38 Burst results for "Professor"

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Midday News

Midday News

01:29 min | 29 min ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Midday News

"Barry says, because of more than 200 sexual abuse lawsuits, the Diocese of Rockville Center was forced to file for bankruptcy protection to keep its programs like educational, spiritual and charitable afloat. The bishop spoke on the diocese website. We believe that The process of chapter 11 offers Thie on Li Wei to ensure a fair and equitable outcome for everyone involved. But Attorney Mitchell Garabedian, who tells me he represents 24 victims, says of clergy sexual abuse feel an enormous amount of pain After the abuse for the rest of their lives. The pain doesn't go away. Eight. Absent flows, there are triggers Princess di filing of the bankruptcy will trigger a lot of victims to feel more pain victims will feel cheated. And Professor Marci Hamilton of Child use a says the victims have now become creditors. It's just a cold slap in the face for the victims to be then subjected to this just to get some kind of compensation for the all the suffering. They've been through. Sophia Hold a B C. B s news. Radio 8 80 11 05 WCBS. If you haven't had a chance to see it today, I can tell you that Mayor Bill de Blasio and his daily briefing is smiling a lot. Today. He's using terms that students might not have used over the years to describe the return to classrooms, though he called it a joyous moment that he witnessed watching middle and high schoolers return to their seats in the Bronx this morning. Here's the man, we're gonna work every single day. Take this achievement and build on it to make our schools better all the time to keep strengthening everything we're doing for our kids and families to stay open all the way through. That is the mission. We've got a lot to do. And we have to constantly work at addressing the health challenges around US schools Chancellor Richard Carranza says he is seeing mass compliance in his unannounced school visits that he's been making and we'll have more for you. Remarks coming up at 11 15 here on WCBS. CBS reporter Marla Diamond checked out the return to classrooms for the older city kids and also heard from the teachers union boss here, a university neighborhood high school. A small number of enrolled students came in this morning. Dad, Derek hair wait in the car until his daughter Jordan got inside. We are concerned. We monitor.

Mayor Bill De Blasio Mitchell Garabedian Professor Marci Hamilton Diocese Of Rockville Center Li Wei Richard Carranza Thie Barry Bronx University Neighborhood High S Derek United States Attorney Marla Diamond Jordan C. B Chancellor CBS Reporter
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 7 hrs ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Midday News

Midday News

01:21 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Midday News

"Siri's over. This is Brad Heller. And what if animals could sniff out Kobe? Guess what? Dogs are able Tio find asymptomatic and pre symptomatic presentations of the disease. They're almost always right. Thursday, October 1st. Good morning. I'm Wayne Cabot. WCBS news time 10 31 Catholic Church is reeling after ignoring for years the abuse inflicted on so many Children and the ability of those Children to sue under last year's Child Victims Act has changed everything. Sophia Hall says the Rockville Centre diocese has now filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy, unable to pay for all those lawsuits, just the latest Catholic diocese to do so. Professor Marci Hamilton of Child use says victims of child sexual abuse within the Catholic Church are not happy with the bankruptcy filing by the Diocese of Rockville Center, and so what Rockville Center is doing. It is basically trying to protect all of its assets. So that the survivors will get as little compensation as possible. The diocese Bishop John Barry's says in a video message on the diocese website that more than 200 lawsuits have been filed against the diocese, and it could not carry out spiritually educational and charitable expenses without the filing. Our goal is to make sure that all clergy sexual abuse survivors And not just a few who were first to file lawsuits are afforded, just and equitable compensation. Professor Hamilton says the tragedy of federal bankruptcy and child sex abuse is that it's just all of the attention to the estate. It's now all about Rockville Center. The victims become creditors. It's really unfair. Sophia Hold WCBS news radio 8 80. So what about the church? What about the various schools? While the filing is not expected to have a direct impact on Catholic schools in the area, the diocese says the parishes the elementary schools in the high schools are not filing chapter 11 because they're separate. Legal entities from the diocese. If there was any doubt that kids need to see their friends and get out of the house. Listen tomorrow Diamond on the first day back inside classes for middle and high schools in New York City. You could see the smile under sophomore Jordan. Evan Hairs mask feel good. You know, I really wanted to come.

Catholic Church Diocese Of Rockville Center Rockville Center Professor Marci Hamilton Rockville Centre Brad Heller Sophia Hall Siri Asymptomatic Bishop John Barry Evan Hairs Wayne Cabot New York City Diamond
Nigeria unveils new COVID-19 molecular test kit

BBC World Service

03:26 min | 8 hrs ago

Nigeria unveils new COVID-19 molecular test kit

"Nigeria's 60th anniversary marking independence and perhaps says the major thing the government in citizens Khun celebrate, and That's News that the molecular test has been developed, which can produce Cove in 19 test result within 40 minutes. Now, according to Nigeria Center for Disease Control, there are nearly 59,000 coronavirus cases in just over 1100 deaths. So this new kit by the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research will be welcomed. We heard from the director ofthe Thie Institute professor. Well, Salako. This test is a molecular test designed with what we call a 16. I saw Tim a machine which works at 40 degrees socials. Us against the conventional PCR runs in cycles. I will walk within high on low temperature in the process off converting area need to gear before detection. So this was designed to walk with that machine on what that does is that it requires an enzyme that assist in the liver's transcript is toe turn irony dear name before the ink. If you don't mind, sir, just breaking that down for me individuals. What does that mean? In terms of how you know it now means that they can get a quick result. Obviously, and and there's no different with how the test is taken. Is that the case? No different vows detests. Taking its live provides the opportunity for a fast run on getting the result within 40 minutes. And is it much cheaper? Yes, is cheaper than the current is. So how much is it if you're to say it in IRA and then in dollars dollar equivalent They should be around $25 per tests That may come close toe 11,000, which is still when you're thinking about it quite a steep price to pay for the average Nigerian. If they're people who want to have this test done, so how easy will it be for you to roll this out? Two different state. You know whether it's Legos, which, as you know, the highest number of other states. How is this going to be distributed? The cost that we have now was not based on mass production, so by the time doesn't rule out Emma's We believe that that cause you come Noah down much more on DH. Since this is something that is not as big required every equipment it is. Very easy to be taken. There were from big laboratories toe several hospitals on rural areas that's use the advantage in these, but I believe the limiting step will be the purchase off my machine. I'm just thinking now, today, Independence Day, many of us Nigerians, especially the older ones will be sinking. Thinking about the recent her national anthem of the old one Nigeria. We held the I wonder if this is something that we should be proud of. It shouldn't it that Nigeria has been able to develop Such test such a quick, rapid test. I believe, so I think it's something that country shooting their proud off. And he is Professor Salako, who is the director for the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research.

Nigeria Nigerian Institute Of Medical Nigeria Center For Disease Con Professor Salako Director TIM Thie Institute Khun Salako Professor Noah
Fresh "Professor" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

01:14 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "Professor" from Morning Edition

"Be able to put any sort of control lines, so it's a bit of a challenge. Farther north. The Zong fire in Chester County has killed at least four people since it broke out last weekend. Two airlines, American and United say they began furloughing 32,000 employees Today, the airline industry wants Congress to approve another $25 billion in Corona virus relief money. To help them meet payrolls through March of next year. The White House and Democratic leaders in Congress remain it on's over another relief bill. Democrats are proposing to $0.2 Trillion in aid. The White House supports a relief package closer to 1.5 trillion This is NPR News Live from KQED News on Brian what The National Weather Service this morning expanded this afternoon's red flag warning for fire danger to include the East Bay Hills in Santa Cruz mountains. It was already issued for the North Bay Mountains, prompting concerns high winds could push the glass fire burning in Napa and Sonoma County's You heard about on NPR? Here's Cal Fire, Scott MacLean. It is very much a recipe for extended fire, baby or extreme fire, behavior and potential for new starts. A fire has charged some 51,000 acres and his 2% contained Students in some faculty at all. 10 University of California campuses plan to hold rallies today to call for the elimination of you, CPD and police forces that cow state schools by fall of next year, She's Kate Wolf reports. Questions about the resource is spent on CPD have mounted since last year. When you see Santa Cruz administrators increase the police presence on campus in response to a graduate student instructor strike And you see, an associate professor Nick Mitchell says he hasn't seen having a regular police force on campus actually reduces crime. We really need to stop imagining that police are solution of violence so that we can start really building effective solutions to violent. Mitchell plans to join Abolish CPD protesters in Santa Cruz, who will be driving through campus in a car caravan. Other big area. Actions planned include a rally in downtown Berkeley and March at UCSF Mission Bay Campus Thie use the office of the president said the CPD performs vital duties for the safety of students and protect sensitive research and medical facilities on key wolf genius, and there's more at dot org's I'm Brian..

Santa Cruz White House Nick Mitchell Congress Ucsf Mission Bay Campus North Bay Mountains East Bay Hills Kate Wolf NPR Chester County Sonoma County Scott Maclean Berkeley University Of California Napa President Trump Kqed News Associate Professor
Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

Between The Lines

09:41 min | 12 hrs ago

Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

"Me. If you've already heard me mention this but one of my favorite quotes during the covid crosses a pdf the guardian. This is the British lift wing newspaper. Now, this was the heart of the coronavirus crisis. It would have been light much quote just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship, there are no free marketeers during a pandemic. Now, the author of that apt quote Jonathan Freedland, he was referring to the audio logical revolution within the British conservative. Party. Now, according to Freedland Boris Johnson's his have defied four decades of thatcherism small-state free-market, thinking I to spend staggering amounts of money and then subsidizing the wages of workers. Could the same thing be said about Australia's Liberal Party they're the party of Howard and Costello now embraces big-spending high deficit government interventionism. And is a permanent state of affairs poor kilis editor at large of the Australian US pipe and Judas Brit is emeritus professor of politics at Latrobe University poll judy welcome back to the show. Hristo Paul, you've written to calms about this subject in the past week, summarize your faces. Will Martha is that all parties and all governments have to respond to the times in which they find themselves on display in Australia. Now we face an extraordinary economic crisis and the response reveals the nature of Scott Morrison, his prime minister and the Mars and government. So Morrison, not responding as Liberal Party progressive or is it Liberal Party conservative? He doesn't see himself in those terms his responses pragmatic selects able and practical. He's not inhibited by former policy and audio logical icons of the Liberal Party. Say What we say is the government has abandoned the long-term syllabus aspirations. It's A. Big Spending government it's a government government intervention focused on Keynesian demand management. It does however on the Liberal Party tradition of tax cuts will see next week. So it's prepared to regulate or deregulate according to the situation according to what's required. So to sum up say that Morrison wants to be defined by results and outcomes not philosophical principle. Okay. You mentioned the tax cuts leaving that aside traditional liberal governments are about balancing the books Paul, how much an as do you think aries in the Liberal Party about in the parliament and outside about these handouts to preserve jobs and livelihoods? Are. I. Don't think there's much on these at all OPTIMA and Tom. and. A couple of reasons for this if there is to be on, he's He's will come through the down the track, but essentially what's happening here is to govern is following the Orthodoxy or what you might call the new Orthodoxy in terms of meeting the financial and economic crisis. So roller response is sort of radical. It's also conventional. The official family is working together very closely. The Treasury the Reserve Bank, what the government is doing is essentially supported by private-sector economists. It's in law and with Patrick amended by the VCD and the IMF not the cabinet is very nodded, the Prime Minister and the treasurer are working very closely together so far the results look good. I think the Overwhelming sentiment on the back benches. Support, the government strategy in the hope that this gives individual employees, the chance of actually being reelected and my will give the government the chance of being reelected. So the reinvention of Australian liberalism is on full display with this budget judith break you agree with Paul Kelly about the the audio logical significance of these changes but actually think the government had much choice in that sense I do think we can see something audio logical preferences in a couple of the policies poor mentioned the tax cuts they've chosen tax cuts over for example, committing to a permanent increase in new act now co Job Seca. They've also, for example, if we look at the way, they wanted to stimulate the housing market. They've gone for giving money to individual owners rather than, for example, embarking on a social housing project. So I think in some of the means, we can still see some of the ideological preferences of the Patty. One of the things I've wondered when I've been watching the events unfold. If Labor had won the last election was in government with the Liberals have supported the same levels of spending or would they have if you like stayed in the sort of ideological bunker bean and attacked the blow out of the deficit? I mean, it's a hypothetical. In some ways I think we've been very lucky that it's been the liberals and the coalition in government because they can sense being able to Ghana much more support. I, think than I have been able to do for the same levels of spending but isn't cameras response to the COVID crosses more consistent with other Western governments during the pandemic Judy. Yes that's what I think. I had much option but the question is if the coalition of being opposition, would they have supported a Labor government going? You've written a lot about this have many many decades about when orthodoxies or overturned. It's usually bipartisan is that you'll since if the coalition cypher argument's sake wherein opposition I would have gone along with this big spending interventionism. Look are essentially agree with what Judy's said about this I think in a sense we're. Fortunate, if you liked that the coalition's in government because it's taken all the big spending decisions. and. Lay has been prepared to go along with back. In fact, it's argued that there should be even more spending. So in that sense, we've had a broad degree of thought-out ship within the economic framework. It is hot the typical of course to tron speculate about what would have happened if alive had been in office doing this but I do think that the coalition in opposition would have been tempted to make caught a lot of criticisms and to suggest that the spending had gone too far. There's a big difference for party thing in government managing across and being an opposition. Cape with this theme of a political realignment among center right parties around the Western world. If you think about Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen, he tapped into widespread anxieties. America's rust belt. What can class constituencies? Boris Johnson showed last December, he resonated with traditional British Library voters in the Midlands and northern England. Judy. Do you think that Morrison in a wise doing the same thing here in Australia? Now, I think they're very different sorts of crises. I mean the pandemic is an external. Crisis, it's not being caused by politics in any way it's not back nationalism versus globalism or any of those things, and so I don't agree with that. I agree with what Paul was saying earlier that Morrison's shown himself to be pragmatic and quick footed in this and I think we're lucky for that. But I I don't think that this lines up with bricks and with trump's appeal to the rest spilled poor Kelly. Well I think conservatism is changing if you look at. America Britain Australia and there's not a dopey getting very significant changes into servitude. Thought. Different changes argued very strongly that there are very substantial differences between Donald Trump and Scott Morrison. I think people who argue that. Morrison is a pilot version of DONALD TRUMP MAUREEN DOWD in the New York Times by the way, but go on. I think. I think turned him mentally misunderstand the situation I. Think the change in conservatism is very dramatic in the United States. If you'd like because we've got the transition from Ronald, Reagan who a generation ago was the great conservative champion, and now we have Donald Trump, who if you lock is a populist conservative? And that transformation is simply enormous install ending content I mean trump violates all the virtues of conservatism in terms of restraint prudence disciplined respect. Regard for the political system, he thrives on division. So he likes all the traditional conservative norms, and then when looks at his policies. Well he's sabotage the global trading system. He's an arch protectionist. He's engaged in this trade war with China he's appraised dictators and suspicious about. So I guess one of the Fundamental Christians here is the extent to which trump is an aberration. And the extent to which post trump American concert is we'll have to try and create a new position cognisant of the damage that trump has done to the traditional Republican Party

