7 Burst results for "Professor Anders"

"professor anders" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

05:42 min | 3 months ago

"professor anders" Discussed on Cinemavino

"And I mean, that was pretty fucking badass. Right? That's kind of how the episode ends. That's how this arc ends. Is with her showing up and clearing out the zombie horde. Because clerics are sort of the ultimate anti vampire anti zombie weapon. Yes, that's why I love them. I love paladins and I love priests or clinics. They can do something called turn undead, which just means they blast out some kind of holy energy and they can absolutely destroy or make those undead fear them and want to run away. Yep. Basically. She denies the magic that brings them to life or something. Whatever you want to multiply them by negative one. Yes. What class was the teacher who turns everybody glamorous everybody? So I don't exactly know because they changed it for the show, but he seems to be like an enchanter of some sort because he's able to talk about the buildup. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. What's Stephen root, right? He was the wing length deeply guy in office space. He's Bill Dory from King of the Hill. But yeah, he's professor Anders. He's basically got a lot of gollums and he has a silver tongue enchanted tongue that can literally has a silver tongue. Yeah, either charm and basically mind control. Sure..

Stephen root Bill Dory Anders
"professor anders" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

06:20 min | 11 months ago

"professor anders" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Get back to it with james. Well i think what doing experiments is giving you permission to just start something because one of the common comments and questions that i receive is you. I want to start this podcast. Or i want to do this thing. I wanted grow this business. But i don't know where to start and as i was listening to you talk about it in the book. I'm like this is it. This is where you start you. Just do little experiments that have tremendous upside potential limited downside risk. And you just start. You just do something. It doesn't have to be the ideal version you just testing to see if it's going to work and if it does take one more experiment after that. Yeah yeah the other day someone was telling me. Oh i'd like to start a doing youtube videos but You know. I need to you know i. It's really expensive equipment. I need to price it out and like production assist and all that like look. Look at your phone right. Phone is has a better video camera on it. Then what. Martin scorsese us francis ford. Coppola us to shoot the godfather like that shouldn't be holding you back and a lot of utah times. Yeah as an excuse because maybe not ready yet or maybe they're afraid or maybe i don't know i don't know what You know sometimes that happens to me. I come up with the excuses. It usually means you don't really want to do something like if you really want to do something you just go do it right if i really wanted to even like riding through i said i wanna write a thriller by really wanted to write a thriller. I would just sit down today. I'd wake up a half hour early right the first three pages of it. Yeah it's it's. It's definitely true that if you wanted it you you would just do it. You would get after it. You'd have no problems and not use that as an excuse to to not move for you. Don't want to go back to something you said earlier. 'cause it caught me and i didn't and i wanted to. I thought about it for a second. You said some people don't believe the idea of talent. I've actually never heard that before. I've never heard that concept. I've never heard anybody say that. I'm really curious where that comes from. Well so the guy who really. So malcolm glad well popularized the concept of the ten thousand hour rule in the book outliers right but it was really just documenting. The research done by this one guy. Professor anders eriksson. Who's a very good guy. He recently or past few years ago he passed away but he's the one who really did all the experiments research to develop the ten thousand hour and his concept was if you spend ten thousand hours give or take a couple of thousand hours of what's called deliberate learning. Which is you you you do something. A coach gives you feedback. You do it again. So there's a lot of repetition a lot of feedback and You know from a from a coach. Who's better and you know that's deliberate practice and and you ten thousand hours of that. He says you'll beat the best in the world. And or among the best in the world and he did not believe at all in talent so for instance he would train people to win the world memory championship. You know how many numbers in a row can you memorize. And he you know. The people he taught using his theories broke every world record in memory and his even was was. None of these people had any more town than anybody else he. He pick random people and he taught them to break world records in memory and he noticed the same patterns occurred. You know in a lot of other fields although it's hard to really scientifically test many other fields and so he did not believe in talent all unless like you know in basketball if you're only four feet tall you're probably not going to be an nba player. There's some like natural limitations. That may not be a talent as much as just a a a characteristic kids something different than i imagine a talent would be right for example and so i think in that area of call it research or whatever they're like what is talent in poker for instance you know. Some people are incredibly good at poker and some aren't is their talent in poker or is there skill You know what you know and and you know is there. Talent in math. Is their skill in math because some part of poker is not being able to calculate statistics. Really quickly. I mean if you spend ten thousand hours really focusing on statistics and other skills required for poker you'd probably be the best of the world poker and i don't even know talent means in poker. Does that mean you have an ability to sense with the people have like it turns out. That's not really such an important skill in poker and yet this is. This is a skill set. They could make people a lot of money if they're good at it yet on this either right now. It's just an interesting concept and as you talk about my knee jerk. Reaction is well yes. There's talent some people are more talented than others. You can train somebody to beat that talent but imagine what you could do if you take somebody who's naturally inclined or gifted and then teach them the right skill sets would that magnify them more than they could've gone on talent or skill development alone. Yeah yeah i mean. I think that's probably that's the accurate way to think about it. Like if let's say All take the area of jesse. And let's say you're eleven years old and you're incredibly strong chest there's gotta be some talent evaluators some party or brain. That is clear enough to see lots of things that other people don't see on the board. I mean it's a very complicated game. It takes decades to be great at it. And but i know i know one guy who when i when i was younger i was in my twenty s My roommate was a my roommate's brother was probably the most time chess player in world. History like he was unbelievable. He was eleven years old and he was just crushing every grandmaster at speech. When you play fast. And when he would explain games to me it sounded like i was talking to like an adult instead of an eleven year old and but then he didn't maybe didn't get the right training or maybe he couldn't handle losing When he played an actual tournaments but by the time he was like a teenager he basically stop playing and he.

