35 Burst results for "Product Manager"

Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

The Business of Content

05:06 min | 1 d ago

Kevin Jones shares how he expanded his sports podcasts network

"Hey kevin thanks for joining us. Simon man pleasure to be here appreciate you having me so before we talk about your podcast at work. Let's talk about what you were doing. Prior to your podcast network you like you got your start in radio right. What didn't you like about that medium. Yeah i kind of had a long winding journey before and got to blue wire tv in washington. Dc at wsh nine Where i actually like a digital blogger. It was bryce harper's rookie year. Rt threes rookie ear there space on the website to create content kind of l. Put my way into media at a tv station. That i turned that opportunity into the cleveland. Crowds dot com. They were growing their media operation. They had Space on espn eight fifty. They had their own radio show in studio in the building. The i broke into radio there. I was on the team side for the browns. You kind of don't have your own voice in. They were losing quite a bit of game so eventually took an opportunity. Came biard in san francisco. The main am station. It was a wonderful experience for the most part. I saw kaepernick kneeling i the warriors when titles. I got to go on the radio every day. I created digital content. But i didn't see a path forward for someone like myself who was twenty seventeen. I was twenty eight years old. I wasn't going to become a radio host. I wasn't gonna be on tv. And i didn't see enough opportunities and saw a lot of really good free agents on twitter and that's kind of how i stumbled upon blue ir but Yeah my background is really creating content for older digital media platforms. And were you like talking head on the radio. Where you're like a court correspondent like bose kind of your role way more correspondent. I came here in san francisco. Be at the warriors games calling in kevin. Jones live from game six of the western conference vitals. Kevin give us the mood. It would be five ten minute had sometimes team not just the update guy so i got to show up my personality. I wrote digital content. I was tweeting all the time And just treating you making better content. For came we are the most of the radio host For my age group which was articles about the warriors tweets about the forty niners. I was giving kmby. Are that brand name digitally. I wasn't getting rewarded for it and that really pushed me to found blue wire. 'cause i thought i was actually giving more wrong to the radio station online and wasn't getting paid properly short. Did you feel like you had a brand like where people obviously wouldn't recognize you on the street Because they only heard your voice today. Would you be like a bar like. Oh i totally know who you are times. Nothing crazy but you know. That's really what they found. Blue stems from dairy. Is that person in san francisco. He had a warriors podcast. I would getting drinks with him. If people were literally coming up to him and dabbling in sam. I love light years. Love what you do on twitter. It was up one of my a ha moments before i came into company. Is that twitter. Influencers in sports are so undervalued beat reporters for newspaper are kind of going out of style. In my opinion it's a it's a necessary way to get facts and information but Radio hosts are being replaced. In my opinion my twitter influencers youtube post snapchat users who have built communities of people. Yeah i think it's fair to say i have by own brandon. We have one hundred podcasters. I know we're going to get to blue i They have their own brands. And i think that's what makes us different. What's the world's going that way man. It's niche you can be this fantasy football funny guy you can be nerdy a little on the browns. Anyone can pick their lane right now. And then from the radio you went to go work at facebook on like content strategy. What kind of content where you strategizing on. Yeah it was on. The business helped team work out of building. Sixty one in menlo park so anytime. There was a new product launch across functional team facebook. There's a product manager. There's a marketing manager. There's someone who also writes help contact when a user gets the pay what is and that was kind of my role. It was definitely a lower tier. Get your foot in the door at facebook. But i learned a lot about scaling and how the task and project management and just it was a even though. They're not in the news in a good way. The culture they're working there was pretty good. People respectful a challenge each other in a polite way. I was coming from media where people throwing dictionaries at each other in the room. People were getting fired left and right backstabbing each other. Facebook actually gave me a little bit of hope as weird as it is saying this big evil giant stealing all the ad revenue move fast and break things but working inside. That building collaborated with people. Who admired and it kind of gave me the wings that eight. I can take some elements of facebook. Mix it into a sports media company

Warriors Biard Kaepernick San Francisco Bryce Harper Kevin Twitter Browns Simon Espn Cleveland Niners Washington Jones Facebook SAM Brandon Youtube Menlo Park
CompTIA Security+ SY0601 update. Everything you need to know

Cyber Work

04:36 min | Last week

CompTIA Security+ SY0601 update. Everything you need to know

"We are excited to have patrick lane today. Patrick is the director of products at compton. And we've done a few webinars with him in the past he always does a great job providing us updates on come tears certifications so excited to have you back patrick A little bit about his background. He directs the it workforce skills certifications come to you including security plus pen test plus c y plus and casper plus he assisted the us national cyber security alliance also known as the ncsa to create the lockdown. You're logging campaign to promote multi factor. Authentication nationwide us also implemented a wide variety of it projects including an internet and help desk for eleven thousand end users. Patrick is an armed forces. Communications electronics association lifetime member born and raised on us military bases and has authored and co authored multiple books including hack proofing lennox a guide to open source security so a fantastic guests with us today. I'm excited to pass it off to patrick here in just a moment after we review the agenda so today we will touch on what is security plus Patrick talk about the baseline cybersecurity skills. The job roles and growth indicators. We'll talk about the differences between s wise zero six zero one versus the five. Oh one and kind of some of the updates. There will talk about the exam details and then as mentioned i will pass it off to patrick for questions. So feel free to submit those questions using the qna panel At anytime so with that I'm going to go ahead and give give the control over to patrick here to get us started. Thank you everyone. My name is patrick lane. And as thank you for introducing me. I'm the product manager for competition cybersecurity certifications as a director. I work a lot with the industry and within comp tia in to ensure that our exams are meeting the needs of the industry security plus as one of our largest certifications of all comp. Tia in fact. It's our number one certification and so one of the reasons why people are coming to security plus is because of the skills that it offers and the fact that employers are hiring people who have security plus social security plus will help you get a job in it and cybersecurity so when we look at the certification we have to remember that security plus as an entry level certification exam it was released in two thousand two and it's updated every three years it assesses the baseline or core technical skills required to secure networks software hardware devices essentially it teaches you the basics to securing anything that's attached to a network or the internet. It's a broad range of cybersecurity skills as you can imagine. A any skills are used for high performance on the job so people are coming to take security plus because it proves that they can do the job and employers will know that they could get the job done so the it certification in general is very valuable also security plus appears nearly ten percent of all job ads in the united states and right now sixteen percent of the entire workforce has security plus and we have millions of people who have taken our commttiee exams around the globe. In the last three years. There have been a lot of changes in cybersecurity. Probably all aware of the industry continues to grow their continued to be more jobs available. There continued to be not enough people to fill those jobs and in fact in some cases employers are looking to icy certifications employers are looking to it certifications in lieu of a college degree. Four jobs. That are hard to hire for. They would rather hire someone with the bachelor degree and assert if they could but in this day and age or enough phenomenal time of human history.

Patrick Lane Patrick Us National Cyber Security All Communications Electronics Ass Ncsa Compton United States TIA
How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

All The Responsibility Podcast

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

"Even if you're a new product manager the chances are great that you have something amazing going on to be hired as a product manager in the first place that means. You're some kind of unicorn your interesting and accomplished with lots of skills and a resume that has compelling experiences an impressive educational background most likely and diverse interests and skills. But i'm going to talk about something different. We're all unicorns as product managers unusual and rare compared with other roles in the company even in life. But we're all still different from one another obviously so. What color is your unicorn. And what i'm talking about is what are your particular talents. Aptitudes and strengths that differentiate from other people even other product managers now. We often use the concepts of strength. Talents aptitudes special sauce superpower to mean roughly the same thing and that is the way that you see the world were act within it. Think and so on that are kind of unique and unusual to you and special and often. These comes so easily to you that it's hard to believe there's anything special about them. I always think about people who can draw and people can draw and think that it's pretty easy to teach other people to draw because they just show them how they learn to draw but the fact is. If you're somebody like me. Who really has challenges. Withdrawing doesn't matter how easy it was for someone else to learn it. They can't teach me how to draw. I just can't learn. This is something that i know about myself. I've tried multiple times. The fact is that usually you're aren't actually the best judge of your special talents. Because they seem so normal so obvious to you like the drawing talent for somebody who can draw now. Often were very aware of our weaknesses. Like i'm very aware by weakness as being able to draw very well. When i say strengths in this context though i'm actually using that as a technical term meaning the clifton strengths finder assessment. It seems to be a meaningful assessment of a person's strengths. It's definitely more meaningful than something. Like the myers briggs type indicator for example. And so. i'm going to talk in this episode about how to find out what your strengths are in this context of the clifton strengths and then how to make use of your knowledge of your strengths. Which you probably don't have if you haven't done this assessment yet to figure out how to make a name for yourself.

