5 Episode results for "Professor Andrew Jackson"

Babbage: The fast and the spurious

The Economist: Babbage

26:50 min | 1 year ago

Babbage: The fast and the spurious

"The Drugs and vaccines for Kobe, nineteen are appearing faster than ever. Put Our government's approving them to easily. The Klay Message to any other government is don't start dropping your citizens with vaccines do not properly tested. It's just not worth it. Hello, and welcome to baggage from economist radio our weekly podcast on technology and science. I'm Kenneth Kooky a a senior editor at the Economist and coming up on today's show. Musk's quest to wire a computer into the human brain. What they demonstrated. The other night was a device that can record from a thousands and twenty four, these the wise a thousand brain cells. And every breath you tank. Just, light breathing display over a couple of minutes youth can really feel this change in your body. But I Any new effective vaccine will be given emergency approval by the British government, which aims to move with unprecedented speed. In America Donald Trump has promised to deliver a vaccine before the end of the year. Yet this week he said the administration will not work with the World Health. Organization. Linked effort to develop distribute a covert nineteen vaccine. While drugs and vaccines are vital to controlling covid nineteen. The WHO warned that a vaccine that is only moderately effective could actually worsen the pandemic. On August Eleventh Vladimir Putin of Russia declared victory push the. Each potential. Another government made the claim that it was the world's first approve of Vaccine Sputnik Five. This involves injecting people with a harmless virus that has been modified to express one of the proteins made by SARS cough to the virus that causes covert nineteen. The approach is similar to other vaccine candidates around the world veteran trials. But the speed of sputnik five use raises troubling issues. We know very little about the testing of this vaccine such as how long it was tested for. In, for long because it was given to only seventy six people, Tasha loader is the economists health policy editor. The results of the tests have not been published. The Russian said they've also tested the vaccine animals. Those results have not been published either and so really we haven't information vacuum about his except for what the institute the did. The studies have said to us, which is very little. How did that come to be approved so quickly? Well, I mean. The Russian government simply decided that it didn't go through the sorts of normal trials that you would expect a vaccine. It redrew the finishing line. You know there are a lot of covert vaccines around the world going through was a called phase three trials and the pappas phase three trials is that you give them to thousands and thousands of people on you find out firstly, if the vaccine works secondly, if in thousands of people, it's still safe tested. Thousands of people that you really get a good signal in a large number of people to serve whether it is really well tolerated. So I suppose there is a thing called best practices in drug development and they're not actually adhering to it. Yes. Absolutely. But the Russians are not the only ones who have been doing this and they may not have been the first earlier this year. One of our correspondents in Beijing had told us that he'd heard. Anecdotal. Reports. Airport workers were being given a Chinese vaccine on the sort of reports that we're hearing now from China that some workers in state-owned industries had been given a vaccine seem to agree with those sort of anecdotal reports we were hearing. So I think it's quite clear that some countries willing to relax the normal requirements for medicine safety in order to just move quickly. Now, that's not something that we should expect to see in countries and regions with. Agencies that a much more independent that governments that makes you think about the governments of Russia and China. They have much more of a stranglehold if you like over the regulatory agencies, one would hope that the regulatory agencies in other countries have a bit more spine and will wait the results of phase three trials that is banned minimum trust to move ahead safely vaccine development. So what's the problem of rushing it? Will the problem is the vaccine could be unsafe and there's a couple of ways in which a vaccine could be safe one it could come with side effects thought all dodging dangerous. You do get ready neurological conditions triggered. The other concern is something cooled vaccine enhanced disease. This is where you give someone vaccine. and. Lowering the risk that someone gets sick or dies from a disease, it actually increases it and you know we've seen signs of vaccine enhanced diseases in talk development. In the past, it's not particularly common, but it is something that can happen and doctors y you put vaccines through phase three trials. You you need to rule out that problem you need to make sure that the vaccine you give to someone is not going to give him side effect ten it's not going to make Cova nineteen us. Now. It's not just Russia or China that's been rapidly improving vaccines and drugs without adequate trials. On August. Twenty third president trump announced approval of the use of convalescent plasma therapy to treat covid nineteen. The FDA has issued an emergency use authorization for re-treatment known as convalescent plasma. How does that work and why was that rush to? The convalescent plasma is essentially take blood from people who've coverage from covid nineteen. Do you extract out the antibodies that they've made in their blood in something called plasma, and then you give it to someone who's sick and plasma therapies been used for over one hundred years on it works in some diseases and not in others we do think convalescent plasma is promising therapy this question of Shit and there are trials going on the planet but as yet they haven't been very conclusive. It still sane as an experimental therapy and president trump describe this as a very historic breakthrough. This is what I've been looking to do for a long time. This is a great thing today. I'm pleased to make a truly historic announcement and are. The FDA Looked at the results of one trial and said, there's enough evidence to authorize it to use. It's former drug approval, and there's a couple of problems with this one is the the evidence is really poor. It's not randomized controlled trial told those. nope. To See by group is just to trial where some patients would give convalescent plasmas sooner than others and some people are concerned that the group that had the high mortality actually had more sicker patients in it, and that's one of the problems when you're not doing randomized controlled trial. Another one of the issues is really that it was just so badly handled by the FDA the head of the FDA cutoff and announced that thirty five people of every hundred treated with compliment plasma with be saved on that number was just completely wrong he had. Gotten his statistics wrong heat confused, relative, and absolute risk on. The actual figure it was more like three lives saved cools that's worth having, but it certainly isn't very historic breakthrough and. We really do need to kind of white for proper randomized controlled trials to really answer the question of whether this therapy wax. The touch. It seems like there's a real paradox here because in the midst of the pandemic, we want governments to act quickly. But here we think they're doing it wrong. How do we square the circle? How can we have it both ways speed plus regulatory muster? Will we have got speed? That's the kind of insane thing is that we're? Moving incredibly rapidly and the results have phase three trials for vaccines could come in in the next three or four weeks. Nobody's ever move moved quickly. So what I would say is the every legitimate step has been taken to accelerate the speed with which drugs and vaccines have moved. What people are complaining about now is that these are unreasonable stops and that essentially governments behaving and slightly risky fashion and doing. So for political reasons if the British government all. The Europeans wanted to accelerate struck vaccines like this they could but they haven't, and why is that? Well, nobody here is coming up for reelection in November asked Mr. Trump is all in China they may wish Russia may wish to sort of show what strong powerful countries they are, how they're taking care of their citizens I mean there's all sorts of political dimensions to moves that have been made Tasha voter you very much. Thank you so much can. For, more pandemic and a wide ranging look at a fast changing world subscribed to the economist go. Economists Dot. com slash podcast offer for the best introductory offer and the link is in the show notes. Again, that's a communist dot com slash podcast offer. And don't forget to tell them. Can Censure. Next up pandemic or no twenty twenty has been a bumper year, for Elon, musk inmate space x became the first private company ever to send humans into orbit. While over the past eight months, Tesla's market capitalization has more than quadrupled making it the most. Valuable car company on the planet. Last Friday another musk venture, the Niro technology company neural link which connect to computer into the human brain notched up what seems to be another win with public demonstration of its technology at use in. Aches. Aren't welcome to the product. Emma. Of Real excited we've got I think it's going to. Blow your mind. Shoot a form, the demo captured the public imagination, and trended wildly online. But as a computer enhanced human brain, really within reach the near link team is working on what's called the brain machine interface, and that involves electrodes of very spoil wise placed into the brain to record the electrical activity from brain cells. Andrew Jackson is a professor of neural interfaces at Newcastle University and what they demonstrated the other night was a device that they've built that can record. From one thousand and twenty four of these little wives about a thousand brain cells and the activity is processed by an implant that sits inside the skull, and then realize that activity wirelessly out to a receiver and the case of New Orleans pig Gertrude. I. Think her name was what activities specifically was being detected and relaid in the pig that we saw the electrodes were placed in. A sensory part of the brain related to the Peace Now. So. You're hearing are real time signals from the link in Grocery had. So this year link and says what? Was the activity of sensory neurons that were relying information about the the paycheck sniffing at various objects. They also showed a video I think they had recorded from brain cells in the motor area of the brain. When we have. Of our picks on a treadmill. Funny concept really in that video, they were suggesting that they were able to infer the movement of the pigs. On a treadmill from listening to these brain signals. In classical style this has been very snazzy presented and Garner a lot of attention but from your perspective someone who's been a lot in this field as an academic, is there anything particularly new or innovative about what neural incas done with this technology thing what they've done a nice job on is. A lot of the engineering of the device itself. So to some extent, I think they've made a lot of progress in the areas that perhaps you might expect a tech company well resourced to make make progress on. So so previously, lot of the work that has been done in animals and also some work has been using these techniques in humans has tended to use a cables connecting the electrodes in the brain through the skin to large racks of equipment. Computers and so forth powered from the mains in order to process and make sense of this data and what they've done is taken a lot of that electronics shrunk it down, made it low power. Enabling it to be placed within the skull and relaying these signals. Wirelessly, the other thing that they showed which I think is very nice is. A robot a bit like a sewing machine. To. Insert these electrodes and apparently automatically avoid blood vessels to do a minimum amount of damage. So I think all of this is very impressive where I am more skeptical is. The the claims that they're making of being able to. Sort of read thoughts and enhance brain function through this technology. There's there's quite a big gap between being able to record these brain cells compared to some of the claims that became rather more outlandish about being able to read thoughts and and read memories and things like that because to some extent that require much more progress in actually understanding how these signals relate to complex mental and cognitive functions does this have the markings of a turf war between academics and entrepreneurs because I know that he on must recently responded to? A news report in which your own criticisms of neuro link had been quoted and he said basically that his view was academics, overweight ideas and underweight bring them to fruition or less kindly that they're all talking no trousers what do you say to that? So I I think it would be very unfortunate if this ends up being a sort of tribal arguments, Elon Musk I'm sure recognizes that he's following in the footsteps of some very pioneering work in the academic field that really pushed the idea of brain machine interfaces forward of basic. Fundamental neuroscience research into practical demonstrations of devices that could help people with spinal cord injury. I think that from the academic point of view, we ought to see this as a success story that a technology that for a long time has been being developed in in the academic research arena is capturing the attention of near technology companies. So I did not mean to any of the comments that I made I didn't mean to turn this into a turf war I think that we will. All benefit from from the exchange of ideas and working together. You heard it here. First Turf War averted and Professor Jackson to end with a look forward musk said that the ultimate goal of neuro link is to usher in an age of quote super, human cognition in your view, does that claim that view of the future really belong in the realm of science fiction as far ahead as we currently see so I think it's very hard to judge these things I think that clearly Ilan Musk likes big ideas and he likes big kind of visions. I think that at the moment, the state of the technology president is that there hasn't really been demonstrated and I think it will be quite a while before anyone demonstrates a cognitive enhancement using this kind of brain machine interface technology that doesn't mean we shouldn't try and that doesn't mean that there's probably not a lot of very interesting science and maybe all sorts of other benefits that we will get along the way but I think it's important to be somewhat kind of modest and accepting of the fact that there's still an awful lot. We don't understand about the brain how the brain works and how intelligence works Professor Andrew Jackson thank you very much. Thank you for having me. Up. This podcast is supported by a vast vast is a global leader in cybersecurity trusted by over four hundred, thirty, five million users of ask privacy solutions to keep your identity and actions hidden security solutions to stop malware phishing virus attacks, and performance enhancing solutions to clean up in speed up your devices avast empowers you to feel safer private and more confident online to do what you WanNa do in your connected life shop work browse confidently on all your devices learn more about a vast privacy security and performance products at avast dot com. In finally. Take our breathing almost entirely for granted. Like the beating of the heart or the work of digestive system, it feels like a process that's been taken care of by the body beyond the need of any conscious attention. But this may not be the case in his latest book breath. The new science of a Lost Art James Nestor argues that our species has actually lost the ability to breathe correctly. And that reconnecting with ancient and largely forgotten breathing practices could bring about a host of benefits both mental and physical. The one estimate I heard was that eighty percent of the population has some sort of dysfunction in their breathing. These people don't necessarily have sleep apnea or snoring even though a large percentage of the population has that but many of them may be breathed too much or struggled to breathe a little too much or their noses are constantly plugged up and once they fixed those issues they can find. How beneficial therapeutic healthy breathing really is, let's go right there. Why is breathing? So important that's something that we do twenty five thousand times a day, and if we aren't doing it properly, our bodies have to constantly compensate for instance I've heard a one estimate of about a quarter of the population suffers from chronic over breathing. We breathe way more than our bodies actually need and if we're constantly doing. That were causing a lot of wear and tear on our heart and other systems. So if you think about it, if you're in a car and you're just reading at every stop light eventually, that's going to cause a lot of wear and tear on that car an on the engine and our bodies in many ways worth the exact same way. Did we ever do it? Well did we ever? Breathe in the best way possible and if we did, how did we ever stop or forget? Well, it's hard to breathing from ancient populations. But what we can do is we can look at the skele- pitcher of all of these ancient faces and all of these mouths and what we find is that people about five hundred years ago when industrialization of food really start ramping up, they had these huge. These huge mouse in these forward growing faces. So they had larger airways in their nasal apertures were much larger than ours, and that's why ancient people didn't have crooked teeth about ninety percent of the modern population has some sort of misalignment or crookedness in their teeth. That's because we have smaller mouths without smaller mouth with a smaller away, which is one of the reasons we have so many chronic breathing problems right now how does one breathe properly? What scientists have found is that very good resting breathing rate is about six breasts five breaths per minute. That's about five to six seconds in five to six seconds out when you do this, all of the systems in the body start to synchronize your heart rate's GonNa slow down, it's going to beat more easily your blood pressure's GonNa go down if you have high blood pressure and all of this allows the body to. Do it naturally wants to do more easily over an extended amount of time and just by breathing this way over a couple of minutes, you can really feel this change in your body. You can imagine if you do that for a couple of days or a couple of weeks or a COUPLA months, and that's what I went out to find people who had done that and had really transform their health and some miraculous way. I. James. That was incredible. That's about the worst way you can possibly breath. Okay. So. I have tried seeing other Maria breathing as well, and it seems like that really did slow me down explained to me what's going on with that? Well, you're a good Catholic So what the scientists did about twenty years ago they looked at different prayers they looked at the other Maria, they looked at satire NAMA which is a Kunda leany mantra. They looked at own money pod Meeham, which is Buddhist mantra when the most famous Buddhist mantras of all and they found that all of. These prayers locked in at that same about five to six breaths per minute because that's about that the mean of all of these different prayers and they have prophesized that these prayers not just for the religious method. But because they placed the body in this state of peace and then allowed all the systems of the body to work at peak efficiency. Now, you experimented on yourself for the book or at least you took part in research by plugging up your nostrils for days on end. Tell me about this. Yeah, just hearing that gives me a little PTSD. So I had been working with the Chief of radiology research down at Stanford and we had had many conversations and he's a nose guy. So he was saying that you know the noses is this miraculous organ were not using it as much as we should and because we're not using it, we could be suffering from all of these health problems on and on and on I said, well, how soon does the damage from mouth breathing come on and he didn't know because no one had tested it. So we developed this little experiment to where me and one other. Subject to plug our noses and just breathe through or mouths for ten days and I know that sounds like some sort of cloudy Jackass stunt that wasn't the intention because fifty percent of the modern population chronically breathes through its mouth. So we were really rolling ourselves into a state that my body already knew and that most of the population already knew but testing and within a day, I went from not snoring snoring we both got sleep apnea, my blood pressure went through the roof I mean I could give you a whole laundry list of other problems now, for listeners who want to improve their health and through their breathing. How. Quickly does this transformation take place if we start being conscious and practicing nasal breathing when can we start becoming more charismatic, handsome richer and? I can't guarantee any of those things. But if you can place your hand safely, don't do this while driving over your heart and take an inhale him to account about five or six. And then to exhale and keep exiling five six, maybe seven or eight, you're gonNA feel your heart rate. Slow down and you'RE GONNA feel. If you keep doing this take another very slow inhale Halen and a longer xl. You'RE GONNA. Probably feel some circulation to your fingers and your toes. You'RE GONNA be getting more oxygen to your brain. So this transformation that I just lead you through happened in about fifteen seconds. So if you're able to control your breathing and do it in a healthy way and allow your body to work. So efficiently, these problems so many problems attached to allergies and asthma, and they've found even with autoimmune disease and anxiety and depression. Symptoms of these problems can be abated and in some cases, people no longer report suffering from them and not sound like huge claims. But this is coming from leaders in the field at top institutions. Gyms Esther. Thank you very much This was a breath of fresh air. Thank you for having. And thank you for listening to badge while you're with us, please give us a rating on Apple podcasts or wherever you listen. I'm Kentucky and in London where I'm breathing in five seconds intervals. This is the.

Donald Trump Russia president FDA China Ilan Musk Professor Andrew Jackson British government Vladimir Putin Russian government Kobe World Health Kenneth Kooky Beijing mouth breathing senior editor Tesla
Startups Want to Meld Minds and Machines

Business Wars Daily

04:48 min | 5 months ago

Startups Want to Meld Minds and Machines

"Take the scenic route in the new hyundai. Santa fe the family. Suv with available h. Track all wheel drive to help travel way off the beaten path find new adventures together in the hyundai santa fe our new book the art of business wars features stories and lessons from history's greatest business rivalries with powerful insights uncovered through hundreds of episodes of business wars go to dot com forward slash. The art of business wars to order your copy now from wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business wars daily on this thursday april twenty second. Well here's a headline for you. A nine year old monkey named pager is causing quite the stir in the tech world. That's because he's the star of a new video released by elon musk's company neuralink. The video is simply titled monkey. Mind pong and yes. It's a short clip of pager playing that classic arcade game pong without using his hands. See pager as musk explains in the video has had two small chips which must call neuralink's inserted into his brain and the chips essentially memorize the monkey's hand movements when he uses an actual joystick to play the game so when the joystick is unplugged the chips remember those movements and let pager play pong just by thinking about moving his hands. Here's musk pager. Is the second animal to show the public. Just what the neuralink chip may be able to do last fall. A pig named gertrude demonstrated how it worked during a widely hyped livestream. Her brain signals were converted to audible beeps which grew louder as she sniffed around her pen and enjoy treats according to scientific american. I have to say in this video. Pager is remarkably good at pong and wallets a startling to watch a monkey dominated video game just by using his brain neuralink does have an important application to the real world at least according to musk. Musk tweeted that. Neuralink's first product that microchip will let people with paralysis use smartphones quote faster than someone using thumbs unquote and he says later. Versions of the chips will eventually allow people with paralysis to walk. That's a huge claim and one that neuroscientists say we shouldn't expect to see anytime soon. See musk is leaning. On decades technology researchers were able to get a monkey to move a computer cursor with his mind way back in two thousand and two professor andrew jackson of the university of newcastle. Put it plainly. Quote brain control of computer cursors by monkeys is nothing new. He told insider so even though pagers getting a whole lot of attention right now musk's goal of getting people with paralysis to walk is quite away off. just ask any number of other startups. Who were just as intent to create. Something that effortlessly. Mel's mind and machine. California based startup colonel rolled out to so-called brain machine interfaces which monitor brain activity last year. The company says they hope to use the machines which were about the size of bike helmets to help people with paralysis communicate. We should note. Neither machine requires brain surgery to work. Colonel to fifty three million dollar funding round last july and swiss company maize is hard at work developing what it calls a cognate chip which is designed to mimic the way a brain receives input from multiple sensors. According to wired the chip may not sound as cool as neuralink's but mine may see yo tej taty says that's okay with him quote. It's time to get a little more aware of what is realistically possible versus. What is still fantasy. He told wired. So sorry mr. Musk may have pager playing pong but is letting people with paralysis walk again really going to happen with the chip in the brain. That is the question that will undoubtedly keep him and many others working on similar projects up all night from wondering this business worse daily. I'm your host. David brown written and produced by jessica edited by emma quarterly. Our executive producers are jenny bauer beckmann created by earn on lok take the scenic route in the new hyundai. Santa fe the family. Suv with available h. Track all wheel drive to help. You travel way off the beaten path. Fine new adventures together in the hyundai santa fe.

hyundai paralysis neuralink Neuralink elon musk david brown Santa fe musk university of newcastle gertrude santa Musk andrew jackson tej taty Mel California Musk emma quarterly jenny bauer beckmann
Brain-Machine-Interfaces - brain manipulation or brain control?

Future Tense

29:07 min | 7 months ago

Brain-Machine-Interfaces - brain manipulation or brain control?

