35 Burst results for "Professional Services"

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

05:40 min | Last month

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

"Thank you now. Back to jason and jeff. I have a quick question for you jeff. You said you win. By having the best people. And that's that's a popular adage and in so many firms. When they they position themselves you know they always say our people our greatest assets. We have the best people everybody says that. Yeah but i'd be curious to know in jason. I don't think i've ever asked you this question. Neither but i'd like to know your thoughts define best. What makes the best person the best people. Because i think what i consider the best people may be different from what jason considers the best people while turning around in another question. What's the kind of work you do. What's the kind of client you serve. And i think those kind of things are going to inform your definition of best people so if the kind of work that you're doing is executional in nature it's process based it's about ninety nine point nine percent up time ninety nine point nine percent quality best person is gonna mean something different for that organization than you know someone who is a doing something more creative that that naming exercise that you know that i referred to advertising or something else that's you perhaps it's innovation in the healthcare space. Perhaps it's developing a strategic thinking and strategic plans. You're more these questions that are more unknown rather than execution of something. That's known you're going to need different types of people for that so so i think the mission and vision of the organization is going to inform how they define best people he i was i was just gonna layer on top latin. Everything you described him. They're totally agree with. It feels very about culture. I think that thing. I would appear at the hip without is the mission of the organization. I don't mean the mission statement that's written down. I mean what is the mission that we're trying to accomplish nowhere. A fifty million dollar firm in our mission is to be a hundred mandar firm by xyz date for this or that or whatever right you know so. There's some future state stated goal that that leadership is driving towards that has to layer onto. What people do you need to get there..

jason jeff xyz
"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

04:27 min | Last month

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

"How leadership in their personalities in these drivers whether it's it's fear of something or fear of not having something that shapes the culture in influences everybody within an organization and the firm's potential. Yeah i mean there's so much rich territory to navigate their at an you highlighted a couple of years in what i would call out or fears. You know fear of fear of not getting what you want. Fear of not delivering the result. That you've been asked to deliver those kind of things. But i think the main fear in a professional services firm frankly from having been in in it and from having been around a lot of people in professional services demane fear is the fear looking stupid and so much hay hay. Jason you have that fear. Don't you never mls. This is true outside of professional service firms. To but i think it's especially true within it and i had managers. Tell me this you know you have two jobs in a professional services for one is to do your work and the other is to make sure you look good doing your work and make sure everybody else knows what you're doing and that second job is exhausting and so the more that as you think about how you be an effective leader in a professional services firm the more you can take that second job off people's plates so that they can actually bring what they bring to the table without the fear of looking stupid or being stupid that they can actually be heard by their leader they can actually contributes a new and potentially innovative idea at no. You know the key to having good ideas is to have lots of bad ideas some of that that idea generation. I mean i was listening to one of your podcast about someone who was in the business of naming things. Well you know. How many bad names do you need to come up with something before you come up with the one that sticks right and to create that kind of environment where there's just this constant juicy bertel conversation that turns into good things mid that is the magic to me. The leader is not the person who has to have the best ideas..

mls Jason bertel
"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

02:26 min | Last month

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

"Jeff. So we're going back to growth. Which i we're never really leave growth but we. We did a series on growth with a blood guests in late. Twenty twenty and we're going back into that series but we're going to do it with a different ben. Dear invited a guest on talk with us about leadership in growth. In really i guess. Leadership either enables growth or or blocks from happening so. Would you like to introduce our guests to our listeners. For me and be happy to in. This is going to be really confusing for listeners. Because on the call with us today is another jeff. Jeff munn say hi jeff. Hi jeff jabs on the podcast with us today. Because i love jeff. Jeff is a former colleague of mine from hewitt. Let him share his story in. Just a moment. But from that time. I met jeff. I had a kindred spirit in so many different ways in terms of our view of professional services business. He's brilliant intellectually by. He really gets the softer side of business. In life in professional services in particular has one of the most interesting career trajectories. And i'll let him tell you about that and you'll soon find out while he's on the podcast with us today. You'll hit jeff all right thanks. Jeff yes so. I started out as a law. Firm lawyer in the nineties moved to hewitt. Was there at hewitt and geoff in my time. Overlapped was it humid for fifteen years. Had eight different jobs. While i was there had a couple of other engagements including a roughly five year one at at fidelity investments to end my official corporate employees career. But all along the way. I was studying personal development. It kind of happened by necessity. I started out. You know in law school and as a lawyer really struggling with panic attacks and anxiety and trying to manage that and trying to manage my own overachiever. Tendencies and guide into meditation. I mean this was at the time. You know phil. Jackson was teaching the chicago bulls. Meditation and i decided it couldn't be too weird if An nba team was using it..

jeff Jeff Jeff munn jeff jabs hewitt geoff fidelity investments chicago bulls phil Jackson nba
"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

07:32 min | 3 months ago

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

"Through what that looks like out. Why do you say that. Do you have data or evidence to point that to be true or is that your opinion that this is a thing. No i i have data and we'll talk about it. I'm not gonna talk about it right now. But yes very much moving in his direction in one of the people that we could probably have on the talk. This is our friend gunnar. She and gunnar branson is ceo of a fire which represents some of the largest investors in real estate and it's really important to those investors to invest in companies in communities that meet these criteria. Because they're all in on the yes g. in you're not you're you're development is not going to get funded and last year able to substantiate them so access capitals can be really import. The second is recruiting two large degree. I think the us is also being driven from a consumer perspective from an employee. Perspective because millennials in particular thing tend to be less religious look to their work for more fulfillment and and want the places they worked for to be purposeful in doing good and giving them meaning in by that at means being aligned with their social views. And if you're going to run a recruit best talent. I think a lot of firms are thinking. We have to say something around these issues. Because it's important to the top talent we want to recruit the third is revenue in having to deal with buyers of services who want to see your. Es score because they want to choose vendors that are aligned with es g thinking a lot of organizations. I talked to have not necessarily lost business because of the espn that can cannot want to an example that was the loss but they are regularly being asked in there are ps to provide e s g supporting materials. I think that's an important one. And then the third the third one in this kind of overlaps. All three of those in that is this element of risk mitigation and really the purpose of es g from a business perspective in that is about ensuring permission to operate so managing the risk that would threaten your ability to operate whether that's a boycott in people not buying your product or are having environmental issues that would lead to a shutdown of some kind. That's probably not as relevant in professional services and software or having some kind of corporate malfeasance. Right where the governance protocols did not. Y'all stop something that should have been prevented in those other two. So i think it's about risk mitigation and ultimately all of this is about permission to operate in the industries that we live in. It's going to be a fun conversation. I think you missed one. What so everything. You talked about a lot of ways was talked about through the lens of really risk. Mitigation right it's we have to be able to attract talent. Were mitigating our risk of not being able to attract talent. You know where we g score to close a deal but there is a giant hot gold for most firms inside this university s g. Because there's so much opportunity. The thing that i've always said on the east side you know leave it on. The east side is that would organization seem always felt seem to misunderstand. Was that the opportunity to solve climate change issues the obscene to solve to decarbonise things all those types of concepts that we've been talking about a business opportunity knocking and there are firms that are positioned to go cream whole new practices service offerings. The never even dreamed us to solve these problems. So i just think y'all set to kind of look at the flip side of this there. There's there's opportunities to help your clients solve these problems that they face every single day am don't miss that. I guess. I'm glad you called that out. That is absolutely spot on. I think that's an excellent perspective. I see that as part of the revenue generation but it really does cut across all them because there are opportunities in terms of recruiting just as much right different type of working as a result of of some of this thinking as well. We won't get into the details here but you think about kind of a lot of the push around diversity in hiring expert on this by any structure immagination but i do think. There's some pretty solid rationale that bringing diversity in thought into your workforce probably a pretty healthy thing where we weren't a point in society where you know we've competed everything down to the bare bones and if you've got a whole bunch of people that outlook the same on the same the same. Pretty hard innovate. This is reality. You need to different view to get nation. Peterson row rationale there too. So fine we are. We're at time. So let's take this to wrap. I'm actually gonna put plenty back to you. Where do we go from here. What were you going to cover next time for. I can go on this journey of itchy with us. what's next. I think we're going to talk a little bit about the risks and rewards of this so ending right where you and i ended. Think is the perfect setup for that you know what are the risk. What are the rewards. Have you accurately assess them in taking advantage of. What's there are you somehow just modeled in the middle of the herd and just doing a little. Or maybe you're going in just to say or something. We need to talk about the risks and rewards. We'll do that next time. This this is going to be an interesting topic. I appreciate you bringing it to the forefront and we will go into it as deeply as we know al endure best to bring you know sound thinking against performed so well. At least one of us were yeah. I know i'll do my desk. We'll see what you can next zimbabwe. Thank you for listening to rattle and pedal divergent thoughts on marketing and growing professional services firms find content related to this episode at rattling dot com rattling pedal is also available on itunes and stitcher..

itunes last year one Peterson third one second third two three gunnar single day
Building The Build To Sell Business

MarTech Podcast

01:54 min | 4 months ago

Building The Build To Sell Business

"For your business be valuable. It has to be something that will work without you and that is really the essence of a valuable company. That when you take the owner out of the equation for a moment does the business continued to thrive and that's really the essence of all of the works that we do is is structure and this is not a new concept. Michael gerber course. The very famous author wrote the ems sort of coined. This term work on not in your company similar principles but the idea is for your company to have transferable value could sell it effectively. What it has to succeed without you. When i read built to sell i wasn't at a million dollars in revenue. I was that probably about ten thousand dollars of revenue. I just left running the marketing department at an early stage startup. i started a professional services. Business i had brought on my first client and i didn't know what i was doing. I was in what i call the. Atm phase which is anything for money and somebody needed some marketing help. And i said great. I'll take it. And fortunately for me. I ran into the podcast and the book and while creating a system where the owner can be replaced from. The business is one of the primary takeaway. One of my biggest takeaways was building a set of systems and products for services business. Instead of saying i'm going to come in and solve your problems it was. These are the things that i can sell. You hear my products. Here's how am packaging the work that i'm doing in a formalized systematic way which led me from being a. I'm a random marketing consultant to. I am someone who does brand development and marketing strategy. And here's how. I think about the differences between these two products and because their products. Here's how i seldom. Here's how much they cost. Here's how long it takes to deliver. And i have a standard deliverable with me scale my consulting

Michael Gerber
How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:21 min | 7 months ago

How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

"Of the characteristics of this virus economy as we have said on this program. I cannot tell you how many times is how uneven its effects have been on people black and brown and low income. Americans do in way worse in health and jobs and just getting by than whiter and wealthier populations are uncomfortable. As to how they're doing depends on what industry they're in and on states some of which have been really hit by this pandemic less revenue from income and sales taxes and higher virus expenses and some of which states that is doing all right so as the senate takes up. President biden's relief bill this week. And it's three hundred and fifty billion dollars in aid to state and local governments marketplace's mitchell hartman starts us off with a tale of several states. The pandemic recession has delta significant blow to tax collections. State revenues were down by nearly two percent from december. Last year overall. All but according to the urban brookings tax policy center tax revenues actually increased in twenty two states. This disparity has a lot to do with the mix of jobs in layoffs in a state. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy so many lower income people have been laid off higher income. People have been much more likely to keep their jobs so tax. Revenues are down by double digits in states with lots of low-wage tourism jobs in hotels bars and restaurants florida and but states with more jobs that can be done from home at higher wages. Like in high tech and professional services are faring better. Washington's one example thinks in part to folks like darby megan of spokane he's a manager for tech startup. his wife's an accountant for an architecture firm. They're both working from home. We've maintained our salaries and that's been huge blessing. Haven't had to take a step back hours or anything. Like that with the stimulus checks. That was a nice little bonus. The couple owns a home. That's gone up in value. So they're paying more property tax but they've improved their overall balance sheet. We've been able to save significantly more right. We're not eating out as much and they made one really big purchase. A new van built into an rv. So we've sort of taken some of our vacation money that you budget and instead may domestic vacation mobile now not every high earner has come through the pandemic recession unscathed. Fiona greek at the g. P. morgan chase institute has been tracking household checking balances. There are some high income families that have seen cuts in their income cuts in their salaries but most of seeing their bank balances and assets grow and she says one reason is the booming stock market the broader trend. There's the growth and wealth. We see a lot of families transferring money into brokerage accounts to take advantage of those games but some states are missing out on taxing. Those income gains at the top. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy. He points to nevada heavily dependent on tourism dollars revenue down about twelve percent where there is no broad based income tax. You're leaning a lot on sales taxes. Regressive taxes in general. Your revenues aren't going to do quite as well as progressive taxes at a time. Like this of just soaring income inequality contrast that with california that's opted for a more progressive mix leaning a bit more on the income tax most states do with higher top income tax rates on top earners. Especially that's staring a whole lot. Better with revenues up around two percent since the pandemic started. That's helped a good bit by silicon valley which attracted v and his family from texas. So i'm a software engineer. I was in iran for about four and a half years. And then during the pandemic My wife connor fulltime opportunity and bay area so we moved. He says silicon valley employers are hiring. Like there's no tomorrow. There were plenty of opportunities in the to offers in my hand. Some states are now considering hiking taxes on top earners to boost revenues and fund recovery from the pandemic including new york. Minnesota connecticut rhode island and

Institute On Taxation And Econ President Biden Mitchell Hartman Urban Brookings Tax Policy Cen Carl Davis Darby Megan Fiona Greek P. Morgan Chase Institute Senate Spokane Florida Washington Nevada California Connor Iran Texas
New York City’s Recovery May Drag Out Until 2023 Or Later

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:52 min | 8 months ago

New York City’s Recovery May Drag Out Until 2023 Or Later

"York City lost about 750,000 payroll and independent contractor jobs in 2020 during the pandemic, That's one out of every six jobs. But while the covert 19 vaccine has fueled hopes of a recovery this year, a new report says the city's economy will not snap back easily. The report comes from James Parrot of the Center for New York City Affairs at the new school. He spoke with W. N. Y C senior reporter Beth Fertig, who's covering the recovery. Which jobs did we lose the most of in New York City? So they The industry with by far the greatest number of lost jobs is the restaurant. Industry. The arts. And entertainment recreation sector has proportionately been hit the hardest. And in both of these sectors in an other sectors like hotels. And retailing. What I call the face to face. Service industry category. Job losses have been about twice. Proportionally in New York City, as at the national level, which communities are hit hardest by those job losses because you looked at the demographics right in here, you know we can only we can only estimate but in trying to estimate that you know our senses that Very heavy concentration among workers of color, you know about 70% of all job losses. Young workers got hit very hard, And in both of these cases, it's because The industry. They got hit hardest face to face service industries restaurants. Retail have very high concentrations of persons of color in industries like restaurants and clothing. Retailing have a lot of young people. When we talk about recovery. Everybody uses this phrase K shaped recovery. Who's on the line on that letter K that's pointing up. Which industries are you talking about? Yeah. So in the report we refer to these is the remote working industries. So it's industries. Like finance, professional services, law firm's accounting firms, consulting firms, a lot of the tech industries and professional services. Also information media. Movie production, television production. And then a lot of the real estate industry is part of that, also, so so these are generally you know, much higher paid. Industries. For the most part, they're workers have been able to work remotely during the pandemics, so that upward part of the K has done very well. And meanwhile, the people losing the jobs are on the downward part of the case. So it's It's a good chunk of people in the lower half of the income spectrum that people who work in restaurants in retail people in the arts sector. Um in nail salons and barber shops, even for some who have gone back to work. Because their industries and businesses haven't fully recovered. Many are only working on a part time basis. Let's say most New Yorkers get vaccinated by September. And you predict thousands of people will move back to the city. As a result, why do you say jobs and businesses still won't snap back this year? Clearly when vaccinations there would spread And business restrictions are lifted me there's going to be an expectation that people will still where face mask for some period of time until you know the infection rate really gets driven down so that you know it means that Retail employment is not going toe bounce back to where it was before, and tourism is a big part of the New York City economy. It supports effects you know between 305 100,000 jobs. You know, one expects the tourism sector to be fully rebounded for three or four years. What would need to happen for there to be a faster recovery? President Biden, you know, has a very ambitious Recovery plan that will further extend unemployment benefits and so on, so that will certainly help. But it's not necessarily gonna Rebuild or reconstruct the jobs or replace the jobs that we lost. But that will take I think is significant physical infrastructure investment plan and and sort of corresponding Social infrastructure investment, and so we need a combination of Service jobs and construction jobs. To provide the level of employment demand that is going to take to get us back to the level. That we were at a year

