22 Burst results for "Production Manager"

"production manager" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

05:36 min | Last week

"production manager" Discussed on Revision Path

"Now for this week's interview, this is part one of a two part interview that I had with design strategist and design educator, Andrew bass. Let's start the show. All right, so tell us who you are and what you do. I'm Andrew pass, and I am essentially designed strategist, educator, art director. Graphic designer. Day job, I work as a aut in production manager and association called rims, handling them, member publication. And I, on the side, I also have my freelance consultancy, straight design, LLC, where I take on various different clients, focusing a little bit more on the small business side and not for profit as well as I'm an adjunct lecturer at city tech or the full name New York City, college of technology, where I teach design thinking, design studio. How has 2022 been going for you so far? We're kind of near the end of the year. When you look back, how would you say the year has been? It's actually been in perspective has been pretty good. I'm employed, so that's good. I'm getting transitioning more in from my basic print background into more digital design, which is actually good way. Also trying to kind of squeak my way into doing a little bit more motion graphics. But it's actually been going pretty well. Been focused more on my full-time job and teaching in a little pull back away from straight design due to family, personal issues. I went through a divorce. I had to sell the house and all this during COVID. Wow. Yeah, but 2022 has been compared to 2021 and definitely 2020.

Andrew bass straight design, LLC college of technology Andrew New York City
"production manager" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:48 min | 4 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hi, this is David Pearson. I'm a staff writer for the LA times based in Singapore, covering Asia. A region near and dear to Southern California, with vital that we understand what's happening in Asia because big issues like climate change and the global economy will all be decided by what happens here in this part of the world. That's not possible without your support. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from a West Coast point of view. If you haven't already, go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. The envelope is a Los Angeles Times production and association with neon media. It's produced by navani otero and Liz Sanchez and edited by hila el urbani and Lauren rapp. Sound design and mixing by Scott sommerville. Neon ham's production manager is Samantha Allison, the executive producer is Sarah Morris. Special thanks to Matt Brennan, has been aguilera shani Hilton, Elena Howe, Caleb bell, Patricia Gardner, Dylan Harris, Brandon side Sophie Chan, Amy Wang and Chris price. And hey, got monkeypox questions or concerns? We want to hear them. Leave a voicemail at 6 one 9 800 zero 7 one 7 6 one 9 800 zero 7 one 7 and tell us who you are where you live and what do you want to know about monkeypox and maybe we'll use your voice in questions on the show. I'm Gustav ariano. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news in this model.

LA times David Pearson Asia navani otero Liz Sanchez hila el urbani Lauren rapp Scott sommerville Neon ham Samantha Allison Sarah Morris Southern California Matt Brennan Singapore shani Hilton Elena Howe Caleb bell Patricia Gardner Dylan Harris Sophie Chan
"production manager" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:59 min | 4 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Hi, this is David Pearson. I'm a staff writer for the LA times based in Singapore, covering Asia. A region near and dear to Southern California, with vital that we understand what's happening in Asia because big issues like climate change and the global economy will all be decided by what happens here in this part of the world. That's not possible without your support. Get access to diverse perspectives on the news of today all from a West Coast point of view. If you haven't already, go to LA times dot com slash exclusive to subscribe today. And that's it for this episode of the times. Daily leaves from the LA times. If you like the conversation with Simone Ashley, by the way, go follow the envelope on whatever platform you use. The envelope is a Los Angeles Times production and association with neon hung media. This episode of the envelope was produced by Navalny otero and Liz Sanchez and edited by hiba el urbani and Lauren wrap. Sound design and mixing by Scott Somerville, neon hums production manager, Samantha Allison. Their executive producer is Shara Morris, special thanks to Matt Brennan, has been a Guerra shani Hilton Elena Howe, Caleb bell, Patricia Gardner, Dylan Harris, ran inside, Sophia chap, Amy Wang and Chris price. The time just produced by Shannon Denise rosalia and David the level on Ashley Brown. Our editorial assistant is Madeleine amato, our intern asura Hendry, our engineers are Mario Diaz marking at the Mike cafe. Our editors can see more. Our executive producers are hasmin aguilera and shani Hilton and our theme music is by Andrew Ethan. Like what you're listening to, then make sure to follow the times on whatever platform you use. Don't make us to put your podcasts. I'm Gustav variado. We'll be back tomorrow with all the news in this month.

Los Angeles Times David Pearson Simone Ashley Asia Navalny otero Liz Sanchez hiba el urbani Lauren wrap Scott Somerville Samantha Allison Shara Morris Matt Brennan Southern California Guerra shani Hilton Elena Howe Caleb bell Singapore Patricia Gardner Dylan Harris Sophia chap
"production manager" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 5 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Production workers at The Simpsons and other shows are hoping to join a union. Now unions aren't rare and animated TV, writers actors and animators are all part of their respective guilds, but generally not production workers in Paris, Andrew Limbaugh has more on the people trying to change that. Ashley Cooper is the production manager for the retakes department on The Simpsons. It's one of those jobs where it's kind of hard to pin down exactly what her day to day is like, but she describes it as being the caboose on the train. I get the show in color. We all screen it for any mistakes or issues. We get the rewrite. We perform the tasks to get the rewrite back in color. And then we make sure it goes on the television when it's supposed to. Cooper's been on the production team with The Simpsons since 2005. And she says that the perception of production jobs that's production managers, coordinators, writers assistants, and more, is that they're a short term stopover, but these jobs become careers, says Cooper. So people can wind up spending many years in something that's seen as like a job for a young person to do for 6 months. Cooper says production workers benefits are much weaker compared to the union coworkers she works every day with to get the show on the air. So Cooper and more than 80 other production workers at The Simpsons and Family Guy and American Dad filed with the national labor relations board to join the animation guild. The parent company, Disney hasn't responded to NPR for a comment. Here's Jason Jones. At American Dad, he's the production supervisor of the animatic timing department. I feel like this is a Beacon to see a show like The Simpsons and Family Guy in American Dad, having union organization efforts for animation production workers. Talks of unionizing were happening back in 2019 before the pandemic before this broader wave of unionization across all industries we're seeing today. The pandemic put the topic on the back burner, but recently, in the niche community of animation, production workers at a few smaller studios started unionizing. But American Dad, Family Guy, and The Simpsons are about as mainstream as you can get in animation. And Jones is hoping this move changes the industry's view of production workers as just a stepping stone. Because he says they love animation production work, and they're good at it too

