38 Burst results for "Professor"

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Bloomberg Law

Bloomberg Law

00:45 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Bloomberg Law

"Made in that case, it is going to vastly increase the amount of election litigation in courts, it's going to give every state court decision interpreting a state election law that supplies in a federal election and every state and local agency decision apply to a federal election, a chance to become a federal lawsuit that could potentially pitch federal courts against state courts and I think ultimately if the court rules the way that the Republican legislators want in the North Carolina case that it's going to undermine voter confidence in both the electoral process and in the courts. Thanks so much for your insights, Rick. That's professor Richard Hassan, of UCLA law school. And in other legal news today, former president Donald Trump is asking the Supreme Court to intervene in the fight over government papers seized at his Mar-a-Lago estate. Asking the justices to let a court appointed special master review 100 documents with classified markings. This is an appeal from the decision of a three judge panel consisting of two judges appointed by Trump and one by former president Barack Obama. Coming up next in the Bloomberg law show, the Supreme Court has agreed to step into the politically fraught debate over section two 30 of the communications decency act, which protects online platforms from liability for user generated content. That's next. I'm Jim Grasso on your listening to Bloomberg And JIT, New Jersey institute of technology makes innovation happen. The university helped biomedical engineering professor Tara Alvarez launch a startup that may revolutionize vision therapy. Our startup through in JIT is called ocular motor technology. We create virtual reality, vision therapy, in a head mounted display. So it's gaming and basically sugarcoating the therapy so that children and young adolescents don't even realize they're doing therapy. To accomplish this, we need biomedical engineers, which are here in on GIT campus, a computer scientist, artists, people that are into story development, and then we are collaborating with a lot of the large pediatric medical centers. This idea of a startup culture is extremely important to not just NG IT and the national science foundation, but also to the U.S. as a societal hole. And JIT, New Jersey institute of technology, learn more at nj IT dot EDU. Not completing high school is more of a social thing than it was an academic thing. I came out in the 11th grade. Nobody was embracing you. Kids were cruel. It was very difficult to be gay. Even though all these years have passed, I still had that longing to have my diploma. The hard part was determining that I was gonna do it. But I definitely didn't do it alone. At age 30, with the help of her mentor, Carissa finished her high school diploma. I have a mentor, Maria. She convinced me to continue my education and finish what I started to get my diploma. Just never judges. She's a true role model. If

Richard Hassan Ucla Law School Jim Grasso Supreme Court New Jersey Institute Of Techno Tara Alvarez Donald Trump North Carolina Rick Barack Obama National Science Foundation U.S. Carissa Maria
The 'Phallic Phobia' Argument

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:51 min | 1 d ago

The 'Phallic Phobia' Argument

"Go to cuts. One 29, PhD from UC Berkeley. Laurel Westbrook talking about trans sports. Again, I'm picking on Berkeley just as an example, but I want to be very clear, University of Texas, Austin, university of Florida, university of North Carolina, Indiana University. They all have elements identical to this. It just so happens Berkeley is a little bit more brazen with this. It's an epicenter, but they're a little bit more cavalier. Andrew says a little. Yes, a little. Play cut one 29. This belief in the innate superiority and threat of male bodies account for why cisgender opposition to transgender inclusion, organizes predominantly around the presence of transgender women and not transgender men. This suggests that gender panics around transgender people might more accurately be termed penis panics as they are fueled by the terror of penises, particularly penises where they should not be. Because where they are in women's restrooms or locker rooms or sports teams is then dangerous to cisgender women and girls. I remember the first time I heard this argument, the first time I heard this argument, they said it a little differently. They said you have phallic phobia. I said, what? I mean, look, this last person doctor Laurel Westbrook. She should not be teaching a class. This is a very sick person. I mean that. She's a professor. And she says that this comes from phallic phobia, or it's because there are penises in places that they shouldn't be.

Laurel Westbrook Uc Berkeley Austin, University Of Florida Berkeley University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Indiana University Andrew Phobia
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Being utilized to transport goods, water, okay? Machinery and equipment to the island. More than 100 deaths in Florida and four in North Carolina are blamed on hurricane Ian. Hours after North Korea flew a nuclear capable missile, ballistic missile that crossed Japan. South Korea and the U.S. conducted ground to ground missile firings in an exercise that was aimed at demonstrating its precision strike capabilities against the north. Daniel pinkston with Troy university in Seoul on another show of strength that did not go as planned. A hyun mu two, which is a solid fueled surface to surface missile. It went off course shortly after launch and crashed onto the air base. So that caused a lot of alarm residents in the area saw and heard the impact from that failed launch. Lawyers for former president Trump asked the Supreme Court to intervene in their battle of their legal battle over top secret documents seized from Trump's Mar-a-Lago home, Loyola law school professor Laurie Levinson. I think the Trump team thinks that they have their best shot with the Supreme Court because in fact, justice clarence Thomas is the justice responsible for the 11th circuit that geographical area. And he himself could grant relief, at least temporarily, to president Trump. A $115,000 reward is being offered in Stockton, California for information that leads to a potential serial killer. This, after ballistic tests, linked the fatal shootings of 6 men and the wounding of one woman in crimes going back more than a year. Stockton Mayer, Kevin Lincoln. The chief, he's assembled a task force of professionals

Hurricane Ian President Trump Daniel Pinkston Troy University North Korea Laurie Levinson South Korea North Carolina Seoul Supreme Court Florida Japan Loyola Law School U.S. Donald Trump Clarence Thomas Stockton California Stockton Mayer
Dr. Walid Phares Gauges Putin's Reaction to Biden's Latest Speech

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:49 sec | 2 d ago

Dr. Walid Phares Gauges Putin's Reaction to Biden's Latest Speech

"Trump adviser, author of the choice Trump versus Obama Biden, doctor Walid Ferris. Welcome back to America first. Thank you, professor, always glad to be back with you. So what do you think Putin thinks of that speech from The White House today? Probably he knew that this would be the speech. That's why he delivered his speech first and imposed on the world in annexation of these provinces in eastern and southern Ukraine. I mean, he understood from February 24 that Putin, that this administration, the Biden administration is not going to react strategically. He had understood before that since there was draw from Afghanistan the way we did the return to the Iran deal. That's the posture of this administration and encouraging Russia and probably as you and I discussed before, China as well.

Obama Biden Walid Ferris Putin Donald Trump Biden Administration White House America Ukraine Afghanistan Iran Russia China
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

00:42 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak Asia

"Innovation happen. The university helped biomedical engineering professor Tara Alvarez launch a startup that may revolutionize vision therapy. Our startup through NG IT is called ocular motor technology. We create virtual reality, vision therapy in a head mounted display. So it's gaming and basically for sugarcoating the therapy so that children and young adolescents don't even realize they're doing therapy. To accomplish this, we need biomedical engineers, which are here in on GIT campus, a computer scientist, artists, people that are into story development, and then we are collaborating with a lot of the large pediatric medical centers. This idea of a startup culture is extremely important to not just NG IT and the national science foundation, but also to the U.S. as a societal whole. And JIT, New Jersey institute of technology. Learn more at NJ IT dot EDU. Not completing high school is more of a social thing than it was an academic thing. I came out in the 11th grade. Nobody was embracing you. The kids were cruel. It was very difficult to be gay. Even though all these years have passed, I still had that longing to have my diploma. The hard part was determining that I was gonna do it. But I definitely didn't do it alone. At age 30, with the help of her mentor, Carissa finished her high school diploma. I have a mentor, Maria. She convinced me to continue my education and finish what I started to get my diploma

Tara Alvarez New Jersey Institute Of Techno National Science Foundation U.S. Carissa Maria
The Republican Leadership Has Come up With a 'Commitment to America'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:14 min | 6 d ago