James Parrot Center For New York City Affai W. N. Beth Fertig New York City York City President Biden
Christine Rimer On Learning From The Data

Crack the Customer Code

05:54 min | 8 months ago

Christine Rimer On Learning From The Data

"Adam. You know we've talked a lot about how changes that we encountered in twenty twenty affected customers. But you know who else. They affected everyone. Everyone including customer experience leaders. Yes one hundred percent the people who were leading these organizations who were trying to figure out. How do we adjust. How do we react. How do we keep our leaders focused on the customer experience when all these other things are happening. And that's why. I'm so excited about the conversation that we're about to share with christine rhymer from surveymonkey. She works with these leaders all the time and really goes out of her way to listen to them. And it's just there's so much in here. I am so excited. Knows great interview and she brings brings a wealth of data which is fantastic. Because obviously she's surveymonkey they have the data they bring the receipts right. Gene-o and yeah. I mean that's been one of the things we've talked about with clients and it's just. How do you predict how plan for howdy strategies for a future when you know that is always about projecting forward a pattern Th that's all leadership for the future is and you know outside of some innovation generally trying to figure out which what are my percentages in which patterns or going to apply. And how are they going to play out and when the pattern is completely just wrecked right. It doesn't exist anymore. How do you project that future so you know. Christine brings some lessons from a lot of discussions and a lot of data about like what we're executives facing. And what did they do. What were the things that were most important in customer experience last year as everyone tried to figure out this uncertain future. Yeah absolutely impressive. I should say certain future. But they had certain president. Yeah i think we're in for uncertainty a while so we can say present and future so there are lessons in this episode for nail And for and for the future. I would say so. So let's get started. Let me tell you a little bit about my friend. Christine rhymer seasoned executive with a unique blend of product marketing customer success and enterprise systems experience leverage to lead high-performing cross functional teams to deliver world class customer experiences as the vice president of customer experience. Christine leads survey monkeys customer experience program community and thought leadership to drive growth and innovation prior to joining survey monkey in two thousand sixteen christine held a variety of cx leadership roles including intuit's professional services team for digital banking and the customer success for into it health. Christine began her career in enterprise. Business systems and data management where she aligned cross functional teams to deliver measurable business outcomes. Christine leverages her customer centric and bias to action approach to help organizations transform customer feedback into action to improve the customer experience to drive growth. Hi christine were so happy. You're here with us today for being here. Thank you so glad to be here. Jeannie an atom. So great have you. I know you have tremendous insights a working with serving a monkey as you do. Because i sure you've seen a lot of data so i'm going to get straight to the million dollar question here. The early part of twenty twenty one. How has customer experience change as a result of the covid nineteen pandemic. It's it's a great question. Adam and and you know honestly. I can remember sitting at my desk in april going. Oh dear lord like for all the date i have. I have not navigated. What do you do when you're not sure to me. It's you ask for feedback right and so actually very in april. I gathered a dozen custody of the top customer experience leaders. That i knew and i asked him that very question. What are you doing different. And so we'll talk about an. I'll give you kind of three headlines of what i saw early in the pandemic that true that influenced customer experience in twenty twenty and then sort of t ap at least what i'm seeing heading into twenty twenty one grio. The first thing we saw was a bunch of folks in headlights. Saying i can't actually focus on the customer experience if my employees are not in a position to deliver so it was so funny those initial conversations when we try to talk about. What are you doing different for your customers. It all came back to the employee experience. So things like are they set up to work from their homes. Assuming most folks not all right. The result essential workers but most folks then shifted. How they do their work to home. So do they have the right tools. Are they a the able to manage their customers. Privacy etc so really really tactical setting employees up for success but then on top of that making sure employees were positioned slash trained to show up to the customers with empathy. So right you're talking to a customer in march and april and there in new york city. How are you and they're a restaurant or they are a travel industry. How we showing up with that right Both the policies as well as the expectation setting to show with your customers. We know empathy matters but my goodness this year. If you're not showing up human first before business right you're just missing the mark and we've seen this both in the conversations As well as you know in terms of how you show up digitally

Christine Christine Rhymer Adam Intuit Jeannie New York City
Geospatial Data for Airports

Airplane Geeks Podcast

08:21 min | 8 months ago

Geospatial Data for Airports

"First item comes from connected aviation today. This is brock solutions emphasizes importance of technological investment in airport recovery. In twenty twenty one. So this is a piece from connected aviation today which is by collins aerospace and it includes a conversation with mark stokes who's the business manager smart suite at brock solutions and that's an engineering solutions and professional services company. They specialize in design construction and implementation of real time solutions. So that's the context for his comments but he notes that and this is a quote. Many in the industry went from full speed ahead managing the absolute peak of volumes to near dead stop. And of course. That's we've talked about that that supplied to to to to airlines to the airports all the many of the businesses that support those kinds of travel activities in this piece stoke says he believes biz as business Starts to come back. Airlines and airports are likely not going to bring back as many people as they had before and instead they'll look at opportunities to connect data in just operations to do more with less so he touches on areas such as well speaking of touching touchless. Travel like biometrics that requires the centralization of data. Buddy there's some issues budgets are tight in so to make investments along this area. The the roi is going to have to be there to support the investments but the other big piece of this is that passengers need to be comfortable traveling. Because if they're not they're not going back to the airport and so the investment is not going to have much of a return. So i this issue of airports managing Hopefully return to two volume one of the questions here. is you know. do you think this is Something that airports need to need to manage or do you think that you know they can just kinda cruise along and see what happens. Who's got a thought. I was i was. I was cheering on bob to go ahead. Go from my perspective traveler. I travel significantly over my career both nationally and internationally in for sure. You're going to see a significant change in technology as we move forward. It's going to be from my industry for geospatial perspective internally. We're going to start using g. I s. features to identify how data is collected insider facilities. In how is managed people move through. It's going to be important Things like uber and uber. Air and urban urban mobility are going to be important factors in. You're going to have to identify people coming through airports in half to be ready for the quantity of people that come through and manage how they traveled in ford. So it's gonna be a significant modification. I think technology as we move forward into the coming years Airlines come back. Yeah i would agree with that. I think because a whenever there's a downturn whether it's the economy as a whole or for a specific industry because of something peculiar or specific to that industry when things happen in companies have to at least temporarily operate differently because of circumstances they learn things about their operation and i it seems like things just never go back to the exactly the way they were so the airports have been isn't the airlines and the industry has been operating in a completely different mode as stoke says you know with volumes coming to a near dead stop and it gives them time to reflect on how they want to go forward and you know something that i think. That's that's likely to happen Especially when it comes to manpower i mean. Employees tend to be the really expensive component of companies cost structure in so You know with all the layoffs and reducing the numbers. Now you know will. They go back to full employment that they that they had before. It doesn't seem likely there. There's another Really interesting i think Quote from stokes in this piece is almost for me about the biggest takeaway in terms of airports and others responding to the situation. He says but in a recent conversation with one of our customers and stokes is talking about his customers he said he. The customer offered and insightful perspective on the situation we had the opportunity to see the future at the end of twenty nineteen which is unmanageable volumes of traffic with our existing systems. We know what's going to happen to our systems in our passenger flows in our facilities when those volumes. Come back now. We have some time to prepare an adjust course so we can avoid those problems. We were inevitably facing in two thousand nineteen died. That's a An interesting perspective on this. I think the other comment he makes which was kind of interesting as talking about touchless travel in the strong push toward that and he talks about biometrics and however in the past a lot of processes were done through human interaction. But he thinks we're going to evolve into more self-service supporting touchless or contact lists travel in. I would say yes. And i welcome that at this point. Who wants to touch anything in the airport. Ryan right arrive and also points out that in order to do that you know. There's a whole chain of events of transactions that transpire between when you arrive at the airport and when you step onto the airplane and to make that entire process touchless than you have to connect different activities within the airport that historically have not been connected because there was no reason to but if you wanna do a touchless flow the entire way you know from a data perspective they need to be connected yet but it you're never gonna be completely touchless Well you're gonna make all of this touchless and then you're going to go buy a sandwich at at the concession stand at the terminal. Yeah i mean the there's a level of yes it's convenient. I took an uber ride. The other day i was talking to my driver and my driver has spent the last couple of weeks taking a new phone and getting a vpn in making sure. Nobody has access to his data which seemed a little excessive but he was really concerned that somebody could track him and all of that. Now how is that person going to interact with a touchless experience. He doesn't wanna be touchless. He wants to be touched. Because when you when you do a touching transaction you can't track it on the internet and get it hacked later. I it's kind of interesting perspective but Yeah i'm all for taking my phone and having them scan the i d court card and not having to carry a boarding pass all around but there's a lot of other people who are terrified of that technology and there are other people who are of senior ages who might not be as tech savvy that want that kind of ability also so a kind of i don't know i'm a little. I'm a little hesitant to go. That everything needs to be touchless. I but maybe. I'm just being my usual grumpy old self you know. It's kind of funny that the uber driver wants to go off the grid when driver. They know exactly where he is at times. I mean you couldn't be more connected. Has an uber driver when your work.

Brock Solutions Collins Aerospace Mark Stokes Stokes BOB Ford Ryan
Are Real Estate Brokerage Fees Too High?

Real Estate Pro Tips & Strategies

05:36 min | 10 months ago

Are Real Estate Brokerage Fees Too High?

"As a home buyer or seller. Let's begin our podcast. Hello and welcome to this. Episode of real estate pro tips and strategies. The topic today is our real estate. Brokerage fees to high most real estate brokers are independent contractors employed by the broker and compensated for their services with sales commissions real estate listing brokers typically collect five to six percent on the sale price of the home and then share these commissions with the selling broker representing the buyer. These commissions represent one of the most expensive products purchased by consumers in the us. Pay an estimated one hundred billion annually in commissions consumer reports. Found that most people do not understand how real estate sales commissions work because brokers don't do a good enough job explaining it to them. So pete why is a realtor compensated with a commission. Instead of a salary or wage leslie. Most realtors are employed by their broker. Doesn't independent contractor. Independent contractors are not characterized as employees under irs and state requirements for withholding for income taxes. Realtors receive a ten ninety nine for tax reporting and they're responsible for paying their own income taxes through quarterly as a tax payments each year the broker benefits by reducing their overhead avoiding the requirement of payroll taxes unemployment contributions workman's comp insurance plus benefits including herald healthcare. Insurance furrow one k. Retirement contributions and what is the structure of a conventional brokerage commission will. Let's identify the parties involved in real estate transaction. There's the listing broker represents the seller. Then there's the selling broker who represents the buyer and by law. All commissions are negotiable wool between the broker and their client. The commission rate is set by the broker and agreed to by the client. Local mark local real estate market conditions affect competitive commission rates commission rates tend to be lower in a hot sellers market where there's limited supply of housing and high demand commission rates tend to be lower in soft buyer's market where there's an oversupply of available homes to buy an low buyer demand. And who pays the commission in a real estate sale usually the seller pays the broker commission to the listing. Broker commission is paid to the listing broker when the sale is completed and the fetus deducted from the seller sale proceeds the listing broker then shares of portion of the commission usually fifty percent with the selling broker who represents the buyer therefore in sales the buyer does not directly pay the sewing broker so if a sale transaction fails to close. Does the realtor receive any compensation. The answer is no the realtors burdened with the risk of after spending months of their time as well as their own money on transaction they could end up with nothing which is a huge loss. How do other professional services how do other professional service providers structure their compensation agreements well. Let's explore that contingency fee versus the retainer fee compensation models so as an example an attorney before taking on a case and formalizing a client relationship they will analyze the odds of prevailing receiving compensation for their services if the attorney believes the case challenging. And there's a good chance. They may not prevail the attorney will require a retainer fee agreement to represent the retainer fee. Compensation is essentially a pay. As you go plan where you're required to pay an initial fee up front in periodic recurring retainer fee payments paid until the case is settled. So with that plan. The attorney is paid regardless of the outcome of the lawsuit litigation and so therefore the retainer fee is a no risk compensation plan for an attorney. Now if the odds are winning or high the attorney can agree to represent you on a contingency compensation. Plan the contingency fee compensation is usually a large percentage of the monetary award. It can be as much as twenty five to fifty percent or more of the amount you would receive if you win the lawsuit. Thir- usually no initial or recurring legal fees paid to the attorney by the client if the lawsuit is one. The attorney is paid only when you prevail if you don't win. The attorney is not paid the contingency fee attorney compensation is a high risk high reward plan which is very similar to the real estate broker commission. Compensation model why might realtors be getting paid too much to sell a home. Let's look at that. The amount of the commission is a percentage of the final sold price so as an example if the total commission to sell a luxury home

Leslie Pete IRS United States
Reflecting on a New Report on the Experience of Disabled Students in Higher Education

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

Reflecting on a New Report on the Experience of Disabled Students in Higher Education

"Start this week not with covid-19. Change but with a new report from the policy connect higher education commission arriving at thriving highlights the work that still needs to be done to support the full participation of disabled students. Thought she I'm already tell us more. Thanks Jim. And so this is a new report from policy connects h e commission. It is called very casually arriving at thriving it's a great Rapport and what I really like about is it's genuinely listen to student perspective. It's got 12 recommendations that right across the student life cycle and these recommendations really ensure that disabled students can fully participate in Haiti. And what's really interesting about. The report is that it's very clear that there's a benefit for all students when we ensure that we get it right for disabled students and it's interesting the report I think cuz there's a few moments in it where the recommendations she talked about a need to focus on outputs. But of course most of our regulations certainly in England focuses on outcomes. Absolutely. The report is is really interesting and actually it needs to be given much thought. Providence and I think it's likely to get to these in these times which is a great shame. The the point that I'm really just made in introduction there about the fact that all of us students benefit from from from making sure that we are properly accessible. I don't mean accessible in a just a physical sense, but but but thinking about that policies and procedures and the way in which we we look after each other and so on so it's really important and finally we need to give it more prominent than it's currently God. I married this thing about, you know, the kind of deficit model that it talks about. I mean should we spend more of our time helping disabled students just navigate an access h e or actually should our Focus be on sort of everyone around disabled students, you know administrators and support staff and academics because it doesn't have a picture of a sector that appears to not really understand the needs of this group of students. Yeah. I mean, I think what's really nice about the twelve recommendations is that they're sort of a balanced portfolio so some wage You know pointed it shouldn't behaviors and particularly around social belonging. It's fellow students who helped you to feel like you belong to an institution not necessarily that you know, the administrator that you interact with. So some of them around student behaviors, but I think the the bigger aim here is to really get institutions and the regulator moving on on some very clear improvements for disabled students. I think particularly for Professional Services listeners this idea around the burden of bureaucracy. I mean University Systems are hard for most students in in my experience. They're particularly hard for students who have disabilities. So I think there's a lot of valuable takeaways for institutions and I guess what's really nice is it's got joined-up approach outside of an institution as well as so it talks about these joined up plans for each stage of a student life cycle may be logged in is a pupil at school or college and then moving through to the labor market and that's really got to be the the ultimate aim of game rights have a joined-up approach across all those sectors and obviously we're in the middle of a pig. Global pandemic at this point are you getting any sense that you know, the the needs here particularly for disabled students in relation to access are changing cuz some people tell me that you know, things are getting actually much better for disabled students. Suddenly, you know, everyone is agreeing to lecture capture where some disabled students were lobbying for that for years, but other people are telling me that actually new needs a new disabilities are coming to the surface wage, you know, each time. We we make progress on on something we make progress in in One Direction or another what we need to really now do and I think the reporters saying is you think about it in in all of those directions to make you know, make sure that we understand the impact that one's going to have on on another. I think one of the first things that we really need to do and universities absolutely and not just universities. But Society more widely. We need to make it off absolutely the case that people feel able to to to be who they are and to and to discuss their