"This is an abc podcast own. So that was not shutterstock. That was actually a man in a black suit. No tie gets up on a knee empty stage at a conference in california and this land presentation. his name is elon musk. he's now the richest man in the world but back then he. We'll just one of the richest top anyway. His presentation is low key but the content is sensational and definitely futuristic. We will gradually increase the issues that we solved until ultimately we can do a full brain machine. Interface sound pretty weird but achieve a sort of symbiosis with artificial intelligence. But i think with a high bandwidth brain machine interface. I think we can actually go along for the ride and we can. Effectively have the option of merging with ai. Achieving sort of symbiosis with artificial intelligence. We'd it all. Hello anthony fennell here. Welcome to future tents. That presentation was two and a half years ago but musk is still deadly serious about his ambitions and moving the research. Food his company neuralink invest heavily in brain machine interface technology and they're not the only ones various research teams across. The world are hard at work trying to decode the brain signals and pair them up with various devices in the medical world that means artificial limbs in the like but in the tech sector. Well they're talking about a future in which people would use mind power to interact with their phones for example or read or even rewrite thought to cure addiction. It's those efforts and aspirations that will focus on today but what exactly is. How does it work. And how advanced is the actual science andrew jackson professor of neural interfaces at the university of newcastle in the uk. If we're talking particularly about what are known as invasive brain machine interfaces so those surgical implants to put electrodes to record signals from the brain. I think it's worth pointing out that. They have already been people with implants of electrode. Arrays usually is people with spinal cord injury or other forms of paralysis and in a very limited way the people who've had these electrodes implanted in the brain and be able to use brain signals to control movements of computers or assistive devices so the moment that the state of the art in that is about a hundred electrodes. It's a small bed of nails. Looks like a lot of about one hundred prongs millimeter long that have been placed into the brain of about probably twenty people also and the able to use these these brain machine interfaces to do kind of useful tasks controlling assisted vices there's also what could non invasive brain machine interfaces that using signals that can be picked up from the scalp so don't require the brain surgery but because those interfaces are slightly further away from the brain the quality of the signal is necessarily as good but again those interfaces have been used by people with paralysis to operate communication devices and that technology is also coming on quite a pace but at the moment most of these uses have been kind of small scale trials with with small numbers of people with major disabilities and what kind of movements The people who've for technologies being applied. What kind of movements are they able to make. They've been able to control the movement of a robot arm in three dimensions and also control grasping of that robot arm so that would assist with activities of daily living that has also been some demonstrations of control of electrical stimulation delivered to the paralyzed limb which helps the power limb itself. Move around now. These are not as accurate as fast as to normal healthy movements. But i think the technology definitely has potential to bring some kind of restoration of function to people who can't move their limbs at all and of course anything that you can provide in that. Context can be very useful to people suffering from these disparities. My name's nathan copland. And i have a brain computer interface. I was in a car accident. And i broke my neck. I'm actually a c. Five quadriplegic. So i have no sensation from the chest down i have some wrist extension when affliction and then i have no use of my fingers at all now nine had his bmi implants six years ago and he visits a lab at the university of pittsburgh three or four times. A week. so i actually have four arrays implanted to in motor cortex and to sensory cortex. And i'm actually the first human in the world to have implants in sensory cortex so what they allow me to do is basically. I can control a robotic arm and hand or a computer cursor or you know. I've played some games that use a computer emulator but basically they can just record my brain signals and convert them into things that the computer can use to control other things for nathan copeland. His bmi implant has given him confidence to speak about his condition but as beneficial as the implant has been. He says it hasn't changed his daily life in any substantial way and that's not meant as a criticism merely a reminder that this kind of technology really is still in its infancy. I am definitely the human guinea pig but it was really cool to be the first in the world to have these kind of implants. And i'm also glad to be in the position where people that decided to have these implants after me might have looked at me in thought you okay. He's doing okay and you know maybe that influence their decision in a positive way. So i think in areas of saying the control of movement. We have a fairly good idea. How the activity of brain cells in the part of the brain called the motor cortex. We have a pretty good idea of how that relates to movement largely. Because we've been able to study this for many decades in animals and now more recently in people using these these brain machine interfaces. I think what's interesting is if you go to other parts of the brain where particularly things that animals can't do so for instance. There is now pushed to a number of groups of working on as to decode speech from the brain to try to produce a speech interface. There we know much less because it's very hard to study speech in animals. So we have to use these human recordings and when we go further into the more kind of cognitive domain of things like sort of memories or decisions or emotions that is very much the edge of what neurosciences currently trying to understand and we have a pack much torah knowledge of how the brain is representing those kinds of ideas. There's tens of millions of neurons. That are active in the brain at any one time in our technology really only allows us access to hundreds of those at a time. So we're really under sampling. You know what's naturally happening. Talk to jennifer cola assistant professor in the department of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the university of pittsburgh. You know misconception in this field is that we can't just place electrodes anywhere and decode your thought. Right what we really need to do is target areas that we have at least some understanding of what the cells in that particular area of the brain are doing to dakota particular things so for example we implant are electrodes into motor cortex and specifically the area that typically controls arm and hand movements. We know that there's information mm in the firing patterns of those neurons that is correlated to the direction and speed that. You're trying to to reach for example. But it wouldn't necessarily tell us you know a letter that you're thinking of so you really do have to understand the science behind where you're trying to place these electrodes and how to interpret that code. And how does that count of technology. Work i mean how do you move a robotic. Come in that sense by using your brain so our participants they actually just think about moving their own arm essentially so the way that we calibrate our system is by having them watch either a robot or a virtual arm and hand move around in space to pick up and grasp objects and the participants. Just think about performing that action while we record their brain activity and so there's a very strong relationship like i said between the firing rate of those neurons so how often they're they're actually firing and the direction and speed that they want to go and so once we figure out that relationship by controlling the arm with the computer and looking at the brain activity we can give them control over that activity and they're really just thinking about where the hand needs to be in space to accomplish that task. We're talking about moving. A limb is it possible is the technology being developed modern able people with a disability. Talk all the here again. Say in terms of communication. What this field has focused on a lot is trying to improve the ability to interact with a computer and so there been a lot of recent studies looking at how to decode speech directly. There's two different approaches one is actually decoding control a computer cursor for example to interact with a virtual keyboard for communication or to actually try to decode those thoughts through the motor control of your mouth in an unseating. The sounds so there's been progress made in both of those directions. How difficult is that though. I mean how much progress has been made. I think in terms of the keyboard control. They're able to get communication rates. That really are starting to approach. You know one finger typing on your smartphone and that exceed what users have specified as being sufficient for control so. I think there's been quite a lot of progress. Decoding speech directly is newer. And there's a limited vocabulary of words that it's been tested but in recent years there's been quite a lot of progress there and being able to reconstruct fairly natural speech from words that have not been observed which brings us back to the tech titans and the potential thysie in brain machine. Interfaces we heard earlier where elon. Musk is looking to go. And then there's another key player to take into account as vox media's seagal samuel explains facebook wants to create a device that can literally read your mind so it's been funding research on brain machine interfaces that can pick up thought strictly from your neurons and translate them into words into english sentences. And it's been doing this for a while now but just a few months ago. The uc san francisco. Researchers that are in partnership with facebook announced that their algorithm can now translate neural activity into english sentences with an error rate of only three percent for vocabularies of three hundred words. That's a vast improvement over the capabilities. It had just one year earlier so the technology is moving quickly. What do we know about the technology. So how were they actually doing this. What makes their approach different so far. Facebook has begun by working with human participants in a study. Three volunteers with epilepsy. Who had already had electrodes surgically implanted on the surface of their brains. That was just part of preparation for neurosurgery. They were anyways going to do to treat their seizures and so facebook cad. These people listen to questions. Like how's your right now. and then. They spoke their answers out loud. A minute later that meanwhile the algorithm of facebook just by reading their brain activity was able to decode the answers with pretty high accuracy rates. So obviously if you have a technology that is going to be invasive and require electrodes surgically implanted in our brains. That's not going to be very commercially viable but the aim is to eventually move to noninvasive wearable headsets which would potentially become much more commercially viable as you said. They are climbing a deal of success in their initial research into these. How do we know that. That's the case. Have they been transparent with their techniques and funding so far or are we really at this judge just taking it on the research would well. I think a little bit of both. I mean they've released some papers. Not facebook itself rather the uc san francisco researchers that are affiliated with facebook so they have released a little bit of data but these sorts of projects tend to be kept bit under wraps. You see this also with elon. Musk's company near league which periodically likes to tease developments and results but keep things a little bit under wraps because companies like facebook neuralink and others like colonel not to mention the us military also working on similar tech are sort of rivals in competition with one another now. Facebook like long must company neuralink the not health related companies post say. What is facebook's interest in this type of technology given that it is a commercial platform. Facebook would say the short term goal is to help patients with paralysis by decoding their brain signals and allowing them to speak their thoughts without actually having to move any muscles. Which you know that could be a public good. There are millions and millions of people who live with paralysis. naturally facebook's long-term goal because long term. They want to reach a much much. Wider audience of billions of people and. That aim is to give everyone the ability to control digital devices like keyboards. Say using the power of our thoughts alone so that would be a much bigger deal if it were to happen and it has potential benefits as well as potential serious risks has anybody from facebook or in fact the university of california team who are working on these. Has anybody responded to concerns have been raised. Yeah i mean you see kind of boilerplate responses from facebook. Basically people saying you know we really care a lot about privacy of the brain data. We gather is kept strictly on the premises at the university. Where we're doing the research but facebook itself has said look. We know that we can't really foresee anticipate all the neuro. Ethical risks were incurring here. And that's why we're trying to talk to ethicists and build niro ethical design in from the ground floor but at the end of the day facebook is a company that like other companies cares about its bottom line and so it's the public might have reason to question to what extent facebook is going to prioritize the public good particularly given it does not have a good track record in terms of privacy cambridge analytica being only the most glaring of its privacy scandals. But seriously who could really have any qualms about profit-driven monopolistic social media companies seeking to control our thoughts. Well dr nicole. Vincent is happy to put up a hand. She's a senior lecturer at the university of technology. Sydney with an emphasis on neuro ethics and eurolaw reading people's minds. She says we'll have a whole series of new legal and ethical concerns including those around individual rights. You've got one set of people who don't really seem to think that this is a very different new technology however on the other hand one of the big issues that some new law school is pointing out. Is that if you're looking directly at the brain once upon a time. If i could ask you a question and you could still resisting. You could resist telling me what it is. You actually know on the other hand. If i just look at the brain this suddenly means that you can no longer withhold evidence now. I'm not suggesting that people should withhold evidence but notice that one of the big issues here has to do with the fact that people's consent isn't even required and one of the interesting issues that has come up. Is that if you leave behind physical evidence at the scene of a crime that is usually treated one way you know so we can collect this information. We can clip evidence analyzes but where comes to testimony giving testimony in court. We can't force you to that and indeed we cannot even legally for you to get. There are seven protections to forcing people to give evidence a right to privacy right to to remain silent. That's right batch in this particular case how should we treat niro based evidence should be treated like no physical evidence at the scene crime or should it be treated like well. You're reading someone's mind. So the distinction gets blurred and the opportunities for people's thoughts to be misused or used against them will increase vincent as the technology for interpreting and reading brain signals becomes more and more sophisticated. I think it's indian increasingly large consent. And the reason why is because the more we find out about how the brain functions the more. We're going to realize that it is indeed another mechanism and when we get evidence also the fact that somebody committed a criminal act as a consequence off how the brain is wired that then leads people to question trust themselves. A question will. Is this person responsible. It's just that the brain is wired like that and other one of the issues. This raises is whether or not we should be s- cutting people's brains to figure out if susceptible for instance to commit sin criminal offenses at the moment behavioral data. The history of how they behave in the past is much more predictive than anything else. But as that ecology improves we are going to find out more about the courts so the similarities. Between what does the grain look like in various people certain criminal offenses and whether we can use this to then make predictions about people's behavior or perhaps whether we can find certain ways of treating them so that rather than punishing criminal offenders one of the very strong movements. I've noticed his movement sago criminal offenders. They're not doing this because the bad there's no such thing as badness it's just a certain mechanisms broken the brain and what we ought to do. Is you have to fix them. And that kind of worries me right because if you've watched the movie capricorn jr. The very prospect of having a fixed doesn't quite sound right to me. It frightens me. So there are enormous ethical considerations to take into account here. Aren't there and this is going to be very complex area because we are really at the beginning in lots of ways of anura technology subway. Yes we are and people tend to focus on the ethical issues related to for instance might this technology harm somebody who has a very legitimate concern especially with new technologies. So for instance whether a certain medication or eight procedure might have an unintended side effect. That's the sort of stuff we usually think about. But actually for me. I love ethical considerations stem from the way in which our society navy right because if we are not going to treat people as people if we're going to start treating as broken machines in need of being fixed. This raises questions that has free. Will it raises questions about more responsibility. And is it. Only the case that somebody can be morally responsible person when the brain functions like we wanted to function something that i wouldn't want to see happening. The potential that it's an allergy should measured by its ability to generate good right. The brain changes all the time that so when you learn it alters its own wiring now if we are going to create prosthetic brancusi's prosthetic devices that actually the brain that the brain the news licenses for its purposes. You know maybe to make you remember things better maybe to make you pay attention better. Who knows then. The brain itself will actually lose some of the functionality that would have otherwise head if it had relied upon. Its own hardware. The hardware for bone with more importantly what that means is that from the perspective of going forward right once. The brain becomes reliant upon this device. What happens when the device breaks. You've lost the abilities to the from these functions yourself because they've been offloaded onto this prosthetic device and the prostate device. No longer works so funny while the issues of this brings up. Is that whenever. You're going to start interfacing the brain with something else. You've got to remember that the brain is going to adopt. Because that's what the brain does it'll change and you'd better hope that the device and if the device alters itself as it learns about how to communicate with the brain you'd better hope that the device can be reproduced. It breaks rights. Because he had can't it can't be reproduced with all of its special new reprogramming. That had engaged in well. Then you would effectively be suffering from something like brain damage. And i really worry about this sort of scenario dr nicole vincent from the university of technology sydney with future tents on aren. Abc radio's national. Exploring the world around us looking for the pathways ahead and signposting the future. Let's go right back to the beginning. Now and the company neuralink the brief that elon. Musk set for his. Scientists is stratospheric ambitious as we mentioned merging. Humans with ai. But the company's most recent work has been much more grounded and practical. They've been focused on the mechanics of bmi on creating better device for implanting electrodes into the brain. So what does the university of newcastle's andrew jackson make any device the state of the art until now is a raise of about one hundred electrodes. So that would be kind of hundred channels of recording from the brain. What neuralink has done is is. increased by. An order of magnitude are gone up to about a thousand electrodes and these are flexible individual wise that can be put in different parts of the brain and obviously to insert a thousand wise into the brain hand would take surge in quite a long time. So they've also developed a surgical robot to implant those fine flexible wise automatically and this is quite nice firstly because it speeds up the surgery but also the robot can do things like identify where blood vessels are and so avoid damaging blood vessels during the surgery so in principle this should be a safer speedy away to implant a brain machine interface into the brain. I know you have issues around not necessarily the technology that you were talking about the but around some of the aspirations i guess you could say that elon. Musk in particular has about what they can do. Particularly around people's memories. Yeah so. I think my issue is nearly that in discussions. They can be quite quick to segue from what i think are practically useful applications of brain machine interfaces into territory that becomes much harder to see the route to get that the kind of device neuralink is developing will have enormous benefits for people with profound disabilities things like paralysis perhaps restoring some degree of vision to the blind. But i think it's when they segues into talk of enhancement so the idea that we might be able to for for instance right new memories into our brain or upload memories onto a hard drive or into the cloud and i suppose my hesitation there is partly because we know less about how the brain systems work and also because. I think we have to be realistic. The moment the kinds of benefits that you can get from using a brain machine interface still. Nothing like the sophistication of a normally functioning nervous system so this is to some extent. These are useful tools for people who have been paralyzed say had lost a sensation but to enhance our brain function over and above what one might describe as kind of normal healthy levels is much harder prospect. I think harder but is it possible. I mean is it canopy down in the future some stage so i liken this talk sometimes to the development of speech recognition systems so in the nine hundred eighty s or so we had speech recognition systems. That required being calibrated to an individual voice. And you'd have to sit in front of your computer and say a lot of different words and the speech recognition system would eventually learn to recognize your voice and then you would have to use it very slowly and you'd get probably about half of the words correct and then you'd have to go in and type the remaining words. Nowadays you can buy something from amazon or other other online retailers that you can put on your mantlepiece and anyone can walk into the room and talked with will understand that now could be brain machine interfaces. We'll get to that point. So that an interface could be put in my brain would recognize. My thoughts and similar league could could recognize your thoughts but at the moment the system for doing that would have to be. I would have to sit down and think all of the thoughts. I might possibly want to communicate through the interface and a scientist or an algorithm would have to match up those thoughts with those brain signals. And now i think at the moment is a fundamental limitation for how these interfaces could work that calibration process works for movements in a small number of directions but when you start thinking about the totality of memories that you could have will or ideas that you could hold in your brain. We're gonna have to come up with some better way of calibrating. The system and that to me is a scientific question. And we don't currently know the answer so it may be the science that we discover in feature will allow interfaces to somehow generalize and not require this very time consuming calibration stage. But we haven't got back the moment now. I think it's a fascinating question to ask there. Lots of people doing really great research in this area. And i also think that the neuralink device can be great tool in helping research along. But it's not necessarily certain. The trajectory of brain machine interfaces will follow that same trajectory that speech recognition has followed where it's gone from being a very experimental thing in a in a few decades to being really kind of commonplace technology professor. Andrew jackson bringing our program on machine interface technology to a close. We also heard from dr nicole vincent. Sa- girl samuel nathan copland and assistant professor jennifer challenger. My thanks to co-producer current savannah and also edwina start. I'm antony fennell until next time cheese. You've been listening to an abc podcast. Discover more great. Abc podcasts live radio and exclusives on the abc listen up.

facebook paralysis university of newcastle anthony fennell nathan copland elon university of pittsburgh nathan copeland jennifer cola department of physical medicin elon musk tech titans andrew jackson vox media seagal samuel musk spinal cord injury niro analytica
Elon Musk's Neuralink Successfully Implanted