Government Donald Trump Liberal Party Scott Morrison Hristo Paul Australia Freedland Boris Johnson Jonathan Freedland Judy Paul Kelly United States Republican Party Prime Minister America Optima Covid Latrobe University Treasury Martha
Airline industry facing worst job losses in history

John Landecker

00:56 sec | 13 hrs ago

Airline industry facing worst job losses in history

"Act Payroll Support program runs out of money tomorrow it helped airline workers hold onto their jobs and some benefits as well. Massive cuts for lows and layoffs are now expected without last minute intervention from congressional lawmakers in Washington. DePaul University professor Joe Schwieterman, says airlines facing historic losses We've seen this October cliff coming for four months. It's no secret that without Federal protection. The airlines they're gonna have to jettison lay off lots of people, he says. With Muneer Americans rather passing on flights during the pandemic, there's no way around heavy cutbacks without more federal financial assistance. We're still only about 35 40% of normal, and I just can't support that payroll made tens of 1000 layoffs. Our inevitable. It appears without something dramatic coming from Congress not looking real good right. That cuts are also expected to impact. Chicago based United Airlines. MGM Resorts and its

Mgm Resorts United Airlines Depaul University Joe Schwieterman Washington Chicago Professor Congress
US election to have far fewer international observers than planned

The World

04:41 min | 18 hrs ago

US election to have far fewer international observers than planned

"There are lots of theories and predictions about the various things that could go wrong with the U. S November election that makes the role of election observers perhaps more important than ever, especially international election observers who could beam or impartial than American citizens. As the world's Rupert Chinois reports. These monitors have just started their mission in the US The Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe or OS Sea, is the largest international body charged with monitoring elections It wanted to bring 500 observers for the upcoming US selections. Instead, there will be about 130, mostly because of covert concerns. Fewer people than expected volunteered to come to the U. S. The major thing that we're going to have to make an adjustment on is thie actual in polling station Election Day observation That said All other aspects of the mission remain effectively unchanged. That's the leader of the S. C. E s mission in the US Polish senator and European Parliament member Ursula got sick at the end of the day. I'm so certain it's going to be accurate Gonna be a true reflection and impartial reflection objective of though what's been happening here in the United States gets sick, will lead a 30 member team that will issue an interim report in three weeks. We're following legal developments were following the camp. Pain and as much as the environment. The atmosphere of the campaign were following the postal ballot just before the election get. 16 will be joined by 100 additional monitors from 30 countries. They'll deploy in pairs under a mandate of strict non interference. They'll be watching things like voter registration, mail in ballots and access to the polls. We'll also look at media coverage, including intolerant rhetoric gets sick, says the monitors will attempt to compensate for their smaller numbers by observing a quote representative sample of polling locations. What we're having to go to do on Election Day is pick our places well, but it will be, I would say the analysis there will be more anecdotal because the sample group will Regrettably, be too small, and that is not anybody's fault. The S C E typically observes elections in developing countries, but like all other 56 members of the global organization The U. S. Has also obligated to invite international election observers. Those observers on Lee started coming in 2002 after the messy Bush v. Gore election of 2000. Not all states have allowed the monitors. In those this year, just 28 States and the District of Columbia have invited international observers. There's also the added complications of President Trump's repeated questioning of mail in ballots, claims of a rigged election and evasion on whether he'll respect the results of the election. Get sick, refused to comment on what she called those hypotheticals at this stage of can't prejudge, you know, I mean, I'm hearing that there are concerns, but then we need to have evidence space We need to see. You know, we need to see the fact we need to see whether things really do or do not go wrong. But those concerns are white, so important tohave international monitors, says Judith Kelly, a professor of political science and dean of Duke's Sanford School of Public Policy. What I find striking is that the United States In many ways was the driving force behind the creation ofthe The whole idea of international election observers and have fostered that movement throughout the world observing elections worldwide, and it is rather inconceivable that we're finding ourselves in a situation now. Where we legitimately appear to be having a need for them ourselves in developing countries, she says. International monitors have been instrumental in shoring up public confidence in elections, but Kelly says they may not have that effect this time. I am skeptical. That they will have any impact. In the United States specifically in this election. Not because they don't have the potential to do so but because they won't be given the opportunity to do so. The day after the election, the S C E team will hold a press conference to talk about their initial findings afterward. As usual, they're prepared to stay to monitor the counting of ballots and whatever court process and they play out to decide the election. Roughly two months later, they'll issue a final report with recommendations for what could have been done better

United States LEE Judith Kelly Rupert Chinois Europe Os Sea S C E Pain District Of Columbia European Parliament S. C. E S President Trump Gore Ursula Senator Representative Bush
Proud Boys celebrate Trump’s ‘stand by’ remark about them at the debate.

Mark Mason

04:37 min | 20 hrs ago

Proud Boys celebrate Trump’s ‘stand by’ remark about them at the debate.

"Meddles in our streams. enough Clorox Clorox However, wipes wipes if you available available folks need to relax about that, there there isn't isn't our enough enough disinfectant disinfectant utilities I've been spray spray working with available available both Salem anywhere. anywhere. and he went To To wipe wipe well his other foot the the from stench stench the Forest Service. USGS. from last They're very night's effective debate. there. On top of this, I was and there a debate last night our on water. water utilities are actually quite effective at removing those W medals. W E The night. things they're going That was to struggle embarrassing. with are going to be the That was ash ah, minutes and some of in the living history carbon of We've never seen and anything the character like it. of that carbon If well you missed will it, create and I challenges got a lot of e mail from for people them saying they and didn't watch costs it last for them, night. They didn't but want to get consumers the won't in get terms involved of their water in what they thought supply. would be a Malay. And it I don't was. think there's ah, We a have major condensed health risk. it into 23. This's the things you Seconds do at Oregon State for University, you 23 which seconds by And this can I think are to this our can benefit pretty much here in Oregon summarize. and were Uh, much the appreciative entire debate of so the time you don't you're spending have to with sit us here, Dr through Kevin hold Bladen, 90 who minutes, was the associate Plus, professor just Forest enjoy engineering this. resource All right. If it And management department impacts, at according Oregon to zip State it University. the question We is learned just a lot just a few short so left minutes. I hope Vote we can call on you again now here. Doctor impact appreciate always it. Absolutely in gentlemen. The jury happy exhibit to do it. a Hey, I'm Charlie Sanders Leaders or Senator, and I'm bald and I'm Brian I'm Husky, zippy Longstocking and I am also ball. You are indeed also bald. packed Those interest is true. When a It's problem good comes because along, we're the host The you new much podcast ball better talk from the big money Players dip. Network It and I would heart radio. you say And because we're bald, it is? Is that right on that's it? That's the whole thing I mean, the show in is Portland about perception, prominently featured. insecurity, Oh, my goodness. vanity, just So like proud. Human Chris stuff. Wallace I couldn't aren't get radio Oregon, is number right? one for podcast. Oregon, But don't take our word for it. Portland, Find Oregon. ball talk But on the I heart radio it app was or wherever you it was listen his to hold podcasts, Trump the real Proud estate boy's market in thing Portland is hot. So Where does it matter where? who you used Chris, to Paul sell? said. Will you denounce It does white if supremacy? you want And top then dollar, and Joe that's Biden why through you and need we'll to probably, call Nick Shivers you at know, Keller denounced Williams. them. Nick's award Here's how it winning went down. online Add marketing to the platform violence and and a connections number of these cities with the top as we 100 saw in Kenosha. agents in the U. S And as allows we've seen your in home Portland to be seen locally, regionally and nationally, giving today, you I maximum would say exposure almost everything and creating I an see auction is like from effect the left if you wing. need to Not Sell your from home the right. and Oregon So what in do you southwest want to, you Washington. know? Call 503847 Willing to do anything. I 93 want Todo 100 or visit What sir? Nick shivers Do dot it say? com there Do pounding you want to call on him? the door. What They're do you calling want to call on him? the phone. Give me a name. Give It's me the collectors. a problem. It's those Right? Like credit cards. You ran proud up trying to start son. Right? your business. Probably Now. You found out that stand a D b A back hurts and the stand family by. and brings But the pain I'll tell home. you what, Do you remember I'll tell you. hearing What these commercials Somebody's on radio got to do for something over 40 about years, Antifa Ray Reynolds and has the helped left customers Because this get is not millions a right in credit. It's problem no wonder is why that they call this is him the a godfather levy I of credit. directed. Reynolds This is will get left your score above 7 20. right, Do Savannah, you need $50,000? Miss. Just stand back and Offered credit stand by using by. corporate credit. You can finance That's of what business, they say buy real estate inside and stock the under a corporation, television studio taking advantage is of they're numerous about to go tax on here. write Stand offs on back. Ly available Stand to a by. corporation. All right, Now you could meet Reynolds let's on his daily go. webinar at 11 a.m. to Wow. P. M. Monday through I mean, Friday, what a fail or call an epic 800 fail for right 90 there. 41 42 Two. He could Find put it out away. more about his secrets He to could success have put it away. and helping If you said fix you know what and improve all white your credit. supremacists Go to Ray's webinar dot com You know, Stand at 11 AM out. Get or 2 out p.m. of here. I Monday don't through know if Friday he and check out if he, his free, uh, very informative if he misspoke webinar himself or call today, 800 for 90 today 41 the president 40. is saying, Now it's worth. I don't Time even know and who the you'll learn proud a boys lot. are. That's Ray's webinar dot com or call 804 90 41 40. So Everyone's back at home Senator and you're loving Tim Scott, the Knights of Netflix the after racing for the black best senator seed, from South But are Carolina you playing musical chairs? You and sit went down to the to relax, president's shifting aide down today a seat for your kid. Then your spouse comes in in. response And you to all Chris Wallace's scoot over another seat. You need a custom, Chris, But lazy he wanted boy to say sectional, where everyone thank has you their misspoke place. Choose corrected how many because seats you need I and guess who he gets didn't to recline? you should Plus, correct it's it. perfectly sized your room. If he doesn't The whole I fam guess he didn't Damn misspeak. ily will be cool. Let me check She is his Khun Twitter B. feed And here. right now save Have you got up anything to 25% their liberal might know. off, Lazy Meanwhile, boy. Oh, Gavin boy. McInnis, Now it who means was so much more. the founder Hey, guys, of listen problems, up. I one have of the some founders exciting of news. published Multnomah they were Medical watching Clinic this has a new on and a live breakthrough treatment video for stream. e D. That does not require And any they were medication. sitting around You listening heard right. to the president's No pills, speech. no shots, And guys. when the proud If boys you're struggling were mentioned, with boy, the D they and also sick they of the sat pills up called in their chair Multnomah Medical and Clinic, they start get the initial they start medical talking assessment to each exam other. It's and all blood caught flow on tape. ultrasound. Listen, Totally right, free. That's a $300 stand value. back Call and Multnomah stand Medical by. Clinic now, But 503505. I'll tell you what, I'll tell you. What Somebody's 1441 got to do something fix your about CD today, Antifa and Call 5035057441 the left. Certainly. or Really visit online. sit here. What Multnomah do you want to medical call him? Go dot ahead. com Tell me, he said Thes the problem. Okay, Air. Strange pad boys times to stand down and stand It's back. been a crash But we have course somewhere in about how to make do you say, with less. probably stand down stand And if you're by a the small General business command. owner, you've probably had to make He's some the general innovative I changes control. The to manage problem expenses. is Donald. But that energy Do not stand trust down. of Oregon Do not stand way back. have Well, been helping small business owners find ways to increase so they're efficiency they're all and charged reduce costs up now. Hey, you for years. know, they got mentioned they've gone It's what quote we do every mainstream. day, and we can I have help been making you, too. T shirts and they're Yeah, they're Find out making how teachers. They at have a new energy patch trust to wear dot on org's their slash arm. for business. But the president ever heard of him. This news has a service of radio Cab

Oregon Antifa Ray Reynolds Chris Wallace President Trump Portland Multnomah Stand Medical Senator Clorox Multnomah Nick Shivers Oregon State For University Multnomah Medical And Clinic Usgs. Forest Service Salem Vote Forest Kevin Professor
How can we safely reopen international borders?