Administrator Haiti JIM Providence England University Systems Professional Services
Stocks Skid After Trump Tests Positive For The Coronavirus

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:19 min | 1 year ago

Stocks Skid After Trump Tests Positive For The Coronavirus

"Investors are reacting to the uncertainty over president trump and the first lady's Corona Virus Test Results the stock market opened lower. This morning and overseas markets also fell after the president tweeted the news overnight. All this comes as Congress has failed to pass another round of corona virus relief aid and a new jobs report out. This morning shows a recovery that may be losing steam. Let's turn to NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott horsely good morning, Scott Good Morning David. Let's start with the financial markets. How have they been reacting to the president's positive test result? Markets are down but not dramatically. So the Dow dropped about three hundred points in the first few minutes of trading. This morning that's just over one percent European markets were also lower. A lot of the Asian markets were closed for a holiday today but the Nikkei index in Japan dropped less than one percent. We've seen bigger moves in recent days as investors tried game out prospects for another round of Corona virus relief here in Washington. So you know certainly this is another wildcard, one more wild card as we approached the November election and uncertainty can add to market volatility, but the reaction, the market so far has been fairly muted. I mean we're getting pretty close to that November election day and we have a new jobs report out this morning from the government and that I mean this last one before the election, right? That's right and it's not a great one The US is still adding jobs but at a much slower pace employers added just six hundred, sixty, one, thousand jobs in September that's less than half the number of jobs they added the month before. And now we've seen three straight months of declining job growth and we've only recovered a about half of the twenty two million jobs that were lost back in March and April. Now there was. An encouraging sign, the unemployment rate fell in September two, seven point, nine percent that sounds pretty good. Unfortunately behind that headline the drop was mostly because people got discouraged and dropped out of labor market. Some businesses are still hiring restaurants and retailers continued to add jobs in September. So did professional services, but we saw pretty big job cuts in education by state and local governments, which is an ominous sign Also, some of those temporary census workers who were hired in August were let go in September as the head count nears its completion. So we talk markets, we talk unemployment and jobs numbers, what what if we zoom out and just talk about the broader economy? How how is it faring and how has it gotten through this this pandemic to take a right now, some parts of the economy are are doing. Okay. homebuilding for example, has been booming thanks to high demand for houses and super, low, interest rates. But overall, we are seeing an economic rebound that is losing some of its bounce. Personal income fell in August, largely because of a big drop in unemployment benefits after six hundred dollars, a week that Congress had authorized early in the pandemic expired at the end of July spending on goods has mostly Rick has basically recovered its pre pandemic levels but spending on services has not and you know there's a concern that the relief payments that have been cushioning the fall out have been have largely expired now, and there's no replacement site. What's more? There's a fear of a resurgence of the virus itself as colder weather comes, and now the White House about the president's diagnosis is just going to add to that.

President Trump Congress NPR Donald Trump Washington United States Scott Good Professional Services Scott Horsely White House Japan Rick
"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"professional services" Discussed on Rattle & Pedal: B2B Marketing Podcast

"You're listening to Rattle and pedal diversion thoughts on Mom and growing Professional Services firms. Your hosts are Jason Wilkie and Jeff MacKay..

What Went Wrong With Contact Tracing Apps

Slate's If Then

08:30 min | 1 year ago

What Went Wrong With Contact Tracing Apps

"Back in March when it was clear that cove nineteen was spreading rapidly across Europe the UK had a problem much like the US ability to test for the virus was extremely limited. So while they race to increase their testing capacity, they put their faith in a technological solution. When they embarked on this APP, it was going to be the primary government response to this entire pandemic. while. Other governments such as Germany I deployed testing capabilities and then got their hospitals ready for the flow of patients. The UK prioritize development of an APP to do all things and that is the APP wasn't just to do contact tracing the APP was there to detect whether or not you are risk, and so it wanted to use as much data as a could in order to compute whether or not based on you not feeling well and based on your interactions with others. Could they guess essentially whether or not? You had the virus so it was supposed to be the in extraordinary intelligence exercise to compensate for the fact that they didn't have testing. The NHS spent months developing their tests and trace APP and in early May they launched a limited trial of the newly minted tech on the Isle of wight. That's an island on the south coast of England. The APP worked are was supposed to work by enabling smartphones to communicate with each other via Bluetooth users would enter their health data which would then be shared to a centralized server. If they had Kobe's symptoms, other users, they'd come in close contact with would be alerted and directed to self isolate. Gus was one of eleven people on an ethics, advisory board for the project, and so he got an early look at the APP and it didn't take long for all of them to find problems when we audited the APP, it showed that it was the moment you opened it it was contacting Microsoft and Google and it's forgivable to some degree because. To be fair to the people working on this up, they were the front line of the pandemic response in the UK, and so they were working twenty four hour days trying to create an option whatever code they can grab from wherever they were just putting it in to create an APP that could be deployed but that's different from creating that is privacy friendly and secure and trustworthy but the bigger finding in our tests that we didn't talk about that much was that it wasn't working. We were testing whether or not. It was detecting Bluetooth connections with other devices around and nothing we could do could get it to detect a phone that was just right beside it. And when we reported this to the developers, their response was on on on a we've got this all sorted, and so this is where we get to the point where as a representative of the privacy community. I wasn't often raising privacy issues about the APP I was raising questions as to whether or not it would work. And second who it would work for could be deployed on every mobile phone or. The most recent mobile phones, the ones that cost thousand dollars plus can it be used by everybody in all walks of life or just by the people who are in professional services? Kept demanding for the actual data to see have you tested it? Can you show me that devices that actually works on King's show me the response rates and they kept on saying no, it works fine. It worked fine. It works fine until finally in June they had actually it was only recording iphones at four percent of the time, which is a disastrous. result. June. Eighteenth they announced there were not going to launch the APP. What happened as a result? What was the fallout? The fallout from the failure of the APP was that. The government had invested so much political capital and. Finally. Being competent one thing because it had failed on protective gear, it had failed undeployed testing and the ED failed on care homes and the numbers are deaths were rising and the prime minister even been hospitalized, and so they needed a win and in that period of time they were building up this up. They were making this APP sound like it was the solution to everything because it had to be the solution to everything because they had no other solutions elsewhere and so the political capital and the public trust capital that they were investing this out. All. Got Wasted. And I think, even the public were hoping that tech would be the solution and everybody woke up the next morning with a horrible hangover from this entire before months of wasted energy and opportunity. A number of APPs have been launched Germany has has touted its version. The State of Virginia just launched its APP recently. have. You seen an APP that you could give a rubber stamp of approval to so. Most of the APPS, you just listed off have shifted over to using the Google, apple implementation, which is as far as we can see into it a very good design from the privacy and security perspective and theory people should feel safe as they download those apps and use those APPs. The Google apple tracing tool went public on May twentieth like the UK's APP, it relies on Bluetooth technology unlike the UK system, it doesn't collect data and share it to a central database. It's useful for individuals but does not supply health information. Back to governments there are complaints about the apple and Google software I'm thinking of Switzerland in the Swiss health department has really complained about Swiss Kovic, the name of their App i WanNa read you the statement from the Swiss Health Department spokesman who said we don't know and have no way of finding out the number of people warned by the APP or any false positives or false negatives essentially, they're complaining that there's no way to get good statistics that they could use for public health purposes. What do you make of that? Leave Swiss responses entirely right. They can't learn about the nature of the disease they can't learn about. Transmission and all those things that would be helpful. The Apple Google model currently precludes any of that kind of sharing of data with the public health agency apple, Google of made some decisions saying if governments want to collect data, they can collect data, but they're not gonNA collected via a covid contact tracing APP on our operating systems and I think that's their right to say as such but it's also given rise to concern that up on Google far too much power to make these decisions. and I wonder what you make of that concern as both a privacy expert and as a human I've struggled a lot with this question but I've seen the way that this process takes place across the world I've seen the beauce's that have arisen. Around the pandemic response, but generally around governments who just can't stop themselves when it comes to the ability to get access and exploit data about their citizens and around dissidents and how they treat people generally and marginalized people in target people. So apple and Google made a call that public trust was more important but they also very importantly, they are not calling it a contact tracing APP. They're calling an exposure notification and that that might sound like semantics, but it's really important differentiation. It's not designed to replace contact tracing, which is that centralized government administer administered initiative. It is just a helpful tool. What governments have had to wake up to, and this is what particularly the UK government had a wake up to they wanted the opt to replace all human processes when they realized that there wasn't going to work because it was fanciful they then ramped up the human processes.

Google UK Apple Germany Europe Pandemic. United States England Virginia Isle Of Wight Kobe NHS ED Representative GUS
"professional services" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"professional services" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Planet. This is business rock stars and joining me right now. Ray Granger, co founder and CEO of Maven Link, Thanks for stopping by the business Rock star studio. My pleasure. Thanks for having me you bed. So tell me First of all, what is maven Link Maybe because we're cloud software. We develop cloud software. We sell cloud software specifically for businesses and the professional services industry. And it's much more than project management. Although there is that component, So tell me when you say business management. What are some of the areas of businesses that you manage? Sure. When the professional services industries or people based businesses and the short stories we helped make their people more profitable? And so everything from resource planning all the way through managing the financials of these businesses Project management collaboration sharing in the full execution of their business. So give me an example of the business. This would be really, really helpful floor and and how it would be helpful marketing agencies or one of our core customer basis. So anybody in the creative industry and specifically marketing Our great clients. For us. They manage projects with clients there. People have to be more profitable. They work across the globe. They work across business boundaries, often with subcontractor specialty skills. And may even lead because thie infrastructure the collaboration infrastructure that everybody comes to work on from anywhere in the world to get client projects done nice. So you have to co founders But you came up with the idea. So we're going to give you credit here. Tell us how did you come up with this idea? Where was the intrusion?.

Ray Granger professional services CEO co founder
Interview With Jeremy Thompson

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Jeremy Thompson

"Today's guest is Jeremy Thompson who was executive vice president of the UK and overseas development of Hallways UK businesses. Jeremy Join UK. Twenty. Twenty. As deputy managing director with specific responsibility for carrying Strategy Business Change in K customers. Pratt while why Jeremy worked for twenty years in senior management roles including product leadership and telecoms joint-venture development for bt group in the UK and other parts of Europe including. Spain. And the nordics. Journeys. Also previously worked in the US in the UK for an IBM Software Company and Consulting Business Welcome Jeremy Thank you. Thank you. Enter could sold here. Now. We have a lot in common. We've both got a career in Tokyo and we've both would with IBM. So what's been your journey to while you K-? Well as you as you mentioned I did in the only part of my career work in professional services with IBM in the US. And then in the mid nineteen ninety S I came back to the UK and I joined the British. Telecom, bt and what the twentieth bt. So I've been really in the telecom space now for or three decades and seeing the development from. abloh through first generation. Now into a fifth generation and my background is in product and product management and joint benches, it had a number of course Europe. We have very similar correct trajectories. We'll explore that in a minute, but it's great to talk to another Tokai friendly person. So back on season two, episode four, we spoke with your colleague Paul. Scanlon about the future of five. G.. And we had a really interesting discussion about why's approach to five G. From Technology Point? Is You know I? Ask you a bunch of technology questions today. But what is five gene to you? Five G. as it implies is the next generation and every generation of brings new opportunities with the Wallet Space. But potentially, I. Think. The second generation was significant. The full generation was significant and the fifth generation is probably very significant with an industry can be criticized a little bit of over promising to quote Bill Gates's overestimate the short term and underestimate the long term and five G. is going to deliver on a number of promises that perhaps it'd be made over the last few years. But it four G. was about APPS and consumers and smartphones five. is about connected devices and B. to be health and agriculture and verticals. So we think we're on the cusp of. A major change in the telecommunications industry and ecosystem around it. I'm sure we're going to talk about that, but it may take another two or three years before the networks rolled out and the applications developed and someone has the aw iphone moments in five G.. What's funny? You Miss Three G is that inflection point? I? Remember when three g came out and I went nine, the carrier, but everyone was promising video calling. I think my too cozy mind tie life. It was really about foster incident although when my guys back to three G or Heaven Forbid Eighth? Edge? I just have to create jogging and should be illegal in any country. There's enough legislation being talked about in our industry right now, I would suggest that the superior technology of four G is going to replace creepy and you're gonNA. See Three G retired property before g that there are some applications onto g which swell three G that spectrum probably will be reformed and used in five G.. Leave. My old employer, Telstra, I think is turned off their entire to work in the spectrum they read farm. So there's some countries where it Econet, she get A to Z signal. You've been away for years to about your heritage research and Innovation UK. While is one of the top investors in our indeed in any industry. I, think we're in the top five or six in the Telco sector where we're number one, a number one by away this year, we're going to invest twenty billion globally in our D.. And that's delivered considerable competitive advantage and give us a jump on the five G. space. Here. In the UK, we have a number of centers of excellence for Recession Development, not least of which is the optical research development and chip design that we recently announced a billion pound investment in developing that further and a fabrication unit is well,

UK Jeremy Thompson Europe IBM United States Bt Group Hallways Uk BT Deputy Managing Director Executive Vice President Spain Bill Gates Recession Development Tokyo Ibm Software Company Telecoms Pratt Econet Telstra
AP Switches to Sony

The Digital Story

05:37 min | 1 year ago

AP Switches to Sony

"This is digital story podcast number, seven, forty, nine July, twenty, eighth, two, thousand and twenty today's theme is. Resting on your laurels can hurt you. AP Switches to Sony. I'm Derek Story. Prior to the murless revolution, cannon had the camera industry pinned to the Mat. I remember attending an invite only precedent at. Back in the day and marveling at their confidence and swagger, and for good reason, they were dominant. But soon after serious tiger FY began to evolve away from the DS or and cannon was slow to innovate. In just last week, the Associated Press announced they were switching to Sony for all their photography and video work. That's Today's top story on the TV S. photography podcast. Change has been in the air for quite some time and I. Just you know you think back on things you know little stories that you read here things that you hear there and pretty soon they start to add up to something. Big and something big has definitely happened with the Associated Press deciding to switch from cannon which they were using primarily of for their work to Sony for everything for photography and video the whole Enchilada. Now those little things I was talking about four example. I remember reading a story a few months ago. About it was a hearing the government hearing and DSL. Ours were deemed too noisy to shoot during the proceedings, so the DSL are photographers were asked to do not shoot except at specific times, so they were basically controlled when they could take a picture. On the other hand, the murless shooter. Room time and it was a Sony shooter ironically. was able to shoot at will, because he was able to set his camera so that it made no noise whatsoever and I. Remember Thinking about that story at the time, I'm going. Wow, look out for this right. If you're in the world of journalism, look out for this and sure enough Not that long after we get this big announcement now many of us. US Are Mere Lewis shooters. We can imagine the benefits of these cameras over DSL. Lars during the daily grind of reporting I mean don't have to be a rocket scientist to figure this out. murless cameras are lighter. They're more agile and they are definitely quieter as I just talked about so if you had to carry a bank all day every day, would you choose? Realistically, what would you choose? At the same time while you know, we're sort of figuring out that we value our backs in our shelters and our necks, Sony continued to add necessary pieces to complete the professional photographer puzzle. They launched their professional service which by the way associated. Press has expressed great confidence in Sony's ability to deliver professional services onsite during major events, so they launched that and they got it going in. They did it well enough to get the. The confidence of the Associated Press they put long white aperture telephoto lenses in the roadmap, and they carefully integrated stills and video into the same camera system, and this becomes really one of the important aspects of a peace decision to make the switch and I have some quotes for you coming up here in just a minute about a week ago, they officially announced a AP did that. They're switching to the Sony Alpha system. The quote with hundreds of staff photographers and videographers around the world and thousands of freelancers who contribute the is a massive entrusted source that covers both the expectant and unexpected, and they're going to do that with Sony cameras so when I have here I, did some research about the discussion you know basically most of the quotes are from a director of photography, also the deputy managing editor, so David is the director of Photography and Darryl is the deputy managing editor and from two different places. We're going to start out with some comments that were captured by the director of photography. On an article in DP. Review DP review, and I have the link to that article in the show notes. The articles titled were confident that they can deliver. We talk with a piece director of photography about the switch to Sony the link is in the show notes there. Here's a few of the. Comment on them and again. This is the director of photography. We like the idea of having the color quality in the image quality, being close to the same between stills and video equipment, so if a still soccer for help out a video colleague with a little filming or B roll. It would fit in the at it in. If we were to pull a grab frame from a four K. video camera, it would have the same basic feel as a photograph from stills camera.