The Republican Leadership Has Come up With a 'Commitment to America'

"I want to comment on the House Republican leadership. This is McCarthy and Steve scalise, who's been on this podcast and Elise Stefanik of New York. And they have put forward one, say, belatedly, because this probably should have come a lot earlier, but nevertheless, it's coming in time for the midterms. Something called the commitment to America. Commitment to America. Now, if you have sense of perspective here, you'll recognize as a kind of a similarity to something that gingrich did. And the period leading up to the 1994 midterm election. Remember, Clinton was elected in 92. And this was an anti Clinton wave that the Republicans were able to ride brilliantly in gingrich was able to nationalize the midterm election, not something that is that easy to do with the contract with America. I would say looking back on it the contract with America was a mixed success and got some things accomplished. In fact, to some degree, it put welfare reform at the front of its agenda. It even got Clinton kicking and screaming to sign welfare reform and then later Clinton took credit for the effects of welfare reform, but it was the Republicans who made him do it, and they did it themselves. There were other things that the contract with America tried to do line item veto a constitutional amendment to balance the budget. And those things ultimately faded. They didn't work. But it was a, it was a brilliant maneuver, and of course gingrich was a marvelous articulator of it. And I think with that in mind, we have this new crew, which is basically McCarthy, who apparently thinks he's a little bit of the new gingrich. Now, unfortunately, McCarthy doesn't have the charisma of gingrich. He doesn't have the intellectual firepower gingrich who actually was an intellectual gingrich was a college professor before he got into politics. And with McCarthy, you know, I approached this with kind of a, well, I'm going to call it one sheer for the GOP plan. The plan itself is not bad.

Gingrich Steve Scalise Elise Stefanik America Clinton Mccarthy New York House GOP
Dr. Kenneth Calvert on Roman History and American Parallels

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 6 d ago

Dr. Kenneth Calvert on Roman History and American Parallels

"I've taken a majority of the hillsdale online courses I've not taken the one on Roman history yet. There's just a really great one that is being taught by professor Kenneth Calvert to the great job and people are really raving about it professor history here at hillsdale college, professor. Welcome. How are you? I'm very well, thank you. Great to be with you. Thank you. So I'm meaning to take your course and the reviews are just phenomenal about it. I want to ask you. Specifically, a specifically about Roman history, there's a parallel that is made every so often about the decline of Rome, porous borders, destroyed currency, greedy politicians, some would say sexual perversion and kind of comparing that to America. Do you think those parallels are helpful or appropriate as we kind of try to look to see if a superpower has ever been on the course of what America is on right now? Yeah, I think there are some definite parallels and a lot of it has to do with the fact that we are a free society and particularly in the Roman Republic. I mean, that was a free society as well. And whenever you have a free society, you have the freedom of citizens to be what they will. And as a Christian, of course, I understand that at least part of that is to act out on their fallenness. But there's also positive that can be found in that. Now, the Roman Empire, I think, suffered from a number of things. First of all, it's paganism was very much running against it. The second was the fact that it was magnificently successful. And so they had a huge amount of wealth and a huge amount of luxury. And you put all those things together and you do have a recipe for disaster.

Kenneth Calvert Hillsdale College Hillsdale America Rome Roman Republic
The Same Censorship on YouTube Exists at College Campuses

The Officer Tatum Show

01:37 min | Last week

The Same Censorship on YouTube Exists at College Campuses

"40% of students are uncomfortable, disagreeing with their professor and public are in writing assignments or written assignments. The three most difficult topics to discuss on campus or abortion, racial inequality, and COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Um. I wonder, how is that consistently something that's difficult to talk about on campus? And it's also the same thing that you can not talk on YouTube about. Maybe there's a connection. Maybe there's a bigger conspiracy than we may want to admit. Right now on YouTube, if you talk about abortion, they will age restrict your video. Although they can show transgender strip shows to little kids, and that's not age restricted. I made videos about it, right? Right, Nick, that's not age restricted. But if I talk about abortion based on an education only perspective, they will age restrict your material on YouTube. And what does that mean by age restricting? Don't let them lie to you. Asian restricted isn't just so young people under 18 can not watch your clips. What happens is when they age restrict you, anybody that's not actively logged into YouTube can not see your video, no matter what age they are. And even if you're logged into and your 18 flyer will pop up or pop up will pop up before your video and it'll say, this content is sensitive content, do you want to go from there? Now, knowing the mindset of most people who have the tension span of a net with ADHD will literally look at that clip and say, I don't want no parts of it. I'm going to the video that I could just view and stimulate my mind for 30 seconds and be on to something different.

Covid Youtube Nick Adhd
Dinesh Welcomes Pennsylvania Gubernatorial Candidate Doug Mastriano

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:33 min | Last week

Dinesh Welcomes Pennsylvania Gubernatorial Candidate Doug Mastriano

"Guys, I'm really pleased to welcome to the podcast Doug mass riano. Doug is running for Pennsylvania governor. He's the GOP nominee. He's currently serving as a state senator for Pennsylvania's 33rd district. Dog retired from the U.S. Army as a colonel in 2017 after 30 years of service. He saw tours of duty in Iraq, Afghanistan. He also has been a Professor of the U.S. Army at the U.S. Army war college in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he taught strategy. He has four masters degrees. What? And a PhD in history. And Doug welcome to the podcast great to have you. Boy, you are running in a tough election in a critical stage, but I your first time on the podcast. I just like you, I'd like to introduce you to my audience, sudden and I see you've done all kinds of things in a very interesting life, so tell a little bit about your story so people can get to know you better. I was raised in a lower middle class family. My dad was a high school dropout. And at 17, he got in trouble for drag racing his car too much, and he kindly judged that you're either going to jail or joining the navy. And so my dad joined a navy, and it completely radically turned his life around. My dad used to say Doug, I was a punk until I joined the navy, and it gave him discipline of focus. And he went on to become one of the most hardest working men I ever knew that he went from working menial jobs all the way up to being a senior manager in the air products plant and he did quite well in life.

Doug Mass Riano Pennsylvania U.S. Army Doug U.S. Army War College GOP Carlisle Afghanistan Iraq Navy
What Actually Is a Marxist?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:45 min | Last week

What Actually Is a Marxist?

"You're always talking about marxists. I hear this repeated theme. Marxist Marxist Marxist. What is a Marxist? What did Karl Marx actually believe? My 19 year old at the university of Alabama is being taught by her professors that Marx was smart profound and visionary help me out here who was Karl Marx. Great question. So Karl Marx is without a doubt one of the most influential people ever to live. There is no questioning that. So Karl Marx is interesting. He was a radical student. Part of the young hegelian group at the university of Berlin. Now, Hegel is a very complicated topic very deep. He wrote a book called the phenomenology of spirit. Hegel basically stole Christian eschatological framing end times. And created a theory of history, so whatever you think of Hegel think of history that things are constantly unfolding towards an inevitable perfection. It goes through this series of thesis and antithesis it creates a synthesis. We talk about this a little bit actually in an upcoming podcast, which is why you have to subscribe to the Charlie Kirk show podcast with James Lindsay, who understands the topic far better than I do. I have a surface understanding of it. He has a deep complex understanding of Hegel. Hegel was profound, though, because he got people to basically buy into the idea that history is constantly unfolding that we're on a journey towards inevitable utopia. Now that is against Christianity in the sense that our actions or the state actions are not going to bring us towards utopia, but we do believe that eventually that the people who give their lives to the lord will end up living in Paradise living in heaven.

