35 Burst results for "Professional Association"

"professional association" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

LGBTQ&A

05:04 min | 2 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on LGBTQ&A

"In partnership with Glaad, I'm Jeffrey masters and today I'm talking to Jameson green. He is an author and the past president of the world professional association for transgender health. He has spent the large part of his career writing about transgender health policy, and that work has been used to lay the groundwork for anti discrimination practices at insurance companies and in other healthcare settings. His scope and scale of his work is really hard to overstate. And also worth noting, he's trans. That's important to say because on the whole, we hear relatively little from trans men. And maybe that's the wrong way to phrase it, right? It's not that we.

Jeffrey masters Jameson green world professional association
"professional association" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:16 min | 3 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Up a Russian missile launcher in northern Ukraine So Ukraine is believed to have fewer than 20 Turkish drones in its fleet their successes have allowed for some optimism Turkey's decision to supply Ukraine with more drones comes as Turkish officials walk a difficult line between NATO and Russia Though turkey's government has condemned Russia's invasion of Ukraine the country has not imposed sanctions or barred Russian aircraft On Monday turkey closed the Bosporus and dardanelles straits to warships For NPR news I'm dairy bush garden in Istanbul Confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee for a Supreme Court nominee kittanji Brown Jackson will begin later this month The committee's chairman says opening statements will take place on March 21st four days of hearings are expected including testimony from outside witnesses Jackson meanwhile began meeting with Senate leaders today a confirmation vote could come as early as April On Wall Street stocks finished up today This is NPR From WAB E News in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim Berra as it's 5 32 A recent survey of Georgia educators shows more than 20% of new hires are considering leaving the profession That's compared to 12% the year before Martha Dalton has more About 4600 school staffers responded to the survey conducted by the professional association of Georgia educators or page Claire suggs is paid to senior policy analyst She says teachers dealt with new challenges during the pandemic like major staffing shortages We just heard a lot of folks saying that they're struggling to provide the level of support for their students that they really want to because of all of these extra things that they're plugging holes in other places One of those teachers who only wants to be known as Nikki is considering leaving after this school year One of the biggest things that I want people to understand is that we aren't leaving because of bad administrators or bad principles or school culture We're leaving because of the factors outside of our buildings that impact us and our ability to help kids every day Outside factors like state mandates Nikki says we because she belongs to several Facebook groups of teachers who are thinking about leaving She says the pandemic made existing problems worse For example she says her fourth graders struggled with the curriculum before COVID Now with the learning loss that our kids have experienced our curriculum is still over their heads Nothing curriculum wise has been adjusted to take into consideration that the kids have not had normal schooling in two or three years That's made a tough job even tougher she says the page survey picked up on that It asked teachers if they'd recommend the profession to others More than half of respondents said they wouldn't Claire suggs says officials need to find new ways to strengthen the teacher pipeline Kind of thinking about how do we attract those young people at 18 and 19 and really support them progressively throughout their career Lawmakers have taken some steps to address this a new law lets teachers apply for a $3000 tax credit if they agree to teach at certain schools The legislature is also considering a bill that would let retired teachers return to classrooms.

Ukraine Senate Judiciary Committee kittanji Brown Jackson Claire suggs NPR Jim Berra Turkey Russia Martha Dalton professional association of Ge NATO Istanbul Nikki Supreme Court bush Jackson Senate Atlanta
Sudan activists reject power-sharing, call for strikes

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Sudan activists reject power-sharing, call for strikes

"Since the October twenty five crew in sit down the international community has xcelerated mediation efforts to find a way out of the crisis which threatens to further destabilize the already restive horn of Africa region the takeover has upended the country's fragile plan to transition to democracy rule more than two years off to a popular uprising forced the removal of long time autocrat a lot of the Shia and his Islamist government now the Sudanese professionals association which led the uprising against al Bashir says that the mediation initiatives which seek a new settlement between the military and civilian leaders would reproduce and Wilson the country's crisis the SBA vows to continue protesting until a full civilian government is established to lead the transition I'm Charles de Ledesma

Islamist Government Sudanese Professionals Associa Al Bashir Africa SBA Wilson Charles De Ledesma
"professional association" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:23 min | 7 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Take a not so random walk through hot topics in markets and finance Listen to odd lots a weekly Bloomberg podcast hosted by Joe wise and Thor and Tracy alloy odd lots explores everything from how the Seinfeld TV show can teach you about economics to why the Federal Reserve blundered by letting Lehman Brothers fail The odd lots podcast available every Monday on the Bloomberg terminal Bloomberg dot com iTunes SoundCloud and whatever app you use to browse podcasts If knowledge is power the Bloomberg terminal is your power up connecting you to real-time financial data market moving news powerful analytics and an influential network of financial decision makers around the world Share ideas negotiate trades and gain the insight you need to make more informed decisions See how the terminal can take your workflow to the next level at Bloomberg dot com slash professional Association and the ad council present the story of Tom and Levi Tom is the smartest man I know He's been a professor at two major universities He's been a teacher for over 40 years One day he told me that he was having problems in his classes I think one of the students I'd ask the question and he didn't remember the answer I also noticed that he's letting his class out earlier than they were supposed to let out And he was telling them that he's doing it as a favor to them but I think in reality he just wanted to get out of there I was really starting to worry because I saw something is wrong Levi an I talked about outward change in our lives but he was there beside me and my love for him was just ims When something feels different it could be Alzheimer's Now is the time to talk Visit a AZ old slash our stories to learn more A message from the Alzheimer's association and the ad council For the Jewish communal fund past president Noel Spiegel people often ask me why it's important to use JCF for their charitable giving I tell them that JCF has a profound impact on our community Thanks to the revenue generated from our funds JCF makes an annual $2 million grant to UJA federation of New York and makes grants from our endowment to special gifts fund This year we proudly granted more than $800,000 to support.

"professional association" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Know transitioning to woman well and some sort of. That's what i would've soon. They would do. And maybe puberty lockers for year or so if a team needs to make up their mind or whatever but after that but the mon spirent and estradiol or whatever and let them go through puberty as they choose rather than how their body initially wanted them to. So i don't understand the need to even have puberty blockers for that long in the first place but his evidently pretty common both bowers and anderson are trans identified men now. This is coming from the christian post which i found on truck report so drudge report so it's obviously hard right. I've never heard of anyone else. Saying trans identified men who go by female name. Okay okay so they are trends. And it's saying that are men who go by female name so there this article and they belong to the world professional association for transgender health bowers a surgeon who performs gender reassignment surgeries and has been tapped to lead w. h. which is the world professional association for transgender health. Beginning next year told her schreer that we zig zag. And i think maybe we zagged a little too far to the left. In some cases the doctor alleged that within w path there are definitely people who are trying to keep out anyone who doesn't absolutely by the party line that everything should be affirming and that there's no room for dissent. I definitely don't think everything should be affirming. Because being trans or being non binary these things are kind of the the flavor of the month right now and there's a lot of people who are doing it simply because they wanna feel like they're special. What are your thoughts on puberty blockers for kids. Six three two eight three six one six zero. There's more coming up. It's.

world professional association bowers anderson
"professional association" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

The Mindless Morning Show

05:43 min | 9 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on The Mindless Morning Show

"Me astle. So what is the difference between. Waco makes the frisbee and the d- is there like a regulation type disks that you guys asked to use or has everything is there's the pga which is the professional association and that's like also a regulatory agency of approving discs to be used so there are certain standards in like there's like a rule like a bunch of rules of what you can and can't do when making in disc Will like so here. Actually how do you make your own. I don't make my die. My don't bring that. I remember when you posted the ones that you died gas alike. That's a driver so like a regular frisbee. Actually oddly enough. I have one get prepared. Flew into more of a traditional thing. It's got like the big rim on the inside. And then you know that this is what you would use as a putter but this is like a driver narrow so based on a lot of visual the visual design of use that you just showed us. You're saying that it's the rim job exactly the way the rim jobs work is a error the job by the faster it goes now that makes payments. When you're throwing it when you're doing it at full speed the like thinner stuff. As opposed like your frisbee that you would use at home or whatever Is just a lot faster in air. So you if you have fast arm speed. He can really far sweet. I mean how long have you been doing it. So i mean i've been playing since i was like i'm thirty now. I've been disk. Not jobs a similar timeline. Line like i've been. I've been playing very recreationally. Since i was like thirteen but like i said so. Kobe hit this year in got really big. I started watching a lot of the coverage of it and it just felt like you know you get into stuff and i want to do that but yeah i i've always been a competitive persons. I was like a wrestler in college. And that is something that i get into adulthood and i realize like hardly anybody has hobbies like just like people just like go through their de. Don't have a thing to do sometimes and it's like oh man i i get to board for something like that but jeez what are we talking about. Brother being an adult and just forgot every adult life fun. I know who. I was just asking how long you've been doing since you were thirteen. So since i was thirteen but just until this year i started actually doing like tournaments in getting somewhat competitive with it in. What's hard for. Me is the fact that like i was really good at wrestling And i like to think that. I'm way better than i am. This call like. I think i should be like competing with the very very best fest than i did and i just took a big old dookie in the middle of that did not happen though i i don't know and also i was still walking up the courts regular jackass. I had to go apple. Wants speaking speaking of you. You're looking what what's the best shot like crazy a shot that you've made while playing one Yeah actually leitch..

astle rim professional association Waco pga Kobe wrestling apple leitch
Wet Notes 8-30-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:35 min | 9 months ago

Wet Notes 8-30-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shack radio for monday august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one. Well we have certainly had our fill of extreme weather lately just last week here. In connecticut we face the challenges of tropical storm on re just barely below hurricane strength and at the last minute it shifted east and we avoided the brunt of the wind rhode island wasn't as fortunate and now we have item a cat for hurricane hit louisiana. Extreme weather is now the norm. The news keeps getting worse. Recently there was a study published by nicholas bars from the potsdam institute for climate impact research and that was that the gulfstream could be varying towards irreversible collapse. Now the gulf stream is part of the atlantic meridional overturning circulation or a. m. Oc this circulation takes warm salty. Water from the tropics moves in north and then takes the cold water south. The study finds that the circulation is at its weakest in one thousand years. So what happens if the gulfstream collapses that will dictate extreme cold for parts of north america and europe. Is the collapse imminent well. That's not an easy question. Answer it could be decades away but as we have seen things are happening a lot faster when it comes to climate change not only will the disruption of the gulfstream resort in colder north american temperatures. It is predicted that there will be a rise in sea level disruption of the monsoon patterns and impacts on the amazon rainforest. An aunt arctic ice sheets. The study concluded that is that this is all a result of human endorse induced climate. Change in may of this year. I talked about a project out on lake. Tahoe called cleanup lake. That project had an ambitious goal of cleaning over seventy two miles of the mountain lake. So i thought i would give it a quick update on how the work is progressing. Now these numbers come from the cleanup delake website. Cleanup delete dot org as earlier this month. Team of divers has removed an amazing eight thousand. One hundred and twenty two pounds of trash were three hundred and three thousand six hundred eighty four kilograms and covered about twenty two miles or thirty four kilometers of coastline. There update indicated that they have completed seventy four dives over twenty seven days of diving. The diver's consumed two hundred and eighty six cylinders of air. Today there have been eighty one volunteers who have delivered two thousand six hundred and eleven volunteer hours. Now i'm not sure if they're on pace to meet their objectives but that's not always the measure success. The amount of continuing effort is what really counts. Keep up the good work guys. The annual boston sea rovers clinic for this year is just one month away. The two thousand twenty clinic happened just a couple of weeks. Before the corona corona virus lockdowns took effect. We really didn't know how serious things were then. Now as we continue to emerge from the pandemic the show may just have the distinction of being the last face to face. Scuba show in the world before the pandemic and the first face-to-face scuba show in the world post pandemic monty. And i were at the last meeting. And everything's proceeding for the october. First and second show the show will follow state and local mandates and as the days pass by. We are all hoping that the show will go off his plan. This year shows moved from the traditional march date to october as a result of the pandemic that you'd be a great time to enjoy some early fall weather in new england. It'd be great to get together and diving is certainly a social sport. Do you miss dive training magazine. I sure do. I think i've re reread all the back issues. We have a good shop at least three times. So what's happening with the publication. Well i reached out to catherine castle garcia the editor to find out the latest catherine informed me that they hope to be publishing again in the fourth quarter of two thousand and twenty one. Now that's some good news. The fourth quarter is not that far away. And i'm certainly looking forward to dive training magazine hitting the streets and finally here on wet notes. I wanted to give you an update on the situation with dutch springs. If you remember last time. I reported that the property owned by stu jill school had been sold to trammell crow texas developer. Who's planning to build a large warehouse facility on the property. The initial word was that dutch would shut down after the season while a lot has happened in the last couple of weeks i there was a petition that garnered over three thousand supporters to keep the place open and as we know petitions can only go so far then there was support from patty professional association of diving instructors patty due to white paper outlining the economic benefits dutch brings provides as a diving venue. Patty estimates that because dutch exists. It helps to generate three point. Four billion annual retail sales in the northeast they tag the economic benefit to bethlehem at thirty four point five million as for tax revenue. The paper indicates that about ninety. Eight point nine million is generated for state and local taxes and northeast and about two point one million for bethlehem in addition to patty support. The lehigh valley planning commission has called the proposal of disaster for the quality of life in the lehigh valley while it seems that there a great deal of opposition to maybe very little that can be done to stop the effort. One positive. I that i did see. Was that trammell. Crow was indiscretions with local officials to offload the fifty off lou to fifty acre quarry for community use. Just how would you get to acquire if they build the warehouses. I don't know while the saga is far from over. I would expect that we won't see. Dutch brings open for the twenty twenty two dive season but his al michaels once said. Do you believe in miracles. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes. Here on scuba shot radio for august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one

Gulf Stream Dutch Springs Clean Up The Lake Dive Training Magazine Boston Sea Rovers Wind Rhode Island Potsdam Institute For Climate Gulfstream Resort Hurricane Cleanup Lake Boston Sea Rovers Clinic Amazon Rainforest Mountain Lake Nicholas Connecticut Catherine Castle Garcia Louisiana Tahoe Arctic North America
"professional association" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