Myers Briggs
Revision Host Maurice Cherry Interviews Danny Shaw, Director of Digital Design and Branding at Brandshare

Revision Path

12:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Revision Host Maurice Cherry Interviews Danny Shaw, Director of Digital Design and Branding at Brandshare

"All right. Let's get to the interview this week. I'm talking with danny shaw design educator located in new york city. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do all right. Thanks for having me. I'm danny shaw. I'm a design educator. Most of the time also product manager when need to be a project manager as well and at the co- at the end of the day. I'm still a designer multi multi-disciplined design of course across the digital space. Okay how has twenty twenty one been for you so far. Twenty twenty one i mean. What are we with thirteen days. Then will far personally has been fine. You know but just looking at the world around me. You would be hard pressed to say that right but personally has been fine so far. So i'm grateful for that How was last year. I know you know the pandemic really kind of turned everyone's world upside down to some sort away. How did you get the year. Last year was a lot. I think a lot of people was ally of me personally. A lot of personal relationships it greatly impacted things for instance my grandparents who visit my grandparents all the time multiple times throughout the eddie live atlanta. I have not been able to see them. And that's really been a tough pill to swallow on person aside and not being able to see other relatives so that's definitely been hard but then which is probably roundabout way on the professional side. It's it's been probably one of the most busiest of hat professionally. A lot of business in the landscape changes so fast rapidly where the digital acceleration accelerated even more than the pace that it was already at which impacted my inbox in my email. People me up for advice and counsel and job. So it's been a mixed bag is definitely been a mix. Let's focus on work for a minute here. You're the director of digital design and strategy for a company called brand share. What does brands share. Do all right. So shit is e commerce marketing company in for a lot of people who may not be familiar with that concept and idea. We work with a lot of. Cpg burns consumer packaged goods such as emmons but if a lot of the packaging goods that we see on a regular basis as consumers so we work with these companies in regards to the marketing strategy. Introducing them to the market gaining insights and data on these new products that's being introduced to the market and we partner with them on their strategy and execution and how the scale they are offering to the audience at large in a nutshell. It comes across multiple channels digital in person shipping. We do a lot of experts. You things as well so Touch on a lot of areas with these brands trying to get as far as being the partner between the brands and these new products. That's trying to the market. In services and reaching that specific audience that the china targeting reach for their respective products. How did you first get started there at the time. I was transitioning from a position that i was working. At in north carolina as product manager and at the time there was some organizational changes. And i was looking in north carolina and and doing that and just going back and forth between new york and chronic to get my fares in order and iran ran to the person who became my manager So we just ran into each other. We used to work in the past at time. inca essence. She just told me she was working there. She was she just started. She was trying to build a team. She was looking for some freelance designers and asked me if i would be open to discuss it and i i'm open to discussing. I was just transitioned from the last role and said hey you know this might be something of interest for me. While i'm transitioning to china figure out the next and then it just happened to work out. Well we worked well together. I've worked with the rest of the team. And i'm working on the designs and floor the digital initiatives and then it just kind of kept going from there into full-time role and then may stand with the company and so forth. What does the team. Makeup look like autumn. Agean you've got designers because you mentioned design but do you work with so i work with everybody. We work with everybody. So i have Outside of me to other designers on my team i work with the vp of marketing. A record the bp digital. We're we're not. We're about fifty. I'll not that big. So we're about fifty person staff based in new york and of pennsylvania so i pretty much everybody to chairman of the company as well That the president. It really depends on the project. What's what needs to be done. You get to intimate environment. So i kind of get to work with everybody account managers and so forth as well now given that the company sizes is so small like what's a typical daylight now because i would imagine you all are not able to get together in an in an office or you now while the pennsylvania offices so they are all the way the to set up a lot of the new york office we are. We're all remote right to be clear. And we were based in midtown manhattan midtown manhattan but The pa office depending on the circumstances on what might be needed. Maybe like a photo shoot or something like that. Some members still going to office but for the most part is still pretty much remote as well. So yeah but a typical day. Nowadays is really. Just you know looking at Obviously out calendar in the before just trying to coordinate on the bear. Risk projects and initiatives looking at tickets. You know gotta look at these tickets to see what's to was the status of status meetings just to kind of make sure that we're on track with a lot of things calls a foul benders looking at roadmap. There's a lot of. I would say a lot of time. Put was president planning a lot more so than in the past so so to speak. It really varies. I really wouldn't even know what to say. What did with low but my on a log. I'm pretty much aware of what my day is already gonna look like just because i leave when i log out. I just see what. I have lined up for the next day. So usually it's a mix between meetings. Some our collaborate with the design team once needed as well as account manager for any new requests checking on the status of ongoing projects as well touching base with the vp of digital. For any other items. That might be down the line sometimes. I am checking in with some of our dev engineers team on the status of things as managing few about digital initiatives and ecommerce sites. Yeah it really ranges mountain towns. I'm looking at analytics in number. Metrics is to see if you know some insights in in regards to the strategy. And make sure we're on pace. We're doing the right thing. There's room for improvement in always looking for some wounds improvements as well so it really varies. Throughout the day. Monday tuesday could be two completely different. Days does sound like a lot. Yes it's it's cool but yeah it can vary a lot. Have you had to adopt any sort of new like strategies or workflows over the past year. Yeah sure well. They tend to crack jokes on me. Because i am like the uae. Try to organize one. You know being a project manager and in the past and project management roles a really try to align and keep things as organiz as feasibly possible. So i think i've definitely had been allowed strong advocate for that. Not just for myself but across the team especially during kobe right so that one thing that be really just had to really make adjustments for the communication on big on communication. I think a lot of not just designed problems. I think a lot of problems in general could be resolved if we communicate elopement so readily had to be strategic in how we communicate and open up communications to help foster solutions especially now that we're not all in this together we can't just walk over to someone and so forth so the communication was definitely gonna be safe there and also iguanas when everything for his hidden in in the world changed right before. Is i do think aloud people kind of know what to do right. So we worked in mit working past normal times and things like that and i think for me was at a place where it had to be diligent about. Okay shut off. There's only so much you can do. And i think not just for me. A lot of people had to make that adjustment as well with the state of the world. Yeah i know a lot of think. It was last year right around the time that the that the pandemic happened. Or the the lockdown started to happen. I was talking with a lotta people for the show who they had either just started a new job in like now it's day for and their mentor. Work from home continually or they're having a tough time to transition from being in the office to now having to sort of work in this synchronous sort of fashion right. And i will say to me. Just because i've had roles in the past where i've worked remote merola north carolina. It was a big remote work environment. Culture prior i would go into the office but it was nothing to see a member who was working remote that day for various reasons. It was very flexible. People have kids people have health issues. We worked with teams across the country. Kind of remote teams across the country engineer so it was never never felt like everybody had to be all his so for me. I was comfortable already transitioned into a more remote environment but this has been the most. I don't know if this is the most remote. I just to show. Has there been like one thing that you've gotten that's really helped you make that adjustment pretty. Well bob meditated. On is i. I really got into a meditation a bit more. Just read different philosophies at least for me just trying to make sense of everything that was going on you know i. I don't have the head. Space is the head. Space app was very very helpful. Helped me sleep more consistently in and things like that. We all just trying to figure out what works for us right. I didn't feel i needed. I wasn't really looking for anything. I was going to make me a better employee anyway. On it I think i was more concerned with was going to help me maintain some schmidt to help during all this time. Yeah so like when it comes to working on a new project or with a new client. What does that creative process look like with you being the director strategy. I know you've got the team under you. What does that sort of process look like from start to finish well. It really varies. Because the relationship that we have with declines it changes in some cases we are more or less facilitators and creative may already common just working on a strategy how to execute it for them and what are the proper market in digital media channels so to speak and then other times. We are developing in design in house. And when that happens of course that's when the standard procedures. What's what's the goal was the objectives. What are we trying to achieve was the demographics that research behind it first before we start opening programs right trying to get an understanding of what the client needs. What goes let's the. Kpi was the measurement of success prior to all of that and then basically looking at our offerings the now tools and resources to see how we can best executed across the board. It may not always be digital 'execution it might be exponential execution might be Just some inserts in getting them the scanty oracle's taken you know micro sites and things like that might be a newsletter campaigns and stuff like that so it does vary but i think we start each project just trying to warn just get an understanding of what are the key goals and objectives and. How do we facilitate that. That making sure that we have the right information to go about executing properly across creative across strategy and course execution as well

Danny Shaw North Carolina New York Emmons Manhattan Pennsylvania China New York City Atlanta Iran PA Bob Meditated UAE Schmidt Oracle
Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | Last month

Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
Cybercrime Amid the Pandemic with Alberto Casares