Cooper Andrew Limbaugh Ashley Cooper Family Guy and American Dad The Simpsons Paris Family Guy in American Dad national labor relations board Jason Jones NPR Disney Jones
"production manager" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:47 min | 8 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Drone boss Lily and king and Nancy se chau a production assistant is Sophie Hernandez a special thanks to Vinny Thomas as a child there was nothing I like better than Peter gwynne Technical directors from Lauren and white are CFOs Colin Miller a production manager Robert newhall So I've seen your producers in shellac the executive producer of wait wait don't tell me is Michael Danforth now panel What will be the next big change coming to baseball Helen Hong They'll travel to away games via American Airlines bus Alonzo bowden neon everything the ball the baselines offenses It's gonna be like rock and roll bowling And when you get the first base you're gonna have to make out with the first baseman Well if any of that happens final will ask you about it on wait wait Don't tell me Thank you Bill Curtis Thanks for the Helen Hunt And Karen G thanks to the staff and crew at the Harris theater Thanks to everyone at WB is in Chicago Thanks to you here at Harris theater Thanks for coming out Thanks to all of you for listening at home on Peter sagal We'll see you next week This.

Nancy se chau Sophie Hernandez Vinny Thomas Peter gwynne Colin Miller Robert newhall Michael Danforth Helen Hong Alonzo bowden Lily Lauren king American Airlines Bill Curtis Thanks Karen G baseball white Harris theater bowling Helen Hunt
"production manager" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:43 min | 10 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"I think listeners who have brands would be so interested to hear this. So Dana was your production manager. And you figured this out yourself. And I think that one of the things that can really be a barrier to people who have existing brands at whatever size, I'm not talking about a giant luxury conglomerate, but an existing brand, and they want to make sustainable change. They don't know where to begin and maybe you think well, I don't have the money to hire a giant consultancy firm, but you just did it. You sat down and went, all right? We'll work with the resources we have. We've got a passion to do it. So we'll begin. Yeah. And you know, again, I put so much on that just fearlessness of reaching out to everybody. And I think that such a huge part of this movement is through collaboration and conversation and sharing everything that you have. That's the way to do it. And at the beginning, we were so lucky to have people that were ahead of us, way ahead of us that shared with us. And you know, we've returned that multiple fold. Since then, and I think that that's the way is that we have to be more connected as an industry so that you don't feel like an island. And if you are a brand and you're beginning this, you're not like, oh my God, I'm alone in this because you're not alone because now there are so many people that have done this work. And there are so many resources out there for better materials and better manufacturing partners and it's there. How big was your company then in terms of staff numbers? Roughly. And I'm trying to think, oh, God, maybe we were 15 then? Okay. Thank you. So materials, that's an obviously great place to start. We've talked about what you're doing with full circle now. But let's talk about some of the collaborative things you've done, actually, one of them is called custom collaborative that you talked about how you can't be an island and you need to work with others. Tell us about some of those projects. What are you doing with custom collaborative?.

Dana
"production manager" Discussed on Under the Influence with Terry O'Reilly

Under the Influence with Terry O'Reilly

01:42 min | 10 months ago

"production manager" Discussed on Under the Influence with Terry O'Reilly

"Goddess was born into a Jewish working class family in 1929 and grew up in the garment district of Toronto. Both of his parents were politically active and were heavily involved in their respective unions. That early influence would one day steer goodis into the world of politics. He was always small for his age, so his main defense mechanism was a very quick wit. Another trait that would come in handy down the road. He was 25 years old when he and his friends formed the travelers in 1953. Sam Goldberg was a pal who had studied music in Paris and good as recruited Goldberg to manage the group. Goodness not only had a singing voice, he had personality, so his role was to act as MC and handled the between song ad libs to keep the audience amused. It was there he came to understand a little about humor and a lot about communication. As he learned to feel out an audience, observe their mood and see what grabbed their attention. Sam Goldberg's father had owned a printing shop and Sam had spent time as the production manager for a small advertising agency, so he knew that end of the business. Good as his half brother Al sorin was recruited to be the accountant, and Jerry got us assumed the role of frontman, just as he had in the travelers. Soon, goodis Goldberg Soren became a very busy advertising agency, and that success forced goods and Goldberg to say goodbye to the travelers and hello to the wild and woolly business of advertising..