Lew Later

1:03:50 hr | 1 year ago

Elon Musk's Neuralink Successfully Implanted

"Got Ourselves. Update a neuro link update. This happened I guess over the weekend or maybe just after we were here on Friday when did this happen? Friday Friday. He does he did a whole presentation. There were pigs. you had pigs that's when you know Israel. As how you know when the science is actually happening when the pig show up Yeah or the mice. The trials on the mammals. And then you're getting closer to the human because we're not all that different than pigs to be honest with you. Or pretty close I think we we like to think of ourselves as you know. More advanced more beautiful, more intelligent. We. Walk on two legs. This is about it. You know that's the main difference s holidays difference. Really. It's all took anyway they got brains those pigs got brains and. They, have complex brains like we do. And so they started their trials on will there there were three pigs present? No one no neuro link pig one, nine link no longer neuro link pig and one current neuro link pig. And had them all there And for the first time, they showcased a live feed. Of, the neuro link pigs brain activity during the presentation. Which? Seemed very enthusiastic about they also talked about this new robot that they are. Designing to aid in the installation of this module. They also talked about how they sort of changed. Their approach. Because if you recall originally, well, the device was mounted somewhere behind the ear. And now. It appears that they've decided sort of more on the upper part of the skull and there will be a little section. Your skull is a tiny sexy we'll get don't get. Or here case can carve out to Selena tiny circle out of your skull come on to make room, and if they do it right there's no blood. That's right. He you see you'd be surprised you know the brain tissue and If, you do it correctly. I have to say the carving out of the coin side section of the skull. No I listen I'm a a tech enthusiast so I remain open minded. CAA. I, got it I. Good. I mean it. It does sometimes that just happened. But you start taking a coin skull out of your head and think at least at first people can be. A little bit resistant. And a little bit apprehensive as the word I'm looking for. Anyway. Of course, we've heard all the claims about this thing. And All the potential applications for something like this. It's a lot of theory right now it's a lot of promise right now starting with treatment for certain conditions. which would make sense that will be an area. You'd WANNA target initially because you counter act some of the apprehension for a person who may be suffering or hoping to fix something they're willing to try a lot of things. Yes. Health health reason health. And you feel that the threshold for risk is a bit different than a human who isn't in search of some sort of remedy. That person on the other hand where it's more, I want superhero powers. Want to enhance my sense of. What were they suggesting earlier around hearing or something like this that. Customer that eventual commercialization has to come down the road because. Eight almost feels. Too early for that. Is Not the natural place to start. Now one thing that came out of me from his pre came out to me from his presentation is that there's not that much yet K-, no, they're trying to figure out this actual physical device, the installation of this device these. Little Strand. This cabling that's as thin as A. Human hair. And okay a now, we can extract some information from some brain activity, which is what they showcase, but as far as interpreting it, that's where the magic comes in well, interpreting it and potentially inserting or sending data back the other way. Now the PIG's help. Having a pigs there it feels a lot more real. And live and live and organic. However, it doesn't change the fact that is a super long way to go. In order to deliver any of the proposed stuff but I feel the need to put it out here. INTO THE UNIVERSE Then almost everything starts that way. Yeah. As an idea. An, execution is difficult. Making things is difficult, and in fact, I've actually got a little twitter exchange here, which is the next Hab over over part of the same thing. Where we have a user here before everyone gets too excited about the Elon Musk Nurlan demo. Here's what professor, Andrew Jackson professor of neural interfaces. At Newcastle University says, this is solid engineering but mediocre neuroscience. And you can go through and read it well, maybe I'll just do a quick piece of it. I don't think there was anything revolutionary in the presentation, but they are working through the engineering challenges of placing multiple electrodes into the brain in terms of their technology. Ten twenty four channels is not that impressive these days but the electronics to really them wirelessly is state of the art and the robotic implantation is nice. So he saying. that. What they're working on. As. Not as revolutionary as some might think because. Well. For the most part, the average person is not up to date on. The current. Neuro science when it comes implants. But of course you you may recall faintly that you've seen someone control a cursor on a screen with their mind in the past. At, the bottom of this. Quote here. So in summary I would say this is solid engineering but mediocre neuroscience finally, I think it is unfortunate that they are presenting their work in this way rather than publishing peer reviewed papers that would allow their claims to be scrutinized but I guess this is something that we will have to get used to as neural interfaces move from the academic to the commercial sector. Okay. So here's a key will. It's all fine and Dandy to be an academic side and have these very high standards and live in the Peer Review viewed world and all the rest of it. But Ultimately. That world relies on funding of some kind. You need people interested at some point is I'm trying to say. I mean. Part of the presentation, there was actually hiring people exactly and how do you hire people and how do you secure funding unless? There's promise commercial, eventual, commercial promise eligible the at some point it doesn't have to be immediately but at some point, otherwise, it remains Nizhny remains small. Once. You put something in somebody's pocket the average person. Then we see this the pace of things improve vastly because now. Who can sell it and if you can sell it, you can hire and if you can hire talent, you have more more people. Putting their minds together into one particular goal. Now, I, understand. I feel the apprehension. I can also understand why a guy like this a neuroscientist. Or better yet the professor of neural interfaces what feel a little bit. He looks at it will and he says. I've been working on this stuff for years for a decade. I've been working on this stuff and then Mr Ilan Koslow MR famous Mr, famous guy. And he's the neural interface guy now all of a sudden. Here, for decades, not only in semi name. So I get that too. And there's two sides who there's always two sides to it. But one thing in on his does has done and I do not think you can dispute this is he has brought attention to the sciences. He brought attention to space now this. Ai. In terms of self driving vehicles, it's gotten people interested because it is marketable and because he does pushed the agenda, he pushes it forward can that be risky absolutely. Absolutely it could be risky but. It appears to be powerful. Powerful in the sense that it can. kind of rapidly increase. Whether for better for worse, can rapidly increase our progression towards something by generating the hype necessary to gather the funds necessary to hire the talent necessary to keep the war going. Alonzo wanted to do it. He's the guy. Says you're boring company there you. Anyway. He says here's Yvonne Response. It is unfortunately common for many in academia to overweight the value of ideas and underweight bringing them to fruition. For example, the idea of going to the moon is trivial but going to the moon is hard. He. Once again is trying to trying to say, yeah, of course, this is going to be hard to do. Thanks I noticed it's going to be hard to do. WE'RE GONNA learn a lot along the way. Anyway, what can I say I don't even know if it's good or bad in a long term like right there so much anytime you're taking a leap anytime. You're taking a risk I. Know There's GonNa be comments. On this video right here that will say, is this what we want for humanity? Right, not everybody's going to be on the same page about that. So I'm speaking I think more big picture on trying to achieve something in general Big Picture on trying to make something viable to get people interested to therefore. Be Able to gather the resources necessary to build something whatever it happens to be whether you agree with this or not, and let's be honest. Well, maybe the commercialization and the long term application of something like this, you may have a conversation about. Ethics and whatever else. But in the short term. Would that focus on Treatment If it's able to achieve this for people who are in great need that's going to do wonders for the conversation going forward, which is likely why would target that I if you were thinking about marketing and that's really the part that's the area when it comes to Elon Musk and. Elon Musk analysis that goes overlooked. Without having a marketing piece without having a voice. That gets the ball rolling And oftentimes those in academia or. Neuro scientists or I mean I'm not gonNA. Paint it with a with a with a wide brushing. See that everybody. Is exactly this but marketing not always in area of expertise that comes along. With safer example engineering experts science expert scientists neuro scientists. Or? Professors of neural interfaces and Newcastle University. Right. Walmart and Microsoft stocks are falling. Because believed to be because partially about some new export rules coming out, of China, apparently that may influence or impact a potential tiktok deal. Take Talk to you. We talked about a number of different potential suitors. They could spend twenty billion. You were telling me today about. Trailer potentially making a move there in the mix Walmart was supposed to team up with. Microsoft Oracle was in the mix. We had sequoia. Some of the investors invite dance in the mix twitter was barely in the mix it seemed for about five minutes. But it kept coming back to Microsoft is being a potential home, a potential home for TIKTOK. But then Friday China unveils these new export restrictions covering such computing and data processing technologies as text analysis, content, recommendation, speech modeling, and Voice Recognition Saint Technologies on the list can be exported without a license from local commerce authorities. Now, some believe this is directly targeted at the potential for a Tiktok deal suggesting that tiktok technologies potentially, it's algorithm and and different. Software behaviors whatever intellectual property exists there. Potentially, that can't even be exported without the approval of the Chinese government or at least a license being granted that you can go ahead and transport transport that. So of course, investors that were feeling a very confident or or at least positive about the potential for Microsoft deal. They get a bit nervous. They say damn. Throw money over years might not go down could have been good for Microsoft could have been a extra revenue stream or Walmart for that matter. So they jump out. And other say. It's still going to happen some say, look the time is ticking. There's GonNa be a deal done because otherwise you to zero. Right just a quick refresh bike, Dan's already makes domestic product of Tiktok in China called due. Date date tick Tuck as a business export product. Because, they got something else that they call it locally and I don't know how to be the business back end works but. That the part that they were trying to sell was only the export part US Canada New Zealand Australia, and the UK. Where we're in. That makes the English speaking. Western. Whatever you WANNA call it. So these export restrictions question is going to happen anyways whereas this just. Some nice little timing radio. Many believe that. It can't just be a coincidence many believe I'm not I don't know but many believe it can't be a coincidence and this is the aim here is to put a. Pause on a potential acquisition buying American farm because maybe politically speaking that's not such a good look for the Chinese government I don't know. These are just suggestions in speculation, which is what kind of do. And what people expect. And of course, really you're an expert at this point, you've seen it all happen many times and it's a messy business right now to talk I mean they're trying to sue the trump administration. which is a tough he sued the president is pretty tough and they have thirty days left for this by Al Mess, right. Now you know there's a there's a push being made from from these various American firms, and for sure they're going to have a little bit of poll but ultimately if. The Chinese government says, no, you cannot export this. You are accompany here they can kinda pull the same thing on their end that's happening on the US end and say this cannot be exported. Now, the difference as I said to you is then then the value of that sub brand tiktok, it maybe doesn't go to zero, but it dipped substantially having lost India the United States, presumably, Canada, all these markets that they aimed to continue to sell it in cell the ads associated with the content. Also if you're the Chinese government, you might say. Well here we got twenty billion on the table coming into this nation twenty, thirty, fifty, billion, whatever it ends up being maybe we should take something instead of nothing. So what but then again, what's twenty thirty billion scope of geopolitics and all the rest of the maybe more important to not look like. You. Adjusted. On behalf of a leader somewhere else who you're in a dispute with. So anyways. for the time being looks like it's on pause but otherwise similar reports saying deal could be done in the next two days. Yeah. So we gotta wait and see. speaking of a deal being done like done done. kway has pulled out of its oldest sports sponsorship relationship with of really famous. Australian. Rugby League team. I didn't know about them. I don't watch all that much rugby, but I understand rugby's a big deal will. In Australia. Have you ever been tossed failure I have actually Cindy I I've never been. So did you taking any rugby then? No Oh. I was in Sydney Yeah and no rugby rugby for you and he rugby's maybe some rugby jerseys you saw on the people. Yeah you probably did. This team Canberra Raiders. Probably not saying right. They had to deal with wally for nine years and while we can't do it anymore we're banned from the from the network's. All kinds of problems from the local government nobody's into it. And what are we doing plastering the logo on the shirts people can you can't do business here? What's the point of spending all this money? I'm sure that's what the internal conversations were about Chinese telecom telecom giant Hallway announced on Monday. It is ending its oldest major sporting sponsorship deal in the world when it ends its contract with Australian Rugby League Team Camera Raiders after nine years. Blaming a quotations continued negative because environment. Now, Australia. Bhardwaj away awhile ago actually this surprise me how how long have you been a kind of ongoing issue in fact? While he's the decision to sponsor the team. Back, in two, thousand, twelve came months after the government banned the company on security grounds from involvement in the rollout of Australia's broadband our in twenty eleven. How long has this been going on for a lot of people think this is us only by the way that the hallway beef and I don't blame you. It's been so much press about it specifically trump's impression and all the rest of it but this has been a global thing for a while now. and. It's multifaceted. So Australia was already restricting quality from its networks back in twenty eleven at which point while we goes ahead and sponsors are really high profile sports team in order to try to, you know potentially change the sentiment. And turn around the public opinion about whether or not they should be able to sell to those. To. Those telcos for the expansion of that network Obviously here we are almost ten years later and it didn't work. Almost ten years later and they gotta pull out completely we have. A quote here from. A. Jeremy Mitchell, Australia's chief corporate affairs officer for. Even after the Turnbull government banned us from five G. we managed to find the resources to continue the sponsorship, but we just can't financially supported any longer. So I think that makes a lot of sense to me I mean I don't need to read into that too much further. This is pretty obvious stuff. You can't do business there or you have a limited facet limited ability to do business there. These sponsorships begin to make a little bit less sense and I was bringing up the one because I think candidate is also just banned from our networks. Is that true? Did I read that? Funny here we are sitting in Canada, and somehow, I missed that story. But. It just seems. So impending Oh. Must Ban. That's August seventh. Maybe click the news heading there Google. There have been calls to ban I don't know if it's officially done here in. Canada yet. But apparently It's on the table and we've been having this increasing while we sponsorship on local sports as well. on hockey night in Canada and stuff like this. So a has been an angle for hallway to try to build sentiment with the customer base, which may or may which they would believe would or wouldn't have a positive impact on their continued ability to do business but. It turns out the plan. Me May not work after all in a number of places including. Well to get started places like Australia. Apple says, APP. Store appeals process is now lives. So developers can start challenging decisions. We had two, four, nine stuff. We have the hey email client we have the facebook stuff and the Microsoft stuff there's so many. Different groups and we have the indy or smaller developers who have had issues with apple prior to all of this and. We even. had. All kinds of comments about apple's policies leading up to ww DC, which was a while back before any of the profile stuff with epic and all that took place. At that time apple was already considering making changes to their appeals process. Not. Necessarily, their policy I guess the appeals processes part of the policy, but making it easier for appeals to take place and those changes actually. Just recently went live. So they were revealed at W. W. DC in June. But there live now and this means developers can challenge apple over whether their APP is in fact violating one of its guidelines. Apple also says, developers can suggest changes to the APP store guidelines through form submission. In its online developer portal so Apple. tempting to receive. Suggestions negative feedback. Suggestions about. Not, just say a denial, but also whether or not a policy should exist that led to the denial and various challenges like I read recently about a VPN company. Who successfully? appealed. A decision by apple even though they but it looks like they weren't necessarily violating policies in the first place. APERTURES has this really restrictive approval process. Sometimes, companies really don't even know or developers especially small time develop. They don't know this thing keeps getting I can't get my APP approved and It's it's a little bit of a guessing game from time to time. And I suppose that they're apples working towards some greater level of transparency at a time where that would be very important where the press hasn't been all that positive when it comes to develop relationships with the APP store. So they were able to actually sort things out with the hey email APP, which is from the developer. Base camp. and. But that kind of happened right before everything blew up with epic and the rest of it. The compromise between base camp and IOS? was their base camp would add dummy accounts to the IRS APP allowing customers to sign up and then transition to a paid account later on the web. So they had kind of stopgap because the whole thing's been around payments if you ever want to acquire a customer inside of Ios and then later get them to pay elsewhere apple's not gonna like it. So you can expect now with this new APP store appeals process that they're going to get an absolute flow. Of requests from developers looking for some different treatment than what has currently existed within apple's terms and plenty of challenges to those actual terms. Now, the good thing here is that apple can hear directly from the developers and say we had one thousand requests change this particular policy and now they've got some real data where they can maybe have a better recognition of the exact impact that they're having developers are where. Developers are failing ultimately if developers fail. And I know people saying, okay apple is so huge. This is impossible but if developers fail over and over again and then they don't develop that next coup up eventually somebody suffers right everybody wants the best experience in the next best product and apple will even come out and say it. But if the policies are restricted to the point where people aren't attempting to build these companies and brands and cool. APPS, and all the rest of it then all of a sudden it can had the other direction I'm not suggesting it's there yet but I'm saying it is a possibility. This is a good step well to way listening. Absolutely there's at least some level of dialogue now I'm sure if you talk to sweeney from epic, he'd say this is nothing this is lip service So this is apple pretending that they're listen he does what he would say yes but ultimately I think for small develop Bradtha least they got something. Going on so iphone twelve to come in dark blue color option. We heard about this rumor previously. Wildly popular midnight green from the previous model iphone eleven, and the thinking was that apple while for a while the thinking spin that apple would do this midnight blue color of new report here from digitize claiming that the dark blue iphone color will be available for the first time. On this next generation iphone twelve some other colors being potentially suggested in another rumor light blue violet light orange among others. What color are you looking for here? Well. I really like the Green. From The midnight Green Yeah. I. Actually watched a little short film I. Don't remember if apple put it out or someone else about. The. Japanese company responsible for the pigment in that particular green because there's very specific requirements. And demands when apple chooses a color, you're going to need a ton of it and they also had some pretty strict environmental requirements. On how you can manufacture this pigment. Maybe, you're not gonNA find it, but it's it was a really cool video somebody will find it and Maybe linked. But yeah. I, think blues cool. I like the idea of them having a new color with each model also also identified in this report is that and this is not really a surprise expectation is that apple is going to have a reduction in shipments. Compare for the twelve compared to the same period. Last year for the IPHONE eleven possibly a decline of around five million units the target within this rumor sixty three to sixty, eight, million units in the second half of this year. Many reasons why? The global economy obviously delays obviously when it comes to securing the parts necessary to build these things also potentially apprehension for Chinese. Customers around what's happening with their software in the APP store and we chat, and there's just you're up against a lot right now and twenty twenty. So. I. I can believe that you could see a reduction in shipments however, maybe the blue can save the day the dark blue iphone. It's a nice car. It's a nice color I agree with that. Twelve inch macbook returning in arm form with fifteen to twenty hour battery life I. Don't know if you remember the there was a twelve inch macbook it wasn't that popular. Well I say that without looking at the statistics just. anecdotally, my life experience you had to starbucks when you could head to the starbucks not allowed twelve inch. You don't pay attention when I'm in there, I can't help it like what do you use it always surprises me how the surfaced products started to pop up more in my life and around, and maybe college students can speak to this. Where they made it might have seen a few of those but anyway, I'm always looking at people's laptops when I'm at the coffee shop when I used to be at the coffee shop and the twelve inch was a rarity is a small little laptop kind of a stopgap it was almost outdated. So shortly after it came out, but it was very thin and light and Super Portable, which has always been an interesting thing to me dating back to the original twelve inch powerbook which I owned one of the very first if not the first. It was the first apple laptop that I ever owned. Really. Yeah. Really cool design on it. Especially for the time I mean it looks blocking dated by today's standards that I do not have the titanium when that's a fifteen inch that you just clicked on, it will be that one, the G. Four powerbook in the top left corner. There you go. This thing was small I remember the advertising campaign actually you had many me from Austin powers. Oh. y'All maiming and Yao Ming had the twelve inch powerbook and mini-me had the seventeen inch powerbook and they were on a flight and it was like whichever one floats your boat, which everyone's suits you in the the huge guy with the smallwood in a small guy with the huge you see how that goes now screwed advertising. So back in the day while what time I ordered that I was on I was. Is it a saying I was on top of the moon that saying that I just made of the world's top world. Why did I want to say top two moon and my thinking about space? Space. Travel. It still looks very clean. I was on top of the moon. Yeah. When I got that whether it's a saying or not as where I was you can find me on a moot. You won't find me what my powerbook. And So anyway they never they kept the twelve inch. To twelve inch form factor but then it didn't it didn't really It wasn't really all that successful I guess because they discontinued it over a year ago. But it makes a lot of sense when you go to their own arm chip well, because now you're really thinking about. Power efficiency and you're thinking about portability. I mean look at this little guy I've got right here on the table to surface. Do I mean form factors? We're all thinking about it. We're thinking about thin and light we're thinking about You know lack of heat. Were thinking about. These sort of solid state units. No Fan just once you're in the arm territory, it gets very exciting from that standpoint ultra portability even in your laptop. So you can imagine them doing a twelve inch arm based MAC book. No fans super slim kind of like the moment with the original Mac book air. Where everyone's like? Is it in that envelope? Yeah able or chopping vegetables. With the sharp edge, this could be even sharper thinner and the best part of it is fifteen to twenty hour battery life, which again, coming back to the portability side of things, all kinds of advantages to designing and controlling the thermals all the way from the processor. Down to the aluminum chassis and the whole thing top to bottom you get a lot of control. So we can see the twelve inch comeback, no I I have to pick it up and take a look if it. Does come to be, but it's always confusing what apple because they really want you to be on his ipad with the keyboard attachment everything else and then I'm always on a laptop no matter what And so while this one's for you then that one's for me. All right we'll. Take a little bit of a a real turn with you here, and you'd ever expected it. When you saw TMZ headline might take a real turn. You hear. Two little girls use Wi fi for school outside the Taco Bell. And they were trying to hop on Wifi. The TACO Bell and people were concerned these girls were left there to try to do their homework. Oh. Okay and this got me thinking now it was. It was a somewhat viral post by the looks of in a couple of people were. Upset that these girls didn't have the access they need to participate in school because obviously depending on where you are whether schools are open or not California. Definitely not at the moment. Everything's gone. Online. And people don't have the same access never mind access. Well, what about to actual physical premises you occupy? Do. You even have a dining room table. Do you even have? Is everybody sharing a small space because try to get onto zoom like that? Or