Karl Marx Hegel Marxist Marxist Marxist University Of Berlin University Of Alabama Marx Charlie Kirk James Lindsay
Charlie and Dr. James Lindsay on the Dangers of the COVID Mind Virus

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:23 min | Last week

Charlie and Dr. James Lindsay on the Dangers of the COVID Mind Virus

"Are not taking seriously this takeover of every major institution of our children of education, of finance, of sports, of language, and then 2020 happens. So doctor Lindsay was doing all this research and then Floyd a palooza in the summer of 2020 unfolds. They only known cure for COVID. Right, exactly. Where if you're burning down a Wendy's, it's better than wearing a mask. And so really a large parts of the conservative movement I use that term loosely were completely taken by surprise where all of a sudden everything was about race. It was about structural inequity, oppressor versus oppressed, and we are still living through the damage that was implemented from the summer of 2020. And I'm not even talking about the burn buildings. That is true. I'm talking about how they saw their moment to change curriculum, implement textbooks, take over HR departments, be able to change hiring practices, affirmative action quotas. They saw a 90 day window when everyone was locked down and cooped up, took over the entire PR narrative to really introduce in my opinion. This is provocative and the media will find this to be newsworthy. I think that mind virus has done and will do more damage than the Chinese coronavirus. Oh, absolutely. Let's not even a question. And as a matter of fact, he calls it a mind virus. Let's exonerate him a moment and make the media have a slightly harder job than just getting the ignore what I'm about to say. This is totally based and this is one of the things I read in the literature writing those fake papers is there is a paper that was published right here. Arizona state university, two professors. Brienne files and Michael Carter, if you want their names, we like to name names. They wrote this paper in 2016 called women's studies as a virus, and in the paper they explained that these ideologies like women's studies and it could extend a gender erase or whatever you want it to be. Are meant to operate. They said the ideal metaphor for what they do is a virus. They say an ideal metaphor for us would be viruses like HIV, Ebola, SARS, some viruses cause cancer. Well, cancer represents true transformative change. So that's good too. Conservatism, they say represents like the immune system. And normally you need the immune system to preserve the body. But in this case, the virus will be good for the body. So we have to suppress the immune system. This is really how they describe themselves. And

Floyd Lindsay Brienne Michael Carter Arizona State University Viruses Cause Cancer Ebola Sars HIV Cancer
How the KGB Recruited Former Agent Jack Philip Barsky

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:50 min | Last week

How the KGB Recruited Former Agent Jack Philip Barsky

"The KGB approaches you. Yeah. What were you doing when you were 23 or 24? I was studying. In my third year of a 5 year program to get a message in chemistry. So that made you a good candidate for potential international espionage. Not necessarily. I mean, there's a couple of interviews out there that were given by the two heads of the first directorate, which was espionage, and what they said, what they were looking for in candidates were like a whole bunch of character traits. Sure, you had to be smart. You had to make quick decisions. You had to be able to be by yourself a lot. You had to be able to you had to be honest, so to become a really good liar. And my favorite trait that they mentioned is a well controlled. Controlled disposition or controlled I'm sorry. Anyway, the last word is adventure. This position towards adventure or something like that. Okay. So then you pass the you pass the test and they deploy you into the United States. Is that right? Yeah, but that test, you know, at first I had an unofficial relationship with a handler when I studied and I was already employed by the by the university as an assistant professor when they actually made me the offer. So it was a year and a half of really checking me out. Yes. Because this is a tough job.

KGB United States
Race Scholar: SCOTUS ‘Founded to Defend White Supremacy'

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Race Scholar: SCOTUS ‘Founded to Defend White Supremacy'

"Over at the college fix another great site College fixed dot com Supreme Court was founded to defend white supremacy should be abolished as a race scholar How do you become a race scholar Supreme Court can not protect the civil rights of citizens because it was founded to defend white supremacy on quote a professor of africana studies wrote on Tuesday professor Claudia Garcia Rojas In an essay titled the Supreme Court won't save us it was founded to defend white supremacy Argues that president Donald Trump's quote stacking of the court with far right justices as a strategic move meant to defend white Christian nationalism Oh yeah that's why all those great decisions for faith and religion in the last half a century Instead of packing the court citizens should be asking what steps can we be taking toward abolishing it She wrote so these are what we have these professors And you wonder why 70% of young people don't think America is great Because a 100% of these nut jobs are brainwashing them

Supreme Court Claudia Garcia Rojas President Donald Trump America
Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Professor Walter Hooper Recounts a Story About C.S. Lewis

"When you first came to Oxford, I remember story that you went to maybe it was the bob land. I'm guessing, and you asked for anything by Lewis, but the term you used was Lewis, Louisiana. Can you do you remember that story? I don't think it's exactly as I told it. I may have asked for Louisiana, but I think together we worked it out. I worked so long in the bodleian over 50 years. And I was always working on Louis. So people who worked there called the readers by not by name, but by the name of the person they're researching. So I've called mister C is Lewis when I'm there. And I know a man who is Civil War Robert E. Lee and Hitler. Mister Adolf Hitler. You're kidding. Well, actually, one of the things about Hitler's. Is that the people that I work with have work with for years, these Curtis Brown, agents, literary agents and London. Well, they were Hitler's literary agents. And they have you're not kidding. No, I'm not. Curtis Brown where Hitler's literary agents. Some have they inherited they have the rights to they control the rights to mein kampf. But and all the children's stories that he wrote. Well, I understand that the royalties of mein kampf have been around for 50 years, and they built up quite a lot.

Bob Land Lewis Louisiana Hitler Mister Adolf Hitler Curtis Brown Oxford Robert E. Lee Louis London
Professor Walter Hooper on C.S. Lewis' Take on Gender

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Professor Walter Hooper on C.S. Lewis' Take on Gender

"For Walter hooper. It's in all of his fiction. This idea of embodying nobility embodying vulgarity and baseness that these things are not what we say they are. They're innate qualities that God has created a universe with these inequalities. Of course, the idea of maleness and femaleness is being challenged today as though anyone can be anything as though there isn't even such a thing as maleness. But the way Lewis portrays kings and queens that they're very different in his world. Maybe you can talk a bit about gender or that kind of thing in his books because it seems to be so strong and it's maybe why some people don't want to read him these days. Well, they may not, but they're enough who do. But I think it was natural that he called the king of the beast. The king named the one who rules Narnia after the king of the beasts, Lion. You can't have a platypus, you know? But that's the funny thing is we know that. Most people would know that, but then you have to say, well, then, well, why? And it's just because it's something innate that we know. Platypus, that's very good. That's a great contrast. But he also was very, very fond of mice. He really loved the beautiful little quadruplet quadruplets. He said that in few may remember that scene in that idios strength where after he finished ransom had finished his tea, the crumbs fell on the floor, the cape crumbs, he blew a little whistle and these mice came soon. He said we want to get rid of the crumbs. The mice need food. Why not do that?

