10 Burst results for "Professor Hannah"

"professor hannah" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:14 min | 1 d ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on WJR 760

"Gordon in Michigan. We may see 90% of schools offering some kind of in person learning by mid month slowly getting back to normal, but by then Much of the damage may already have been done Research out of Stanford University Very eye opening, and it shows that the learning loss from covert 19 cannot only be quantified. You can actually put a dollar amount on it. How much potential Lifetime earnings will be lost because of this lost time in the classroom. We're joined by Professor Eric Handshake and Professor Margaret Raymond, who authored those studies. Professors good to have you with us. Thanks for having us Professor Raymond. We haven't had any kind of formal or standardized testing here in the state of Michigan yet, so how are you measuring learning loss over the past year? My team at Stanford University has had a partnership with the Department of Education in Michigan for many, many years, and they allow us to take a look at what happens to students from year to year. We were able to use the historical experience of students to project what they would have learned over last school year had coded not happened and then make adjustments for the loss of classroom time and the erosion of learning due to the pandemic. So we have projected learning for students in Michigan in both reading and math and show that they have substantial Less learning over that time then they would have had in regular classrooms. And I want to quantify that in a moment and hopefully in a way that we can all understand it. But Professor Hannah shake When you start to calculate earning losses, there's kind of a presumption that we can't recover from this. Why is that? Why can't we summer school our way out of it, Or is there some skepticism that we can actually fill this void? Why should Craig now everybody is trying to just get back to what the world was like in 2019. And that's the main goal. And if we just get back to where our schools were in the past, we're gonna find that this is a permanent loss to our kids. Because they've lost this learning over this period of time, and they're gonna be put back now they might be able to make up for it by having more schooling and summer school might make it. Make up for it if we could figure out how to do that, But that's really an attempt to make the school's better in order to recover from this and if we don't make the school's better in some way The kids that we see today and this cohort are going to be permanently harmed. When you say co hard. I mean, we're really talking about a generation of students that air K through 12 right now, who will have gaps? And Professor Raymond as you quantified this, especially here in Michigan. How much have our kids lost? And in same question for you? What would it take to make it up? So first let me give you the numbers that we came up with. From from our estimations. In reading. We found that the average student in Michigan lost about two thirds of a year of their reading, learning. And, uh, in Mass, they lost almost the full year. Um, I want to stress, though, that those averages, um, have a lot of variation around them. And of particular concern for you Sitting in Detroit. It turns out that in large urban areas in in areas where schools enroll large percentages of students that have educationally disadvantaged in one way or another, those impacts are even larger. And so we have to think not just about getting kids back into school, but we have to think very dramatically and seriously how we're going to take kids where they show up. That they're going to be all over the map and move them forward. And so the kinds of educational innovation that we need that professor hander shack is talking about is really a pressing crisis right this very minute. And how did we do relative to other states? Oh, well, you are not the worst and not the best. Uh, I would say you are pretty close to the midpoint of states in the loss of reading that you have, um, but I'd have to say that you're slightly worse than average in the math losses that you incurred. Yeah, but just by looking at the numbers that were in your study, it looked to me like we were number six out of 18 that you studied, including the District of Columbia, which is which is still not a Ah, good thing by any means, Professor Hannah chicas. You look at this through the neck Economic lens. If we don't recover what the kids have lost in terms of learning. How much will that impact their lifetime earnings over the they're working life. Well, if we got back to 2019 schools today or or soon, as you noted, Michigan is moving toward trying to get in class instruction going within the next month. We're talking about. On average 69% of lifetime earnings for this current cohort. Hand is, Professor Raymond pointed out. There's high, highly variable responses. And basically, we're Pretty certain that disadvantaged kids to find and in common in other ways are going to do much worse than the average kid. So some parents And help their kids and they haven't lost so much. But other parents aren't helping their kids are making sure that they're there in the canton engaged and they're gonna lose more than 69% of their lifetime earnings. This is a real number. This is a big number. You said 6 to 9% or 69% to 9 somewhere in that plane for on average. 69% is that they're going home for life, right? Yeah, Yeah, yeah, that was like a shock to the heart there for a moment. Let me let me ask it, but it's still 69% of your income over your lifetime is a considerable amount and can make the difference between being in the middle class and not On. By the way we speak to a universe of counties with this radio station. We have a very, very big signal, so we cover a lot of rural areas. Are you finding the same kind of disadvantages in rural areas that you're finding an urban Oh, Matthew, do you want it? Yeah, sure. Uh, we did find that, uh, that the location of the school had a negative impact the further away you got from suburban schools so you could go either direction. Urban schools were worse in suburban and rural schools were worse than suburban..