03:58 min | 10 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to. Nobody told me. I'm laura owens and i'm jan black if you've ever struggled to tell your career story in a resume you're gonna wanna hear what our guests step cartwright has to say because in two thousand fourteen. She started to help job. Seekers get higher faster by creating resumes lincoln profiles and cover letters. The present them as the best fit for the job that they want. Steph is certified by the professional association of resume writers and career coaches and an active member of the national resume. Writers association steph is also the founder of off. The clock resumes steph. Thank you so much for joining us. Well thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be here. I mentioned that you're a certified resume writer. What is involved in that. What separates you from someone. Who doesn't have that certification absolutely so. There's actually several types of certifications in this. And i went through the professional association of resume writers and career coaches to be certified where i had to do some testing Provide some sample resumes That we're judged by other resume writers and hiring professionals that are members of that association. And and that's how. I got my certification back in two thousand fifteen. I believe i've been writing resumes a little bit before that You know probably six to nine months before and really learning as as i possibly could from you know. Other industry leaders other organizations I've actually very active with the national resume writers association as well. They put out trainings all the time. I mean monthly sometimes More than definitely more than once a quarter. I'd say you know. Every couple months. They put out training so trying to stay on top of you know hiring trends hiring technology. What's working what's not and really how to better serve job seekers out at the where. The job market is right now except i'm a bologna and it seems like my generation is more interested in how they're linked in profile looks versus their resume. Has that changed in the last five years or so. Yes and no lincoln has really come a long way. You know when microsoft purchase that Several years ago they really started. Amping up you know the the way that linked in really got job seekers in the door. with other companies Face to face with other recruiters. I think what has really shifted though. Is you know. Lincoln operates very much like an applicant tracking system. And so i do encourage my clients to treat it like. It's a resume because it may be the first impression that you're making so making sure that you are presenting yourself for the best as the best for the job you want. Not just the jobs that you've had and really honing in on the fact that that is potentially that first impression that they're making in they may be asked for a resume after your linked in profile has been found but it is a searchable database. Excuse me a searchable database that recruiters are using to find people who may be a good fit for. The jobs are looking to fill. What are the most important things you would say to a job seeker right. Now as we hopefully are emerging from the pandemic. What should they do as far as their resumes concerned. Or they're linked in profile. When i'm really seeing is that a lot of job seekers are coming out saying you know. I am worried that i'm facing ageism. I'm too old too young. There's other biases gaps in employment. You know some are very significant. Others are just a few months that they're trying to hide but really what i'm seeing more than anything is they're coming out saying i don't have the right experience. They're feeling very almost inadequate. They're not quite feeling like they have what it takes to land the jobs that they want. Which often is not true. It's just a matter of reframing their experience to present them as that best fit.

laura owens jan black professional association of re Writers association steph professional association of re national resume writers associ lincoln cartwright Steph Lincoln microsoft
"professional association" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

The Successful Encore Career Podcast

04:35 min | 11 months ago

"professional association" Discussed on The Successful Encore Career Podcast

"I was really active with professional association of of continuing educators in ohio and our goal was to emphasize continuing education adult education in the state from all perspective so it was private schools. The universities public universities all the the two year campuses proprietary schools and we would work with local. Legislators and the governor's office to talk about the needs of adult students and Not the current change two semesters which just happened in the last fifteen years or so at all the schools but there was a wave going two semesters back in the nineties and a lot of the sm- the smaller private schools went from quarters to semesters one of the schools. The continuing ed unit Their enrollment dropped by half their students could not go from a quarter to a semester. They needed To deal with that length of time on a course because of family obligations and all. So that continuing ed unit was able to change their schedules of the courses. They supported to mini masters so they actually went from ten weeks to eight weeks instead of going up to fifteen or sixteen weeks so that big long explanation. So my question fellas. What can we do to get the state to actually have a plan for adult education to recognize adult in the the the scope of all of the programs that they are trying to create an k. Through twelve and up through adulthood. I think the community colleges are starting to offer her. Some shorter term programs like breaking a semester into two pieces. For the reasons you were talking about. Carol it just fits in better with adult students. I think that the work of this adult learner working group. I was talking about I think that will help but administrators at each college community college. They have to buy in the need. And if there's not that by the funding for it it's not gonna happen either right well and you know in in coming off that just for a bit diving in. Are we looking at a situation right now. With covid the pandemic and university enrollment down a lot of universities are on teetering even closing retrenchment particularly small. So what we're dealing with a situation here that we may not see in a resolution to helping this for a little while correct. And i think that's possible i mean it's all conjecture of course it is possible. It would be a shame for the state and the educational institutions to not take advantage of a new normal right and so we have seen what we can do in not getting to a store not getting to be able to buy groceries What having kids at working we're working from home and our kids are learning from home. This is an opportunity for many of the schools to say. What can we do to make things easier for. All students not just the traditional age students but adult students right exactly. Yeah and particularly that we can. We can get past the technology issues. It's an again and educational process that we need to do but we can get people up to speed on technology. We can There are still parts of ohio. The rule areas rural appalachia. Right depp alaska that lack broadband right. And there's no shoe but you know they put through. There was an organization ohio that was supposed to do broadband all over. And i'm not sure where that one. But i did an interview with Someone into ohio technical center yesterday that is at a school in rural appalachia and they still have a lot of issues with their students in it was especially bad during the pandemic because the students would go to the library libraries to get access public libraries and they were closed right but i i do wonder how education will change what lessons were learned during the pandemic that will we'll see education change on a more permanent basis..

professional association of of ohio Carol appalachia ohio technical center alaska
"professional association" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"professional association" Discussed on Pantheon

"Interested in hip hop like we all did starts break. Dancing teaches himself. How to rap and a dj performing in talent shows around detroit. So he's he's dabbling now. Ladies young kid he sees it. He's like ooh. I'm intrigued and start. Dabbling goes around detroit which is a good music city. It's going to be hard for me not to interject on little tidbits here before you sam. I know you got the stuff on the cards. I might as well just have jason here. No no no no no no. But we've he's a local guy. So i heard a lot of this stuff this. I'm gonna sit back and listen. This is great. No you should tell me what you know. Because again i had heard that he tried to get into the biz and he went that route. Yes and he got shot down. So it's about to happen. And then he came back. He's like fuck. I'm doing i won't and that's when he blew up. That's the second time we've talked about this. Maybe it's not just americans. Maybe it is michigan metro area. We're just like you know what. I'm gonna do what i want. You can't tell me what to do. Leave jiancai as we just watched that video before we turn the mike on. Don't tell them funny did late. Nineteen eighty s. He begins his professional music career. As a member of the hip hop group beast crew a beast girl. Did you ever hear the beast crew. Meaning that i've heard of being screwed but not the beast screwed beast crew. Okay some sub-conscious stuff going on bee's crew okay. During this time. He meets rapper. D you ever hear d- nice round close. Denies is an american disc jockey boxer. Rapper producer does little photography on the side. He began his career in the mid eighties with a hip hop group. Boogie down productions. Yeah he basically. He's famous for discovering kid rock. It sounds like that might be as well. He's still might be something big he and he's one of those behind the scene guys. We'll we'll get back to him. Don't worry about it but Anyway he discovers Bob bobby we're going body body. He discovers bobby one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and he gets me deal with jive records. Now see eventually these to sort of collaborate and do some things and now you got bobby being the opening act shows for boogie down productions. Okay and boogie down. Productions probably had other groups bands people things. I think that's actually the name of the group. Oh okay it wasn't like they weren't a manager. They weren't the right. It's like cnc. Music factories not like factory group early really young and yanking on my childhood one hundred year right. Here tell me the burlington coat. Factory doesn't have a bunch of people in the back sewin- coats together. I worked there. I can guarantee you. They don't think we've talked about. I was playing security to watch leather coat department. Cisterna people looks like shit on you. Well they had some of them had like wires all run through them so you could kind of put it on what you had to stand real close to the rack. Same time head to kinda use as like a puzzle to get it off the mannequin. You try it on. This is natural. Come at this time. he's he's opening for boogie down. Productions bob begins professional association with producer. Mike e clark who after some initial skepticism with the idea of a white rapper..

detroit Bob bobby sam jason bobby michigan burlington bob begins professional associ Mike e clark
Interview With Bennie F. Johnson

Revision Path

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Bennie F. Johnson

"All right so tell us who you are and what you do all right. My name is beneath johnson. And i'm the new executive director of a professional organization for design. And i know you've been in the role now for for several months. It was announced earlier this year. But congratulations to you. Thank you thank you. It still feels new. It feels a bit surreal. We started in january with the announcement that was my first day in the office. And you know before we know it. We're here under quarantine. And i'm back here in dc so it. It still feels new but a lot of work and a has happened since we started. So where were you when you first got the news that you got the role you know. It's funny i was in the car in. Dc about have lunch with a dear friend. And i received a phone call it said. Are you available to talk in a couple of minutes. So it's always like that pre call to a call. And then i received the word that i was selected to be the next executive director. Now our audience of course has heard of aig. A if anyone. I think has been listening to vision. Path that links at least since twenty fourteen or two thousand fifteen. They know about aig but for those who don't know who might be new to this conversation might be new to you and organization. Can you just talk about what. Aig a is and also what specifically attracted you to this role. What is is a legacy organization in many ways. It's a hundred year plus professional association. And there aren't that many hundred year organizations you can imagine but. Ai has been at the center of design design community design education profession for larger than assists century. And so what attracted me to spent the last ten years working with professional organizations and helping them reinvent reimagined and position themselves for a contemporary world. And so the opportunity to come into space. I'd always been designed always been central part of my experience professionally personally. So they have the opportunity to take the experience that i had working with other professional associations and apply to design professional organization was a really big draw for me. My background is really been coming into organizations to try to help pivot in move from what has been to build a better future of what can be so. I saw an opportunity. Here with edgy. A. and space to help the organization expand along with the design professional expanding right. You can't have the profession expand the professional organization stay the same. So what does an average day look like for you. You said earlier you were in new york. Now you're back in. Dc what does it look like running this organization like this remotely. The first couple of weeks. The average day was starting off monday mornings hopping on the train. Amtrak in heading from dc union station to tribeca new york and spending the bulk of the week. They're meeting a connecting with design leaders and professionals on students having meetings and getting acclimated to the organization. So that was about two months of that kind of back and forth. After we went into fool states that you can imagine of and we all have kind of lived through our pandemic this became. How do we think about the organization in physically from running from my living room. Dining room the favourite corner in my house right in and it quickly became. It wasn't a question of where. I was physically but using the tools and the opportunity to bring together our team to deliver and build for our profession. You know how do we deliver our mission. Yes we're used to being in office spaces in traveling. But what can we do more dynamic way. What's really nice about edgy. A is we were already positioning ourselves to be more virtual part of even my being able to come in at the role i lived in. Dc and so having ceo who is not based in the office was deliberate point for the organization as we stands right now only about sixty to sixty five percent of my team is located in new york the rest of the distributed across the country. And i think that's an incredible opportunity in advantage for us. And i think there's probably important to note here because when people think of aig a they think of the chapters. Each of those chapters has their own kind of bored and everything. Those are not employees of lateral organization. Itself is pretty small right. Those are nine employees so we are what you know. Many people haven't had experience with but we are federated model and it's very common in professional associations and spaces we all exist under a core mission in brand right that his asia but we're network community so we have seventy five chapters who are individual chapters. They have their own. Bores volunteer leaders were connected with them but they're connected through affiliation and grew an overall network to larger aig a mission brand. We also have two hundred student chapters across colleges and universities so the power of a federated model is just that you have this connection to community at a really directing granular level. But you're tied together in the national office in which i lead gets to serve as really kind of the infrastructure and the backbone organization that at its heart in all of the chapters and the student groups and are forced to be to do that work that they get