Sam Goldberg goodis Toronto Goldberg Al sorin Paris goodis Goldberg Soren Sam Jerry
"production manager" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"This is where they take pieces of aircraft and turn them into stunning works of functional furniture and aviation art. They also take pieces of fuselage, cut them to size laser etched them into luggage tags. They're really beautiful if you've never seen them. Well, Dave decided to have a festival of plane tag owners at a shop in Torrance California, and what a great event it was. Not only did he open up his shops at every one could see the inventory of the airplane parts. All the equipment they used to make art and tags, but we were also treated to a fantastic barbecue, impressive DJ, an open bar. I had my recorder with me, and I was able to get an interview with a collector, Dave, who has a very interesting collection and story to tell. I was also able to interview Kevin, the production manager at moto art, and of course I was able to spend a few minutes and chat with Dave, the CEO of moto art and plaintext. And for all of our listeners that have some holiday shopping to do, I think this is a great company to support and you'll truly get a unique piece of aviation history. So now without further delay, here are my interviews. I am here with Dave and have come across probably the best superfan of plain tags. Dave, welcome to the show. Thank you. Good to be here. You're telling me that you have quite the collection of plaintext. Can you tell the listeners a little bit about it? Yes, so I probably have right now around 500, but at one point, my tag collection was well over 550. Different colors variations just a lot of no duplicates in that total, just different combinations, different colors. Try to get one of every release of every color. And how long have you been collecting? I think it was probably either late 2016 or early 2017 I bought my first one. Of your entire collection, what's the pride and joy? It's almost like picking your most favorite child, right? It is, so I'm partial to the military planes. I think my favorite one is probably the B 25. And why is that? I don't know. It's an iconic plane from World War II. Doolittle's raiders use that. For whatever reason, that one is when I like, and I had at one time, I don't know 14 different ones, different colors, different shades.

Dave Torrance California Kevin Doolittle raiders
"production manager" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Country <Speech_Male> that worries me though. <Speech_Male> Not iraq <Speech_Male> iran not north <Speech_Male> korea. The only <Speech_Male> country that really worries <Speech_Male> me is <Speech_Male> the country <Speech_Male> of germany. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't know if you guys are <Speech_Music_Male> history. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in the early <Speech_Music_Male> part <Speech_Music_Male> of the previous century <Speech_Male> germany <Speech_Male> decided to go to war. <Speech_Music_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> who did they go to <Speech_Music_Male> war with. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> The world <Speech_Music_Male> <Laughter> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> never been <Speech_Music_Male> tried before <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and So you <Speech_Music_Male> figure that out about <Speech_Male> five seconds for the <Speech_Music_Male> world to win but <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> It was <SpeakerChange> actually <Speech_Music_Male> close. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Then about <Speech_Music_Male> thirty <Speech_Music_Male> years <Speech_Music_Male> pass <Speech_Music_Male> and germany <Speech_Male> decides again <Speech_Male> to go <Speech_Male> to war again <Speech_Male> it chooses as its <Speech_Music_Male> enemy <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Music_Male> world <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> this time they had that <Speech_Music_Male> again <Speech_Male> to go <Speech_Male> to war again <Speech_Male> it chooses as its <Speech_Music_Male> enemy <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Music_Male> world <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> this time they had that <Speech_Music_Male> guy <Speech_Music_Male> that guy <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> dignify <Speech_Music_Male> him by saying <Speech_Music_Male> his name <SpeakerChange> but i <Speech_Music_Male> didn't you know <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> but you'd think at <Speech_Music_Male> that point the will <Speech_Music_Male> listen germany. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Here's the deal you <Speech_Music_Male> know. Yeah it'd be a country <Speech_Music_Male> no more <Speech_Music_Male> on account <Speech_Music_Male> of you keep attacking <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> the world <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> if you enjoyed <Speech_Music_Male> this episode. don't forget <Speech_Music_Male> to subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> And if you want <Speech_Male> to help spread the word. Please <Speech_Male> give us a five star <Speech_Male> review and tell <Speech_Male> your friends to subscribe. <Speech_Music_Male> We're <Speech_Male> available on apple <Speech_Male> podcasts. Spotify <Speech_Male> wherever <Speech_Male> else you listen to <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Also be sure <Speech_Male> to check out the daily <Speech_Male> wire podcasts. Including <Speech_Male> the ben shapiro. <Speech_Male> Show the andrew klavan <Speech_Male> show and <Speech_Male> the matt walsh show. <Speech_Male> The michael knowles show <Speech_Male> is produced by. Ben davies <Speech_Male> executive <Speech_Male> producer. Jeremy <Speech_Male> boorda our technical <Speech_Male> director. Is austin <Speech_Male> stevens <Speech_Male> supervising producer. <Speech_Male> Mathis glover <Speech_Male> production manager. <Speech_Male> Paul vitebsky <Speech_Male> editor <Speech_Male> and associate producer. <Speech_Male> Danny d'amico <Speech_Male> associate producer. <Speech_Male> Justin turley <Speech_Male> audio <Speech_Male> mixer. Mike corinna <Speech_Male> and hair <Speech_Male> and makeup by nica <Speech_Male> geneva. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Michael knowles show is a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> daily wire. Production <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> copyright daily <Silence> <Advertisement> wire twenty twenty <Speech_Male> one and asthmatic. <Speech_Male> Two year old is <Speech_Male> kicked off a plane <Speech_Male> for not complying with masking <Speech_Male> regulations. While <Speech_Male> video shows yet. Another <Speech_Male> woman getting followed around <Speech_Male> the grocery store <Speech_Male> and harassed by <Speech_Male> a male member of the masking <Speech_Male> call. Also <Speech_Male> a mayor in ohio <Speech_Male> threatens to arrest the entire <Speech_Male> school board because <Speech_Male> of pornographic material <Speech_Male> distributed <Speech_Male> to students meghan <Speech_Male> markle and harrier name <Speech_Male> one of the most influential <Speech_Male> people in the world. <Speech_Male> They still just <Speech_Male> want privacy of course <Speech_Male> talking about all that and much more today on. The matt walsh show.

germany korea iran ben shapiro iraq andrew klavan michael knowles Ben davies Mathis glover Danny d Justin turley matt walsh Mike corinna Michael knowles apple Jeremy stevens austin geneva ohio
Keith Urban's Tour Production Manager, 72, Dies From Fall