Outcomes Rocket

05:05 min | Last month

Cybercrime Amid the Pandemic with Alberto Casares

"Welcome back to the outcomes are so marquez here and today i have the privilege of hosting the outstanding alberto gonzales. He is the vp of threat research at four iq. I read it though is a deep dark web expert researcher investigator and product manager at four. I q where he helps. Define and dr product strategy to expand the addressable market. I bet this passionate about security and how breached in leak data can be used to protect citizens and organizations across the globe. He leads investigative work at four. I q manages verification attribution and analysis. Of data enriches marketing content and helps with pre sales activity. I'd rather has over ten years of experience. Managing and leading teams for several startups and has led several research and development projects supported by the spanish ministry of industry in collaboration with the university of granada. He's an awesome guy and he is with us from spain so really really delighted to have met the with us to talk about something very serious. That's cyber enabled crime in the risk. So admit such a pleasure to have you here. Thanks for joining us into. The place is absolutely so i definitely excited to jump into the work that you guys are up to that for iq but before we do that though. Tell me a little bit about you. And what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah good question. So then what despise me the most is actually to to know that with our daily war we can Held one of the most important sectors especially during the pandemic rights so electorally have been researching about many threats started the healthcare sector industry. And you can imagine so in these last few months number of cyber attacks on threads has increased drastically right so a huge fraud industry around the health sector days with many faked buck scenes. fake news. fake news around these undamaged healthcare showed the strengthening vaccines cetera et. We sold full some fake in once in the dark web alumni longtime will show many many people have been scam ride so Sides are fake sites offering for simple face mask. This is can that we leave during the beginning of this pandemic show is absolutely motivating to work from or in this summer security and trying to help these sector. I'm also the citizen right. Yeah and i totally agree. You know it's such a shame that people take advantage of this time to take advantage of of others in a time of crisis but the reality is it's happening and so you know it's important that we we think about ways to protect ourselves. Our organizations or businesses are patients are employees. It's critical so. I'd better talk to us a little bit. About what four. I q is doing to help against some of these things in the healthcare ecosystem. Sure i say that we are helping reporting the healthcare ecosystem in three different ways so the first one is it providing awareness right so i'm personally providing some educational will be nour's meet apps it citra and fully dedicated to the health sector in order to provide on it's just allies this kind of threats on attacks and also to educate people employees within the industry right the healthcare industry nor to avoid those kind of attacks again on risks. So that the second thing is that a with our pro dolphin so we have really brought up offering going on foreign as you said dude might might presentation really focused on identity protection so we have our very compelling if not the best quality in protecting the identity align percents Uncompromised data on also with another pra languages protection which is essentially covering many use cases Shown to dr. Web monitoring broncos take sean etcetera show we have a compelling solution that is helping us to detect again threads and half also the castle some early diction capabilities. is protecting not only the what we traditionally do in many of the companies protecting the network tonight. B.'s citra we. We are also taking care of the employees

Spanish Ministry Of Industry I Alberto Gonzales University Of Granada Marquez Spain Sean Etcetera Broncos
Gaurav Afore Discusses Pre Seed Investing

Software Engineering Daily

04:31 min | Last month

Gaurav Afore Discusses Pre Seed Investing

"Grab welcome to the show. Thank you for having me your the co founder of a four capital which is an early stage investment company. What was the thesis when you started a four. Yeah so both. My co-founder automates banerjee have been investing in venture now for almost nine years. And we were both. I was at a fund Fund and one of the things we've noticed in the kind of four years these funds. Is that the goal posts for early. Stage founders shifting. So if you were trying to raise your first million to a million dollars pre product market fit. When you have little dune attraction. It was getting harder and harder to raise capital not from angels and scouts through definitely been obvious explosion of that which is great for the ecosystem but none of those investors usually lead the route. So if you were to go to a seed fund Fund for them to lead around price terms so on and so forth they were very often telling founders. Like i like what you're doing. I like your background but you're too early for us. Go get some traction go. Bill the A little bit more than we can invest so we saw this firsthand and we said allow there is a problem. There's a gap there because a personally just from our passion. It's like we love getting involved very early. In love helping founders. But we think there's a problem here to be solved so typical founders. When you see a problem and nobody solving it the best way to solve it is to go. Go after yourself. So my partner adamantly denied we left our previous funds and middle twenty sixteen we raise our first fund in the fall and the rest is history if you go back before that you were an early product manager for android. What was it like being google in the early days of android is a lot of fun like looking back. Obviously come a long way when i joined android in two thousand nine. It was like a skunkworks kind of projects on the side. I mean look at google building massive business right in an online ads in the early two thousands but it was pretty clear by. Oh seven ole that mobile was going to be the future not desktop so from google. It mobile was a potential existential threat. Right if apple was the dominant you know or the way that most people accessed mobile if that was apple or the carriers right if reisen etc like the own the customer relationship. That will be very problematic for google right. Because the reason google's been able to really flourishes. There is no sort of toll booth if you may for the internet and anybody can spend up a website and you can start to make money directly with consumers but mobile was potentially to be a different dynamic so when i joined android it doesn't nine. We essentially had a blank cheque right from the management at a google. Say look this is potentially going to be existential for the business. We need a horse in the race. Right we need to have something where we can compete with apple and have a dominant position or or at least one of tour to three key players so that was intended to mandate orchid blackberry. Back in the days so at started a company in mobile as well as building software for smartphone platforms. So i'd seen the movie before and really put frankly one foot in front of the other was a leap year for the next product line. That was our way to really put enjoyed map. Because when i joined had already launched a couple of phones but always considered december the fourth operating system after blackberry in iowa s maybe windows mobile as geeky operating system. Open source right. It's like on the fridge and we would really trying to show demonstrated the world that android has come a long way and it is a very formidable competitor to less so the next one was something google we paid for. That product developed by. Hec in that case. We work closely with the carriers to bring that product market which tried to sell the phone online ourselves. That did not work because we realized people still like to buy the phone in person. After the two years that i was there android went from when i joined less than a million total users. To by the time he left we were getting about a million new users day in that kind of scale for small. You only see a few places and in hindsight it's twenty twenty Bunch of things. We did right in the moment it was. We were just running around with their heads. Cut off and trying to figure out how to compete in a very fast growing world

Google Banerjee Apple Bill Iowa
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

04:07 min | 3 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Five years ahead so we can't just manage our product managers on the top line revenue because that's out of mostly out of our control but there's a lot of better subtle symptoms or or signals that as product leaders. We want to recognize. We wanna reward. We wanna push our folks ahead. You know maybe they graduate and they don't work for me anymore but they get to do something even better and and that makes me feel great. It's like being a parent you know. I want my kid to play the violin carnegie hall it means i drive my kid to a lot of music lessons and i stand in the back of the hall and i applaud but nobody cares that i'm there they care about who's onstage. Now i love that. Now how do you go about building. That cross functional trust and psychological safety if you No magic here We try not to lie to people we try not to throw them under the bus. Or tram or whatever. Your transport is I think it's our obligation to deal as straightforward as we can with everybody. I think it's important Every day every hour somebody comes to every product manager with a really really good idea. I'm sure it's happened to you right now. Most ideas are not actually very good ideas. But it's important that we separate the person from the idea instead of you know chewing them out and telling them they're stupid right. We wanna thank them for the effort they put in to come to us and bring us this and then of course tell them. We're going to put that idea in the backlog where it belongs in position. Nine hundred fifty and it's never gonna see the light of day but I never wanna be talking anybody down. I never wanna be accusing anybody of things unless it's really true We wanna lean across the island help where we can and i think we as product managers. Because we're very cross functional. We have the opportunity to explain to lots of other departments why departments. They're not happy with actually doing okay. i've never met a sales team. That done engineering was working. Hard enough. right and sales always thinks that the engineers are sitting around eating bon-bons right playing video games right. It's never the case. Just as i know that the engineering team thinks often pretty badly of sales right that engineers think that sales means carrying priceless into a meeting turning it around having the customer sign it and fill out a purchase order right sales as a lot harder than that so part of our job i think building bridges is to build understanding to build appreciation across the other functions because when the companies will we succeed and we'll have companies not doing well. We fail no matter what right so so again. There's this generosity of spirit. There's this understanding of cross functional behavior. You know why do marketing people worked at behave that way. Well it's because they're marketing people and that's how we pay select them so you know. A lot of this is re explaining endlessly. Why the product matters re explaining endlessly. Why customers want it and how it's going to help them and then making sure we as a company love our customers care..

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

02:32 min | 3 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"System or road mapping tool. I'm happy with which everyone they like. And everybody's going to get on board. It does make it much easier if everybody on. The team is doing similar work with similar tools. So we're going to confuse the sales and marketing folks if every product has it's own format and structure for what's happening next or they have to look in six places so i think there's there's a lot of value in common tools in alignment but i would really back off and say if the folks on my team have strong preferences will go with that for starter he app. You've said just leaving open dialogue between them and then they figured out right so right and then at the foreign. We know that the engineering team won't use anything that we picked from the product management side. So if we don't have an output to jira or whatever their ticketing system is they're going to ignore everything we want so there's a minimum technical requirements here but I for instance don't expect my product manages to use jira as a product to because it would be terrible so you know what are we gonna do to capture good customer input to wait different parts of the model and then we're going to just transform it somehow later that's fair. That was talking about the next challenge. Rich on around garrone cross functional collaboration. Yeah this is again. I think this is leader. Level material now every product manager does this but Maybe not everybody on my team spends a lot of time on it We know that if marketing isn't paying attention to what we're building and shipping and releasing the nobody's gonna find out about it and if sales doesn't have the right incentives to sell it. Nobody's gonna take it. And if support isn't excited and trained and has good faq's and escalation paths than our customers are going to suffer so You know lots of things. We have to do here to build cross functional collaboration things on my list. One is I think is a product leader. Probably need to visit every one of the staff meetings of my peers. Let's say once a month or twice a quarter you know refresh him on the roadmap asked for input. Show them that we care. I think You know everybody on. My product team needs to remind their cross functional equivalence..