Matthew Stanford University 2019 6 90% Detroit 69% Margaret Raymond District of Columbia Craig Raymond today Eric Handshake Michigan Hannah 9% 9 first 18 more than 69%
"professor hannah" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

06:37 min | 9 months ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Back in Macquarie's algorithms and data addition. You never thought we'd go there, but we did. there. I got chuck of course and a Professor Hannah fry associate professor of Mathematics at University College London share with earlier in the session that you live in Greenwich and we've all heard of Greenwich. Even if you've never been there Greenwich time that's. The time the base time of the world, right? You get kind of cocky about that. Swagger around. House. She took me to move to Greenwich. I've any live three years. We'll say, but it takes me to move to Greenwich to realize that Greenwich Meantime is. The word meaning it actually means average made across an anti. that. Tireless Course Twenty four hours a day twenty four hours. It's twenty thousand average. Exactly yeah the time it takes. The time it takes the Sun to return to its spot on the sky on average is twenty four hours. Sometimes it takes longer sometimes. It tastes less people. Don't know that yeah. Yeah I was happily drinking Greenwich Meantime. LAGA and wandering around the Greenwich Meantime Village and I didn't realize the. Average mean. Has Nothing to do with the emotional state of your tone. So Chuck. We left off. Someone upset that He didn't learn the meaning of Algorithm in school, but I think there's a question based. On. What does it mean to use algorithm so okay and then how? Like a well, a recipe is an algorithm, but I like what had to distinction is making as we go forward in the twenty first century that we think of Algorithms as an automated procedure. It makes vision and I think that there's a distinction there as well between Algorithm and official intelligence. I think like the the way I think this is. Got US a spotlight. OBE Is connected to the Internet. And you'd science program. attends on six twelve. There's off eleven o'clock, so that's an algorithm. Right US program that you said if it six o'clock ten Ryan. If it had on whether that's just a straightforward anger them. If he was office intelligence, generally speaking, most people agree ozzfest intelligence needs to include some aspect of learning so instead lightbulb would. That you came home at six contended light on. It would recognize the Alliance Jim, the switch nine PM. You do some reading on the eager to eleven bucks. I startled to learn environment, and then impose rules itself council on intentions. And, but but but that's simply an up dateable them. Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly something. That's continually revising broker. By the way you. Go I was going to say in addition to that, though it is also more importantly pattern recognition. So the update is based on the recognition of patterns. Yeah completely, which was really good until very recently. How are you scared me a little when you began that comment because you said imagine a smart lightbulb and I thought aren't smart robots enough acco-. What would smart lightbulb? Might both marching down the street. Smart Light Bulbs. Must Die? In order for us to sign, humans must die exactly, and in fact they would. They would dig up the joke from There's a comedian whose twitter handle is the science comedian and I quote him every now, and then one of my one of my favorite jokes of his comments was the light bulb. was such a good idea. It became a symbol for a good idea. So. Light Bulbs become overlords. There will remind us that. Anytime. We think something brilliant. that. Don't think we don't know what you're thinking. Well, we only know what you're thinking. It's a good thing. If? It's a good thought we know it. That's funny. Brian Mala if anybody WANNA dig about. Okay so I got another question there? Check sure thing This is Ben Sellers in Ben wants to know this from an evolution stamped when relationships of mating behaviors probably follow patterns useful for hunter-gatherers gatherers, how to our behaviors on social media and dating websites resemble patterns from more primitive days. What would make interacting online more connected to our primitive programming now I don't know if this is your purview, but is he's making a really. You know pretty pretty poignant associated, which is we now find people online. That's how we find love. Now I mean an and the members only going up every year. Do the Hunter Gatherer Brains sets actually applied to the way that we go after one another digitally and have been like foraging foraging for lovers. Hunter Gatherer. foraging swipe rights swipe. Actually one of the very first by. stay because I did this. Really silly talk was like actually supposed to be the kind of private. Jake, it just really out hands, which was cool. The massive love was impart looking at data or online dating websites and I. It was kind of this thing. I just wanted to demonstrate that you can take a mathematical view to everything anyway, tear me out of hand and ends up being tedtalk and in that. That was something that was really interesting. I think he's Today's. which is just just a quick thing Anna most people who have thoughts that get out of hand. Don't end up giving Ted. So so it requires some level of brilliant to. Wanted to distinguish you from everybody else. It'd countered. To, so your tedtalk guess? For number of years in Burston, people started calling me dogs love and I was like it was just a guys. It's never been serious I'm really not Dr Love Anyway.