AIG DC Dc Union New York Johnson AI Amtrak Federated Asia
"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's a crisp fall evening just arrived at your local theater to see a play An usher hands you a glossy program. You scanned the rose for an empty chair. You take your seat, then. Stage lights come up The magic takes over. Remember all that? Yeah, me neither. The pandemic has made that scenario. Just go into the theater feel like something out of a fantasy novel. And now that the second wave of covert 19 has arrived, theater artists have to figure out how to deliver a theater experience without anyone coming to the theater. But Leave it to artists to find creative solutions. The Factory Theatre in Toronto just opened their 51st season. It might be their most innovative one. Yet they've launched a season virtual programming and get this. It's all free. The artistic director Nina Lee Aquino joins me now virtually, of course. Talk more about it. Hi, Nina. How are you? I am gag s o. You know, I remember at the beginning of the pandemic. We all thought it was going to be like, two weeks. And then it was like it wasn't extended march break here. We just gotta We gotta buckle down for two or three months. At what point did you realize people weren't going to back in theaters anytime soon that you needed to make a new plan. On. I guess after the two week mark, right, like I mean, one schools decided not to open. You know that that this was going to be the longest march break ever. Um, me and my staff at factory. We were one of the first to really pivot right away in many in many ways, And so our last two shows that were canceled. We immediately kind of had to adapt. And, you know, we presented our can first virtual show, you know, in May and, you know, learned lots of lessons from that. Thank God so that now for the 51st season, you know, just lessons learned from that, like we're bringing We're bringing. We're applying all of that here to basically an all virtual season. So So what does this look like? Let's talk about this new season is the factory theaters 51st. It's called the Satellite Season Canadian stories in orbit. You're directing the season opener. Acts of faith. It'll be stream so paint me a picture. I'm sitting at my computer. I log on to watch this play. What do I see? Well, you'll you'll see some sort of a setting some sort of a set, but it'll feel well, like like any TV show. Like any film that you're watching on screen right? Like it'll you'll, you'll immediately feel a setting. I hope off where that character's going to be. It's a solo show that was decommissioned. You know, playwright David G to write customizing. You know, the medium customizing the story to the medium, which is, you know an actor talking directly to a camera or cameras, so to speak, right? So you know the only difference in in our scenarios that it's performed life, so there's gonna be six performances and wherever that actor is, it's going T in a very safe location. Um, it's It's going. It's going to be performed live in the moment. So the feelings that you get when you're watching Peter, you know the fleeting moment right of a performance. You know that. That performance is just for you that that I am hoping that we can still capture that. I mean, I can tell you that you're hopeful. What are some of the challenges of doing this of trying to make Engaging theater in the digital media. Wow, it's it's the digital realm. Which is something like we've never had to do before. Right. I'm a theatre director. I have no idea. Howto work cameras at a You know, but now I have to consider it and again, like you know, when we did our last virtual production last season, you know that was a steep learning curve for me, but you know, I'm open to playing. I'm open to experimenting, and that's really all we can do at this point, and I'm kind of done being bogged down by kind of different labels of What people are saying. What we're doing. Is it Hybrid is it zoom theaters like giving it and I'm like, You know what? I just want to tell a story and I'm going to tell you No, This is storytelling at whatever form it takes. You know, to communicate with our audiences. T deliver great Canadian stories from across, you know, wherever you are right. So let's just let's just sit back a lower audiences to just keep engaging. If it's a compelling story. I hoping that all of you will lean in and just be kind of swept away by it. And I hear you. You know, I think that like there is the expectation that I well will log on and watch a play. But what you're doing here is is really amazing. Your You kind of changing the theater medium to match this digital moment, and that includes doing a podcast. You guys are doing a podcast. Right? Well, you know, audio drama has been around forever and a day whether it's your good old fashioned, you know, tuning in, you know, to a radio station to now we have podcasts. But again, it's just delivering a different form of story like a different kind of story telling, But at the heart of it all, it's It's just trying to, you know, enrich everybody's lives through art and which is our sole responsibility. We're just tuning in. My guess is named Nina Lee Aquino, the artistic director. A factory Theatre here in Canada Factory has recently announced that they're going virtual for the 2020 21 season. We mainly been talking about Factory Theatre and its role in Toronto. But I'm interested in talking about theatre across the country. Obviously, you know very few places in the country right now. Come, people go see live theater and even places where they can go see live theater. No, the theater's aren't able to be full. What are you hearing? As your president of the Professional Association of Canadian Theaters are packed. What are you hearing from other theater makers all across Canada right now. About morale is low. I'm Tom and and and that's really important to note because because we're on pause because you know not only are we on posits not like, you know, somebody said, Okay, just going to take a short break. Here's the date and then after that onwards, because, like we are in uncertain times and Like what? I've had to do it factory. We're We're just trying to be as creative as possible..

Factory Theatre Nina Lee Aquino director Toronto Professional Association of Ca Canada Factory Canada Tom David G president Peter
"professional association" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"professional association" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Is the Hollywood professional Association and the podcast is on there somewhere. Yes, it should be rotating in the carousel on the top of the time he tried about Oh, I see. Look, there's a picture you Your studio C. What are you doing there? Get out of my seat. Miracle That's hysterical. No, no, I'm I'm really glad it's really great. That's so cute. Thanks. So cute And I was I was talking to Dick DiBartolo in that shot. Nice. You were doing the show I was. I was something you. Yeah, that's awesome. Good. H p ay online dot org's Scott Wilkinson. He is our home theater geek. Changes every week. At this time, you could find his work to a tech high. Thank you. Report Detect. I'm or cost 6 30, my heart radio station. Folks recently. Did you see this? A National Geographic photographer named Joel Sartori really great photographer has suffered a devastating loss. He has luggage stolen the airport in Bali. Lost three hard drive's weeks of photos. Joe shot some of the world's rarest animals in Indonesia lost forever to all of us. That's why I always say back up. Back up. Back up back up to the cloud with I drive PC magazine has given I drive their coveted injuries. Choice award six years in a row..

Scott Wilkinson Hollywood professional Associa Joel Sartori Dick DiBartolo PC magazine Bali Indonesia Joe
"professional association" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Scattered showers and thunderstorms. Tonight Low 70 partly cloudy Tomorrow highs 91 Atlantis. Most accurate in dependable forecast is coming up. You'll soon have to wear a mask on Marta, the transit agencies general manager and CEO Jeffrey Parker tells w. S B is the word on the street. Marta police will enforce the policy on their buses and trains. I don't think we can say that we're going to stop every person every time that they don't wear a mask, but we're committed to getting masks out there. People. Marta recently began distributing two million masks throughout its system, The agency will have more to say about its new mass policy on Monday. Georgia teachers are concerned their input is not being fully addressed when it comes to reopening schools. Teachers have had a say in the process, but more than half surveyed by the Professional Association of Educators are critical of what's been released. Groups, Margaret Ciccarelli tells The Atlanta Journal Constitution. Teachers don't feel current plans appropriately respond to the risk. Those concerns include how best to keep students separated. What with younger kids using tables instead of desks how to get students to wear masks properly. What happens if there's a spike in covert 19 cases in their schools? Chris Camp, 95.5 In Cobb County, A group of parents, teachers and students are pressuring the Cobb County School district to share more details about what it will take to resume classes in August during the pandemic. The plan, which does not need school board approval, says that face masks and coverings are strongly recommended for students but are expected for staff. The top local news every 30 minutes, and when it breaks 95.5 WSB depend on it. 21 people have suffered minor injuries in an explosion and fire today on board a ship at Naval they naval base. San Diego and a federal appeals court has ruled that the first federal execution in nearly two decades can't proceed as scheduled on Monday. WSB news time is 803 24 24 hours a day live local coverage of the day's top stories delivered to you on air on your smart speaker and on the WSB.

Marta WSB Cobb County School district Cobb County Margaret Ciccarelli San Diego Jeffrey Parker Professional Association of Ed Georgia Chris Camp general manager CEO The Atlanta Journal
NBA players to receive 25% less in paychecks starting May 15

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

NBA players to receive 25% less in paychecks starting May 15

"There the English NBA had drama been premier players criticism over league will see clubs baffling twenty some have five beaches discussed status percent were of the their open corona hung paychecks like last virus a cloud testing month taken during over required out the team starting spring all and may break scenarios season fifteenth and some that the now could first of the allow first direct the closure season page hit to is to their to resume reopen salaries jets from because are June GM in of Kevin northern at the the corona earliest Cheveldayoff Florida virus with pandemic explained the aim mayor of Charlie completing up often the Latham decision all told fixtures was in the finalized Jacksonville team in September Friday beach the in aspirations a says board he of was governors of losing they'll the league be meeting the open desire is from restarting six and to play was to done eleven on in June concert AM and eighth reiterated with and the national five clubs basketball that to in in eight the January three Players PM professional Association after the whole getting leagues point below ankle of having the surgery players premier the two will league thirds be and paid growing of in the have full weary break been told up on by of the the may time the English first rehab a little football bit league the so cutback that that we big don't may in see sixteenth buff salary the walks large has away been crowds is from expected the fourteen earliest here in for Jacksonville some training time million sessions in response mayor dollars are Lenny recommended to it curry the is NBA now to start points a shut free out agent down no crowds if there is it no started of expectation more you March than want fifty eleventh to play by the again English the data the leagues regular he's for Duval that one season any of the county few bands would've remaining ended is will encouraging be Wednesday players allowed into and from two when stadiums hundred the for team now fifty moved from we nine when Atlanta need games to games stay have to the can Winnipeg yet course be to played be played in again twenty and eleven as continue efforts if none taking continue of the and precautions remaining is beloved regular to contain season in this we'll city games the get spread for are back his played of to the big corona life the hits league's as we virus players know it and would lose the but joy we about hi must with Mike eight be which hundred patient Reeves he played million other the dollars game more in high gross profile personal salary mail beaches I'm Josh in when South Rowntree a packed Florida including Miami beach were closed by state order I'm a Donahue

Mike Reeves Latham Cheveldayoff Florida Kevin Northern Donahue Miami Beach Florida South Rowntree NBA Winnipeg Atlanta Duval Lenny Jacksonville Players Pm Professional Associ Charlie GM
NBA players to receive 25% less in paychecks starting May 15

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

NBA players to receive 25% less in paychecks starting May 15

"There the English NBA had drama been premier players criticism over league will see clubs baffling twenty some have five beaches discussed status percent were of the their open corona hung paychecks like last virus a cloud testing month taken during over required out the team starting spring all and may break scenarios season fifteenth and some that the now could first of the allow first direct the closure season page hit to is to their to resume reopen salaries jets from because are June GM in of Kevin northern at the the corona earliest Cheveldayoff Florida virus with pandemic explained the aim mayor of Charlie completing up often the Latham decision all told fixtures was in the finalized Jacksonville team in September Friday beach the in aspirations a says board he of was governors of losing they'll the league be meeting the open desire is from restarting six and to play was to done eleven on in June concert AM and eighth reiterated with and the national five clubs basketball that to in in eight the January three Players PM professional Association after the whole getting leagues point below ankle of having the surgery players premier the two will league thirds be and paid growing of in the have full weary break been told up on by of the the may time the English first rehab a little football bit league the so cutback that that we big don't may in see sixteenth buff salary the walks large has away been crowds is from expected the fourteen earliest here in for Jacksonville some training time million sessions in response mayor dollars are Lenny recommended to it curry the is NBA now to start points a shut free out agent down no crowds if there is it no started of expectation more you March than want fifty eleventh to play by the again English the data the leagues regular he's for Duval that one season any of the county few bands would've remaining ended is will encouraging be Wednesday players allowed into and from two when stadiums hundred the for team now fifty moved from we nine when Atlanta need games to games stay have to the can Winnipeg yet course be to played be played in again twenty and eleven as continue efforts if none taking continue of the and precautions remaining is beloved regular to contain season in this we'll city games the get spread for are back his played of to the big corona life the hits league's as we virus players know it and would lose the but joy we about hi must with Mike eight be which hundred patient Reeves he played million other the dollars game more in high gross profile personal salary mail beaches I'm Josh in when South Rowntree a packed Florida including Miami beach were closed by state order I'm a Donahue

Mike Reeves Latham Cheveldayoff Florida Kevin Northern Donahue Miami Beach Florida South Rowntree NBA Winnipeg Atlanta Duval Lenny Jacksonville Players Pm Professional Associ Charlie GM
"professional association" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on The Heat

"Heat. Podcast with us to speak about the life threatening burden being placed on nurses and other health co workers in the United States is any cortes. She's a registered nurse and Co President of the National Nurses United the largest union and Professional Association of registered nurses in the United States. She joins US via skype from Los Angeles California Zanny. Welcome to the heat podcast. Thank you for having me last week. where as you were taking you. What are some of the things you've seen? What I'm seeing is. Nurses are giving more afraid to come to work more anxious to go to work because our employers have been telling us that pretty soon we will be running out of personnel protective equipment and that in itself is pretty scary because as nurses we are not afraid to take care of patients. We take care of our patients no matter who they are or what they have but if we're going to be faced without protective equipment caring for our patients than that racist alarms because if we are not safe our patients will not be safe and if we get sick there will be no one left to take care of patients when you go to work now when you go to the hospital and you go about your duties. What kind of protective equipment? You have right now. I'm right now. Where were we are wearing playing surgical masks and we do not have so far. We have not had a positive compensation. Come TO SURGERY. But in the other areas the nurses have been telling me that when they take care of the coveted positive patients. They are not provided the N. Ninety five mask also known as respirators because there is shortage and also they are wearing a not so appropriate gal that they are constantly being afraid and constantly just anxious that anytime at any moment they might be contracting the virus in. That's something that you know you think about because you go still go home to your families you still go to the communities and also infecting other patients and your coworkers. When you go to your supervisors and you say look. There are shortages of equipment. I don't feel safe. I need to be protected. What's their response? Okay so because we are told that the N. ninety five is in short supply. They are kept under lock and key in our managers offices. So that if you need one quickly to respond to a patient emergency who is Copied positive you will have to look for the manager. I in order for you to get that and in emergencies. Time is of essence. So that's what's facing US daily show. Are You Also sharing these mosques okay. So what we've been told. The last couple of days is that we need to start reducing the masks and as you know the virus is in the air or couple of days couple of hours in. It's pretty scary if we are going to be using the same mask as we go from patient to patient and so that's where the new problem lies because they want us to reuse the masks and that of course poses a whole load of risks for patients and of course we're nurses as well. Yes because if we have already contaminated the mass using it to take care of one patient then we do not know what has adhered to that mask. And if we go to the next patient using the same masks than that's a big problem is any in all your years of nursing. Have you ever seen anything like this? I have been a nurse registered nurse for over forty years for decades and I have not seen anything like this. And what's really bothering me? Is the fact that at this moment in time we are not being allowed to use our individual professional judgement like allowing us to use whatever protective equipment we we need in order to safely. Take care of the patient and so it's it's pretty scary. When did you first become aware of that This was something really big. This was going to be one of the biggest challenges that healthcare workers in the United States would have a face well way back in January. Our Organization are Union together with staff nurse leaders in twenty countries drafted a letter and sent it to the World Health Organization and to the Centers for Disease Control saying that they need to start drafting guidance for preventive measures for this virus and yet we were ignored in. That's where I'm very frustrated because if we had been listened to way back in January if they had taken as seriously than perhaps it would not have resulted to spend amick. You know we've been seeing more and more images and videos of the conditions that. Us medical workers have been forced to work in and as the situation grows more dire. More of those workers have been speaking out like yourself but Right now let's listen to a club of young nurse. Her name is immoral and she posted this video on instagram. My job today into work and I was assigned to a couvert patient an ICU unit that has been converted to a designated Cova Unit. None of the nurses are wearing masks. Ninety nine surgical masks in the hallways. They're giving report to each other. I had my own end. Ninety Five Mask. I told my manager. I understand. We're short on supplies will let me protect myself. Let me say that I have to go to and the way things are looking to get any better. Not Prepared listening that Is any to that knows. Her name is immoral. Echoed many of the consensus. You have echoed as well. Many nurses of credit of course others have been fired after refusing to endanger their lives in this way as medical professionals Do you have any rights when it comes to protect yourself? I do share the same sentiments as us. Her and so at that time nurses were threat to be fired if they brought their own masks. Nurses will be disciplined if they brought their masks. But we push back in. We said if the hospital cannot protect us than we need to find something ourselves to protect us. And so we started bringing our own masks. Our Own Respirators in ninety five and so the hospital where I work with. Were telling the nurses that you need to take off because you are scaring the patients. You're scaring the public. But we stood up and stood our grounds and said in my professional judgment. I need this in order to protect myself and I need this in order to protect the patients so we won and it's because we stood together and also because we belong to a union and our union backed up and said allow the nurses to usurp professional of judgement and we did public campaigns. We did press conferences. We stood outside the hospital saying that nurses will be fired if we brought our own masks and so the public supported us in so up to this time as I speak. We're still demanding that we'd be given the optimum in ninety five mass. How did the hospital management explain that You know patients would be scared. Why would patients be scared? Because you're wearing a mask to protect yourself. Yes because they said that we're giving the illusion that the caregivers us the frontline workers. The nurses are sick or that we are scared and so that feeling transcends to the patients in so. They don't want us to do that. But again you know it was our insistence and we stood together and we got them to agree that we need to use what we need in order to protect ourselves and our patients. I understand you have a duty as a nurse As a healthcare professional you have duty to heal the sick. I mean this is not like somebody going to a job on a car assembly plant. This is a matter of life and death But a any legal protections for people like yourself when it comes to the danger that you might face doing your job under the safe and healthy code. Our employers are obligated to give us a safe working environment and part of that is they need to protect us by giving us what we need in order to do our jobs and that includes personal protective equipment. The MASKS GLOVES. She'll covers head covers respirators. All of that in order for us to be safe at work so employers have that obligation and like you've heard everywhere we are not being given that gear in order to safely take care our patients so we continue to raise the issue. We continue to document that we are not being given a safe environment to do our jobs and so we will continue to do that. Canada doctor or nurse BA- fired for refusing to be endangered. Like this nowadays. What I tell my boss or any other nurse with doubled the boss that we are not simply refusing the assignment but we want protection in order to do the minute. So that's that's where we draw the line you know if you're not gonNA be able to protect being performing my job than I need to document that and I need to notify you that you are violating the health and safety code. You know as we've looked at this pandemic unfolding over the past three or four weeks and we look at the shortages of equipment all over the country. Clearly there was a breakdown in the supply chain in the provision of things like mosques like protective gowns. Like shoe covers etcetera. Where do you think that went wrong? You know at this time. I think it's futile to point fingers but I still want to say that it starts from the top if this spending before it was abandoning. It was dismissed. As it's only the flu it will go away in a few days. Don't worry about it it's a hoax. If this pandemic was not downplayed at the very beginning I don't think it would have blown to this magnitude in with the supplies. We are being told.