Coronacast

05:02 min | 21 hrs ago

How can we safely reopen international borders?

"So there's been a lot of talk in the last couple of days about the international border and particularly from the Prime Minister says that international rivals from safe corona virus countries could avoid Herta quarantine and instead of going into Mandatory Hotel quarantaine people from those countries could go and do it in their own home. There's been quite a few questions about this coming through it. ABC. Dot Net dot edu slash corona cast including one from Kathy who says, what does Norman think of the PM suggestion about that Safe Countries Avoiding Hotel Quarantine? So this is an a nuanced, not easy problem to deal with. So there are some countries which do have very low prevalence of the virus. There's not many of them by the way, but there are some in which case you have people quarantining at home. You probably have large numbers quarantining. Technology rights even from paces with slightly higher prevalence. You only one person to get out by the way and spread the virus and you've got a major outbreak on your hands. So there is a risk they are, but you could have ankle bracelets which people could pay for, and that would be cheaper than hotel quarantine for two weeks you could have geo location on your phone you could. Have fines for giving you a phone to somebody else. But you've got to be able to know that the police whoever's going to administer canister this at huge scale, but it's possible to do that with modern technology. So it's not a bad idea and it could loosen top and it could listen up for international students particularly if you add rapid testing to the equation, but we don't ask that. Level of imposition from the government on ankle bracelets for people who are infected domestically and I selecting at Harmon we've we've spoken about this on chronic hospital four but also kathy also makes the point that one of the countries named was Japan which had more than four hundred cases on September twenty eighth alone, and she says as a Melbourne Ian in lockdown she's furious because as as you've noted, Norman that it only. Takes one case to to start another wife Yes. So you've just got to be very, very careful and this is not something you could turn on tomorrow. This is something that's got to have an infrastructure in place to make it manageable and to be as fail safe as it possibly can be. The Abbey's reported a couple of experts saying that it actually could work one was Robert and the other was paid calling. So. Do you think it's worthwhile though like if wages taking only a few countries admittedly with low A. numbers that it would help or is it just sort of opening up this slow step towards making it back to trying to get life back to normal? One way that you could do this is open it up to lure countries, get the system, right get a working with ankle bracelets or however you're going to do it get the systems in place and do it with relatively few travelers from Lewis places while Hotel Corentin is going on in parallel you could actually compare the two and see what the rate. Of positivity is you could combine it with rapid testing before you leave when you arrive and the middle of the of the quarantine periods, you could do this at scale with international students from Laura places like China one assumes that China at the moment Israel Risco that you can't be sure. So there are ways of dealing with this, which is not. That all of a sudden on the fifteenth of October hypothetically just starting to do this you might just ease your way into it learn how to do it in a safe way, and then you could scale up quite rapidly. Having said that you got to experts saying this is a good idea not not really a problem and you go professor Rhino, McIntyre Who's been pretty accurate predictions right through this Pandemic University of new, south Wales saying well, numbers would soon overwhelm you and you be able to cope. It does seem a bit strange talking about international arrivals to Australia win still many state borders are getting better but they're still closed. I mean you couldn't come down and visit me in Tasmania at the moment. But I'd have to quarantine. You'd have to come visit me through the window. You're right. But INTERNAL BORAS WE'LL start opening up your already. See a bit of relaxation in. Western. Australia with Corentin. NEW APP which they think is going to work in terms of how are monitoring people. Technology is the answer here, which would include I think rapid testing. So moving to Victoria, the numbers have been falling in recent days the average fourteen day data graph, which we all love looking at every single day continues to fall, but it does seem like healthcare workers are still getting infected. Yes and just today the updated healthcare worker numbers, and so the last week there have been twenty four H. Care Workers Nurses one doctor one, paramedic one allied health professional infected. So they're still comprising a fairly significant percentage of the. Total cases in Victoria and shows that there are still problems there and the thing is that there are catching up with numbers. So the numbers coming through very orgy complex cases you've got healthcare workers suddenly increasing you don't win there were infected the numbers from Victoria I'm sure they are trending down, but they are not as said this again and again they're not as transparent as they luke. Okay.

Kathy Norman Australia Victoria Mandatory Hotel China Hotel Corentin ABC Prime Minister H. Care Workers Nurses Government Abbey Israel Risco Tasmania Wales Harmon Pandemic University Of New Corentin
'No winner tonight': Undecided voters weigh in on debate

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:04 min | 23 hrs ago

'No winner tonight': Undecided voters weigh in on debate

"Of last night's chaotic presidential debate, local political analysts are saying there was no winner in the American voting public are the losers. We get more from Kemal's Corwin hate. Those who expected coherence and clearly stated positions from the two nominees likely came away. Disappointed. We all lost tonight, and it's just a sad commentary for people who support both Biden and Trump. This was a mess. Ron Dots, our political strategist, and Cuomo, analyst and Pacific University professor, Jim More commenting for K two in Portland. I beat Bernie Sanders. Not very much. President. Trump set the tone right out of the gate, refusing to let Challenger bite and complete a sentence. You would have lost every problem. He knows how to choose her Tuesday. You look very large delight and resorted to talking over. Trump's comment is not a right wing problem is a levy I direct. This is left with white dots our questions whether there should even be a second in the proposed Siri's of three debates. I would expect the Presidential commission to step in and say, Look, Folks, This is just not acceptable to the American public. Corwin Hey HQ Momo News. Starting

Donald Trump Corwin Ron Dots Presidential Commission Bernie Sanders Kemal Challenger Biden Cuomo Siri Pacific University President Trump Analyst Portland JIM Professor
Portland sheriff disputes Trump's claim he supports president

Democracy Now! Audio

04:10 min | 1 d ago

Portland sheriff disputes Trump's claim he supports president

"President trump, you have two minutes wise. Should Americans trust you over your opponent to deal with right crime bill nine, hundred and ninety four where you call them superpredators African. Americans the Super Predators and they've never forgotten that they've never forgotten. Also it's his two minutes. You did that and they call you Super Predator and I'm letting people out of jail. Now that you have treated the African American population community, you have treated the black community about as bed is anybody in this country that's president trump and Joe Biden sparring last night in Cleveland perhaps, the Congress moment of the evening when president trump was an interrupting almost everything Joe Biden said fact checkers have noted trump lied when he accused by calling black-americans superpredators. Actually. First. Lady Hillary Clinton who used that phrase in nineteen ninety four not Joe Biden still with US Temple University professor Marc Lamont Hill and Kristen Clark is now joining. She's the president and Executive Director of the National Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under law, Kristen, let's begin with you start off with your reaction to what they said here we just were discussing president trump refusing to condemn white supremacists when pushed on at several times and on what he is saying here. Was a deeply disturbing moment last night in many respects. That question will you condemn white supremacy was a softball It was would have been very easy for president trump to disavow white supremacy in crystal clear terms. You think about the tragedies that the American nation has lived through in recent time the. Murder of nine peaceful. At the. Baptist. Church. In Charleston South Carolina the murderers of eleven worshippers at the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh the murders of over twenty people in El Paso Texas the murder of heather higher in Charlottesville. Virginia these horrendous incidents all fueled by a white supremacist violence. Are Easy for any. reasonable. Minded. American to condemn much less the leader of our country and we know that the FBI director has identified white supremacy as one of the greatest threats that we face in our nation today. So I'm deeply disturbed and. I think about how history will reflect on this moment and Yesterday. Was a dark day for our country. I think about one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifteen when Woodrow Wilson screened birth of a nation inside the White House and over a century later, that is a moment. That stands out. For for any ordinary, American as a white. House that embraced unnecessarily white supremacist rhetoric and and essentially that's what we saw yesterday. We know that the proud boys are rejoicing today we know that they have taken this moment to breathe life into their movement. They are boasting about how last night has helped to. Energize their base and help them to recruit new members, and so this is a moment that poses a real and grave threat to black and Brown people in particular in our country who are often the victims of racial violence. and. Kristen. Clark this repeated emphasis the president throughout the debate last night and obviously in statements previously about the dangers of the left and then t for and he kept referring to Portland at one point claiming completely. Complete lie that the Sheriff of Portland had just that day endorsed him. But then Mike Reese who is the sheriff of the county which Portland is immediately tweeted out I have never supported Donald Trump and never will, and yet she brazenly claims that had the support of the sheriff a Portland,

Donald Trump President Trump Kristen Clark Joe Biden White House Lady Hillary Clinton Murder Portland Softball Woodrow Wilson Mike Reese Marc Lamont Hill FBI Virginia Congress Charleston Pittsburgh South Carolina National Lawyers Committee
How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 1 d ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
Donald Trump reportedly spent $70K to style his hair during 'The Apprentice'

All Things Considered

02:48 min | 1 d ago

Donald Trump reportedly spent $70K to style his hair during 'The Apprentice'

"The New York Times reported on Donald Trump's tax returns, one detail stood out too many. Trump claimed that he spent $70,000 on hairstyling for his reality, show The Apprentice and classified it as a business expense so that he could deduct it from his tax bill. And that made NPR's Tom Dreisbach wonder is that legal? When people get in trouble with the IRS. They might call a lawyer like Sam Brotman in San Diego. Could I just ask you have you ever dealt with a case with someone who claimed a haircut as a deduction? No, I haven't. We've had a lot of strange deductions in this firm without a car rentals trips to Vegas, but a hair beauty salon type of staff is very, very difficult to pass off. It's because it is illegal to claim a personal expense as a business expense. Still, the line between personal and business can be blurry. And over the years, people have tried to make the case to the IRS people like Richard Drake in the 19 sixties, Drake served in the Army and the Army required him to get a haircut every two weeks. So Drake figure that's a business expense, and he deducted 50 bucks for haircuts. The text court disagreed and found that expenses for everyday grooming are inherently personal, even for soldiers. It would have say You're a performer and you need to look or sound a certain way to get jobs like the actor Ned Sparks. You got a swell voice and a great personality. You're different. You got class that sparks in the movie the gold diggers of 1933. You might have heard that when he said the word class. There was a slight whistle. Will sparks heard it, too. And so we got dentures to fix it at tax time, he wrote off the cost of those dentures as a business expense. Because he said he'd lose jobs without fixing his teeth. But the court said it would be difficult to imagine anything more personal than a set of false teeth denied again. Courts of referenced both of those cases when judging whether people can write off hair care, and that brings us to Donald Trump in 2000 for while promoting the Apprentice, Trump said his hair care was actually pretty simple. You know what I do I take a shower, wash it. I then comb it. I then said it and then I spray it and it's good for the day. But Trump's taxes claim more went into the hair. In just a wash. Koman spray a lot more 70,000. Is that the number? That's the number that's a big number. And that's Jennifer blew in and accounting professor at the Wharton Business School, she says if Trump paid that money for his everyday look That is most likely illegal. But she says there may be an exception if the president was having his hair done right as he was on the set of the apprentice, pinning down the hair in a certain way to be on screen. Then that expense would be potentially deductible. That is, if Trump rather than the show paid for it.