Walter Hooper Lewis Narnia
The Biden Administration Serves the Elite

Mark Levin

01:35 min | 2 weeks ago

The Biden Administration Serves the Elite

"What exactly has the Biden administration's agenda been When it comes to working men and women To the middle class it's been nothing but destructive Pushing electric vehicles subsidizing electric vehicles That's for the wealthier Student loan forgiveness is for the wealthier among us IRS agents that's the enforcement arm of the Biden administration Open borders illegal aliens pouring into the country They believe most will eventually through chain migration and through the generations vote Democrat Otherwise they wouldn't do it Their destroying our public schools because most of them send their kids to preppy private schools And I could go on and on and on The Biden administration is not of the people for the people The Biden administration is of the rich Self appointed self aggrandizing white elite And by the way many elitists who are minorities professors and so forth Who also benefit from these policies The average American regardless of race or faith and so forth benefits not in the least

Biden Administration IRS
DOJ Agrees to Accept Special Master

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

DOJ Agrees to Accept Special Master

"Justice Department yesterday surprised all the Twitter lawyers by saying it would accept one of Donald Trump's recommendation for the special masters in the Mar-a-Lago document case. And I'm reeling because I was told by all of the lefties in the blue bubble that this was outrageous and they could never do this, then it was unprecedented. Rate of a former president's home is unprecedented. It's not what we did with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, when she was running for president Donald Trump might be running for president. And it was just, but they assured me, everybody assured me all the Twitter legal experts, all the former U.S. assistant attorneys who haven't had a job in a long time who show up on MSNBC, a bunch of long tooth law professors who are 15 years old or niam are out there browsing that this can not happen. The DoJ will never have to accept it. It will be reversed ticket that the Supreme Court, and then Deion shows up yesterday and said, you know, we will accept one of the judges Raymond Derry that former president Trump's legal team had suggested, judge Derry is still a senior district court judge, meaning he's been trying cases and presiding over matters for since Ronald Reagan. I think he's 75 or 76. Again, former United States attorney, it's just in the United States attorney. Also was a member of the foreign intelligence surveillance court. Remember how they said it was going to be tough to find someone with the credentials to oversee classified material that's all judge Gary did for a lot of years because the foreign intelligence surveillance court, that's the court with which I am familiar most back from my Justice Department days at the one the only one I need to do with. I wasn't appellate lawyer. I was just dealing with Pfizer Lawrence going over to the Pfizer court. And judge Derry course qualified to do it in whether or not he turns back all 11,000 documents that Trump or none of them. It will be good to have that review for the benefit of those of us who are open to any result, but are not in a hurry to accept this Department of Justice word for it.

DOJ Secretary Of State Hillary Cli President Donald Trump Judge Derry Foreign Intelligence Surveilla Raymond Derry Twitter Donald Trump United States Deion Msnbc Supreme Court Ronald Reagan Pfizer Lawrence Gary Pfizer
David & Christen Limbaugh Know How to Write on a Popular Level

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:57 min | 3 weeks ago

David & Christen Limbaugh Know How to Write on a Popular Level

"I am talking to the authors David Limbaugh and Kristen Limbaugh bloom of a new book, the resurrected Jesus, the church and the New Testament. And at the end of last segment, I was just I was mid rant. I was ranting because I get that all the time, where people who have spent decades, let's say, on as Bond Hoff or scholars or whatever. And they look at someone who has a BA in English and they say, what right do you have to write about this? And you realize that's kind of the problem is that it's very rare that you find an academic who can write on a popular level. We could almost analogize this to the experts who hate Trump because he is in a career politician, but I won't go the second. No, no, no, but it's exactly the same principle. It's precisely the same principle. It's like somebody says, I am a professional politician. What right do you have? Well, the founding fathers created a situation where average people are supposed to govern themselves Cincinnati and his plow, you come, you serve, and then you go back. The idea of the career politician, the professional politician, it's the same misunderstanding that you have in the world of writing and the academy. It is. And this is true of law books, they're written to other law professors, not even to practicing lawyers, law professors. And they're elitists and showing off. The same thing, I don't think the theologians are showing off. But they do ride on a higher level of some commentaries are more light level. But one thing I learned to bridge this gap is I, one of my early mentors said, I said, I don't understand this commentary. I want to understand this, commentary. Well, I mean, I've been steeped in it for 20 years. You'll get more. The more I read, I do get the jargon. Well, here's a great thing. I think I can introduce readers. We can introduce readers. And she's been into this too. It my behest, of course. I deserve all the credit. And we can introduce readers to the brilliance of commentators by kind of rewording what they say. And then they would never even hear these people, you know? And there's some great ones out there. I don't know what you think. Well, I think of it. Well, John Macarthur and what a jerk. Yeah. Actually, I like John Macarthur very much. He's amazing, but you just, but you actually, you touched on something. And this is why I get so animated about this. You're doing exactly what I do in most of my books. You are a popularizer. You're basically saying like, look, I'm not going to spend 30 years studying this, but I don't need to God didn't create me to do that. Other people have done that. What I can do is read their stuff and help allay reader understand some of the best of what they have to say. And that's what I do in most of my books and it's exactly what the two of you are doing in these books. I know that for a fact. I mean, as I see it here, I think that that's exactly what you're doing.

Kristen Limbaugh Bond Hoff David Limbaugh Donald Trump John Macarthur Cincinnati
Professor Bruce Gilley on the Legacy of the British Empire

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Professor Bruce Gilley on the Legacy of the British Empire

"Is a almost an incantation that exists on these campuses. Berkeley, I know that you're at Portland state, wherever I speak, they will always revert back to colonialist rule and the massacring of indigenous people, that is not the case of the British Empire. They might be conflating it with other empires. Maybe conquests or attempts of the Portuguese or the Spanish. But the British were very benign. In fact, they did everything they possibly could to institute the rule of law, habeas corpus, respect for the individual. Tell our audience about the legacy that the British Empire left and really helped develop the modern world as we know it. Yeah, so I mean, on the other question of violence, of course, what they do is they say, well, any form of colonialism is itself evil. Therefore, every time a British policeman in Kenya arrests a thief, that's genocidal because that's violence, right? So they don't make a distinction between justified and legitimate use of force like with a police or counter terrorist operations, which the British had a lot of, they had a lot of that because there were a lot of elite traditionalists who like to engage in slave rating and plundering and enslavement of others like the tribes and they didn't like the fact that the British imposed this civic institutions on these places because it basically deprived them of their traditional prerogatives. So what the British did in these places was not only create the civic institutions, the rule of law, the property rights that equal access to the political system, the expansion of rights, especially for minorities in women, right? They were the big beneficiaries here. But at a more fundamental level, the British created these nations. So when people say they colonized us, it's a joke because there was no us until the British came. There were a bunch of Internet signed slaving feuds going on, or you were actually in the hands of another alien empire that wasn't the white man, but it was much worse. So

Berkeley Portland Kenya
A Defense of British Colonialism(?!) With Professor Bruce Gilley

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:54 min | 3 weeks ago

A Defense of British Colonialism(?!) With Professor Bruce Gilley

"Heard the news yesterday, Queen Elizabeth passed away. She was a stoic wise and phenomenal leader in public life for 70 years, never had a misstep never had a scandal, she loved her country, and she saw, she entered one world and when she passed away, it was a completely different world. Her passing, of course, has basically had every single apparatchik on social media every single one. But a lot of the apparatus on social media say that she was representing a genocidal colonialist empire, all this nonsense, which I think actually opens an opportunity for us to defend British colonialism. This is a contrarian take. This is something that you will not hear on a college campus, but I think it's time to lean in and defend our Friends across the pond. And no better person to help us do this. Then someone who has published extensively on this topic actually has published a piece the case for colonialism, a response to my critics by professor Bruce Gilly and he joins us right now professor welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Hi, Charlie. It's great to be here. So professor walk us through your argument, the case for colonialism. That is a thought crime to say in decent and public society today as we remember the Queen of England and her passing, it seems appropriate to talk about the British Empire, why is colonialism something that we should defend? All the empirical data shows very clearly that if you were colonized in particular of your commerce by the British and the longer they colonized you and the more intensely they colonized you, the more you are likely to be democratic, developed, stable, law abiding and free society today. The empirical evidence is a slam dunk,

Queen Elizabeth Bruce Gilly Charlie Kirk Queen Of England Charlie
Sean Feucht: "Jesus Christ 'Superspreader'"

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Sean Feucht: "Jesus Christ 'Superspreader'"