Sony United States Director Associated Press Sony Alpha Derek Story Cannon FY Soccer Lars Managing Editor Professional Services Scientist Darryl David
Update on Salesforce

CNBC's Fast Money

01:31 min | 1 year ago

Update on Salesforce

"Kick things off Josh Lipton for more on salesforce Josh dig into the salesforce results. The segments subscription and support so the software revenue. Earning four point six billion that's in line Professional services so they're consulting services two hundred ninety million but the forecast light versus consensus cute to NPS sixty six to sixty seven cents. The street was closer. Seventy five cents revenue the guides for also life for the year. They're looking for between two ninety three to ninety five three dollars nine cents and they said look for the year for revenue to be up seventeen percent to about twenty billion shoot was close to twenty point seven. I did catch up with Steve Over wedbush bull. I wasn't his take. He says revenue did beat incensed by about nineteen million on lower expectations stocks. Selling off he says on this guy down. Crm says also lowered operating cash flow forecast. He billings did show twenty percent growth in beat consensus. He says he remains a buyer that. This is a resilient business mild. His words strong secular drivers and reasonable valuation on the call salesforce CEO Marc. Benny off saying the first month of the first quarter showed in his words. Amazing growth trajectory. Then he says the virus emerge and which time has company he says pivoted to keep employees safe guide customers and support our communities. The pipeline is strong. He says and we can operate successfully in any environment at any time for more on Benny off. Checkout Jim Cramer's show tonight mad money. We're Benny Office. Part of a jam packed.

Salesforce Benny Office Benny Josh Lipton Billings Jim Cramer Professional Services Steve CEO Marc
Women have been hit hard by the coronavirus labor market

The KFBK Morning News

02:14 min | 1 year ago

Women have been hit hard by the coronavirus labor market

"Says the type of jobs lost in this economy are mostly service and professional services a study by the university of Pittsburgh professors found that women account for about seventy seven percent of workers and these high contact inflexible occupations so think things like you know food preparation jobs or health care support personal service a massage therapist for instance black and Hispanic women are losing jobs at higher rates than white and Asian women and one group of women that normally pours into the job market during an economic downturn they are not doing that this time labor force participation among married women normally increases during recessions because women who were out of the labor force tends to enter the work force to help supplement their husband or male partners lost income but that likely will not happen during this economic crisis because the hits you predominantly female jobs has been so extreme so Sam some analysts really believe this recession's going to highlight some of the issues that women are facing on the job market specifically on the service and professional service jobs which tend to be more public facing and therefore riskier so they've remained shut down well when we talk about the glass ceiling here a number of times it doesn't this just highlight that eight and in a lot of times it's the type of industry that's that's you know shut down it typically is a more female dominated industry whereas in two thousand eight we saw many of the more male dominated industries being shot well and that was really two thousand he was really a financial driven right episode right I mean it does that obviously we saw the real estate market crash in a number of banks went belly up or at least for in big big trouble and this has more to do with a complete shutdown and that affects the services directly immediately right and things like hair salons and nail salons massage therapists typically many more women in those industries up nurses as well laid off due to you know and no one nothing going on at the

Professional Services University Of Pittsburgh SAM
The Federal Financial Help That Small Business Need to Stay in Business

The Small Business Radio Show

08:37 min | 1 year ago

The Federal Financial Help That Small Business Need to Stay in Business

"Well. well. Thanks Thanks for for joining. joining. This This week's week's radio radio show show remembered. remembered. This This is is the the final final word word in in small small business business for for those those keeping keeping track track listeners. listeners. Now Now show show number number five five eighty eighty four. four. I'm I'm recording recording this this from from my my home home studio studio because because of of Corona Corona virus virus and and I I just just want want to to say say that that this this episode episode provided provided by by next next diva diva the the all all in in one one communications communications platform platform for for your your small small business business fun. fun. That's That's a a word word that that we we need need more more of of these these days days especially especially as as I'm I'm now now recording recording from from home home during during the the cove cove in in one one thousand thousand nine nine hundred hundred and and it's it's very very difficult difficult with with everyone everyone really really working working remotely remotely. but What what role role is is fun. fun? Still Still play play in in your your business business and and how how can can use use it it to to spoil spoil your your culture? culture? My My next next guest guest is is Nick Nick Jenolan. Jenolan. Who's Who's the the founder founder of of the the Fun Fun Department Department Consulting Consulting and and Training Training Company Company that that featured featured on on BBC BBC Washington Washington Post Post Ted ex ex and and many many other other media media outlets outlets his his clients clients range range from from fortune? fortune? One One hundred hundred companies companies those those as as few few as as ten ten people people known known as as the the Godfather Godfather of of fun fun he he began began his his company company after after experiencing experiencing firsthand firsthand the the enhanced enhanced culture culture and and Business Business Results Results Fun Fun during during his his twenty twenty year year corporate corporate management management ten. ten. You're You're with with a a company company that that embraced embraced a a work work hard hard player player and and culture. culture. He He partnered partnered with with delivering delivering happiness. happiness. Two Two leading leading cultural cultural experts experts that that were were born born Zepos Zepos culture culture and and bestselling bestselling book. book. Nick Nick welcome welcome to to the the show. show. Thank Thank you you so so much much for for pleasure pleasure to to be be cyber. cyber. Had Had The The godfather godfather of of fun fun on on well. well. It's It's not not the the intimidating intimidating kind kind not to shoot above above. Actually actually want want a a James James Brown Brown dance dance competition competition competition competition in in my my early early twenties. twenties Godfather godfather souls souls so so so so all all of of us us are are shelter shelter in in place. place. How How are are you you and and your your family family doing doing it it during during this this time? time? Good Good thank thank you you feel feel very very fortunate fortunate. in you Know know in in spite spite of of everything everything that's that's going going on on so so very very well. well. No No one's one's been been sick sick and and and and we we are are trying trying to to have have fun fun every every day. day. That's That's that's that's one one of of our our mantra. mantra. So So we're we're we're we're we're we're enjoying enjoying making making the the best. best. So So there there are are a a lot lot of of coal coal company company cultures cultures out out there. there. Some Some could could be be called called fun fun not not fun. fun. Everyone's Everyone's got got their their own own type type of of thing thing but but now now that that people people are are sheltering sheltering in in place place and and there there are are workers workers it it does does change change the the cultural cultural dynamics. dynamics. Doesn't Doesn't it it absolutely absolutely sure? sure? So So how how does does it it change change in? in? How How do do you you still still keep keep fun? fun? If If that's that's part part of of your your culture culture going going so so we've we've been been getting getting requests requests long long before before krona krona virus. virus. Actually Actually it's it's our our biggest biggest call call out out over. over. The The last. last. Several Several years years has has been. been. How How do do we we engage engage remote remote workers workers so so this this is is not not a a new new phenomenon phenomenon but but it's it's been been exasperated exasperated obviously by by by by Corona Corona viruses viruses and and social social distancing distancing? but But it's it's important important because because Some Some reports reports indicate indicate that that eighty eighty percent percent of of workers workers are are working working remotely remotely in in you you know know to to some some degree degree these these days days and and different different locations locations whether whether it it be be a a company company with with multiple multiple locations locations or or just just working working from from home home so so it's it's a a phenomenon phenomenon it's it's been been going going on on for for some some time time and and keeping keeping employees employees engaged engaged is is important. important. People People feel feel isolated isolated that that you're you're lonely lonely some some depressed depressed and and just just to to be be the the culture culture right right right. right. Yes Yes so so everybody everybody knows knows that that feeling feeling now now so so So So it it is is important. important. And And there's there's there's there's little little things things that that you you can can do do to to you you know know to to keep keep people people engaged engaged in in happy happy so so and and it's it's not not so so much much about about fun fun it's it's about about it's it's about about really really enhance enhance your your culture culture and and keeping keeping that that that that culture culture alive alive and and consistent. consistent. So So what what steps steps would would you you take? take? I I mean mean some some people people are are doing doing you you know know zoom zoom happy happy hours hours or or things things like like that that where where people people just just get get on on and and shoot shoot the the crap. crap. What What kinds kinds of of things things you you seeing seeing that that companies companies that that want want to to preserve preserve their their fun fun culture culture are are actually actually doing doing during during these these times. times. Sure Sure so so we we recommend. recommend. There's There's some some really really easy easy things things to to do. do. You You can can always always start start a a meeting. meeting. Zoom Zoom meeting meeting with with with with a a video video right. right. Videos Videos are are abundant. abundant. They're They're free. free. They're They're on on Youtube. Youtube. You You can can you you can can share share a a video video and and maybe maybe it's it's a a leadership leadership meeting meeting and and there's there's a a lot lot of of funny funny ones ones when when it it comes comes to to mind mind as as the the you you know know the the dancing dancing guy guy video. video. So So there's there's there's there's plenty plenty of of a video videos that that are are topical topical that that kind kind of of you you know know out out a a little little. levity. Levity they They take take a a couple couple of of minutes minutes and and it's it's well well worth worth the the time time to to do do that. that. Another Another thing thing depending depending on on the the size size of of the the audience audience is is to to just just take take a a minute minute and and do do something something literally literally thirty thirty seconds seconds and and ask ask people people hey hey share. share. What's What's on on your your your your background background of of your your Your Your iphone iphone or or your your your your cell cell phone phone so so we we call call it it background background check. check. It's It's just just a a quick quick little little game. game. It's It's usually usually something something personal. personal. That That will will just just connect connect people people and and humanize humanize a a meeting. meeting. So So there's there's little little things things like like that that and and then then they they go go well well beyond beyond we we you you know know we we create create videos videos contests contests and and themes themes that that people people can can can can do do as as a a group group you know know virtual virtual team team building building if if you you will will but but little little things things are are important important and and I I can't can't stress stress that that enough enough that that it it doesn't doesn't have have to to be be big big elaborate elaborate productions productions just just a a little little bit bit of of Levity Levity On On a a consistent consistent basis basis goes goes a a long long way way I I the the biggest biggest mistakes mistakes a a lot lot of of small small business business owners owners make. make. Is Is You You know. know. They're They're actually actually nervous nervous about about people people working working from from home. home. Are Are they they really really doing doing their their jobs? jobs? So So they they have have a a tendency tendency when when they they get get on on these these zoom zoom calls calls or or they they connect connect with with people people in in their their company. company. They They actually actually are are all all business. business. And And they're they're actually. actually. It's It's a a lot lot of of pressure pressure instead instead of of humanizing. humanizing. What's What's going going on on to to galvanize galvanize people people together together from from a a loyalty loyalty standpoint standpoint to to go go towards towards one one mission? mission? It's It's a a great great point. point. You're You're absolutely absolutely right. right. And And the the data data is is there there to to support. support. All All these these people people are are productive productive in in home home right right so so the the actually actually more more productive productive at at home home so so it it if if you you can can kind kind of of get get over over that that shift shift that that paradigm paradigm and and just just just just recognize recognize that. that. It's It's kind kind of of just just like like at at the the office. office. There's There's GonNa GonNa be be a a little little water water cooler cooler talk. talk. There's There's going going to to be be a a little little break break in in the the day. day. Like Like that's that's a a healthy healthy thing thing for for for for everybody everybody to to to to stay stay connected. connected. Stay Stay engaged engaged and and and and really really to to be be able able to to live live your your your your culture culture and and your your values. values. It It was was so so fascinates fascinates me me because because I I was was talking talking to to one one of of my my longtime longtime clients clients the the other other day day and and I've I've been been probably probably helping helping him him for for fifteen fifteen years years he he said said really really for for the the first first time time people people in in his his organization organization are are really really stepping stepping up up and and in in fact fact being being remote remote now now his his company company is is actually actually working working better better than than it it did did in in the the office office and and he he was was kind kind of of person person that that said said he he didn't didn't want want anybody anybody working working remote remote and and now now it it actually actually is is more more optimal. optimal. Yeah Yeah that's that's that's that's phenomenon. phenomenon. I I hear hear every every day day from from companies companies that. that. Oh Oh my my gosh. gosh. We We didn't didn't think think this this was was at at all all possible. possible. And And the the facts facts are are that that the the work work is is getting getting done. done. People People are are stepping stepping up up as as you you say say especially especially in in these these times times so so it's it's It's It's going going to to change change the the work work place place forever. forever. I I I I really really feel. feel. That's That's the the case. case. That That working working remote remote is is here here to to stay. stay. It's It's it's it's particular particular to to a a few few industries industries that that have have been been doing doing this this for for a a long long time. time. So So you you know know tack tack in in creative creative have have been been doing doing it it for for a a long long time. time. Traditional Traditional professional professional services services banking banking finance finance and and professional professional services services have have been been a a little little bit bit later later to to to to come come on. on. But But it's it's here here to to stay stay now. now. So So what what happens happens if if you you have have a a culture culture which which is is not not a a fun fun culture culture right right now? now? I I have have a a client? client? Always Always tell tell the the story story where where when when they they used used to to get get together together as as a a company company when when they they all all worked worked in in one one place place they'd they'd have have bowling bowling night night right right and and bowling bowling night. night. Start Start at at seven seven o'clock o'clock and and bowling. bowling. I I ended ended at at ten ten o'clock o'clock would would show show up up two two minutes minutes before before seven seven and and leave leave one after after ten ten after after a a while. while. They They realize realize we're we're just just not not people people that that really really want want to to get get together together so so if if you you have have a a company company that that doesn't doesn't have have a a culture culture of of fun. fun. What What else else can can you you do do to to make? make? Sure Sure people people feel feel like like they they belong belong and and to to actually actually help help them them in in their their isolation isolation. Yeah so so one one of of the the things things that that all all the the data data again again indicates indicates and and that that it's it's it's it's been been part part of of our our model model from from the the very very beginning beginning fund fund really really should should occur occur during during working working hours. hours Right right. that's That's what what people people recognize recognize is is real real genuine. genuine. And And they they they they appreciate appreciate the the most. most. If If it's it's after after hours hours it it's feels feels a a little little more more obligatory obligatory so so if if you're you're doing doing things things after after hours hours not not to to say say you you can't can't do do those those things things but but if if it's it's always always after after hours hours it's it's not not gonna gonna be be embraced embraced for for for for the the long long term term so so we we encourage encourage these these short short brief brief consistent consistent breaks breaks during during the the course course of of work work whether whether it it be be remote remote or or at at the the office office and and it's it's almost almost like like permission permission to to play play right right that that it's it's a a you you know. know. Some Some people people have have fun fun and and play play. as As part part of of their their core core values. values. Many Many people people have have not not gone gone that that far far but but It's It's it it really really starts starts with with leadership leadership and and leadership leadership saying saying you you know know it's it's okay. okay. This This is is part part of of you you know know we we work work hard hard and and we we want want our our people people to to have have a a break break and and

Youtube Founder Nick Nick Jenolan One Communications Professional Services Training Training Company Comp Washington Post Bowling Nick Nick Washington Zepos Zepos James James Brown Bowling.
Mental Health First Aid In Lockdown