anders eriksson youtube Martin ten thousand hours james today first three pages ten thousand hour four feet Coppola one one more experiment eleven years old twenty s eleven year old francis ford past few years ago decades couple of thousand hours one guy
"professor anders" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"professor anders" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And we tried everything to contain it, and it was not possible and it was spreading to you graphically and this giant risk of our off. Ah virus was spreading to the community and people. I'm infected with these variants in this area around. 50% of the people are not troubled that we found these mutation in this spike protein. This is a crucial protein for immunity. And after an infection or a vaccine, and in the lab, we tested these. Ah Some of these variants and found that they, In fact, as we feared, was list sensitivity popular assistant actually transported Professor, If I can ask you this variant that you talk about when you say 50% off people infected have this variation. How dangerous is it? You know? And how worried are you now? Given that there's now talk of culling these minx? Well, it's not just talking yesterday the government decided to call or meetings or 17 Ming's in Denmark or 1200 farms, even though, is only 200 farms that are infected. So I think they're very serious about this stopping the source and by isolating the humans, we can stop these acute viruses, not a chronic virus. And we know how to stop it among humans with social distancing and Onda, current ain and all these measures that we cannot apply to animals, flux, animals, producer animals, So once we have stopped the That whole soul to save their source. I think we should be able to. Ah, contain this. No doubt those who own these farms and one continues in what they have been raising these rearing These mints for won't be too happy. But if it's such so contagious and I believe you found this out about three months ago. Why wasn't the decision to call them taken sooner? If it is so easy for things strain of the Corona virus to be transmitted to humans from the minx? Well. The first three farms were called and then they tried other measures to contain it. And obviously that didn't help and it went very fast, I would say, And we had no control of why that isthe most likely with humans workers that works on several farms, but it was kind of a mystery. And and, Ah, until ah recently there was no cooling. But then they took up calling again properly Wa that was difficult to keep up with the speed with two or three new farms with 20,000 each being infected every day so they could not keep up with it. And we could see that he was in vegetable that they were spread to farms within a distance of eight kilometres. And if you move came along the way, Okay, cooling off all because eventually all farms would have been infected was in danger. Obviously opposed to more human. Thank you very much. Professor Anders.