"So you are mocked by Rolling Stone magazine. Some little editor there was really psyched that they came up with Jesus Christ super spreader. And let me tell you that this is going to be, I mean, it's kind of like when they said to Donald Trump about fake news and he decided, okay, I'm going to embrace this term fake news. I'm going to make it my term. So super spreader, you decided to make it the title of the film, which is brilliant. And I've only seen clips of the film, but it is amazing. Now who made this film? How did this come about? Well, I've been I was approached by vice and showtime and all these different crazy left outlets that wanted to do a documentary. And of course, we knew how they were going to tell the story. So we just thought, you know what? And then I had some other Friends approach being they're like, hey, what if we just followed around with the camera and we kind of told the story and the full story, which I think is important for people to see, I mean, you know, of course you added so much depth to the film, bringing historical context and sharing your history of what you've seen through your studies and everything. But then we also had a lot of people that were trolls that we interviewed. We had people telling their side of the story from, you know, how much they hated what we're doing or criticize what we're doing. We have Harvard theologian professors on there, a guy that ranted against me in a whole lecture, you know? We have, and then at the same time, we have these crazy testimonies that are undeniable of people that we're going to kill themselves. And all of a sudden they're walking through Washington square park in New York City and they throw their suicide medicine down at the altar and they get baptized, you know, and they leave in freedom. And so you have this incredible journey where it's not like a cheesy face film. I mean, it really is controversial. It's raw, you see the depth of despair in the moments that we wrestle with, but you also see the incredible breakthroughs that got brought.

Rolling Stone Magazine Donald Trump Washington Square Park New York City
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"H. a. p. s. a. As i mentioned earlier there's an easy way to share this podcast with friends and acquaintances and also earn yourself a bit of cash simply go to the ap professor dot org slash refer to get personalised share link. That will not only get your friend. All set up an podcast player of their choice. It will also get you on your way to earning a cash reward. Oh and i always give links to other resources on topics. I cover in each episode. If you don't see links in your podcast player go to the show notes at the episode page at the a professor dot org slash eighty four. We can explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast. There's another episode about student. Evaluations of teaching coming soon. And i'd love love love love to that's four loves..

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Think they really understand the purpose of these evaluations. They don't know enough about evidence based teaching practices to evaluate. A course they know little or nothing about coarser curriculum design. They don't know what's coming up in. Their next courses are what they really need to know for their professional program or professional career even if they were competent and all of that which would be an unreasonable expectation. In my opinion they're not likely to be competent in evaluating all that reporting on that evaluation in a meaningful helpful manner yet. Another issue we student. Evaluations is the number of students sampled as scientists. You and i know that reliable data often depends on having a large and a large number of samples. If i have a large number of students will number of evaluations coming in. Then i have to be careful about how reliable that information is. If i have a small number of students and of course even if all of them respond to student evaluations then i still have a small sample size and there can be a lot of fluctuation within that small group where one or two outliers can skew everything which makes it possible for one student who makes a mistake on the scale and things one is good and five is bad the opposite of the direction given and wow there goes your average just for a simple mistake so a mistake a disgruntled or anxious student a biased student. Any number of things can make a good course or a good teacher. Look not as good as they are or on the other hand the opposite could occur. Give me a false sense. That something i tried in the course worked much better than it did when really the tally was skewed by two students. Who really like me and gave me high marks for everything no matter what probably didn't even read half the items if that may so if i'm really wanting to get some reliable actionable results from student evaluations. I think i'm more likely to get them from big numbers rather than small numbers. But i don't always get big numbers and that's bad..

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"So go ahead and get that coffee or tea or chocolate or whatever on me if you find new listeners. For this podcast. Here's how it works. Go to the professor dot org slash refer and get your referral. Url copy that personal link in share it with other anatomy and physiology faculty maybe include a sentence or two telling them something about what you out of listening to this podcast. Then when your friend clicks your link they'll be introduced to the professor podcast and can subscribe in the platform of their choice. One should get two or more new subscribers. You'll automatically receive five dollars in cash for tea or chocolate or coffee. Once you rack up ten or more subscribers you'll receive twenty five dollars cash. Not kidding up to twenty five dollars. Cash simply for sending a few emails or tweets or posts or dmc to other amp faculty inviting them to listen to a podcast that you know they might enjoy or at least get some benefit from if they don't exactly enjoy it they benefit you benefit the cafe or you buy your dear chocolate or coffee. It's win win win right. I know you're planning to send a big day gift this year. But i'd much rather do this for you instead. Just go to the professor dot org slash refer get your personal url and send it to a few friends and then sit back and wait for the cash to roll once again. That's the ap professor dot org.

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Links and the show notes. And at the episode page at the professor dot org slash seventy nine in case you wanna further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors and you're always encouraged to call in with your questions. Comments and ideas at the podcast hotline. That's one eight hundred three or one eight three three five four six six three three six or senator recording written message to podcast at the professor dot. Org we'd love to have you are private online community. Well away from all the ads and spam and tracking algorithms that hide. What in who you wanna see the convoluted email threads online bullying away from all of that. It's a comfortable supportive space filled only with aim faculty like you just go to the ap professor dot org slash community. And you know what. I'll see you on the road. The professor is hosted by dr. Kevin pat an award-winning professor and textbook author in human anatomy and physiology safety and the safety of others. Please do not put your hand to outside the car when the krebs cycle is in motion..

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I have to fail and not just once but multiple times with multiple opponents likewise if my teacher only matches may two opponents who have no ability to resist me because there are two week or they're lacking in skills then. I won't be ready to face a real opponent when learning concepts. It works the same way if my teacher never asked me to do anything that requires effort in trying to understand it thoroughly to it then when the tank comes from me to recall it an employer it. I just won't be able to do that. I'll have never mastered it. I tell my students that this is the difference between familiarity and mastery. Familiarity with the concept is important. Just like familiarity with one's wrestling opponent is important but we need to move on from familiarity to master and that takes work by work. I mean effort. And i mean repetition. And i mean coming at it from different angles when my students find out that all of the regular tests will be done online with multiple attempts possible to get a better score and they're all open book open notes. Open open open. They rejoice they think and sometime. Say out loud. This course will be easy. And of course that's what they all right and easy course. Of course students almost always want an easy course right. I was like that too. But now i look for difficult courses difficult in ways they get me to learn but my students who think they'll have it easy. Find out that's not going to happen. In my course. Sure they look things up but looking things up and evaluating them slows them down and get them to learn. What's what in a fairly low pressure. But then they hit the test items that they can't so easily figure out using the information that they can find easily in their books or notes or even on the internet they have to truly russell with these items but the key is that i've made sure they do have the information they need and that they know where to find it and i make sure that i've walked through similar scenarios with them and i make myself available to help them if they get stuck and if they just don't know what steps to take next and i give them specific strategies for what to do if they fail to analyze failures and how to fix the issues that they're analysis turns up. I'm the wrestling coach. I'm not going to wrestle for them. Nor am i gonna match them up to weaklings.

