybe some other commodity prices. Well, professor, professor powers. What is your take? Do you also do you also believe that maybe the government's policy is is playing a leading role in terms of this twenty one percents twenty one twenty one point four percents import growth dad, China saw last month? I I would agree with what professor gong has said. And at sad to that. One of the one of the efforts are initiatives that the Chinese government has taken a to stimulate imports at this time is to reduce tariffs..

China professor United States professor Joan professor gong Chinese government Sean Connery analyst university of international rove Trittin Donald Pabst Trump administration Iran eleven percent
"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Natalie with the code reporters of this New York Times, special series on pregnancy discrimination, just Connecticut. I'm going to ask you. Really patient here. I just wanted to get a lot of those additional stories, but I'm gonna ask you to stand by for one more minute here because I want to introduce Joan Williams into the conversation. She's a professor of law at the university of California Hastings and director of the center for work life law there. And she joins us today from San Francisco, Joan Williams, welcome to on point. So the big question here now after we've heard the extensive reporting from Jessica and Natalie and those three stories from women who just called us is what rights do pregnant women have in the workplace to ask for combinations. I mean, there is a there is a law from nineteen seventy eight on the books. What does that law purportedly do are actually to odd native women far more rights than people typically. No, they have the pregnancy Discrimination Act, which is the law from the seventies says that if you accommodate on people who aren't pregnant, very often, you have to accommodate people. Well, you always you have to accommodate people who are and that may give you additional rights. But the other law is the Americans with Disabilities Act. Now, the pregnancy is not a disability, but a lot of the conditions. Instant pregnancy are disabilities. For example, lots of women get carpal ta. Tunnel as a result of pregnancy. So it doesn't make any sense that you have to accommodate women with carpal tunnel, which is a known disability so long as they, it's not incident to pregnancy. So for many of the kinds of conditions that women typically need accommodations, they're entitled to combinations under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Even if the pregnancy Discrimination Act doesn't help. Jessica and Natalie reported where women were told they were at risk of miscarriage and that that risk was exacerbated because of the nature of the the highly physical labor they were doing. I mean, that's not necessarily a disability, it's a risk. So wh. What rights did they have. It depends on a medical condition, and this is exactly why we need a federal law that addresses directly the need the women's need for accommodations. It's it's been proposed. It's called the pregnant workers fairness act. But depending on the specific conditions they had, they might well have been entitled to accommodations e one under one of these existing laws. The problem is it's a patchwork, it's very complicated. We actually have a website at work nice law to help it's called pregnant at work to help pregnant women know what their rights are, and we have a website to help doctors get them disability, the disability leave or disability accommodations if they need it, but it's really complicated. That's why we need a law, Jessica. About thirty seconds here before the break. But as far as I understand it, the major loophole in laws, it stands right now is if a company doesn't offer a combination to anyone, they don't have to accom- offer accommodations to pregnant women. That's right. Yeah. I mean, and the women in the warehouse, you know, they didn't have any specific condition. They were just told that the having, I mean, in some cases, they had high risk pregnancies. Some had given birth Preterm before, but these were women who were in a workplace that did not accommodate anyone. So that workplace had no obligation under federal law to accommodate them. We'll Natalie kitchen with Jessica silver Greenberg and professor Joan Williams. Hang on here for just a second. We gotta take a quick break. We're talking about pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. We'll be right back. I'm making the chocolate bar dean. This is on point..

Jessica silver Greenberg Joan Williams Natalie professor of law New York Times university of California Hasti Connecticut San Francisco director accom professor thirty seconds
"professor joan" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on Business Daily