Mentally Yours

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Mental Health First Aid In Lockdown

"Listeners. You might have noticed that we saw it a little bit different obviously chatting about different things because a pandemic is happening the well destroy at the moment. Yeah it's really weird and scary and Pau. That is where working from home now so if an eye annoy next to each other as usual if we sound a bit different that's why we're over corday from our own homes and self isolating as advised usually when we do the podcast. We basically meat. So That's myself an Ellen. And then either judy at all. Sam Altogether in a room with a lovely guest sources together and we'll have a chat and then take a photo but at the moment. Yeah I'm Home Front of my Laptop Ellen's In front of a laptop jewels in front of a laptop in front of the laptop. So there's like four things that could go wrong and it's a little bit stressful. And he's doing a lot of mini episodes this week about Kerlin virus in general. Because I think it'd be weird froze to pretend that it's not happening with time. Excitingly anybody like whether you have a long term and to health issue or not. I think those must be more stress around from home just general kind of anxiety around the situation that we're living in at the moment Yeah so kind of thing that chatting about this stuff is more important than ever really. Yeah so we're GONNA start with. Took him working from home with Emma? What is Mental Health First Aid? Mental State is the equivalent of physical fast aid. What's really great about? Is that the training that we provide -ticipant into providing them with skills and competence and recognizing what to recognizing sinus symptoms of common mental health issues and effectively guide. A pass into the right support. Be Bat self help or professional services but the key to things about is just raising awareness around common issues that might arise and symptoms are more so effectively key things to signpost people's relevant help. What kind of things can help with can help different things I mean? We trading inspections of mental health whether it stress anxiety extent depression a covers acquire wide variety of the spectrum. But initially it's very much around. Those made things so of mental state. I feel like applies in the workplace and now with Kern virus so many of us are working from home. How can mental health status continue to do what they're supposed today whether now remote? Yes so. That's really interesting. Aggression actually quite good question itself. I think don't the training is definitely workplace focused. But we're now going online and being quite How Do Exist? Organizations will still have to connect with their colleagues But also what's great about the training as well as much? We don't even wet place focused you. You can't apply to family to so to answer your question. I think the key thing of mental age. They're definitely not therapist psychiatrist but they can't offer initial support through non judgmental listening or guidance to the keeping is is for them to be able to connect people line super cheap. Where there is you know offering their services actually to their colleagues and signed an colleagues are being aware that even still working from home they can contact them via the personal laptops or whatever meet him they using to connect eventually with Java. That's a great opportunity to still be able to contact at. She helped make a difference and again. The same could happen in terms of family and friends. You know you co pay. Some of us are living at home because the current situation with either housemates so Fatmi old friends etc Sagana saying could be applied there but I think the key thing is that as much as we're reaching out to our network of festive mental best ages. They make sure that they too are looking after themselves and getting the the support that they need to enable them to help out those. We'll all the kind of issues that are going to Ryan's now the F. One is self from home. You know worry about a very serious democ as well. What kind of issues that can arise from? Not I think there's quite a few different issues that could rise to that. I mean you know. We come station before we started around. Just getting your head around ragging from high and last week. We launched new guidance Alongside our our recent campaign miles south and the guidance actually look at how we can support meant to help them wellbeing whilst working from high of one of the things that could displace people came to. It you now that. I'm a high end because everybody's very used to getting up and leaving the building and you're leaving the house and go into a building to act so I think some of the things will be just like thinking about how they can get into regular routines. How set their day to enable them to achieve what they need to do? So a lot of things will be around just how to think about using your days productively whilst whacking from high and also any missile off things around still keeping up the mental mental and physical wellbeing again. Most of us we the guys who are Gym Swimming Pool. Whatever physical activity will have during the day or at? Wack wack than that. That's allow hot now. So again thinking about really quick easy exercises that can be done in the Heim and actually to some extent the Need equipment to do so if you have got a criminal. That's great if you don't you still think about this. Lots of things online out that offering free twenty minutes thirty minutes an hour sessions depending on what you WANNA do. Some advice would be for people that she off being a bit overwhelmed with the whole issue of what do I do? Now that I'm not working on going back is to establish the daily routine. Wake up the same way. You would wake up every time you set your goals for the day in between them take breaks where you're either going for walks or you're just taking time out to the family that around your friends you know and connects with your employees. The Noble Way. You would eventually actually. I think what's also interesting about you? The other problems that might arise when you kind of already from home is Sunday. If you're working virtually your Dr gets bombarded so many meetings because again you know having to either Goto meeting or you know physically being the meeting room when I think about what I would advise people to do is space out their time so to ensure they're not they're not in continuous back to back meetings and also they have you know social meetings included in there where they can have copied Copycat jobs have lunch with colleagues Ashley So I think it's definitely comes down to the routine piece and just making sure that your routine consists of you actually having something active whether it's going for jog in the morning before you start your day or lunchtime or having a walk in the afternoon just to break up not constantly being in front of the Laptop. You exercises in there as well. Do you mean things like meditation affirmations? What do you mean? I said mental health and physical health. I combined If you are mentally healthy you can be physically healthy and vice versa. So for me I think from a mental perspective meant to help. Perspective is very much around the mindfulness. It's very much around meditation. It's very much around yoga sessions but also to get your you know your blood pumping and just being a bit more physically active you could do sit-ups you could do jumping jacks do different things so. I think it's around of a good balance between Exercising the mind but also exercising the

Ellen Judy SAM Professional Services Emma Gym Swimming Pool Kern Noble Way Heim Ryan Fatmi F. One Goto Sagana Ashley
Staying Elevated with Robert Glazer, CEO of Acceleration Partners

Mission Daily

09:42 min | 1 year ago

Staying Elevated with Robert Glazer, CEO of Acceleration Partners

"Rubber. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me so we were joking before the call with everything going on. I think we're down to rationing zoom. Here you know it's bad when you rationing Zumikon. You're not though because we have another great episode today and Robert Excited to have you join us. Your career compromises many things. You're speaker writer. Ceo You're doing a lot out there so it's exciting have your show thanks Yeah Interesting Times. They really are so. You're the CEO of acceleration partners. And if we were meeting six feet apart of course on the street and introducing ourselves how would you go about describing what you do in your work? Yes warn you in advance? I describe you what we do. And then I'll just give you an example because it does. The description doesn't do forever anyone so we manage affiliate programs or partner programs We're one of the largest agency that kind of builds a manage these programs. Which are it's a performance? Based digital channel. Where a a merchant or retailer gets together and rather than pay for. Click on impression. They enter kind of a almost a digital business about relationship with that partner that partner can promote their products and services in there actually paid when there's an outcome so the example would be you know you talk about my books and then you post this podcast and you. Your podcast has joined the Amazon affiliate program and you do affiliate links to my book so that when you drive people to buy my books on on Amazon and then they do that You know you get a cut of that. So that's a the Amazon has a pretty huge associate program. We manage it for a lot of other kinda retail brands March Brad. So did did that help. Yeah that's a good description and if we're to back it up though into your personal life who who are you. Where'd you grow up I grew up outside of Boston Massachusetts in a in a town called Brookline. You know as a kid who kind of did everything I don't want I don't think I excelled at anything but I did everything I get it. Sports Find School. I think I have a pretty familiar story to a lot of entrepreneurs which is like as I got into school. I just As sort of creative problem solver Constantly told and I think he's really living up to his ability in fact. I do a presentation. Wade's my opening book. Which I put eight years of report cards up to any literally all say the same thing. It's like wow. We think he could do better. Sounds familiar with the sort of weighed on me Because no one really. Kinda told me how I could do better. Why could do better or that like the things that they wanted me to do? Where were you know about conforming and coloring in the lines and and that's just not the stuff I'm good at so you know we can go in into that whole trip? I? I don't think my life really changes in Iffy away until I realized that all of those things that people were trying to get me not to do for years. We're actually we might unique strengths and the things that I really lean into now and in my business my personalized at what point in your life did you start to realize. That was an epiphany. Was it just? You know years of kind of banging your head up against the wall. What was that moment or series of moments? Like where they were to mean breakthrough moments for me so I. I did fine in school. I did well enough to like. Keep my parents off my back because the repercussions whereas I went to. It's GonNa be a great student and and and it wasn't until I got through in college. I got through by sort of core curriculum and I went abroad first semester and I I was exposed to business marketing and just loved it and realize like those were the things I had always been been. Good at and I was also coincidentally Kinda done with my Your prerequisites And so I came back all classes. I wanted to take I sort of was able to get independent Major I took business in industrial psychology. And like I got kind of almost you know the junior year so I really realized Ashley Loved Learning. I just have to learn things that I'm interested in. I just can't learn things that I'm not interested in. It's just I don't know whether it's part of the. Add or or whatever but it's also not worth it. And I think that's when I realized that I had sort of confuses whole time like I didn't know I love to learn because I wasn't interested in most of the stuff that I was in learning and so then when I got engaged on staff I am trying to make up for for a lot of years later after I started the business We kinda got a couple million. I went to a pretty Intensive leadership program that SORTA stripped us down understand our core values came out of that really feeling like guy. I'm still not living to my potential. And just realign my whole life and business around my core values. Once I could articulate those and that's that's kind of when I started cooking with gas. That's really interesting. You bring that up. Was that experience. Would you describe it as like traumatic difficult? How did you face that reality? Because that's kind of where now is just Taking a really honest look and Step back with the help of a you know really specialized Let's just call it like performance program. You know it's funny i. I've been doing this for so long. Have been helping our teams to now do this and understand their core values. 'cause I think it it locks so much into them but but most people i. I now accused of being a therapist but first of all I love which is good which I think all the best CEOS ultimately are the people around right. I run a large professional services business. Nothing I ever deal with isn't a people problem whether it's a client or a partner or an employee and one of the things I've learned in my journey and it's not just I mean it's just so obvious that people what I've noticed is for. Most people is that their purpose lies very close to pain and and for some people. It's obvious like they grew up in someone in their family was affected by cancer and so they went and became a doctor other people. It's really obvious and sitting in front of them but they haven't made the connection so I had a friend We work with the call me last week and was talking about some jobs that they were looking at and and all kinds of stuff and and and really trying to figure out what was the best opportunity and how important it was to help people to make connection and bring people together and help them be heard and I know this person is is is gay but you know very openly gay and and actually said after bunch because he's going around trying to understand what he was actually looking for in a job and he just kept talking about I said. Do you think that that it's maybe not related? That these things are really important to you in work. And it's basically how you lead and you kind of large part of your life kind of had to hide entire part of And there's just like thirty seconds of silence on the phone and then he was like I don't understand how I missed that right. I was just I was just listening to it. But but I've had these conversations over and over and and for a lot of people I think the connection is really clear And for others it there. They just haven't seen it and once he does really powerful because I think it's it's super motivating when you understand why you do what you do. It's not it's not about being a victim it's not about not honoring that but you know most people are really you know they're trying to solve something that that is personal it's Namur passionate in there. Either is something that would form of the happen. Usually from either positive or negative experience earlier in their life definitely. I think that you know exploring. That is so difficult right. Because you're just mean when you experience it and you experience what it's like to be blind sided with something that you've been oblivious to for sometimes a decade or multiple decades. It's not easy right. It's a confidence shake. It's a punching gut. It's whatever you WANNA call it but as you go through that and start to like reconstructor identity I think there's a lot of opportunities to emerge into something new so when you started to emerge into something new after this program What was that process like for you and was it like taking the weights off. Did you like you know? Take the emergency brake off. What was that like? Yeah I mean I it two ways right. I think yeah. It is euphoric so when you and I talked about this in my book elevate I I think that we all know our core values like when we cross them and we feel it. We just can't articulate them or we can't see them well enough to make a decision on them I was driving through the car in the dark. And you hit the side of the tunnel and then you know to bounce off and then you hit the other side writes. Your car's pretty battered. But like you know when you hit the guardrail while if the lights were on the lines were painted you'd stay from from from the guardrails so I think when you start looking at this you put this together. I did have this sort of moment. Wanted all came together for me like it's kind of like look back and someone takes this like Stencil and lays it on your life like Oh my God. It all makes sense now. Everything everything that worked in didn't work and people and relationships in jobs like I I look at it under the Stencil and it all makes sense

Partner Amazon CEO Zumikon Robert Excited Writer Sports Find School Boston Massachusetts Brookline Wade Ashley Cancer Professional Services Namur
We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