a laptop or a laptop or connectivity, which you gotTa pay the bill every month, and what are you gonNa cut if you're short on funds Or. You're not working which a lot of people are are not working right now. You may be you cut the Internet and you try to hop on the Wi fi wherever you can, and of course, it got me thinking well. Initially my brain went to starlink where I was like. You got the you got the satellite Internet now. You're still GONNA have to pay money for that. So that doesn't really solve much but then they went to the next place. And in next place. I guess Oh. Wow. Like a covert advertisement for Taco Bell. Is that what you're thinking? No not at all but I like where you're going. Okay let's hear. Let's hear what you got. Well, I mean like these kids who really want Internet connection. I mean Taco. Bell there you go. You can grab a meal and no because you're. In California, you still can't even go into Taco Bell. That's why the girls are sitting outside. Oh, well, I mean eventually you'd what's that they can order food. But they're sitting the reason the picture went viral because they're just sitting on the pavement and the Taco Bell employees like why are you sitting on the pavement? That's true. Yeah. This this photo tells a lot. Yeah. So. So. Anyway. What got me what what the way it got me thinking all right and the by the way these girls have been identified and people came together and help them out as well. Afterwards. But what it got me thinking thinking about was education in general and how things have shifted online. and. You know there's education funding is maybe it's not what people wanted to be depending on the district and area that you happen to be in. But right now if people aren't going to schools. Maybe. There's a way. To repurpose. Some of that funding. So that, there can be some level of connectivity because ultimately right now, what is your access to the world? If you're I mean these girls are what like twelve years old? Their entire potential rests on that Internet connection right I, and I guess a laptop that's how interacting with their education. Completely that's their. That's their access to the outside world outside of their own personal quarantine whatever the happens to look like And so you start to wonder if we as a society, put some resources into education at all and say, Oh, there's going to be a premises here where everybody goes and is going to be a premises here where. Bergen. They'RE GONNA WE'RE GONNA use tax dollars to employ teachers to teach kids. Then in the world that we're in right now wouldn't version of that be. To enable these kids to get online at least at the bare. Minimum. Now I know things don't move that fast you can't just start sending checks and. You need to vote on things and I understand all that. But this is kind of an interesting glimpse into. Our current situation. And how? Families depend on those schools. As not just as a way to learn but also as a place to be during the day like presumably. I mean sitting on the floor there's a notebook there with a pencil I'm just saying it's an image. It's really it really is an image and the Taco bell employees like what you guys doing here. Now, I do feel the need to also put this out there because I know we have a global audience and I'm sure there's some people in some other country in the world this. This is how connect every day. This is what you mean. I don't know. Normal for me you know and and that's just me being aware of the global audience and the differences that exist in the disparity that exists. But ultimately, like I said I believe that there is in California they took place there is funding that goes to the school school shut down at the moment. I don't know if it's possible to act rapidly enough but that connection. That's all you got right now and so you would hope that there's some way in which. People that are in this situation have some sort of alternative means to to get their schoolwork done but showed up to these girls do your work anyways by the way, maybe to twelve thirteen, ten age faces are covered which I like as well but. They got the notebook on the sidewalk. And they're getting it done and your mom's not even there and and. Kind of a shout out to them. Yeah. Shut up. We have a leak here on a new GOPRO Hero Nine I. saw you reading about this earlier as well gopro still doing China find. Maintained their position in this whole thing. So difficult, you know the Action Camera. Was a were Gopro, put the action camera idea on the map, and it is still in action camera, but cameras in general increasingly, the market shares been gobbled up by smartphones that have continued to get better. And then smartphones even went ahead and got the Wide Angle Lens at the Cobra was famous for and people started using that now smartphones or not as rugged as the GOPRO and you're still plenty of applications where it's the best choice. But it's just harder to justify the current landscape of things to spend five hundred dollars on a Gopro when your smartphone does a pretty good job part of the time most of the time. But I've looked at some relatively recent versions to go pry looked at the hero eight and I'm amazed at some of the stuff they're doing with stabilization. They're now talking about the next generation potentially going up to five K.. Anyway. They're hanging in there. All right and this next version. Appears to. Point or indicate to US what their? Strategy might be going forward. There is a relatively healthy vlogger community going on on Youtube. There's bloggers. And I know Sony they have sort of dominated that market place. They've recently came out of logging Z Z. One that the name of it. Targeting. The tools. That have logger would want to have on their on their camera including a flip around LCD display a better microphone and And this is one area where it appears. You can actually find something better than what your smartphone is capable of. Because if you WANNA have a screen in your spiteful now you're on the front facing camera and those are never really that good and. Certainly not if you're launching a youtube channel I'm not saying you can't but you understand the target market for a product like this one. So pro thing hey, we can have a piece of that. If we want five hundred dollars from people. So here we have this hero nine. And they put a screen on the front. Not just. Black and white or gray tone LCD that tells you. A little bit of information but an actual color LCD which presumably could give you a preview of what you're looking at, which is kind of key characteristic for of lager. So, we'll have to wait and see this is just a leak at the moment. But like I said from facing display and potentially five K, maybe it'll be enough to convince some people to pick up a GOPRO. the next version of GOPRO. This is an interesting one. I think you might have a point of view on this well. Sony is GonNa make some of their exclusive first party titles available on PC. Now, don't go any further. I want you to tell me why they would do this. Market share. Maybe Go ahead to. Compete with Microsoft and their titles right Maybe to have I guess yeah just market share. I. Imagine having like you know last of us or God of war on PC, they'll be awesome. I would totally buy a PC for for that. Okay you're wrong oh look. I mean, maybe you're not wrong completely I'm sure that that would play some sort of a role. But it's actually the opposite. They don't want you to buy a PC to play the game. They were going to reluctantly give you the title on pc much later in order to let you know what you missed out on by not having had a playstation. So early access. Almost, like on place like a tiered system, if they can make you a fan of a particular series because you don't have a playstation yet, but you're on PC, you may invest in playstation. So next time around you get that title straight away. Apparently they're trying to sell the playstation brand as a whole the game they're talking about. I, never played it horizon. Zero Dan. Have you heard of it? I just got it on PC. Wow. Okay. So that was a playstation title is now available on Steam how much did you pay for it? Gosh I think it was like sixty or seventy bucks. Even. Though it's much later. Yeah. I'm going to have to check okay. Someone else bought it but I was playing it. Someone bought it on your steam. How does that work you have shared steam? Yeah Oh interesting. Okay. Is that legal? No. A Euro, Gamer as Euro Gamer reports confirmation of future. PC, ports was discovered in the company's twenty twenty corporate report. We will explore expanding our first party titles to the platform in order to promote further growth in our profitability. A. I think it's important that we stay open to new ideas of how to introduce more people to play station and show people maybe what they've been missing out on by not having had a playstation. Let's see. You See. So it can be. Both things you weren't completely wrong. Obviously, profitability is what every company operates on. But if it's even It could be if you're non playstation Gamer, you really enjoy playstation gaming experience on pc with playstation exclusive title. Then, your potential profitability goes through the roof because you may then turned into a subscriber, a playstation purchaser. Buying the exclusives more earlier, this is an older game as I mentioned, but you could imagine it applying to other Sony exclusives that could be really big on pc at a later date and games. You're a fan of all these Sony Exclusive Game Oh. Yeah. Naughty dog and. I think Santa. Monica. Studios. Looking to war it's Great Willie Hyundai Motors unveils ionic brand song with bt S. Your big BTS guy. You're everytime be theus is in trending. You have to tell me you're like this forty, four, million views in five minutes. I was like Holy Moly. How does he how they do it? Yeah. Why? The. You know the transfer of Korean culture to absolutely. No. Way Not be themselves. I don't be part of that part of the culture. Yeah. I mean a big part of the culture maybe the biggest part of the culture I don't know I'm always tracking a difference black paint bts who's pulling the numbers I don't know I don't know who's bigger or whatever. I think beats. Yes. Probably I'm just guessing they did the on boxing video people came at me on twitter when they did a I think it was a Samsung on boxing video and look beat the S. Lou. They're better than you over here and they're better than. You know they're everywhere they go turn everything they touch turns to Gold Apparently everyone loves beets I'm sure somebody doesn't love them, but it's certain appears everybody loves them. So this one, two, three, four, five, six, seven guys. That was another thing I was curious about when we when you made me watch the music video I was like how many are there? How many guys they got in this thing? Because it wasn't the backstreet boys. They only had like four five at five five. Okay. Well, man you just keep going wife it's fifteen. Well. There are Korean groups with. Over ten over ten, it's incredible. I. Don't know them by. But you Kinda do. But anyway so they're now they're doing all the marketing. So shout out to them there signing deals left right and center, and I can't even I can't even figure out how they all get along. I can't figure out how they sit down and go. Yeah. We'll take that deal not that one will will be at this event. We'll do a live performance seven guys do you think they make the decisions? Mass, route, how dare area of course they do their? They call the shots. Anyway. They got another deal another big deal going on here. It was the on boxing video that they got and I didn't get and they got instead of me, and now they gotta deal with Hyundai Motors on on the brain which I want to look at those cars as well. But they did the officials saw. And I didn't even know cars had officials songs which you can download for free. On the website, you didn't know cars had official songs with beats. Yes. No this is the first ever I don't know the brand. Song. IONIC I'm on it s the name of the saw will be distributed on the automakers global website seven PM Monday. Believe it or not as when we're filming this. So it's all happening. It's all developing so rapidly. Let's hear the song will be downloaded on global website and the music video will be released. On. The Youtube. Channel Hyundai's Youtube Channel at eleven am on Wednesday. Right, here that's the lyric video. Yeah that's not the official or give us. Can we play any of it? We're going. We're going to let you go listen to it for yourself but anyway, you got the official do what do you think they paid for that? What did holiday pay for that? Seven guys they all get paid. Hundred Mil. Okay not how they did not one hundred mil you maniac. Quite a few Mil quite familiar quite a few men would get one each. No no I don't think. So I don't think they got these got seven mill, the Bryan Song. I mean look first of all, there's probably way more to the package so they would probably be ambassadors to this car brand for awhile. So events. Maybe. If it's part of a bigger deal, you might be on would. Yeah all right and what I what do we know man I would like to know. I onic somebody. Let us know people put your guesses down in the comments whatever they were paid for this particular partnership. Anyway video comes out on Wednesday. We're you know we're GONNA be here waiting. We'll give you. We'll give you the feedback. We'll give you the reaction. So Shaquille O'Neal has said that the Tesla Model S is not shack friendly he also said. You WanNa make a big boy tesla that's his quote. He's looking for a big boy test. I don't know if it's GonNa be the cyber truck though because. shock I believe famously endorsed at different. A different electronic truck brand Nikola I think he was, he tweeted about the Badger. So. I don't know what type of what type of big Boy Tesla he's looking for but he is a big he's a big boy. So he would need a big boy vehicle. Yeah. So is him what the Badger he tweet about the Badger I believe. What is his tweet? Nikola Motor Company just released the nine hundred and six horsepower electric truck. You know I just reserved for myself. Zero to sixty two point nine seconds want one reg reservations. So, he has some relationship with Nikola Motors. But maybe the I don't know how it's all going to map out with the spacing in the cyber truck could that would that be big enough for a guy like shack and he's seven feet tall. The video they're actually of him trying to get into his friend sort of sneaks a shot of him trying to get into the passenger seat and he doesn't know what I he's being recorded. He's this is just a regular model s. You can see here it's very difficult to get into it. Oh Yeah. I mean, the head is almost touching the sun roof and feet bare won't go in all men. And in a lot of cases to be fair if he wants to get into a sedan, he has have a custom made. The chair pushback By says, look I'm looking for a big boy tesla. So, like I said, maybe maybe this cyber truck will solve his issues or maybe he'll get one of the badgers. He's apparently also been in touch with Ribian. He was present at Amazon's. Re Mars event in June two, thousand, nineteen where riven CEO RJ skrine showed. Shack in our won t pickup. So shacks on the lookout he's looking for that next. Electric vehicle that'll fit him. And, we'll see if any can deliver it straight out the gate with the stock version or he's going to have to get some modifications on their to fit comfortably any of them but for right now, the Model S. is not for shack. Pinterest ever used pinterest by the way Yup every. So often pinterest is the latest tech company that is making a a sort of shift away from your traditional office spaces in the face of this particular lockdown twenty twenty style. They're going to pay eighty nine point, five million dollars just to cancel a lease. Shellfish. Almost one hundred mil just to cancel a lease for New San Francisco office. Now understand the way this works well, you make a huge make a huge commitment. There may have been improvements as part of the commitment where an office building was going to do all kinds of things for them to be suitable for their massive workforce. Day. Just say forget it man they're saying everybody's working from home. We're doing fine. It's the way it is now. They cited Corona virus as well as the reason why they can't follow through on the lease in San Francisco as we analyze how our workplace will change in a post covid world we're specifically rethinking where future employees could be based. A more distributed workforce will give us the opportunity to hire more people from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences the company. Was Planning to Lisa four hundred ninety. Thousand Square foot office space. Half a million square foot office space in a high rise which was currently under. Construction. Now, the put this in perspective for you will. A recent study found forty two percent of the US labor force now works remotely forty-two percent well. The reason. That's important is because that's actually the majority because there's a lot of people who aren't working at all. In fact twenty, six, percent or thirty three percent of the workforce isn't working at the moment and twenty six percent are the essential workers that are working on their business premises. Let's see. So the majority of the workforce is at home right now. Working digitally that's it. The girls at the Taco Bell with the laptop it's all they guy and their Internet connection. That's how the world is operating at the moment how the United States is operating at the moment forty two percent. So you have these tech giants, companies, Pinterest isn't even as big as some of the other ones. Google apple and facebook. Saying. We're GONNA pay one, hundred million dollars just to get out of this deal because we don't see it making any sense. We don't imagine anybody's going to show up. Half A, million square feet. This. Is I guess for their new HQ? Yeah, it was going to be. Let's see here the company they operate a different site. which I think they're going to keep. Yeah and I mean this must have been new H. Q. Five, hundred, thousand. It would be whole campus win it at half a million square feet. Is this the address? Yeah. Eighty eight blocks blocks home high-rise is where this was going to be. So it would have been I guess a couple of floors of a bunch of floors inside of this high rise in San. Francisco. This I mean, it's just what is going to happen. To commercial real estate retail. Real Estate. All real estate and the future workforce where are they going to be what's going to happen to productivity? How're things when to change is just another piece of substantial evidence that things are not going to look the same. This would have been part of a to do a least like that will one hundred, million dollar lease or one hundred million to cancel it. So it was probably worth even more. You got to be looking at ten years down the road at least. I would say. So this showcases how long standing our changes are going to be in our lives. Because it is locked down because of Covid we're talking about maybe forever type of changes or at least decade-long changes. Including changes to the way that we work obviously, and the way that we shop because in the next story, we have another report twenty, five percent of US malls are expected to shut within the next five years. That's that's one in four miles. You have about a thousand malls in the united. States. And they're already things are already really bad right Five years isn't GonNa do any better for them? Presumably, there's been a lot of talk about what to do with these spaces. We talked about potentially turning them into. A. Residential spaces. We talked about how Amazon was looking into taking up some of that real estate in order to turn it into film center fulfillment centers, warehouse space you it turns out. That's way harder harder than it sounds as you might imagine, and the biggest difficulty year is actually around zoning and the communities in which these malls exist. You see retail when you have retail zoning, you pay a much higher much tax rate than if you have warehouse industrial. And so if Amazon wants to go into a particular community. and. And have a fulfillment center or have another warehouse. The tax rates are going to have a really big impact on wh. The their consideration over whether or not they should go inhabit. a historically retail zoned location. Because that's going to be a ton of square feet and and they're gonNA be taxed based on whatever that amount happens to be. And they could just go across town to the industrial area over there just put the thing there and pay the much lower tax rate and these things take a long time to change. If they wanted to say change zoning, it could be. Take, a lot of time and it could be expensive and the communities might not be all up for it because they're sitting there saying, well, I got this retail tax rate going on here. Yeah I don't want to rezone that thing. I want more retail to come in even if the retails not gonNA come, do they have the foresight to realize that they should fast track some of these alternative operations so that the whole thing doesn't shut down it's a lot of moving pieces, moving parts and different. People involved, they'd have to approve of these types of things. So in the meantime, these malls are just going to fail and they're just GONNA shut down. presumably, and they have been shut down in many cases for an extended period of time depending on where they're located. So we have to wait and see obviously how catastrophic this is going to be at the mall will ever make comeback but. It appears a lot like our previous story with the with the commercial real estate that retail real estate might might be the same thing where we could see decades long hair like massive changes that are permanent. Before people start flocking back the malls if at all. I don't know about you. Will I presume you haven't been to a mall in a very long time? No. No. Not recently any even if you did what it would be hard to make a habit again. It would be hard to adjust some of the things you know how they say it takes thirty days to break a habit or thirty days to make a habit. Is it thirty days or ninety days whatever it happens to be whatever that amount of time is you just adapt here new surroundings and if you're going to build another one, it's GonNa take time again with this type of. Real estate expenditure. Is GonNa be hard for people to hang on for you to rebuild your habit it all over again, and in many cases, there's plenty of evidence in this particular. You have big high-profile tenants just refusing to pay. They're just saying I'm making no money which want me to pay for and they're getting kicked out. And there's no one to replace them an enormous leases. So anyway. Go guess. While he's still can if it's even open in your area but. Here's the. Here's the last one. Will we've covered these kind of stories in the past you know when you find the old McDonald's burger that's perfectly intact no rotting no mold nothing. So there was the famous story in Iceland where there was the camera on the Burger that never rod it and I don't know how old that one was but it was to commemorate the closing of the One McDonald's in Iceland which laughed at after the economic recession. McDonald's. Left and this guy saved one cheeseburger in his closet and put a camera on it. So anyway, every. So often these stories pop up of the abandoned cheeseburger, which is someone finds it under their bed or something, and it hasn't there's no mold on it and it looks similar to when it was purchased. Actually it looks like the packaging in this case on the ten year old McDonald's the packaging has suffered more than the actual French fries. Anyway I didn't realize that one is only ten years old because this grandmother in this video shows off a twenty four year old McDonalds Burger twenty four years old, and you can actually click the clip. If you want semi viral, it looks to have more than semi viral. That's five hundred, thousand likes. So I don't know how many views that is a million she's got boxing closet. You can turn it up a bit. and. It was advertising a Nascar race in nineteen ninety six. Now she she kept the bag that came in. So people didn't dispute the age of it. Fries I in the paper. So. So it was the deliberate. Accident No, no, she saved a don't ask me why she but she's touching. The bread has never mold the bread is. The Bradley. A bit dry but it looks like McDonald's Patty Yeah it's incredible now. Does it smell though? Do you ever wonder about? Her Expression I. 'cause usually what you're smelling is the decomposition, right? Yeah. Usually what you're smelling is the mold, will you have not afraid of moulder anything? Well, there isn't any. Well, that's the thing. It's like, wow, like it's so Preserved. A foster Off. Its fossilized sort of. Twenty four years old anyway this clip. Do every. So often when this stuff emerges of the pristine, McDonald's hamburger up and up here in a pops up here and there, and it becomes it seems to be a thing that gets passed around. There actually has at one time been. A response from a McDonald's representative and I don't which time this this was but. An Christianson director of field brand reputation for McDonald's once said in the right environment are burgers like most other foods could decompose. But in order to decompose you need certain conditions specifically moisture. So her suggestion is that that that was well preserved because there was no moisture in their. Shoe Ball and I know you're laughing and saying it's still should have decomposed but. It's kind of funny says in the right circumstances, it could decompose but usually, no, it lasts about a thousand years. The thing is how long does that really last? If it made it twenty four years looking like that a probably can do one hundred years based on the way. It looks right now, which is kind of incredible. It's an incredible thing to think about no actually it's a regular hamburger keys and she got no toppings which may have helped the president preservation. And I just noticed that right now. But anyway, she got the fries in there, the rapper and the original bag. It's kind of amazing I. Don't know how does it make you feel well does it Are you worried about this at all does this Is. This a kind of a fun thing or does this concern you about eating the hamburger? It doesn't concern me personally, I I'm a big fan of McDonald's I do like it. Right. Enjoy it from time to time. Okay. Did you just edit yourself right there? Had to like change the phrasing a little bit. I mean, this is a cool experiment to see that kind of stuff. That's all it is. So he doesn't doesn't. Doesn't concern you. There's no there's no bacteria nothing that that twenty four years the thing looks better than you don't eat it enough to actually you know be affected by it if Ri-, aided every door maybe it's actually It's It's What's the word when you never die? Immortal immortality becomes your mortality immortal. That's right. The more a visa you eat the longer your life gets does it affect you? Know not not really I. Think it's. I it is I feel the reason it goes viral every. So often though is because people have fear or people have an inkling that. That There's something about this particular food which is unnatural at say yeah, and that everyone knows if you just pulled a gun off like real bread, you slice it and you put ground beef on it and you left it in your closet that would not be fun. Yeah, I. Think most people have a feeling are thinking that that will be the case and then when that doesn't happen, they share the clip because they're like, wow, what does McDonalds doing and I don't think it's really all that Surprising that you would have preservatives or whatever else because they gotta ship this stuff all over the place and and I, think it's exclusive to McDonalds either I think there's probably plenty of food. You might be surprised how well they I mean I remember hearing about this when I was a kid and you would say, Hey, this thing's expired can I still have it and then somebody would say has all that sugar in it which preserves it. I don't know like jam or something. and. We'll have a best before but people would say now you can still eat it something like this. And so is it the sugar because I know that sweet bun they got to Oh. Yeah. So I'm curious mostly I look at it because I'm curious but it does anytime something gets passed round over and over again there's usually some sort of. human connection where you have a number of people who are skeptical or curious in the same way which is why the thing goes viral. So for health reasons like I guess everything in Moderation Hey, man I'm with you on that. Yeah I'm with you on that you don't want to be having these McDonald's hamburgers every day you Treat. All right.