Donald Trump Ned Sparks Richard Drake IRS Wharton Business School Tom Dreisbach Sam Brotman NPR The New York Times Jennifer Vegas San Diego Army President Trump Professor
NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

All Things Considered

03:17 min | 1 d ago

NPR News Interviews Professor Anita Hill

"Considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly has enough changed in the three years since the Harvey Weinstein story broke and the me to movement took off. A new report finds that for Hollywood and the entertainment business, the answer is no. The Hollywood Commission, a nonprofit that works to eradicate harassment and discrimination in the industry. Surveyed entertainment workers nationwide and found many are staying silent because they fear retaliation. Or they don't believe people in positions of power will be held to account. The chair of the commission is Anita Hill, who, of course, has fought her own battles over getting allegations of sexual harassment taken seriously. She accused now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas of harassment and testified. Under oath back in 1991. Professor Hill joins us now welcome back to all things considered. I'm glad to speak with you again. I'm happy to be here. Tell me what surprised you in the survey results Well, the standout data was the data on accountability. We ask people Do you think that a person of higher rank Who was found to have our asked a person of lower rank would be held accountable and what we found is that 64% of the people we surveyed said that in fact, that person would not be held accountable. I suppose that's the thing that surprised me. I mean, on the one hand, it's not surprising that we're dealing with such deeply entrenched culture and history here. On the other hand, it's been three years of me, too, in the spotlight, and many powerful men have been held to account. You're you're absolutely right. We've seen some very high profile cases. And what we want to make sure is that it doesn't stop with just a few high profile cases. We know that they are problems throughout. Workplaces, and we want to make sure that everybody, whatever their position is Can count on being heard. So that's one piece of this. The other is persuading people who believe they're being harassed, have been harassed that they have a safe path to come forward and report it. I remember interviewing you, Professor Hill. Always. Almost exactly. Two years ago, September 2018 on we were talking because it was in the middle of the confirmation battle over Brett Kavanaugh. And we talked about the the personal cost of choosing to come forward. What do you say to someone who's weighing whether to do so or not? Well, you're absolutely right. There are personal cost. But even when people are willing to take the risk, there are other things that they're considering. People don't come forward because they think they won't be taken seriously. Unfortunately, the Cavanagh hearing really gave the impression that the Senate Judiciary Committee Did not take Christine Bozzi. Ford's claim seriously, and people see that example and becomes, you know what they think will happen to them.

Professor Hill Harassment Hollywood Commission Npr News Mary Louise Kelly Ari Shapiro Hollywood Harvey Weinstein Brett Kavanaugh Ford Clarence Thomas Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Cavanagh Christine Bozzi
Notre Dame president apologizes for no mask at White House

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:35 sec | 1 d ago

Notre Dame president apologizes for no mask at White House

"Of Notre Dame's president has issued an apology for not wearing a mascot, a White House event. After pictures surfaced online of him, shaking hands and sitting shoulder to shoulder with people without one. Reverend John Jenkins attended the Rose Garden ceremony Saturday for Judge Amy Cockney Barrett. President Trump Supreme Court nominee Jenkins was there because Barrett is a Notre Dame alumna and a professor at the law school. The South been Tribune reports that Reverend Jenkins also pointed out that upon arrival, he another guest received rapid response code. 19 tests

Reverend Jenkins Judge Amy Cockney Barrett President Trump Supreme Court White House Tribune Rose Garden Professor
Cities Experiment With Remedy for Poverty: Cash, No Strings Attached

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 2 d ago

Cities Experiment With Remedy for Poverty: Cash, No Strings Attached

"Now experimenting with a remedy for poverty, and that would be cash. No strings attached. That's just Ah, what he's already doing right? Yes, he's doing that other cities are not following suit. Critics point to several potential drawbacks. First. If only people below a certain income, received the transfers and aren't required to work. They may hesitate to take a job quote giving money to people no strings attached. Changes behavior, said Douglas. Bashar. Al, He's a professor of public policy at the University of Maryland. Quote. We create incentives. We don't like her want unquote,

Bashar Professor Of Public Policy AL University Of Maryland Douglas
Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

Short Wave

12:37 min | 2 d ago

Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

"So, you just got back from the Gulf coast where you were covering Hurricane Laura. How was your trip? The, hurricane damage was really bad. You know a lot of people down there have lost their homes, which is hard to see. Yeah and just to remind everybody Laura was the one that hit the Texas Louisiana border in August. This storm is clearly roaring. You're reaching that critical moment here. This now joins an elite group. It's in the top ten, a small elite group of the most dangerous hurricanes to ever make landfall into the US residents along the Gulf coast are bracing for potential devastation, Hurricane Lara and that area is so flat. It is so full of petrochemical facilities to their these refineries, a lot of new natural gas infrastructure, their chemical plants that manufacture all sorts of things like plastics and solvents actually even the raw materials for p. p. e., a lot of them are manufactured. Rubber gloves and surgical masks. So so what happened when the hurricane of hit all of that a lot of them shut down and when petrochemical facilities shutdown they usually release a lot of pollution right stuff that can't safely sit in pipes. So it has to be released or burn and preliminary estimates just in Texas showed that more than four million extra pounds of pollution were released. That was actually before the storm even made landfall. But the reason I wanted to talk to you is because one chemical plant caught fire because of the storm that is a look at I ten, which has now been shut down as these plumes of smoke emerged about an hour ago. The governor now is confirming this as a chemical fire has made an emergency crews responded to the inferno at via lab in Lake Charles which manufacturers pull supplies. Okay. So we've we've talked about this on the show before it didn't chemical plant in Texas catch fire after another hurricane Hurricane Harvey. Ago Yes and we talked about it on this very podcast because that fire in Texas started this totally new kind of legal battle, a climate change criminal lawsuit, and I have to say so far there is no indication that this most recent fire will lead to similar litigation but with this really active hurricane season that we're having in the super hot water in the Gulf of Mexico hoping spawn these strong. Storms head right for America's petrochemical centers I thought it might be a good moment to revisit that story and the questions that raises. So this episode, we're going to hear that story. It's a story that asks this question can companies and the people who work for them be held responsible, even sent to prison for failing to adequately prepare for climate change, you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Becky, take us back to the beginning of this story. So it's a story that happened in twenty seventeen at a chemical plant near Houston Texas, and it's when this major hurricane struck. We are coming on the air for breaking news. This is Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Harvey barreling into the Texas coastline as a category four storm with one hundred and thirty mile an hour winds. It's yeah, I remember. Hervey was kind of unique because it made landfall and then it just kind of stopped and sat on top of Texas, just dumping and Dumping Rain. Some places got as much as sixty inches of rain. There was a lot of flooding obviously, our primary layer of protection was our power supply. When the storm hit we lost our primary power. You're hearing a guy who is a division president at one of those petrochemical companies that was overwhelmed by the flooding. His name is Richard. Rendered the company he helped run it's called Arkham. We brought in emergency generators to provide backup power. So what he's describing his in the aftermath of the storm, those generators were compromised. There's this intense effort to keep the power on at the Arkansas plant outside Houston. The plant is near a major highway. It's in a relatively residential area. So why were they fighting so hard to keep the power on basically because the plant was full of chemicals that have to be refrigerated Otherwise they catch fire. We do have that breaking news that we've been bringing you throughout the five o'clock hour this brand new explosion and a fire burning. As we speak the Arkham plant in Crosby, you can see that plume of black smoke billowing into the air. In fact, you can see it for miles and miles away. So they make organic peroxides which are. Volatile Chemicals, they're used to manufacture plastics and other stuff and organic rock sides are pretty hazardous because they can catch fire if they get warm right and they don't even need a spark, right. So organic peroxides contain both fuel and oxygen and when they become unstable, they heat up on their own and catch fire. Yeah. I can really hear that PhD coming through. So the Arima plant, it had a lot of refrigerated warehouses and buildings to keep these chemicals cold, and they also have a bunch of refrigerated trailers outside those warehouses. Okay. So talk me through it. What happened that resulted in the accident so harvey was stalled over the Houston area, just dumping rain for days and the refrigerated warehouses, the buildings they were flooding as the warehouses flooded. The employees were using forklifts to move containers of these chemicals from one refrigerated warehouse to another to try to keep them dry and cool, and the water just kept getting higher and higher and the electrical generators for the buildings started. Flood that's not good and then the forklift flooded. Okay. So would you do when you're forklift floods? So according to the US chemical, Safety Board investigation employees at the plant started carrying individual jugs of these highly flammable liquids in the dark my chest high water while it was still raining to get it to the refrigerated trailers we talked about because only the trailer still had power. Yeah. I read this report and it was terrifying like I can't imagine being one of those people still there as they're in like deep water trying to move these chemicals at one point, one of the trailer started to turn over. On their side. It was really like super scary. Yeah and you might be able to guess what happens next the trailers flooded they weren't refrigerated anymore the chemicals got warmer and warmer until they caught fire. So did people get hurt when the fire started in the plant? Well, the plant had been evacuated. So the employees were okay that we know of but there were some first responders who say they were injured while they were patrolling the area that had been evacuated specifically that there is and respiratory tracts were urinated by air contamination and there were some people who live nearby who also say they were injured. By the smoke and the ash from the fires. So we knew the chemicals themselves can be toxic was the smoke from them toxic as well. That's a good question. So when the chemicals burned, they actually just turned into carbon dioxide and water, but I talked to multiple organic chemists and they explained that the problem is actually the containers that were being burned a chemist at Bryn Mawr. College Name Michelle Francis explained it this way everything from the labels on things to whatever plastic or metal that the containers are made out of all that stuff is GonNa absorb other chemicals that didn't burn entirely. So the ashes nasty. The ashes nasty so that ash is made up of container junk and chemicals that didn't totally burn. That's the stuff that potentially could have harmed the first responders and the people close by and it's not something you ideally want in the air or water right so much. So that in two thousand, eighteen, the district attorney's Office for Harris County Texas announced criminal charges against the plant manager who was actually one of the people carrying those chemicals through the water. And Armas North American CEO, and later they also filed charges against a third person and executive at the company which was really surprising to a lot of people because in general, the criminal courts aren't used to punish companies in their employees for polluting the air and water especially when it happens during big storms and I went down to Houston interviewed the district attorney about it. Her name is Kim Og-. The. Charges are environmental. They are reckless emission of an air contaminant and endangerment of persons. Reckless emissions of an air contaminant feels like a bunch of words that be polluting lawyers like. Big Words. So why did she say she was filing these charges you mentioned that there were a lot of petrochemical plants around Houston that flooded and leak stuff during Hurricane Harvey is there something about these fires that was worse? Yeah I asked her that and one argument she made is that the fires happened because people at Arkham ignored the risk of flooding like they should have known that their plant could flood like that and prepared better. For example, the plant is in a flood plain and even though Harvey dumped more rain than any US storm on record the argument the county is making. Is that there were signs that flood risk was increasing before harvey because of Climate Change we've had new normal in Houston. We've had three five hundred year floods in just a short period of time, and it's true that flooding is getting more frequent and severe in. Houston as it is in many parts of the country and something climate models have been predicting for a long time that extreme rain will get more likely as earth hotter including rain from hurricanes. So in this case, the county is basically arguing that the company had a responsibility to recognize that flood risk was increasing and do. More to keep their chemicals from catching fire. So obviously, the company doesn't agree or they wouldn't be in the middle of a trial right now what is the company say? So after the indictments for announced, I interviewed two of the layers representing Komo and its employees. One of them is pretty well known in Houston been working for a really long time. His name is Rusty Harden Arkham did everything they were supposed to do here hardened says the company followed all the regulations it's required to follow. He seemed pretty galled that employees were facing criminal charges trying to find scapegoats and calling individuals felons. Are you kidding me this is outrageous. It's morally legally ethically wrong and the point he made is that if the current regulations for chemical companies in flood prone areas aren't enough. Then the regulations should be changed by legislatures not by courts and especially he argues by criminal courts sometimes bad things happen that there's no crime. There's no responsibility is not anyone's fault we need to look forward to. The future and make sure that we are prepared for these kinds of things if this is going to be the new norm in many think it is. Okay. So becky, like what is at stake in this trial if the county wins and the company loses will that change how we think about climate change in the law it could actually yeah, I talked to this Guy David Omen he's. A law professor at the University of Michigan, and one thing he said that I think is really interesting is that environmental laws and regulations are generally based on this underlying assumption that the future will look like the past today. Already, we expect companies to be prepared to handle what I might call ordinary rainfall. What climate change is going to do among other things is change our definition of what is ordinary rainfall. Another way to understand it in a legal context is that you can be held accountable and punished. If you don't prepare for something, you should have seen coming. It's the idea of foreseeability so. Like if you know that climate change is happening, does that mean it's foreseeable and you should prepare for it yet that's the big question exactly and how foreseeable extreme weather is hinges in part on how businesses inform themselves about the climate science that's available to them, right? Yeah. Like I talked to an environmental lawyer at the Conservation Law Foundation Alina Mehalle that foreseeability isn't just a question of did you personally know that this could happen but it's really what kind of maps were available to you. What kind of experts did you hire to inform yourself about this decision? What kind of modeling

Houston Hurricane Harvey Texas Arkham United States Harvey Hurricane Laura Hurricane Lara Becky Gulf Coast Volatile Chemicals Texas Louisiana Laura America Conservation Law Foundation
Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 2 d ago

Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

"Government backed commission of its kind is about to start investigating a harrowing part of the state's history. The Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission has set out to document the state's 42 known racial lynchings. The panel delivered an interim report to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan earlier this month. Charles Davis Jr is the commission's vice chairman. He joins us now to share the commission's plans and goals for this project. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me so tell us. Where did the idea to create this commission originally come from? Sure, most historical scholarship concerning racial terror lynching is centered in the deep South. And so you have states such as Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi and the like who get noticed for their history of racial tear. However, it's important for people to understand that lynching took place throughout the United States. I'm in. One of those states that is often overlooked is a state of Maryland. And so we call Maryland the middle ground in many ways, because it represented like most border states, a style that was southern but also had a progressive leaning on. So this oftentimes caused the state to be overlooked in terms of looking at the legacy of racial terror and tell us what are the primary goals of this commission. The commission is tasked with investigating lynchings that took place in the 19th and 20th century in Maryland, and we are centered and focused on salvaging the humanity, first of the victim's arm and then really laying out each case individually and hopefully bring about some semblance of Justice to the family members in the descendants of the deceased victims. Can you talk about a specific case that the commission is investigating? Right now? Sure. Yes, we're looking into the lynching of Matthew Williams, which took place in Salisbury, Maryland, in 1931, and so Matthew Williams was a young labourer who got into a dispute with his employer over discrepancies in his pay Following that his employer was founded. And Williams was actually hospitalized after the employer's son shot him and the lynch mob descended upon the hospital and drug him out of the first floor window. And the lynching commenced. And he was eventually taken to the drug to the courthouse lawn in front of thousands, along with local law enforcement politicians, religious leaders who did nothing. Eventually, as if that wasn't enough. He was eventually burned, and no one was ever held accountable. And no one was ever held accountable. So what does the commission do with a case like this? Today. Your ultimate goal I imagine is trying to figure out exactly what happened to Matthew Williams. Yes, And that is the ultimate goal. And it's important to note that we see the racial terror lynchings of old that took place in Maryland. Directly in relationship to the ongoing racial tear that we're witnessing in the United States. And so that's important to consider when we're looking at this and investigating this today in this fractured America that we're seeing, as relates to race relations on DSO. Yes, The truth is what we're seeking getting to the bottom of it, seeing who indeed was complicity and involved whether it was locals on state government officials because we believed that the descendents are owed this truth. Is the state. I'm in what we hope the citizens of Maryland and decisions of nine states learn from this work that we're undertaking is that truth comes first. And if we have the truth in there could one day possibly be Reconciliation. Charles Davis Jr is the vice chairman of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission. And he is an assistant professor of conflict resolution and history at George Mason University. Thank you very much for

Maryland United States Reconciliation Commission Matthew Williams Assistant Professor Vice Chairman Larry Hogan George Mason University Salisbury Arkansas America Mississippi Lynch Alabama
Time Travel Theoretically Possible Without Leading To Paradoxes, Researchers Say

Kottke Ride Home

03:29 min | 2 d ago

Time Travel Theoretically Possible Without Leading To Paradoxes, Researchers Say

"An undergraduate at the University of Queensland has apparently proven that time travel without paradoxes is possible. This is from a new paper published last week in the journal classical and quantum gravity by the student Germane to bar and his professor Fabio Kosta quoting popular mechanics. The math itself is complex, but it boils down to something fairly simple time travel discussion focuses on closed time like curves or CTC's something Albert Einstein I posited until Barton cost say that as long as. Just two pieces of an entire scenario within a C. T. C. or still in causal order when you leave the rest is subject to local free will I results show that C. T. C.'s are not only compatible with determinism and with the local free choice of operations but also with a rich and diverse range of scenarios in dynamical processes, their paper concludes end quote. In other words stepping on a butterfly during a dinosaur hunting expedition would not entirely change the present world returned to and the way Mardi MC fly prevented his parents from meeting or accidentally left behind a sports ALMANAC for biff defined would not drastically change his present reality either. Instead, the mathematical research shows that time travel would be more akin to vendors endgame something that matches the findings from Los, Alamos Laboratory earlier this summer. Side No. Los. Alamos is also one of the few labs messing around with plutonium. So All I'm saying is if you see a delorean cruising around New Mexico, maybe watch out. But essentially, the findings say that you can go back to the past and mess with things a little bit but it will basically smooth over and eventually lead to the same results preventing things like the grandfather paradox in which you go back in time, kill your own grandfather, and then prevent yourself the time traveller from ever existing. To Warren constant used relevant example from our present time to put their complex math into plain language quoting a press statement by the researchers say you traveled in time in an attempt to stop covid nineteen patient zero from being exposed to the virus? However, if you stopped that individual from becoming infected that would eliminate the motivation for you to go back and stop the pandemic in the first place this is a paradox been inconsistency that often leads people to think that time travel cannot occur in our universe. Logically, it's hard to accept because that would affect our freedom to make any arbitrary action. It would mean you can time travel. You cannot do anything that would cause a paradox to occur. In the coronavirus patient zero example, you might try and stop patient zero from becoming infected, but in doing so you would catch the virus and would become patient zero or someone else would no matter what you did. The salient events would just recalibrate around you try. As you might to create a paradox, the events will always adjust themselves to avoid any inconsistency end quotes. So our timelines are a bit more self-correcting than we thought and trying to adjust the time line. We're currently living in to go back to one where perhaps a different person won an election and the berinstain bears are still the Bernstein bears probably isn't going to happen. As NPR quoted from Stephen, King's time travel novel eleven twenty to sixty three about trying to prevent the Kennedy assassination quotes. The past is obdurate. It doesn't want to be changed.

LOS University Of Queensland Fabio Kosta C. T. C. Albert Einstein Alamos Alamos Laboratory Professor Biff New Mexico Bernstein Barton NPR Warren Stephen Kennedy King
Interview with Kamala Harris

On One with Angela Rye

05:16 min | 4 d ago

Interview with Kamala Harris

"Senator. Harris. It is so great. Our refrain from calling you Connell today because I think it's important that they put respect on your names on the start lead. By example we know you are in the middle of debate prep. I wish I was in the room with you to give you some one liners but hopefully we can get you ready and most comfortable today how you doing how you feeling I am well Angeles so good to see you and I just wanted to thank everybody. Chairman Russell for that introduction. Thank you for mentioning not only the head of the NAACP. But also my pastor Dr Amos Brown thank you to dare Johnson for your ongoing leadership. We talk. So often these days about the importance of everything that is at stake and making sure everyone's voice is heard. So it's good to be with everyone and Angela. It's so good to see a good. You know one day at a time thirty, nine days before. An election that will determine the course of A. History generations to come. Here will and with that are WanNa because I know that part of what's happening in debate Prebisch, they gotta get you with rapid round. So in my favorite things to do for the PODCAST is irap around part of that is to just loosen up you're ready to just die right in we WANNA consider family. So, here we got less third. Okay. You are Proud Aka how y'all normally greet each other. With a hug. A not but not during cove it. Okay with what are you guys say with the low thing you say Greeting sorer. Along elite but I. Know when when you go through the process of becoming one, then we can have that confidence. Not Happening I am black in that Greek I'm Eddie reg out. Okay negatively. Did, you know that you an suit dog share birthday. I did I actually did. And I talked to him recently. About voting actually. About all of US voting yeah. Yeah that's that's really important right now. Yeah. Okay your favorite professor at Howard. Oh. Doctor How skains. I there were so many but I'll start with him. He was yeah he was one of one of the the ones who had been a a real barrier breaker in his own career in life and But. You know there's so many and the thing about the professors at Howard. Is that they were the best in the brightest in their field, they could have taught anywhere that they wanted to teach, but they chose to teach us, and in that way really inspired us in ways that very special and long lasting. Well now they're Howard has their their commercial from this to this little plug. We've keep going round. Okay. Go through the. But. HEC. That is but no truly that isn't Hvac experience and. Universal in that way Okay who threw the best shea during the Democratic primary debates you've gotTa pick one. Beside myself. Okay. Now, you can say you're so you could save yourself. Okay with. You in the morning. Oh A combination of things but prob read is one of the first I do. Favorite thing to cook the people don't know you can slay down in the kitchen with yes by. A roast chicken it's kind of my go-to. Annan, a best rapper alive. To Pop. He lives on. I I to. Listen West Coast girl think to park lives on. I'm with you. I'm with you so. He Goering, doing that. On. WHO WOULD I say? I mean there's so many i. mean you know it I. There are some that I would not mention right now because they should stay in their lane. But. Others, I. WanNa. Know who? Keep moving. Didn't that was not supposed to be comfy there about. Okay Aka was founded. When and where? In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight at Howard you. Okay person who you would fan girl over the most if you met them right now. Angela, why are you doing this to me? The person I would fan girl the most. I don beyond say.

Howard Angela Naacp Eddie Reg Dr Amos Brown Connell United States Senator. Harris Chairman Prebisch Russell Johnson A. History Goering Annan Professor
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

12:05 min | 4 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Going into it thinking. I'm going to design an experiment. I'm going to do an experiment and see which is best. I probably would have done it differently in recorded things differently and that but I didn't. It was just part of what I was doing as a teachers. I'm going to try this and see if it works in a probably won't so who cares. That's okay there's always next year and won't harm them too much and so yeah so the tough thing about doing scholarship of teaching and learning is that you know to do in a study that has this level of control. You really have to plan it very well. Ahead you know not only in terms of the actual content of what you're delivering but getting Irbe full everything like that. And I don't know about you Kevin but I think a lot of bull lament that they get their teaching assignments very late or they change or a pandemic happens. You know so. It's very challenging to plan ahead so very often. We're doing a lot of the scholarship of teaching learning retrospectively. So looking back at and saying okay. Well was there something define in that in this course rather than having the opportunity is to design it in advance? So I personally know knockoff. Topic really excited about everything that will hopefully come out of what we're going through right now in terms of teaching and you know comparing face to face for zone line results and I'm sure some are trying to very tightly replicate their in class experience and some are totally going a different direction and you know I think time will tell which is the right way to go under the circumstances that we're all in right now so you know type back to the whole point of the article about engagement. I think we're going to find that. There are so many ways to engage students online that we haven't thought about and I've had several experiences teaching online and not having that face to face lecture in going into that thinking. You know. This isn't going to be as fun. Or how will I know that they don't understand and if I can't see their faces and things like that but they're so first of all in all our learning management systems are so many tools to engage with students? There's also you know if you are dealing with students that may be aren't intrinsically motivated by the material will you can engage them by doing little things like frequent frequent quizzing or frequent little mini assignments. That maybe don't count for very much but giving them stuff to do on a couple of times a week that they have to be checking in with the course and then you know rather than something. I was calling my online lectures when I teach are sort of more of an online conversation that goes throughout the week at my previous institution. We had voice thread and I really liked that all night. Haven't found one. That can do the same thing yet where I can post the slides with Audio Narration. And they can listen to one slide at a time so it's not like a video that you have to watch the whole thing but then right on that same slide with my audio track. A student can text or record either audio or video a question so throughout the week part of their assignment was to ask or answer. You know two or three questions on that slide set basically so the mice slides or you know what would be the traditional in class. Lecture Became living discussion board. That went throughout the week. So it wasn't just a one and done type thing and it gives students at least from the feedback so much more time to digest the material than they would in one class because they had questions that occurred to them four or five hours after class was over and they would just forget to shoot often email or not bother and things like that so this is one example. There's so many other ways to interact with students online than in the only have him for class or office hours which nobody attends anyway but some raising. I learned something really cool every time I talk to Krista. I'd never heard of that tool. That's that's amazing. I'm going to investigate that a little bit further for myself but as you mentioned there are so many tools out there and that's part of the fun of some of these organizations like hats and triple A. And so on that you really can't. That's why I keep tuning into as many of those town hall meetings. I can't because I want to hear what other people are doing. That always gives me ideas on not necessarily doing it the way they're doing it but it gives me an idea for how. I can tweak what I'm already doing in help with evolution that I talked about that. Not only that my podcast but applies to our teaching. I think we're paying attention as teachers were. We're also evolving as teachers in the you know you mentioned the interaction. Something that I have found is I I think I have better rapport. Or maybe I should say I. I get to know my students a little bit more deeply in an online class compared to at least the larger regular traditional lecture classes just because of the way it set up you can really have those individual conversations but you also learn more about them and I think there are some people I've mentioned on podcast the number of times that. I'm naturally an introvert in so I'm not you wouldn't know it sometimes it meetings but The I wouldn't necessarily in a class be the first person to raise my hand. It's not until I get very comfortable with being a student in that class and get comfortable with the instructor and get comfortable with my classmates that I'm ready to do that. And there are some students who never reached that level of comfort and being online. It's sort of like social media where you hear from people that you don't normally wouldn't expect to hear from very much of course that has a dark side to it in social media where you'd rather not hear what some of those people have to say but online works out well and you can really engage students more and you learn more about them as people as individual people and and I think having those kinds of connections really engages me. Moore's an instructor in there's been some you know quite a bit of research that shows that students who feel connected to at least one faculty member tend to stay in school longer. It'd be more successful in end up really achieving the degree that they not necessarily the same decree that came in for but achieving degree and And there are you know. Unfortunately so many students who don't get that far but if we can engage them then they can and and you can really do that in online education and I know a lot of people that haven't done much of that. Don't believe it but I can see you shaking your head by the way where were connected. Not only by audio video is we're doing this. We didn't record the video. But we're just recording the audio so I can See KRISTA shaking her head. It's funny that A few hours ago I did as soon Paul sort of a reunion with three of my students from my online pathophysiology class last summer and They were always working together. You know they kind of came into school together. They're all doing. Emt hours and all applying PA school at the same time and all of them had really unique things to say about how the class summer got them to think differently. Just about themselves The way that they learn and then how much. They're applying not toot my own horn about my class but how much they're applying that material in their daily daily life getting clinical hours and things like that and but the point is that in a year later. You know I'm doing zoom call. Because they wanted to catch up with me and I was that professor that has stuck with the three of them And that that's what a privilege that is for what we do. You know to have professors that I still think about end. I wish I could. I guess I could tell them that. Maybe I will. This'll be good inspiration. But there's a couple and they made such a humongous difference. You know whether not even their class but just the way that a approached me as a student trusted me as a student believed in me and what that got me through at times. You know it's immeasurable. So why not be that professor and you can absolutely do that online Like you mentioned. I got to know my students so much more usually because the classes are smaller but they don't necessarily have to be there's a lot organically built-in more room in time to approach your professor when it's you don't feel like you're bothering them because class just ended in their off to somewhere else so it it gives you that natural breathing. Room to meet whatever's more convenient for your schedules. It allows more time. You know that than maybe you would feel like you had with professor in person. There reminded me something you just said about. You know you have those teachers in your own history that you think about it. Maybe a shade reach back and talk to him and and I've done that a couple of times in my career but an assignment. I've given some of my students in the happy program ungraded assignment and I don't check up on him but I tell them your assignment is to go find one of your old professors or or even a high school teacher. That really made a difference in your life and just try to track him down reach out to him and say hey. I appreciate you even if it's just that short and I think the neighbor were this on. I think I saw something that this is like National Teachers Day or World Teachers Day or something like that. So I'm giving you an assignment dear. Podcast list your assignment is to go to their one teacher. Reach out to him somewhere. There probably hold up somewhere not here. Many people are GonNa WanNa hear from you because we all know that you all know that. I know that Krista just mentioned that that we as instructors. That's where it is. That's where it is for us and so to hear the feedback that we really made that connection with our teacher is going to be golden to them another. I have for anyone listening to this. Podcast is to give some feedback on this journal club idea and on how you think this episode went. What suggestions you have for future episodes. And we're going to be doing this as an occasional kind of thing so it's not you know every episode is not going to be a journal club. But we're going to be doing this regularly. So we need that feedback so that we know for the next one. We have some ideas that we can work with as we kind of mull this into whatever shape it's GonNa finally take and Krista it's always a pleasure talking to you I really appreciate The assignment gave me early on in reading this paper. And it's one that I would not probably have run across myself. would not have popped out to me but I'm glad we read it so We'll paper that. We have some debate about because I think we pretty there. We agreed on our. That'll be interesting to when that happens. But if anybody listening has Something that they would like to debate us on regarding that or have an opposing opinion. Or whatever then go ahead and and shoot that to us and You know we we might be able to get it on the air. We might address it in a future journal club or something like that and if anybody has good articles that they want to suggest as well go ahead and in some that into the podcasts. Top Line or podcast at the Professor Dot Org and I'll pass that along to Krista and we can go from there so Krista. It's been a lot of fun. I'M LOOKING FORWARD TO OUR NEXT JOURNAL. Club senior.