09:21 min | 1 year ago

We Are Now the AI in Business Podcast - An Update From Dan

"I'm going to be breaking down why we're changing the name. What's been new with us here at emerge and what's coming up to give you a little bit of a preview of where we're headed wanted to be able to serve do justice to our longtime listeners and give a sense of where we're going and how their feedback has played into Where we're design a focus. Things moving forward so I'll be quick here over the course of the last two to three years. We've seen a lot of growth in the show we went from somewhat middling downloads with Ai. Not being nearly as popular to over the course of the last three years growing upwards of sixty thousand downloads in a given month which for a business show is quite a lot. We don't really attract engineers attract kind of techies. We attract functional business leaders. And it's tough to actually get that critical mass so we're really grateful to have the listeners. We have but we're changing things up a bit. Who served decided so in terms of what you're GONNA learn in this little short session here with me. I'm going to be covering three main topics I serve. Why the Name Change? What's new? What's coming up etc? What's new at emerge so in other words? Serve what we've recently focused on as well as where we're headed in the future. And then lastly we kind of wrap up with getting a little bit of your feedback at the end if you'd like to send some along to me We happened here from our folks where longtime listeners. So we'll talk first about the name change of the program so the show for years now has been called. Ai Industry that's been intended to be a broad name. For sort of any given industry could be banking. It could be manufacturing. It could be whatever the case may be but we find that the term a industry has connotations that time more to heavy industry time more heavy equipment etc now we have plenty of listeners from financial services that's our main sector banking insurance investing wealth management. The these are the folks that listened to a lot but the connotation would be a look at the show from the outside is that we're GONNA be talking every episode about oil and gas and about trucking and about manufacturing because industry often implies those kind of terms so really. The show is a in business. This is a program for business leaders who do not know how to Code but they need to marshal artificial intelligence to leverage artificial intelligence to drive results in the bottom line. They're not here to learn. Coding they're not here. Learn theory the her to learn about the real precedence of USA and how they can leverage that in their own businesses meant so a in business. We just felt as a more apt name for the show. Some of our listeners agreed and so we decided. Okay we're going to actually do the name change so this is now the AI in business podcast in terms of the actual focus. We're going to keep things the way they've always been in other words. We're going to appeal to business leaders. That could be. Vp's executives managers could even be consultants that are working within the enterprise or mid sized companies. Folks who are leaders of digital transformation leaders of change who need to marshal ai to make a difference in their business so when we talk about topics that's going to mean it's going to be use cases diving into different individual sectors. It's going to be best practices for adopting a I for finding R. Y. OF AI. And it's going to be real stories of actually leveraging the technology within a company and figuring out what's hard what's easy. What are the trends that matter? So if you're interested in use cases discovering basically what's possible and what's working with a across businesses in addition to the best practices for making it work. This is going to be the show tune into. That's been our value prop for a while and I think we're GONNA be doing a better job of at this year's we bring on a really strong cadre of guests in Twenty Twenty. I'm very excited about our guest lineup. In the next two to three months we've got some big names in the in the hopper as well which. I'm sure you'll be hearing about once. There live on the program rather than doing month long themes for I am business. We're going to be doing shorter. Individual episodes about different topics keeping things. Different keeping the variety up. So if we have a bunch of episodes within let's say banking fraud or compliance and we do a lot in financial services here instead of having them all in a row for a month. We'll kind of sprinkle them intermittently amongst other sectors looking at other best practices other trends are other aspects of AI. So we want every week to be a little different a little interesting a different kind of guests different kind of topic. Sue people really get a good S- play of what's happening with artificial intelligence across sectors and how they can leverage themselves so that's another change will be doing moving forward. I think people really liked the variety. That's been the feedback we've gotten and so we're GONNA be doing it better than ever and in fact I think for some of this year we're going to be doing two episodes a week because some of you had asked for that as well in terms of what's new here at emerge so little quick update on what's happened recently and then where we're headed here just as a company just updating you our loyal listeners last year was pretty exciting year for us so a couple of big things happen there. We've increasingly become more involved with the large intergovernmental organizations last year. We presented our research on deep fakes. Some of you familiar with fakes. Basically taking somebody's face making them say or do something that they never did using artificial intelligence to programmatic generate. Someone's face moving or someone's voice. We presented our research on deep fakes at the headquarters of the United Nations last year presented some of their counterterrorism events as well and presented our research on a in the life sciences sector for the OECD down in Mexico City. In addition to presenting an Interpol World Interpol world is the largest police in law enforcement. Serve event for the international community. It's run by Interpol which is the intergovernmental policing organization. We presented our works on deep fakes. They are as well. In addition to that we've continued to focus on our research work with enterprise so last year was year of really seeing kick up. A lot of that work has been with big banks with multibillion dollar insurance companies with players and financial services but some of it has been in other sectors in professional services in life sciences and other sectors as well the commonality is working with businesses. Who essentially are aiming to make better fruitful use of artificial intelligence in their company and they need to know the current precedence of. Roi Within the field. And that's essentially where our research comes in so this year were served doubling down on what we've been called upon not only speaking at presentations but for our client work in the past. Let's say eighteen months and really focusing their so. We've titled Our what was previously called our AI capability map research. We've we've titled our AI. Opportunity Landscape Research. We've improved the process. We've broadened out what we look at and really the focus is three things so when you think to yourself what has emerged do ultimately what we do is three things we help. Companies develop or validate a winning strategy. We help companies pick the right high. Roi Projects of finding low hanging fruit. That's going to be a win. And we help. Companies pick the right vendor for their particular needs. This is essentially where our work comes in and some of you have already seen the video. You can actually go to E. M. E. R. J. DOT COM Slash A. O. L. That's a opportunity landscape so emerged. Dot Com slash. Ai Aol you can watch a two minute video on what? Our research process is with this sort of updated process. Actually looks like in terms of the research deliverable you can see that emerged. Dot Com slash. Aol But the basic gist here is. We're taking really what our strengths are in. Our strengths are mapping the vendor use cases of AI within a given sector of the total vendor use case could be companies in Europe and the United States etc and looking at their various capabilities. And then doing the same thing with the enterprise. Let's say we're talking about insurance looking at Geiko looking at all state looking at the global top. Fifty insurance providers. Asa and mapping where they're a investments are mapping they're known use cases these level of traction of their various use cases and being able to use both of those sets of data that is to say the startup landscape and the enterprise landscape to find. Where is the evidence of our? Why where are the ease of deployment in terms of AI? Applications with our own proprietary scores? Here it emerged. That's exactly what we do. We look across both landscapes. Look at all the vendor providers. All the enterprise folks and get a sense of where is their current adoption now. Where's the evidence opportunity for us to drive our whereas at Roi already happening by really layering data on those key questions of where the Roi is? We can present a visual map to clients and essentially allow them to make smarter decisions. Moving forward advise them in recommend where to go. What COMPANIES TO PICK? What initiatives are going to be quick winds on informing that strategy moving forward? And so. That's the crux of our work against the bulk of last year's work that's why we were called upon by the bigger organizations and that's why we did our work in the private sector this year. Were only doubling down there so many of you already read the content at emerge dot com. Because you wanNA understand what's possible and what's working the Iowa services essentially the very high level version of that it's the version of that that allows companies to truly inform their strategy to back their suppositions with data and to be able to move forward with data back confidence when it comes to where they're investing their dollars and how they're going to compete in the market when it comes to leveraging artificial intelligence

AI United States Interpol Twenty Twenty VP United Nations Fraud Iowa Oecd Mexico City Europe E. M. E. R. AOL Geiko Professional Services
"professional services" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

09:45 min | 1 year ago

"professional services" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Okay let's pick it back up with mad at his guests as I often do can ask one quick question here. Have you guys before you launch back? In course curious as I'm listening to this conversation when do you know urine stoppable is it? A mindset shift is a bit of momentum. Things are just rolling your way. Is that process that you talking about that. You got him play. She got enough of big enough funnel. That you know it's GonNa feed you went. When do you know when you look at yourself and say man I'm there? I'm unstoppable? Yeah I think it's a mindset. I've got a quote here on my walls. My favorite quote in the world from Calvin Coolidge the thirtieth president of the United States and the short version of it is nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not genius full not education. And when I think about all of the business owner's heightened coming up when I was early in my career that I really admire. They weren't necessarily the celebrity business people but they were the people that I came across that we did business with that. They just kept going to matter. What obstacles thrown in their way? We all have that. But they just kept going. They kept creatively overcoming. And Pretty. That's what that need to use that as a way to transition or go to the next question which is around. Be Thinking about mindset. If you're thinking about some of the disciplined approach you bring to things. I think you brought up earlier before the break. A struggle I think a lot of professionals general but especially folks with professional services firm struggle with is finding the time to do the right level of business develop. Find the time to get that book written finding the time to do this to me. It's not necessarily a time question to me. It feels like a disciplined question. Can you talk about what you've seen work most successfully for companies in making the time to do this? It's a real challenge. I mean you have people. Who are. They've gone out and gotten clients. Okay and so. They're feeling this pressure to fulfil to those clients and going capture the dollars that are right there in front of them and almost always takes precedence over trying to go out and chase dollars. That might come tomorrow or next quarter or next year and so it's a really tough trade off so I I've been working on this problem for twenty years now and I will tell you the only real answer that I've found to it. As the number one use marketing methods that create some blabbering. So that it's it's a minimum amount of time for you as a professional and then to get a t to do everything that you're not absolutely necessary for and so what we've kind of come to Matt as we've looked at podcasting as almost a perfect medium to sorta based up professionals marketing and the reason for that is not because we particularly well podcasting. But because it's it's audio that the vast majority business owners that we come across their great in person they can talk to a prospect. That can explain what they do for a living. What how they create value but if you ask them to sit down and write that they're gonNA scratch their head. They're going to get frustrated. They're gonNA feel overwhelmed by that in many cases because podcast in this audio forum. It's really easy for them to get that out. It also doesn't take a whole lot of time so they can sit down in thirty minutes and have a great interview also at the same time connecting with somebody maybe in their community that might be a strategic prospect that they have a really hard time getting in front of in any other way but because they've invited them to interview on a podcast where they're gonNA share their wisdom and expertise and made that other business owners going to promote their business but now it's really easy to get in relationship with them media strategic partner who has an audience of all of the people that they wanna get referred to. So we're able to do a lot in a short amount of time And in a form that really placed strength most every business owner that we've come across and then we can take that content repurchase it and lots of different ways so it can be all of their sort of staying top of mind marketing. So that they're showing up for all of their prospects every week we can carve out a few of those those podcast episodes and if we think think through how he outlined that those topics maybe in three or four or six episodes they can talk through their book and then that can go and get wit and for them so that they don't have to write it then so we use it to do an awful lot in the little bit of time that we can carve out it seems to be as well at this format allows people to become a little more. I'm a I'm a print journalist by trade. I've always done a lot of sort of written format and you can make the written word conversational field virtual as well. It's a whole nother story when you can actually hear someone's voice when you can hear their passion when you can. It just feels like this is a more familiar way. Especially if I'm going to be investing not in a product you built but in spending time with you then whether it's video podcasts. This becomes a more relatable format absolutely. I mean it's very difficult. I I've written act. We actually just released. My my fourth book lawsuits four books. I can't even count. How many articles anymore thousand and it's tough as you know to really convey a lot of personality interesting and a lot of emotion writing it to be very good at it but we don't have to do that when we talk and what you're allowing your future clients to do is to sort of. It's like they're at that networking event. You know that cocktail party and you and I are having this conversation and the person listening to the podcast is that third person. So have you ever had that person just sort of standing there and they're not really talking to either person in the conversation they're just listening to their sort of their and in that process. They're getting to know you. They're getting to understand what you're like what you know what it would be like. Talk One on one with you and so. It's a little bit of a preview for your future clients and they they can understand what it's like what the experience would be like moving with you now. We were talking about podcasts. And we've mentioned this couple times one thing I haven't heard you mentioned is video. Is there a difference in costs and video? Is there a reason? Why are you you see video as sort of an extension of this or is there a reason why podcasting might be more preferable than video videos gray and there's a lot of reason to do it? I also find that. Not many business owners feel super comfortable on video so I think right barrier there and if it's not something that the business owner will do that it really isn't a solution that's going to work for them but the other thing about audio is that you can take audio with you and so you can. Listen to that audio podcasts. Just like you would on the radio in the car. You can listen to it while you're Jim while YOU'RE GONNA WALK. You know it can be in the background so will carry you along with them and you'll occupy this sort of unused but intimate space in their lives. Best Decapolis I ever had. We got on a sales call the potential client and he said Body Mind referred. You referred me to your podcast. And I started downloading some episodes one on a business trip that I was like a four hour drive each way. I listen to you all the way there and all the way back. I got eight hours with this guy before we'd ever gotten on the phone and the one anymore selling to do is just at that point already. Felt like he knew me personally We've never met as powerful and I. I think Paul's probably heard me say this before. Like I feel like I have a face for radio. I'm not I'm one of those does not super comfortable being on video and there's all kinds of sort of mental barriers to that and. I completely agree with you in terms of accessibility of video as well. We just got a couple more minutes here with Steve Gordon. He's the founder of unstoppable. Ceo definitely check out his website. Unstoppable CEO dot net lots of great resources there and even though this has really been focusing now. Your Business is very focused. Yvonne Professional Services Firms. I can't help but think that a lot of what we're talking about here does actually apply to product companies as well company is that are for companies that are selling a product piece of software. Is there still value? And making sure that their or reinforcing the likability or comfortable with the people behind that product. I think without a doubt I think that's equally well with product companies where we see it come in and be kind of more effective is when you've got a product that is complex or it is it's one that's higher investment so the Speech Group. Mike he goes in their own some crispy. Cream donut franchises and He didn't need any of he just needs to turn on the hot doughnuts. Now sign right complicated. That people need to understand or that requires some relationship with you or with your company out all of this stuff absolutely help. Sales Brockton don't celebrate. Love it well. Fortunately we're out of time today but this has been awesome. Steve thanks so much. Other than unstoppable. Co Dot net. Where else can people learn a little more about you if they'd like to go there? And unstoppable dot net slash sales pipeline. They can get a free copy of my new book. Which podcast prospect goes through everything? We've talked about today. Pocket podcast processing. I love it. Well thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you everyone for joining us on another episode. Today we are out of time. We'll be here next week. We got some great episodes coming up as we head into march into the spring. Whether it's getting nicer even up here in Seattle Paul. The weather's getting nicer the sunsetting later a love it. This is a great time of year. Well thanks very much for joining us on behalf of my producer. Paul this is Matt. Hi thanks for joining us on another episode of Sales Pipeline Radio and with that we wrap up another episode of Sales Pipeline Radio. Right here on the funnel radio channel for Listener Mike You..

business owner Mike You Steve Gordon Paul Matt Ceo Calvin Coolidge Seattle United States professional services partner Yvonne Professional Services F producer Sales Brockton president Speech Group Jim founder
The Demoscovery

Daily Sales Tips

05:36 min | 1 year ago

The Demoscovery

"In yesterday's tip from pornography Hindu Burnell called me out for not having featured any tips related to demos on the podcast. He was right and he did something about it by sharing his own tip which was fantastic. I thought I'd continue on the theme and turn this into a bit of a demo weekend and share one of my personal philosophies around on demos and a strategy that used to work really well for me now to be fair. I haven't really done demos the last few years as I've been working in the professional services space but before that when working with Alachua and then in the event technology space as much as possible I did my own Demos Mos- I always wanted to show my prospects that the solution was easy and intuitive enough for the sales guy to us because I always worried that bringing in some technical expert to run the demo just implied that it was difficult or complicated. It also put me in a position to control everything everything. I didn't have to stress so much about having a perfect mind meld with my sales engineer. Who May or may not take people down a path that I thought would be the most relevant what I really WanNa talk about. Though is a process. I developed called the demos discovery. This was driven by the idea that so often Vinh. Your potential new client just wants to see a demo. They WanNa get a sense of the solution. See what it's actually about and make a determination for themselves around around whether or not it might help them solve a particular problem or business issue instead of doing that demo for them. We of course want to do a bunch of discovery. We want to try to understand their needs. Their pain points how much that gap in their business might be costing them all of that so instead of doing what the customer Marwan's we try to force them into a discovery process. That for them is a time commitment that they often can't even tell is going to be worth it or not because we haven't showed them anything it creates friction and really goes against what the customer wants. So I put the two together I.. I built a demo. That was all about give and take and allowed me to run a really good discovery process while also demonstrating the solution and now. I totally get that. This might not even be possible for some solutions but where I did it. Most effectively was in that event technology. Space he's one of the primary things that my future clients wanted to see was a walk through a of the event registration process both the front end and the back end. Fortunately for me the software was easy to use and super customizable so I built a demo event whereas we walked through that registration example example I had embedded all the things I wanted to know some elements. I would have pre filled based on the research in prep had done for the call so at its most most basic have their name email address. Company and title prevailed this. Let me show off some of the marketing capabilities and demonstrate how we could set things up to show things that we already knew about their ten dis. Once they clicked or registration link in an email from there I could talk to. Ah them about the events they ran. How many what type. How complex were they. How many people attended all those kinds of things while they're telling me this. I'm actually chilly capturing the details inside the demo then I could start asking about different functionality. They might need. Would they need to manage hotel. Registrations distractions where they want a mobile APP all those types of details. This is what drove the rest of the demo. I wouldn't show them anything that wasn't relevant if they don't need to worry about hotel registrations why on Earth would I show that to them if they told me. A particular capability was really important. I could go into more depth and also learned from them why that specific capability was so important was done and after using the option to register multiple. Attendees Simultaneously Ashley. If there were multiple people on the call I would show them the confirmation email capabilities here. I was able to send them that email confirmation with with all the details that I had just captured throughout the process. It was the ultimate leave behind. Follow up and it just happened in real time and of course that confirmation email came from my email address and included my contact details. Then as we transitioned into the back end I was able to show them their own data. How it was used. And what else we could do with it. Based on additional discussion around how they were hoping to make use of all this information mation to drive sales deliver better experiences or whatever else was important now. I wanted to give the specifics of this example to make it more real. Oh and show that. This isn't just some theory. Sure had about the perfect product. Her run this demo discovery process inside of. But I've been able to do versions Asians of this with other solutions. The point is this. Try to find ways that you can do your demo earlier turn it into a conversation instead of having a one way discovery conversation where you're trying to get everything you need and then doing a demo where you're providing a one way pitch. Try to combine the two and have a conversation.