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"So i i'm looking for if i can folks who've been around the block who've been product managers and for whatever reason want to do it again because i think a lot of smart folks do product mentioned while may they quickly figure out. It's not their favorite thing. But you've been done before brought a bunch of versions or releases out on some products that matter so i'm going to go there. I and i generally try to separate to be folks and be dec- folks because i think b. the b. worlds very different from the mass market consumer. So if i read to be a be a company as it usually am. I'm looking for somebody with a few years of experience as a product manager on a b. two b. product If i've got enough of those on my team. I might bring some young. Bushy tailed excited New product managers. In because i'll be able to pair them up and maybe have some mentoring relationships there and i might put a subject expert on the team. But i'm going to be watching them pretty carefully. Because i think there's a whole series of mistakes that subject experts make in their first product management job. And i'd rather have the make it in somebody else's shop on somebody else's product so you know again a balance if it's a brand new space maybe there's nobody with experience but i would say if you've worked on. Erp systems than you can certainly understand network security. You can understand ai and machine language. You can understand You know big data flows and data lakes. etl's whatever. I don't think i need to get someone who's been on the very same product or very same market but give me some adjacent seas. Yeah no that's fair. Now on this topic i've noticed. Quite a number of product leaders making hiring calls purely on direct similar past experience solely. So i'm i'm curious to know what are your thoughts and this wouldn't having someone with fresh eyes and and a private initiative likely bring more innovation out of whack stinking to it. I think there's a mix here so. I believe for instance. I do a lot of work last couple three years around machine learning and ai and natural language processing. That's pretty hard stuff. So if you bring some ai machine learning experience. I think you're up the curve on the other hand if you've only done. Ai for the last twenty five years. You're probably blinded to a lot of things that are happening out there. So i i'd both look for individuals that have a mix of experience but it also look across the team. So i if i've parachuted into a company where all four of the product managers are deep technical experts for a long time in their market. That probably wants some folks with some fresh thinking right. Because i think we bring lessons from other markets we bring lessons from other products and situations if you've had to end life a bunch of products and you know it's hard and ugly. That's almost the same anywhere you go. So if we pick somebody who's done a bunch of good product e work elsewhere. I think their own experiences going.

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:14 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Let speaking of them. Zoom a couple of months into the twenty twenty school year where everybody was using zoom. They partnered with a company called de ten to build a zoom tablet. Call detained me. I think it is but it's a it's only presume. It's not a general purpose tablet. it's zoom tablet and has all it does and it's got a good webcam and it's got good speakers and it's got a good microphone and all of those things that are not true for any of the year that's in the school system right there you the ten year old computers. That are terrible right. So i i'll be interested to see if that that tablet does well for them. A dedicated resumed tablet would be appropriate for many applications. I think most most of my nerd friends say everything. I need on my existing tablet but then i spent a thousand dollars on my tablet. Not three hundred dollars. Which is what the teachers have. So three roles product growth. How do we sell more of what we've already built the planning role product owner role of identifying friction that prevents our customers from achieving satisfaction and then the strategy role of what new product should. We be building for the future. What new markets or new What new markets for our products or what or what new products for our markets. And i love how you broke it down and gave example for us and how you know the main role off the product manager is discovery part of like. You know what needs to come next. And how are we going to like. You mentioned build a new product. That technology is enabling us. So there's a new market for it or customers like you know is is from the customers that kind of needs come from rights. I love how you broke each down kind of elaborate on those and actually one can argue once you build a right product as a product manager. It's gonna make the product growth their jobs much easier because the product is so good that you know it's not that hard to market in a sell it right well. That's true although it's almost at odds. I mean it's like two trends. We having in the industry right now. That are at odds. One is product led growth. Which says you know. Build a great product. The product sells itself. You build Capabilities in there that make it easy to share with.

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"I mean yeah i. I'm actually i'm i'm cheating. I'm trying to remember a particular slide described it. A product managed product management is is systematically turning good ideas into successful products and the key word. I'm looking for in that is Well successful a good word but systematic and this gets me to a a real difference of people. There are some people who do whatever it takes to get something to happen. you know. they're expediter. They're like just get it done and product. Managers aren't like that product managers are. Let's get it done right so we don't have to do it over again. And sales people and services people and support people tend to be very much the expediter. It's like i've got somebody on the phone. I have to deal with the issue. I want to get him off the phone. I want to resolve. I want you know. I want this taking care of. I don't care about being the documentation. Or i don't care about being systematic about it. I just need to deal with this fire. And maybe that's even the best metaphor. There are many people in our companies who are firefighters. Product manager should not be firefighters. They should be fire preventers. And it's an and i think it's an entirely different mindset but at the end of the day in answer to your earlier question It's about systematically turning good ideas into successful product a hobby elaborate on that and kind of like made this make the distinction from their spell. Now you know what if you were to kind of like talk about the main productivity and elaborate on each one of those be great. Okay cool well let me work backwards. So so we so we've got a product in the market and we'll let me do it another way. Three things keep executives up at night particularly in startups but even in more sandwich companies. How do we sell more of what we've built our we. Can we build what we've planned and are we planning the.

Product manager
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

04:04 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"And whereas your users are are much more focused on the value that your product is going to drive to them and how you're going to make their day easier. So right away, it's it's again a different landscape for the B2B p.m. It's almost like you have for everyone sale. You have two people that you've got a you know work with and keep happy birthday. And another thing I want to speak to in again on the B2B side is that there's this notion of what I call disproportionate customers, you know again, when a consumer product you think about something like Netflix, it's like, you know, you've got that kind of one-to-one relationship with with Netflix. I'm a consumer and here's the service but if you think about how B2B products are are designed and bow ties, you can have you know, these kind of disproportionate customers if if I'm selling, you know on a per-seat basis as we did in for example pagerduty off. It's a very common, you know, B2B, uh monetization strategy then large accounts will will dominate your userbase. Right? So if you have a large charge Enterprise that that's going to have a larger impact in terms of your product or strategy your sales motion and so on then, you know a whole bunch of smaller groups similarly on the API side a lot of apis nowadays are monetized by volume. So if I've got a large Enterprise that is firing over, you know, millions and millions of API calls. Everyone else might just be a rounding error. I can give you an example my time at audience view this they did software. I do suffer for Live Events, you know, the the big guys on Broadway or the West End these people would be sending, you know, millions and millions of API calls to discover. Yep. Which which shows are being, uh are being put upon, you know, Broadway or in London and then you've got all these other guys and you know, they barely appear on the graph. So now you've got another kind of Dimension to contend with you've got, you know, these very large accounts that will disproportionately influence your product your strategy your up time. And again that's just doesn't have a parallel on the on the consumer side. So it's another thing to to keep in mind and be aware of as a difference and then maybe my last thing I know we've talked about challenges for the B2B space one thing that I found to be actually easier when you're on the B2B side is getting feedback. If you think about how often you've answered a user survey took a consumer product, you know, most of the time they just go straight into your in your spam. It's it's it's not something you take up but on the B2B side wage. I've found that your users are are way more engaged in terms of giving you feedback. They'll spend hours talking to you about your product. Hey, I want to test this feature because you're obviously there to make their work day that much more efficient that much easier for them. So they're they're highly motivated to to give you the money back and and and to inspire you to to make that next Improvement that can help them. So so yeah as indicated, there's certainly a lot of differences and and again coming back to it principles are the same but the tactics you really have to adapt them in light of this different landscape and and and these differences between the B2B and b2c Juice world. Like what you hear so far, make sure to never miss an episode by clicking on the Subscribe button. Now this podcast has been made possible by listeners like yourself, and I'm thankful for your support now. Let's get back to the office..