Krista professor instructor Kevin Professor Dot Org PA school teacher Paul Moore faculty member
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:42 min | 4 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Elizabeth F Barkley once wrote student. Engagement is the product of motivation and active learning is a product rather than a some because it will not occur if either element is missing. Welcome to the. Anp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Heaven Pat in this episode. I talk about a seminar on running concepts and KRISTA Polski joins us for a journal Club about content delivery style a.

KRISTA Polski Elizabeth F Barkley Anp professor Club
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:17 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A if we want to have a different version of anyone attempt of anyone test and we want to allow at least three attampts. Whoa that's a lot of different tests to right. Isn't it allow unlimited tests? Which is the direction which I've been having then. Wow we need a Jillian versions of each test. Any of that is pretty much impossible right or is it impossible. Not only is it possible. It's fairly easy not super easy but fairly easy. All the learning management systems have the ability to use. What I'M GONNA call a question set but each has its own name for this feature. Here's how it works for test item. One I ride three versions. They could be three different ways to ask the same question or they could be three different aspects of the concept that I want to assess in test item one for example it could be three different examples of cardiac muscle tissue to identify or it could be one. Each of three major types of muscle tissue when a student takes attempt one one of those three items in the questions that will be presented as test item one in their next attempt. It could be the same item presented or more likely one of the other two versions because it's randomly selected by the learning management system. Even if it's the same item one that they saw in their first test attempt each item in the task. Let's say fifty items total we'll be similarly randomized so yeah okay. Test Item? One is the same as they've seen before. But maybe probably all or most of the other forty-nine items on attempt to will be different than they've seen before as with a slot machine having three items in each question site for fifty test items will generate now on your seats here. It'll generate seven point two times ten to the twenty third different possible test attempt versions. Yeah that's all right. It's it's more than a mole of different versions. The thing is I usually have more than three items per questions. I divide up. I want my students to know in the fifty categories some of which overlap because I want to attack some things at different levels of understanding or application or style of test item. Then once I get going and I'm constructing three items from my first category or my first question set you know what I always think of a fourth item which boxing idea for fifth item Mandalay that but for multiple choice and matching items I can set the LMS to randomize the choices. So I've got another billion Brazilian versions of that test being generated because not only is the LMS picking random items out of a question set of three or four or five. It's also scrambling up the choices within a multiple choice or matching item. When I first started doing this back in two thousand and two I got a math. Professor help calculate the possible number of versions on any one of my tests and her calculator could not go that high. It just gave an error being a math professor. She had a pretty powerful calculator. And you know what that's all I needed to know. I didn't need to know the exact number I just needed to know. It blew out the math professor's calculator so that was good enough for me. That is good enough to ensure the my students weren't getting the same test and every attempt of course I waited until the semester started to begin making my first time hoops ship. It started that way and advanced so well so heavy days that first semester. When I came home from school I immediately set my timer for twenty minutes and wrote as many test items as I could before the timer went off doing that every day. Yeah it was a chore. But really twenty minutes was not that big of a chore and it became a habit so it really wasn't that hard to sit down and do it for twenty minutes every day. Because that's just kind of what I got used to. After my first test was done I was really getting good at writing test items and getting faster and faster about coming up with good test. Items and his students were taking attempts of their first test. While I was working on test to they were taking the first test. And they were giving me feedback on. Which items were poorly constructed or just odd or Fulla? Typo is or something was wrong with it. I could claim that I did that on purpose. But I didn't know I just got started late but it did turn out to have that silver lining then the next time I taught that course it was easy to add a few more test items to some of the question sets of course I was by now a seasoned pro at test item writing something. I'd always dreaded it because I didn't feel like I was any good at it. But all that retrieval practice gave me a certain level of mastery mentally mastery of test item writing but I also gained insights about the AP concepts that. I was considering for test items. I lived through it and I'm a better person for it or at least a slightly better person for and so yeah like any new project. It seems intimidating but it's like a very long walking trip. You take one step at a time and I don't know if you walked for twenty minutes a day four days a week for two sixteen week. Semesters you'll end up having walked more than one hundred twenty five miles probably with no injuries. No collapsing on the roadside. No dehydration just a smile on your face. So do it one step at a time and you can do it to me and I also want to mention some icing that I put on that retrieval practice cake and decorations after all. Isn't that cake that much better when it has icing and grains one thing? I did that helped a lot. The icing was give students an online pre-test before much of the course and online attempt taken from that huge test bank that built over that coming modules content because I told them to expect to fail it but they had to take it to unlock the videos and other learning resources for the coming module honestly it took a while to convince them not to read ahead and not to study not to prepare for it. It was merely to give them a peek at what they be expected to know later. But we're not in any way expected to know yet and you know what those pretexts helped a lot now. The cake decorations consisted of making my online tests. Cumulative every test had questions from all the previous tests the really important questions the core concepts the big ideas. Yeah of course. They balked at that one. I I told them who wouldn't. We've all learned. The cumulative tests are scary. But it didn't take them long to realize that those questions from prior modules were the easy questions to answer on a new test and by the time they got through a few tests. Those questions got even easier because they kept seeing those kinds of questions again and again questions on those topics cap coming up so they grew to love cumulative testing. I know that sounds weird. I know don't believe me but I swear it's true and I know what you're thinking that if we're doing all formative testing and it's open book and students can even consult with each other than well. Can we trust that? They've actually learned anything that they have any knowledge in their heads that they can use without a book without asking anyone and also there on the right track. Well the answer to that is an emphatic. And wholehearted yes. How do I know that? And how can I be so confident about it? It's because when I first started this and for many years thereafter I also did to summit of exams to see whether all that retrieval practice worked. And you know what it did. Not only students walk into their exams with more confidence. They did way better on them. Then my pass classes had done on their exams before I started doing. Any of his formative testing possibly part of that improvement came from their confidence. But I'm sure that a lot of it came from all those open book formative tests and my students told me that they not only felt confident on exam day. They also told me that they tried to cram for the exam but found that well. There just wasn't any need to as they prepared to cram the night before an age old ritual. They felt compelled to perform they realized as they reviewed the course content that kind of knew it all and knew it pretty. Well so yeah. I don't have any problem thinking that. The formative testing alone gave them what they needed. There's more to my story of retrieval practice in the AP course and a lot of that story is told in previous episodes and in seminar that I have available in the links and the show notes episode page. But before I wrap it up for now I want to mention that I really think it works. Best if we write our own test items most of the time sure the test items at the end of textbook chapters in study guides in online study or quizzing programs and the like are all useful tools and have their place and learning. But I've grown to like making my own and I think if I use my own test items that integrate easily with the way I tell the story of amp it works better for learning. But that's a discussion for another day. A in.

professor AP cardiac muscle dehydration Mandalay
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:49 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I've talked about this retrieval practice thing in past episodes so you may want go back and listen to the back catalogue you know as you walk your dog around your neighborhood at a safe distance from others but right now. I do want to summarize the essential way my implementation of retrieval practice works in case you WanNa try something like it or in case it sparks an idea for some little tweak that you can make to what you're already doing or are already planning for the next semester. I it's based on online open book tests. That open book thing seems heretical. I know all but really this is real life so I just needed to get over that and I'm glad I did because it turns out that this is the way that students achieve mastery by getting help when they need it. Just like in soccer or trout fishing and you know what isn't looking things up and consulting with peers. Something that the truly competent health professionals do all the time. Hey if they're taking care of me I'd rather they double check the proper dosage of that script. They're about to write for me or ask a colleague. Check my medical imaging before making a diagnosis. Why wouldn't I want my students to use those options in amp? The next thing is that I set my learning management system to serve the questions one at a time just like they do in the online board exams that most health professionals have to take to get licensed or to proceed from one stage of professional training to the next. I heard so many of my former students told me that this one time format raised their stress levels even higher than they already were walking into that board exam meaning maximum stress. Right after I'd been doing that for a while in my class I started hearing from former students that think. We're so glad that they've gotten used to doing that in my class. And then unlike some of their classmates who didn't have me for amp. My students didn't freak out when they had to do test items one at a time on their board tests. But you know what that's just gravy. The main reason I do the one in a time thing is that I'd found out that during in class testing some students had difficulty focusing when they were faced with many items on one page. Now I know you and I are used to. That are more likely. Our brains are just wired a certain way to allow us to focus on just one item on a page of many items but for some students probably each with their own unique set of neural pathways and connections the ability to see just one test item at a time helps them focus which means that it helps them to succeed next. I don't strictly time mine tests. There's usually a start date and an end date but not a limit of a certain number of minutes way back in two thousand and two when I first started doing you miss. I didn't plan on giving untying tests them up in my first one with a one hour time limit and it had to be on a certain date and within a certain limited window of time like ninety minutes guess what because I had at one of the highest number of students per semester at our college and because I was apparently the first professor in history of our college to give students one test item at a time there were too many hits on our server per hour and the learning management system started weasing and coffee in will. It simply stopped working for a while. Not what you'd want to happen. When two hundred and fifty students have a limited time to take a test right especially in amp test because those are always scary and even more so when it's an online test because remember this was almost twenty years ago when not very many students had ever taken an online test or at least. We're very comfortable with them then. Matt at our college certainly so I went to our staff and they advised me to stretch out the day to my test taking window and make my tests on timed of course that sticky frozen stay in my comfort zone. Part of my brain rebelled. What an untying tasks that they could take over the course of several hours or days but the alternative was the shutdown our server for my students and all students that are so. Yeah okay I relented and I think I kinda did pout. A little bit at least in my head I was pouting. You know what though it turned out to be a breakthrough on time? Testing is so freeing to the learning process and in so helpful to students with almost any kind of learning challenge. Which is everyone in my opinion. Sure eventually medical professionals will need to be able to answer things quickly on the spot but we should not expect them to start their should we? So okay maybe closed. The books notebooks and have some kind of time limit on a midterm or final exam. Maybe but really. I'm thinking of the closed. Books and timing should come at or near the end of their degree program. Not In my course at all and AIM P. They're still beginners even at the end of my course marketing support for this podcast is provided by. Half's the human anatomy and physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. As I've mentioned in the last.