Professor Anders Professor Onda Denmark Wa producer
"professor anders" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"professor anders" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"The confirmation hearings for Judge Amy, , CONYBEARE IT Senator Maisy. . Hirano of Hawaii expressed outrage and shock that the nominee would use the term sexual preference instead of sexual orientation sexual preference announced senator. . TORONTO. . Is An offensive and outdated term used by anti lgbtq activists to suggest that sexual orientation is a choice. . It is not after the Exchange Merriam Webster which apparently like most Americans had not gotten that Nemo with these new linguistic absolutes quickly changed the definition of sexual preference in its online dictionary. . To, , indicate that this wording is now offensive who knew we'll beyond the orwellianism of the literally changing the dictionary to support a political climb. . It seems that Senator Hirano is the one who's actually behind the Times on this whole sexual orientation versus Sexual Preference Issue According to Dr Glenn Stanton, , and then outstanding new article at public discourse. . Judge Barrett's terminology is actually more in line with the latest thinking of leading gender scholars for example, , Professor Sorry Van Anders at candidates Queens University has stated that. . Quote sexual orientation as a term is increasingly seen as regressive because it belongs to the bio centralist project translating to English. . What she saying is that the word orientation suggests that sexuality is hard wired and according to Professor Anders that's just not the consensus anymore among her peers though the whole born this way claim was once a very useful slogan to advance gay rights it no longer serves the goals of the LGBTQ. . Movement years ago for instance, two , scholars at Ucla question the concept of. . Sexual. . Orientation especially for women to instead that women's sexuality and Orientation Fluid Changeable over time and variable across social context other social scientists that Glenn Stanton quotes in his public discourse Article Call For a paradigm shift in how female sexuality is studied and described, , and there've been plenty of surveys indicate that most self identified lesbians will have relationships with men. . At some point. . There's also a more obvious problem with the idea of a fixed orientation that's found in the very initials of the acronym especially the. . Be The queue of lgbtq as political commentator Douglas Murray who identifies as gay by the way rights bisexuals continued to be viewed as some kind of betrayal from within the gay community gay men tend to believe that men who claim to be by are in fact, , gays in some form of denial yet according to a pew research report from last summer bisexuals account for almost half of all LGBTQ adult in the US in fact, the , authors of a new book published by Harvard University Press. . Think. . That male bisexuals are those who call themselves mostly straight vastly outnumber exclusively gay men. . Thus they conclude the old system of gay straight or BI has as stanton puts, , it outgrown its usefulness and even bigger challenge in the B. to the born. . This way dogma is the T- gay rights and gay marriage were sold to us. . The premise that homosexuality is hard wired maybe even genetic like race but anyone claiming transgender as an identity does. . So in spite of physical and genetic realities not because. Of . them and the CUE which usually stands for questioning well, that , continues to evolve in both meaning and practice to include more and more sexual preferences as an identity. . Well, , one wonders whether Senator Horon would feel compelled to lecture the various social scientists that Glenn Stanton sites. . In this article my suspicion is she wouldn't in fact, , my suspicion is that Senate Arana was fed this talking point by an aide who's checking twitter and saw it as an opportunity to tar and feather judge Barrett as. . A big what's ultimately revealed by her political posturing awoke language policing however is crucially important for all of us to now that phrases such a sexual orientation or sexual preference or whatever. The . latest nomenclature are terms made up not to describe reality but to advance the idea that has revolutionized. . So much of our culture on politics that sexual attraction and urge define and determine who we are. . That's the idea we can never embrace even if we're facing outrage from a senator

Dr Glenn Stanton senator Senator Hirano John Stonestreet Judge Barrett Senator Horon Professor Anders Senator Maisy Judge Amy Glenn Stanton Exchange Merriam Webster stanton TORONTO Ucla Hawaii US Queens University Harvard University Press Douglas Murray
Born This Way Is Old Science

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Born This Way Is Old Science