Netflix London West End
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

02:22 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"That's how you're getting, you know revenue from them. Uh, and if all of that goes well, they'll they'll renew or the continued to to make purchases in the app. In the B2B space you just have more players and and and structures to contend with in the B2B space. Your user is not your buyer. Right typically the user. So I'll just give the example of my time at page or Duty, you know, the user was, you know, a developer someone on the devops. I'd someone whose job it was to keep a particular service up whether that was a website whether that was some back-end service database Etc that that person that team's job was to keep that service up and running and then wage it wasn't they needed to know about it right away and you know paid your duties value proposition was to alert you and you know as many ways and as efficiently as possible so you could jump in we always took the the metaphor of a responder just says you have an ambulance for medical problems. You needed digital responders to deal with digital, you know outages and emergencies. so that's that's the user that that I was, you know working with and whose day I was trying to make better but the buyer was the manager of that team or maybe the the VP or the executive and That person has a completely different lens on the product. So, you know, the the user he wants to know he or she wants to know how quick are those alerts going to come to me. What happens if it's 2 in the morning, how are you going to wake me up what happens if I'm driving and I get the alerts. So those are the kind of specific user challenges. We're trying to solve the buyer has their own set of concerns, you know talk to me about pricing talk to me about you know data management. I'm sending you all these signals and you're you know sending signals back on that data. Do you what does privacy you know look like do you have nice integration single sign-on to do all my you know, you know developers have to remember a whole bunch of new passwords and so on so the buyer is typically going to talk to you about like what I call CIO topics, you know privacy security data management, et cetera..

developer CIO VP executive
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

04:39 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Product management, we almost always talk about a consumer product and the b2c space where there is, you know you I whether it's a a web app or a mobile lab, so when I was, you know earlier in my journey home And those you know, the technical p.m. Role I mentioned earlier the B2B role of hatred Duty. I found that my day-to-day was a lot different from what you see Express in the community, right? You know, if you you read up on best practices you read up on user research and so on if it's always expressed in terms of a consumer product. What do you take as someone that's not working with that sort of product? What do you take if if you are working on saying API that that doesn't have a you I you know, how do you do design work or or user testing when you're looking at something like that? So for me, you know, I really felt that I really feel rather. There was a missing Dimension page that uh, you know out there in our community and I'm excited to you know, speak today to really speak to to those, you know p.m. That were in my shoes, you know on the on the technical p.m. Side that are on you know working on very complex B2B products because again, you're not really seeing this talked about too often in in our space and you know, one of the things I think we're going to talk about repeatedly in our time today is that you know, we're all product people write the product principles are the same but What we focus on in our tactics day-to-day are are vastly different when we're looking at, you know, when we're comparing the B2B space the BDC space, you know technical products for home humor products. So I'm excited to share. You know, what I've learned and my wisdom today on those differences on a percent and you know, not only I guess we're wrapping B2B p.m. Today. But also it's nice to be you know, an eye-opening chat for you know other B2B to CPS out there to get to know this whole Space of B2B appearance better. So I'm going to be a lot for every month to get some value out of now, who are we solving for as an invisible p.m. And.

Finding A Cure For Hangovers

20 Minute Fitness

04:31 min | 4 months ago

Finding A Cure For Hangovers

"Everyone, it's Martin from twenty minute fitness. I'm here in San Francisco and I'm connected with season Lee founder of more laps Could you please do to yourself and Tello our audience? WHAT MORE ABSENCE? All about? Yeah. I Li- Martin having me. Yeah. Little background about myself. I was born in Korea and immigration with my family to Canada when I was nine. So I grew up in Canada did all my school here under Grad and that moved To Central Cisco right after that where it began my career as a product manager at Facebook, a couple of years through lots of different asserted destroyed I ended up in L. A. starting two thousand seventeen to start what's more laps today am what has more labs do is essentially we're stupid you company on Consumer Goods Company that makes what we call science beck supplements that combat modern-day stressors that slow you down such as fatigue poor sleep quality. Hangovers. I. Mean we referred to our products says, life products you know things that can help you hack your life be more productive than just more joy out of it and yeah, I mean like one of your hero products has been morning recovery. Maybe we can start with that product and you can tell us what actual day stressors this product actually focuses on. Yeah I mean I think the sort of DOT gr no more labs and our mission definitely evolved from morning recovery, which was the first product and basis of our company in its early days although we a lot of months where this was sort of a fun side project before it stepped into A. FULLTIME and a company with a mission, but ultimately, morning recovery think of it as their a remedy for when you consume alcohol especially if you to consume too much alcohol. So we we have it's a holistic approach though it's not a single ingredient but the hero ingredient is flavonoids called out Dha, which is an acronym. Extracted from a plant known as doses, which is also known as on Oreo, Japanese, raising tree, and product that carry the is actually quite popular in Eastern Asian culture especially create Japan, and what's interesting here is that it's got properties a speed up the breakdown of what as hell to hide, which is a highly inflammatory biproduct alcohol that's created when we rate out in our liver and so ultimately when we consume any type of liquor beer wide, ultimately, it's alcohol that we needed to break down into a civic asset fled under body but before call acidic acid, it turns into height that's actually a byproduct as much more than alcohol itself, and so all the really doing is. Acting as a catalyst to help your body break on sort of faster than that you, you didn't have a morning recovery and so at its core at you know that sort of how it works right. So basically helps me to process alcohol much quicker or my liver by that I mean, of course, and then the next day I on much faster recovered and I don't half that sensation of well hangover which for many people can be quite a few different things from nausea rain faulk to exhaustion dizziness headache CETERA, right? That's right. Yeah. Arrive at that compound yes. Oh, you know initially I mentioned through a lot of serendipitous dirty. We got two more labs and so I think It's difficult to sort of describe how we found developed the product without going through the founding story. But I, mean ultimately over decades especially in places Korea Japan, there's actually a giant industry, but that's explicit known as hangover drinks as funny as that sounds just like how energy drink is massive north. America with hero brands such as red bull monster at everybody is very familiar with personal concept over there but replace energy drink with hangover drinks. Now why? Why is that? So I mean I think a lot of it is a cultural thing and I think there's two components to it. This is just my best my best guess what is scheduled to set to drink quite a bit and so a data sources such renominated a year year actually shows that Korea especially is the number one liquor consuming country in the world. So I'll give you a statistic that's kind of mind blowing fourteen shots of liquor per week per capita in south, Korea and number two Russia at seven, and so I think this is one of those things where when people talk about worker. Party without ever actually having been to places like. China Hong Kong Japan Korea people definitely drink a much frequently and I think maybe that's also the reason why and especially because they have such a cutthroat work environment where even though the throughout the week, not just weekends next day you you have to dress up and go to work

Korea Li- Martin Japan China Hong Kong Japan Korea Canada San Francisco Product Manager Founder LEE Facebook DOT Consumer Goods Company Faulk Cisco Russia America
How failure can led to massive success

Startup Stories by Mixergy

06:07 min | 4 months ago

How failure can led to massive success

"Hey, their freedom fighters, Miami's Andrew Warner and the founder Mixer g where I interview entrepreneurs about how they built their businesses. You know one of the big hesitations that we entrepreneurs get in our heads before we start something is. Going to be a lot of time a lot of work. Some of our money maybe a lot of our money and Risking all of it along with our credibility on an idea on a business that I was gonna say could fail but let's say is likely to. And it causes hesitation it keeps us from starting keeps us from building on. Well, joining me is an entrepreneur who? Entrepreneurs hate it when I say failed but I'm going to say you tell me Charles. If you're uncomfortable with me saying he created this product called T. L. Dr Dot co he his goal was to summarize the interesting content on the Internet. I failed invested a lot of time into it. Put a lot of themselves into it. It's still. Closed. Upset with me saying the word failed you don't seem to be. because. I like to say that the the failure. To stock the more winning business. That's the point I was getting exactly what Charles just said that he because of this business because is bad experience ended up learning how to create businesses learning, what to create went to create it how to figure out what customers are willing to pay for how to get customers. And it's. This was not a bad experience you said. It. was a very good experience is not because you fail that it's a bad experience. You're. Always to to see the the good ways of things and the see that's a a an experience is experience and you have to take the most. It's an thing is what we did we geology are is that we look back at what we did and What we did great. What did he do? Wrong. And how we could make it. The next run. And you did the new company that Charles, whose voice you just heard that's Charles Micheletti he is the founder of to Ken. What they do is they help companies take the data that we're all building up and make it easier to express to other people find the meaning of the data, make it actionable. By making the data more visual in- it's especially helpful for CEOS and product Product managers who are building his software into their own platforms, but many other companies in addition to software creators, and by the Charles talk about how well he's doing with his business and we could talk about it. Thanks to to phenomenal sponsors the I. If you're trying to get your ideas off the ground, you gotta check out host dater. And I'll convince you later to go to hostgator dot com slash mixer to do it and the second if you're at the stage where you're kicking around idea for business for a product, I want you to check out my friends over at launch pier where they will build out that first version for you and their launch pure dot com slash mixer g, but I charles the hardest in most awkward and maybe the one that you're most proud of is What's your revenue? So. Our revenue approaching like millions of recurring revenue. Doors ten yet even more than we had an arnold since last time we talked. Yeah, you'd. For I would say approaching. Growing fast and. WHERE WE WILL BE A. Big inning for twenty twenty one in the few just of Schumann's and up until recently, you were bootstrapped about a year ago you took on how much funding? We took twelve million funding. To boost? The growth and to Elvis. A. Meanwhile. Though you hit what four million dollars in revenue by then by the time that you took on more than that, we we it's a six million dollars. Why'd you take on funding? Because it was the right thing to do it. Because you wanted to take a little bit of your money off the table. No it was the right time because we want to skate and we want you to. Higher more senior people. Because you you know that the right time when you see. Will hit some. Glass ceiling. When and if you don't have. Money to invest you you will lose opportunity to. take the market and to. Go Faster. So we knew what were you going to do with the money? What was the vision for it? So we the plan which is still the gun to to invest money in a few different areas of the company from is the product because issue onto leader of the growth. Strategy you need a Marie strong and differentiated products. So I would say that nearly a third of the offending. Will be used always be he's being used to fund the new version of the product, and the second thing is to a more senior people in the leadership's sue until then when we would strap only said for funders, full people driving like nearly. People Company and be wants to. The the company Kale, and also provide the people that worked at you can with a great leadership to ebb them grow in their. Career and went into Higher Sanyo people to do so and and. So we want you to envision says pitching, which is used to. Expand. The business in Unification's