Greenwich Greenwich Meantime Greenwich Meantime Village US Professor Hannah fry Macquarie University College London Burston associate professor of Mathema Hunter Gatherer Brains Chuck Ben Sellers Anna Ted Jim Brian Mala official Ryan Jake
"professor hannah" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:30 min | 10 months ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And because of that because you're certainly there was doctors in the room whiting just standing there waiting to take him on and he only had thirty seconds with a newborn baby before nurses took him off the say I took a lot to special cat and I was taken to isolation and to attend a board it's about three or four hours later when the midwives came in and she was almost in tears nine nine nine or it's we don't have the results yet it's just I have to tell you the results come back positive I Straley essence the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected or tested positive to the virus had given birth in conditions similar to abbey's it's brutal dot it's to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with a pandemic is being fought once the restrictions are more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates in the United States are pushing the legally mandated berthing rights I sent to many women even those that aren't sick New York especially have been forced to give birth alarm and then separated from the baby here in Australia it's been nice finisher hospitals have tried to ensure all collided moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to abide maternity experts are worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures but it's really important that we don't intrude on all impact on human rights that are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful thoughts professor Hannah Dahlen from the school of nursing midwifery at western Sydney university so I am concerned to west some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have hot now we have had some concerning reports where pediatricians in neonatologist a recommended in the case of code that nineteen being confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby and then there are some other things such as being excluded from water buckle not having it available to dole in a hospital or not having gas and now they're not necessarily based on strong evidence she's these reports are mainly coming from private hospitals and she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating it is the C. sections even if.

abbey United States New York Australia Hannah Dahlen western Sydney university whiting Bob professor dole
"professor hannah" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:10 min | 10 months ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Came in and she was almost in tears nine nine nine or it's we don't have the results yet it's just I have to tell you the results come back positive to Straley essence the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected or tested positive to the virus had given birth in conditions similar to abbey's it's brutal dot it's to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with a pandemic is being fought once the restrictions are more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates in the United States a pushing the legally mandated thirteen writes I sank to many women even those that aren't sick New York especially having forced to give birth alarm and then separated from the baby here in Australia it's been nice finisher hospitals have tried to install covert moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to abide maternity experts are worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures but it's really important that we don't intrude on all impact on human rights that are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful thoughts professor Hannah Dahlen from the school of nursing midwifery at western Sydney university so I am concerned with some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have hot now we have had some concerning reports where pediatricians in neonatologist a recommended in the case of code that nineteen being confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby and then there are some other things such as being excluded from water birth or not having it available to dole in a hospital or not having gas and now they're not necessarily based on strong evidence she's these reports are mainly coming from private hospitals and she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating it is the C. sections even if.

abbey United States New York Australia Hannah Dahlen western Sydney university Bob professor dole
"professor hannah" Discussed on Correspondents Report

Correspondents Report

11:03 min | 10 months ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on Correspondents Report