"The confirmation hearings for Judge Amy, CONYBEARE IT Senator Maisy. Hirano of Hawaii expressed outrage and shock that the nominee would use the term sexual preference instead of sexual orientation sexual preference announced senator. TORONTO. Is An offensive and outdated term used by anti lgbtq activists to suggest that sexual orientation is a choice. It is not after the Exchange Merriam Webster which apparently like most Americans had not gotten that Nemo with these new linguistic absolutes quickly changed the definition of sexual preference in its online dictionary. To, indicate that this wording is now offensive who knew we'll beyond the orwellianism of the literally changing the dictionary to support a political climb. It seems that Senator Hirano is the one who's actually behind the Times on this whole sexual orientation versus Sexual Preference Issue According to Dr Glenn Stanton, and then outstanding new article at public discourse. Judge Barrett's terminology is actually more in line with the latest thinking of leading gender scholars for example, Professor Sorry Van Anders at candidates Queens University has stated that. Quote sexual orientation as a term is increasingly seen as regressive because it belongs to the bio centralist project translating to English. What she saying is that the word orientation suggests that sexuality is hard wired and according to Professor Anders that's just not the consensus anymore among her peers though the whole born this way claim was once a very useful slogan to advance gay rights it no longer serves the goals of the LGBTQ. Movement years ago for instance, two scholars at Ucla question the concept of. Sexual. Orientation especially for women to instead that women's sexuality and Orientation Fluid Changeable over time and variable across social context other social scientists that Glenn Stanton quotes in his public discourse Article Call For a paradigm shift in how female sexuality is studied and described, and there've been plenty of surveys indicate that most self identified lesbians will have relationships with men. At some point. There's also a more obvious problem with the idea of a fixed orientation that's found in the very initials of the acronym especially the. Be The queue of lgbtq as political commentator Douglas Murray who identifies as gay by the way rights bisexuals continued to be viewed as some kind of betrayal from within the gay community gay men tend to believe that men who claim to be by are in fact, gays in some form of denial yet according to a pew research report from last summer bisexuals account for almost half of all LGBTQ adult in the US in fact, the authors of a new book published by Harvard University Press. Think. That male bisexuals are those who call themselves mostly straight vastly outnumber exclusively gay men. Thus they conclude the old system of gay straight or BI has as stanton puts, it outgrown its usefulness and even bigger challenge in the B. to the born. This way dogma is the T- gay rights and gay marriage were sold to us. The premise that homosexuality is hard wired maybe even genetic like race but anyone claiming transgender as an identity does. So in spite of physical and genetic realities not because. Of them and the CUE which usually stands for questioning well, that continues to evolve in both meaning and practice to include more and more sexual preferences as an identity. Well, one wonders whether Senator Horon would feel compelled to lecture the various social scientists that Glenn Stanton sites. In this article my suspicion is she wouldn't in fact, my suspicion is that Senate Arana was fed this talking point by an aide who's checking twitter and saw it as an opportunity to tar and feather judge Barrett as. A big what's ultimately revealed by her political posturing awoke language policing however is crucially important for all of us to now that phrases such a sexual orientation or sexual preference or whatever. The latest nomenclature are terms made up not to describe reality but to advance the idea that has revolutionized. So much of our culture on politics that sexual attraction and urge define and determine who we are. That's the idea we can never embrace even if we're facing outrage from a senator

Dr Glenn Stanton Senator Senator Hirano Judge Barrett Senator Horon Professor Anders Senator Maisy Judge Amy Glenn Stanton Toronto Exchange Merriam Webster Stanton Hawaii Ucla United States Queens University Harvard University Press Douglas Murray Twitter
"professor anders" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"professor anders" Discussed on WDRC

"I'm Rich Dennison, and this is Fox News. This's Fox on Justice. Mark and Patricia McCloskey break the law when they pointed guns at protesters outside their ST Louis home. Mark McCloskey had an A r 15 when I saw that mob come through the gate with a rage in there, and there Anger. I thought that we would be overrun in the second, he told Fox's Tucker Carlson. He supports the Black lives matter movement, but he felt threatened, they would surmount the wall come into the house. Kill us Burn the house down. The ST Louis prosecutor says she's looking into charging the McCloskey's with a crime. But at least one legal expert says, if anyone broke the law, it was the protesters, ST Louis University law professor Anders Walker says even though the demonstrators were peaceful, they were trespassing in the McCloskey's private gated community they were looking for. The mayor is home to protest there. Walker says. In Missouri, the castle doctrine applies that means you have the right to defend your private property. With Fox on Justice, Hank find Liam Fox News. Welcome to First Amendment Friday on the large Larson show today, Laura's puts you in the driver's seat You talk about what you want to talk about. Government is the problem. No topic is off limits. We will make America great again. 866 A. Lars, That's 866 A Lars To speak your mind. No. First Amendment Friday with Lars Larson. Welcome back to Lars Larson. Joe. It's a pleasure to be with you all. Get back to your calls Later. I'm talking to Kimberley Strassel, uh, about her new book Resistance at all costs. How the Trump haters are breaking.