soccer difficulty focusing professor Matt
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:46 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hey I have some exciting news. We have a new kind of segment plan for the next episode. Or maybe the one after that these days. I've learned that one must not make plans based on the world staying on. Anyone assumed trajectory but soon I hope what is it I can tell you. It's not a book club we already have one of those and won't be getting a new book club recommendation soon. So now it's not a book club. It's a journal. Club the ADP Professor Journal Club. And we have a new voice joining in for that one. It's a voice that we've heard before on this podcast and a voice that you may have heard before if you've been active in town hall meetings or in Triple A. Or any of a number of other venues including her own journal articles on teaching and learning. It's my friend. Krista Room Polski who is an associate professor at Moravian College in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and part of the ANC authoring team over at McGraw Hill? Every other month or so she'll be bringing us a journal Article She's found. That helps enlighten us about evidence based approaches to teaching amp. I have a link to the first journal. Article in the show notes in the episode. Page if you WANNA read ahead and perhaps send in your recorded reaction but you don't have to read ahead. Don't worry about that. Crystal will be summarizing. The article in the Journal Club segment. And then she and I will be discussing it a bit as always if you have any ideas to share about that or any other feature of this podcast or perhaps a new feature. You'd like to suggest. Please let us know so that we can better meet your needs. Hey let's have a peer review. Wait we already have that. It's called the listener survey. I don't have nearly as many of those in is. I'd like to have so why not go to the? Ap Professor Dot Org Slash Survey Right now and tell me what you think anonymously. Of course this is professional peer review or after all right searchable transcript and a captioned audio Graham. This episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy at Anatomy Dot Org. Did you know that if you're looking microscopic images to use remote teaching triple a? Has You covered? They have something called the virtual microscopy database or Vm. De.

ADP Professor Journal Club Article Krista Room Polski Journal Club associate professor Professor ANC Bethlehem Pennsylvania McGraw Hill Moravian College American Association Graham
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:25 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I know you've missed it but here it is finally once again were are where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words. Translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're familiar terms. Sometimes their terms that are new to US may be so fresh that they're new to everyone and the first one on our list today should not be surprising. It's the term virus. Now that's a simple term that everybody uses all the time. But what does it literally mean? Well it literally means when we translate it poison which makes sense right it can also mean slime or ooh which makes it sound even uglier and Nastier than just thinking of it as poison. So these little particles that are creating such havoc in our world right now those we can think of in a way as poison particles. Of course they're going to be working differently than many other poisons do but they are a hazard particle that is a hazard to our biological function. The next term list is related and that is krona virus in the word part corona which actually is part of a lot of different terms in anatomy and physiology as well as in virology in corona means crown. This virus is named for the crown like arrangement of protein spikes in the virus particles protein code or captured. And of course the second part of the word is virus so it's just corona attached virus meaning the virus with the crown or with this crime like arrangement and that group of viruses called the corona viruses was named quite a while ago back in the nineteen sixties. So it's almost as old as I am. But of course we've only more recently been hearing a lot about it in the news and in coming up in various conversations that we're hearing right now and related to corona virus has our next term in our word dissection list and that is the name of the virus itself and that is SARS covy too so that's Capitol S. A. R. S. Hyphen Capital C. Small Capital V. Hyphen to SARS. Covy to and breaking that down the first part. Sars is an acronym that means Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome virus. Got that name because the virus that causing the current outbreak is genetically related to the virus that caused the SARS outbreak of two thousand and three and then the next part the covy part is short for Corona Virus Co for Krona V for virus. So putting those two parts together SARS covy. We're talking about a SARS related at least Czars Related Corona virus. Okay that tells us a lot so far but it wasn't the first one discovered it wasn't the one that caused the SARS outbreak in two thousand and three. It's a new one so we're going to call it number two because it's not the first one in SARS covy to was officially named in February of Twenty twenty now. This virus causes a disease that is called. Kovin nineteen and covert nineteen was broken down in a word dissection back in the special post preview episode number sixty four. She can go back and review that if you want now in that previous word dissection. I mentioned that the World Health Organization named Bokov in one thousand nine hundred. So that's the disease and they named the disease using existing guidelines and they did that on February eleventh twenty twenty now that who names diseases in the ICU D. or international classification of diseases on the very same day the International Committee on taxonomy of viruses or ICT named the SARS. Covy to as the agent of that disease. Now it's the ICY TV. Who such the official names viruses. So the World Health Organization names diseases and this organization on the taxonomy of viruses. They name viruses. Their official name is International Committee on taxonomy of viruses. Ict Now interestingly the World Health Organization has been avoiding using the term SARS covy to directly when they're giving out through public communications because they want to avoid the public confusing Kobe. Nineteen with SARS. That is that original operate from two thousand three because it is a different virus and a different disease. Yes related yes conceptually. They're with each other but it's so easy in public communications for things to get out of focus and confused so in order to avoid confusion there instead preferring to it indirectly as the virus responsible for cove in nineteen. Now they're not denying or abandoning the official virus name. They're just you know kind of finessing. Their language a little bit to avoid using the official name again to avoid confusion the next term on our list is pandemic and we all use this term a lot but breaking it down I think gives us insight into its meaning that a little bit different maybe than we we have when we're not thinking too much about what it means so the first word part pan means all and the next part damn means people as in our term demographics or democratic so when I say people I'm I'm really using out in the sense of a group of people as we would look at in a demographic study for example and then the icy ending means relating to so pandemic describes a situation that relates to all people now of course that's not met absolutely literally it just means that potentially all people could become exposed to a pandemic disease or be affected directly or indirectly by pandemic disease now that's a more widespread phenomenon than the next term on our list which is epidemic an EPA means upon so we put that together to upon a group of people are related something relating to something that affects a whole group of people so a condition becomes epidemic when a whole group of people is affected when that extends to a wider group. Pat Is across the globe now again not literally every single corner but much more widespread than a typical epidemic. Then we elevate that to the status of pandemic and again it's the World Health Organization that usually gives the official designation of something being an epidemic or pandemic. You'll see these terms. Often used outside of those official.

SARS World Health Organization official corona Twenty twenty International Committee US Kovin Capitol S. A. R. Pat Respiratory Syndrome Kobe EPA
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A in the upcoming full episode. That is episode number sixty six. We're going to continue the conversation about how to quickly and effectively move our on campus amp course to remote learning. And as part of that discussion. I'm going to talk about what author and Professor Bruneta Brown Calls F F ts Now. I translate. Ft's as fumbling first tries. She has another fray she uses. And I'll talk to you about what that phrase is and why it's important for amp teaching in the full episode. Something else I'm going to talk about is a phenomenon called Zoom bombing and it's something that I put some links in the show notes for the previous episode but run across it in time to get it into the audio part so I'm going to be doing that in the full episodes sixty six something else. I'll be talking about briefly. Is the online protein folding game called folded and how we can use that in teaching and learning and how that relates to the current pandemic and the featured topic is going to be about our teaching slides how we can keep them simple and keep them connected to the story. We're going to tell in. These are skills that I've learned in continuing to learn over a period of time. And it can help us now at this time when we're scrambling to deliver our story and our slides in a different way than we're used to but these are principles and techniques that can also be used once we get back on campus too so all of that and more coming up in full episode number.

Professor Bruneta Brown Ft
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hit yet another episode focusing on strategies to cope with teaching amp e during the cove in Nineteen Upright. This one is the third one. The first one was bonus episode sixty three which I titled Mid Winter Winterizing of our AP course in which came out a few weeks ago just before things officially hit the fan with this outbreak in the United States. We better get ready for a pandemics of planning tips and strategies. And that's still helpful even now that we're in the thick of things. The second one was bonus episode sixty four B which came out a little over a week ago enlisted nineteen additional specific tips for quickly moving from an on campus course to a remote environment. I called that episode quickly. Moving to remote delivery the musical and we did have music. Amp teacher and stem music composer. Greg crowder graciously sang three songs to sing along with so yeah really was a musical and now this third episode which probably won't be the last before. I jump into my list of additional tips. I WanNA clarify few things. I you may be listening to this episode way later than when I'm recording this. Which means that you are a survivor of the cove in nineteen outbreak of twenty twenty. That's great congratulations. You made it through but you might be thinking and there's nothing in these episodes for me but you'd be wrong. Most if not all of these tips really can help us in the cove in nineteen scenario but they are also useful for any course anytime anyplace second if you find even one thing in any episode that sparks. An idea for your teaching or is helpful any way. That's a win. Remember Kevin's law a professional development that I mentioned in the bonus APPS conference episode way back in twenty eighteen. It states that if I learned just one useful thing in a professional development experience. It's worth it. I've been reading and listening to a lot of advice often from colleagues who have never even taught online before that. Well just isn't the best advice in my opinion so I'm thinking there will be one thing in this episode that will spark a different way of thinking for you. If in fact you do learn just one thing in this episode or in any episode. Will you do me a favor and share it with a colleague? Email social media singing it off of your balcony would ever gets it out there to folks that could use the help. They're not flying those advertising glimpse anymore so this is the only way to spread the word third. You probably noticed that. I've not been providing my usual update on scientific discoveries in human biology for the last few episodes part of the reason. Is that the big story now. At least that set of stories keeping our attention right now are about the cove in nineteen outbreak could discuss these stories in this podcast but given the rapidly evolving nature of what we know and what we think. We know what we thought we know. But now we know we didn't know and and given the time between planning and episode recording an episode and then getting it all set up for release. Well whatever I say. We'll be out of date by the time you hear it. So what I'm doing instead is putting the top stories in my nosal newsletter which is a daily update of up to ten headlines. I've chosen for that day. Just go to nonsol- dot com slash. The professor nozzle is also nuzzle dot com slash the ABC professor. And take a look at some of the past issues if you think. It's helpful vent subscribe. It's free by the way you just need to put in your email address and share that newsletter. To if you know someone who may be interested fourth wow fourth. This is giving a longer than I intended. Oh men wait a minute. Don't tell me you're surprised by okay..

Kevin professor United States Greg crowder ABC
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:04 min | 7 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Immune. I guess one of the things I would need to keep in mind if I'm teaching. This technique are offering this technique to my students is that I need to emphasize with them. That lets him sitting down with a handful of students in my office and in there asking me you know. How can we deal with this fire? Hose of information and I'm giving them different techniques and they might say well concept. I just can't get the hang of that or flash cards. Just don't do it for me or you have something else you know and and also what about these memory palaces and kind of walk them through the idea of it but I guess something? I need to emphasize with them. Is that when they walk out of my office? They're not going to be fully prepared to that. It's something that they have to just keep coming back to until they get more and more comfortable with it. Would you say that's fair? I definitely think that's fair Personally I actually I heard about some of these demonic techniques before med school unfortunately I just watch a few videos online and tried to learn from that. I think I could remember a couple of numbers better because I made a visuals seen one time but after about a week or two hit a roadblock and I didn't know where to go so I completely cut off the practice without actually developing satisfactory technique. Can I didn't use it all through Mexico only revisiting it later on towards the end because it's not something that you're going to be able to teach in one session. It's something that requires a little bit of practice every day or a couple of times a week or something along those lines so when someone is actually taking this seriously we often recommend they spend ten fifteen minutes a day maybe in the morning first thing before they get out of bed using these demonic going over their old ones trying to create a new one or two at already have Flash Card deck for instance they can go through the flash cards probably on their phone or IPAD and then make a demonic or while. They're sitting there in bed. Write it down or store I would suggest writing it down on your flash card deck or drawing it out or having some reference point for later on because you might not remember it the first time. So there's still space retrieval required in it but it tends to be much less retrieval and much better organized when you can implement these techniques but this technique sounds great. I'm glad to have it now in my little toolbox that I can open up for my students in show. Hey look there's lots of different tools here and it. Kinda you know this this idea of taking a lot of practice kind of brings to mind something that I learned late in life and that I give up too easy you know. I'd need the channel that when I'm talking to my students who likewise you know You give technique like let's say the Memory Palace and and really give along with that. Not just the technique but the encouragement that it's don't give up too easy like I would unites when you're a little kid and you're learning to write for the first time you're learning to read or you're learning to ride a bike or catch a baseball. You keep working out. I mean just think about you know little kids learning to walk. They don't follow over and then give up. They get right back up when they try it again and fall over and get up and fall over and then eventually they get the hang of it and I need to to do that. You know I need to learn to do that as an adult when something is difficult for me. A new learning management system is thrown in my lap. Oh my gosh. I'll never learn. But if I stick with I do and the same thing with these memory palaces if I can encourage my students to stick with it then it can be a very useful technique and and there are a lot of resources out there. That students can to kind of get that. Hang of it and and learn what to do. And that includes some of those At your website and show notes in the episode page so you can learn these memory techniques and you can also point to them off for your students. And they're they seem to be geared toward medical students but I've listened to a lot of them and you know why they applied. Amp students to. I mean everything that they're talking about in their a fits with what our students are going through so I highly recommend it and once again thank you very much chase. No thank you and yes. There's a lot of examples on on the podcast and on our youtube page. They can go and check and feel free to email me or contact me on social media and give a little more instruction possibly a regular listeners. Know this but if you're new or just need reminding don't forget that I always put links and the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas much in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors for this episode chased DeMarco gave me a link for an example of how to build your own memory palace in a video tutorial called memory palaces for medicine they're also links to his podcast episodes on Memory Palaces. The story method pneumonic and a blog. Post on evidence based study strategies. You can reach chase directly by way of email or any of the social media accounts listed in the show notes or you can even set up on one on one session with him. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions comments and ideas that the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three Lion Dan or one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording a written message to podcast at the Professor Dot. Org I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor and textbook author in human.