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TWiG 575: Thank You, Chad - Google Town, India vs PUBG, Remembering Chadwick Boseman

This Week In Google

2:57:11 hr | 1 year ago

TWiG 575: Thank You, Chad - Google Town, India vs PUBG, Remembering Chadwick Boseman

"It's time for tweet this week in Google Jeff Jarvis is here aunt pruitt Stacey Higginbotham. We will talk about. Google's AD market. It's ten times bigger than the stock market, but completely unregulated, should it continue to be real also talk about the Fed averse having some problems and android google change log, and then a very, very moving farewell to Chadwick Bozeman from a guy who knew him pretty well, that's all next on twig. This week in Google is brought to you from twits. Last pass studios securing every access point in your company doesn't have to be challenged. Last pass unifies access and authentication to make securing your employees. At secure even when they're working remotely check out last past dot com slash twit to learn more. PODCASTS you love from people you trust. This is. This is tweak this week in Google episode five hundred, seventy, five recorded. Wednesday. September second twenty twenty. Thank. You Chad. This episode of this week in Google is brought to you by last pass left last pass improve your employees experience while safeguarding your business from cyber threats. Last pass is the number one password manager visit last past dot com slash twit to find out how they can help you. And by Monday dot com Monday dot COM is a flexible platform to manage any team project or workflow online collaborate plan and track everything. Your team is working wherever you are to start your free fourteen day trial. Go to Monday dot com slash twit. It's time for tweet this week in Google show, we cover the latest news from. Google. And Parts around there. Aunt pruitt he is coming to us from his house and beautiful northern. California. Hello Anthony. Mr LaPorte your the squad doing yeah we're doing good. You're in the bar today I could tell. With Purple Walls Barn it's nice everybody out of have a Purple Barn also Jeff Jarvis visiting us from New Jersey. Of, course the. Leonard Mean I'm getting it? The Leonard Tampa for journalistic innovation at the Craig newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University archies also blogger at buzzmachine dot, com prolific writer, and all about man-about-town. Prolific do you think I say too much too much problem with that I said prolific not pro licks. There's a difference as Stacey Higginbotham well knows. She's my editor Red Pencil in hand Stacey on IOT DOT com. Now, we have to warn everyone stacey. Is doing some home improvements right now. Here. The gentle were the saw. Took that the. But that's good. Tool belt on. Yeah. It's good. She's getting her windows done. I am going to have sixty nine windows or Yes. Good to do that. It was time we did a little while ago on our house, you get the double patient insulated things and all that. Exactly. Soon, you won't hear everything I know I'll. Buy. Please we love it. It's like Home Depot. Here is the the real life of it. Yeah I. Love It. No, that's good. It was we were talking about the. Early. Days of Cova crews at all your dog, all anybody's your dog and your calls. It's like by now everybody's saying you have a dog got a cat. You got him out hamster snake looking forward. To relieve his boredom. Yeah, anything. Where when zoom today from nine am until whatever we end? Of To be seven thirty ish. All Day on zoom all his at your office hours now. No I just had a I. I had. Well, I had two meetings than I had an event and then I had class right before this. I have this wonderful moment. So by the way I'm GONNA. Tell you something I I woke up this morning which I do and I pull up the rundown. I do my work. Thank you and I looked at it by said. To be on this show. Yeah I. Know You mean. It was it was just it was like it was like this weekend content moderation. So I went a little crazy I added a lot of stuff fantastic I'm lots of things other than oo facebook leftover poster Google down opposed board me silly and by the way all kinds of stuff those stories. In domus. Before those stories have been in my rundowns for the last two weeks notice I haven't been doing a story. By that I I took it over. I. Took it over. I even added a new category you notice that. I didn't catch that. There's a new green category on it Tiktok. Note. Right. Right. Here is. Really moral and. There's moral panic over misinformation moral panic against cats moral panic over Cunanan moral panic over screen time and then sex and social media a new book about moral panic regarding sex online at we my friends will cover those topics you have i. took it in Google. And then Marston was gonna have us just be. Be. Depressed to don't blame. You don't blame Carson because I bookmark those two and they're probably all stuff I bookmarked as well. I bookmark Markham but it doesn't mean we have to talk about. Warning. Did you see the Herman Cain tweeted Now. That's that's amazing. That's it. Gave me some levity during dark times. Oh, man got to cut that was burritos out. So What's rear easy tweeted an anti Biden video. So who is doing the Kane Gang obviously, NOT HERMAN FROM HELL Wow. Keeping up on the election that you gotTa Respect A. Guy. No. So I by the way, vote to you you're you're going to hear this here. I but I think you're going to hear. More of this. Twitter has apparently place somewhat of a hold. On. Banning trolls and things. I've been getting e mail. You know we I regularly go through things and Emma requests stuff taken down and. I beginning emails saying do to Covid. We're we're busy and never, and then never hearing again I've been checking with some other people services that do this and so forth and saying, yeah, something weird. Going on twitter for the last two weeks. Oh no take more than two weeks. I've been seeing that for at least a month. Yeah, and then. This morning? Of Very well known Brumer, Guy, the walking cat. Who We've used for a long time, a referred to a longtime on Windows weekly because he does a lot of windows tweets. Was Banned? He tweeted some information from the Intel event which happened this morning right before the Intel event. Obviously a leak not anything we hadn't heard before and boom his His His pages. Gone. That's weird. So they are banning something but apparently not taking requests. That radio station. Where you call up, we don't take requests. So it makes you wonder why would he be he or she band? Is it just strictly rumor? or or what but he's saying he's been doing these kinds of leaks for several years. He's very well known. He's one of the well-known. leakers often very accurate does it that Intel has so much clout that they can call up Jack Doors say Jack can you can you help us out here and boom? He's gone or what? Or the the algorithm is going a little nutty I think. So wally genre fast right is that always say love her yeah. She's great and a friend of mine a clinic. WHO's an expert A. Law on section two, thirty and facebook and. She tweeted a scene where molly was on something and she said stop that or I'll kill you. Obviously to a kid or a dog and just quoted that and she warned for account being taken down. Yeah I think quoted I'll tell us is clearly I think everybody's gone home we know that. And the and it's just the. Just the algorithms now did you know about the twitter account called Brags Yeah? So it's gone now it's not gone and stopped why it's a it's a it's a kind of a funny story. So there was speculation is because of VC's evidently hate to be. Yeah because it's a parody account right and so they have he's not too much money and no sense of humor and so. VC brags brags all the time about who's blocking major VC's or blocking them right. So one person who was a V. C. and is now. Has. A company and gets VC money. There was some joking rumor that it was him because ever wonders who is this person and he played along for because clearly couldn't be him because he was a BBC. We'll the people actually thought it was him as getting too close for comfort. So whoever it is runs vc Brag said, okay it's been fun stop really. The stories are but in. Research more and try to find happier topics like this. I've found the example of. The work of VC brags and professor cold takes is just brilliant. Professor. Professor coach. He's the new. VC Brags. No He's this subject be breaks callaway. They make fun of Scott. Oh. Yeah. You're no fan I know of of Scott Galloway professor colds tapes. He's become. So here's professor cold like Galloway. As, long as I feel good. I think it'll be worthwhile. That'd be funnier. Here's this is the official trailer for professor called takes on the campus of New York Stern School of business. Comes over respected academic successful entrepreneur. Generous Philanthropist. bestselling author. And devoted family man. He's living the American dream. One problem. Just can't seem to get his business predictions, right Tesla's GonNa take. Dropping, below one hundred dollars a shot in the next year. Why will it drop below hunger on one? So I made this call three months ago. I was bucks halfway idea future transportation. The future of the World Am I. IF YOU'RE A retail investor that's pretty exciting test four, hundred, sixty, two. macy will be the most successful retailing. On Amazon Amazon loops. Today after reporting dismal resorts. Online furniture firm wayfair shares fraction DOC wayfair it's gone on a business over. Eight hundred percent. You know. Source Spat between him. And Cow China's. Galloway and CAL Canada's? I don't know who I root for that one man that's a hard was. It. Was Entertaining You Know Galloway. Ticket is stalking if you will from cal Kansas but I think they were I think I just honestly. Some of his previous. People getting fights on twitter all the time and it's like, please get off twitter just don't. It's not doing anybody. You're not doing yourself a favor just stop it. I learned my lesson years ago and getting into fight with people like. The show Leo was reading something intently I asked, what are you reading these? You're going to laugh at me and said, go ahead. Tell him alleging what he said twitter he was grossed in twitter he was enjoy. On Air Okay. Clear, I was engrossed at twitter because as usual twitter, I'm trying to understand am I having a stroke or does his tweet make no sense that's pretty much. My reaction is like, what are they talking about? I? Guess I'm just not part of the twitter Roddy you now I gotTa. I still stand by you needing to better curator twitter experience. Standby get right. Get off of also you know. Social media all of it except Tiktok stay on Tiktok. Can One we're waiting supposedly. Tick Tock. Would be today said, it would be Tuesday the announcement that who had acquired tiktok Microsoft in a consortium with a Walmart and who else is involved in that one Microsoft Walmart and there's the oracle bid. So there's at least two years. but then I think actually Mary Jo Foley nailed it earlier today on windows weekly when she said, no. Big there's a long weekend coming up. Everything, they're gonNA we're going to have the biggest news dump in the history of the world four pm Friday and among all of the things that they'll announces who bought Tiktok. What I'm really curious is how well compensated the US is going to be the press. That's the president's phrase that the US better be well compensated. By whoever buys TIKTOK DON'T UNDERSTAND HOW IT WORKS Is that leads acquisitions work. He said he'd said Okay President. Donald. This is from Bloomberg Donald Trump says, he's told people involved in the sale of by dances tick tock the deal. A must be struck by September fifteenth and be the federal government must be well compensated or this service will be shut down. It's like I. don't even I. I just can't. What He's got the power right? Right. No he doesn't actually he doesn't have the power to do. Tongue in cheek and. That's looking out for the united. States interests. Either we get well paid or we're GONNA shut it down well, is it a security threat or not I? Don't understand I don't get any of it. So I wrote a post about this yesterday. Okay. And I got really upset. Because it was about this and it was about the Australians demanding that's another one from right any money from facebook, which we can talk about together but. Down Tiktok should be a first amendment issue because it is the press of the people. Even heads owned by China. I don't care. It's the it's what people are using and we haven't grappled with that fact that we have a first amendment then China. China. Does actually fluence. China doesn't influence who can post what people see antic talk so if he can, we can't by law right. Okay That's the difference right and so if we choose to use it if the people of America are used as their press and they now have a press finely. And that press gets taken away from them. Still argue that as a first amendment violations really interested I mean I I think it's very complicated I. think that's a legitimate point of view I think also the the Siri held by people like Amy Webb that but it is also a political arm of the Chinese government and as a result, we have to be very careful about it because it could be used against us is also a legitimate point of view i. don't honestly know what the right answer is on that one. Let's. Let's move on. There's many many other things that can cause Jeff's blood pressure to go up and I WANNA make sure. Say we'll. Never know the right answer on that, and that's what makes this story so. Difficult for us. I think is Americans because we're absolutists in ways and we believe there is a central truth or year we'll never know the central truth because. It's China in. China. They don't have a central truth. And we don't under under the president. That's one of the kind of central tenets of I believe his his. Strategy is. Confused everything as much as possible so that you can't say with any certainty what's going on? That's actually a pretty good strategy as it turns out. Well for me squirrel paying no attention after awhile you. Just give up. So you're right and we don't like we don't like that. Do We Stacey? We don't like living in that gray area between. We hate it. Yeah. Do. You. Think that's human uniquely American. I think, Americans tend to be uncomfortable with. Gray. The we want to make definitive stations rights in by secure, right? Yeah. It's part of our national character because you know why? Because we believe in good and Right and wrong good and evil we believe in that. And we believe you can you can judge. And we get really stymied when there's something that is like I don't know. Is it good or bad? I don't know it's is it K- it's chaotic neutral. Up to with that. Neutral. Chaotic good. Those. Google wants to build a new village. I would would you like to live in Google town? y'All we're living GOOGLE ISLANDER REMEMBER WE'RE GONNA move there because I don't WanNa. Stay Our v Twenty, four seven. This is. This I think is specific aunt and excuse me it's not an RV. It's a tiny house time. Pacific. Will stop living in the parking lot. they want to build a village next to their campus and other Mount mountainview checkups. It'll be called middle middle field to park. Earth Look little black children are the white children playing together in the in the water coming out of the grand. Oh. Wait a minute. There's also other taking showers because they can't nobody can afford to have the shower cafe not. Here. That's Ellis. Lanes is not a that's a self driving bus in the background you think no, that's the light rail that already exists. It would dramatically re sculpt a large area now dominated by old tech buildings and huge practices that that is a really ugly ugly air. Those tilt ups and everything, right? it's sixteen hundred homes. between East middle field. Road. That's where the name comes from and state to thirty seven I know exactly where that is. Middle Field, Park near midfield. Road. Is New housing. effect both apple and Google have both. pledged a lot of hundreds of millions of dollars to fix the housing problem in Silicon Valley and facebook too. I think all three because nobody can afford to live there. And they can't. It's hard to attract employees now I think one solution is to say, well, you don't have to. I suspect that's going to be a big part of the post. Covert world is people working from offsite. Yup off way off site in cities from there. Yeah. KUDOS development thirty seven percent open space thirty percent office space twenty, four, percent residential, only six percent parking. Two percent retail one percent civic uses. It's interesting idea I apparently Mountain view wants to do it. The housing crisis is so awful. Yeah. would. The tax base for this be better than those office buildings. If the office buildings are vacant. Yes and I suspect this is an at least at this time. This is probably a concern. Google, reminded they just trying to get that. Are they underwriting like what role does Google have in this other than pushing it? That's a good question I'm reading through. Just. I'm trying to understand if this is going to be strictly a google property for Google employees, guests or. Area because nobody wants any. We don't want company towns coming back. I'm sorry. Oh must so to the completed Stolz. Yeah I think Google is does own. This is building this maybe they even already. Own The they were buying up a lot of yeah. Twelve acres of open space, which is pretty nice. this way. This is where they can put their smart cities thing we can go and in Marvel Athletic, true. DYSTOPIA and future take that Toronto. Well it's funny because I talked to a lot of. TECH INDUSTRY UTOPIANS WHO HAVE THIS VISION OF SMART Cities or smart villages are smart apartment buildings. This is a very common fantasy. In the in the in the Silicon Valley world, there's somebody's doing this unveil. You're talking to the expert in a right there. WHO's at? Stacy are you the? Tea Or. She's. Smart homes. You say. You're told me as. A sponsor, her home than Stacy's while she she would take over the sure Seattle if she could. But she starts with her own base nobody has a smarter home then Stacey Higginbotham. It's actually not true right now. I do appreciate that you I heard. I heard there's no windows in her house. That's what I heard. Not yet. So. This is interesting. It is a it's not. I don't think it's been approved by the Mountain View City Council yet. You know they love these guys so. But it's unclear like is google going to own if Google owns the land you know, are they going to pay to develop the housing or are they gonNA work on eight? I'm sorry. Australian developer that they're that they're working with lend lease a developer with global scope. Oh. Yeah. Lend lease is big. They're huge. and they've worked with Google and some other things. Okay. So they're working with them. They're going to build the houses to people by the houses or do people thousands. I imagine. That they're also be bit of give and take with the city council. You know usually what happens with city governments? They say, okay, we want twenty three percent be low income housing which you know we want certain amount to be for sale we want certain out to be I mean I suspect that all of that is still to TVD but I think this is very interesting. Company. That it is a little bit company town though isn't it? Really? I. Mean That's kind of interesting. It's a very Larry. Is something like do you have to work Google to be able to live there? And if you do work there, what happens when you get fired? The health insurance tour. WE WANNA tire living arrangements. Hey I like it. I. WanNa. Cradle to grave Google town. I'm there I'm there. You are there. But. What about that? What about that? What if you as a young family could move to cradle to grave Google Google town and Google takes care of you Google basically runs the local government because they're smarter than the average bear and they're used data and the traffic lights are always just right and there's always exactly the right amount of pizza available and all of that paint to. Picture. Yeah, there's gummy bears in every department just. What if and then Stacey and then guaranteed pension when you hit sixty five and a half Google retired Oh and the and the death benefits Google or amazing are they Oh, yeah yeah your family is really taking care of the funny thing is you move in four years later, Google closes down. In typical Google fashion. Sorry. We're GONNA we're, GONNA, tear it all down. Yes. Cradling rate. It's not receive. We're not getting the data. To. That's all we can do. Voice, says, it is a mix of rental and for sale housing units predominantly in the form of stacked flats that could maximize the number of residential units in the area would include twenty percent affordable housing units. God knows how to find portable on in the valley. Depending upon how many units are built? Three hundred thirty five to three, hundred, seventy deed restricted units for income housing. I like that idea that all of that is mixed in, but I have concerns on a personal level far as. If I were. Working for Google or whatever like a Full time employee at Google. I don't know if I necessarily WanNa live that close to work is just the personally I need some a little bit more separation in you know like where I live now here in northern California I'm just enough to be far away from the studio to feel that I'm not at work. Know this comfortable that way of people in my past at previous employers where they lived around the block and their phone always ring and they were always at the office and I never thought that was healthy and nor did I think it was fair to that But on the other hand that having a having had until March, an hour and forty five minutes each way commute. Being near work sounds like heaven to me, and that's why I'm kind of. I in I I did have some scenarios where I used to live an hour away and I hated being that far away I agree there was a sweet spot you know being just enough for way. But now how long does it take you to get where they can say, Hey, can you come in and unplugging replugged this thing for us? You know that's know. How long does it take into the studio when you go there? Pardon. How. Long does it take you to get to the studio when you actually go there fifteen minutes, twenty minutes tops. That sounds lovely. I. Love It. Basically had the five minute commute so. Two minute thirty second I. Don't really know to count like bedroom to coffee desk. I have a trailer from. The Google village, a concept. This is just an example of what it will be like when you wake up. In your stacked, flat. Kim Google Town USA just peek out the window. The perfectly manicured lawns. I thought it was going to be Pleasantville. Are you to younger remember the prisoner Stacey. I am too young to remember. One of the greatest shows of all time. Helix no sense. It makes no sense. He's a secret agent who decide to get out. But it turns out when you leave the British secret service, you end up being sent. To the village. which is full of of Stepford wives types, and you can't escape. Every time. You do a giant, a giant ball tracks down brings you back. Do. You remember this ad I. Know I've never heard of this always watch it. Just for the Hilarity I. Am a Free Man I am not a number. This is black. Mir before there was like. The greatest. It was the greatest was great. Yeah. One when did it career? We were probably too young to prevent teen sixty seven. Yeah. Yeah I don't think I would have gotten it but I. I definitely thought soon after I was probably Middle School, it was British. So we didn't see at the US. On TV. Yeah. Never. Seen Patrick McGowan who And the funny part is and I was a big fan of secret agent which was the show prior to that where he played a James. Bond. Style secret agent and so there was a certain amount of. in inside joke when his next thing was the prisoner about a secret agent who leaves the Secret Service and is trapped in the village. I always love Patrick mccaw and I think he was one of my favorite actors in the back in the day. Google is pulling off or maybe pulling fed averse. APPS now we have a fed averse mastodon incident instance called twit dot social. And one of the great things about the Federer's it is a it's a competitor twitter. But it is decentralized. So if you go to twitter dot social, you'll sign up for it account. And then we federate with other mastodon instances and there's software that you could put on irs or android that lets you join the Fed averse. Google has warned. It's GonNa pull many of these programs on the play store for. And this is interesting interesting problem inciting hate speech. ANDROID titles like Fed. Lab Husky, and subway tutor. help you connect to twit social but also help you connect to things like Gab when Gab was shut down for being to Neo Nazis, and so forth they moved to a fork for mass on then became part of the Federer's now every mastodon on instance I'm part of including our own blocks, Gab and other Nazi sites certainly neo-nazis our problem on twitter. Interesting that Google wants to shut down not by not by you know trying to shut down these federal Federer's sites like Gab but by blocking the clients the as of a couple of days ago are still on the play. Store, coordination. Gadget. So maybe maybe they thought better of it after getting some publicity. Interesting conundrum do. You. This is what people get tried to do to Google right with the right to be forgotten. Well, we're not going to pull down those sites that have articles. We don't like we'll just pull them from the search results. So they they don't exist. Yeah I think it's overreaching and it would hurt us I mean twits social is. Not, exactly, the most vibrant place in in the world, this is the problem with Mastodon in general is that it's It's not well known I. Think. Right So I'M A lot. I. Actually Am not logging on this machine that shows you how often. But. Because it's not centralized. One thing or another. You can pull down any given server I guess or complain about given given server but you but you can't a attribute, any particular kind of content. To to the Fed verses a whole or can you I don't know? This. Is One a lawyer is needed. Maybe. Loophole City Yeah. Yep, I don't know I. didn't I didn't know there was a fed verse I? Feel kind of with social. Here it is. If you want to visit the divers. Go. Go right on in there. because it looks a lot like tweet deck right instead of coming Youtube. Because the the the. Sounds like you far well, the mascot is a mastic no beings needed. So it's an L. faster. Like. A conglomeration of mastodon servers is the Fed averse. Yeah. So Matt Well Mass. So, mastodon is and there is massive on social, which is Eugene's home server. But what it really is is software and protocol, and so we for instance, I set up a twitter dot social server running on a different server but it. So my address is twit dot social twit dot social at Leo. And if you are on Mastodon dot social, you can follow twitter dot social at Leo that's my fully qualified name. And then my toots will show up in your stream your stream. Yeah I think I could do without your teeth. Don't need them. Don't want him. Father Way did you see the Washington Post story today about toilets Kobe Bid Yeah we knew that never goes it about three suspects news. It's worse. It's worse. Yeah. So the issue is we well, we we've said for they've said, experts have said for awhile that Cova can be spread. Both through saliva and through poop. And the problem is if you go to public restroom once you flush the toilet as you know that. You know kind of era. Whatever? It's yes by the way, those dyson hand-driers to they're really good at that as well. So you know what? Usually when you put your hand under the you've washed them so. That's a little. So you wash them I that makes a lot more sense. I'm like every time people are like freaking out about that. I'm like but hands clean well, but it also picks up whatever is in the air and. The problem with Cova is we really now it's kind of widely accepted. It's an aerosolize spread. That's the real problems not full nights. It's the aerosols. That's at least what I read your the one as follows all these people on twitter but There's actually a toilet or. Is An excellent Ariza leuser and so you go into a public restroom there could be a you know in these. Once it's aerosolize it can last for many hours. There could be just as floating clouds unless you change the air in the room at the tunnel and our you have to really ventilate. so What if they put the seat down before you flush? If you have a lid but many men's rooms do not have. Yeah most public ones don't. Yet, but even in your home y'all like is sometimes see people player House and they've got their toothbrush. In the bathroom. Thought of that Stacey. Oh, you need to like always shut that led before you flash as. Well, I think we've all learned something today. Maybe we should take a break for commercial. Too Bad toto is not a sponsor, any longer I would really love to toto. The toto wash it would be perfect. Terrible. We've they were a sponsor. Even more oh I have three of them. We every bathroom in our house as a toto. I got the first one I had to convince Lisa she said on. It's one of those Japanese Day toilets and you've used ours. and. He did she did she did. Okay. So I said he said we should get this. It'd be really cool. 'cause I think we'd even use them in Japan and she said. So I just we'll just try it. So we put it in the master and she said after a month or two we had him everywhere because it's like. Anyway. That's not our sponsor today. This twig last can toto. Toto. Wash responsible for what I think. It was actually a Wayfair, a co OP. So I was actually a wayfair AD or wherever they. Yeah. I think they're Salem's. Who is today sponsored Leo? Well, I'm glad you asked Stacey Higginbotham its last here we are in the last past studios or putting together. Good last best event for October is security months. Next month is security month. So we're going to do a couple of events all around security. We're going to do a last pass event and I pitched to them and I. Thank you. Last past for going for it. We're going to have read teams and blue teams. We're going to have hackers and defenders, and the hacker team is gonNA come up with an attack. And their fire at the defenders and defending team, which will consist of a security experts will say well, here's how we would defend against that I think it's going to be a lot of fun I think we'll learn an awful lot. So stay tuned for the details on that last pass event coming up I. Think our third last Padova a passive out of the year we've really been having fun doing these. You know last passes of course last past is all about what they call in the Biz I A M identity. And Access Management I. Think a lot of people think of last pass as a password vault and ensure its that in fact, it's the best password ball ever I store and more than passwords in there. My passports by driver's license social security numbers PG peak he's anything that needs to be securely stored, but available on all my devices last pass is the place to put it, but it's so much more than just a vault. Normally you think of security, it's either security or convenience. You can't have both but single sign is a perfect example of the more secure better than passwords and it's more convenient. You just press yes. On your phone you're logged in, you want your employees to use last pass to protect them and you want. And you're not just them but you're most vital resources, your banking, your databases, customer records, things like that but you want it it has to be convenient. They won't use it plus you want a centralized view of what they're doing you. Always you need to know who who has access to what from where Especially, with employee's at home, right, they're no longer coddled in the umbrella of the IT Department they're on their own networks, which common go there `up-and-down you want to make sure that if it looks like Joe from accounting is logged into quickbooks, it really is so from accounting not Dimitri from solve Sebastian Pool. So it's really important really important that you use last pass Enterprise Password, management gives oversight a shadow it and an an enforceable policies. For instance, we require to factor of all our employees we have minimum master password requirements, multi factor authentication. This is so sweet it. It's more than just fingerprint or face recognition. Is Sure. It uses biometrics also use contextual factors, things like Ip address and Geo Location. It makes the process even easier for employees and it makes you more secure and if you're sharing passwords and you know all employees, your passwords and they're at home, you don't want them texting or emailing passwords to their colleagues. Last past makes it easier and safer employs share loggins keeping access to your data safe. There's a completely secure channel within last passer password sharing employs will always have their passwords with them they can access. The the things they need to do to get the job done no matter where they're working from any device ANDROID IOS MAC, windows, links, everything. Working remotely is actually more convenient, not more frustrating and you'll rest easy knowing your businesses secure with last pass we as ten years ago. Steve. Gibson was shown every bit of last past the Creator Josie. Grist, gave him. The tour Steve was blown away es to fifty six bit encryption. They use PC ADF to which is the Key derivative factor, which makes it hard to brute force any password they use salted. Hashes. And Steve Verify that said Yep this is this is the way you should. We should do it. Your data is decrypted an encrypted only at the device level. Your Password is sent to last pass its secret from everyone including from last past the number one password manager, but a whole lot more last pass premium last pass for families. That's what least an I use at home and at. Work, we use last pass enterprise. Let Pat Securely manage your users identity letting your employees work efficiently without making your business vulnerable to cyber threats. Last pass dot com slash twit that's the address we use it you should use it and we are so grateful to last pass for not only keeping US safe heure but for supporting this week in Google in all of our efforts here twit. They are the of course the. Naming rights sponsor for the twits last pass studios, and we really appreciate last past dot com. Slash. twit I thought this was a very provocative and kind of interesting article I know Jeff you're gonNA laugh at it from Galab Edelman. Should. Should Google's ad market be regulated like the Stock Market Eshelman is an expert in antitrust and his point is kind of interesting. He says actually he's quoting. antitrust scholar Dina Shrina Vossen. Who has written a paper? The antitrust case she wrote the antitrust case against facebook last year Now in the Stanford Technology Law review she reviews new paper. In which he talks about how the Google Ad Market Works, and I've always had kind of vague idea of Vega understanding