Mark McCloskey Lars Larson Liam Fox Fox News Patricia McCloskey ST Louis Anders Walker ST Louis University Kimberley Strassel Tucker Carlson Rich Dennison Missouri Trump prosecutor America Joe professor Laura
"professor anders" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

14:26 min | 2 years ago

"professor anders" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"That means you've got me I'm carousel Baird you have a great show lined up today we're going to be talking about conspiracy theories and the corona virus what they are who's believing them why they're being perpetuated and maybe in the end the conversation about what we can do to stop them proactively systematically but also perhaps as an individual as well I have two professors who are you know have a level of expertise in the V. conspiracy world joining us on the phone we have professor Joseph use it use in ski she's an associate political science professor at the university of Miami and the co author of Americans conspiracy theories he's a member of the university of Miami you team combating online extremist conspiracy theories hello professor used in ski hello great to be with you thanks for having me thank you very much for joining us and his colleagues also with this professor I'm Adam enders she is an assistant political science professor at the university of Louisville where he studies conspiracy beliefs misinformation and political polarization hello professor Anders glad you can join us hello thanks great to be here it's great to have you so the two of you authored an article that was in Atlantic and it it started by sort of saying the corona virus has created a perfect storm for conspiracy theories why is that so we have a situation where everybody is focused on one St and that's the pandemic so that's in all the media it's the only news story we're talking about and it has infected so to speak all aspects of our lives and on top of that there's a lot of stress uncertainty anxiety feelings of being out of control and powerless that that come with that because it's very dangerous pandemic that has helped a lot of people out of work and put strain on people so all of that together has laid the groundwork for a conspiracy theorizing is it really is the biggest piece of all that is that we're also focused in paying attention to what is happening in the world because we're all correctly impacted by the corona virus with this have a different implication if it was right the election of the United States president huge conspiracies around president Obama president trump and and all all of their elected leader colleagues but not everyone always pays attention to that and it here on the global pandemic everyone needs to be paying attention on one way or another what's happening that's exactly right you know with presidential elections which tend to be the elections the people pay most attention to even then your average person isn't really tuning in and until in a serious way until September October even early November and the exposure to a conspiratorial idea here or there is just a lot less likely in those kinds of instances but here we're sort of a captive audience we're all stuck at home we're all sort of glued to our televisions we have the state you know governor they're doing regular updates on television in the evening we have the coronavirus task force that's happening at the national level so we're all focused on this we're all constantly thinking about this we're all wondering when this is going to be over and you don't have a lot of answers to the kinds of questions that we we wish we had answers to we get into the numbers the two have you conducted a poll and that is sort of shocking and incredibly telling about where the American public is can we start with sort of a conversation of what are the conspiracies that are out there didn't do the sort of fall into two rounds one of none of this is real and another one sort of a little bit on the opposite of this oh boy this is really real this is equivalent of any intentional terrorist act so there are numerous conspiracy theories out there ranging from the wacky and zany like a dean Koontz novel predicted this virus forty years ago or you know some some the Illuminati or behind their overall gonna get chips in our brains or something like that Ellen is the Mormon Dan so there are really two types as you as you mentioned one is the more political type that the virus is being exaggerated largely as a political tool and given that it's an election year and president trump is going to be judged largely on what happens this year people are saying that oh my gosh the Democrats are jumping this up or some shadowy group is trumping this up to excuse the term other than in the coming election and then the other kind is this is some variation of a bio weapon that that was either engineered or purposely released choose to either kill people or they got it escaped by accident out of the laboratory these conspiracy theories it is it is there ever doesn't need an ounce of truth and and do you find that people have a trouble figuring out what actually is a conspiracy and what is the truth these days yes there are there are a lot of reasons why the stack we talk about that for hours and hours I think you know one important thing to note is that you we we aren't sort of blank slate that just sort of here information and then right instead we it's it's better to think of conspiracy beliefs as the product of various kinds of motivations they don't have to be sort of conscious motivations where you know I decided that I am you know a trump supporter and therefore I will go out and believe and spread the word of coronavirus being exaggerated but we do have these political concerns we do have ideological concerns we have a host of sort of psychological need Joe talked about anxiety and powerlessness and helplessness conspiracy theories can help with those things because they impose substructure on the world and make things seem less random and scary there are all sorts of social concern if you come from a lower status group that has been met with different kinds