wrestling russell
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Dictionary dot com defines an acronym as a word formed from the initial letters or groups of letters of words in a set phrase or series of words and pronounced as a separate word but that definition which is very common among dictionaries reflects a controversy about what an acronym properly is this definition states that an acronym must be pronounced as a word so look at the acronym for the human anatomy and physiology society. Ha ps that's pronounced as a word it's pronounced h- apps so that fits this definition sodas. Ha were happy for the nyc graduate program in human anatomy and physiology instruction but the acronym for the american association for adamy. A is not pronounced as a word. It's usually triple aaa or i don't know i've not heard this much a but i've heard it if i did try to pronounce. That is a word. I wonder how i'd say that or or a. Yeah okay that's not gonna work so then fit that definition. So even though it's not commonly defined this way dictionaries most of us would define an acronym as a type of abbreviation formed by the first letter or letters of each word of phrase or each segment of a longer term and pronounced. Either as award are by sounding out the letters now. I just looked over. A list of hundreds of acronyms commonly used in the undergraduate amp course and only a handful of small handful are usually pronounced as a word so that ladder definition the real life definition really is the one that we all use and kind of supports mile long long-held conviction that dictionaries even science and medicine dictionaries are useful but they should not be our only source of definitive information. Some of acronyms from adp include dna for deoxyribonucleic acid. Aren a for ribonuclease asset. I noticed that both are in a indian. A are not formed from the first letters alone. Otherwise we'd be using just are a mda. The n in the middle of each of those acronyms comes from the nucleic segment of either ribonuclease or deoxyribonucleic so are modified real-life definition still works right and there's lots of other acronyms we use like. Hr for heart rate and e. r. n. plasma particular which by the way is one of my favorite terms to say out loud from all of. Ap it's right up there with carb no hemoglobin both of which have always been on my shortlist of possible baby names but acronyms are not limited to aim adp or even to science. We use them all the time. For example usa. Uk fbi nbc. And so on an acronym. I hear a lot from the company that syndicates. This podcast is t otd. Okay let me say that again. Because it's a long one g. G. t. otd that's an acronym for good generic time of the day which is just a silly way of admitting the terms like good morning or good evening are meaningless in.

human anatomy and physiology s american association for adamy Aren fbi nbc usa Uk
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"In the radio series hitchhikers guide to the future serreze. Douglas adams said this about digital books. Lovers of print are simply confusing the plate for the food. Welcome to the professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host heaven episode. I discuss arm length digital textbooks and a new book club pack. We've been in the age for quite some time. Now and aibo have been around quite a while including the textbooks notice that i just used the terms book and digital textbook. I haven't even had the chance yet. To drop in e textbook electronic book online textbook e taxed nor have i had the chance yet to address the variations of spelling involved in each of those is the book lower case upper case is that e hyphenated or just added onto booker taxed or whatever were pre pending to. You're anticipating that. I'm headed into.

serreze Douglas adams aibo
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"You'd better stick to it so my schedules that i put in there was always a little bit loosey-goosey so we knew always knew what was coming next. And roughly when it was coming but you know it also gave me some wiggle room if we wanted to stop and do something different for a little while and then move on or something took a little bit longer and i knew that we could catch up with that time a little bit later in the course. So it's up to you. Think about how you want to construct that you might wanna think about adding in there in the scheduling section. What do we do if there is a weather emergency or some other kind of emergency. That's going to require or shorten class or something like that and build in the contingency or at least how any change. Due to those reasons Will be communicated to the students so they know where to look if there's a hurricane and they can't come to campus in they're trying to figure out is this course still even going on right now..

hurricane
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"On your own with the judges. A i know what you're thinking to students read the syllabus. I'm guessing maybe half of them do and you know what half isn't so bad. that's batting. Five hundred. I'll take that it's the other half the onto. Don't read the syllabus who drive us nuts pan do we re directions or do we just ask our chair or director ordine or office administrator or a colleague in the next officer at the next desk. I do that all the time. I you know. Instead of looking at up i just ask somebody. Because that's the quickest thing. And i think our students often do that. So i'm kinda starting out with the idea that that empathy thing that i'm always harping about. Maybe we should put ourselves in our students shoes. You know. think about all those times when we don't read the directions either and we're just asking somebody because that's the easiest route and when we think of it that way and then put on our warmest sincerest smile and try to answer them and a voice other than that snarky one inside our heads. Then maybe we're going to connect better with our students and we can also embed in there just a gentle reminder that they could have found the answer in the syllabus. Okay so here's another question. What is syllabus. Well there are different kinds of syllabi or syllabuses. If you prefer that it could be just basic course. Policies plus probably a list of important elements in the course like like an overview of the content or other kinds of things like that. And we'll talk more about what can go into a syllabus later. But there's another kind of syllabus with a more. Comprehensive may be a very very detailed outline of the entire course sorta like attacks booker course manual raw of course pack. Well that's not the kind of this. I'm going to be discussing here. I'm talking about the first kind where it's a hopefully rather brief listing of course policies and different important facts about the course that students are going to need to refer back to later or we're gonna want them to refer back to them later and we're going to hope that they refer back to later about half of them are going to refer back to it later in the other half. Were just going to have to guide them back to it. There are some syllabi. That of course are somewhere in between the The short just the facts type of syllabus and the long textbook kind of syllabus. But i may aiming at That shorter end of the spectrum..

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"We want to hear from you so take a few notes and call the podcast hotline at one. Eight hundred three lion dan. That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or send an audio file or written message to podcast at the professor dot.

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"The results of this study show that student performance on practical and written exams is not affected by face to face versus online delivery. Student engagement with online material is the key factor towards performance on questions related to content delivered online further analysis done by the authors showed that students who performed dwell online content questions also performed well on face to face questions suggesting that strong students stay quote strong students. The authors acknowledged that the inclusion of the three hour practical lab session may have offset the self-directed aspects of the course since practical or lab classes served to supplement and consolidate the course content. Any issues and questions students had about their face to face or online content could be addressed in these sessions. In addition students who average less than one view didn't fail practical exam questions suggesting that practical lab sessions may have made it possible to succeed without commitment to accessing the online resources inclusion second year undergraduate students learn just as well from materials presented in the online environment as they do from face to face lectures and that repeated viewing of online videos with improved performance on assessments therefore a transition to online or blended learning does not hinder the performance of anatomy students provided the online resources are appropriate and as long as the face to face practical or lab sessions are part of the blended learning mix.