United States National Nurses United N. Ninety Los Angeles union and Professional Associa California Co President SURGERY flu Cova Unit World Health Organization Centers for Disease Control Canada
How The Food Industry Manipulates Public Opinion, Science, And Government

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

08:40 min | 2 years ago

How The Food Industry Manipulates Public Opinion, Science, And Government

"Today. I want to talk about how the food industry many plays public opinion manipulate science. Manipulates the government. So here we go. Let's take on Science I. I mean who isn't confused about what to eat. And that's why I wrote my book action. But what's really going on is a concerted effort by the food industry that manipulates science. The government our government spends about one billion a year on nutrition research. The food industry spends twelve billion. And they find all kinds of concocted studies. That actually manipulate the truth. For example. I think Coca Cola. Spent one hundred twenty million dollars to universities and other groups to actually provide money money for research and guess what they funded three hundred eighty nine articles and one hundred sixty nine journals. Things like exercise. Is the key to weight. Loss at soda doesn't have any role in our way. The Snack Food Manufacturers Association groups that confections group funded studies that show the kids. We Candy Actually Lose More Weight and have less inflammation the kids who don't eat candy. I mean how does that even make sense? And when you look at the data I'm you know studies funded by the food. Industry Are Eight to fifty times more likely to show benefit? I studied for example on artificial sweeteners. Show that by the food industry that ninety nine percent they're safe and effective but about ninety plus percent of the studies but their independence show that they cause weight gain obesity. Damage the microbiome and definitely are not a healthy food and not good for dieting. So we have so much going on all the time in research I there was a there was a big review. For example by a group of scientists have looked at sugar recommendations it was published in the animal internal medicine which is one of the most important journals in medicine and yet it it shed very computing. Seems like there's no evidence for assure guidelines to reduce sugar that actually sugar is an harmful that our concerns are overstated in the data to support any limits on sugar in our diet. Well the study was funded by a group called the International Science Institute which sounds awesome but turns out is funded by none other than Coca Cola and Monsanto and Pepsi and all the big characters in the food industry so we're completely bamboozled by misinformation major journals and it confuses doctors nurses nutritionists computers the public and even in confuses policymakers. How do you make sense of all this? So you really have to follow the money so nutrition. Science corruption is huge. And it doesn't just stop there. He go onto fun all sorts of professional associations for example the American Diabetes Association the American Heart Association the Academy of Nutrition Dietetic which which receives forty percent of its funding from the food industry. They create a partnership with kraft singles. Calling it the smart slice of cheese you know which is crazy because it's not even cheese. Something has to be fifty one percent cheese to call it cheese so I'd say cheese like product or I don't even know what to call it. The government doesn't like to call cheese and that's called a heart healthy. Smart Snack is because they were funded by the food industry They are also corrupting their meetings. Their meetings and they provide all sorts of CO education so they have panels with makers of high fructose Corn Syrup and transfats an all kinds of crazy stuff and it just computers nutritionist. Because it seems like it's good science. They're very very good and they spend millions millions and billions on this so they corrupt all these organizations and and so Dr John Nine Ninety s as a professor at Stanford said. We shouldn't believe any recommendations coming out of professional societies that have conflicts of interest. I mean how does the American Heart Association can have fruit loops and twix cereals? Be Hard healthy when they're so full of sugar because they're low fat they get three hundred thousand dollars for putting that seal of approval so we have to be very cautious consumers. See Not just stop. With professional associations they also create front groups. Front groups are group's that actually seem like they're legitimate groups but actually are funded by the food industry or the Agan History of the oil industry. So you've got things like climate smart. Agriculture sounds wonderful. And I who's against that right but it's funded by the fertilizer companies who want to use more fertilizer and as we've talked about before fertilizer drives huge amounts of damage to the ecosystem uses tons of energy to produce damage our waterways at his huge contributor to climate change so Not so smart. In my opinion I see you've got then you've got the ways in which these companies also create corporate social responsibility and it's another mechanism. They used they. They fund groups that are social groups. It's called corporate social responsibility. And what did they find? They find the N. W. C. P. And they find the Hispanic preparation make money. And what does that do that makes them sort of loyal to them and a little bit and the it co ops them for example and there's a soda tax on the ballot. They actually will oppose a soda tax. Because they're funded by coca-cola or or the food industry or so makers is pretty pretty frightening. they also fun things like the hunger groups which which why they're so against limiting soda for snap or food stamps are we spent seven billion soda for the poor every year about thirty billion servings through our food stamp program how that make any sense. When we're trying to create a healthy population says all these insidious ways they caught these groups. I remember when I was showing fed up in Atlanta. I met with Bernice King. Martin Luther King's daughter and she wanted to the movie and the King Center instead of being nonviolent is also nonviolent yourself through how you take care of your health and she was all excited about it and I got a call later. We couldn't show the film there and I was like why and that was moving about obesity in the food industry said well because Coca Cola Funds King Center. It's pretty frightening And how they co op these groups And we also do all kinds of other nefarious things They besides the front groups besides sole told responsibility besides getting into our public health academies besides corrupting science. They're involved in terrible political efforts that are behind the scenes that manipulate public opinion for example. Now there's a couple of things that happened. One was an effort by the Grocery Manufacturers America which essentially was a representative now-disbanded thankfully that was representing the big food companies and they illegally got them to contribute to a slush fund to fight. Gmo labeling. Which would have cost those companies billions of dollars and fight it in Washington state and they pretended to sort of hide behind this this group. That wasn't actually disclosing the funding Attorney General Washington state figure this out and sued the grocery manufacturers of America for campaign finance violations and led to the biggest settlement. I think it was like fourteen or eighteen million dollars against them Yet the ballot passed to fight. Gmo labeling and they won they spent so much money but they got slapped a few million bucks. I mean they make millions of dollars. They don't really care. But after that a number of these companies actually you're standing up and doing good things and I think I see I see progress. I see change and that makes me happy for example Nestle's known Unilever and Mars Got Out of Jimmy at that point the grocery manufacturer America and they formed a sustainable food policy alliance which was a great idea. And I think it's exciting and we'll see what happens with that. Nomination hopefully work with him on my food fix campaign so so that was terrible and then of course even worse things eighty for example they create a ballot initiative in California which was to prohibit local governments from raisings local taxes unless there was a two thirds majority which would have crippled the governments in the local towns so they couldn't schools are departments police stations etc and They didn't care about that but they cared about was manipulating. The Governor Governor Jerry Brown is probably liberal governor. We had in America to put a preemptive policy that prevented any future taxes on soda. Junk food. Now think about that. I mean they literally strong armed the government by threatening them with a measure that would they spent seven million dollars promoting that would have crippled local governments and basically bribed to force the governor to create this preemptive law which is terrible so all of a sudden affairs ways that the food industries acting and we need to fight

Snack Food Manufacturers Assoc Coca Cola America American Heart Association Governor Governor Jerry Brown Bernice King Kraft Martin Luther King Coca Cola Funds King Center Atlanta Obesity Dr John American Diabetes Association W. C. P. International Science Institut
The many ways professional organizations help product managers  with Mark Adkins

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

09:32 min | 2 years ago

The many ways professional organizations help product managers with Mark Adkins

"How pita evolving to keep up with the Times. So it's funny because the one thing I in kind of full disclosure sure is I have two sons I four children. Two sons oser product managers. Not that I made them do that. Once a senior product manager at Google the other one is a product manager for ten cents the Chinese company that owns we chat but they also own riot games. James and he's part of the League of legends brand so I have these two sons who think they invented product management right. No no no no. Oh No it's been around a long time. I can't remember. I don't know who to ascribe it to a friend once called it the accidental profession. That's right and I. I've always loved that term. Although it's changing right I think that's what we'll talk more today about it. It really is a legitimate profession Russian. If you will but twenty thirty years ago it was you're tapped on the shoulder you know you're working at a company and you have an engineering degree or Marketing degree or finance degree. Somebody says hey. Atkins I want you to Ron product development in like what really and boom you're a product manager and that's part of again my history with PD was when I was tapped to run a product development program. I'm like who do I return to. How do I learn it is a profession? How do I become better at it? And that's where we are today. The role of product manager product owner her and so on his exploded and I think pedia may as well position to be the keeper that Professional Association for for this community. Because the other thing I would like to add is product. Managers are in corporations. Say We're practitioners but we have a great great history with academics. We welcome service providers so one of the very unique things about PD. Ama Professional Association is we include the entire our community so it it yes. It's people incorporations is people in startups doing product development. But it's the academic people that give us the foundation that we need to be he great at innovation and it's the service providers market research companies. The the design firms that are instrumental in doing great product Komo. Yeah I think that that Nicks is really key to PD me. And what I find so appealing about it and I was having a discussion with someone. This wonderful experience. I got to train in their product managers in this large organization and the guy that brought me and it was senior director of product management for them and he was talking about what we did for the training raining. My group is all based on. PDA's body of knowledge and put my hands around that. And the reason why I chose that is instrumental in the work that I did that. I successful and it's also grounded in research every what four five years. There's this study that does about what are the best organizations doing in the space. And how does that compare to everyone else and it gives you a real appreciation for what you need to be doing right. The distinction there and his reflection on this. Was You know Chad. Yeah I've done training from all the different organizations right. I've been in product management longtime. I've never seen something that is as wide breath and as integrated as this Body knowledge that covers all the things that you really need to know. So what I'd like to do to build on that there's two elements one is going to be China. Our Program in China is going to be teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Environ January. So let me let me start with my personal program. I teach a course I in the technical title is managing medical device. RND right but I use the PEDIA may body of knowledge approach as my textbook. Because when I looked at what I'm trying to do with these graduate students who are pursuing a master's of science and bioengineering. I I I WANNA give them the full breadth of understanding of what it is to develop new products and the PDA body of knowledge is the guidebook is as a wonderful resource. So I use it personally might textbook as far as China. There's not a better example when you were talking earlier about. PM Am I and project management and Pedia. May We have a wonderful program. I've been twice to China to be representing Pedia. May It was is our former chair. Alan Anderson it really got the program going and we are certifying thousands of Chinese folks who have a PM so they were project managers but now literally the government of China wants to move up the value you chain. They WANNA be innovators. They don't WANNA be simply low. Cost manufacturing companies in a country. That just can only make cheap product. They want want to innovate and so they've turned -pedia may as their partner in developing a certification program. So if you WANNA be a product manager in China China you need to get your n. p. which is our revocation and we have literally trained thousands and thousands of Chinese and it grows every a year so I think it's a wonderful example of this differentiation and the move up if you WANNA call it. The value chain from project management into product management innovation. And we're doing it in China in spades. I think it's really interesting. How PD may is in? A sense has always been international nationalization but exporting what has been known as the US has capability dominance in product management to other places and China paid attention to that right an open the doors to this just as they did two PM. I sometimes goes well. Can I also add the global nature on our former tair. He's a key week he's from New Zealand. So for the last three years our chairpersons been the New Zealander so I agreed read the PDF roots are in the US but it would be complete underestimation of us to think of us as a US only organization. Yeah I I do. Think the recognized dominance in at least the area of product management has been kind of US base. Because when I talked to other people in other countries they talk about well. You guys have so much experience in that. How do we get that experience to? And this is one way. And that's awfully kind of a wakeup call. I think for product managers. If you're listening to this now certification. Should I think historically has not made a big difference in our industry frankly. I very rarely see job. Announcement saying some kind of certification is desired but if if we have thousands and thousands every year of product managers in China getting certified. It's going to start making more of a difference and it's something just to look into frankly clearly the value to me. The value of many people that have helped train for specifically for the certification isn't really getting that certification right. It's not the piece. The papers not magical but learning that body of knowledge learning the framework man if there was big light bulb moments. That went off for me as I was doing that personally. And I had the pleasure of helping to co train on that body of knowledge at last year's conference of you and I were that and I assured just my journey with that too and said when I learned about this. That was huge. I suddenly put together the pieces that I've been doing for the last ten years that I didn't really know how they fit and there were other people in the room that came up to me afterwards and said you know. lightbulbs would offer me too during the training today that I never made these connections before it was just really powerful. Really good so let's talk about the benefits associated associated with a so if people want to check out the professional organization lots of free resources available and of course it is a professional association. If you're a paid member when you get access to other things to just what's involved in those benefits I really WanNa go instead of going down into the dark details of everything everything when I reflect on my time with. PDA In this recently yesterday. On a link to impose it's been a couple apple decades of meeting fantastic people so whether you volunteer for DNA or you're just see participating or online or as part of a chapter after I can guarantee you're going to meet some of the smartest most interesting most dedicated people you'll ever meet you'll meet them through pedia and that's pretty priceless kidding. It's very priceless. And then the second thing is what you learn right. Yeah so like to your point about body of knowledge right. I tap on the shoulder twenty years ago. It's like you're in charge of product development. Oh man what does that mean. And the ability to go to the website the body of knowledge all of the books we published all the webcast we do. There's so much you can learn is part of PDA so rather than going down into the weeds of benefits in listing a dozen. You'RE GONNA meet great people and you'RE GONNA learn a lot. Just become become part of our community and I can guarantee those benefits you'll get