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Keith Urban's Tour Production Manager, 72, Dies From Fall

"Country star Keith urban is mourning the death of his longtime tour manager who fell from a stage in Ohio Keith urban's tour manager Randy Baja Fletcher joined him a decade ago after working with groups like ZZ Top Randy Travis and Brooks and Dunn the seventy two year old Fletcher fell off the stage last week while preparing for the lake your read bash on the bay concert he died a day later urban told Billboard Fletcher had an orbit of light they all loved him and he was grateful Fletcher chose to be part of urban's road family Fletcher was an army veteran who had served in Vietnam he received the country music association's first ever touring lifetime achievement award in twenty seventeen I'm Jackie Quinn

Keith Urban Randy Baja Fletcher Fletcher Randy Travis Billboard Fletcher Dunn Ohio Brooks Country Music Association Army Vietnam Jackie Quinn
"production manager" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"I don't think. I've seen a characterize better than richard engel. Nbc news did last night on nbc. News here he was. This war used to be called operation enduring freedom and it's turned out not to be enduring and they're not leaving behind a society that is free it is only free. According to what the taliban says it will be pre the taliban promises that it will be free so you could also look at as tremendously humiliating moment of american humiliation. Leaving forced to leave on the taliban's clock and with the taliban's good graces that is correct. And that is joe biden's decision. There is no one else to blame for this except the old man who says the bucks with him he american people have said the buck stops with him now. The question is going to be where we go from here. How many americans get left behind. How many afghans left behind and will the american people continue to pressure the biden administration to do the right thing and get people out or are they just going to forget about it. The way that joe biden seems to think you will maybe. He's just projecting his own short term memory loss onto the american people. Already back your later today with an additional hour of contents in the meantime go check out the michaels show. That is available right now. I'm ben shapiro. This is the ben shapiro. Show if you enjoyed this episode. don't forget to subscribe. And if you want to help spread the word. Please give us a five star review and tell your friends to subscribe to were available on apple podcasts. Spotify and wherever you listen to podcasts. Also sure to check out the other daily wire podcasts. Including the andrew klavan show the michael mole show. And the matt walsh show. Thanks for listening. The ben shapiro show is produced by eliot feld executive producer. Jeremy boring are supervising. Producer is mathis blubber production manager hover white hausky associate. Producer bradford carrington host producer. Justin barber show is edited by adam. Siobhan's audio is mixed by mike. Carolina and makeup is fabio christina production. Assistant jessica krantz. The ben shapiro. Show is a daily wire. Production copyright daily wire twenty twenty one doctor. She sees his shadow predicts another two hundred and seven days of locked down. The white house admits that it will likely strand americans in afghanistan and big banks. Finally do something right. Check it out on the michael show..

taliban ben shapiro richard engel joe biden biden administration Nbc news nbc andrew klavan eliot feld Jeremy boring mathis blubber bradford carrington matt walsh Justin barber fabio christina jessica krantz apple Siobhan adam Carolina
"production manager" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Two two percents of <Speech_Male> high school students and one point six <Speech_Male> four percents of staff tested <Silence> positive <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> k so <Silence> why <Speech_Male> why <Speech_Male> so. They say maybe <Silence> additional testing at <Silence> the schools. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Or maybe <Speech_Male> there's just no evidence to <Speech_Male> back this sort of stuff by <Speech_Male> there are plenty of studies <Speech_Male> showing the face <Speech_Male> compare how he reach <Speech_Male> how we read emotions. <Speech_Male> There is one <Speech_Male> particularly from frontiers <Speech_Female> in psychology. It cites <Speech_Female> sixty five other <Speech_Female> studies talking <Speech_Female> about how people need <Speech_Male> to see faces <Speech_Male> in order to interpret emotions. <Speech_Male> This is perfectly <Silence> obvious. <Speech_Male> But we live in such <Speech_Female> illogical stupid <Speech_Female> society that things that we've accepted <Speech_Male> as ritt <Speech_Male> for literally <Silence> all of human existence <Speech_Male> are now <Speech_Male> being were <Speech_Male> being asked to defend them <Speech_Male> saying well. Can you explain <Speech_Male> to me why <Speech_Male> looking at human faces <Silence> <Advertisement> is good for you. <Speech_Male> Can you <Speech_Male> explain why we shouldn't all <Speech_Male> just be working or walking <Speech_Male> around number. I mean what's the problem. <Speech_Male> It'll protect you from <Speech_Male> the virus and also <Speech_Male> you'll be abiding <Speech_Male> by taliban-like <Speech_Male> fundamentalist <Speech_Male> law but what <Speech_Male> you'll be hitting so <Speech_Male> many green check <Silence> marks for yourself. <Silence> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> We all understand <Speech_Male> that. Not <Speech_Female> wearing a mask is <Speech_Male> a good thing. <Speech_Male> The fact that we're being <Speech_Male> asked to defend this <Speech_Male> on the basis of <Speech_Male> like really <Silence> really shoddy public data <Speech_Male> is <Speech_Male> completely crazy. <Speech_Male> Completely <Speech_Male> crazy at <Speech_Female> this point already <Speech_Male> well. We have reached the end <Speech_Male> of this week. But <Speech_Male> we will be back here <Speech_Male> next week for much <Speech_Male> much more. I'm <Speech_Male> ben shapiro. This is the ben <Speech_Music_Male> shapiro. Show <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if you enjoyed this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> don't forget <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to subscribe. And if you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> want to help spread the word. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please give us a <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> five star review <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and tell your friends <Speech_Music_Male> to subscribe to <Speech_Music_Male> were available on <Speech_Music_Male> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> Spotify and wherever <Speech_Music_Male> you listen to podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> Also <Speech_Music_Male> sure to check out the <Speech_Music_Male> daily wire podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> including <Speech_Music_Male> andrew klavan show <Speech_Male> the michael malls <Speech_Male> show and the matt <Speech_Male> walsh show. <SpeakerChange> Thanks for listening. <Speech_Male> The ben shapiro <Speech_Music_Male> show is produced <Speech_Music_Male> by elliott fell <Speech_Male> executive producer. <Speech_Male> Jeremy boring are <Speech_Music_Male> supervising. Producer <Speech_Music_Male> is mathis blubber <Speech_Music_Male> production manager <Speech_Music_Male> of white. Hausky <Speech_Music_Male> associate producer. Bradford <Speech_Music_Male> carrington host <Speech_Music_Male> producer. Justin <Speech_Music_Male> barber. the show is <Speech_Music_Male> edited. I adam <Speech_Music_Male> sivan's audio <Speech_Music_Male> is mixed by mike. Karleena <Speech_Music_Male> and makeup <Speech_Female> is by fabio christina <Speech_Music_Male> production. <Speech_Music_Male> Assistant jessica krantz. <Speech_Music_Male> The ben shapiro. <Speech_Music_Male> Show is a daily wire. <Speech_Music_Male> Production copyright <Speech_Male> daily <SpeakerChange> wire <Speech_Male> twenty twenty one. <Speech_Male> John <Speech_Male> thickly here <Speech_Male> daily wire editor and <Speech_Male> chief wake up <Speech_Male> every morning with our new show <Speech_Male> morning wire <Speech_Male> on today's episode <Speech_Male> a battle <Speech_Male> over mask. Mandates <Speech_Male> erupts in texas <Speech_Male> oregon schools. <Speech_Male> Make big changes <Speech_Male> over alleged racism <Speech_Male> and a hollywood <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> metoo group <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is caught up in a me. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Too scandal <Speech_Music_Male> join us and get the <Speech_Music_Male> facts. I on <Speech_Music_Male> the news you need to know <Speech_Music_Male> with our show <Speech_Music_Male> morning wire.