"They even though they've been classified as vulnerable group. Pregnant women have so far not shown themselves to be particularly vulnerable to the extremities of coveted non team. But there's no doubt that pregnancies and births around the world have been disrupted even in Australia. Pregnant women have missed out on important appointments and support services like mother's groups and birthing classes and for women who've been suspected or tested positive for the virus pregnancy and childbirth has been traumatic Catherine Gregory reports that maternal health experts are now looking at how to prevent any long lasting impacts. These pandemic could have on new mothers and their babies look. It wasn't sure she'd get to hear these miraculous. Sounds my waters break? I was thirty one weeks and six days so we came to the hospital. Thirty seven year olds spent the night Victorian Maternity Hospital by herself. Luckily I didn't gone to live within the next morning. I recall my husband and he left in a hurry but husband never got further than the hospitals front desk. You can't come into also and you need to get checked for carbon scandal. Has He was about to enter and found he had a favor. Sorry basically like a really sorry you husbands not going to be for the lie in ways to treat you like you have carbon sorry smashed up and secluded up. And that's when Abby Real nightmare began. She was facing childbirth alone. I'm by the side. A little bit of pioneer. That asked with some high relief and will live. You can't have guests now because you might have carbon then the stock transferred into special boosting room an isolated one by that stage. They checked me. I was now ten centimeters dilated and there was going to be our pain relief at all and now husband merciful person. Sorry I started freaking out a little bit and then came be pays Yoda me. We'd no drugs. I think I just Kinda ran into shock. Mars surreal experience. And because because you early doctors in the room whiting just standing there waiting to take him as soon as he was born only had thirty seconds with her newborn baby before nurses took him offer. Say I took them up to spatial. Katya and I was taken to isolation in the world so it's about three or four one of the midwives came in and she was almost in tears and I said I know you're GonNa Seiger's narrowing are it's we have the results yet. It's just I have to tell you the results come back positive until you've Corinthian Stralia. Since the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected tested positive for the virus have given birth in conditions similar to Abbey's it's brutal bought needs to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with pandemic has been far worse the restrictions on more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates. In the United States a pushing the legally mandated. Birthing rights. Face ain't too many women even those that aren't sick. New York especially have been forced to give birth alarm and then separated from their baby here in Australia. Each Spain less of an issue hospitals have tried to ensure covered. Moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to a Bite. Maternity experts a worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures. But it's really important that we don't intrude on oil impact on human rights. That are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful. That's Professor Hannah. Dolon from the School of Nursing Midwifery at Sydney University. Though I am concerned West some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have pa. We have had some concerning reports. Where Pediatricians Indiana technologists recommending in the case of cove in nineteen being a confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby And then there are some other things such as being excluded from water birth or not having it available at all in a hospital or not having guests in air. That are not necessarily based on strong evidence Jason's days reports are mainly coming from private hospitals. And she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating theatres for C. Sections even if there is no risk. The thing is while the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and gynecologists have issued guidance. The health practitioners. There's no standard approach across different hospitals. Health districts in states then needs to be some level of adherence particularly to the international guidelines. So one of the very concerning bits is where mothers and babies are separated when that strongly recommend that they have skin-to-skin all of the recommendations have come out saying that women should have a support person with her at. That's very concerning. When we see deviations I ask her about Abbie's experience I can tell you as a midwife hearing the Midwest speaking that they're the points we john heartbreaks. 'cause it's the last thing we want to do. All of us in on the planet at the moment with the best way forward. Sometimes we get it right. Don't in Abbey's the separation from her baby was in part because he was premature and had to be transferred to the special nursery AB holds. No Grudges Shay says. Medical staff did the very best on the exceptional circumstances. I don't think they've learned from Auburn. Smaby twenty minutes. Not I can. I can understand the restrictions and it's not the staff it's hospital it's the rules favor. Bec- having a baby is already daunting fear of complicated birth possible fetal abnormalities and Painting parenthood. Now imagine amplifying that with the global penick where there's the worry of getting seek giving birth alone or even just not having the same level and frequency of pre and post natal care for any of these trouble in Lhasa. I'm actually visiting my midwife. One of Sydney's major maternity hospitals. Get up in a face mask but first. There's the chick at the front desk. He felt his head. I to Paul. Had BEEN DOUSE MY HANDS IN SANITIZER? He I'm Ju- in about a month but I've only seen my midwife a handful of times and this is my second loss appointment so I'm not allowed to record my point that we did talk a lot about changes to how to be looked after from here on the thing is anti-nato visits have effectively been caught by almost half it means in this late stage of pregnancy where. I usually get an appointment like once a week. It's now reduced to one every two or three weeks. It means sooner fewer blood-pressure fatal hot right chicks. That sort of stuff and to be honest does make me a little bit nervous. The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of obstetricians and gynecologists says while some appointments can be replaced with telehealth counseling. It's not an ideal why to manage pregnancy. It's a risk versus benefit. Scenario midwives agree but what is the risk of some of these things that we're doing by stretching out visits do is that GonNa Cole is more of a problem or more of risk for pregnant women and their babies than the risk of chain Palmer is a private practice midwife. This means she does home and hospital births. Operating out of West Mate in Western. Sydney really makes me anxious that we're doing these things. Some hospitals are even limiting pain. Relief medication regardless of whether women have coit gas and water births are considered infection risks and then postnatal care which has been limited. I'm with reduced support. They'RE GONNA be less babies that'll have We'll be Potentially that has long term implications breastfeeding protective against a whole lot of Infections for number one so really really difficult to give good price night. Okay I I've Zoom for instance. She's worried about what this means the postpartum recovery and the potential for more cases of postnatal depression the College of Obstetricians President John Roach. Hsieh's the concern. We know that women are increased risk of depression. Enough I think that will only be worse at a time of crosses such as these that this will only engendering as hospitals learn how to manage the risk of Nineteen and adapt the collagen midwives. Atoning Beth Chris to reducing the impacts of the pandemic on new families. Vj Right evidence that during times across the incidents personal depression increases and so the first step is a wins. The second is be screening so that we identified as women who suffering and also remembering. The partners can experience anxiety and depression as well support service perinatal anxiety and depression. Australia or panda says. It's received twenty percent increase in calls for help between February and April. We see with women reporting anxiety and isolation because of covert nineteen restrictions. It's also noted a particular jump in women needing help immediately post birth because they sent home from hospital sooner without those follow up and face to face appointments CEO Julie Burn and cough is particularly worried about a spike in cases of postnatal depression which she doesn't think we'll be going away anytime soon as we know that some of those financial family pressures that are not usually there for. I'm people really will have a lasting impact on people's capacity sort of bounce out of those feelings of bank flattened stock from bushfires to this pandemic to what that might mean you know in the next six to twelve months after they give birth. What what are these sort of.