of it. It's fairly complex as the auction we've talked about before Here's here's how element describes it when you see an ad online on a website, for instance, not on our podcast, but on websites, for instance, the odds are very high the advertiser used Google to buy the AD. The website used Google to put the space up for sale. Google's exchange match them together in other words, cool runs both the largest extent exchange and competes as the biggest buyer and seller on that exchange it also on top of that owns youtube one of the biggest suppliers of ad inventory meaning it's competing against publishers on its own platform. And shrina Vossen argues this is exactly what antitrust law was created to protect against. But nobody even thinks twice about it. They're there apparently is no regulatory oversight of digital. Advertising because. Youtube wasn't even. A concern. Yes absolutely Boca go ahead Jeff. Oh go ahead. Go ahead. You. I was wondering if Youtube wasn't in the picture, would this be a concern but also just what are the other options there was? What was that being right? It's not it's not. That they're not able to capture more of the Bulls drink lamarcus. Both ends of the market that's the problem. It's the same problem as when the movie companies owned the movie theaters. And and and and it's a classic antitrust case they were forced to divest. You can't own both the the distribution in the product catchy. To. Ships Yep. right. So two things about this. I've always said that we're Google is most vulnerable is not search is advertising. At a does have the power of God never -tising. And they needed to be more mindful of that as they went. However, the way these exchanges work. If I'm on APP Nexus, which was bought by Oracle, which is huge, which actually invented programmatic advertising and that's where I do. It's still it's still inter operates Google. So it's not as if Google has closed world. The auctioning the bidding at. Across multiple trading floors. So that might be the problem is Google has the biggest on both sides? Yes. And by double click and they compete against. Every other product because they own. You're on their exchange and they're selling ads on it but the other thing to consider is right. So of Google I've always talked about this a Google word old style media company. They would have been a closed network and they would've said, Google, has lots of traffic lots of audience and we're GONNA we're we're like Yahoo or like a New York Times or cutting asked we sell our audience what the market will bear but of course, we will didn't do that with Ad Sense. It said Google said we're GONNA put ads across anybody wants them, and so we're going to send billions of dollars literally billions of dollars to media companies everywhere because our ads benefit media everywhere. and. So it's the models are so off from what media used to be used to be about scarcity and controlling the scarcity Google is about advantage ing. Abundance. and. So any law that exists is irrelevant for how this operates because it's sneaky but because it's Just taking a reality if this sounds familiar, you may remember when senator. Pichai. was testifying in front of Congress Pramilla giant Paul from Washington actually cited the paper. she said, the problem is google controls all these entities. So it's running the marketplace it's acting on the buy side it's acting on the sell side of the same time which a major conflict of interest. It allows you to set rates very low as a buyer of AD space for newspapers. which has hurt them rights deprived them of ad revenue, and then also sell I at the same time as you setting low for the the the. Newspaper, he's sitting at high for the small businesses who depend on advertising on your platform. So actually Leo this is where I've had this argument with people in the newspaper business. I mean I'll tell you this I've said to them why? In fact when the New York Times Google announced ads since I was there that day and I'm not old Then The New York Times was at the press conference at the events saying we're going to turn to the vice president of your times at the time who I knew well. Why the hell you is I said why the Hell you doing this? Why are you let Google Lynn And the argument I heard is the New York Times. But especially from smaller papers was I can expose my adamantly to advertisers I could never possibly ever in a million years, Celtic? Yeah. But it ended up. In a deal with the devil. Well it then, right. So then the next problem is, of course, a commodified them because what matters is the data about the user, not the environment and it lowered the prices because it was. Abundant. Abundance. I was at that's the way that was Santa I have to give credit to Adam Curry for crystallizing this in my mind I don't give out credit much credit at all for anything but I do give them credit for this. That's the key because display ads in a newspaper were a limited. Scarce Commodity Right, digital ads are unlimited. There's no scarcity at all watson more. We'll make some more. So it's a very different environment and that what happens when something becomes a commodity as opposed to a scarce entity is the price falls right? Because it's come out of ties. It's just just abundance alone now I had an event at the schools Chatham House rule so I won't say who it was, but I had a major executive not from Google all say that. From the programmatic ad. World. And this executive looked at the media people I had I had top level sea level people, media people in the room, and he he he or she Scolded them and said why the hell are you on programmatic quarterback was intended to get more inventory for direct response. It modifies you. You shouldn't be there. You should be selling directly what the hell. And one of the executives in the room who was a digital, a pure play executives said. Yes but sorry bud I gotta go where the dollars are and all the ad agencies all the ad dollars in programmatic. These great deals, and so that's where I have my advertising. So, what about the premise should google's ad market be regulated like the stock market. Should it be regulated? Yes. The stock market no. She. Writes on on the thirteen us. Stock Exchanges combined about fifty million trades happen every day. On Google's market alone trade desk. Tens of billions of transactions, tens of billions of transactions every every little ad because an ad cost ten. A. Stock costs. Scarcity by the way. And costs. Every time you open a page folks, and in the time it takes for that add to come onto the page. All of this auctioning is occurring in the background. Without even. The minute you hit a page and starts loading the auction begins. Yes. And it happens within the milliseconds of loading time. Before that ads display, do you. There's been a bidding war and the highest bidder has one that Ad. Yes. Wow based on based on not on environmental data that is not on a boot at on a boot page g coup, but based on cookie data. This is what may change right because of cookies and browsers and all that changing but the data about you provided the other part of this is so called retargeting remarketing ats you went to Amazon you looked at some boots those frigging boots follow you around for three months even though you bought the Goddamn things which by the way is. Don't be so scared about the. Efficiency that's actually not good. Yeah. But that that data point about you boot interested buyer. Consumer is more valuable than any environment. So you're looking at a weather site or a sports site or a food site. The Dan boats are there is that's how remarketing retargeting and programmatic work together. You May. Remember. that some months ago Google announced yeah. We've decided cookies or a privacy violation. We're GONNA knock that off the new chrome browser will turn off third party cookies, and everybody cheered Google's doing. God's work to protect your privacy I being the skeptic I am. Said well, that must be because they've got some better system, and in fact, yesterday on security now Steve. Gibson. Talked about the better system, which is essentially a perfect fingerprinting system. That Anybody, you know anybody can run if they have if you load their page that identifies you much better than cookies for did so. Google said, well, you don't need them anymore. Everybody hated cookies once we discovered cookies really like cookies got super cookies and we're really does, and then now basically this is kind of like a super cookie. Isn't it? Yeah. So. the title. Oh come on. Come on. Get some pep or something. That's. You were talking about to. The title of security now La- Yesterday is I. Know What you did last summer It's the it's the end piece of it and he talks about fingerprinting. It doesn't even need to be a cookie for instance When you load a page, that's the the page in the background can load another page with sites on it and can tell if you've been to those sites or not. They can actually read your effect read your Internet history. and by doing so it depends the more sites you visit the more accurately they can do this but by doing so they can uniquely identify you so so here's an interesting. Okay. That's fine. That's you know that's so I just put up on on the run down at the bottom under other Alex Thomas linked to Kevin Munger linked to a new paper but found that. Politically. Targeted advertising. Basically. Doesn't do Jack. All the talk about micro targeting and it's going to change people's brains and they're making a fortune and. At Alex is just joking that that you know the sales people that we will facebook sh. Yeah, because it says, political advertising is a small part of their revenue. But if this, if this goes to larger level micro targeting advertising, what this study says is that anything. this is this is Steve was quoting paper. it's kind of interesting. Stories it was delivered at the sixteenth used Nix on usable privacy and security, and they duplicated a paper from eight years ago. The paper from twenty twelve was called why Johnny can't browse and peace on the uniqueness of web browsing history patterns and this second paper said, well, we're going to go back and duplicate that methodology and see if it's gotten better or worse. and. It they identified forty, eight, thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen distinct browsing profiles of which ninety, nine percent of unique. High uniqueness holds even when histories are truncated to just one hundred top sites. So. Basically. If they can see the last one, hundred sites you visited, they can pick you out. With ninety nine percent accuracy from from fifty three thousand other people I guess from an infinite number of other people that you are you. You are absolutely unique. So yeah that's A. Really interesting. This is from. three Mozilla researchers why we can't still browse and peace, and this is why you know do not track and third party cookies and all that stuff just hand waving at this point. Brat modern browsers can get so much information about you all sorts of sneaky ways and they can clearly identify you but but but it may not do nearly as much good as the AD industry is trying to tell. Well. I mean. That's the part of it that you referred to. That doesn't work, which is this you know this? targeting. And I don't think that's probably because the back ends aren't very well done. You know it's recommendation. Engines are notoriously awful look at Amazon. Looking Net. They just still. Is I'm sorry to say this on a show sport advertising but especially when it gets down to that level, how effective is it right? Pretty. Good for me. Yeah instagram ads they work. Like you to. Use You quite a bit in I'm always hitting like or dislike on things that I watched because I watch youtube as if I'm watching. Regular TV. In the recommendations for several years have just been. A dream for me because I. Fed. Fed. Algorithm. In is not uncommon for me at the end of the day to go downstairs and turn on TV and fire up youtube in watch hours of random stand up comics or or. Something about. What it it knows what I like, and it does a good job, right? That were sent to see ads. The ads, the ads word today will the ADS is another story because I never seen him paid pay. Right. Where do you? Get sucked in. Stacey. Oh I. You know I get Sutton because I looked at something like maybe I've. Right, now I have a house right. So I'm buying some crazy furniture and things like that and being stopped I'll be honest by like a piece of furniture rug you're like, oh, there it is again. The top of mind and you're. You're a golden and I'm in the market. I'm I'm beautiful for these people they love me. They're like this woman has to spend and floors to cover. All the rugs. And it wasn't hard for them to figure that out about you didn't have to do any secret manipulation of your history to know that you just bought a house that's public record and I mean they know? Search. And you Google runs although I will say. Google in my new section then recommends what what's frustrating is like. Google right. Now, I go through my news, it has stopped being so much about Iot in quantum computing in now it is like. The design elements, how to look for rug. Chicago yeah. They're smart. They know how to get to you. That's Margaret's stupid. Oh That's stupid because it's not advertising. It's assuming the I'm searching for to buy or also things I'm interested in researching knowing about from. A content perspective and they're two very different things but Google's just like. I bet you in that content, there are a few ads. Probably isn't Kellyanne. Sponsored. Isn't content sometimes just it's just it's just a Jello mold to hold the. Ads. Stories are on there. Actually. If I looked at my news feed rate I've got the verge telling me about Amazon's survey surveillance flex delivery drivers. I've got the Guardian. Let's see. What else do I have A stupid story. I have a story about window what to plant in the fall Google peonies the other day not something I really want to. The rest of my life by your local garden store. No. It's on apartment therapy though it's It's It's a sponsor it's like they're affiliated links. and. They do tell me that the best way to do it is not to go to my local garden store but to go to these online stores that sell their stuff like. And why they happen to have some links that Good. Bye. Bye Bye. Gardens store. Yeah Know I'm going to make our in store. Those people are awesome. But you were talking about how smart these modern browsers are nowadays regardless of cookies what can we do as consumers to to SORTA, help protect ourselves of other than VPN? Is there anything? No VPN won't protect you. Right, that's what I'm saying I mean is there anything the technique? Is used traffic from Nias pe but that's about it as you know when you Click Lincoln a browser. That click is marked visit. That link is marked visited it used to be in the old days of the Internet would turn the link be purple instead of blue that most play. I remember remember that but that mark visited visited persists regardless of what color. It is so tragic that. I think would completely have nothing. You could use a VPN doing matter is they load a shadow patriots you don't see, and then they can actually query the browser. for which links have been visited they just by doing that, they just grabbed your web history for whatever many sites they put on that right they said, oh. Whoever this is I don't know who it is. The IP address recognized because it's you're on a VPN but look at of these hundred sites they just fired up This person has visited twenty nine of them on these dates. Oh, that's Bruin. and. He and he's interested in boots. So we know he's damn. Yeah. We showed him those boots last time show again, he still has bottom. Or maybe he did. We don't know. Boots. From clearing your your commerce shared with Google. You. Would know if you bought the boots or stood. Yeah. And to answer your question at. If you clear your history. No they wouldn't see that that's based on your history but you do you want to clear your history I guess every time you could most brands. You had you could set it to do that. Yeah clear it periodically. Well that'LL HELP You should clear it every time. If you use a service like last pass clear your. Cache actually is not as painful but. Yeah because at least you've got the passwords. Complaint I have whenever I clear my cache like, oh, there go all the passwords. So I can I'm looking at fire Fox I can't delete cookies and site data on fire foxes closed I can check that box the problem is. by the way, look how much cookie site data and cash on this system. One point seven gigabytes she's man at the system was rebuilt by. A few months ago. And I only use it for two shows a week three shows a week cookie. A cookie is. Tiny No. They're saving a lot of stuff. That's the cash the cash. So I could have that cleared every time but I think basically that's like making your browser dumb every three ads. Can Be Three adds one point seven gigs. I don't let me just clear that data right now and I can. I'll clear. So cookies and site date is only only seven, hundred, fifty, nine megabytes. Only. Cached web contents one gigabyte. So there's actually very close someone clear all that. Now. My browser is like fresh and clean again and I every time I close it. It's going to do that. We'll see I'll I'll keep it that way for a while we'll see if it makes it harder to I don't think it'll affect me. Cookies might but like who uses cookies anymore? So facebook you mentioned this when we I dropped the ball I, apologize. FACEBOOK here it is an update about changes to facebook's services in Australia Jeff gives the background on this. This is Rupert Murdoch background is that there is Murdoch backed legislation in Australia that would make facebook at all negotiate with a gun to their head with publishers for the right to live to the content. and. So this happened in various other forms in. The LYSTER wrecked. In in France the in Spain rather the link tax indeed when you are a great. Shot Glass hold up. This is this is the light like shouldn't conflict. Show. So now okay, stacy, you're better getting closer by about ten months. So So this is this is this is the publishers saying to the government let us put our pocket, our hands and facebook pocket. They took money from us because God gave us that money and and and they should give it to us. Now Murdoch is basically saying you'd be government sport but nobody no conservative. POLITICIAN IS GONNA, pay burdock. So what they're saying is take the money from facebook and give it to us. Because there some writer. So so facebook has said and Google of Said No, we're we're sending you were setting you audience we're not gonNA do that no. And and Australia's trying to act all tough. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA we're, GonNa, find a way to get money anyway. So facebook statement two days ago and said if you do this, we are going to cut off anyone media companies or users from posting news to facebook. Now, that's Obviously, a matter of negotiation in terms of what they're to do they're trying to. Fire a shot against Australia's bowel here but you think about facebook would probably be very happy without news news causes trouble news is controversy. They don't make any money on news thought you could be careful what you wish for Murdoch at all the case of Murdoch its regulatory capture because let's say that facebook does that no more news of any sort on facebook Murdoch owns the big brands the big brands. are still going to be okay because they have name recognition people will still go to them but every little competitor, Murdoch's every startup trying to compete with Murdoch they're all screwed. So he's fine either way he's happy. So. Here's what facebook is threatening. In their posts assuming this draft code. Becomes Law we will reluctantly Oh. So reluctantly stop allowing publishers and people and people in Australia from sharing local and international news on facebook and Instagram. Boom. So. This is why I wrote about this in the context of tiktok. We have a first amendment. Stacy's earlier point. The First Amendment in our country, which has an impact. Australia doesn't. But as a matter of freedom of expression and human rights because the platform that people use to discuss public policy and discuss government and discuss what's going on and to share the news that has behind that. So one hopes. In informed fashion gets cut off from under them. It's a violation of their human rights. This is the people's press. And I'd never really. Before but but it is before it's the first time in history everyone has truly had access to oppress, and now we see governments cutting it off. China was doing it already. But now the United States is doing it with Tiktok and Australia's doing it with facebook and facebook is full well within its rights to say, okay no news just. That's it. That's all we got now no news. Our life is going to be a lot easier folks mates. and. Actually, fight be a lot better. This might be I might be a lot happier. I might go back to facebook if they do this in the US. No more news. That'd be great but unfortunately. What you're going to get is no more links to establish. News organizations, but lots of links to Russia and troll farms right they'll come in. They'll take advantage of this, right? Chris Fisher. Yeah exactly exactly. But but again, Murdoch is cynical and clever. And the same I win either way. I make my political point I try to get some money out of them. I get paid off because facebook was saying we are going to put facebook news in in Australia and we are going to pay publishers and facebook paid. newscorp in the US I sat in the event where literally check was handed over for Mark Zuckerberg to Rubber Thompson the head of News Corp.. And but but but Iraq is making this bigger point and and what gets me too. Is that I'm angry at publishers because if you think about it, I thought about this post to. facebook started never beat about news. It was about hookups and parties. Twitter never started be about news. It was about where my drinking right now. Google never started about news people WanNa, do is they added that? All of these cases, the users brought the news to the users that Oh we want to use this thing on facebook to share news, we want to use his twitter thing to share what we witness out there and share news and talk about it. We want to search for news on Google we want to share news education, all kinds of stuff on youtube it was the user brought the students why because newspapers were? Stuck in their ways to provide that functionality to share what people knew and talk about it and so on with their users. So then lost those people and now they're acting as if God and Australia Oldham facebook and Google the money back. No, it's their own damned fault. Sorry end away well, and it's concerning when you see stories like this Russia's most notorious troll farm reportedly used deep fakes to push a fake news outlet. On facebook and twitter they both got rid of twitter now both. Pulled them down. This is the Internet research agency. We've all heard so much about. Never left Yeah. But but I have to say, okay, they pulled this one down. But if in absence of legitimate news sources I suspect a lot of these. Don't try every trick in the book. Yeah. I'm the only place you news and it's GonNa get harder and harder because deep fakes are getting easier and easier. So, so it's a cynical effort at protectionism by my own dear industry and I, hate them for it. Yeah. That's the end of. That's long rant. Rant. All right. Let's take another break log coming up and then it's the silly season we've got some. Some silly stories but the way I have to say, I already am hating it that I deleted my history and cookies. Realize into Google re log into twitter and. Didn't take long for I realized why I didn't WANNA. Do that yep in Google is just thinking yes, we got him forever now he'll never delete delete again, ha ha well, fortunately I use a Yuba county so logging in is too hard but it's you know I gotta do it I. Guess Now every time I close my browser every I start a show may have to log into everything and it's not that was the wasn't that the premise of cookies from the from the Better user experience. Who is because dropping? Is that Stacey Stacey Stacey I think they drilled through your Internet connection. She's frozen. Let's take a break. We'll figure this out I word from our sponsor Monday dot com, a team management platform. That lets teams plan mad manage and track work. In one centralized place you can collaborate with your teammates track everything your team is working on wherever you are in any history. Whether you work with a team of five or five thousand Monday dot COM is easy to keep everybody connected on track. 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So you can get your team up to speed instantly and they have great on boarding special specialist like Eddie the one we worked with he helped us set up that podcast board and by the way they already had a podcast template was very easy no matter what business you're in the templates are there you can increase productivity efficiency, facilitate transparency improve collaboration, and there's even know code automations so you can put your team's workflow on pilot on autopilot you don't have to manually enter data and it just goes flows in their from their natural work. You got alerts. You have automatic status updates project to keep your team on track and confident in their work. I think this is an amazing solution that works with the tools. You're already using to give you a single source of truth a place on the web you can go to you can look and you can say here's where we are. Here's we are this minute right up to this minute. 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As you all know we've done host read ads that they call these things where I or hosts aunt Mica Jason How will read an ad in the show but some of our shows during because of covid have not been sold out and maybe some of you have noticed in fact, maybe some of you have been shocked. By because I'm getting some emails from people saying Hey I was listening to twig or one of our other shows because we're doing a number of shows now, a twig and all of a sudden there was an ad for. Another podcast in their way who put that in there That is something we're trying out it's called direct ad insertion. We use a company really I think a good company called Megaphone and they will sell ads and insert them. Some of them are host read they might be doing those ads some of them are not some of them. You know our sponsors you've not heard before. So don't be don't be shocked if you hear that that's normal it's one of the ways we're. We're trying to keep the lights on during a difficult time because as I'm sure you know. Time tough right. Now, a lot of businesses are struggling advertising dollars off by I don't know thirty forty percents of a significant amount animal exactly what it is but. So it's costing us a little bit of money, but we want to try to keep the lights on his best we can't. So if As a as a surprise, he'll be our. Listen to the podcast again and again and again and see over ten times. What ads do I get it it'd be a lot of. And it'd be good for twit right now. I will not be in the video versions. It's not in the live versions obviously because it's done. Fact. It's only in the audio versions of this show we try to do it in such a way and this is the trick us and I've been struggling with this little bit so that I indicate there's applause here but for those of you watching video. We continue on it's not like what happened where. So Well, you'll see after the change log I'll another one. And and you'll see I'll say something like coming up next it's picks of the week. Pause, and now stacy was see I don't think I've been trying to talk to the street I think you can have another way because when it coming up next sounds like it's coming up to a commercial, but you don't really have to say. Why can't wait to hear stacy's picks ause Stacey. What are your picks? Okay, right it's it's works as a tease and. We're struggling with transitional because it has to be enough of transitional statements so that people don't go whoa I just got hit by an ad like I want to warn you know but I don't WanNa warn I don't Wanna I don't WanNa confuse you if there's no ad so I don't know what the answer is on assessment my experience with other podcasts that I listen to that use a similar service I. Don't know if they're particularly use a megaphone, but it would just be a jarring break with your. Transition or anything at least you try to transition to to it somewhere within the show but. As Well, and and obviously, it's not working completely because I'm getting a email in twit community people are mentioning it and they're like I. Don't what happened what the Hell's going on some. Guy Just posted I th I thought I suddenly got another podcast playing and partly that's because for fifteen years the only adds you've heard on twitter or reading those ads. So that's probably some of it. So that's why I'm even bringing it up otherwise I wouldn't but I just to prepare you to understand that that just like on network television or radio where he shows going along, and then there's an ad that has nothing to do with a show or the show host draining, and then it comes back. That's that's how media was sold for years. We did something we started with doing something very different, which was every ad was kind of woven into the content and the hosts read and I would like to keep doing it that way but but apparently, it's indeed not good enough for. and and we'll see this is an experiment. If people really hate it you know we can turn the lights off. Offer. I don't think we'll ever do a paywall although did you see? So. We used to have a a young couple lives up the road, a piece come in they they had they were on youtube wonderful little group called pamplemousses-triolet. They'd come in they play music I. Just Really Love Them Jack Conte and his girlfriend they were so good now wife your wife did they get married all right married yeah and they were just adorable couple and I loved their music and they come and perform for us, and then I heard the Jack because he's a youtube guy actually they did I think the thing that was an epiphany for him as they did a tour a concert tour. And they lost money like crazy. They wrote a post about it. He didn't think he. Broke. Even within a dollar or something that was clearly not worth it. Yeah. Everybody says this is how performers are GonNa make money now not through records but through touring and he said here's I'll give you the. No he was very transparent is I'll give you all the numbers. Yeah it was it was a medium post Pamplona's two, thousand, fourteen tour profits. they've finished a twenty eight day tour twenty, four shows twenty three cities Natalie, his wife now wife who was just. Wonderful Singer, and he's performing she is she crowd surf for the first time ever we sold. Under. One hundred thousand dollars in tickets one, thousand, one, hundred twenty nine tickets in San Francisco Fillmore I'll never forget that knife night for the rest of my life. One Fan question fans repeatedly asked what does it feel like to have made it as a band? Here's The van. there was expenses So they paid the band's week of salaries for musicians tour budget the tour ended up costing us now remember what they made. On the tour one, hundred, thousand dollars in tickets tour ending up costing as one, hundred, forty, seven, thousand, eight, hundred, and two dollars. So it was I think an epiphany for Jack just. You know what we are. So thrilled, we love seeing our fans. This is an amazing event, but it's not a is no way to make a living. The. Lost Eleven thousand, eight, hundred lost eleven grand. The Great. Band. So Jack Thought. Well. What if what if I did what if I made it possible for bands and others to kind of? Raise money in another way he founded some little thing you you might have heard of. Might have heard of it called Patriae on. Patriots Stat. PATRIAE. On just got its second round of funding. I. Don't know if they make money actually but I guess in this day and age doesn't matter if you make. Money. But they got their second round, a couple of years after you IPO. They are now worth one point two, billion dollars. So. Yeah. They lost eleven thousand dollars on that tour, but it was an expensive education but you know what credit to Jack and Natalie. And Jack the is. Killing me. This is killing me because I brought Jackson New York for an event on membership in news and other people I brought is now the president of WNYC in New York golden chicken was slummy and so they bet that way as she's on his board, I, wanted to be on his board. Well congratulations axe. Great. Because he wants to support creativity. Cares about yeah, and it's been a great success So their second as actually is not seconds to their series. The funding of ninety million dollars values. I'm at one point, two, billion dollars they have raised for creators two, billion dollars, six, million patrons. So many of our friends as a matter of fact, or on Patriot so well done Jack. That's really great. That's really good and the great thing is they still do music. Yeah pipeline lucile. Studio I think separated I. Think they live in San Francisco and their studios in L. A. or something like that and they were they were separating out the two lives but they still do that. Oh that's too bad. Yeah. They'd probably a nice big mansion now these to live up there. They need to ask what's it feel like to have made it that's been yes I mean literally they lived like they were waiver feels like they made it. No, you can. You can lose that money anytime. Right. So they raised a total of two, hundred, fifty, five, million to date. Isn't that great? It's good for their good stuff. Yeah. Big Success Story and and Nice. Nice. People who they so nice. I just love him. I just love him and I, I discovered them. They were on Christmas I. Think Nissan Commercial Oh. And they were just this really cute couple with nice singing and. Fun At it. I wonder if you can find it online. I'm sure I can. and I don't think Nissan Hyundai Hunt. Well, that's good. The halls Hyundai and I don't Hyundai would mind if we play this would they? Person Screaming Right now. Screen Carson screen, take it down. What do we care? This is This. Now, you'll know why everybody loves Jack and Natalie. They also. The Rain mazing. Breast rightly feel this. Nominal hovering you a great deal on the two thousand eleven. Genesis is one of ours. Now. During the holidays, you can lease the twentieth. You've never seen him when you saw this genesis said. Twenty ten. I said. This. Exactly. It was another one music was. They're really cute and fun and I just looked them up and. Let me I'm I'm always amused by people who act in commercials who are actually likeable and good and look who is that person and so I was Harlequin found them and. So yeah. I started following him them long before we'll. We should try to get I know I think we are trying to get them on on one of the shows George