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:17 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A if we want to have a different version of anyone attempt of anyone test and we want to allow at least three attampts. Whoa that's a lot of different tests to right. Isn't it allow unlimited tests? Which is the direction which I've been having then. Wow we need a Jillian versions of each test. Any of that is pretty much impossible right or is it impossible. Not only is it possible. It's fairly easy not super easy but fairly easy. All the learning management systems have the ability to use. What I'M GONNA call a question set but each has its own name for this feature. Here's how it works for test item. One I ride three versions. They could be three different ways to ask the same question or they could be three different aspects of the concept that I want to assess in test item one for example it could be three different examples of cardiac muscle tissue to identify or it could be one. Each of three major types of muscle tissue when a student takes attempt one one of those three items in the questions that will be presented as test item one in their next attempt. It could be the same item presented or more likely one of the other two versions because it's randomly selected by the learning management system. Even if it's the same item one that they saw in their first test attempt each item in the task. Let's say fifty items total we'll be similarly randomized so yeah okay. Test Item? One is the same as they've seen before. But maybe probably all or most of the other forty-nine items on attempt to will be different than they've seen before as with a slot machine having three items in each question site for fifty test items will generate now on your seats here. It'll generate seven point two times ten to the twenty third different possible test attempt versions. Yeah that's all right. It's it's more than a mole of different versions. The thing is I usually have more than three items per questions. I divide up. I want my students to know in the fifty categories some of which overlap because I want to attack some things at different levels of understanding or application or style of test item. Then once I get going and I'm constructing three items from my first category or my first question set you know what I always think of a fourth item which boxing idea for fifth item Mandalay that but for multiple choice and matching items I can set the LMS to randomize the choices. So I've got another billion Brazilian versions of that test being generated because not only is the LMS picking random items out of a question set of three or four or five. It's also scrambling up the choices within a multiple choice or matching item. When I first started doing this back in two thousand and two I got a math. Professor help calculate the possible number of versions on any one of my tests and her calculator could not go that high. It just gave an error being a math professor. She had a pretty powerful calculator. And you know what that's all I needed to know. I didn't need to know the exact number I just needed to know. It blew out the math professor's calculator so that was good enough for me. That is good enough to ensure the my students weren't getting the same test and every attempt of course I waited until the semester started to begin making my first time hoops ship. It started that way and advanced so well so heavy days that first semester. When I came home from school I immediately set my timer for twenty minutes and wrote as many test items as I could before the timer went off doing that every day. Yeah it was a chore. But really twenty minutes was not that big of a chore and it became a habit so it really wasn't that hard to sit down and do it for twenty minutes every day. Because that's just kind of what I got used to. After my first test was done I was really getting good at writing test items and getting faster and faster about coming up with good test. Items and his students were taking attempts of their first test. While I was working on test to they were taking the first test. And they were giving me feedback on. Which items were poorly constructed or just odd or Fulla? Typo is or something was wrong with it. I could claim that I did that on purpose. But I didn't know I just got started late but it did turn out to have that silver lining then the next time I taught that course it was easy to add a few more test items to some of the question sets of course I was by now a seasoned pro at test item writing something. I'd always dreaded it because I didn't feel like I was any good at it. But all that retrieval practice gave me a certain level of mastery mentally mastery of test item writing but I also gained insights about the AP concepts that. I was considering for test items. I lived through it and I'm a better person for it or at least a slightly better person for and so yeah like any new project. It seems intimidating but it's like a very long walking trip. You take one step at a time and I don't know if you walked for twenty minutes a day four days a week for two sixteen week. Semesters you'll end up having walked more than one hundred twenty five miles probably with no injuries. No collapsing on the roadside. No dehydration just a smile on your face. So do it one step at a time and you can do it to me and I also want to mention some icing that I put on that retrieval practice cake and decorations after all. Isn't that cake that much better when it has icing and grains one thing? I did that helped a lot. The icing was give students an online pre-test before much of the course and online attempt taken from that huge test bank that built over that coming modules content because I told them to expect to fail it but they had to take it to unlock the videos and other learning resources for the coming module honestly it took a while to convince them not to read ahead and not to study not to prepare for it. It was merely to give them a peek at what they be expected to know later. But we're not in any way expected to know yet and you know what those pretexts helped a lot now. The cake decorations consisted of making my online tests. Cumulative every test had questions from all the previous tests the really important questions the core concepts the big ideas. Yeah of course. They balked at that one. I I told them who wouldn't. We've all learned. The cumulative tests are scary. But it didn't take them long to realize that those questions from prior modules were the easy questions to answer on a new test and by the time they got through a few tests. Those questions got even easier because they kept seeing those kinds of questions again and again questions on those topics cap coming up so they grew to love cumulative testing. I know that sounds weird. I know don't believe me but I swear it's true and I know what you're thinking that if we're doing all formative testing and it's open book and students can even consult with each other than well. Can we trust that? They've actually learned anything that they have any knowledge in their heads that they can use without a book without asking anyone and also there on the right track. Well the answer to that is an emphatic. And wholehearted yes. How do I know that? And how can I be so confident about it? It's because when I first started this and for many years thereafter I also did to summit of exams to see whether all that retrieval practice worked. And you know what it did. Not only students walk into their exams with more confidence. They did way better on them. Then my pass classes had done on their exams before I started doing. Any of his formative testing possibly part of that improvement came from their confidence. But I'm sure that a lot of it came from all those open book formative tests and my students told me that they not only felt confident on exam day. They also told me that they tried to cram for the exam but found that well. There just wasn't any need to as they prepared to cram the night before an age old ritual. They felt compelled to perform they realized as they reviewed the course content that kind of knew it all and knew it pretty. Well so yeah. I don't have any problem thinking that. The formative testing alone gave them what they needed. There's more to my story of retrieval practice in the AP course and a lot of that story is told in previous episodes and in seminar that I have available in the links and the show notes episode page. But before I wrap it up for now I want to mention that I really think it works. Best if we write our own test items most of the time sure the test items at the end of textbook chapters in study guides in online study or quizzing programs and the like are all useful tools and have their place and learning. But I've grown to like making my own and I think if I use my own test items that integrate easily with the way I tell the story of amp it works better for learning. But that's a discussion for another day. A in.

professor AP cardiac muscle dehydration Mandalay
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A in the upcoming full episode. That is episode number sixty six. We're going to continue the conversation about how to quickly and effectively move our on campus amp course to remote learning. And as part of that discussion. I'm going to talk about what author and Professor Bruneta Brown Calls F F ts Now. I translate. Ft's as fumbling first tries. She has another fray she uses. And I'll talk to you about what that phrase is and why it's important for amp teaching in the full episode. Something else I'm going to talk about is a phenomenon called Zoom bombing and it's something that I put some links in the show notes for the previous episode but run across it in time to get it into the audio part so I'm going to be doing that in the full episodes sixty six something else. I'll be talking about briefly. Is the online protein folding game called folded and how we can use that in teaching and learning and how that relates to the current pandemic and the featured topic is going to be about our teaching slides how we can keep them simple and keep them connected to the story. We're going to tell in. These are skills that I've learned in continuing to learn over a period of time. And it can help us now at this time when we're scrambling to deliver our story and our slides in a different way than we're used to but these are principles and techniques that can also be used once we get back on campus too so all of that and more coming up in full episode number.

Professor Bruneta Brown Ft
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hit yet another episode focusing on strategies to cope with teaching amp e during the cove in Nineteen Upright. This one is the third one. The first one was bonus episode sixty three which I titled Mid Winter Winterizing of our AP course in which came out a few weeks ago just before things officially hit the fan with this outbreak in the United States. We better get ready for a pandemics of planning tips and strategies. And that's still helpful even now that we're in the thick of things. The second one was bonus episode sixty four B which came out a little over a week ago enlisted nineteen additional specific tips for quickly moving from an on campus course to a remote environment. I called that episode quickly. Moving to remote delivery the musical and we did have music. Amp teacher and stem music composer. Greg crowder graciously sang three songs to sing along with so yeah really was a musical and now this third episode which probably won't be the last before. I jump into my list of additional tips. I WanNA clarify few things. I you may be listening to this episode way later than when I'm recording this. Which means that you are a survivor of the cove in nineteen outbreak of twenty twenty. That's great congratulations. You made it through but you might be thinking and there's nothing in these episodes for me but you'd be wrong. Most if not all of these tips really can help us in the cove in nineteen scenario but they are also useful for any course anytime anyplace second if you find even one thing in any episode that sparks. An idea for your teaching or is helpful any way. That's a win. Remember Kevin's law a professional development that I mentioned in the bonus APPS conference episode way back in twenty eighteen. It states that if I learned just one useful thing in a professional development experience. It's worth it. I've been reading and listening to a lot of advice often from colleagues who have never even taught online before that. Well just isn't the best advice in my opinion so I'm thinking there will be one thing in this episode that will spark a different way of thinking for you. If in fact you do learn just one thing in this episode or in any episode. Will you do me a favor and share it with a colleague? Email social media singing it off of your balcony would ever gets it out there to folks that could use the help. They're not flying those advertising glimpse anymore so this is the only way to spread the word third. You probably noticed that. I've not been providing my usual update on scientific discoveries in human biology for the last few episodes part of the reason. Is that the big story now. At least that set of stories keeping our attention right now are about the cove in nineteen outbreak could discuss these stories in this podcast but given the rapidly evolving nature of what we know and what we think. We know what we thought we know. But now we know we didn't know and and given the time between planning and episode recording an episode and then getting it all set up for release. Well whatever I say. We'll be out of date by the time you hear it. So what I'm doing instead is putting the top stories in my nosal newsletter which is a daily update of up to ten headlines. I've chosen for that day. Just go to nonsol- dot com slash. The professor nozzle is also nuzzle dot com slash the ABC professor. And take a look at some of the past issues if you think. It's helpful vent subscribe. It's free by the way you just need to put in your email address and share that newsletter. To if you know someone who may be interested fourth wow fourth. This is giving a longer than I intended. Oh men wait a minute. Don't tell me you're surprised by okay..