depression Australia Abbey Sydney Victorian Maternity Hospital Catherine Gregory New Zealand College of Obstetr United States Bob Spain Indiana Corinthian Stralia Lhasa Katya whiting Professor Hannah Beth Chris West Mate
Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

Correspondents Report

05:47 min | 10 months ago

Concerns over new mothers and babies during COVID-19

"They even though they've been classified as vulnerable group. Pregnant women have so far not shown themselves to be particularly vulnerable to the extremities of coveted non team. But there's no doubt that pregnancies and births around the world have been disrupted even in Australia. Pregnant women have missed out on important appointments and support services like mother's groups and birthing classes and for women who've been suspected or tested positive for the virus pregnancy and childbirth has been traumatic Catherine Gregory reports that maternal health experts are now looking at how to prevent any long lasting impacts. These pandemic could have on new mothers and their babies look. It wasn't sure she'd get to hear these miraculous. Sounds my waters break? I was thirty one weeks and six days so we came to the hospital. Thirty seven year olds spent the night Victorian Maternity Hospital by herself. Luckily I didn't gone to live within the next morning. I recall my husband and he left in a hurry but husband never got further than the hospitals front desk. You can't come into also and you need to get checked for carbon scandal. Has He was about to enter and found he had a favor. Sorry basically like a really sorry you husbands not going to be for the lie in ways to treat you like you have carbon sorry smashed up and secluded up. And that's when Abby Real nightmare began. She was facing childbirth alone. I'm by the side. A little bit of pioneer. That asked with some high relief and will live. You can't have guests now because you might have carbon then the stock transferred into special boosting room an isolated one by that stage. They checked me. I was now ten centimeters dilated and there was going to be our pain relief at all and now husband merciful person. Sorry I started freaking out a little bit and then came be pays Yoda me. We'd no drugs. I think I just Kinda ran into shock. Mars surreal experience. And because because you early doctors in the room whiting just standing there waiting to take him as soon as he was born only had thirty seconds with her newborn baby before nurses took him offer. Say I took them up to spatial. Katya and I was taken to isolation in the world so it's about three or four one of the midwives came in and she was almost in tears and I said I know you're GonNa Seiger's narrowing are it's we have the results yet. It's just I have to tell you the results come back positive until you've Corinthian Stralia. Since the pandemic began about half a dozen women who've been suspected tested positive for the virus have given birth in conditions similar to Abbey's it's brutal bought needs to protect doctors nurses and other patients from the virus overseas in countries with pandemic has been far worse the restrictions on more extreme lawyers and human rights advocates. In the United States a pushing the legally mandated. Birthing rights. Face ain't too many women even those that aren't sick. New York especially have been forced to give birth alarm and then separated from their baby here in Australia. Each Spain less of an issue hospitals have tried to ensure covered. Moms and Bob stay together but now as the virus appears to a Bite. Maternity experts a worried about the long term impacts of some of these measures. But it's really important that we don't intrude on oil impact on human rights. That are not necessarily going to be beneficial or even potentially harmful. That's Professor Hannah. Dolon from the School of Nursing Midwifery at Sydney University. Though I am concerned West some facilities are suggesting that the woman be accompanied by nobody not even have pa. We have had some concerning reports. Where Pediatricians Indiana technologists recommending in the case of cove in nineteen being a confirmed that the woman be separated from her baby And then there are some other things such as being excluded from water birth or not having it available at all in a hospital or not having guests in air. That are not necessarily based on strong evidence Jason's days reports are mainly coming from private hospitals. And she's heard of cases where partners aren't allowed in operating theatres for C. Sections even if there is no risk. The thing is while the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and gynecologists have issued guidance. The health practitioners. There's no standard approach across different hospitals. Health districts in states then needs to be some level of adherence particularly to the international guidelines. So one of the very concerning bits is where mothers and babies are separated when that strongly recommend that they have skin-to-skin all of the recommendations have come out saying that women should have a support person with her at. That's very concerning. When we see deviations I ask her about Abbie's experience I can tell you as a midwife hearing the Midwest speaking that they're the points we john heartbreaks. 'cause it's the last thing we want to do. All of us in on the planet at the moment with the best way forward. Sometimes we get it right.