Hindu Burnell Sales Engineer Alachua Vinh Professional Services Marwan
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

19:32 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"And I think there's a fun factor in everything we're talking about yeah and hopefully hopefully I mean if you're doing it the right way it can be overwhelming right let's be real there's a lot going on yeah well I appreciate that is your kind words thank you and you'll learn more about how to do that in the ultimate guide to social media for business owners professionals in Akron by guesses week Mitch Jackson my content and I'll see you guys have years I mean you are always showing up to the dance every day and and I think that kind of ongoing the house off pull this out while I'm down to each run I'll pull this out and shoot quick content will then take that content in we'll repurpose it and that's our secret last week I believe j you had a guest on ten x Reno repurposing content something like that yeah yeah yeah and that's saving us so much time on I'm sitting in trial sweet as into a trial and opposing counsel I don't usually get along with opposing counsel he leans over and he pulls out his phone he goes hide you just send this tweet out in its now also through a platform that we use being shared over the next seven days on all of the other major platforms so were reported in content to save ourselves time into also reach people who aren't using Amazon and I'm not gonNA say the word she'll wake up use front office staff I'll use virtual assistance to do all the above and then a lot of it I enjoy doing and I'll do it myself so much we we've talked about content and creating good content that is actually delivering the results that you want talked about using technology to push and publish your information to try to multi use content in different environments because again content in many cases it's one of the most challenging things to create I'm curious where paid social activities fit into your kind of bag of tricks if they do it all you you have the benefit of having done this for so long you probably have a amazing organic reach but where does paid social fit into your marketing mix so in our firm very little that simply because I'm kind of any unique condition and I will be the first to say that when I go to marketing conferences when I go to social media and digital marketing conferences and I listened to experts a tube talking about using paid content paid marketing paid advertising the right way on facebook and Instagram I get that I mean I think it's very very awful tool is just not something that in my wheelhouse it's not something that we're doing but if I was just starting off and I wanted to build a brand of social media I'd be I'd be tapping India do paid marketing advertising on facebook and instagram and I'd be creating the type of content this congruent with those two platforms as opposed to lawyer sitting behind a desk answering one of those twenty most often asked questions I sharing a different kind of content that's more entertaining more engaging more unique and more memory regulations we talked a little bit about regulations before and also saying of course you're going to speak but you're not speaking on behalf of the Bar in California and what you may not be able to do a different states but are there any kind of general regulations around law firms using social and specifically paid social activities to either target potential plaintiffs or or or or or clients or anything of that matter I'm just curious 'cause I oftentimes don't get the chance to speak to somebody with your with your experience and insight so so great question Adam there are each state bar is different so what works here in California what's allowed here in California may or may not be allowed in Arizona so you want to check with your with your state bar there actually some state bars that are still wishy washy about any level of constructive advertising offline or online you gotta be careful I will tell you guys that when it comes to creating the content that were creating when you're thinking about advertising sometimes what I'm thinking about is sharing my client version of the facts seating social media ah with my clients version of the case so that two years later when the jurors are were halfway through a two week trial and the instructions the judge gives the jurors are you're coming up there they're putting in keywords doing a search I hope that's not the case but I have a feeling it is and I wanna make sure that when they tap into social media when they check out the dogs they have a good accurate understanding of what exactly happened to my clients and my clients damages and the case so that's another reason why we're actively services sharing our clients stories our products our services the stories behind those using these platforms I mean that is so powerful Aguirre's whether you mentioned was your global referral business and I'm curious how that fits in and certainly with the brand that you have created for yourself as you refer cases that may come in that you don't have the wherewithal to to respond or assist with your to then pass them other two two other other law firms or or partners curious if social kind of fits into any aspect of that part of your business it's huge absolutely I would say one thousand nine hundred twenty cases come into our law firm we say no to it's not because they're not good cases but just not a good case for us and so we have extensive national and global referral network set up where we can get those potential clients referred to the right lawyer who cares about his or her clients and it's going to take good care of those clients so it's a big business model that I think social media nicely complements the other the other factor is it opens up the door to a lot of new opportunities you would normally be exposed to for example I love speaking at social media vans talking to you young entrepreneurs and I've had friends asked me why are you here why are you sharing business tips with this group of four hundred people social media day Jay down who are all starting their multimillion dollar businesses with a couple of twitter. DM's they're going to need a lawyer and I WANNA be the guy there that could take them by the hand and help them make smart decisions so they can find long-term success so it's all about just just giving and everything else will fall into place in a few minutes is GonNa ask you one of the two questions that we've all of our guests around a tip for a social pro I'm curious if you'd have any tips for an aspiring oh you're or someone who's fresh out of law school and terms of how they need to comport and present themselves in social media because I'm going to guess whether they want to become there own firm and hang out a shingle or if they become a part of a larger firm what they do right now or don't do and social media could have an impact upon that Job respective nece in any absolutely you know I've been in this world for the last three years with my daughter right and so what I've shared with with she and her friends is bill aw of how people look at you and what they think of you when your name comes up when they see your image because it will help the firm bringing in new clients into the firm that's a good thing if you're on the partnership trail on the other side of the Coin I love being an entrepreneur and having my own office always have since day one and so he then go sideways away from big firm and open up your own shop it's always nice to have that personal brand built in established so I always say focused on creating that's what this is all about and you need to have a database where you're keeping track of spouse names dog names sports activities goals whatever it may be put the power of relationships to work view and the way you do that is embrace them understand them respect them and learn as much expand exactly what I'm doing in other words I'm not much of a traveler I'm a homebody I love where we live I'm not interested in being on the speaking circuit okay social pros we'll see you next time thanks much.

three years seven days two years two week
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

31:31 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"I think he probably would agree with this is the same way I've Protien opening statement in court my opening statement in court I don't stand up walkover and thank the jury thank the out of Flagstaff Arizona Mariam Crater couple of thousand feet takeoff on the first person J to ever fly off the gates pass I don't know if I know that those gates content like Jay you've seen me down to beat Sh- right taken Iran I pull out my phone and GOPRO and I'll shoot at twenty or thirty seconds video and then I'm back to my run as he said many times it's just in the middle of a run or something quick and casual do you have the tip in mind and turn on phone then I do know what you mean sometimes it's both I mean sometimes you know that's okay I've got something I want to talk about I don't want to do it here in the office this behind my desk like every other lawyer on social media throw my tennis shoes go for Iran and then I'll shoot the video right then and there down on the beach sometimes GM listening to can you know there are and then I'll roll into my normal opening statement trial stuff I do the same thing with live video in with recorded video I wanNA capture my audiences attention immediate taller emotional story to start things off I mean that just works well for me if you tell jokes maybe tell a good joke right if there's breaking news talk about that we need to check off as as we do any type of of marketing activity my question for you though is in this in this fifteen minutes or so much you have given do it why do you think that professional services firms are not quite as good as as this at our colleagues other industries being manufacturing be it be at retail is there a risk aversion to it is it just that they're not marketers communicators sells I'm really curious why this your industry is not doing all the things that you do so well well Adam thank you for that I think a lot of lawyers for example maybe a lot of professionals that are worried about their state bar rules Roy about the rules and regulations to control their professions in each state and federally and at least for the law with a lot of lawyers need understand is as long as you're being honest as long as you're not misrepresenting what you're communicating as long as your father doing the same state bar rules that apply in your state offline you're probably OK online you want to check with your state bar and by the way while I am a lawyer in a very good lawyer I'm not your lawyer so this is not legal advice that's the other thing is use waivers use common sense when you're when you're creating this content like I just did I need to him but I was trying to walk my talk I think they're just apprehensive about violating maybe state or rules I think a lot of professionals are worried about how they come across right how am I going to come across as well as I would like to it's a live video I'm going to make mistakes I'm going to use incorrect grammar I may say something that's going to piss somebody thiamine whatever it is they're worried about that kind of stuff and I'll tell you one of my first youtube videos back in the day and we've been online since nineteen ninety six with our website but when social rolled out one of my first successful youtube videos I'm doing a Saturday morning mountain bike run down to the beach I didn't shave baseball cap on backwards You know nice I had J. thought about why it's important for trial lawyers to try to stay in shape because it's a very grueling professional right healthy by be mine healthy case happy client and I stopped and pulled over just told my phone up like this and I shot a video and that video got more action than all the other junk that we've been trying to put together for about a year at the law firm in the back office full grown green screen set up long you know twenty thirty minutes does that little two to three minute video got more traction and I thought to myself y you know people really don't care maybe they relate more to me as to how I looked at Saturday morning then how I do right now just rolled back from court you guys that's why still got this on but if you walk in my office normal you'll find me in you know just a golf shirt in some shorts Tennessee is very so I think they need to give themselves permission Adam to be themselves to show the human side and what's going to happen is they're going to connect with more people than they've ever connected with before I think if you look at Richard Branson the reason a lot of people connect with him is that whenever you see him he's always in jeans he's he's always just kind of hanging out he's one of the guys right is approachable. He's approachable he's windsurfing he's just hanging out singing a song I think that's what connects US human beings more professionals of figure that out the sooner they figure out I think the faster they'll find a successor looking for with building there on wanting brands so ask lawyer questions you're going to get a long answer Adam but I think that's probably what it comes down to you I think that that's that's great advice and great insight one of the things that you already mentioned here on the on the podcast and you mentioned your books is this analogy that I love the welcome mat S- analogy and I'm curious if that means for for you and your industry to most interactions begin when someone kind of to continue analogy knocks on your door and how you measure the success of your social actions at driving those types of business so I am not a numbers Guy I took a business accounting class J at the U. A. and didn't do very well in it and realized okay I need to go I need to focus on business law that's just the way my mind works so the the R. Y. of what we're doing what I'm doing you know as long as you guys know it's hard to measure I don't really care I honestly don't spend a second worrying about that I've I've experienced the results I've I watched the cases come in I know how well this works force I will tell you that from twenty eleven to twenty fourteen we actually tracked every single sixty percents of them didn't come in from the person who had been following me online it came in from one of their friends so somebody had a legal problem and was talking to a friend and offend would say hey listen I know someone on facebook on twitter on linked in on whatever the platform lawyers instagram wasn't around back then He seems like he's a pretty honest guy seems like he knows what he's doing when it comes to legal stuff you should give MSCI call so sixty percent of the incoming new cases came from that next level of relationship which which really blew me away how do you measure that I mean it's it's crazy right yeah that's a really interesting join social pros listeners so I want you to enter what Mitch just said it's a challenge that we have in every industry with regard to social because so many times your boss or your bosses boss wants to measure social using just last click attribution so how many people clicked the Lincoln gave us money and yeah some people are going to click the Lincoln give you money but a lot more people are going to file it away and either use it down the road when you can no longer attributed to social media or engage in some sort of word of mouth where you're gonna get this indirect bed benefit that Mitch just described that is frankly unmeasurable and it's one of the challenges I think we have with social media in a lot of boardrooms right we we know that it's working more than correct numbers would indicate but it's hard to convince somebody of that if they haven't experienced it firsthand the way Mitch has an I know many of you social puzzle centers you know exactly what I'm talking about because you've that fight in conference rooms as has Adam as and and it just goes to show that sometimes from media is is going to pay off way beyond you know the Hour Day week month that that you produced that piece of content so let's talk about the three of us I would not have met either one of you if it wasn't for social media or digital we were just running different circles and by doing what we're doing we've created a top of mind awareness factor a lot of other law firms and lawyers aren't doing having said that circling back to social you guys I I wrote the book down into three categories and you guys already know this but for the listeners I really believe social media at least for fascists about three things number one you've they get the mindset of social media down you have to understand it's about giving adding value it's not about taking it's not about trying to close that deal at least in my profession is about giving and giving and giving some more showing your human side once you understand the mindset number two is about understanding the personalities of the social media platforms each uh-huh different and so what works on twitter may or may not work on linked in May or may not worked on Instagram so you have to understand the dynamics of personalities of the platforms and then number three you want to make sure that you can effectively communicate on each of these respective platforms it's one thing to be able to tell an emotional story and lawyers have been telling trial lawyers retelling stories you know for hundreds if not thousands of years right all the way back today one telling telling a good emotional story is powerful stuff you guys but unless you can tell a story that motivates your audience motivates my twelve jurors to take the intended action it doesn't matter okay it's all about doc telling a story to empower your audience to take that next desired stop so in the third section of the Book I've reached out to some of the top occasion experts on the planet and they've shared different tips on how to do just that and I think if you take those approaches and take those communication skills the social media platforms that that's where the goal I right that's where you build relationships you engage you listen and you communicate the right way and obviously you guys are experts at that jail want you to know I was flying back with the family from a family trip and it was either I think it was Paris and I read your book utility I don't think I had met you conference at that point in time and it just clicked with me I'm like I want to be useful to my audience this is exactly could into writing exactly what I was trying to figure out and that really did give me a good compass reading where I needed to go next right and so I I'm just excited that hopefully other professionals other business owners other CEO's can do the same thing it's a game changer keeps what we're doing it makes it's fine again you don't call it out specifically one of your three points but but I would argue that that one of your fourth sort of success components is especially in your case is your assistance see so you've been doing this for a while now and and you are consistently creating content in a multitude of platform terms as we have discussed it's not as if you've got here's the twenty five questions I'm asked most often as a trial lawyer let me answer those peace out I've created wean effort makes a huge huge difference because a lot of people especially now are engaged in random acts of content and that doesn't actually see need at least not at the same level in mission in a lot of people make it more difficult than it needs to be most of my content is created while I'm walking you know he's he's watching what's going on and I'm using a scheduling software program rights while I'm sitting in court contents going out this is something that he didn't even oh existed he thought I was sitting there actually tweeting when this tweet was going out and so what we do is we really love to repurpose content like for example I had a new you don echo flash briefing go out this morning which is great it's an audio we try to get him out every day but we then took that audio and we re purposed it.

Flagstaff Arizona Mariam Crate US Adam twenty thirty minutes fifteen minutes thirty seconds sixty percent thousand feet three minute
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