Product Manager China Product Development Pedia Senior Product Manager United States Senior Director Of Product Man Times Professional Association China China Riot Games Google James League Of Legends Ama Professional Association New Zealand Nicks University Of Pittsburgh
Many young women get unnecessary pelvic exams

All Things Considered

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Many young women get unnecessary pelvic exams

"A new study shows that one point four million adolescent girls and young women in the U. S. might have been given unnecessary pelvic exam last year in pairs and leave on reports over the past few years leading professional associations have come to the consensus that most young women don't need regular pap smears or pelvic exams they issued revised guidelines about when the procedures are appropriate but according to a study published Monday in the journal JAMA internal medicine doctors are not paying close enough attention to these new guidelines issued for women between fifteen and twenty more than half of the pelvic exams and almost three quarters of the pap tests given to this age group last year might have been unnecessary the study's authors say the over use of these procedures can lead to false positives anxiety and an estimated one hundred twenty three million dollars annually in needless expenses Emily von

Jama Emily
"professional association" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on No Agenda

"It has spotify everyone just trust each other and has this culture of it's okay to ask questions even if they might be difficult questions are kind of a tricky subject for me in that going back and forth about kind of what put years which is where I spent about thirty years or so in the closet it because my previous employers didn't have any particular tolerance for for transgender people at spotify we have employee resource groups so what we did is come with a list of essentially every medical procedure that trans people might need basically spotify said offer masculinization feminization treatments recommended by the World Professional Association for transgender health it's not a question of vanity you know for someone who needs these things it's really a question of being able to be perceived as themselves as spotify everyone's part of spotify everyone's a member of the band and everyone is determined to help everyone else needs it my advice is don't be afraid there's nothing wrong with knowing who you are and where you stand part of what I'm doing here is trying to be visible so people who are like me know that they're not alone and now as we were talking earlier John About the entertainment business and I consider this to be an entertainment company the first down quarter this publicly listed company Has Gone You're feminization treatments okay that's the first thing they're gonna cut that I'm telling you that's new on the list by the way but this virtuous and the thing that struck me was it was all White People Trans this trans that Oh virtue Singley there's a subtle message in there I think is elitist gay because some valley thing probably then so I think it's an Alita Geico company and and the reason I say that is because of the code word that was in their wishes were all members fanned yeah and there's there's a movie called boys in the band which was one of the first game but the gays Dan seem to be the coach elitist gays that are just virtuous signaling and it's like it was right is all bull crap totally and it's all going away with your first down quarter or your or your or you know when when when you lose the lawsuit and you have to pay eighty billion dollars was in in back royalties this is the first thing that's going to go hey give me your feminization back by I can't believe why would they put it this is really I really hate virtue signal or is this I hear you I hear it yeah when do all that stuff just do it why you have to brag about it I mean the whole thing was I think if you're a very generous person philanthropist many of them to this day they don't go bragging about it.

World Professional Association Dan spotify Alita Geico eighty billion dollars thirty years
 Sudanese rally against deadly crackdown on student protest

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 3 years ago

Sudanese rally against deadly crackdown on student protest

"The political opposition in Sudan is calling for nationwide protests after the shooting deaths of five people by the country security forces four of them are high school students taking part in protests NPR's offend me a quick start and says the killings are raising distrust between the opposition and Sudan's military gunshots can be heard on video circulating with some graphic images on social media protest organizers in Sudan accused the security forces of shooting dead young demonstrators as they March through and obeyed in central North Korea found province news about the high school students prompted outrage in a call for action the influential Sudanese professional association at the forefront of pro democracy protests says there must be an immediate return to civilian led administration this latest deadly incident is likely to undermine the fine tuning stage of a power sharing deal between the military and civilians in Sudan there's been heightened tension since dozens of protesters were killed in a crackdown by the security forces in the capital heart two minutes early

Sudan NPR North Korea Two Minutes
"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:57 min | 3 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Former Egyptian President Muhammad Mosey has been buried in Cairo, just hours after his sudden death while on trial in custody China cooled on the US and Iran to reduce tensions in the Gulf. And an internal report is detailed failings in the United Nations approach to me on my head of the mass exodus of Ryan jut Muslims. It's Newsday from the BBC World Service. Where the opposition forces for freedom and change have called fortnight protests on the eighteenth and nineteenth of June in the capital team and a number of states and also issued a timetable for his escalation of activities until the end of the week gotta speak now to some him about act. She is a spokesperson for the Sudanese professional association. One of the groups involved in organizing the protests. Good to have you on the program, some hair, what exactly you asking people to do? Hi right now, we're, we're trying to organize and we organize in your very difficult situation with the lack of internet, and lack of communication amongst ourselves, and we've gone back to our traditional means of communication right now where we is text messages. We use. Distribution of Nathanson song. We did not have the privilege of, of normal connection internet in this first century, so that this is how you having to mobilize people literally by walking the streets to get people to come out. Yes. Right now. We have the schedule for the week for the revolution explanation. Ops out in order for the message to be to be to be transmitted or transferred to the people. We have a dissident TV channel Saddam Booker, when which are messages are broadcasted through that. It's very, very modest TV channel at at the time. And that's still not ahead. It has still not grown in. It's, it's just a new form of, of resistance and apart from that. We have to walk around the street live. He let's or send text messages within. The network of, of people whom you know, and answer on this is how the message spreads. What happens is year know that there are going to be protests in the neighborhood, you know, that they're going to be rallied in the neighbor, but for you to know the exact time you just have to keep your ear out to when it's going to start. If you are not part of organizing, the protests itself and understand people feel very, very you're out in the streets. Okay. And being mobile, then come out. I just wanted to say just let me put this question to you people will feel very concerned about coming out. We know that people have been holed up in the homes any coming out for essentials after the June. The third violence, where protesters like yourself, what were dispersed and many people left for dead after the rapid support forces, the parliamentary came in to disperse protesters. So there's going to be an understandable. Reluctance, don't you think for people to come out at night time to put themselves in such vulnerable position, even though they may well agree with political motives? Yes. Yes. It's, it's, it's if, if is very it is very likely end as actually happening. A lot of people who are still reluctant and come up like the way that the military council, the ministry coup, cancel right now is trying to give it self legitimization. And to move is isn't great is a much greater threat that is given people motivation to come back out in the streets. And what happened on the third of June to the extremity and, and the horrific -ness of what it has been what we had basing since December. It's just that the June was at a larger and much more mass-scale. We have been facing bullets detentions beatings, and so on. And despite all the time. That you've always said he wanted this to be a peaceful process do stick to that message. Yes. Definitely definitely is, is what? Nonviolence and peaceful protests. It's, it's our motto. It's what we are going to go for. And this is the only way that we wouldn't go all the way to the end. Some of thank you for joining us on Newsday. That some him Barak. She's a spokesperson for the Sienese professional association..

Saddam Booker Muhammad Mosey Sudanese professional associat BBC World Service United Nations Gulf President Cairo Sienese professional associati Nathanson Ryan US China Iran
 Sudan's protesters launch general strike after crackdown

BBC World Service

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Sudan's protesters launch general strike after crackdown

"The main protest group in Sudan, says a number of Bank airport and 'electricity workers have been arrested and threatened in the run-up to a nation. Unwired strike against continuing military rule. Sudanese professionals association has called on workers to stay at home from today as part of its campaign to voice the ruling military council to cede power to civilians,

Military Council Bank Airport Sudan
Sudan protesters want civil disobedience to pressure army

Snap Judgment

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Sudan protesters want civil disobedience to pressure army

"The Sudanese opposition is calling for a nationwide campaign of civil disobedience starting on Sunday following the arrest of three opposition figures, the BBC's Mary Harper reports the Sudanese professionals association, which initiated the protests said the campaign of civil disobedience would continue until the ruling military council hunted. Power to a civilian government for now. Now, the army leader seem intransigent arresting key position leaders hours after they met to pin prime minister of the Achmat, he went to Khartoum to try to mediate between the military council and the position the two sides, seem further pas an Esa with your position demanding civilian administration and military leaders more prepared to use force, the BBC's, Mary

Sudanese Professionals Associa Mary Harper BBC Prime Minister Khartoum Army
Will Sudan's Transition to Democracy Succeed?

Background Briefing

12:06 min | 3 years ago

Will Sudan's Transition to Democracy Succeed?

"Welcome to background briefing. Steve out. Thanks very much. And there was a massacre of the pro democracy. Protesters in Sudan's, capital, Khartoum. The capital is effectively locked down by the Jonjo. We'd militia is lead a committee appears to be the power behind. And the scenes here and trying to turn back the aspirations of the people who managed to oust the long time dictator Bashir, but it does appear that their chances of succeeding against the kind of brutality that the judge away to famous four particularly in the massacres I that they conducted enough or with the Saudi Arabians with CNA chipped. And with the Maradas backing the military and the judge. Wade, what's your sense, whether people power can prevail? I I've been terribly impressed in in moved over six months, so power people power, and I guess we have to say it isn't inexhaustible. They've particularly in the this, so called Muslim generals and dictators, so forth, have really desecrated the holy month of Ramadan for the population by killing people. And now making a complete farce of the, the, the holiday at the end of of fasting month. I really think they'll stop at nothing to continue with this can only call an another cool and Dan, and that they don't have much of an intention to turnover power. And particularly when they say that they wouldn't have elections and nine months. That's that's ridiculous. Really giving what they've they linked. They've gone so far to make sure elections wouldn't take place. In twenty twenty in the first place, and now to imagine there's staging elections and nine months is kind of beyond belief. Well, what I find beyond belief is that this relationship between President Trump and his son in law, Jared Kushner with MBC in the Emirates, and m BS, the Saudi Crown prince, in many ways, it was set up by this character. George Neda has just been arrested in at JFK airport on charges of having child pornography. He's a cake guy and setting up that relationship, and that seems to be at the heart of it. We have a president Scholley in Donald Trump and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who just simply don't care about the brutality of these people that they so unswervingly support. I mean, if you can still support Ben Salman off to the murder okay? Shoghi then you pretty shameless. Scholley. Oh my goodness. Yes. That, that without question. Yeah. So what can be done. The people in the US government show to the White House that can make some kind of stand for democracy. I guess the signs do point to the lower echelons, including the assistant secretary of state for making some pretty strong statements, and, and courage ING, or really condemning the military crackdown in the death of the protesters, and so forth. But I guess I wouldn't be surprised about the next step was to try to get in some sort of particularly African Union force to supervise some sort of oversight of, of peace talks of some nature. It's hard to imagine what they look like at this point. But that seems to be the usual pattern that the, the African Union is called into to Elise oversee these things if not bring. To some successful conclusion anyway, the next step. And again, I'm speaking with state. How is a professor says director for graduate studies at the high University School of media knots studies a sociologist, by training is work focuses on social change in Africa and social movements in the Muslim world, a just recently returned from sedan where he was visiting professor at the university for women. He's the author sedan scenes from youthful uprising and he's forthcoming book as we have mood on the path of the prophet and unsettled times. But at this point, you've got the John, Joey militia locking down the capital cartoon killing people indiscriminately and they pay to be doing. So at the behest of the military council, led by general relative Burhan. So once these guys back in the saddle and prepared to be that ruthless. Then not lucky to invite the African Union INA. They. No. Although they do have all kinds of amazing global connections in that they were brought to life after the four prices by the European Union, believe it or not, which gave to Dan, all kinds of money to make sure that migrants wouldn't cross through Sudan, into Egypt into the onto the Mediterranean in Europe. And, and the again, government gave all that money to strengthen the Jeonju, we then rename them as this rapid, deployment for to protect sue do monitor the borders, while these are the people who are now murdering protesters and compliments of the European Union. So what do you know about the John Wayne leader, heavy? I mean, how much does the military council control him? Well, you know. It's a, it's a very interesting issue, because of I'll be curious to see how it get because of really kind of rampant Sudanese racism that the people control the country, every administration, whether military or civilian since independence, have been people from the Nile valley, people from north of Kotome or itself, and vodka of someone from the four or being coming. Head of the government is, it's really hard to imagine given the way that people from the central part of the country look down on, on the Dr four people, and of course, the, the south side as well. Right. It's this is a rice between. What would you say between African looking people and Arab looking people? Is that is that the dot? Katameya and I'd say when you say Africa looking are looking, I think, for the most part from the outside perspective, it's hard to tell the difference among among the Sudanese, but it but they know who comes from where, and there that the, the central Sudanese, I, I love them dearly, but they're, they're kind of remarkable races to about the, the marginalized ethnic groups outside of the central part of the country. So they and they and they've marginalize them in terms of education, and social stature, and so horse. So they have much chance to rise up in this society through the military and is considered one of these dock skinned people. Right. I see that might limit is political horizons. What about that? As soon as professional association. That's been spearheading these protests. Do you think that simply that's going to be decimated, by the, by the Jonjo Wade, or do they have what kind of international today have I it's, it's strictly lip service to the to the to the greatest extent. I mean dot getting financial bagging. But they're certainly noble. Well, trained educated that gated peace loving good Muslim people, but without any arms at their disposal. And then, you know and they dot gonna take up arms. That's not their intention. And so, I think my guess is that they would just sort of fade into the background and, and another frustrated sort of, you know, giving up on democracy for now, kind of thing if. If things get more violent that would be my estimate. Well, is there any way to shame the Saudis agency and the Maradas who without their support this? Of course, if the US would would ravers rattle some sabres and, and make some noise about this and condemn what they all are up to. But, you know that's not gonna happen with the Trump governments. They're, they're very cozy with the leader of the Emirates and, and with these e and with, and the S and so forth, so that, that I can't see that happening. That would be astonishing and very significant but doesn't seem like we're going to intervene in that way. Unless I must we get some further public uproar in this country about it. And so I appreciate your talking about well just in closing then. These reactionary leaders liked CC, NBS NBC manage to roll back the clock in Egypt's, 'cause flirtation with the Arab spring, and in general, and if they succeed in, in Sudan. Crushing the democratic aspirations of Sudanese people. It doesn't say much for that raisins hopes for now democracy, doesn't even though you know, political Islam is being promoted by the Qataris seems to be alive, but not able to stand up to this reactionary SUNY kings and military generals, Lexi, right? I mean, the whole world is becoming very Trump like and it needs to end. So. State. How I think very much for joining us. Oh my pleasure. Thanks for calling me. And again, I'm speaking with Steve, how is professor and director for graduate studies at the high University School of media arts and studies associates by training. His work focuses on social change in Africa and social movements in the Muslim world. He just recently returned from Sudan where he was visiting professor at the university for women, and he's the author sedan scenes from youthful uprising and he's forthcoming book, as we have my mood on the path of the prophet in unsettled