Charles Micheletti Andrew Warner People Company Miami Founder Sanyo T. L. Dr Dot Schumann KEN Arnold Marie
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:40 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"There are really heavy, right? They don't leave a lot of room for adaptation or the inclusion got a new learnings or new evidence. Is it Go and so the simple fact is we don't know everything off the start and we'll never know everything upfront. So the right path forward really on a process side effects, you know to kind of give that a little bit of room to get that little bit of flexibility, you know, the right path forward here can rarely be completely planned at the outset as you know, complex changed almost dead. Always encounters unknown unknowns that require adaptation on the Fly and organizations have to move away from these fully baked change plans and instead adopt kind of a sense and adapt to approach that I'm a bit of that room and that really means getting comfortable to kind of experimentation iteration and most importantly failure which is really the lifeblood of learning right, you know, if it kind of analogize us again back to some things just got in product manager to kind of bring this back a little bit, you know, we got this like build measure learn framework or learn build measure depending on people want to view that diagram in product. But you know, it has a it has an equipment and change management, you know, there's a guy based out of Ottawa named Jason little who developed a framework Colleen change management and his structure basically is like insights options experiments home, which is you know, basically, you know coming up with a list of the things you're going to do making experimental change driving from that do insights new learnings which then drive new options with then drive to your experiments. It's a really dead. We'll start a flywheel right but it's it's about you know, leaving that room in your process as a really key part, but also just thinking about the process and the way you want to go and vote move through this change. So think about a recent change that you made to something, you know, as an example..

Jason little product manager Colleen Ottawa
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:26 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"It helps teens build great products together and when I got a chance to join I was really excited to do that. Yeah, no, that's pretty awesome. I remember I had a guest not too long ago and then we talked about okay ours and he's okay our trainer and he meant I mentioned you know, what's the least understood about you do and they said well just think they can just okay put a frame call it okay on and they can just do it. Yeah, totally. I love I love full leaves episode. Actually. It was a great episode on this one. Yeah, for sure now, Scott. I'm curious to know how do you define change management? Actually, why is it important? So I like to Define change management as being I guess a systematic approach that includes dealing with both the transition or transformation of organizational goals core values processes or Technologies and like the focus of my work is on the organizational side the processes and the technology generally are pretty well kind of known a lot of cases and you just really important because change is a constant and really frankly inevitable today. Like we all work in you know, highly changing environments like, you know, the world is not going any slower. It seems to be if anything speeding up and changes critical to businesses growing and evolving and we need to be able to work through change successfully are really actually organizationally we risk dying as organizations or his team's and and not be successful and what we set out to do and where we need to go. Yeah, no, that's fair enough. Totally. Now how does I'm curious? How does change management relate to product field and like, you know to begin with let's do that as a bit of a loaded question cuz I think change your plan is to so many roles. It's not just change management. But like each and every day, we as product managers deal with change. We have to manage change to our road maps have to manage how you know change how we're working with changed the projects that were executing on or or building or developing and we need to make changes to our things like are strategies and plans as we recently saw with with covet. The O'Neills Dave is a you know, a break does the all the responsibility podcast that's out there and and certainly as a writer on the topic or product manager likes to say that you know, we have all the responsibility. None of the 30,000 to navigate change to as PMS is really important as a scale, you know, just I guess give an example of this like where this kind of shows up as you've got an organization say working a certain way today. And maybe a team decides they want to go do something like go a jovial and and suddenly there's a whole lot of people impacted by that change, you know, somebody's responsible for product is people in other departments Engineers. TJ, people everyone's kind of you know, suddenly starts struggling with all the communication around this before, you know, that's kind of a bunch of misunderstandings. There's a bit of resistance and teams before you know it like some of the themes are feeling like there's I mean, you know kind of knee deep in quicksand and all these people are struggling to kind of get aligned.

product manager Scott Dave writer
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

02:12 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"It's it's often very diagnosable with you know, using disk on both sides and seeing how they're matching and not meshing. Well, so style Frame Works is super helpful the career progression matrices. There's there's quite a few out there. The one that resonates the most with me is there's one from intercom that they published on their blog couple of years ago that's good for kind of establishing like a foundational framework for health p.m. Should progress in their career. I think it's a listening feedbacks and and practicing from practicing messaging with your peers is probably one of the most important ways because I fundamentally think Coaching is more about practice than book learning all the time. And in a lot of coaching situations, you've never seen it before it's it's the first time you'll run into them. And so the best way then to do that take that is actually practice with a peer or a friend or somebody that's that's helpful to you that has some coaching experience, you know, we're home network of professionals as PMS that are all geared towards giving and receiving feedback. So I think it's pretty easy for you just to go out and ask someone for some help and you'll often get the right kind of feedback. Yeah, that does make a lot of things. Well Scott. Thank you so much for being in this show on talking about how to coach product managers my pleasure. Thanks for having me service and and really appreciate the time the show. That's it for this week's episode of p.m. Hipparchus guys. If you enjoyed this episode in the show overall, feel free to share on your social media leave a five star review so we can reach more audience. And if you have any suggestions definitely reach out to me, you can email me at Cyrus at product manager have the org or you can find me on social media Linked In all all over the place. Now we can get all the tips action a sense and and it's kind of like the notes for this show for free at the speed link. I'm going to give you a speed that lie forward slash p.m. Have 19 also make sure to subscribe in your favorite podcast app. So you don't miss any of the upcoming episodes. So you're slamming and until next show stay safe and healthy..

product manager Scott
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"I've always been flipping back and forth between the tech and business world. And so if you think about product it's an amazing cross-section of the two great great blend of the two disciplines so long in my career. I started by studying Computer Engineering knew I didn't want to be a developer. So I landed in strategy. But while I was at beIN in strategy I missed the tech world. So I took the transfer to change the Bay Area in order to get some strategy work in a technology business or multiple businesses. So then when I moved back to Toronto, I went back to bail to try and leverage a strategy game into an operating role at a company that is in a more technical discipline. So there was kind of always this Evan flow between do I want to be in technology in like a operational role or a Strategic role and and then I think after I'd been through that the skills that I learned from the Consulting side of my career actually more transferable than you might think. So but some of the things you need as a product manager are strong relationship building the ability to deconstruct and build up the hypotheses that come to kind of conclusions with them politically and data-driven solutions estimate value and prioritize things and then of course, you have to kind of have a little bit of vision in both worlds in order to be successful in the careers and that's basically I took the plunge when my friend offered me the job and never looked back that said, you know, the world has evolved a lot since 2009 and my understanding is evolved a lot of the role of p.m. So thinking about it, you know, some of the things I have learned along the ways my first fact was about thirty five pages long before I went to that as opposed than a joke kind of flow. I've never run or heard of a b testing or even user experience really or web analytics package broke down at one point and we had no web data for three months. So we would make decisions in the blind which is very hard in a consumer business. And so obviously my my view on what product management means is changed a lot in the last twelve or thirteen years, but especially Journey you've been all over the place from you know, software engineering to Consulting and then finding your way to product which which actually pretty much explains it in all the touching different areas, you know technical business strategy and then you come come in the middle and then you do kind of like double into all of them, right? So that's that's very cool. Now you're at home product at rate Hub. I'm curious to know if you could share a bit more about your role there and then how you went about building the product practice their? Yeah. Sure. So for those of you who are unfamiliar re bap The financial product comparison site. And so what we do is we help Canadians find the best products in mortgages credit cards bank accounts Insurance.

product manager beIN Bay Area Evan Toronto developer
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

03:15 min | 4 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Now speaking of the role of a product leader developing people is arguably one of the most important part of the job and this show will focus on that now in this episode, we all learn why product matures need coaching to begin with and how is it different from other professions? You also talked about how to coach product managers effectively and we talked about some anti patterns will also cover how to track progress and to make sure actually if it's working in a coaching relationship now, I guess today is a Scott Affleck Scott is currently the VP of product at retail. CA where he needs product design and analytics now prior to discuss joining great help. C a three years ago. None of these functions exist. That's so much of his past three years old building the team and establishing processes to support a business that has grown 3x in that time Scott even Avid, lover of high-growth BTC and Marketplace startups dead. I spent over a decade working product and fintech travel and social media prior to his career and products God spent six years working in corporate strategy at Bain & Company and Bell. Canada should get rid of guys for a very fun talk and how to coach PMS with Scott Athletics. Hey box are slamming and welcome to p.m. Her podcast a show dedicated to bringing you fresh and unique insights from product leaders and Tech entrepreneurs. All right, Scott. Welcome to p.m. Hub. Thanks. Thanks very much for having me service. How are you doing today? Doing great doing great. I'm really excited to have this conversation with you Scott on how to coach PM's cuz I know you have a lot of golden nuggets to share with us. But before we dive in I'd love to you know, we all have different Journeys in the product. I'm curious to know how how was your journey product? Yeah, sure. So I kind of stumbled into the whole product world. I spent a long time working in corporate strategy and and kind of got tired of just telling companies how to age or defining ideas for companies to make more money and and figure things out actually want to make should happen. And so I decided to start taking a look around when I was looking about 2009 and I was in Toronto and product management was kind of not as well known here as as it was in in the Bay Area or lots of places in the US wage. Um, so I hadn't really heard of it in its current Incarnation. I had heard the term product manager when I worked at Bell, but really those roles were more like product marketing as opposed to project management as I know it today and so I started looking and and heard this sermon one of my mentors from Bane and Bell connected me to Former Consulting birth. His who took who was setting up a product function at a Wanda. So I chose to explore it and luckily and actually took a chance on a guy with no experience. And basically I fell in love kind of immediately. If I go back a step further throughout my life..