ben shapiro andrew klavan elliott fell taliban fabio christina jessica krantz apple Bradford Justin mike oregon texas hollywood
"production manager" Discussed on VICE News Reports

VICE News Reports

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on VICE News Reports

"Thanks to t t you for reporting the story. Thanks also to ben decker for sharing his analysis of the puck times vice us reports is produced by jesse l hundred cotrol sophie cases gen kinney jesse mocha julian butter and sarah. Cavuto our senior producers are ashley. Quick and easy egan are associate producers. Are sam egan and adriana rodriguez sound design and music composition by steve phone pran bandy and kyle murdoch our executive producer and vp vice. Audio is chaos burned. Janet lee is senior production manager for vice audio production coordination by steph brown fact checking by nicole polka. Our.

ben decker jesse l cotrol sophie gen kinney jesse mocha julian sam egan adriana rodriguez pran bandy kyle murdoch egan ashley sarah Janet lee steve steph brown nicole polka
"production manager" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on Reveal

"And it's a way of washing their hands of responsibility. The way that discrimination happens. Racism happens is never by accident it's either by design Or it's baked into the system for generations you can see the impact of those disparities here in north sacramento. Where vida church used to be for pastor alex standing in front of his shuttered church. The memories flood back. We use all of that space for those large halloween events. We'd fill it up with jump houses. It was really neat because people would come from all the community and you know be able to hang out with us thought of being a lot of memories. Vida church is still broke but pastor. Alex is trying to get resources together. So they can begin to hold services. I in people's homes and then hopefully at a more permanent location. Sarah mize's tan is the race and equity reporter for cap radio in sacramento. Her story was edited by aaron glance and was part of a collaboration cap radio. Npr's california newsroom. The show was also edited. By brett myers and cynthia rodriguez our production manager aiming moustapha help produce the show and i was the lead producer this week reveals mohammed al illu provided data analysis on our akron eviction story. Grace oldham helped out with additional research and nina martin was the digital editor. Thanks to james miller at the dupont manual magnet high school in louisville victoria baranovsky is our general counsel score and sound design by jim briggs and fernando arruda. They had helped this week from stephen scone. And claire mullet our digital producer. Sarah merck our interim ceo is anti shabelle..

north sacramento vida church Vida church Sarah mize cap radio aaron glance cynthia rodriguez moustapha alex mohammed al illu Grace oldham brett myers Alex nina martin sacramento Npr dupont manual magnet high scho baranovsky akron james miller
"production manager" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"You guys design a logo for this. You know rock channel. We're starting and they're like yes and they didn't ask me anything. They didn't ask me how much they were going to get paid or anything like that and this was right after you sent out the first memo in june of one thousand nine hundred and boy do. I wish i had that memo so for a year. They design logos. And i just rejected everything. Probably five hundred designs finely. They come in the office one day. We're actually going to go on the air soon right and we still don't have anything and they bring a pile and i'm like no now going through the whole pile and at the bottom of the pile is a piece of tracing paper. Remember that you could see through. And it was all wrinkled. And they had flattened it out. It was just like a sketched tv. I went okay. That's the one i can see. Frank like rowling. He and i now disagree. But what i had heard is that there's a three partners and one of them wasn't really a designer. She was a production manager. And she had done it. Frank sodden hated him through it in the garbage. She fished it out and put at the bottom of the pile. He says that's not true. But you know may for a good story. The only reason. I said yes is that dale had taught me one lesson about design you need to dominate the space and that big block. Em was the only thing they showed that when you put it on a tv screen filled the whole screen okay. We dominate the space in in a world of thirty channels in a day when the screen was square. Exactly right so then i go..