Sudan Africa Jonjo Wade United States African Union Steve Visiting Professor John Wayne Professor And Director Jared Kushner President Trump DAN European Union Egypt Jonjo Saudi Arabians Khartoum Dictator Bashir Donald Trump
Protesters shot as Sudan military tries to clear Khartoum sit-in

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:55 min | 3 years ago

Protesters shot as Sudan military tries to clear Khartoum sit-in

"Sudanese security forces have attacked a pro democracy. Protests in Khartoum live rounds have been fired and fatalities reported. Charles at the not wishing at all sound glib about the deaths that have been reported. Is there any grounds for hope at all? This may merely be a blip. The long term forecast for Sudan, is for the gradual hopefully transfer of power to civilian rule. That is the theory. That is the theory in practice. This is a massive setback. It's a massive setback to the agreement that was struck. I think just a couple of weeks ago for the very, very beginning of that transition to civilian rule. I mean, if you talk about good faith negotiators, and if you look at the transitional military council, and the D F CF the declaration of freedom and change forces the civilian side. You can't assume that the military is a good faith party to the transition of power when they do what they did on the ground in. Khartoum. Dundee. Are we seeing an on interest by the transitional military council in being all that transitional? Well, absolutely. And I it's quite hard to avoid being cynical about this kind of situation in great hope his met with great disappointment. We have been here repeatedly in recent years in the region. The, the military are not going to give up that power without a battle. And the problem is lack of outside forces. Well on this, if you think about the I mean, things could have turned out differently, and so many other countries with financial and diplomatic in strategic, backing hair Saudi Arabia is one of the major one of the major outs outside. Onlookers is interested in the status quo. And the status quo is military regime, and they have the money they have the money they announced a massive aid package. They have the money they had to have the strategic. They won't Yemen's support in in. So in. They won't see down support in in Yemen. And so from that point of view without any other outside actors stepping in said the US it really doesn't look good at the moment, little Charles on that subject might this be playing out differently if we had a United States that was more, obviously interested as the United States is traditionally, so supposed to be in the promotion of democracy elsewhere in the United States, perhaps it had not been burned, perhaps for some generations by. It's a attempts fifteen or sixteen years ago to interested different Middle Eastern north African country in liberal democracy. I don't really think so. I think it's the regional players as Daniel mentioned. I think it's the regional players here that even given a heightened or more engaged American presence or more meaningful American presents. It's the regional powers here that hold sway the TMC has been received by heads of state in south. Saudi Arabia in Egypt in the UA and elsewhere around the region. And we've seen a lot of sort of this northeastern sort of Africa become a playground for regional powers. And I think that their presence their money and their influence is closer bigger and much more engaged at anything that the United States states could come up within that part of the world the, the Sudanese professionals association, which has been the, the umbrella organization, which is sort of spearheaded the protests and the opposition, which and helped drive Omar Al Beshir, the previously long-serving dictator from power, a now calling for an extended campaign of civil disobedience,

Transitional Military Council United States Khartoum Saudi Arabia Yemen Charles TMC Africa Sudanese Professionals Associa Sudan Omar Al Beshir Dundee Egypt Daniel Sixteen Years
"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:21 min | 3 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Your doctors and nurses can find out all about your medical conditions by reading through your electronic medical record. But how can you get them to see who you are as a person Bram sable Smith reports on the answer during the Vietnam war. Bob hall was marine when he got home he served. A decade as a Massachusetts state, Senator. He spent three more decades. Leading professional associations. But in two thousand thirteen he was forced to retire. He needed a lung transplant. He was sixty seven at the time in living near Madison, Wisconsin. So he got the transplant done at the medicine VA hospital. There were complications. He ended up back in the hospital five more times, during one of those days of volunteer, walk into his room and asked if he wanted to tell his life story, though, I'm very shy and unused public speaking, as you can guess, from my background, I said, sure as you can hear Bob hall is not actually shy. Today is March sixth twenty fourteen and we are seeing with Robert Hall. Returning. You can. It did take a while. He ended up talking to the volunteer for over an hour about everything like his high school days. These student, I school, I graduated in the top ninety five percent of my class to his time in the military, and why did you pick the marines over all the other branches? Will you know went through something. The interview was part of a project called my life. My story, volunteer writers seek out vets like hall who are staying at the hospital and ask them all about their lives. Then they write up a life story of thousand word biography, and attach it to the patient's medical record. So any doctor or nurse can read it. One of my hobbies is writing published hundreds of articles and opinion pieces. Plus short fiction of poetry hall was one of the earliest patients to be interviewed for the project which was only at the Madison VA at the time. And by zone admission. He was kind of a pain in the butt being a writer. I wrote the whole thing. Now, more than two thousand patients at the man. Addison VA have their stories in their charts about forty more VA hospitals around the country are looking into doing the same and it's not just the VA hospitals like Brigham and women's in Boston are also giving storytelling try, that's a lot of confidence in the value of something that began as a simple solution to a pretty common problem back in two thousand twelve Dr Elliot Lee was a medical resident on rotation at the Madison VA. He wanted to find a way to bring new doctors up to speed on their patients that just their health histories, but things like their hobbies, and who they trust to help them make decisions seem to make sense that maybe the patient, might know about themselves and could help provide information to the new doctor, that they're going to be meeting. But how'd you get someone to tell their own life story? We says they tried getting patients to write it themselves. But that many people really wanted to they tried surveys that worked. Okay. And then. Someone realized they could hire a writer and it just so happened. There was a poet in town named Thor ringler, who also happen to be therapist and knew how to talk to people, and they were looking for someone who had a who had a writing background in also was a therapist to anything painful, tiller stories, and I was like crazy ringers run my life, my story since two thousand thirteen. And he says hospitals really only need one writer, working Hafer fulltime to manage a storytelling program like this. That means spending as little as twenty three thousand dollars to address the complaint, that ring were says is common to patients all over health care is like, everybody has the same complaints about healthcare. I don't see anybody for very long. Nobody knows who I am. There is research suggests when caregivers know their patients better, those patients have improved health outcomes, one study. For example, found that doctors who scored higher on an empathy. Test have patients with better controlled blood sugar. Another found the common cold was shortened by almost. A full day in patients who thought their doctors were more empathetic professor, Heather coats at the university of Colorado studies. The health impact of, by graphical storytelling, she points to two thousand eight study that looked at what happened. When radiologists were simply given a photo of the patients who scans. They were reading they improve the accuracy of the radiology made meeting less misspelled words, a better report that's more detailed and Cote says the kind of storytelling happening at the VA isn't just about patience either sites. Consider it a gift to the doctors per caring for the patient. Indeed survey at the Madison VA showed eighty five percent of clinicians thought reading the stories Thor ring team provides a good use of clinical time. And also help them improve patient care, take. Dr Jim Maloney, the surgeon who performed Bob halls lung transplant. It gives you a much better understanding of the entirety of their life and had to help them make a decision. Only about half the people who undergo a lung transplant are still live after five years. Dr Maloney says knowing a patient's life story makes it easier to have difficult conversations like hell to be if a complication occurs so my life, my story allows for near immediate access of this background, what experienced of what they're about what their goals are for the entire team and is Bob hall learned the stories can be meaningful the caregivers, even when they're not working like it was for one of his nursing aids. She came in one night, and set down until I just talk to me for a while because she'd read my story, and I found out later she wasn't on the clock. She just come in after her shift ended to chat for a while. It's been five years since Bob halls lung transplant he's breathing. Well, he's moving well. And even found a part time job, putting his writing skills to work at the my life, my story program in just two years. He's written two hundred eight by. Geography, some veterans, just like himself who come to this hospital for care for NPR news. I'm Bram sable Smith in Madison, Wisconsin. That story came to us from a.

Madison VA Bob hall Bram sable Smith writer Bob halls Madison VA Dr Jim Maloney medicine VA hospital Wisconsin Addison VA Robert Hall Massachusetts NPR Thor ringler Senator Dr Elliot Lee
 Sudanese protesters, military council say talks 'fruitful'

BBC World Service

02:17 min | 3 years ago

Sudanese protesters, military council say talks 'fruitful'

"First, let's cross to the story breaking in Sudan today. This is that Sudan's main opposition group says it's reached a deal with the ruling transitional military council to Fulmer joint transitional government, a member of the opposition's negotiating team described the development as positive and the protests organizes, the Sudanese professionals association said the talks would resume on Sunday to decide the number of civilian and military members of the sovereign council. Let's cross to Peyton now as an advisor to the United States institute of peace and full Merican diplomats as well. Based in Khartoum he's currently in Berlin pace. Thank you foot. For joining us. I you up to mystic as well that this is real progress in Sudan. I mean, it's certainly seems to be a step forward. But it's early days. I think there are two key questions Rebecca that will have to watch closely. The first is whether the military and security services are prepared to be subordinate to the civilian elements of this transition. Which has been a key demand of the demonstrators. And the second is the length of this transition in what would come next and how it's how it transitions to a full civilian authority 'cause of people are looking at the situation in Sudan and remembering back to two thousand eleven and what happened with the IRA spring. Where have the Sudanese protest is got it. Right. This time. I think what we've seen is remarkable not just ability to organize clearly in mass numbers across different socioeconomic and ethnic groups in different parts of the country. But also, a incredible degree of restraint in terms of not pushing for example, a rush towards elections, and that could be further destabilising. I think there's also been a clear signal from the Sudanese demonstrators against foreign intervention for its own ends and reticence to go down the path of other countries, Libya, Syria. Elsewhere were foreign influence and intervention has religious better recipe for fragmentation within those

Sudan Sudanese Professionals Associa Fulmer Joint Transitional Gove Peyton Sovereign Council Khartoum United States Institute Of Pea Advisor Rebecca Libya Berlin IRA Syria
Leaders of Sudan to name transitional authority on Sunday

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Leaders of Sudan to name transitional authority on Sunday

"Leaders of Sudan's ongoing protest movement have declared that they will name a transitional governing thority on Sunday to replace the uncertain military Gionta, which has been in charge since overstaying dictator, Omar el-bashir was deposed in a coup data last week, the removal of the share by his own military was in itself response to huge and persistent protests in Khartoum and other Sudanese cities. But the demonstrators do not appear satisfied as yet the Sudanese professionals association has emerged as the foremost opposition voice. They want their civilian transitional council, which they will unveil at seventeen hundred on Sunday to replace the