Catherine Gregory Australia Victorian Maternity Hospital Katya United States Corinthian Stralia Spain BOB Whiting Indiana Midwest New Zealand College Of Obstetr Abbie New York Professor Hannah Abbey John Heartbreaks PA Jason
"professor hannah" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Out S K, L dot S H slash majority report to all right? Quick break. When we come back. We're gonna be talking to professor Hannah Hollmann about empires and dust bowls and ecological disasters and lessons of history. We are back. Sam cedar on the majority report on the phone. It is a pleasure to welcome to the program. Assistant professor of sociology at Amherst college, author of dust bowls of empire, imperialism environmental politics, and the injustice of green capitalism Hannah Hallman welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. So let's start with first of because I think I think they're probably more folks than we would imagine who are just simply not aware or to the extent that they are not deeply aware of what the dust bowl was. Well, so the dust bowl is a is a turn that used to refer to an ecological crisis. That was situated in the southern plains region of the United States and that really reached its peak in the nineteen thirties. And so when most people referred to the dust bowl, they're talking about the crisis of soil erosion that follow and that was exacerbated by drought in the nineteen thirties. But that followed the expansion of cash crop agriculture in the southern plains region. And so the southern plains region a lot of the ecology there are these incredible grasslands, and I don't know if you're listeners are not familiar, these these grasses that developed on the southern plains have roots that are, you know, go down eight twelve fourteen feet underground when all of that was plowed up to expand agriculture and ranching it left the soil loose and bear. And so that exp. The cash crop agriculture expanded really rapidly in the region in the late eighteen hundreds, but especially in the early nineteen hundreds and during World War One and when drought descended on the region in the nineteen thirties that loosened dried soil just lifted into the air and Retallack across the land. And so your listeners may be familiar with images of the Oki's or folks from Texas going out west because they were displaced from the land because of the dust bowl Ken burns made a kind of famous documentary about it. But a lot of those images that we associate with the nineteen thirty especially displaced farmers from that region. The the cause of that was the combination of dust bowl. And obviously this is taking place at the same time as the great depression. And so it was a it was a serious social and ecological crisis in the southern plains region in the nineteen thirties. How much? Much of the the amid I guess, you know, some data points. I'm curious about like, I mean, how many how many people we talking about vaguely or specifically, I guess who were displaced essentially in many respects becoming internal refugees. Right. And and to what extent did this? Exacerbate the great depression? Right. Well, so for farmers that were on the affected land. It was obviously devastating. You already have an economic collapse that that led to displace people's for many parts of the United States. People were roaming around looking for work..