Frank sodden rowling Frank dale
"production manager" Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on The Two Of Us

"I didn't want to have anything to theater of as ended up going to film school because we had had a logical on television production which i loved but the problem with film school which was amazing is i had no idea how to translate that into working in the in the industry so i came out going. I don't wanna be a runner. And then i was just in retail for ages until until i was at the poetry cafe and a saint martin student wrote a flyer that said of making japanese. No play looking for power. I'm like i've kind of kind of impo- it. So i worked with her. And her final performance basically devising process wars writing the script. Even though i didn't know what was called at the time and that was brilliant and she eventually became so bereft that i seem to show no ambition getting out of this graph designed bookshop award for years that went her position as a video. Assistant at the place came free. She she strongly encouraged me to go for temporary position. I got it. And before. I knew what i was working. Within video production that led to animation. And the funny thing is round. The houses having had a career as a producer production manager animation that also drew to hate. I went to berlin thinking that. I just have gearshift and regroup. And then that's how he fell into spoken words and then cabaret performance at the same time and at making a lot of support that feels. I hate to say not dissimilar for the way to work in the last year like being in my room with a laptop camera phone and kind of just making stuff and writing blogs and putting it out there and teaching myself how to create through making for this unseen audience which of which in many ways i feel having developed of performance art practice theatrical practice. I'm of in a variation of being five berlin with my computer now zoom instead of skype. Now it's now it's instagram. Rather than mice. Base tools are different. Now me but for better or worse a lot of the mechanics. I would like to think or evolved but are also quite similar in a way. I loved the story though. Because what i love about it is. It's the narrative our kiss my best better bathroom better best there you know. I started out when i was six years old. I picked up a piece of charcoal on my new. I could draw. I work with plasticine. And then i went onto clay on now. I do everything in marble the end. I just wanted to turn the price..

saint martin berlin skype
Breweries Are Facing a Reckoning Amid Accusations of Harassment, Racism

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Breweries Are Facing a Reckoning Amid Accusations of Harassment, Racism

"Women and people of color are questioning their treatment in the brewing industry. Cristella ghetto of wbz says. It started in boston two weeks ago when a woman spoke up on instagram stories rent. Her mind is brian allen. Drives to work at notch brewing in salem her instagram has become a vessel filled with accounts of abuse. It started off. Just your everyday like women can't lift kegs. Women shouldn't be brewing like just those off handed rude comments and then it escalated really quickly into people talking about sexual violence and sexual harassment. Racism from owners superiors. She got comments like this one. I was just a brewer at the time when one of our district companies owners came up to me and said in light of the metoo movement. I probably shouldn't say this. You look really sexy driving that forklift. I wanted to crawl out of my body. Allen doesn't know who all these people are but she knows what they've been through. They told her they were assaulted on. The job felt up by superiors made to feel like they didn't belong. She knows the feeling it happened. Recently as allen worked to open notch bruins newest location contractors talked to her like a puppy calling it cute. She was helping. She's the company production manager. I'm like in the middle of building brew house upside down on my back under machines and they're just being super rude and asked me questions about like why i was there now. Alan sharing anonymous stories publicly thorny messages to breweries business owners accountable. She's gone from two thousand followers on instagram. To fifty nine thousand and counting. It's taken its toll. They haven't been sleeping or eating. I've been handling it. That was a christian. Not well just like crying every day. I mean this is terrible and it's not just women either. It's it's everybody. Allen worries nothing will change but people have resigned or been fired from breweries around the nation. Women are raising money and a brewery in philly is holding events to discuss sexism and racism in the industry

Cristella WBZ Brian Allen Instagram Salem Boston Allen Bruins Alan Philly
"production manager" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on WJR 760

"Would be blue Water Bridge east and westbound between the U. S and Canada. Due to the fact that it's closed in on this income traffic. The rest the road seem to be okay. I'm being levied. Wh air traffic and weather first. Maybe a few flurries starting off this Sunday. Otherwise, the mix of clouds and sun for the afternoon and Cole again today or the highly hitting 16 Partly cloudy tonight the low dipping before it's mattered in snow showers on Monday with a high near 19. The weather Channel. I'm meteorologist Jeff Mar. A new stock 7 60 wjr. You're laughing and learning with the inside outside, guys on news talk. 7 60 wjr. Here's inside Guy, Chuck Brydon, Stein and the outside guy, Ken Calvert. Good morning, walking back to the inside outside again when we are thrilled to be here for you this morning, you know And the construction world for forever. This kind of temperatures would hit and we kind of just slow down. Everyone just start backing off. Even the inside stuff would really just start slowing down and back it up. But I don't know if it's because our populations boomed so much No one's back enough anymore. Not even a Michigan there no slowdowns in Michigan for winter anymore. And we have a gentleman and a company and decide that can do your work, giving new countertops all year. Long, Spring winter, summer and fall, And I'm with us right now. We have George Mattei, whose the production manager For granted sources of Michigan. He's on to tell us about some of the great options and beautiful products..