Omar El-Bashir Khartoum Sudan
"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:13 min | 3 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After the news from the BBC BBC news with Jerry Smith, the group leading ongoing mass protests in through Don says it wants the full dismantling of what it calls the deep state left behind by the deposed President, Omar share. I'm Jeff Arita of the Sudanese professionals association said lead is the policy regime must be put on trial. The protesters have remained camped outside headquarters in Australia. The lawyer defending news organizations against contempt charges relating to charge. Abuse case has called the court process. An attack on press freedom, try to three journalists and thirteen news outlets recused of breaching. A suppression order not to report on the trial of cardinal, George Pell for views. Finland's social Democrats have won a narrow victory in Sunday's general election. But the party leader said he was disappointed hadn't on as well as expected. A man from Indiana. Pete Berta judge has announced his bidding for the democratic nomination in next year's US presidential election. The young veteran of the Afghan bowl who's openly gay says America needs a new generation of leaders. The former Malaysian Prime Minister, nudge, e Brazil has returned to court in Kuala Lumpur for the second day of his trial for corruption his accused of plundering the investment fund one MD, which was set up to boost Malaysia's economy, the operator of Japan's nuclear plant has begun removing nuclear fuel from one of the reactors that melted down as a result of enough quake conc- NAMI eight years ago, high radiation levels, the engineers using remotely controlled a quick -ment to move the fuel. The army in. India says it has painted over new murals put on a Sikh temple in the Doug a this region of Kashmir state Sikh devotees. That's when the fine was recently renovated. This religious slogans were painted on its folds babysitting. News. This is discovery from the BBC, I'm Jamal Khalili and into days program. I'm in conversation with a leading scientist about their life and research, welcome to the life scientific. Amongst all the small things your smartphone can do. There are plenty of feats of engineering, you probably take for granted. Like how you expand image by moving. Thumb and forefinger on the screen all the way response to the different amounts of pressure. You apply or even how the image changes from portrait to landscape mode when you rotate the device. Well, many of these remarkably useful innovations would develop thanks to the work of my guest today. He's an American engineer inventor and leader in disruptive technology will find out more about what that means later. His works spans both defense and civilian Micro Electronics from the stealth bombers to the digital microphone. Ken Gabriel may not be a name that's familiar to you. But I'm certain you'll have used some of the inventions and concepts that he's most associated with if you have a laptop a smartphone all have driven a car made in the last two years, then you will have used men. James technology pioneered by Cam can Gabriel welcomes the life scientific. Thank you. Pleasure. Be here. So let's not with the acronym. Mems on his fantasy that most if not all listeners will be using it. So what is it? So Mems is an acronym that stands for micro electro mechanical systems, and it's a way to make mechanical parts that are integrated as part of building microelectronic circuits. So that you can use those mechanical parts to be the types of sensors you're talking about so give me a simple example of one simple example, would be to make a membrane mechanical membrane along with the transistors. And that membrane would then be flexible enough to move in the presence of changes in pressure that for example, come from your voice or from using that. Music or your voice pushes on the membrane deflects it. And then that deflections and that motion is detected by the electron IX and converted into an audio signal and you have made a Mems microphone so that will be the microphone would find smartphone. Other devices. Tops smartphones, any consumer electronic device there are more than two billion of them made every year what sort of other devices. More broadly dementia up there showed up I in the detectors in a car that would deploy the airbag. So prior to Mems the things that detected a crash were relatively large expensive devices. It was a magnet that would hold a ball. And when you got into an accident that ball would escape the magnetic field going hit a switch and deploy the Iraq. And what made the Mems the first application of Mems, the airbag accelerometer was the fact that not only did you have that mechanical sensor of acceleration? But it was integrated with the electron IX. And so when you're in an accident you needed to work precisely. But if you have a clunky ball being held by magnet. How do you know it hasn't rusted in place or stuck with a Mems device? You're. Able to not only sense it. But to give it a little jolt electrical Joe to test the mechanical component was free and clear and ready to deploy as a win win of. It was needed. We really are talking about tiny devices and tiny moving parts absolately when I turned my my mobile phone by ninety degrees. I just expect that picture to rotate and stay that way crime and time again, the very fact that they're small we're talking about micrograms to nanograms of mass millions to billions billions of Graham, and if you then go back to your high school phys Ed equals, you have to have a tremendous amount of acceleration to cause any appreciable force. Right. So they are extremely stiff as a material and extremely small and lightweight therefore the normal forces that even picking up the phone and dropping it on the floor. Ten thousand times the force of gravity is not going to cause an appreciable deflation with hindsight, I could be very appreciative of the Mems concept self certainly as we use it every day. But when you first proposed it when you realize the impact that these Mitchell these machines can have did you have a hard time convincing the right people that it was worthwhile. Investing time and effort than I would say locally. Yes globally. No, some people view this as not really going to be useful for anything. Let me take you back you trained as an engineer. Gabriel can you trace back when your interest in engineering I began? Yes, it's one that has to do with my grandfather. My grandfather was a survivor of the army and holocaust as a sixteen year old boy hit survived for about a year in the woods, essentially fleeing as a result, he had learned to survive and live off the land. So when I was about twelve he was visiting us. Well, we were in the United States living in classic suburban town suburban house, and my grandfather took me out one day and taught me how to catch birds to eat. Of course, just in case he wanted to make sure I had that skill. What's the trap to trap them with a piece of string? My grandfather showed me how to catch birds. It may sound awful that we were catching small, person suburbs. But it was a revelation to me I could extend. My abilities as a human being. With an engineered device in this case. A piece of string tied to a stick at one end with a loop at the other under some leaves and birds from that perspective, I've always viewed engineering as a very human activity. I mean from the minute we climbed down from the trees, if you will we have started to change the world around us. You grew up in the sixties, we time with tremendous technological change and these marvellous feats of engineering, particularly for example, the space race in the Apollo mission. And of course, we're celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landings. I wonder what you remember much of that time as a boy into what extent in that might have inspired. You must be about twelve or thirteen. Yes. I was actually fourteen on the data the landing, right? But yes, absolutely. I mean, if my grandfather's sparked interest being that age during the space age cemented, it not only could we adapt and change the world to our advantage. But we could do things that we were never technically designed to do which is to leave the earth. It was inspirational on many levels and one that I continue to look for as part of the what I do because innovation is an overused word, but the ones that fundamentally change. Change the world or as jobs used to say put a dent in the universe. Those are the ones that I try to focus on. Well, you didn't studying engineering, and you went to MIT, which is to this day, a place synonymous around the world with pioneering science, and engineering and feel PHD. You works on acoustics. What was the specific problem you're doing during a PHD, then if we were to design a human being what do I do with the signals coming from the thirty thousand fibers on the left side thirty thousand five on the right side to give a sense of position. How is it that humans process that and what can be the underlying mechanisms without having to stick electrodes into the brain? It was a lot of traditional signal processing theory, but not applied to electromagnetic waves or signals coming from the air, but rather neural firings. We won't follow the chronology of your your career to rigidly as. As I think, I'm interested in the logical innovation you've come up with the have changed. So many lives around the world. You mentioned your Tom at bell labs in the start thinking about Mems. This some years later after your first stint at DARPA the US defensive research projects agency, then as a professor of engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Robotics institute. You went back to your early acoustics work. Is that right? Many people have begun to commercialize them's at that point. There were gyroscope accelerometer actuators displays, but the audio space have been practically untouched. That's where the idea of the membrane came back to build microphones because I could see at that point in the late nineties early two thousands microphones, we're going to be increasingly important part of consumer electronics smartphones and mobile phones were beginning to take off at that point. But the the existing technology at the time, which was an electric with Jay fit in a can had been around for twenty thirty years worked, well, but one of its failings was it was relatively large compared to the rest of the chips that will phones were getting. Narrow thinner thinner and more compact all the other parts on the phone could be what was called wave soldered in a mass manufacturing technique of electronic assembly. But because this was a electric piece of plastic with Jay it had to be inserted by hand at the end. It wasn't conducive to the mass revocation of the rest. There was an opportunity for new type of microphone chip. And that's what I started my company around marrying, those two loves of acoustics audio and meant so these microphones are another type of Mems. The microphones that we use enough smartphones. Now, the microphones yes, they are. Now, nearly two billion Mems microphones made every. Credible. Well, you eventually went back to the defense industry as Thomas acting director of DARPA DARPA for many people's most famous role in the development of what would then become the internet. Yes. But of course, it's it's primary interest is in military technology missile garden systems, for example. How did or even today?.

engineer United States BBC Ken Gabriel Indiana George Pell Finland Australia America Jeff Arita Kuala Lumpur Jerry Smith Pete Berta Brazil Malaysia Sudanese professionals associa India
Sudanese army to deliver 'important statement' amid protests

BBC World Service

07:49 min | 3 years ago

Sudanese army to deliver 'important statement' amid protests

"You to sedan. Now in about four hours ago. We learned that these students military was going to make a statement. And state media started playing military music while we're still waiting for that announcement demonstrations against the government of president. But she would have been going on for months now, but they have intensified in the last few days with many protesters camped outside the defense ministry. Let's go to the capitol dome now and speak to Hoffa's Muhammed, an activist and political analyst Hafiz tell me what it's like where you are. Now, what's the mood like at the moment. I think the people are expecting, you know, announcement by the army and things going on. I think that using for the day is a little disagreement. Who's who's going is changing specially within the army because people are they have some vision over defense minister under stuff out because that show. Close to achieve and they change that reason why we have an negotiation green on. And that is what rain by army. And I think this is sentiment was echoed by many of the protesters that we've spoken to a couple that we've spoken to in the last couple of hours is that whatever the army says whatever the army statement is it's not just about almighty by she'd as an individual even though he's the president. And they want him out. It's about the all muddled machine regime him and everyone around him. Exactly. Painful years. They have killed that middle chain in. And that has to be ready to have people, and that you need to them valium an energy from older than I what we need is need at road for the Jimmy Chan you great to just come by on announcing from me. But by using all, especially this protest. They have to have on anything with the change allowed the army commanders of this team. And I have. Trust them to actually to democracy, sustainable peace. Perfect. I think we need to take everyone, and they have to listen to the people on the people have failed for most almost out of state. To indeed. It's very interesting. What you're saying about involving those were at the protests or are at the sit-in right now because we we've seen many scenarios before where people take to the streets. They have demands, you know, the army comes in. But then they feel that they're being overlooked. They're being sidelined people who took to the streets having said that even with just the announcements that there's going to be a statement from the military. We still don't know what the statement is people have been taking to the streets. People have been celebrating on the streets. But actually, they are actually because they wanted to see what is going to be on the brink. If change is going to be purely by the army that is going to be acceptable people out, no space. I know they're going through it. And they have done that the doing. And this is not just kidding. I'm reading. We're going to this school. I want to see a process of change was his now we stopped by Pittman, which is great run the Ingraham arraignment. That is important that the impure that is something we need to see until that two people on a clear roadmap. Mohammed and activists and political analyst live with us from too many, thanks. Let's speak to Newsday's James Cup know who's keeping an eye on all the developments teams. Of course, our former sedan correspondent two things that stood out from what is was saying one is there's an clear agreement among the top echelons of the security apparatus. Whether it's the chief spy, or, you know, you know, heads of the officials at the ministry of defence about what to do next and who's going to kind of who's going to carry on from whatever happens after that statement. That's one line of analysis speculation coming after Khartoum right now. Everything is speculation into we have that announcement from the armed forces. Certainly I've been giving the names of at least five people who various insiders on this one from another field is going to be the next leader. Who will be announced as the person who has taken over in a coup. Many means either people simply can't amongst themselves who should be or that there's lots of misinformation flying around room conjecture. There's plenty of that. I think one thing that's pretty clear is that because of a shares being empowered for so long because he stocks a higher ranks of the army and the national security service niche sort of intelligence buddy, I'm the other military forces within the security structure in Saddam with his loyalists. It's quite likely that anyone from the top ranks all the being around the generals. And so on will be seen as being close to the president in one way or another. Now, you've heard many of the Dem's rice on the street sang we wanna get rid of the Islamists. We want a different side of governor. Well, many of the ministry offices, for example Islamist. That's one of the reasons they were loyalty to president by share. The there are plenty of people with incident who are desperate for a change. And there are mountains of protesters, many who are nervous and they've told me this couple of what's happened. Various other means that every nervous about the all me taking command that it might just be a palace coup. Something shuffles the personnel at the top, but doesn't lead to real change. And of course, we don't actually know what's going to be announced the two, and that's another thing that that half is was saying, and I say that looking at for example, what's happening, Jerry. But also further back what's happened in Egypt, for example, where people take to the streets. The president steps down. The system is still the same. And what he said about engaging every everyone about those who took to the streets being part of whatever happens next, how likely is that to happen? I think that's the key question. Now said if the price initially was spontaneous had pushed since then by youth groups and activists opposition groups, but particularly the sedan professionals aside. Association which Hasely created buddy that by doctors and other professionals, and I think unless their participation is recognized in some sorta transitional government unless they play a major role in whatever happens next in sedan, the many of the people on the streets simply won't recognize what has happened if there isn't some sort of military coup. So that's I think the key thing to watch. If announced his made the role of people like that professionals association protest is and so on I wanted to protest as one is for the whole spate sway of national opinion to be represented, if it's just the military and lots of people can argue, well, actually, you know, what maybe president shares gone if that is the case, but not that much has changed. And so we're looking out for the statement who's making the statement and who's going to be involved in whatever happens after Jane's culpable many. Thanks, indeed. So James will be keeping them on what's happening incident and that development. Still waiting for that statement from the

Army President Trump Political Analyst James Cup Hoffa Muhammed Jimmy Chan Khartoum Hasely Pittman Jane Mohammed Egypt DEM Ingraham Jerry Saddam Four Hours
"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:04 min | 3 years ago