15:51 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"Great sort of job listing site it's really the place where a lot of people go now to get their content right it's it's almost become almost like a blog aggregation or video aggregated for B. Two B. book we'll talk about it here on the show it's called the ultimate guide to social media for business owners professionals and entrepreneurs it's really fantastic super practical step by step how to Jeff Mitch thanks so much for being on the show thanks for having me I really appreciate it Adam it's great to meet you and J that book would not be possible without experts like you contributing chapters so for that thank you very much really appreciate it my my absolute pleasure to be part of it that is a key point about the book the ultimate guide to social media professionals there's how many contributors did you have book Mitch dozens or something so I had forty six other experts from around the world contribute chapters on everything about a social media I real lies J. I've never been the sharpest knife in the drawer so I've always surrounded myself with you know with quality people and every single her was kind enough to contribute their chapter as a favor in it really turned out into a really nice piece of work for anybody in business for CEO's for professionals lawyers doctors who want to know how to tap into social media understand the personalities of social media reach out to companies like yours and then embraced the Senate well as you did build their brands and expand their brands from local to global so that's what we did that's what I talk about in the book and that's what I've done with my law firm over the last twenty years it's been exciting you have been a litigator for more than thirty years now and we're actually California litigation lawyer of the year at one point so you you know your way around a courtroom Mr Jackson I I don't think it's an overstatement to suggest that you are probably the best in the world at lawyer there's using social media use that you say that I just said how would why is that the case I mean I know a few attorneys and and generally speaking the last thing they want to do is use social media for anything so how have you uh not only bucked this trend but but written a book about why the trend is Is Wrong became a lawyer J I love helping other people I practiced with my wife met well we just celebrated our thirty first anniversary last Tuesday which in California's two or three marriages right stick in there and I just do what I'm told and she's just a fan ask litigator and trial lawyer and what I realized is instead of helping people one to one there's something special about tapping into the digital platforms we can help people one hundred or one to one thousand answering questions and educating the consumer about all the value that a good lawyer brings to the table well I helped start up several hundred companies from my clients there are two things that every sex successful company had going for it number one they had a good lawyer in their back pocket and number two it had a good CPA were accounting firm in their back pocket without exception without those two things it's really hard to find success offline and online so tapping into social media jays allowed us to Kinda take all the information we picked up over the last thirty three years share it with the general public ensure human side right show that were just like the neighbor next door show people that they can trust us and what then happens is the curls the referrals happened in the business comes in the front door I wanNA talk to you about that is specifically I know that that there's a number of examples of of people who've actually retained you and your firm as a result of the things that you have done in social media it really is a utility philosophy it's help people and eventually some of those people will end up giving you money and you are certainly living proof of that and I think it's important to actually to to to talk about real examples because what I hear from some professionals and I know you debunk this a little bit in the in the book is this idea that will yet is funding you out there and interact with people line and be quote unquote authentic but we can't make any money at that and I am a lawyer I've got a bill rate I got things to do this is a waste stop timer it's frivolous or there's some other better way to accumulate new clients make you've proven that you can turn social media into revenue eventually the two of you well now it's all about relationships right whether we're creating relationships offline or creating global relationships on what I love about. Social media is allowed us to create those global relationships so that if somebody needs help or the question they need answered here in California which is where we see just you know the phone rings might my twitter DM lights up e mail one of the things the last question we ask every client Jay is how would you like US mutate with you in other words it's all about the customer or client experience as you've written about in the past and now they say talk which is really a thing you got to put it to music it's the whole process I'm on tick tock playing around with your on everything so there is no social channel that Mitch Jackson is not on it is but they're welcome matched their welcome matched my firm they're welcome matched to my life they're welcome match hopefully to help other young people going through school or thinking about illegal career at the point where I love what I'm doing and want to be more good caring honest hard-working lawyers out there and I'm hoping by setting an example it brings them into the profession our daughter just started yes today Jay and Adam at Sheppard Mullin up in Los Angeles just took the bar she gets a results next month she's working for large love mentoring the young lawyers right so this is kind of overwhelming there's a lot of stuff that professionals look how much time does it take does it bring in revenue is it worth the time in trouble right and if you don't mind can I circle back just to a quick story and Cleveland Arizona they're kind of lays the foundation for everything we're talking about you and I both spent time into alright bear down wildcats I went to high school at joy at high school which is on the back side of a mountain in tune Amok Hill I'm at football Practices August one hundred ten one hundred fifteen degrees full pads I'm looking up at j guess what I see flying off the top of a mountain hang-gliders- I'm down on the field leading tired out of breath I look up I should be up there in the cool desert breeze flying like an eagle what I did my senior year that's my buddy and I signed up for lessons at the summit hot on speedway did two evenings of ground school found ourselves a week later down in snow to Arizona running down the hills in Cochise County territory something about having a fifty pound hang glider show you something real quick something about having a fifty pound hang glider on your back and there's a picture me at the mountain launched area and just like some PVC pipe the replay here on Youtube that that does not look like a quality piece of equipment match it was back in the days okay no helmets or anything else but the point being and let me come back to you is running down the slope with a fifty five count hang glider on your back and all of a sudden your feet nothing's touching your feet aren't touching the ground and so you fly about five or six feet usually crash you go a little bit higher up the hill and you keep repeating this until you get it down long story short fast-forward flying ask unless you hit that parking lot at all Tucson Tucson movie studio there's no place else to land there's nothing swirl cactus the point of my story is and what I thought when I looked up at a mountain what it would be like to hang glide what I thought I needed to learn to to hang glide three or four years later after I got my hang for experts rating looking back I didn't know anything right in other words I what I thought was important became secondhand when it came to takeoff locations wind direction thermal lane in hot thermals and things like this safety protocol hang gliding what I looked back and aw I needed to know what I thought I needed to do was substantially different than the reality the same thing applies to social media for a lot of CEO's and business owners out there when you look at the platforms don't let it overwhelm you in other words take your time and do your ground school learn how these platforms work in on slowly in overtime to consistent use of these platforms you'll become more comfortable with with picking up that platform that hang glider and running down the slopes actually running off the cliffs getting two or three hour flights over the ocean over the years on a desert in over the past and what I've noticed is that that social media is very similar to activities like hang gliding or snow skiing or any other sporting activity you start slow you surround yourself with experts like you is continue to build upon that foundation a little bit out of town time focusing on your communication techniques one of the reasons nineteen chapters in my book is all about communication techniques that's really what it's all about talk triggers J. The reason that resonated with me your book is because you know number one the power of communication my ability to build rapport with the jury is what's allowed me to have success in the courtroom is not because I I know a lot of fancy Latin legal words it's not because I'm the best evidence civil procedure because I'm able to relate with my jurors and I relate with my jurors the same way hey that I'm trying to connect with people on social media and I think your audience members that are starting to embrace social if they do the same thing it'll work for them to if you're national show your human side strategically transparent tell good emotional stories create in share content that you need content that's that's unique to your interests your passion sure why in create memorable experiences if you do those three things when you're creating lawyers aren't doing that and by me creating that interesting emotional unique and memorable contact them allows me to stand out above all the noise that allows me to share ups and I think it allows me to when it's done obtain referrals from around the world here in California GonNa ask you a quick question about that when you share your your video are really good at it and and and then you sort of get to the point I'm GonNa take a break in shoot this video or does the tip come to you during the run and then you're like I gotta share this stop running yes I love listening to podcasts I'm running and you'll hear something right and it sparks is sparks a thought and you start thinking the endorphins or kicking in and it's time Go that then I'll stop and I'll share something new but you know I always try to immediately grabbed the attention of my audience most fashions doctors lawyers dentists goes they spend the first couple of minutes talking about who they are how smart they are what they're credentials are there waiting for people to come in especially on a live video and then they dive in the content what I like to do and I think he probably would agree with this is the same way I crochet opening statement in court my opening statement in court I don't stand up and walk over and the jury thank the judge let them know how important it is to serve as a juror what I do is I immediately dive into emotional story maybe a story this too three minutes long it's a it's a verbal headline and I'll take that jury by the hand and walking back in time to the day when the incident or matter took place in I'll use sight smell sound all of the senses in this two to three minutes story then I'll stop then I'll introduce myself and I'll thank the jury les den take a step back and then dive into the content and I think that's one of the biggest challenges I see professionals have is giving themselves the opportunity or permission breaking news story which you know I Love News Jackie that's a game changer for my firm has gotten me on stage Tony Roberts asked because of news jacking talk about that breaking news story and then take a step back and maybe answer questions maybe share resources and things like that but that works really well in which I think advice that not just professional services firms but frankly anybody doing social media or any marketing communications can can leverage which is eat dessert first I which is have that arresting moment get everybody's attention that you could always come back and build authenticity build the credibility and introduce yourself and all those kind of things every amazing way that a law firm a lawyer professional services organizations can use social media you've talked about great and you've talked about why they should.

California US Jay three minutes fifty pound one hundred ten one hundred fi thirty three years thirty years twenty years four years three hour six feet
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"AH matches a great great guest and a terrific authored as well we'll talk about his book here in this episode a lawyer I want cool that's streaming Laura yeah he goes to the street I mean lawyer -able anywhere else if you haven't spent any time investigating what Lincoln Marketing Solutions Can do for your.

Lincoln Marketing Solutions Laura
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"Tenets that are so important as we change someone's feelings perceptions beliefs in emotions about a product service or or brand image Jacksonville has it figured out they publish a lot of content there as does adamant in salesforce marketing cloud certainly was interesting about linked in and the reason I use it myself for for advertising for convincing duplicate.

Jacksonville
"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

Social Pros Podcast

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Social Pros Podcast

"WHO's tried to immediately grabbed the attention of my audience most professionals doctors lawyers dentists? CEO's they spend the first couple of minutes talking doc who they are how smart they are what they're credentials are waiting for people to come in and especially on a live video and then they dive into the content what I like to do I let them know how important it is to serve as a juror what I do is I immediately dive into an emotional story maybe a story that's two to three minutes long it's verbal headline and I'll take that jury by the hand and walk them back in time to the day when the incident or matter took place and I'll use sites me L. sound all the senses in this two to three minutes story then I'll stop then I'll introduce myself and thank the jury for being there and then I'll roll into my normal all over statement trial Stub I do same thing with live video in with recorded video I wanNA capture my audiences attention immediately then take a step back and then dive into the content I don't know if I've ever thought of that atom this this idea that powerful storytelling is such an important part of being a trial lawyer but it's also such an important part of being a success in social media and our guest this week on the show Mitch Jackson only has a foot in both of those camps you're exactly right and I I hadn't thought of it as well but the tenants of the stereotypical trial lawyer that we see on TV every Tuesday and Thursday and I think in real life the good ones kind of are following the same road map if you will the successful social programs do that you're arresting that you have an idea you get people's attention and once you have that you can establish credibility authority and all those other here on this episode shows listeners you know he he gets it right he's authentic he he's generally wants to help helps them come back to him in in in five four all dimensions he plays the long game all the things that we know are the right way to do social media but sometimes we lose sight of he's actually doing a really special show and you could be I don't know the the streaming salesforce marketing cloud data strategists doesn't roll off the tongue it's Kinda long like business card I am Jay Baer from commits a convert he's Adam Brown from salesforce marketing cloud this is social you're going to hear from Mitch Jackson here just a second before we get into it a quick knowledge of our sponsor first this week thanks as always to them without them there would be no social pros we've been doing this every week since two thousand twelve so thanks to them very much this week the show brought to you by salesforce marketing Cloud New Free report that I want you to download social pros fans listen to this go to be it dot L. Y. Slash customers rule bitterly clash customers rule to grab a copy of the state of the connected customer report salesforce surveyed eight thousand consumers and business buyers that's the globe for the third edition of this report found that customers expect companies to understand what they want before they ask okay we're we're now in the world our customers expect you to understand what they want before they have to ask huge ramifications for everybody in business huge vacations for social pros a copy of this right now won't cost you nothing billy slash customers a rule it's the state of the connected customer report from salesforce also this week this show brought to you by our pals linked in marketing solutions and they are on a roll they keep adding features adding targeting capabilities adding features adding Ed types were in more more business is obviously especially to be making even more use of Lincoln as part of their paid social media strategy and rightfully so here's the thing six hundred million people using Lincoln now which is staggering right I mean it's it's doubled in a relatively short period of time as they become more content focused and and less verdict clients is that they offer targeting options you simply can't get anywhere else like you know you can't get them at facebook can't get an instrument can't get it twitter it has an audience and targeting capable they simply are not.

CEO three minutes
"professional services" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"They can auto charge you based on your understanding in terms of receiving those services back number two and the number three any interaction as it relates to paperwork that typically has to transpire, you know, when you go to an institution you have to fill out a form about your skin regime when you work with. A personal trainer. They have you fill out a waiver. So you can you know, give them clearance runny liabilities. You shouldn't have to deal with paperwork and faxes and emails. They can just tax. You a form you can tap through it on your phone, and you're done, and I wanna make the point that we're not saying that professional services are people are going to go away. It's just that they need to have different tools and they need to conduct business differently. Right. That's fundamentally what we're saying. Yeah. And I think these trends as you mentioned it in way is really good for the small business professional because having regular business is always the best part for professional because one of the downfalls of so many small business owners at every single month. They've got to create a new book of business, right? The name of the game is really trying to lock your clients end. So you don't have to keep requiring them. So the professional service workers that are getting it, right? Are really acquiring those clients the first time and really keeping. Him and one of the other things that you said chinois that you need if you're going to be successful as a professional services person at twenty first century is auto charge. And I love this because small business owners by their very nature are bad at collecting money from their customers. Now, I think part of it is their freight to ask for money or they haven't already complex. But if it gets charged auto magically right after you complete the service that's great for everybody. Absolutely. Is one of the downfalls of the typical kind of professional service worker is that it.

professional services
"professional services" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

Conversations with Phil

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on Conversations with Phil

"Is the other side, but this is a professional services example, and I have a professional services client that I was introduced to on a connection. So here's the first part of social it was not social media in. There's again, there's nothing wrong with that. But this was not a social media connection. This wasn't introduction from someone that trusted me and was. Willing to expend her social capital to introduce me to this other firm that needed my service. So that was the beginning of the relationship, and as the relationship has progressed in we've done business together. And we have shared value given take so one way that I like to add value to my clients beyond the deliverables is I love to introduce my clients to people that might be important to them. So people who have specific areas of expertise outside of mine that can help my clients expand their network. So the way that a lot of this has come back to me is I did did a webinar in the industry, and I had the the mailing list for the women are my client actually offered to take a look through this list and to recommend people that I could further connect with and then also offered to make introductions for me. So you kind of kind of kind of follow that progression. I know I'm giving kinda the the cliff notes version of the story, but following that progression of where the different connection points are in where the value has been added there such a high degree of trust that my client was willing to do that do that for me. And actually, I didn't even have to ask he offered to do it. So it so there is a there's bad bad for me is just the epitome of social out- outside the outside of a platform or outside of the methodology that that's the enemy of creating social capital. Awesome. Awesome. Well, one of the interesting things, I find is you actually have a formula for social capital, which I really like it's in parentheses create plus sustained squared minus leverage equals social capital. So can you break that down for his Amy yet? So I say, I'm not I'm not a math genius. So that that's a bad. That's supposed to be very simple. This is not hard math. That's not hard math. I did. I write knowledgeable in calculus. But definite, definitely not my not my strong suit. So the idea here is this is a formula. This is very tactical in as I'm thinking about the relationships that I want to build whether they are client relationships prospect relationships centers of influence pick your category. You can you can apply this to it. So very tactical when I think about so when I think about you for an example, and I apply this formula to to fill so Fillon. I have a long history together. And so the create and sustain pieces are the value that we bring to the relationship that I hopefully ad to you to fill. So we created a relationship on Twitter. We brought that relationship off mine at one point and my goal is to add valuable contribution to you. You professionally personally and the goal is always to do twice of what I might ask down the road. So that that's the squared piece of it. Maybe it's an introduction. Maybe it's a brainstorming session, whatever valuable to the other person to you. And then at some point if there is something that I am looking for and I'd like to make an ask. And I think you might be the person to help me with that. I feel confident that I've placed enough value in put enough into the relationship that I can now make that ask, and that's the leverage piece of it. So it's creates his in sustain do it twice. What you think you might need to do? So that at some point I might be able to ask for something. Maybe I need to ask for an introduction. Or maybe I need to ask for your expertise. I'm not afraid or have anxiety about it. Because I know that I put that into the relationship. And so so that's how I kinda gauge m I am I doing enough in the relationship have earned the right to ask for something that I might need to move. Oh, my business forward or whatever that is. I'm like fed formula..

professional services Twitter Amy
"professional services" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on a16z

"Create some market for professional services you get them turned onto professional services market you'll get them educated to the point where they can actually do top of funnel but you still have to have an account rep there and then when it's a fully pull based market they can actually sell for you got is the that is the life cycle equivalent it's almost identical to take my oversimplified safeway example if safeway has buyers decide which products to put on their shelves and if it's very very clear that people that are going to safeway wanna buy particular things safely wants that sheriff spent like they already have that captive customer if they knew that twenty percent of safeway shoppers would by vitamin water they're going to stock vitamin water and that's how new products get into shelves you have to build the market you have to build the demand and then eventually you layer on channel that's where i was mentioned the economics of channel because if you do it in that ordering hopefully the channel wants to work with you as opposed to the other way around because if the channel says ooh i already have i already own this group of customers here's something else that i can sell to them which is often how they think about it you're one of n like maybe i'll just pick one of the other ones but i need you my customers actually want you you've defined a category now the balance of power in terms of the economic split is much more fair so this is super helpful entrepreneurs who are trying to build these businesses and thinking about what they really should be doing versus having to go through the sort of false start exercise it works when you are a bread merchant and then there's another meat merchant that you can work with and you realize that.

professional services account rep safeway twenty percent
"professional services" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"professional services" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Yes series five you could still buy the original bio all of them sony of history of kind of doing that they keep things in the line because to your point right i mean shirt dealers have stocked but you could blow that up companies do that but if they're still great cameras so yet it sets a price point you know it's very important that the retail steph like beaches great at that educated so they can help inform people that this cameras greet for that price but here's what you're missing out on because things have changed in the last six years in some cases but yeah they're all still current which for some people's a great thing for some people confusing or something but that's why education is such an important part of it and is pro support is that a new i don't know this but no is it an canon professional services all the company are you guys are you there for pro photographers as those branches of their companies are or is this more about education to the general public know specifically that what we are the pro support group where at every major sporting event right now we were at the at the olympics the super bowl where at the us open of golf antennas there in a in a pro support sweet loaning repairing gear and to qualify to become a mmc or as a after a sony donor okay what about what about other qualifications somebody goes out and they buy sold in eight nine eight seven three or whatever and this i want to join the requirements so if if you've never seen it there's a sony alpha universe is are like.

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