"Another straughter of sort of books taking they need to do i think if they're going to approach this box ticking they should not bother because it's not going to have any effect i mean on the vice interrupters website it we have very very concrete things that managers can do that may give you an example in basically every professional environment there's some work that's very highly valued and some work that's pretty undervalued and the undervalued work is what we call the office housework and women tend to get loaded up with it they also tend to do literal housework like planning parties and a lot of administrative work because what manages just think women to students to have to stay for it yes yeah exactly and when i gave it to a man and he did a terrible job so i'm going to give it to the woman what that really means is that there are cultural signals telling the man that if you do this poorly there will be no consequences everyone kind of expects you to do yeah and if their cultural signals telling the women if you do it poorly god help you if you're a manager of very concrete thing you can do is just sit down and jot down what is the glamour work in your environment and what is the office housework both the literal housework the administrative work and they undervalued work and then just run through your head and see our women doing a disproportionate amount of the office housework and if they are the very simple solution is just stabbed simple rotation easy peasy wealth soto that was professor joan williams on next guest of tackle gender inequality in business in their own way they all the british entrepreneur debbie wolves co and the fullness ceo of hearst and jones and they've set up a women only private members club in central london place for working women to meet a network is cool the old right and it's their onset to the gentlemen only clubs that have been a feature of.

ceo hearst professor joan williams jones
"professor joan" Discussed on Crash On My Couch

Crash On My Couch

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on Crash On My Couch

"For han corner civil law as knows you're following casey nice just of light a twenty settled balls just a little late thirty nine miles at a at a four point seven pace now you even human all right we'll see 'cause casing i said is a human love him to death but he's three of the other day was like i was like holy homeless ubon sounds like a dream house eight how much you ryan's a one six miles like warrior for wrongly six moslem mike a aama calf the mike six shit mile honor he ride in what i really relied crave as though it's your tolerance like once you build up a tolerance you can run for so much and i think of that would be very satisfying all like being out just be like keep running from chandok who twelve miles this morning match the kotwal such does a casual twelve an end up in the country that's fine okay so there's actually a reason why allied hans being interrelationship can make running are exercising harder than just doing it with a nonobjective partner okay okay according to professor joan duda duda an expert in sport and exercise motivation how is that a thing at the university of birmingham an exercise but he can promote sustained involvement in physical activity but this relies on three factors competence autonomy and belonging when you're running you wanna set the stage to your most likely feel competent and feel a sense of autonomy like you've a voice choice an input you need to have a sense of belonging with the person whom you're exercising it is best to feel your supported in a non judgmental way so like that's why people can work out with their best friend because they feel like that person is encouraging that person has their back and like the physicality isn't really a problem because you're comfortable with that person but you're not sharing a bed with them you know what i mean like there needs to be support that's unbiased whereas like i might have a stake in your health like i might look at you and go oh i don't want you to died early death we should go running and i want you to push yourself so that you do really well for the year has these aluminum more than an average person and also i can read into whatever you're saying a lot more.

casey professor joan duda han corner ryan partner university of birmingham
"professor joan" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"professor joan" Discussed on 1A

"Because if you had a job i think you be healthier and better off financially we'll continue our conversation about poverty and policy in america interest moment with robert door fellow in poverty studies at the american enterprise institute assistant professor joan maya mozelle us teaches sociology at rutgers university camden professor michelle gilman of university of baltimore school of law and terrance mccoy of the washington post phillips support for this podcast comes from simply safe and award winning home security company their system uses an arsenal of wireless sensors and has twenty four seven professional monitoring plus you pay by month and never get tricked into a longterm contract simply safe has no installation costs and no hidden fees so you can protect your home and family the smart way right now listeners of this podcast can get ten percent off any home security system only if you go simply safe npr dot com back now to our conversation about poverty in america and what to do to help people get out of poverty with university of baltimore law professor michelle gilman robert door of the american enterprise institute rutgers university camden sociologist joan maya mozelle us and washington post reporter terrence mccoy thank you all for sharing your stories of dealing with poverty in america we know this is uncomfortable to talk about so to everyone who sent stories whether we read them on the air or not thank you for being willing to talk to us about this larry tweeted steinbeck opined that americans view themselves as temporarily embarrassed millionaires poverty as a moral failing is the core problem professor mozelle as i wonder about that this idea that were all just kinda millionaires awaiting an apology is just kind of this little thing than going to shake off one of these days how much do you think our conversation in our culture about wealth affects the way we talk about poverty.

michelle gilman phillips america american enterprise institute terrence mccoy steinbeck robert assistant professor joan maya professor university of baltimore school terrance mccoy washington post university of baltimore reporter larry ten percent