"professional association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"People, and it will be really great. The habit leader Gamal Habini. He was told if you do this again, you're not going to see the sun. What does this tell you about how the government's handling these protests this because everybody could come here and Mike until a story? You know, I know how people are arrested, and they went to go, and then how to raise so everybody could cello story. I will not say this is right or wrong. Everybody could change Chinese incense until everywhere. Yeah. I want to comment on the degree of violence on the streets and who's causing a because clearly is at at happenings in the protests are happening with militias and different forces that are related to the to the ruling party's vice the former vice president month. A prominent Islamist trigger few days ago acknowledge the presence of civilian that are ready to sacrifice their lives to protect city, gene. Many people in uniforms who are in the streets who are shooting live bullets and killing people are government related and clearly the ditties undescended number of detainees, including too many doctors who were in the streets trying to help the wounded was why do you think doctors are being targeted and not only does. But also professional unions have a simple itself in what's called Sudan professional association who have called for these protests. The reason behind that is the collapse of the public service delivery system in Sudan, doctors and other professionals are unable to conduct professional and moral duties have on if I can bring you back in if you don't want to comment on that specific story. But what about the violence? I would like to comment on this. I'm not here to get defy some statements by some of the MCP Lee. Specific private context. So everybody could take a statement. And then draw. We've seen the evidence that that has been acknowledged of the violence. What do you say to that? I think the violence is party troops and even. You know? Now these station is deviated from its peaceful late. They bring the stone. The biggest holiday three cars from molding and do all the and preparing themselves to stop the violence talking about comparing between people trying to blow cars for attacking them and Brookings. The streets in front of the big Thatcher's that are full of soldiers holding guns and shooting them and comparing this to people blocking the streets. This is just funny. Alex devel-, the the cause of the violence can be disputed, but there has been violence, where do you think this will take the protests, there is anger? Certainly a lot of anger the history of Sudan is that the only way that a thorough Teheran government or military dictatorship has been overthrown has been by nonviolent popular protests on the streets had happened in nineteen sixty four it happened in one thousand nine hundred five in two thirteen demonstrations were were ruthlessly put down and we saw it again in the Arab spring in in other countries. And so what the president Bashir is most afraid of is a popular uprising that is non violent. And of course, there will be shown provocateurs who will be posted. Among the protesters insofar as the security agents can provoke violence among the protesters, turn it into a tax on shops on restaurants. And so on they will the protesters will begin to lose the sympathy of the population. But I think the the fact that we have had more than four weeks of of sustained protests in multiple cities, many of them. Well away from the glare of publicity in towns, like upper I like I like Adare like Madani as well as Khartoum and the level of violence has been as low as it is. I think this reflects on the very very strong social consensus against this regime, and on the strength of the demand being made to President Bush that it is time for him. Let's talk about president share a little bit more. How would you describe him as a man? He's always underestimated people always thought that he was a simple soldier without many political skills without much education at Satra. But he he is very street smart, and he has one particular remarkable skill which is he's very personable. And he no he has an encyclopedic knowledge of who's who he remembers people. He remembers their families and what he's managed to do over over almost thirty years in power is have detailed person. Knowledge of the officer corps of the army, the senior chalance of national intelligence, and that type of personal knowledge means that his own personal patronage networks unsurpassed he's like the spider of the middle of an enormous web. No one actually in this regime can replace him in that regard. Which is why? And even though he himself may want to go not been in good health. He's been quite tied. He's talked about stepping down for some years. Those around him recognized that there is nobody with this still set for maintaining a highly centralized highly personalized very cleverly disguised system of patrimonial rule. The other feature I want to just to mention is that he's everybody's second choice. Anyone who's a senior officer may want to mount a coup and become president. But there's one thing that they respect with President Bush share which. Is he doesn't sacrifice his own people? He may arrest you he may remove you. But he won't kill you Habbaniya. Imagine you've had interactions with the president. How would you describe him? I I know everybody has its opinion is the other party. I would let me tell you something. Very well educated. He is one of the African. He has been expected. I need to read very high. Relations between the Africa. I'm he has influenced his even among Africa lead. And he acceded to bring the bread that in south Sudan. When I better advocate institutions failed to do. So the very brave man, he leads to them for charity in a very difficult. Wreaking protected so Dan for seventy years from international interference, president Bashir. I will agree on Gummer's propaganda in one point that was a very distinguished, man. As being the only sitting president who's entirety to ICC. He has very distinguished tactic on defied on rule not only on the opposition. But his own party. He he's very fondly to building too many militias on them against each other. And being in the media in the center of all these so everybody is a free to do a Kusuma Amani. How do you perceive the president even given this indictment by the ICC? And they sense that this is a man who is short his power through. The political issue. I see is making aggression nations. And we know how that that Florida compete have been blah, blah, blah is an international community. Try to divide to that political issue is not our issue. I I. Okay. And I should explain that. That's the international criminal court. We're talking about. But on this specific idea that he's short up his power by in a sense using surrounding himself by the military getting to know, the military and creating malicious which will underpin that too. Is that do you think that's a fair way to describe how he's held onto power wherever? Security forces and police forces weekend. Popular defence force therapy support forces. We can't. Border guards we can count the national intelligence and security forces. We can count. Okay. I wanted to give Kamara a chance to answer that there are these name militias many of which will be familiar to our listeners. All. We. Lord. Okay. I want to just move on to talk about the nature of the opposition within Sudan. I imagine that that's something, you know, little bit about how strong is the opposition official or unofficial within Sudan. In addition for the last thirty years as I said, president Bashir played defied ruled for very long, and yes there aware divisions among the political parties in with for failure long. However in the past few years Dayton into two big allowance which include everyone as well as new movements on the professional trade unions, which also forms the Sudanese professional association since two thousand twelve these now formed a collective leadership under the declaration of change and freedom, which we will have accepted eights leadership this is organized, and this has leadership and has a bland for the transition, Alex devil from your perspective is the opposition is as organized as jet describes. But of course, there's no way to learn democracy and democratic organization except by practicing it on one of the problems of Sudan has been over the last fifteen years the different attempts. To have a democratic opening have always not exactly being squashed, but have been manipulated. The leaders have been bribed the opposition parties have been bought off. So that typically they'll be one faction that falls in with the president of a share and one that goes into the opposition. So the opposition is doesn't look very coherent at the moment. But the argument that they shouldn't be a change. Because the the alternatives are not as organized as we would like is really not a strong argument is an argument from a managed transition. Not a not an argument for for no transition at all. And if I could just make one point about the ICC, I think the most unfortunate thing about the arrest warrant against president for shared ten and a half years ago is that it has given him nowhere to go apart from staying in the pilot. So there have been repeated indications of the president would like to step down, but he can only step down. If they're awesome guarantees for his own personal security that he's not going to be handed over to face trial. And surely, I would say to the opposition the fate of Sudan is much much bigger issue than the fate of this one, man. And this is one thing that they ought to consider putting on offer will do this sort of amnesty? Allow the general president Ibrahim Abu in one thousand nine hundred sixty four to step down. That's the point. I hope we can agree to Alex last probably last point on the ICC, but let's define shared between two processes that. The political processes is one thing on Justice unaccountability another thing, and they will they are both respected and we have been used. That's the point. I'd like to come back to but we have to take a short break. Now. Thank you to our panel. Alex divall, Jared al-tayeb and Gamal Abani to remind you do let us know what you think of the program or any ideas for topics likes to look into you can Email us.

president Sudan president Bashir President Bush ICC vice president Sudan professional association Gamal Habini officer Satra Mike Alex devel Africa Madani Teheran Kusuma Amani Thatcher Brookings Alex Gummer
UN rights chief alarmed over excessive force, life fire against Sudanese protestors

UN News

06:36 min | 3 years ago

UN rights chief alarmed over excessive force, life fire against Sudanese protestors

"This is Matt wells at US news reports that Sudanese security agents have used live ammunition and tear gas against anti-government. Protesters gathering hospitals in the capital Khartoum aren't deeply worrying the UN's top human rights official. Michelle Bachelet said on Thursday, according to the government twenty four people reported to have died in demonstrations across the country which began almost a month ago. Although the High Commissioner says the official toll may be nearly twice as high in an interview with Daniel Johnson from UN news ravinus Shamtou Sony from the UN human rights office noted the rights chief's assertion that a repressive response can only worsen grievances against poor governance food and fuel shortages. There have been demonstration into Dan across to Dan, in fact, in a number of teach in the nineteenth of dissent. The now the government itself has concerned that twenty four people have died in the course of these protests, but we understand from other credible reports that the death toll maybe nearly twice as high and many other. Others have been injured. We've also had reports that security forces have actually followed some protesters into a hospital in the on Durman hospital, and they fired tear gas and live ammunition into the premises of the hospital. Now, this is certainly not as possible, and we are calling on the authorities to ensure that the rights to freedom of expression, and peaceful assembly are protected, regardless of the political affiliations of the protest is going to ask you about the use of excessive force or the allegations. And reports of use of excessive force Sudan is a signature of the International Covenant on civil political rights. So people do have the right to to demonstrate should they wish to do. So what more do, you know about the use of excessive force? You do mention that have been emonstration in what fourteen locations around the country. That's right. There have been demonstrations very much across the country. And in fact, just today, there's a call by professional associations for mass protest again across twelve different cities. What the heck Commissioner for human rights has been stressing is that there are some real. Grievances. And we're not seeing that these are easy to resolve. But a repressive response can only worsen these grievances the government as a state party to international conventions, civil and political rights and has an obligation to impact the syndicate and protect peaceful assembly rather than cracking down on it. And how many people have been rounded up in these month long series of demonstrations? The authorities have confirmed that up to the sixth of January there at least eight hundred sixteen people who were arrested in connection with the demonstrations. And these include journalists opposition leaders protesters and civil society, we understand that the figure might be even higher although some of these people remain in detention while others have been released. It still does send a message to individuals that their right to protest is not being protected by the government, even if they're just detained and released within a few minutes of being detained on president mile bus. She has been in power for the last three decades. Or say, what is it that the demonstrators calling for well, you know, these protests actually, started you to economic issues the price of bread has almost doubled into they've been excessive inflation their few shortages, but partly because of the repressive response. But also because there are genuine grievances. They have grown to protest against corruption and protests against the government itself. What we are calling on for the authorities to ensure that all those were arbitrary detained are released and that instead of repressing these protests, the government sits down and works to resolve this tense situation through dialogue and staying with government. What exactly is it that you wanted to do is it going to investigate these reports and allegations of the excessive use of violence, and you say Tig us in hospital and live rounds? When in fact, there has been recognition by the government, and the condemnation of the firing of tear-gas some into this mission into this hospital. And we understand that they have established a national act finding committee. We are. Asking that they ensure that any investigations and the work of this committee are conducted independently with you to bring to Justice the perpetrators violence, regardless of their political affiliations, we are also offering our support to the government of Sudan. And the High Commissioner has reached out to offer to deploy a team to sedan to advise the authorities and help to ensure that they act in accordance with their human rights have legations how much does the office for the High Commissioner of human rights liaise and coordinate with Sudan's national commission of human rights. We are very much engaged with the government and through the permanent mission of your Geneva. But also on the ground, we've had a few visits recently where we have been trying to offer various kinds of distance to the government, and we would be very supportive of national institutions as well that could independently monitor and investigate and human rights violations, and in terms of Sudan's wider political picture, maybe you could explain the various difficulties. Is that the country has there is separatist violence in the north and various parts of the country. There is cooperation with the international human rights mechanisms that the United Nations facilitates, maybe you could just help us get an idea about what the picture is for people on the ground in Sudan does play an important role in the region, and it has been relegated with various international human rights as the country, as you know, does have quite a difficult. Recent history, you know, with the separation of Sudan and south Sudan and south Sudan plunging tour, which has seriously affected the oil revenue for Sudan itself, Sudan was also subjected to sanctions until quite recently and the impact of those sanctions still does resonate. However, there are problems of governance as well. Which is what these protesters are really taking to the streets about they are frustrated that corruption and the lack of good governance at perhaps the lack of accountability and transparency in governance has actually. Helped worse and the economic situation rather than resolve it and the optimistic of the position of sanctions and final question to your Ravina dishonesty from the office of the High Commissioner of human rights what happens next. Well, we are hoping that the government will accept our request to deploy a team to assist them in ensuring that their response to the situation is grounded in international human rights law, and we are hoping that they will seek to resolve the situation through dialogue with all the people with all their grievances to knowledge those grievances and work together to resolve them and to set aside a repressive approach to protests.

Government Sudan High Commissioner South Sudan UN Michelle Bachelet Durman Hospital Commissioner United States Matt Wells Daniel Johnson Khartoum DAN Sony Official International Covenant United Nations
White House admits 559 children still separated from their families

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

04:54 min | 4 years ago

White House admits 559 children still separated from their families

"This is an important story on developments in law in the Trump era. There are judges now across the country who are fighting back against the way. This administration has crackdown immigration while also failing to come up with a solution to the family reunification problems it caused. Now, it's been over two weeks since a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to reunite all the two and a half thousand migrant children, separated from their parents. Now, the good news is most have been reunited, but five hundred fifty nine remain in government custody and three hundred sixty five parents of those children have been deported which is it self an ongoing humanitarian crisis. Now on Thursday, a federal district court, judge voice outrage when discovering the the Trump administration was deporting, mother and daughter while they're court, hearing was still happening. And this was a highly unusual move. The judge demanding the plane turn around and bring them back to the US and threatening to hold the attorney. General of the United States, Jeff Sessions and contempt. Something we were discussing a different context or earlier tonight. Now those two people seeking asylum, we're basically trying to escape what they call gang violence from El Salvador. And that's part of a lawsuit that has been filed by the ACLU the challenges, the way that sessions has excluded people who are fleeing gang violence from getting asylum. Meanwhile, the union that represents three hundred and fifty immigration judges in our country is pushing back against pressure from the Trump administration to try to speed up these deportations. This is something called the national association of immigration judges, and they did something important. They filed a grievance against Jeff Sessions DOJ. This was on Wednesday when it began because it occurred after there was a DOJ replacement of a Philadelphia judge who was delaying the deportation of this young undocumented immigrants from Guatemala. Now, this judges union is basically arguing that the DOJ is overstepping into thority and undermining a key key concept. Sept judicial independence. I'm pleased to say that I'm joined now by judge. Dan lay marks president emeritus of the national association of immigration judges. She's practice immigration law for forty one years in San Francisco, a judge. Thank you for making time to walk through this tonight. Thank you so much for having me are it's a complicated issue. It is, and one that is important and that you and your colleagues of argued has both a legal do process dimension and a moral dimension. So for people who are falling this and saying, what does this mean? The judges are kind of pushing back against what Jeff Sessions and the Trump administration are doing? How does that work? And what are you trying to achieve. People have to remember that the immigration judges in the United States are administrative judges, which is a distinction that means we work within the department of Justice. Unlike most judges, that means that we have a boss attorney general sessions. Congress sets the laws, but many of the policies that are implemented are established through the attorney general and directives that he or she makes. But immigration judges are the trial level judges who decide whether or not someone is actually in the country illegally. And if so, whether that person is entitled to some kind of benefit such as a Silom. So we need a guarantee of judicial independence of decisional independence so that we can be sure that political pressures are not affecting the way that judges are allowed to carry out their role and. Recently, we have felt additional encroachments on our ability to do our job as judges. And that's what brought us to this very unusual step of choosing to take an individual's case, a labor union grievance for a sitting immigration judge and for our association to join with this judge and to publicly release what the grievance is in order to help highlight how our signal independence is being encroached just to pause on that because you're you're running through a lot of important stuff. Is it fair to say that your organization has taken this as you put it unusual step because of your view of how extreme the Jeff Sessions encroachment has been on what would otherwise be your thority to handle these cases that is accurate, but I wanna make it clear as well that we are not a partisan organization. We. We are professional association and we have had criticisms of encroachment on her independence in different ways, smaller ways by several administrations, both democratic and Republican, and we have pushed back, but not quite as dramatically as we're doing now, do.

Jeff Sessions Donald Trump DOJ National Association Of Immigr United States Attorney Aclu El Salvador Congress San Francisco President Emeritus DAN Guatemala Philadelphia Forty One Years Two Weeks