Scott Affleck Scott product manager Scott Athletics VP Bane Bain & Company Canada BTC Toronto Bell PM US Bay Area Former Consulting
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:44 min | 5 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Really that's developing understanding You go hunting for new data in inside to collect this detective. You trying to get into data cotton, slice it. You're always trying to figure out what what, what are the trends or the hidden nuggets that might be in your data. You you are also very much valuing, and in fact, you need to participate in doing user custody interviews and you don't just focus on your own solutions, but you're trying to get to know the customer you're trying to observe their problems you bring back qualitative as well as quantitative. Context into into a into your team and that's the analyst wind set. The challenge mindset allows you to identify mitigate rates so far from just simply being critical it actually really helps you surface assumptions that you've been making that might undermine your success It also allows you to do this saddle psychology change like when you restate your ideas in terms of a hypothesis that allows you to focus on the problem and what might validate or invalidate it and not your personal feelings postal attachment to the idea and see this allows you to kind of with more interactively say no to things look for disconcerting. Validation evidence. And you can just sort of embrace as dissenting voices so far from trying to avoid unhappy customers or or not told to the near that engineer that always pushes back in asks why you working on something you embrace that because you really really want to. Understand kind of what might be. More, what might not be going so well for your product. And then finally often overlooked the the evangelists mindset really allows you to build momentum. It allows you to kind of focus your team it motivator team builds support for with your team in your stakeholders particular. It requires a lot of community over communication education on the outcomes. You're really bringing to working infectious optimism enthusiasm while still being realistic and importantly the lousy. It's an important step a mindset where you kind of lose ownership. And you allow the team to own the problem and solve it, and that's an that's a hard thing for many for many progresses. So that's basically what the full mindsets I I'm pressed to argue that a product manager does not need at least. Some of each of those to bring those to at least some of the time..

product manager analyst engineer
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:49 min | 5 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Thanks a lot. I'm really excited to be doing this. One hundred percent I thank you so much for coming on the show. Can you know I've taken some time to read most of your book they influential product manager, which is basically I found to be like a gold mine of how to's you know practical frameworks, tools and templates and a piece basic I enjoyed the most myself is your concrete examples from your past experience so. I'd love to yeah jump right in I..

product manager
Adobe MAX! The Creativity Conference

This Week in Photo

04:49 min | 5 months ago

Adobe MAX! The Creativity Conference

"Welcome back to another episode of this week in photo I'm your host Frederik van Johnson Today on the show we're talking to some folks from Adobe about. A little show called Max that they put on from year to year. The lot of people in the creative industry look forward to kind of like Mac, nerds look forward to macworld. The creatives look forward to Max because it's kind of the latest greatest it's coming out of adobe innovations. And just sort of a shot in the arm creativity wise of what's happening in the creative world. Obviously. This year is a little bit different, and Max is a little bit different They're pivoting. These were pivots overused this year but they've they've restructured the conference into some more of a virtual offering and I want to get to the bottom of it. I want to understand is it better? Is it? You know what's better than being full on physical is virtual virtual allow more people to attend a you know, what are we giving up going virtual? So all those things we're going to answer. So Britney miscarrying Katrina ice men. Are, here to talk about the stuff, we're also going to dive into if we have time into some topics around light room in understand light room workflows in that cool stuff. So welcome to the show guys how you doing. Great. Thank you for having eight. Thank you. No. Thank you both for coming on. Monday afternoon I know how busy Mondays are for everybody. So thanks for taking the time to do this. I WanNa have you both introduce yourselves your individual areas of expertise inside the adobe adobe ecosystem, Katrina iceman. We'll start with you what do you what do you and I have known each other you know for a long time I won't go into how long but it's been a long time. I'm happy to see your face in here and I was surprised when I saw that you are attached to adobe also they need her so What do you? What are you doing at Adobe? Well, first, let me say that I started with Photoshop. Before it was released and even when I see with that Beta version of photoshop like I WANNA work with this company that was over thirty years ago. So hang on to your dreams because they do come through and. I know I'm tenacious and. Due to my photographic writing and educational experience. There is a new project that adobe was developing. That's now in light room, and it's all of the room to to`real and the discovery edit files learning an inspiration all in-app that I'm happy to talk about, and that's really what I concentrate on is working with the community to share integration and information. So you're you're I know you're you're official title of over there is the your product manager for engagement and I'm interested to a really happy to see that you're helping with the education side of that because you know as as the interview progresses as we talked about in the Green Room, I want to understand and I want our listeners viewers to understand that ecosystem, the light room classic ecosystem in Mobile, and how that fits into it and what they should be using for what is. As you know as a educator, there's a lot of confusion out there around what tool should I use much much to a to the effect of people even beings suffering from analysis paralysis like, Oh, I should use that year. So I use that I use this deal or whatever. So let's get to the bottom of that to in this interview as we progress, of Brittany, tell us about you and your your expertise over to Dobie. What are you? What's your? What's your area of responsibility? So, I, oversee strategy content and marketing for adobe corporate events, which includes Adobe Max says well as Adobe Summit. So this year has been a very busy year where we're going all in on virtual events, and so I'm very excited to talk more about what we're doing for Max. That's cool. That's cool. So Max. So take us for the folks that may not have heard of adobe Max right what what was adobe Max originally concepted for and who who's target So, Adobe Max is the world's largest creativity conference, and typically it has been three full days of immersive learning and training and inspiration workshops in a variety of other activities in a physical environment. So we traditionally have appealed to creative professional's across all of the various products that adobe focuses on. It's also where we traditionally will announce any of our new releases and our latest innovations.

Adobe MAX Katrina Iceman Frederik Van Johnson Macworld MAC Photoshop Britney To`Real Dobie Brittany Official Product Manager
Interview with Jeremy Stoppelman of Yelp

How I Built This

05:00 min | 5 months ago

Interview with Jeremy Stoppelman of Yelp

"This industry has just been absolutely hammered unlike any other industry travel leisure as well. So many people go to yelp for restaurants. So did you anticipate that pretty quickly early on that restaurants we're going to get hit or did that come as a surprise to you? We had some sense that restaurants are gonNA, get hit. What of our? More Cedar product managers of Chinese person who had lots of contacts in China and was relying like all the changes that restaurants were going through in. China to try and adapt at the outset of the pandemic like this is crazy. They're doing all these things with temperature checks at the door like delivered new delivery things partitions, and it just seemed so unlikely that that could be our reality especially at that time call it early March, we were studying this and everything still felt normal but it was you know pretty soon we could start seeing impacts in some of the cities that were hardest hit in the. US. So for example, Seattle and You. Know that obviously got US thinking about business ramifications and okay restaurants, which is a big portion of our traffic are going to be hard hit. You know what can we do? We weren't going to charge restaurants for instance, for that period where traffic was following and even if they were getting some value, you know the everyone is thrown into total chaos and like there really isn't a whole lot of point to advertising. Traffic is falling like that. So so pulling together, a bunch of different things to support the restaurant nightlife industry at a time, became a big priority and ultimately culminated with about thirty two million dollars, worth of forgiven fees and young. To Support Restaurants Jeremy Your Business Model depends largely on advertising on businesses that advertise on the platform and businesses that depend on ads have had a difficult time because companies are cutting back on their ad spence. For obvious reasons, they've got to preserve cash in many cases. And this has actually pretty dramatically affected your business yelps business right I mean over the over the past year that was one of the scariest things a particularly about march in April you know in a pandemic especially as things are shutting down. WHO's buying advertise wait? So that was my great fear was you know is our revenue going to go toward zero like maybe it's not zero, but is it going to go towards zero pretty darn quickly. We had some very stressful difficult conversations around my the different potentially catastrophic scenarios. What would we do? How do we survive you know? Is there a freeze? The company amber type strategy literally was something we were talking about like where we just go down to the skeleton of staff fits a nuclear winter type of situation. Fortunately, the world did start to re stabilize and as the panic subsided, there were businesses that actually were doing even finer good You know like as all of us were sheltered at home. Suddenly if your toilet backed up, you're calling the plot a plot. Being more busier and some people started moving later in the pandemic mover traffic was doing reasonably well and so there ended up being areas of our business because we are diversified we're no obviously widely for restaurants, but we also have. Reviews and customers in all sorts of local services categories as well. Area of the business has been quite resilient contractors and and and so on. Interesting I remember when you on the podcast you talked about to crisis moments I remember was when you were x dot com and you were just Totally, terrified that I think that pay pal was gonna like crush you guys and you'd sleepless nights about that and then the other one was when you started yelp and nobody came to the party like it was really just didn't gain any traction in the in the months many months and you will really worried you had a lot of anxiety about and you talked about that and this sounds like even more intense what you went through in March and April. Just probably personally, I? mean. Planning for a nuclear winter. But in in some senses like I wonder whether anticipating that possibility actually was in a sense probably the best way to game out what your strategy would be. Because in the end, it didn't work out that way but it but you were planning for the worst. Yeah. One of the things that I would say was beneficial of going to that awful place in our minds with I'd say at the early part of the pandemic, it's hard for people to really wrap their heads around the scope of the problem how big the problem is how it's going to change our lives it just seems. Unbelievable. and. so by forcing other executives managers, etc start thinking about this, this could be the big one just so to speak. You know it gets you into a brain's base that did shift everyone's thinking to. The A big problem. We have to take this extremely seriously, and there's going to be big changes and moves that none of us are going to like we have to do to ensure the survival