Michigan George Mattei blue Water Bridge Ken Calvert Jeff Mar production manager For Canada Cole Chuck Brydon U. S Stein
"production manager" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"production manager" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Some film projects are really, really big, and they require multiple producers, particularly if there are different crews that air filming in several parts of the world, so you can have co producers who are all of the same level. They they're sharing producer credit, so it's not like one producer is over the others. But they're all over seeing different parts of a production. You can also have an associate producer or line manager. These air sort of the next in command kind of lieutenants of the producers. They oversee specific tasks, usually designated by the producer. So they if you don't like the lieutenant analogy could think of them as a vice president of a company so they might oversee a secondary film crew. Let's capturing footage that's going to be inserted into the film. You know, a film crew that's going to be focusing on stuff that doesn't require the director or any of the main talent of the movie to be in it. A line producer tends to be the person specifically supervising the budget of a film, so they're very much taking a close look at the numbers. You could also have a task manager producers who are in charge of specific parts of the project, and then you also have coordinating producer producers. Their job is to make sure everyone involved in the production of a film remains in step. And informed of what's going on so that no one is left behind. If something changes, or there needs to be a shift and scheduling or anything like that, the production manager For example, is in charge of supervising the production budget to the various departments, and that includes scheduling of crew and equipment and covering crew's salaries. They report their needs to the line producer who then make sure that Those needs are met or comes up with a really good reason why they can't do that. There are also productions secretaries. These are people who assist with paperwork and administration needs. And there are production designers who worked with the director to get a sense of what will be needed to achieve the director's artistic vision. And at the bottom of the production hierarchy. You have production assistants who perform basic tasks for the production side, such as distributing hand radios to the various departments or running errands for the production staff. Um, they don't tend to run errands for anybody else. There specifically meant for the production staff side so you can think of the the sides of a film being the production side. Which is talk, you know all the stuff that's necessary to make sure everybody else has what they need to make the movie. You have the the creative side, which is like the director and all the talent, and then you have all the crew who are doing the actual physical work. To support that. So you kind of have like these three columns in a way now I've mentioned the director a couple of times. But what does the director actually do? Well, that's the person who is the lead creative artist on set. So ideally, the director sets the vision for the film was the film going to look like? What is the tone going to be? What sort of reaction is the film supposed to evoke from the audience? So ideally, if someone is watching the film, How should they feel from scene to scene? You know, if the horror movie you need to feel Uneasy and fear and tension. If it's a comedy, you need some tension offset by laughter, which relieves that tension these sort of ideas. So the director is the person who says This is my goal. Here's how I'm going to achieve my goal and then has to communicate that out to other departments. In order to make that a reality. They're also in charge of directing the talent to get the performance the director has in mind. Talent is the word used to describe all the actors in a in a film. Um, it's also the word that tends to be used to describe me as a podcaster, and I find it funny to be referred to as the quote unquote talent, but that's just an industry term. So the directors are in charge of making sure the actors are giving the performance that the director had in mind. In order to create the movie that they wanna make. Keep.

producer production manager vice president
Julie Towner CEO of Towner Communications

Dose of Leadership

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Julie Towner CEO of Towner Communications

"Julie Good Morning Welcome to dose of leadership. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me I'm really excited. I'm excited to you know what I was doing. The research morning getting up and looking at your background and very interested in how? Someone started out in the fashion industry ended up being an entrepreneur and a CEO of a communications company. So this is going to be a fun conversation. Yeah, it's GonNa it's GonNa be weird. So, what was the dream the dream you were going to be this? Fashion designer, you got into fashion obviously for reason and spend a lot of time in it. Yeah. What was the dream? Well. It's funny because you know people, people say fashion and all that kind of stuff. It makes me sound very glamorous and I got into. Industry because I liked how things were made so my. A CLICHE My passion really wasn't fashion A. It was. It was how things remain as manufacturing production. And Apparel was just easy to get into you at the time there is a really great program at the university that I went to and I had some really outstanding opportunities to travel abroad during my education. so I was very very lucky to get the opportunity to. Become a production manager for gap INC DOWN IN MIAMI. And what I did and still I mean this is if I could go back to this in just live my entire life on a factory floor as bazaars at town. That's what I would do right. Of Your and So I was in charge of getting the designs from. New York or San Francisco? And reengineering them in costing them in sourcing the fabrics in in all of the hardware details in. Pleasing men in South America I was in charge of the Americas and Taking them from the RND stage all the way to win. They hit a distribution center. I loved it I. Love the process of how things were made. Even now I. I'm the Nerd that watches the how it's made show right? If it's anything in a factory in if it's how things are put together, I probably probably should have been some sort of engineer but I. I. Don't enjoy mass. So I had the chance to travel the world and. Most recently I. Did a lot of work in India and China, and that was a wonderful experience, not just in how things are done in factories, but culture and You know just being more worldly known experiences. I get it. I mean when I got laid off from American host telling you earlier. One of my first job was in the manufacturing company, and at one point I became they were. They started sourcing stuff from China and Mexico, and they asked me to. Start the international operations department, which sounds pretty heady, but it was just a team of one. But eventually grew, and we started going to Mexico and China and I'm with you in watching the whole process from. Coming up with you know working with our own. Design Marketing and coming up with the concept meeting with the buyers at the big box and coming up, and then finding a factory to source it in developing the relationships, and then when it when you know purchasing on on A. You kinda betting that this is going to start the manufacturing to meet the the shipping deadlines, and you still don't have anything finally approved in, so you're kinda betting on risk. You know you start producing on risk and I. Get it i. mean the whole thing is just. Amazing right and there's always every morning as unique problem. There's something that happened so I get it. It's kind of fun to watch the whole process. I guess what I'm hearing. You say and I'm kind of with you. You're kind of an operations person at heart rate I'm I'm with man I've done I? Get that completely. Yeah, yeah, and you know we used to. We used to talk about how our job was literally putting out fires. Get Out. That that's what we did, it's interesting that I am when I first moved to Kansas City I I worked for a company here for a very short time. They hired me for my production. Experience in a you know I. I tried to bring all these lessons to them in. As simple as you know how we how. We were shipping these little toys. and. I said you know they. They have to be in packages. They You can't just throw them in boxes. You know it's GonNa. Get what no, no, we've never had that happen. I said okay well. You know I lost millions of dollars worth their genes during Hurricane Katrina, but whatever you know exactly. Did and it was. It was ironic that that shipment actually the shipment of these toys actually came in, and there had been an accident. in shipping in all of the things were were wet, so nobody nobody ever listens to me. So they last several several million dollars worth of product as well. You didn't want to say I told you so.