Kevin professor United States Greg crowder ABC
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

11:27 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hi there this is Kevin Patent. With a brief audio introduction to episode number sixty four of the amp professor podcast also known as top radio and audio salon for teachers of human anatomy and physiology in the upcoming full episode. That is episode sixty four. I'm going to have a conversation with chase DEMARCO. Now Chase. The Marco is widely known is a numbness. That is a memory expert. He's also a consultant entrepreneur more and believe it or not initiative that he's an MD PhD candidate who has a passion for helping medical students succeed in their studies and in their professional exams. Now I got a lot of support from my recent discussions of Flash Card techniques and episode fifty eight fifty nine and sixty and this conversation will complement those with an explanation of a study techniques sometimes called a memory palace which is based on something very old and very effective called the method of Loci. But wait for the full episodes. Sixty four where you'll get to know chase and learn a lot more about this memory technique. The free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science and Human Anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree. I'm on the Faculty of this program so I know the incredible value it is for an MP teachers check out this online graduate program at NYC DOT EDU slash. Happy or click. The Lincoln the show notes episode page. And you gus that it's time once again for were where we practice what we all do in teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes terms that are new to us or maybe they're so new that nobody knows him yet because they just got made up by somebody today. We have a few related to our main topic in that. Is this memory technique that we're going to be discussing with chase the Marco and the first term is come up before actually more than once and passed up assode and we did dissect at once back in episode number fifty nine and that is the word mnemonic so just to refresh our memories a little bit that word part non means memory literally. It means mindful but we use it in terms of memory and then the icy ending needs relating to so pneumonic when you put it all together means relating to memory and usually refers to something that aides memory it can be a mnemonic sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word and sentence has the same first letter of items in a list that we wanna remember but there are other mnemonic techniques. And we're going to be discussing one of those techniques in the full episode regarding pronunciation. I find myself going back and forth between me monarch and pneumonic and that usually depends on the context words around it and my brain just goes there with when to or not. Just come out of my mouth. And maybe they're things like that you do two now. The latter pronunciation MNEMONIC is preferred by most of the sources. I looked at so I'm going to try and stick with that as much candy or we'll see how that goes. The next word on the list is a related term. It's actually just another version of the word pneumonic. And that is numbness. And it's the same as demonic. But we're going to swap out that IC- ending in demonic input in ast ending which means an agent or performer of something and so an honest literally van is a person in agent performer. Someone who performs memory most often the term in the English language is used to describe someone who's adapt out or skilled in feats of memory. Like I dunno remembering the order of cards and a shuffled deck or Memorizing as much as they can from a page from a phone book or maybe trying to learn all the bones of the skeleton. Yeah that's a feat of memory and that takes some work and maybe there are some techniques that we can use to make that. Go more simpler for students at still going to be hard. But maybe there's a way to help them organize that and and get done quickly and effectively really be able to retrieve that information when it needs to be retrieved and yeah I sometimes find myself pronouncing it sometimes which actually that does show up occasionally dictionaries but it's most often pronounced nemesis are honest. I sometimes mistakenly US methodist instead anonymous. I don't know where that comes from. But anyway I swap out the end for a t go figure. I promise to work on that. If you promise to overlook my mistake okay the next term on our were dissection list is Loci L. O. C. I it's a word that's GONNA come up related to demonic technique that we're going to be discussing in the full episode. It can be pronounced. Loci as I just did but other common pronunciations are low cy or Loki but when I hear pronouncing that way Loki High. I think of that trickster. From Norse Mythology Loki L. O. K. I. So loci it is from me but you get to pick your favorite LOCI. Is the plural form of the Latin word locus LLC US which we also use as is an English meaning place or location? In fact the word location is derived from the word locus. We sometimes use locus in genetics. To describe the physical location of a gene within a chromosome. So you may have run across that use already. Loci is the plural form of locus. So it simply means places. We're going to be talking about a technique sometimes called the method of loci which we can now more easily see simply means method of places. This podcast is sponsored by hats. The human anatomy and Physiology Society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit HAP- s- at the professor dot org slash hats that's h? Aps only hey but step into the bookshop and see what we may want to add to our personal professional bookshelf. I'M GONNA go straight over to the medical shelf this time because I know exactly which book I'm looking for. It's called read this before medical school out of study smarter and live better while excelling in class and on your use a complex board exams. It's by chase DeMarco Theodore McConnell and Grodin recognized that name chase DeMarco. He's the guy I'm chatting with in the upcoming full episodes sixty four as you can tell from the title. This book is for students in medical school and you may teach. Medical students are students in some other health profession program. Or maybe you're teaching. Amp TO PRE MED or pre nursing or any of the many other students in the typical amd p course. This book could be helpful to any of them really why because all the students had just mentioned are being hit with what's surely feels like a fire hose of information if feels that way because it really is a lot of information and ideas to learn in a very short period of time and most of them will eventually be facing licensing or other professional exams of some sort right whether it's complex or in class or even try outs for jeopardy advice and strategies offered in. The book could be a game changer for some students. This book covers all the important things to consider when trying to figure out how to succeed in. Aim for example. Why STUDY SKILLS ARE IMPORTANT? Y? Class participation is essential how to use the teacher's time and resources effectively using the school's resources how to study at home making a study plan in managing time effectively. A lot of my students could use. I could use the value of study groups and how to organize and run a study group and even how to optimize work life balance. There's also a big section on test prep which strategies for both course exams and those big professional exams. I just mentioned a moment ago and because there's a lot of memorization required in amp. Yeah you know there is right. There's a big section on memory strategies. This is a great book to have on your teaching show to offer to students as a place to start learning how to study. And how to handle that? Fire Hose of ideas. Amp or perhaps. Add to your list of recommended resources for your students. Just go to the show notes or episode page or the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Book Club to take a look at this book and be sure to listen to the full episodes sixty four featuring a chat with the author chase DEMARCO. Hey you probably forgot about that survey that I've been taking. That's part of my end of season. Debriefing I'm asking you now. Please take just a few minutes of your time to respond to that anonymous survey because it's your experience as an individual listener. That's important to me. Just go to the AP professor dot Org Slash Survey and as always. Thanks for your support. Searchable transcript and a captioned audio gram of this preview episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy. Check out there many resources and events on their newly redesigned website at Anatomy Dot Org. Well this is Kevin Patent signing off for now and reminding you to keep your questions and comments coming. Why not call the podcast hotline right now at one eight three three? That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or visit us at the AP Professor Dot Org. I'll see you down the.

chase DEMARCO professor Kevin Patent Marco amp professor American Association for Anato NYC locus LLC US consultant Loki High Physiology Society DeMarco Theodore McConnell Loki L. O. K. amd Grodin
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Sixty two of the ANC professor podcast also known as tap radio. You an audio laboratory for teachers of human anatomy and physiology well. This is a preview of the upcoming full episode which is episode number sixty two and it's titled Another Big Year in Teaching Anatomy and physiology and that parallels the title from an episode. We did about a year ago called a big year and that was a debriefing. A review a look back back of the first year of the professor podcast. And so we're going to do that again in episode number sixty two. And so. It's all about debriefing. It's all about reflecting flocking. It's all about looking back and reviewing what we did so we're going to take a moment to think about to remind ourselves about how we as teachers can in deep grief in a way that is constructive and helpful and affirming and then we're going to dive right in and summarize a whole year of this podcast. Okay non exactly summarize everything but at least sit at the scenic overlook and take in the broad view of everything finger pointing out a few of the most interesting things that happened along the way.

professor ANC