Least Jack Signature relations here to give you a better idea because one of the things that she's famous for is their covers they do great coverage. Here's a song. You might know Pamplona's cover from a few years ago three point two, million views on this. And that's Jack. Jack the drums piano, he does all the instruments. Singing. She plays him instruments. Muscles. Is they would do these out of their living room I mean this was done in the yes. Poll. Yeah Jack. Told me the editing was hell. Get. One with like a robot host is always the hard part. Yeah. Post is the worst. Actually, I. Thought. They were the next big thing. I actually was shocked that they didn't become huge but that's a little. That's maybe more about the music industry than anything else I think so. Anyway. Anyway I didn't know that news. That's good news for them. Yeah. Yeah. I hope this is last week's news but this still made me think about spotify and job bud and when you're talking about The story here with them being in the music industry and how much money. They could have potentially made versus what they actually lost when it comes to all of the hidden fees and hidden costs and expenses that tend to show up in. Last week on Tech News weekly, we talked about Joe Bud a pretty popular rapper from about ten years ago, who is big in the entertainment industry now with podcast and so forth. But he learned a lot of lessons from being music and pretty much has led to him saying you know we're done with spotify being on their platform for our podcast exclusively because I know what it takes and I know how much money's coming in I understand value understand the growth in all add spotify just just going to take and rips apart, and we're not gonNA own the content and he's speaking as a heart at the heart of a Creator not necessarily. This Day. Also he says spotify promised US bonuses. when we got to a certain size and he says, you know his show exceeded spotify's audience reach expectations by nine hundred percent to the point that his listeners crashed the platform and he says, but but we never got a bonus. The company wouldn't allow him and his team to take vacation days on Christmas and New Year's Joe. If you worked for us, you can take Christmas and new years. Because that would have required them to miss two episodes of the podcast. The company did give them rolexes, Joe I'll give you a TIMEX. It's just the same. The same but then even waterproof then it was worse because Joe and his team picked out rolexes in the. End spotify those are too expensive. then he said, Wolf spotify give money to to our fans for Christmas instead of rolexes in spotify said No. He said, this is the first time dawn on me that spotify his pillaging you pillage the audience from the PODCAST and you've continued to pillage each step of the way without any regard for the fans. I wonder how much money spotify gave them upfront? You know the rumor is they gave Joe Rogan one hundred million dollars over several years to go exclusively take. Off Incentives podcast audience exclusively spotify. About that, they have a Shell Obama. That's right but the details but Rogan was that he was so adamant about was Rogan. is still going to own the the art that they're creating still going to be here spotify not going to have. All of it you know and I think that's the big piece that Joe Biden has been fighting is you know they're doing all of this work and create content in spotify and Gimblett knows folks are like Yeah. If you lead this is still hours. Defense because we would assert the same thing. So if you you know so it started with a nod. Britney loose and Eric eddings created the podcast four Gimblett. And then Gimblett was acquired by spotify. And Brittany Eric said, well, we built the show and the audience, but we don't own it. Well, I gotTa tell you aunt if you build a show in an audience on our network and then you decide to leave, you don't take the show with you unless we don't know yet. Dan I get because like if something if I ended up leaving twit I can't take hands on photography we own it. We put a light on Iran's I thought. And now Fair. To be fair every single time that's happened we've said, okay. Go ahead. I haven't been happy about it Chad Johnson did that great minecraft? OMG Craft podcast right on our network built a great youtube audience. We build them a beautiful set and all that stuff and and at some point he said Yeah. I I make it a lot of money now can I just have it and do it my own and? Any. Other company in the world would have said, no, we own the IP actual property to this. You made this as an employee. But I am and we spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on it. But I'm not that guy. So I said now go ahead and he's doing great. He's actually broke a million. Subscribers just the other difference there though is Joe. Bud In already had. Didn't. The Not didn't Joe Button did. Right so I don't I don't know I. Know that happened with a nod I don't know what the deal was with Joe Biden did he say? I think he's taking it with him. Yeah he is. Yeah. They're they're they're cutting ties and but. For to be on that platform, there were some other things that he wanted to happen. The company wanted him to read ads. He said, no, yeah was like Nah I'm not reading ads making it one of the only shows not to be monetize on the platform. there. Well, again, there's a lot of people in the. For. The monthly specifies subscription. to not get ads when you pay for spotify premium, but you're still going to have ads inserted on those certain exclusive on the free you have ads because that's the only way. That's not cool. Well. Okay. There are a lot of creatives in the world think. Oh off I mean I've been on both sides I mean all these shows but yes so I've been on both sides but I've always known forty years in the business that when you create as an employee, the company owns what you create I don't own the screen savers I don't own call for help and I would never even have thought in my head Oh, I want to take that with me you owe it to me or I'm never doing ads because you understand it's a business. He. Thought it was a fast. As a creator I will say, like would giga own went away suddenly I lost all my Foul what was all that is not podcasts that Kevin and done on that one. So when I doing it fortune. GIG Yeah. We were. And it was called the Giga Oh. That GEICO, Iot podcast. So after that failed about a week and a half or two weeks later I was, can you WANNA start it up again you know and we we still didn't know what we're GONNA do. That's also yeah. And we've done that with other shows when Scott Wilkinson. We had that show wasn't making a Lotta money. We couldn't afford to do it anymore. I said, Scott, we'll give you the feed. We'll give you. You know you have the name whatever you WanNa. Do if you want to do it, he went to a couple of publishers nobody else picked it up. We've done that every time when. We when we Tom Merritt used to do. A show for us He wanted a lot of money. He hired an agent that was a mistake by the way. And the agent said I want Wanted Triple Tom's salary and he wants to do less, and so we just didn't renew the contract. We couldn't come to terms. The Guy said, no no, you gotta give them three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollars a year and I said. I don't make that kind of money. Sorry. I can't. So we didn't renew his contract and but we but he but we left on good terms and he tended to the exact daily Tech News. He didn't get TNT the name Tech News today because that was ours and we continue to do that show but he went and did the daily Tech News Show and we and you've been on it. You could have signed him to a non compete. You didn't. We don't I've never done that partly because non correct I. As a as a I signed non competes in my lifetime all of them unenforceable in California. Yes. But I've signed the many times and I see I come from both sides of the track. But at the same time I, understand you, I'm not gonNA take the call for help show with me. It's not mine. So I was Gonna say that when Kevin when I went to fortunate, I actually offered them the show. And because they wanted to do podcast but they didn't want to do my show. So. They were fine with me doing it but they they didn't want it and then when did want they decided they wanted it but then they wanted to own the licensing and I was like, thank you. come to that was just like a no go for them. The chat rooms bringing up all these shows that we said. Okay. Fine. Keep your show. Idiot. thinking. I just can't do that to somebody. Well, we're going to do we were going to do a show out of the school right and we tried to figure out how to do a tweet worthy show the school, and they couldn't, which is the same folks. It's hard very hard. That's the thing I think a lot of talent I? Miss doesn't understand. All of the. Money. Time and effort we put into this stuff. Oh yeah, and So. I mean. I was I was just like and it's not enough to be talent. You have to also have the brain and add smarts to which is tough to find in the same person. That's why honestly when when, when g craft when Chad did so well, with it I was thrilled for him I was really thrilled for him. and you know it's great. We we stopped doing the gives was with Dick debartolo but I said, please take the feed whatever you want and he and Chad got together and they. Show so I'm an idiot. No. But I understand. Joe's point of view. But I also understand spotify point of view and it sounds like He refused to he refused to do ads. and. It sounds like spotify and said Okay Joe we're going to keep the show. They've they've. spotify said they wanted to keep button on the platform as joe references show he made him a considerable offer when that was significantly larger many times the value of the existing agreement reflective of the current market and the size of his audience. Unfortunately, we couldn't come to terms and we respect his wishes to find a new home for his show. Yeah I. Believe the argument was The offer you giving me right now is just not quite good enough because I know what my trajectory is I could see what my trajectory is based on my past. You know were continuing to pick up steam and we're GONNA continue to bring more to the table to the umbrella of spotify. So you know he's saying hey. GimMe a little more cash and we in. Of course, they just couldn't meet up you know. Just like you. Thought it was a good discussion. Of Joe. Doing. He was the first to do an exclusive deal with spotify and I don't like these exclusive deals. I don't like what Joe Rogan's done either because I think it's giving spotify huge amount of power and what spotify is trying to do. Is To to kill RSS podcasting. and to make podcasting be something that lives on an application. So they can gather more information about you and we really don't I don't think that's the right thing to do. So in a way, I don't if Joe wants to leave that's fine. He made he kinda made a deal that I didn't really support to begin with same thing with Rogan I. Hope both these guys cash in. was more about the capitalistic side of it too though. Yeah. No. Maybe let's see what let's see what Joe Button does. He had is he brought a name. He was a success going into it right? Right. So that's that's That's that's the. Average person. Go on into these negotiations. This is someone that has some sort of establishment with them, but apparently did not have enough clout to convince spotify. Right. So that's always. Is. I didn't know. He was I'm not. I'm not a big hip hop artists like I was obtained years ago but I I knew of his name I didn't listen to any. You did a bunch of other different things beyond music. Far As being in the community and just and things it is. Something called calming rap. where? It's very low. Tail. Were you a hip hop artist? Is that true? No. Never was really excited by this hold. By name never been there is aunt and I'm here to say I came spit and not to play. I'd like to do my rep for you like that, right? That would be no. It's Asmar rap. It's a whole new thing. It's a new category. Yeah. Aunts central melodic rap according to. Right. So I think it's To Watch this when money comes into a business podcasting never was worth anything when money comes into a business, it changes boy does it change? You Watch this thing happen and so spotify signed? Yes. Joe Rogan Michelle Obama Kim Kardashian. I. Mean they're trying to build this exclusive. Thing and You know they bought Gimblett. They've spent more than half a billion dollars. And I'm just bitter because they didn't buy us. That's all I'm Jay I'll be honest with you. Audible. is now trying to pump up its podcast. Comes in at changes everything and when it leaves it changes. Yeah. I'm waiting till leaves I'll be here to pick up the pieces. No and that's interesting. Audible doesn't want any pockets with ads. It makes sense because their books don't have ads either right but that that leaves us out because That's how we make money doing this show and. It's. So what else do podcast do do they just have? Well some people are like patient. Audible. I guess I don't know you have to make. I mean how did they? How did they feed their families? That's a see. That's the fundamental question. Patriot and it's not. Yes. Well my friend. Tom. I. Do WanNa Feed my family. Yeah. Right. Friend Pete Dominick who was on Sirius who's a stand up comedian and as a political show on the series longtime build a channel for them basically. So he left serious and now he's in a shed. He shed his backyard doing his podcast is going really well, and he's doing mainly on patriach good for him. That's awesome. I thought you know. Advertising I think I think when I retire I'll do a patriotic podcast so we can't I can't go to patriotic. For shows that we've been giving away for free, you can't do that. Nobody, you would get more support. Fan Support. Than Your. Letting on. I don't know I really know about that but. I. Mean people are so fickle. We we put this show out. Along with all of our others, gazillion shows we have on the network for free. We just insert our own personal ad reads into him here and there, and people will bitch and complain about some of those add reruns even they didn't pay a dime for the content. No and I think that a lot of people say od pay five bucks a month but but when push comes to shove I, don't. I don't. and. That's why it's going to be when I retire. So that I, it's not like well, I have to make a certain amount of money I. Just WanNa keep talking and if it'd be nice if I can make a little money do. People have been very generous with us. I have to say we sold a quarter million dollars worth of bricks to build the brick house some as reminded that That was an amazing We when we started, we asked for tips and we re not only doing eight or nine thousand dollars a month and tips. and not to mention seven bitcoin which. Somewhere somewhere I will get it. And actually I think it's now technically I think Florence Ion, my bitcoin but oh, that's right. That's right. She doesn't want it fair and square. Hey by the way, we should mention even though we have debated back and forth about whether Tiktok and we chat should be banned in the US. Of course, as we know twitter and facebook banned in China India has now an added they banned tiktok awhile ago a lot of Chinese apps they have now added one hundred eighteen APPs to that list including. The the game that is now taking fortnight's place on IRS PUB G mobile. Band I didn't realize pub G mobile was owned by a Chinese company. I didn't know that either. Ten cent. You've heard of them. There they own Dan Pudgy Mobile. It was according to many the most popular game in India prior to the ban. So that is a government Modi's government is says pine who cares where banning it. TIKTOK. One of the one of the most successful markets are was India until it was banned in June. so Do we want to be like India and just banned stuff. We don't like I don't think so no. Because we again, we're. Of them. So Yeah Yeah. No that's right. Let's Yeah. Well, I don't know people there. There are people say look how China's treating its weaker Muslim minority. That's a good reason not to have any Chinese commerce in this country, right? Oh, if we apply the, they're jerks to some people argument to why we shouldn't have Chinese businesses here we have got to clean our own house first. Cages and we're shooting black men on the streets and. Yeah. Yeah. Sh. I agree with. Those living in glass houses should refrain from casting oldies. Too. We talk about neural link last week. NO WE DIDN'T Elon, Musk. which WHO's read? A lot of science fiction as have I want to live in a world where you can jack in a mind machine interface. You've got a little thing in the back of your head. You just connect the computer in your in the metaverse and neuro link is a company's funded to the tune of one hundred, million dollars. To create the next generation brain machine interface and ladies and gentlemen would you put your head? In that thing. Because that's what it involves. This is actually a concepts an automated surgeon. That Well, it drills a little hole in your skull little one just little cordless drill. Holes in the ground and get roles in your head. The same skill it's the same boring machine. It's economists are doing epidemiology. You know it's not hard to pick up. The place in your the they. So they take a little bit of the skull out. They'll put it back promise take a little bit of skull out put like a cellophane like membrane in there, and it has electrodes thousand electrodes, the diameter of a quarter of the diameter of a human hair very thin, and it plunges them into your brain at different depths and locations avoiding very important avoiding the blood cells because if you hit a blood cell, well makes a mess. So so and the machine can do six threads with one, hundred, ninety, two electrodes every minute. So it's like a little sewing machine for your brain so it takes a little holding. Put those in there closes Yup, and now you have a neural link in there and and this is the best part you parrot to your smartphone via Bluetooth. Really. To. Now Let's be frank. Demo. Didn't in fact, they didn't do it to humans and they haven't even built this machine. They did it to a pig actually they did it to a couple of pigs they had I'm not sure why they had three. They had control pig they had the pig they did the surgery on and then they just had some third pig just hanging around to keep everybody else company here is the neural link reading the pigs brain activity and predicting its limb motions ahead of time isn't that amazing? Isn't that mind boggling. Let let me ask you. Yeah. You asked if we would if we would. Connect ourselves to this device GonNa answer that. Refers would this? Would you do this and twenty, twenty two if this device? But I would do it. TEN YEARS Okay I'll do it in twenty thirty. So you're saying give it time to mature. Well. Yeah, and also at that point I'll be so old if it kills me, it's not the end of the world. Well, it's the end of. My world. But I beat you. Know be like okay I'm going to take a chance I'M GONNA. Guys for science like if you ask me, will you go to Mars and there's no return trip I do that now I've lived a good life. You know I'll have some fun on Mars and Do we get stacy back. We Lost Stacey briefly. I think hurt Annette is just really. crapping out, it's supposed to long does not the Internet I've always wanted see I am not happy with VR glasses the VR helmet I've always wanted to get in the metaverse I want to be so realistic that I think I'm there. If they told me that we could do that tomorrow but you gotTa do this procedure, I probably would do it. Don't you see? Be On. You love. fultz. Kind that should be on my tombstone. He wouldn't on facebook but he would let alone must drill his brain. I thought I thought it was going to be are you knocking fats but? I think that might be on to both of those either one of those. So Stacey I'm glad we got you back because I. Think you probably of all of us. Have the best understanding of the brain machine interface. Well, Stacey is going to turn herself into an Iot no no. So I would never do this although. I don't think the risk versus the reward here is compelling and I say that because the ability to access information is going to become less valuable over time and that's basically what this is at giving you. Now, we all have you know we all take a moment and keep our brain on Google like how many times have you talked about that, right? So or how you know? You're talking to somebody and you're like Oh. What was the name of that? Okay. That's not where the value is going to come in. So that's one. So I think risk versus reward I do think. The process is interesting because deep neural stimulation is becoming such an interesting area in the medical world for things like Parkinson's treatment and Migraine, treatment actually there's some potential there but. Really don't come from Elon Musk. So those are the things that what I saw this almost like this could be really compelling especially as a mechanism for. Real healthcare into the brain. By there already and by the way. Quickly it was pointed out that neural link is not doing anything that a number of other research institutions are doing and in many cases doing better and a more advanced way, and that is exactly one of the benefits they talk about a tetraplegic began type forty words a minute just by thinking and it's that kind of empowering technology. That would be amazing. Not. So much me thinking on the beach and Portofino. because I have a thing in my head. You saw the guy who lost his arm and unplugged A. Bigger Raspberry Pi into the socket and music. Brain that's nice. You can do that. So the BBC asked a number of scientists the UK's Science Media Centre. they put out a press release quoting professor Andrew Jackson no relation from he's a professor of neural interfaces at Newcastle University. I don't think there was anything revolutionary in the presentation he said, but they are working through engineering challenges placing multiple electrodes into the brain. In terms of that technology one, thousand, twenty four channels is not that impressive these days but the electronics raise them ray relay them wirelessly is state of the art and the robotic implantation is nice. The biggest. That's what I said. Just like stacy. I just don't have a British accident degree. This is solid engineering but mediocre neuro science some said. Elon Musk's. When asked? Why isn't this peer reviewed said well. Well. We have time. It's silicon. Valley. People. We had a control I have no no his answer. was I have no peer. I have no peer who would review it. I'm the third richest man on earth how the hell did that happen isn't that amazing isn't that amazing? Scott Galloway's laughing. The Big Dog Elon. Musk responded with a tweet of course. It's unfortunate like common for many in academia to overweight the value of ideas and underweight bringing them to fruition. Good Point for example, is the idea of going to the moon. The idea is trivial but going to the moon is hard. So, I, don't know he also some with them on that I got to give him credit for that because a that's. A fancy way saying there's a whole lot of talkers and not a lot of do worse yeah yeah. So. Ilan's doing some look I, think I do hope. Always wanted. Something like this at some point and you're right Stacey I simply for accessibility for empowering technology this would be amazing. Imagine Stephen Hawking instead of having to. Type into. Some sort of interface being able to call you played the hocking card. Okay. All right. Right. And I think it'd be nice to be able to you know go to the beach in my head but and I do think this happen eventually. So these are the first steps. You know we would've we would've mocked a lot of the first steps in. You know personal computing. I to say Elon off often over cells things. But you know that's that's gone. I. Think he's. I know he's a great huckster. But he's also done some really good stuff. Is the third richest man in the world how that Al that happen? Stock Splits my friends stock splits. Money it is. It's just it isn't paper gained. And you know to credit he took all the money made in pay pal, which is initial fortune. Sunken into wrist a crazy idea to do electric vehicles So and you know he deserves whatever he gets I think deserve their. Yeah. He's worth more than than Zuckerberg? which is. Wow. That's big money hundred eleven, billion dollars. But that's still almost just half what jeff basis is worth. So Jeff bezos delivers a lot more than us. Yeah. The Central Avenue Tesla literally I had a tesla. Yeah you're right. It is literal F Jeff Bezos does literally deliver. All right actually. Now normally this time of the show we would do the change log but now we're going to do the immoral panic log. Because I'm excited about some of the things on the line. Are we still going to do? Yes. Of course we are okay. He's making a bad joke jeff has provided. With five fabulous stories on moral panic. Just, for you stacey the, we'll we'll covered quick. Instead of the horns, that's what we need. We Need Jeff's doing his what what Jeff. What go what what? What? What what? Hell I need. What? Stacey. ooh Ooh Jeffco's what what what echoes Jeff. At PRUITT and I'm here to say the time to come Tyco go where's May drink. My Booze. Just, go. Government public information advertising has been a staple of British life for many years. We didn't do the moral panic. This is it oh, the moral panic over misinformation. Are you just. My only supposed to read the headline. No no no. No. No. I'm happy to have you as much as you want. Yes. Please go British government has a public awareness campaign called don't feed the. Yes right. All about online misinformation I think that's good. Don't feed the beast. You don't like that. This is your brain. This is your brain on drugs. That's not no. Yeah. No I think it's good. Don't feed. The beast is a good idea. I like this I don't don't don't feed the trolls. Yes actually. Yeah. Don't they call it a moral panic I just wanted that on the record. Okay. Now here from the conversation dot com, which is an academic site. Let's be careful faculties scientific reasoning. In our most recent publication in the journal Conservation. Biology we examined an error of reasoning that props up I. think There are Australian. The moral panic of a cat's. There could be Irish stop. What is the moral panic over cats because everybody was afraid that cats were killing all of wildlife. Birds Birds. Every believe cats were these horrible beasts don't about side they're ruining the environment and these scientists say not so much. Really a moral panic over cats really cats aren't got back wait. Is that shaky? How people? That me we don't have to build our Cavallo. We were going to build a Cavallo an enclosed patio. So the cats could go outside without getting any birds. I'm gonNA need a drink. I gotta read this study. What it says, the cats don't kill birds. But this whole notion that they contribute to the conservation of endangered birds by pray and and and so they just say, no, the the key documentaries coexistence between cats, native prey species, and everything's okay. Just calm down. It's all about calming down. All right. So I could still build the CADDO. Yes you cut I'm frankly was you don't want to run away and. Around here got Fox's the Fox would kill the cat. Right. Don't that we enjoy because we have a elaine is that documented or just Lake Myth? Fox's. Fox's will kill your small pets. Dingo ate my baby. What is the reddit question who would win a battle between? A thousand. What is it? A horse size stuck or thousand duck sized horses who would who would win. Yeah. Who would win that battle between a thousand? A thousand horses size duck sized horses or a single horse size duck. Is. It one, hundred, hundred. Okay let's. You mean anything smaller than me hundred duck sized horses. I think one hundred bucks could even take on ant. Honest. Just. Swipe words. This is moral panic. Q. And on Mr X I think this is true Mr Extra attention away from the real threats to Children Cunanan. One of one of the crazy parts of this is that Democratic leaders and bill. Gates are killing children to take a hormone from their blood that will keep them from aging. So qn part of Cunanan is that Democrats are. Predators two children. And they're keeping him in the basement of this pizza parlor doesn't have a basement but who cares? And somebody's number people pointed this out Cunanan does nothing to protect children. They make no effort to protect children. That's not the point of Cuban guy came to Washington with a gun shoot up the pizza parlor about it but yes, essentially. It doesn't. So I think that that's not moral panic. Well it is. So we'll the Cuban on his moral open is reassuring. Yeah absolutely. Yeah. It's it's spiracy three admiral? The Stranger danger thing which for years kept kids from playing in the street because we'll still have stranger danger. Yeah. Oh. Yeah. Oh. Yeah. A. Panic next moral panic concerns over kids. Screen time is a modern moral panic says study. Let them watch. Let. You just do a google search for news idea. What I wanted I thought I'm doing this. This is. This is. More sleep at night Early Childhood Longitudinal Study. An ongoing research project conducted by the US. Department of Education of follows different cohorts of children from kindergarten to fifth grade teacher sentiments every year they compared the cohorts kids starting kindergarten in nineteen, ninety eight, which would have been roughly our kids age jeff and another begining kindergarten in twenty ten to see if there are differences in social skills between this pre internet kindergarten class and this right smack DAB in the middle of the Internet kindergarten class. The researchers found no difference in social skills between nineteen, Ninety, eight and two, thousand, ten cohorts they both displayed similar development from kindergarten fifth grade the only noticeable difference. Was a slight decrease decrease in social skills for children with very frequent use of online gaming and social media. But even that was a pretty so there anyway. Maybe that yeah. What do you which came first chicken exactly exactly. Yeah. So. So then finally, there's a book which I just finished section social media by to academics, which is very good. He's their sizes social media. But it it. It talks about the societies that can form in social media who who have been told that are deviant and then confined. Their themselves other deviants online. And there was a moral panic around sexting which they go through a whole chapter, Oh yeah. That was moral panic. So it wasn't a moral panic that really wasn't as problematic as yes. Yes. Yeah. So if you're interested in this stuff at interested in how society reacts technology, IT'S A good book. Yeah. Okay, that's our moral panics our moral panic. We need some we need some music for this. To do a rap the moral panic. Now. It's time. Speechless in. Yeah it's. Yeah it's laughing I. Did it for you Stacey I did free you five moral panics five or how I feel the panic I'm going to disagree on some of the sex social media but that's cool. We're GONNA talk actually my pick of the week involves this so it'll be a fun thing. Wow. Sexy. Show. Plus I haven't read the book. A. N. T. and the place to be watching social media because you don't WanNa. See the P. or the on the line that's with me and that okay. Sorry about that. Pretty impressive I. Think for her a Dork. Stacy's. I. Go. Please give me just so lazy gentlemen. It's time for the Google Change Law. Chains Law. The Google doodle is Double drums man double drums the Google doodle is now crossing over. into the android Google and it's that's in the story or not. But I noticed this grew Google do. Page yeah it was. It was popping up in the search bar on the bottom of my screen was kind of neat but a new thing and I think that's fine. And this was to honor Jackie I. Don't know if it's or Mez she is a black cartoonist, an activist who challenged the disparaging portrayals of black characters in media in the nineteen forties there is it was I saw it and I thought what is this because it was all you'd click it and it would go on and on it was a long bar. It was a comic strip, a slide show created to celebrate Jackie Ormuz, and it was a really cool. Google doodle. So that was yesterday and I think it's gone now for Jazz but you can. There's a Google doodle site you can go to that has all the Google doodles ever. Google maps now shows traffic lights at intersections. I don't think that's new. It started doing that a couple of weeks they were working that out but yes. Oh wait a minute. I can't go to this site it uses cookies. What, Oh, no wait a minute. I've been ours technique many times I probably click this months ago but because I deleted all my cookies. Now I'M GONNA see every one of these. Occur you what happens if you click do not sell my personal info does it does absolutely nothing absolutely. Nothing. Nobody wants your opinion. Yeah I'm in California. That's why I saw. So now you could see traffic lights a tiny little traffic tight waiting to see their. Eating hardly consumer traffic light at the intersection. Not, useful so much for human drivers, but for autonomous vehicle self-driving. Yeah. Is Dry vehicles have the sensors they shouldn't be able to see. Anyway we'll. They have to have sensors because it's not sufficient to know there's a light there you have to. Talk about real time auctions behind the scenes. Imagine you're autonomous car performing the same calculations to find you know traffic signals which ones are fast or. Read between Green, which are anticipated to beat that at that time to give me the fastest route right So. This is a wider rollout we talked about this earlier, but it's now. Coming to the maps near you google assistance daily snapshot feature gets, Birthday Reminders, and recipe recommendations. So we'll just tell you what's on your calendar. What want to eat today because Google, does best actually hate birthday reminders 'cause. I despise it. When Mark Zuckerberg turns sixty he's going to regret all those years made people feel. Well, it's also birthday reminder. Young. Young because I remember. My problem is I have more than fifteen hundred people in my address book. So I get reminders of people I don't really care. I don't put their addresses in though I'm sorry their birthing Jason in. Well, that's the problem nowadays, you don't have to because these. They look it up, they go searching for it. I. Never knew these people's birthdays but somehow Google does. The ONES WHO Are actively put them on the calendar however many years ago and told it to remind me each year Yeah. They're not necessarily contacts either so. Maybe that's why I see it a little bit more useful. I may be maybe I'd doing it wrong but I. Just, put all your data. Today enabled surveillance mode today's deafening Hamburg. Stephanie Hamburg Karston You my remember her she was a floor director at Tech TV twenty six. Oh. Happy Birthday. You. got this data facebook. At one point because it has her facebook page on here. So at one