Memory Palace Professor Professor Dot baseball youtube professor Mexico Dr. Kevin Pat An DeMarco
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:21 min | 7 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Greg crowder is a dedicated and creative. Ap teacher besides being a rockstar literally Rockstar in creating in using music and stem education if you haven't explored his many many songs that relate to m. p. education. You really need to do that. When go to that? Link in the show notes or episode page also find a link to the page for another of Greg's pieces. That's great for a sing along that one students learn some basic ideas about spinal nerve plexus when you go there check out the fact that Greg provides many different ways to experience his songs for this one about nerve flexes. One of the options is a carioca screen. That you and your students can follow as you saying really you need to check these out a tip number fourteen read the book you know that unreasonably large and expensive tax book students bought for your course. Now is the perfect opportunity to get them to actually read it. They'll be socially distance anyway. One hopes and looking for something to read more students raid their textbook rather than actually reading it. Now's a good time to turn the reading of the book into a bigger element of the course. If You keep your instructor provided explanations at a minimum as I advised in an earlier segment then students have no choice but to get a lot of the needed information from their textbook tip number fifteen just in case and center substituting Your Plan Lecture Class activity with a case study. There are plenty of these case studies available online but I found it to be fun making up my own. It's much easier than you think. If you've never done it I often use medical images and make up a story around it and then ask questions. About this. Scenario the tease out important concepts of anatomy physiology one option would be to post that maybe divide the class up into groups in your learning management system and give each one a different case to workout and then posted in a discussion forum of just for that group. And they're easy ways to do that. Your folks at your institution will help you figure out how to do that. And then have them more the case and then have each group present their case to the other groups and what their conclusion was and why tip number sixteen learning is art and art is learning. Drawing drawing is a powerful learning strategy. Nearly everyone can draw. Sure some folks are regular Davinci's when they draw many of us most of us are not and that's okay making stick and ball. Figures can work just as well as the more realistic kind of art. This can really help with lab activities. When the lab's not available consider drawing in labeling exercises drawing out concept maps making organs from household items like paper or doe or scraps of fabric bake a cake in the shape of an Oregon in heaven share picture of it online things like that. Tip number seventeen simulate reality even if we've never used computer simulations of anatomical structures or physiological functions. We know they've been around for a while. Your institution may already provide access to some of these and there are some available online at no cost. I provided links to a few of them but go out searching. Send your students out searching and play around with them and see how that might fit into your remote learning scenario tip number eighteen embrace reality if things go well any temporary move of your face to face class to the online environment is well temporary probably a few weeks then the emergency past and we're back to our usual mode so yeah it may be nerve wracking but normalcy will return soon right tip number nineteen no side trips. Somebody in your course. Maybe you might suggest that you're suspended on. Campus class should meet somewhere off campus. Maybe a cafe or restaurant after all these venues are likely to be virtually deserted and would welcome even a little bit of business. Do not do it do not that would defeat the whole purpose of suspending face to face class meetings which to slow or even break the cycle of the viral outbreak. We're not doing this just for us. We're doing it as part of our social obligation to support and protect each other. So let's keep that our priority. Yeah there are a lot of other things that we can do quickly and easily once we put our minds to it and hopefully this short list has already stimulated some IDs. One final thought. Let's look at this at the adventure it is. The universe has thrown in unexpected challenge at us but tries to the occasion and tap our creativity in our experience to make some awesome. Lemonade or those lemons. Our positive can do attitude can go a long way to reassure our students and to motivate them to do some strong self powered learning a as. I mentioned several times earlier. I put links in the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors tell us what's going on with you your tips and suggestions and your questions at the broadcast hotline. That's one eight three three line Dan or one eight three three five or six six three three six or senator recording a written message to podcast at the AP professor dot work. I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor Textbook. Author in human anatomy.

Greg crowder professor Rockstar Professor Textbook m. p. education instructor Davinci Oregon Dr. Kevin Pat An Dan senator
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 7 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

11:27 min | 7 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hi there this is Kevin Patent. With a brief audio introduction to episode number sixty four of the amp professor podcast also known as top radio and audio salon for teachers of human anatomy and physiology in the upcoming full episode. That is episode sixty four. I'm going to have a conversation with chase DEMARCO. Now Chase. The Marco is widely known is a numbness. That is a memory expert. He's also a consultant entrepreneur more and believe it or not initiative that he's an MD PhD candidate who has a passion for helping medical students succeed in their studies and in their professional exams. Now I got a lot of support from my recent discussions of Flash Card techniques and episode fifty eight fifty nine and sixty and this conversation will complement those with an explanation of a study techniques sometimes called a memory palace which is based on something very old and very effective called the method of Loci. But wait for the full episodes. Sixty four where you'll get to know chase and learn a lot more about this memory technique. The free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science and Human Anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree. I'm on the Faculty of this program so I know the incredible value it is for an MP teachers check out this online graduate program at NYC DOT EDU slash. Happy or click. The Lincoln the show notes episode page. And you gus that it's time once again for were where we practice what we all do in teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes terms that are new to us or maybe they're so new that nobody knows him yet because they just got made up by somebody today. We have a few related to our main topic in that. Is this memory technique that we're going to be discussing with chase the Marco and the first term is come up before actually more than once and passed up assode and we did dissect at once back in episode number fifty nine and that is the word mnemonic so just to refresh our memories a little bit that word part non means memory literally. It means mindful but we use it in terms of memory and then the icy ending needs relating to so pneumonic when you put it all together means relating to memory and usually refers to something that aides memory it can be a mnemonic sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word and sentence has the same first letter of items in a list that we wanna remember but there are other mnemonic techniques. And we're going to be discussing one of those techniques in the full episode regarding pronunciation. I find myself going back and forth between me monarch and pneumonic and that usually depends on the context words around it and my brain just goes there with when to or not. Just come out of my mouth. And maybe they're things like that you do two now. The latter pronunciation MNEMONIC is preferred by most of the sources. I looked at so I'm going to try and stick with that as much candy or we'll see how that goes. The next word on the list is a related term. It's actually just another version of the word pneumonic. And that is numbness. And it's the same as demonic. But we're going to swap out that IC- ending in demonic input in ast ending which means an agent or performer of something and so an honest literally van is a person in agent performer. Someone who performs memory most often the term in the English language is used to describe someone who's adapt out or skilled in feats of memory. Like I dunno remembering the order of cards and a shuffled deck or Memorizing as much as they can from a page from a phone book or maybe trying to learn all the bones of the skeleton. Yeah that's a feat of memory and that takes some work and maybe there are some techniques that we can use to make that. Go more simpler for students at still going to be hard. But maybe there's a way to help them organize that and and get done quickly and effectively really be able to retrieve that information when it needs to be retrieved and yeah I sometimes find myself pronouncing it sometimes which actually that does show up occasionally dictionaries but it's most often pronounced nemesis are honest. I sometimes mistakenly US methodist instead anonymous. I don't know where that comes from. But anyway I swap out the end for a t go figure. I promise to work on that. If you promise to overlook my mistake okay the next term on our were dissection list is Loci L. O. C. I it's a word that's GONNA come up related to demonic technique that we're going to be discussing in the full episode. It can be pronounced. Loci as I just did but other common pronunciations are low cy or Loki but when I hear pronouncing that way Loki High. I think of that trickster. From Norse Mythology Loki L. O. K. I. So loci it is from me but you get to pick your favorite LOCI. Is the plural form of the Latin word locus LLC US which we also use as is an English meaning place or location? In fact the word location is derived from the word locus. We sometimes use locus in genetics. To describe the physical location of a gene within a chromosome. So you may have run across that use already. Loci is the plural form of locus. So it simply means places. We're going to be talking about a technique sometimes called the method of loci which we can now more easily see simply means method of places. This podcast is sponsored by hats. The human anatomy and Physiology Society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit HAP- s- at the professor dot org slash hats that's h? Aps only hey but step into the bookshop and see what we may want to add to our personal professional bookshelf. I'M GONNA go straight over to the medical shelf this time because I know exactly which book I'm looking for. It's called read this before medical school out of study smarter and live better while excelling in class and on your use a complex board exams. It's by chase DeMarco Theodore McConnell and Grodin recognized that name chase DeMarco. He's the guy I'm chatting with in the upcoming full episodes sixty four as you can tell from the title. This book is for students in medical school and you may teach. Medical students are students in some other health profession program. Or maybe you're teaching. Amp TO PRE MED or pre nursing or any of the many other students in the typical amd p course. This book could be helpful to any of them really why because all the students had just mentioned are being hit with what's surely feels like a fire hose of information if feels that way because it really is a lot of information and ideas to learn in a very short period of time and most of them will eventually be facing licensing or other professional exams of some sort right whether it's complex or in class or even try outs for jeopardy advice and strategies offered in. The book could be a game changer for some students. This book covers all the important things to consider when trying to figure out how to succeed in. Aim for example. Why STUDY SKILLS ARE IMPORTANT? Y? Class participation is essential how to use the teacher's time and resources effectively using the school's resources how to study at home making a study plan in managing time effectively. A lot of my students could use. I could use the value of study groups and how to organize and run a study group and even how to optimize work life balance. There's also a big section on test prep which strategies for both course exams and those big professional exams. I just mentioned a moment ago and because there's a lot of memorization required in amp. Yeah you know there is right. There's a big section on memory strategies. This is a great book to have on your teaching show to offer to students as a place to start learning how to study. And how to handle that? Fire Hose of ideas. Amp or perhaps. Add to your list of recommended resources for your students. Just go to the show notes or episode page or the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Book Club to take a look at this book and be sure to listen to the full episodes sixty four featuring a chat with the author chase DEMARCO. Hey you probably forgot about that survey that I've been taking. That's part of my end of season. Debriefing I'm asking you now. Please take just a few minutes of your time to respond to that anonymous survey because it's your experience as an individual listener. That's important to me. Just go to the AP professor dot Org Slash Survey and as always. Thanks for your support. Searchable transcript and a captioned audio gram of this preview episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy. Check out there many resources and events on their newly redesigned website at Anatomy Dot Org. Well this is Kevin Patent signing off for now and reminding you to keep your questions and comments coming. Why not call the podcast hotline right now at one eight three three? That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or visit us at the AP Professor Dot Org. I'll see you down the.

chase DEMARCO professor Kevin Patent Marco amp professor American Association for Anato NYC locus LLC US consultant Loki High Physiology Society DeMarco Theodore McConnell Loki L. O. K. amd Grodin
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:07 min | 7 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's discouraging to make a mistake but it's humiliating when you find out your so unimportant that nobody noticed it. Welcome to the amp professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin passed in this episode. I talk about how stress turns. Our hair. Grey the discovery of a new type of immune cell and making mistakes. When we're teaching a if.

professor Kevin
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 8 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 8 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 8 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Sixty two of the ANC professor podcast also known as tap radio. You an audio laboratory for teachers of human anatomy and physiology well. This is a preview of the upcoming full episode which is episode number sixty two and it's titled Another Big Year in Teaching Anatomy and physiology and that parallels the title from an episode. We did about a year ago called a big year and that was a debriefing. A review a look back back of the first year of the professor podcast. And so we're going to do that again in episode number sixty two. And so. It's all about debriefing. It's all about reflecting flocking. It's all about looking back and reviewing what we did so we're going to take a moment to think about to remind ourselves about how we as teachers can in deep grief in a way that is constructive and helpful and affirming and then we're going to dive right in and summarize a whole year of this podcast. Okay non exactly summarize everything but at least sit at the scenic overlook and take in the broad view of everything finger pointing out a few of the most interesting things that happened along the way.

professor ANC
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 8 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

professor ATP