United States Hannah Hallman Hannah Hollmann Assistant professor of sociolo professor Amherst college Sam cedar Retallack Ken burns Oki Texas eight twelve fourteen feet
"professor hannah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Perhaps tomorrow man, we might have bad down on this main thing about the Highlander center. So I can share with you a lot of oil from about it. A lot of people are not aware. They used to be called the Highlander folk center. But it is probably one of the most important is one of the most important sites connected to the civil rights movement in but country. Okay. And white supremacists. Have burned it down. Four zero four eight nine two seven zero three need to get up to what's going on brother. If you know, we talk about the movement with Florida there is there's a movement of foot among white supremacists. White nationalist and sympathizers to that movement of that we are caught up in and we respond into. Just just won't you to be clear. I wanted to be no when when we look back historically at this time in this country. I won't record to reflect that I was crying out. Okay. That I was making noise about this. And that was warning us. We need to pull together and plan about how to respond. We need to give that needs to be national attention given to these kinds of occurrences, and we need to connect the dots and make the connections. So that the larger country and and the world. Can be made aware of the connection that all leads to a white supremacist movement to dilute the power the little power that black people have and to contribute to the destruction of anything that looked like a black liberation movement. Four nine two seven zero three. This is a related story in a very real way. The last survivor of US slave ships has been discovered the last known survivor of the trans Atlantic slave trade brought to the US. Eighteen sixty has been identified. Bye. Professor at Newcastle university. The woman's name was Sally Smith, she was kidnapped from west Africa by slave traders. And she actually lived in Alabama. Until nineteen thirty seven. She lived on the plantation where she had been in slaved. Professor Hannah Durkin made the discovery while researching firsthand accounts archives. Simpson's records the previous last knows of ever had been a former formerly person who died in nineteen thirty five. Dr Durkin says it seems almost shocking. That the story is so close to living memory, no doubt. My mama was born in nineteen thirty six this woman lived until nineteen thirty seven. So there is an overlap. The woman who had been named Sally Smith in the US. Her name was Ridolfi. She was kidnapped by flav traders eighteen sixty from village now in what is now -benin. She was twelve years old, which he was transported. One of the last ships to the US along with more than one hundred other men, women and children. Brothers and sisters. It has been a very long time. This is what this story is to help to relate to you. It hasn't been a long time since black people were in slave. It hasn't been Jim crow existed when I was born. I need for us. To relate to those who are coming behind us. Who may not know may not be familiar with may not have a grasp of. Our history to be clear that we talk about two lifetime. We're talking about two generations. In overlap to slavery. We've talked about me and my mama. Okay. Need to you know, we got to wake up, ladies and gentlemen. My sound like I'm being a dead horse. But this was needs to be beaten. Was so wild and crazy about the world is. Life in America. And is like a rarely if ever quote. White. The alot jobs. White of ministers. But. Rick Warren had a thing that you said that life is like a train track. While some bad things happen at some good things happen. And I want you to look at this. If you would. Life is like a train track. Bad things happen to good things happen simultaneously. The main thing to maintain the main thing today on one is where a wins day. We celebrating. Hopefully, what would be a good thing. In the city. Call the shot. Shutout city has elected its first black woman, and I open league gay person to lead the city. The sister's name is Lori Lightfoot and in and historic election that fell to black women competing to become of the nation's third largest city voters in Chicago Tuesday night shows Lori Lightfoot to become the first black woman, I openly gay person to lead the city as mayor. And so. Man, if she she beat the brakes off preckwinkle. She was running against who was. Presidente Cook County board of commissioners. So the main thing for today. With the election of Laurie. Life foot, the first black woman, I overly gay person elected to leave the city of Chicago. Do you believe? That. This country has actually change for the better. Do you think that is actually changing for the worse? Women's world Wednesday. We all over forty five right now. We'll be black. We get back with more this day. This is black talk the hard way about play with you. Better. Are we going toward better times? We hit it toward worst time in this country. I see you on the radio on other side of break. Don't leave me your brother to Queen the soul, and we'll be black when we.

Sally Smith US Highlander folk center Professor Hannah Durkin Highlander center Chicago Florida Lori Lightfoot Newcastle university Rick Warren Professor Alabama Cook County Simpson Jim crow Ridolfi America Laurie west Africa
"professor hannah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