of misfortune and stuff like that sometimes conspiracy theories can be useful for helping explain why that's true so we have these motivations largely unconscious motivations that make conspiracy theory seem attractive to us for various reasons so back then and and sort of figure out how widespread this is the two of you conducted a poll of Americans ask them about twenty two different conspiracy theories from March seventeenth to March nineteenth up the number that surprised me the most actually wasn't that you found the most people that you talked to thought that one of the twenty two conspiracy theories was a possibility yes we asked about twenty two conspiracy theories in our most recent poll and I think less than ten percent claim to believe in none of them so one way to think about this is that there is an incident number of conspiracy theories out there there's new ones popping up all the time we can't pull on all of them but what we find across polls is that the more conspiracy theories we ask people about the the less likely it is that that someone's going to say they don't believe in any of them so there really isn't an us and them when it comes to conspiracy theorists as we all fall victim at one time or another to one theory or another that's really just sort of overwhelming and startling when that so that makes me presume as I'm sitting here then I must believe in a conspiracy theory that I must think that there's something accurate that actually isn't really based in fact would you say that's true I mean if you're saying that less than ten percent do you agree to any of it that that all of us are still sitting here ninety percent of us are sitting here ever take a percentage point believing something that isn't true well not you know it's not a sure fire thing yeah there is still that nine percent but wisely you know most people so think about it that way we all tend to sort of stereo type throughout the day Kerio typing is a useful kind of psychological mechanism because it assumes that patterns that we you know observed in the past are probably going to be repeated in the future so it's just a nice way to help us navigate the world without thinking too hard about things and conspiracy theories are are sort of the same too right so when when when rain chance when were really sort of you know feeling uncertain with this unpredictable kind of virus that that's plaguing the world at this point and and people don't have very many answers to what's going on we might turn to something that reasonably conspiratorial right maybe maybe it's not a full blown the shadow we government or shadow we group backs you know malevolent sand and doing these horrible things to us in secret but something that at least has some elements of those things would you say so I'm gonna use your Wisconsin there's a poll the legislature has sued the governor there are two different parties one sort of focusing more on the science of closing down the stadium one side focusing more on the economics of opening up the state so and these are both both entities that have been elected by the populace of Wisconsin right so we have Democrats on one side Republicans another all fairly elected I'm so would it be conspiracy theory if if I were to say you some people are saying yeah one side they're exaggerating the science facts to keep its closed I would think that's reasonable and another type of say yeah they're exaggerating the economic harm into forces opened is is that where it gets to the were not willing to trust the faxes resale as we see them well what you're describing there is sort of a very normal human setting I mean recognizing that you know vested political interests might be biased in some way isn't a conspiracy theory in itself but it it it does lay the groundwork for once you start considering the motivations of the groups involved I mean it's clear that different parties have different constituencies and they're going to act on behalf of those constituencies it's not necessarily against the common good and it's not clear to me that either side wants to do harm to anyone and I think it's reasonable to consider both economic health and public health in you know and we can do it in the same sentence without being extreme but I think we're the conspiracy theorizing pops up is when we start saying well you know there are people with interests who have evil intent and they're operating in secret against all of us for their own good and we might even know what their full planners so when I bump into people whether it's at the grocery store check out or in and who were you know and they say well this must be China or must be Russia or it must be you know some group who wants to put vaccines with chips in them into us that's where it starts to run off the rails some of the numbers that you that came out of your polling twenty nine percent of people that you spoke with agreed that the threat of corona virus has been exaggerated to damage president trump ends thirty one percent agree that the virus was purposefully created to spread its up in America and perhaps other places as well yeah about those numbers how did we get here it isn't just about the but the political implications of that are those mostly people of one political party are holding those views or is it bipartisan so we find a correlation between partisanship and these conspiracy theories and ideologies such that conservatives and Republicans are somewhat more likely to believe them but that you know a correlation is is far from cognition and it's far from a determinative relationship so it's perhaps not particularly surprising that Republicans and conservatives are expressing higher levels of belief in the spending plan one of them it's it's pretty obvious that partisan concerns are kind of being triggered because it's about supporting president trump and president trump's reputation every election chances chances being harmed by this virus and the bio weapon one has found some support among you know sort of far right conservative voices Tom cotton has has sort of talked about this one a couple of times now and and Jordan.

Baird