point, I must I don't even have her phone number just birthday Inter facebook page. So, always knew who my real friends were with those birthday announcements back when I did have a facebook account right? I had a fake birthday in there for myself and I would randomly get these little notifications of happy birthday from. so-and-so. So back home and I'm like. If. You're my friend. You know this isn't my birthday. And Neil Dashes. Forty fifth birthday it'll be on Saturday Jeff we know him. Five twenty five they thought he caught up to me I don't think he's that young I think that's the other people lie on on facebook. Yeah. Jason Hal's birthdays coming up September eleventh. If this is a mistake. Kevin, marks, birthday Sunday, September thirteenth. So some of these people I care about. Oh, my gosh. There's exciting stuff on this one updated assistance snapshot will now make recommendations that one. Oh. Okay. That's so much. As exciting as it was moments ago was ninety say. A minute ago kids space aims to make android tablets more kid friendly. Now, anybody uses android tab well, I tablets actor I think the schools zoom a lot of inexpensive android tablets sold right because if they get a chromebook by the way. Yeah for kids. Yeah and you don't maybe pets too expensive but you get one, hundred, fifty dollars a android tablet, it'll do zoom just fine. So this this is going to come out on the Lenovo Tab ten HD JEN to. And more devices in the future. they're you know there's already Amazon already does this with its fire, they have a fire tablet. That is guaranteed if the kid breaks it in the first year, replace it. It comes in a big rubber Fr- hard rubber frame. I can't figure out what's exciting stacey and the rest of the change. Lock. So. It wasn't you gotta you gotTa. Let us know. It that I I will tell you when you get there. Okay. So you may remember, we talked a long time about the privacy implications of the Apple Google Api for Kovic tracing as of the latest version of Ios, and soon, the latest version of Android, you won't need an APP anymore. To use the the Cova. Tracing. State health agencies. Can use the information without creating customized APP. You'll be able to go in to the APP and enable it. So up to now, if you went to the APP, it says you don't have an APP. You the settings it would say you don't have an APP to do this, so you can't enable it, but you will be able to. Notifications for covert exposure. Partly because it never made any sense they were going to every city was going to have their own APP. Yeah nobody's. GonNa Sense Yeah Yeah it was every state. Only six states have actually built one so far twenty-five we're trying to make it happen. So it does make sense but the downside is you trade off data so. This is a very realistic version of your ease of use versus privacy convenience versus security Washington Post writing about this had thirty five of their staffers download the Virginia Kovin wise APP which launched last month. In a week of using it. Zero received exposure to nobody knows about nobody has? Yep. Yeah. So it was. Yeah I mean. Yeah. That's the problem. Nobody's using it. Nobody wants to use it anyway this courage people to use it. I mean I'll turn it on. I'll turn it on. You Know I. Don't know what you're going to do with it. If you if you're notified, you then quarantine for two weeks. Right what do you do? Do you would? Would you suggest I do that? I think when fide the health department follows up with you and tells you what to do. Quarantine Well maybe or maybe they give you a test. I don't know. Do we have tacit. Sued question detests. Depends on where you are. If you're at the White House, you can get tested. If you're a football, a college. Yeah Okay. This is coming up on the story Oh. We're getting there. We're getting there. Oh I know why she loves undersea cables Oh. That's right. There's an undersea cable. So there is an undersea cable that's not it. So story and facebook were going to have their undersea cable terminate in Hong Kong but now you know there's this whole thing about China. So. Now, they're going to have it terminate I think in Malaysia and Taiwan Taiwan. Off China which is probably wide per white trump is making this happen. This is the Pacific light cable network. the cells like A. Seventies band. Yellow That's a good name seventies band. Yeah. That's nice. That's nice okay good. About and now ladies and gentlemen. Starting in Austin Texas do please home. You, can now pay for parking directly from Google maps. That's awesome. It is. I mean, let me just say that parking every time I'm parking someplace like Seattle has two or three different places. So annoyed ABS- that do part so you're like. I got a download and assest. Here. This is what what's going on. Why are you standing there? I'm downloading the APP so I could pay for parking. You've been standing there for ten minutes. I know it's still coming in. And then you have plagued credit. So. Yes. It is it's not safe. That's what drives me absolutely buggy about this. I am standing in a parking lot focused on my phone, my wallet out Roy. Dangerous. Wow. That's because you're a man probably but like I trained myself never to be focused on anything in a parking lot other at would ever get mugged. I don't care if he's waving hundred dollar bills in the air. To try people like me by. Never never having been a fit or in any way strong person. I didn't know this. So if you walk around looking, you know big strong people like you know like Popeye they go. Okay. Come on lenders is always a jackass that thinks he's the bigger better man if you will. You see it a lot with. Hitting the on me. They don't be sack of Sand My. Say Give me your mother's fear for me quite a bit whenever I would travel because she's doing sense. Yeah. People were she's like you know when you're out in the streets or whatever just try to. Be careful because people were just they just WanNa get froggy and want to try and how tough the Yes. So you should do like I do where shapeless new. People just think you're fat. No. So, this is cool but is limited I. It's I guess is passport the company that says parking in Austin. That that's who they partnered with IOS or android. or you can go to google dot com slash parking on the mobile web. Able remember your car information. will remember us remember where you parked your car, which is nice payment information awesome, yeah And I'm betting. Here's the cool stuff. Right? Imagine this taking fast forward like three three, three years. Two Years Google. Now knows that I am parked in a spot rate so when I leave Or my time runs out, it can send notifications and it can assume that spot is empty, which it can help update its own parking. So. That's stated that could eventually be cool. Really cared about us. It would say stacey paid for two hours but she only used an hour and fifteen and all you need is ten minutes Jeff Free Spot. It could because it knows the location of my. Drives off. But that maybe if I have to click on it and be like Berbie, cared about to be like you only here for like an hour of your to get your money back or just you like to donate to the next person. That'd be cool. So here's. It's in Google pay pay for street parking with Google pay. New Session Alaska for the zone number. Now this is you know you gotTa have a zone number I'll say one, two, three and apparently I'm going to be was about to spend ten dollars for parking zone does not exist Yeah. It was probably some larger number. And it doesn't doesn't like it. I wish it did. We got his own map coming up I got auto zone map. Street Parking Austin government. I. Can tell you where to go. Meanwhile, back. Stacey Lenovo has unveiled a Google assistant powered smart clock over to this smart screens. This is nice. It's got that Google fabric. It's the clock. Well, no, it's. It's a smart dog it's a smart speaker. Fuck. Aunt. Elsie Tate's using led's cheaper but here's what we talked about my show because this is these clocks are very important to me. I have Sony Dream machine from Lake Oh my God. Wow. That was the square one. It's like a cube right? No, it's actually minds all it's it's like that. Rectangular. So but I was. Frustrated because they don't know how low you condemn the led's and I love for them to have used red led's because that's softer. This is an update to their previous smart clock called the smart clock essential. It's less. It's about thirty bucks, which is Nice it will hit the shelves sometime this month. and it doesn't. Yeah. See I have the I like the nest. Hub Mini which doesn't have a camera. So it's appropriate for the bedroom because it has a. A picture screen, but it also showed me the time if I want time and I can talk to it the best thing about the Google alarms as you can yell stop. Stop you have to. Say Hey anybody or anything he just stop. It's very satisfying. It is nice. I do that all the time. Timers work that way to. Finally. Google is adding local news to your assistance. audio. So see I'm getting that cooking everywhere. So. They last fall they launched their smart audio news playlist. But. Now you're news update is coming to Google podcasts. So if you're podcast listener, you can open the PODCAST APP navigate to explore tab and subscribe to your news update. You'll get a mix of short news stories chosen in the moment. Based on your interest. I guess it's kind of like Google News for audio and it, and it knows your location as well. So you you you will hear about. So, for instance, they give an example if your music fan living in Los Angeles, you might hear a local story about the governor's latest announcement then a review of the latest Kerry pay. Katy Perry album although I do WanNa, know what Kerry paid up to these days followed by deep dive of the upcoming election. So this is Google trying to understand audio news understands texts news, and giving you something. You want hear I'm GonNa turn that on I. think that sounds like a good feature that's available in the Google podcasts APP. And I presume if you've got that turned on, you could also do it on your Google Assistant. If you said what is it? Hey Google play local news or hey google play news about Petaluma. Unfortunately they're still doing some of that text to speech stuff which I really don't like. It's too robotic. Really a better. And that? Is the Google Change. Law. A lot of that I got one story before we move on I. Really WanNa do. Because I just want to play this audio. So, apparently. Let me find the audio. This happened the other day at LAX. Pilot. Flying. Let me let me jump ahead. This is. This is a report. From local airlines, pilot reports a guy in a jet pack. A second pilot believed to be sky. West flight confirms a third pilot was on the lookout. Has. Just. Twenty three consonants. person the jetpack reported three hundred yards south final at about three thousand feet and a guy flying roughly be. Of A jet airplane at three thousand feet here's the. Past, the that shift pack. Mankin nineteen ninety seven though thinking with their left side to right side also one side. Maybe three hundred yards or so our else. Okay. Guy In a jet pack it's it's along mosque of course, it's. Ex. Of course from Fox eleven in La and a number of experts came on saying how dangerous that is. Now, only for the guy who could be sucked right into the engines, but for the passengers and the airplane itself. Plus at that he's got to be we're oxygen at three thousand feet. Don't you know? No no no no, he doesn't feed. Oh haven't you ever Never climbed a mountain. Walk down. I can tell you that I did a hike this last weekend that had three actually it was thirty nine, hundred elevation games. Ever been the lake talk. I was out of breath though. Brief. Yeah. So at least two pilots sawed. Can I just take a moment and say that everybody handled that with such apply don't you? These guys are so jetpack okay. Yeah. I love. Art is out of the right side or the left side. ATC We're. Back. This is the funniest thing three, hundred yards or Play. This is. Here we go. Scroll back a little bit. We just passed the guy that chess pack. In nineteen. Ninety seven Oh thank you. The right side off. Maybe three hundred yards or so off our else. Okay, Ninety nine, seven. So, just a I guess you don't show up on the radar if you're a jet pack. Clearly unless he had a cell phone with them. All the passengers are GonNa, show up on his Co. tracking APP. Right Good. Good. Good Point. Now Three Hundred Feet is the Bluetooth limit. US All right. All right Now, this is where we're going to insert an ad unless there is no ad or you're watching video or the lifestyle that was a really smooth. Awfully. Now is the time when we may or may not insert an ad I can just do that. Right. Can. And now a word. From a an advertiser. At this time, we would like to play you important message. Our show today brought to you by a brand new podcast. I thought you might be interested in wild. Wild, tech. Kind of tells you. Fun It's going to be you know we talk about this all the time technology shapes culture and and vice versa shows like star trek influenced a whole generation of scientists, thinkers and innovators. You know doing things at NASA and SPACEX saw I on the TV. That's what the wild wild tech talks about the Wild Wild Tech podcast discusses the most bizarre the most infamous stories about tech and how it's shaping our culture. You'll hear interviews on topics like how iphones are giving away the entire plot of movies. How is being used to challenge copyrights in the music industry very first episodes about how world of warcraft has helped researchers understand how to battle the spread of covid nineteen. Check out the wild wild tech trailer today on Apple podcasts spotify in all the places you get your podcast, wild wild tech you can listen now and don't forget to subscribe. Or not a less. A. Gambling site we're and we're back. was. Easy. That was painless. Let us start with this thing of the week. So y'all are going to get mad at me, but I did actually just order a whole bunch of things. So I've got things real coming. and I will make a note of this one thing. It's not out yet but life ex just announced life ex clean, which is a light bulb with H. E. V. Lighting that says it will clean your. Counters as that the light hits everything the light touch. Right. It is capable of safer people but capable of killing germs such as E. coli and collect Your Body. You could open your mouth really wide and it only does this when it turns on for a certain amount of time and then puts white light. So this might be something you put in your bathroom to kill your fico plume off your toothbrush. Or? You could stick it on your kitchen counters It doesn't say that kills Listeria or Salmonella, but you know there's Still bad yet on the life ex website, but Just announced today or these I mean these are fairly expensive D. Bulbs are are they good? The the life expos are actually really good. They used to be before Philips, Hue updates game they used to be. Brighter and better colors The reason they're more expensive is because you don't need a help their Wifi. That's right. They built in Wifi They're also What is it? No Hub. I like the colors they actually a really Nice Turquoise, which is a tough color to do in there a little bit brighter than Phillips you. but they are expensive they're like. Fifty. Bucks Oh. Are, sold out which is a little. Yes, and this doesn't go on sale until October just going to tell you that. So you would get this. If you didn't WanNa Kill Your Fico Plume, you might also get his the kitchen. Sure. I'm probably not going to get this. Yeah. Yeah but but if you if I were going to get it, it would go smack into the bathroom. Right, underneath actually that makes a lot of sense if it works. If it doesn't mean I feel like there is a lot of research on these lights and we know you VC will kill bacteria, but it's also harmful to humans so. Yeah I. Think the question is, how long does it need to be on? How close does it need to be what percentage of the germs you know? Those are a lot of variables in how well does that work in the real world? I, mean even the. Wipe wipes you look at them closely you need to have them lake for a certain number of minutes on you have to let it be wet for half a minute or a minute. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So Get wipes to save your soul. What just can't Waiting for six months. Get a hand sanitizer. This is the one I use, which is smells like coconut lemonade. It's everyone for everybody and they talk for six months and I just got us I just got six of my couldn't believe it. So I'm willing to sell these for a mere one, hundred dollars each. Hand Senators is coming back in but but wipes bleach alcohol can alcohol anywhere. Yeah. Wow. Alcohol right here. real. What kind of are you drinking today? Someone get that Jif I think it's local Chin or Portland Jin I know that you're a great. Agenda File. If. That's not kitchen i. Would her to drink I knew it I knew it. Yeah. It worked Okay. With my my other thing that I'm really I gave you because I feel bad about not recommending things but this is really important and I'm reading it and I really encourage everyone who especially who has sons to read it because I think it's really important. There's a book called boys sex it's by pegging. Ornstein. Who did the book girls insects and this was a couple of years ago. Yeah, I think I recommend it here, but it talked about. You, know. How How our kids are the messages they get in how it really hurts them. A lot of ways in her first book was all about how it hurts girls and she was done. She's always done girls. But after that she realized that it's impossible to talk about like coercion and the pressures that girl space without also saying. You. Know without also recognizing that boys play a huge part of this So she went and talked to over two hundred boys in college in high school to to get their opinions and thoughts about its sexual history. It's what they've learned from people and she backs us all up with both her research in actual research from. Social scientists and that sort of thing. In the book breaks my heart because. I know this I. Have Nephews I don't have sons I do have a daughter They're not getting no one's talking to them at all about sex and feelings, and they have no expectations around their emotions and it really. Can make them behave like entitled jerks but it also. They don't. It's like they don't have any other options and it really drives at home in it offers some really concrete things that I think I really think if you have kids. You should read this and if you have sons, you should read it. So you can actually talk to them because if you don't talk to them about these issues. You're setting them up to be basically incomplete humans in the sense that they don't know how to engage with people in a intimate manner both sexually, and emotionally this is something parents are really struggling with right now. I think. and it's a very it's a challenge because these kids are growing up in a world with a lot more information and a lot more exposure to sex than we ever had. And and I don't it's hard to know how it's affecting them and it's hard to know how to talk to him about it. Girls are speaking up. Thank God in you know how many? Some of these boys have had their own lake me to moments where they realized. But at the time they didn't realize they were being. They didn't realize they were literally destroying some. Young. Woman's. Right and they didn't do it outer shell, US. Oh. Yes that hurts. Imagine these kids in ten years later, they come to realize that that. They might have really destroyed. So I mean most people don't want to be that person. Right. So anyway, I it. Clearly. Speaking to you the heart but y'all should read this guy I'm ordering it right now because we have a sterile at home and I think I think it's important and it's challenging. The recommendation. Yeah. Good recommendations called I. Don't think we've actually said the name it's boys and sex. Young men on hookups love porn consent and navigating the new masculinity and it's by Peggy Ornstein. And if you don't think you need to read it, you should read or I went on girls in sex is then you'll be like crap now I got to read about boys because. Bet that's like the why you should care even if he didn't care before, it's you should care. It's damaged kit it's damaging and and yeah and. And I think I think that's very sensitive. You know that it's not the boys being malicious necessarily I mean it could be in some cases. It's just ignorance and and especially if they seen a lot of porn or they've kind of been influenced by the sexualization and modern media and they just don't know just don't know any better. That's good. Health parents. Thank you for that recommendation. Pruitt we're actually you know I'm GonNa. Save. You at for the end because I what you have is so important. That I want I want to give you a little more time. How about you jeff your number of the week. It should be eleven because I've now been on zoom for eleven hours. This Guy Oh my God eleven exclusive. Need. All I need. I saw. Let's see here. I'll do this one. Okay. The price of a GIG in data worldwide in an interactive map. So, if you look at it, they are pulling it up right now get. Yeah. So, a GIG. In India. India bell side. I can't see I've hours of this up all right off say a Gig in Greenland there you average price is nine dollars and fifty cents least expensive five dollars the most expensive thirty, six dollars and twenty two cents. How about let's try. Japan. Go to go to India is ranked number one. It has an average price of nine sense. Oh, it's funny. Okay. So even though it's not coloring, there's information there. That's the least expensive i. so the darker the color, the more expensive it is. India the average price of. The US eight dollars. Japan in the US As to twenty. Leah is true sense see and I've always thought for instance, Sweden had the best prices. And it's two dollars. Finland is two dollars. Norway is five dollars. Great Britain a dollar thirty nine. This is very interesting. What an interesting man. So they've actually gone out and now the all cellular carriers or is it The they're more. Mobile data's that's important. Mobile I think mobile data is more expensive than landline. Canada's more expensive than the US that's because Canada's not a competitive market. At. All right. Average price. Canada's twelve, fifty, five Australia. Wow. Also I would say not a competitive market but sixty eight cents. Russia fifty two cents. Wow. Interesting. Yes. This tells you more about the state of the Mobil. Economy Brazil is dollar. But Peru is two dollars interesting. Yeah. So that was fun. Yeah. Mexico four dollars seventy seven cents compared to eight dollars the average price in the US of a gigabyte of. Data. Actually, eight dollars seems low I don't know anywhere. You can get a gigabyte a mobile data for less than ten. Most expensive in the US sixty. So the the challenge in calculating these are data plans are really. At being incredibly complicated ourselves so. But like Google Fi, it's ten bucks a gigabyte. Right. Not. But you get a certain amount before over. No, you don't know. Hair. But our sponsor Mitt Mobile Mobile I get twelve gigabytes a month for twenty five bucks. So it's just about two dollars a gigabyte. So honestly. There is a broad range. Oh is cool. Yeah, it's ten bucks. A gigabyte it is. Yeah. good numbers Jeff you gave us a lot of numbers. Well the other ones worth mentioning even non eleven hours into this is the more than two thirds of executives planned to downsize their office space. Yeah. So don't buy any reits? No no I agree and and that we work stock you thought you were going to really cash in on. Should have traded it in for wayfair. And you have the mask the week? I like this I want it it's called the humanity. She'll not cheap it's fifty nine dollars and sixty cents. It's a fait shield. But kind of nuns, what do you call his nuns thing? It's got a habit cowl yeah. Yeah. So you're still breathing when the air is coming in it's not coming from in front of you. Obviously, it's coming through the back and the fabric. It's really interesting. Wow latest. Is. There supposed to be a plastic shield in front of? Yes you. Can't really see. Okay, I was like. Side same react. Yeah. They made it to clear. They really should have. The seems like the least effective mask. Hole in the front. That's really interesting. This will people can see your face gets you talking. medical grade filtering barrier. And I'll have to read more about this humanity shield from rapid response P. P. E. DOT com. Not Cheap, but you wouldn't need a whole bunch of them. I don't even know if how you wash them actually the bulk order price tend to forty nine shields at forty nine dollars each. That's the mask of the week. And now. I am going to yield the floor to my colleague from North cackle lackey. The Right? Honorable. Is that I always say it is eight right e set right off Khakis. Khaki Mr the honorable Mister. Aunt. PRUITT has the floor. My pick of the week is I want to say, thank you to Chad and. I mean Chad Bozeman. The whole Chadwick Bozeman still throws me off because I didn't know him by that name always knew Miss Chad. I. Wanted to put this out there because I know a lot of listeners from my hometown of Anderson South Carolina and I felt that I should I owe it to them bring this up and just share just a few minutes of the of. What I know about Chad Where I grew up the house, my mother built the land she built it on was owned by some of Bozeman family. So. My neighbors were bows, men's. In. There were two sisters that live there. That had another brother named Chad that he didn't live with them but he would come by from time to time. We would all hang out together play basketball and just being teenagers. You know just be kids had a good time talked a lot of. Had A lot of fun and. Chad was special. He was a hell of an athlete. It went to another high school in the area, not the same one that I went to. And just talked a lot of trash heck of a competitor really good at at the sports you know. But beyond that, he was an interesting kid because he wasn't like the rest of the kids that you know we all had the dreams and aspirations of going pro and the sport and going pro and that and whatever. But Tad was different. Chad was into debate Chad was into theater and he had visions of of. Being able to go to college to get into theater and most people in our area didn't think that way. and. He. Ridiculed when you talk like that dependent on the area that you're from if you know what I mean. And so he continued to go on and I wasn't in touch with him much. But I was in touch with his sister because again, she they live next door to us. And during this time of his past and I really feel For her because she kept US abreast of his progress in let us know that what was going on with him and I never really saw any of his his movies until forty two who? with him portraying. Jackie Robinson. But I heard about some of his stories of just being in New York, and struggling just like all actors do but he kept pushing forward and he also had the mission of saying you know what I actually want to make the story I want to be in directing I, want to be in the writing to act and stuff just. Happened you know that wasn't even his main vision has named vision was just make the story and when he got that opportunity to jump into marvel. And bleep be the Black Panther. He just took that opportunity in just just absolutely crushed it considering all the things that he dealt with growing up considering all the things that he was dealing with at the time. And it really resonated with me. I never go to the movie theaters. I hate the movie theater spirits to only time I've gone is for star wars and that was because of the connection I have with my late father but I did go see black. Panther. Because of Chad. When I went to see Black Panther. It warmed my heart to see that. This man was a superhero. In an area. superheroes didn't look like Chad and it looked like me they look like the sky with the pompadour or just there were no black superheroes like that and see that he was able to bring that to life and my kids could see you know there are superheroes out there. That looks like us. We can still go out there and strive to do things beyond the basketball court and beyond the football field, we can go and write stories. We can go and make the story that we want to present an entertain millions around the world and he put his guts into this he. Was So serious about his craft and he also wanted to make sure other people could prosper from his efforts as well, and I just wish that more people would could understand the back story behind Chad growing up in a tiny little town of Anderson, South Carolina. Where is not much going on there other than Clemson football but he had a vision and he stuck with that vision through thick and thin getting more opportunities left than right that he had no control over. It does the story of Denzel Washington helping him pay for his trip to go to Oxford and study acting. Denzo frigging, Washington. Then, he gets back and he's been told no a gazillion times onset because he didn't fit this this role that role dinners another time in the soap opera where he was portrayed as a black man but he didn't like had at role was being portrayed. Negatively he spoke up about it and they took him off but he said, you know what has okay. I still want to make this story is okay. I don't have to I can just right and do my own stories, and then after that, all of these other doors just continue to pop up on and. Just keep pushing folks don't don't half ass life. We really do have a tremendous opportunity right now even though this cove nineteen and things are shutting down if you have a passionate about something right now, just keep going for keep living at Chad. Did it. Better than anybody ever realize considering everything that he dealt with with. With with cancer in people are complaining about wearing a damn mask. Walk in his shoes do what he did. And just be better and I just wanted to say, Chad, thank you so much and for representing our city represented state. Representing our people. Resilience Brother, I love you. In to your sister I'm not going to say your name I'm thinking about you too because you've lost not one sibling. Twenty years and I, my heart goes out to you. I Love Ya thank you oh. What a hero? That's beautiful. Thank you for that. And that's it for Twig. Thanks for joining us. We'll see next time. Bye Bye. That was really. Wow I didn't know you well, holy cow. Wow. Thank you. As really from the heart. It's interesting how beloved he was such a short career. But boy? Sh. I'm not a marvel fan by any means. Black Panther, it was like. Wow. Wow Yeah his sister. Used to send messages. and. Say Look at my look at my little brother you know just doing it up. And I would joke with her and say yeah. That don't look like the same dude. are asked him. He. Had already been diagnosed with colon cancer where. We knew we knew Chad was different from. From a lot of the kids that we hung out with. You know he was likable and. Cardi and all that stuff just like any other teenager, but it was something different in that whole. Theater theater life and into the Bait Life. He wasn't like the rest of Senate showed he just kept pushing along and as. We should mention that the most liked. TWEET OF ALL TIME Was this tweet from his twitter account? Saying he had passed away. seven point six, million likes re tweeted three point one, million times. Sesame to but the coverage in. Having, having covered entertainment industry. It shows how? Not Racial is it but. White. Controlled media just didn't understand how huge he was until they started hearing the reaction that how profound A sadness. I got the message from mom. When it happened and I was like, wait a minute. Now this this can't be real, and then my son, they sent me a message because I was out. They sent me a message is just broke their hearts and done my own in from people from back East just. Like this, this can't be real in. Being able to hear everybody else's story it just just further proved. That catch is just really. Meant to all of us from the area. Not I didn't keep in touch with Chan is no way I could keep in touch with Chan is just it is what it is. Now was never upset about that. But? I. I really appreciate it what he represented from the area because. y'All know how it is. In the South you've heard the horror stories that I've told about the south. In This being the so called land of opportunity. It was great to see that he was able to take his opportunities, just really maximize it and then beyond that. Back. To everybody Yeltsin to say, Hey, you can do this to get on their due to work get slapped in the face. A couple of times keep going at it and you know what? You can be a frigging superhero that we used to dream about and look at the TV screens movie screens when we were kids and never ever would have assumed something like that would happen. Until seeing that with my own kind of amazing. Yeah. and. I think he made. Forty two Thurgood Marshall and Black Panzer three movies. That must mean so much to black children and just black people in general about achievement. In in not just in sports but the. Court justice and it's writing of what conduct which is pretty good. Yeah, if you can make king of what continent, you can't make it anywhere. Yeah I, remember when I saw a Black Panther. Where we left the theater I remember walking out of the theater and just sort of stand in just looking around and I was just taking it in. Yeah. It was It was Phoebe at that particular time that was phoebe and I and I just stopped in was just taking it in. People were taking selfies. It was so inspiring. It was it was it was beautiful. It was really beautiful. Really. Thank you for your generosity and yeah. Not Easy to do that but. Yeah really appreciate it. Was a great actor too. If you saw genius James Brown, you realize what I thought. I was looking at James Brown I was blown away. I couldn't believe he did he did use. Actor. And I love the with the soap operas. Yeah Yeah. But. There's going to be a tribute to him tomorrow in Anderson Oh at this center Oh. Wow. There's been some art shared and things things go bad I guess you can't really go back. I wish you good. Family House still there's your mom's still there. Oh Yeah. My Mom's isn't moving anywhere. She had that house built in it's been there. For as long as I can remember. And is in that whole area. Who? Man It's it's. You know it's the Bozeman land all that's that's how small town was, which it's huge compared to where I live now here in northern California but that's how small that area was is just all families. Come together, and this is I land. We all live together and we love each other. We're all related to each other is. is just, different there. You know. Yeah. Well. Maybe someday we'll get to go back and visit Indeed. To make your mom. Yes. Yes. All Right Ed. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much for that. You'll take care. All right. Take care.

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