China Mexico Julie CEO Hurricane Katrina South America Production Manager Gap Inc New York Engineer Kansas Americas Design Marketing Miami India San Francisco
Servant Mindset Equals Success

Dose of Leadership

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Servant Mindset Equals Success

"Julie Good Morning Welcome to dose of leadership. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me I'm really excited. I'm excited to you know what I was doing. The research morning getting up and looking at your background and very interested in how? Someone started out in the fashion industry ended up being an entrepreneur and a CEO of a communications company. So this is going to be a fun conversation. Yeah, it's GonNa it's GonNa be weird. So, what was the dream the dream you were going to be this? Fashion designer, you got into fashion obviously for reason and spend a lot of time in it. Yeah. What was the dream? Well. It's funny because you know people, people say fashion and all that kind of stuff. It makes me sound very glamorous and I got into. Industry because I liked how things were made so my. A CLICHE My passion really wasn't fashion A. It was. It was how things remain as manufacturing production. And Apparel was just easy to get into you at the time there is a really great program at the university that I went to and I had some really outstanding opportunities to travel abroad during my education. so I was very very lucky to get the opportunity to. Become a production manager for gap INC DOWN IN MIAMI. And what I did and still I mean this is if I could go back to this in just live my entire life on a factory floor as bazaars at town. That's what I would do right. Of Your and So I was in charge of getting the designs from. New York or San Francisco? And reengineering them in costing them in sourcing the fabrics in in all of the hardware details in. Pleasing men in South America I was in charge of the Americas and Taking them from the RND stage all the way to win. They hit a distribution center. I loved it I. Love the process of how things were made. Even now I. I'm the Nerd that watches the how it's made show right? If it's anything in a factory in if it's how things are put together, I probably probably should have been some sort of engineer but I. I. Don't enjoy mass. So I had the chance to travel the world and. Most recently I. Did a lot of work in India and China, and that was a wonderful experience, not just in how things are done in factories, but culture and You know just being more worldly known experiences. I get it. I mean when I got laid off from American host telling you earlier. One of my first job was in the manufacturing company, and at one point I became they were. They started sourcing stuff from China and Mexico, and they asked me to. Start the international operations department, which sounds pretty heady, but it was just a team of one. But eventually grew, and we started going to Mexico and China and I'm with you in watching the whole process from. Coming up with you know working with our own. Design Marketing and coming up with the concept meeting with the buyers at the big box and coming up, and then finding a factory to source it in developing the relationships, and then when it when you know purchasing on on A. You kinda betting that this is going to start the manufacturing to meet the the shipping deadlines, and you still don't have anything finally approved in, so you're kinda betting on risk. You know you start producing on risk and I. Get it i. mean the whole thing is just. Amazing right and there's always every morning as unique problem. There's something that happened so I get it. It's kind of fun to watch the whole process. I guess what I'm hearing. You say and I'm kind of with you. You're kind of an operations person at heart rate I'm I'm with man I've done I? Get that completely. Yeah, yeah, and you know we used to. We used to talk about how our job was literally putting out fires. Get Out. That that's what we did, it's interesting that I am when I first moved to Kansas City I I worked for a company here for a very short time. They hired me for my production. Experience in a you know I. I tried to bring all these lessons to them in. As simple as you know how we how. We were shipping these little toys. and. I said you know they. They have to be in packages. They You can't just throw them in boxes. You know it's GonNa. Get what no, no, we've never had that happen. I said okay well. You know I lost millions of dollars worth their genes during Hurricane Katrina, but whatever you know exactly. Did and it was. It was ironic that that shipment actually the shipment of these toys actually came in, and there had been an accident. in shipping in all of the things were were wet, so nobody nobody ever listens to me. So they last several several million dollars worth of product as well. You didn't want to say I told you so.

China Mexico Julie CEO Hurricane Katrina South America Production Manager Gap Inc New York Engineer Kansas Americas Design Marketing Miami India San Francisco
Top 10 US radio advertisers vs top 10 US podcast advertisers

podnews

01:13 min | 4 years ago

Top 10 US radio advertisers vs top 10 US podcast advertisers

"Ten usaradio advertises for two thousand eighteen have been published by inside radio of possible interest. Not one advertiser is in the top fifteen US, podcasting advertisers work. It the podcast was published yesterday. A full audio version of the women's podcast event in November in it. Right. Your own rules lead. Like a woman features three women who launched their own podcast company's July. Alan Tieger Williams have Latigo Williams and co Don day media's Martina, Castro and side-hustle Prosenik. Halo Matthews a coma. His July kellan Tieger Williams. I've been in media for twenty years and after eighteen years in legacy media, I decided to jump ship last year and starting my own podcasting network and best decision. I ever made hard. Is this decision? I ever made would do it again twice on Sunday. Elsewhere pod chaser gives advice on how to make podcast ads that make much. Money speaker submissions and now open for podcast movement. Twenty nineteen Nick Hilton wants more podcast reviews in mainstream media and jobs going in Los Angeles in California, Air wolf, Stitcher and mineral looking for a senior production manager.

Alan Tieger Williams Kellan Tieger Williams Halo Matthews Nick Hilton Los Angeles Side-Hustle Prosenik Production Manager Martina California Castro Eighteen Years Twenty Years