07:08 min | 2 years ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Is probably one of the most important is one of the most important sites connected to the civil rights movement in the country. Okay. And white supremacists. Have burned it down. Four zero four eight nine two two seven zero three y'all need to get up to what's going on sisters and brothers. This is you know, we talk about the movement with slaughter. There is there is a movement afoot among white supremacist, white, nationalist and sympathizers to that movement. That we are caught up in and we ate respond into. Just want you to be clear I wanted to be no when when we look back historically at this time in this country. I want to record to reflect that I was crying out. Okay. That I was making noise about this. And that was warning us. We need to pull together and plan about how to respond. We need to give there needs to be national attention given to these kinds of occurrences, and we need to connect the dots and make the connections. So that the larger country and the world. Can be made aware of the connection that all leads to a white supremacist movement to dilute the power the little power that black people have and to contribute to the destruction of anything that looks like a black liberation movement. For forty nine two two seven zero three. This is a related story in a very real way. The last survivor of US slave ships has been discovered the last known survivor of the trans Atlantic slave trade. Brought to the US in eighteen sixty has been identified. Bye. Professor at Newcastle university. The woman's name was Sally Smith. She was kidnapped. From west Africa by slave traders. And she actually lived in Alabama. Until nineteen thirty seven. She lived on the plantation where she had been enslaved. Professor Hannah Durkin made the discovery while researching firsthand accounts archives and census records the previous lasts. No survivor had been former formerly enslaved person who died in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. Dr Dirk and says, it seems almost shocking. That the story is so close to living memory, no doubt. My mama was born in one thousand nine hundred thirty six this woman lived until nineteen thirty seven. So there is an overlap. The woman who had been named Sally Smith in the US. Her name was redundancy. She was kidnapped by slave traders in eighteen sixty from a village now in what is now Benin. She was twelve years old, which he was transported. One of the last ships to the US. Along with more than one hundred other men, women and children. Brothers and sisters. It hasn't been a very long time. This is what this story is to help to relate to you. It hasn't been a long time since black people worrying slave. It hasn't been a Jim crow existed when I was born. I need for us. To relate to those who are coming behind us. Who may not know may not be familiar with may not have a grasp of. Our history to be clear that we talk about two lifetime. We're talking about two generations. Overlap to slavery. We've talked about me and my mama. Okay. Need to you know, we got to wake up, ladies and gentlemen. It may sound like I'm beating a dead horse. But this horse needs to be beaten. Right. You know, so wild and crazy about the world is. Life in America. And is like a and I rarely if ever quote. White. The white ministers. But. Rick Warren had a thing that he said that life is like a train track. While some bad things are happening. Some good things happening. I wanted you to look at this. If you if you would. Life was like a train track while bad things happen. Good things happen simultaneously. For the main thing to maintain. The main thing today on a windows were a wins day. We are celebrating. Hopefully, what will be a good thing. In the city. Call the shy. Shutdown city has elected its first black. Woman, and I open Lee gay person to lead the city. The sister's name is Lori Lightfoot and in and historic election that saw two black women competing to become mayor of the nation's third largest city voters in Chicago Tuesday night, chose Lori Lightfoot to become the first black woman, I openly gay person to lead the city as mayor. And so. Man, she she beat the brakes off preckwinkle.

Sally Smith US Lori Lightfoot Professor Hannah Durkin Rick Warren Newcastle university Professor Alabama Benin Dr Dirk west Africa Chicago Jim crow America twelve years
"professor hannah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"professor hannah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Where it's been sitting but it tastes to really good it's like the earth but the permafrost here is no longer reliable there's washer instead of ice at the bottom of naomi seller there are some that has that are not working anymore because of the changing weather he he's he he he hey travel across the arctic ocean over the north pole and you reach svalbard a group of islands administered by norway but home to research stations belonging to france germany russia the uk and even china with so many scientists here the melting of the ice and the following of the permafrost are monitored very carefully showed was religious hoover here and further than seeks to and in each and then after that for lashed the show to show to five years rashid ahmad is persistent too much who increase via only hamlin is a geographer at onus the university center in style bart the only rule where we could work on frozen samples ullah is married to geology professor hannah christiansen it's minus seventeen in recent today she keeps our core samples from the foul bart permafrost in a woken freezer at onus not only do we measured the temperature of the permafrost and robert but we also meant monitoring and measuring the thickness of the thawed later the actively on top of the permafrost that develops every summer win energy is provided to the ground and then we can monitor that and we've been doing that for fifteen sixteen years now so we know that an average over that period of time where temperatures have gone off we see an increase in the sickness of the actually over off around half the centre mutetwa centimeter of course varies between years so that means that we're losing that amount of permafrost from this area that we are monitoring lacked though flowing permafrost can release the climate warming gas meesane which is even more damaging than carbon dioxide it also causes local problems most.

russia uk china rashid ahmad hamlin carbon dioxide naomi norway france germany professor hannah christiansen fifteen sixteen years five years