United States China Seattle
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:51 min | 5 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"Yourself on thankful for your. Now, let's get back to the show. I love that. Now, if you really were to drive the film natter Kinda give us an example from your own. Past experience. What would that be? Yeah I'm Trying to think of a good example because. I've I've only gotten that I've only become what I think is a good product manager park measure for now ten years. It probably took me like five or six years to really think that I am a good product manager. The one example I can probably think of is at my last company, we built a product called sleep. And so we were you know a little bit of context and I won't go into too much detail because it's not as sexy as necessarily facebook But we built this product called fleet mode, which was a word in the trucking space and logistics base, and we were dealing with owner operators and When we were trying to think of the problem was like, how can we expand our market share? How can we go after a different market? Well, you know. Owner operators are individual truck drivers but in what the next step is, obviously when you have a group of of truck drivers at work together for a particular company and when we set out to talk to fleets effectively and when we when we talk to fleets trying to understand their problems while they had a lot of problems, they had problems from say. not only trying to. So our previous product again, a little more context we were a load or freight matching platform, which meant that we can match a driver and the shipper together like based on their location, their truck rates and based on the shippers location. Obviously in also what they wanted to pay, we would basically match them almost like a dating site for truck drivers in a way. Romance Part But anyways when we talked to fleets, I mean, there problems were were really long. It started from because obviously when you have more drivers, one of the things that you need to do is also scheduling is a big problem and you know so they have things like you know. So scheduling it is signing to the right driver knowing where the driver is there's even like multi booking in. So when we when we really went through this particular problem of what we wanted to solve for fleets, we we dove until like what is the core problem and so we work with our target audience, which was really a forget the term now, but it's effectively like. The at any fleet, there's always a coordinator if you will. This is a coordinator who is somebody who works at the at the at the trucking company and they're on the phone all day trying to find loads for the.

product manager coordinator facebook
The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:43 min | 6 months ago

The New Backend Engineering Lead at TextUs - Brittany Martin

"By corner of the world is very different and so I think I've kind of alluded to it on some of the episodes we've recorded up to this one but nick, you are my very favorite co host. So of course, I waited until you were back on the podcast so that we could discuss all the changes but I have recently shifted roles. So I quietly changed my linked in quietly changed my twitter and my get hub but I am the new engineering lead for the back end at text us. Congratulations that is that is huge right I don't even know where to begin but. I guess the best place is at the beginning. So how long ago? Did you kind of find your way into the world of Texas yeah. So ask the listeners know I've been at the trust for about five years, which was fantastic because I leveled up. So much of the trust, a lot of my conference talks that I gave came from the work that. I was doing at the trust I loved those working at a nonprofit affecting the arts and the Pittsburgh community because when I came back from San Francisco, I really wanted to get re-involved with Pittsburgh and there was no better place to do it with the trust being a small nonprofit and you know there was only so many places that I could grow up words. I decided to start considering my options, and so I came across Texas and text. US. Basically is a business class text messaging software and they're built in rails, which of course, is very important to me as the host of this show to continue working on ruby on rails. So you know I have bet my career on it. And the Texas currently serves the ASS staffing recruiting industries mainly though they also serve a lot of different industries but it's a really interesting and complex code base and they use a lot of the dry principles, which is that I was somewhat familiar with, but I hadn't worked one on one with. So how about you neck? Have you used a lot of dry rb? So when you dry principles, do you mean like actually using like dry rb and the dry rb tooling and the ghost? Yes heavily on my goodness. So I have literally just wandered so far as hearing about it in a podcast or you know and I and I, think I follow the maintainers on twitter and reading about five never crossed that threshold to actually using it even in a in a toy up. So House have been. kind of seeing that world is imagine it's quite interesting. Yeah. I'm coming off of a code base where we used a lot of service objects. So in some ways, there are some principles there that are somewhat familiar where you don't stack all of your logic into your models and controllers, but dry principles. It's just it's very clean and I'll tell you that during the interview process with Texas, which first of all was a really fantastic. Interview Process and I hope a lot of companies have processes like this it my process probably took I would say about five weeks and that involved a lot of one on one in conversations with their product manager the CTO, their chief architect, my partner, who is the engineering lead for the front end and just really making sure that it was a good culture fit and then I ended up doing a pairing session with the chief architect and. What was neat about it is that we tackled some very rails lia problems, but then as towards the end of the interview. He gave me some examples of how my code could change to actually reflect those dry principles and how that is how they manage the code in code base and I left that interview just ceiling. So intrigued about how I feel that I knew ruby on rails fairly well, but just seeing it in that sense it got me really curious and I was like this is this is. going. To. Be Great for my career. It must be amazing to get another set of eyes because I have to commend you you know. There's A. Strong trend in tech where people you don't hear the five years that often anymore. I don't think you you see is short as eighteen months to I'd say, even three years I'd look at unlinked and say, wow, that was a while. So so it's definitely you know there's all the. Normal aspects of changing changing a job but I think from a code aspect just saying these different ideas you know and. It's like a super learning experience all over again if you're around a bunch of intelligent people working in this code base and and especially with tooling that you may not have used before so must be. An absolute thrill.

Texas United States Twitter Nick Pittsburgh Chief Architect San Francisco House Product Manager Partner CTO
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 6 months ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

Ruby on Rails Podcast

08:19 min | 7 months ago

My Best Programming Tips with Jason Swett

"I think it's easy to fall into the trap of wasting time by just like. Chasing this rabbit, chasing this rabbit, and if you step back and say if somebody came and looked over your shoulder and asked like hey. Are you actually trying to do right now? A lot of times. If you don't have an answer to that question, then it's like, what are you even doing so like? Anytime. You're coding and you're feeling like lost like you're just flailing around it can be hopeful to step back and say hang on a second. What am I actually trying to do right now and I catch myself doing this when I'm just like messing around and not getting anywhere I'm like hang on what's my goal again, and often the problem is that I don't have a clear goal and so just saying what it is that I'm trying to accomplish is so so helpful even going to the extent of writing down. Can Be really helpful because then it forces you to really be clear. See I read this one in terms of a group contacts or a context where I'm given a ticket that might be fairly vague and so when I look at the taking I, don't know what I need to do here and so I have all these clarifying questions that I need to do and when I try to do is once I can get those into a more technical format I liked to rewrite the ticket with the product managers you know. Acceptance on that so that way I can clearly articulate that goal. Yeah. That's interesting. If I saw a story that was too vague I would look at the story and say, this story is not what a call shovel ready. So shovel ready just means that it's Ready to begin work on it. And throughout my career I've I've had a lot of instances of the of the challenge where I get a story and it's not shovel ready. And I think a that's kind of the role of a scrum master. If you're working in agile methodology to go through the stories before they get to the point of being assigned to developers and making sure that they are sufficiently crisply defined to actually be worked on one of my tests that I that I do on stories when I when I look at him as I asked if we. gave this to an external qa person would that Qa person be able to read what's in the story and know what manual tests to be able to perform perform to know that this story is done and if that's not possible, then it's very likely that the story needs to be made more crisp, including a very clearly laid out definition of what it means to be done with that story. That's great. So moving onto the next tip, keep everything working all the time, and this is one that I have definitely failed to do before we have had to do a massive ru factoring and I realized halfway through that the behavior of my code has changed tests or failing I'm not sure which part of the code I've changed has caused this issue and I ended up having to kill the branch start all over again. So what's your tips around that? Yeah, that's painful. I've definitely had that experience myself a lot of times in the past, and that's why this is one of the one of the top tips in the sequence because in in my career, this one, his burned me a lot of the time. So there's not much to say about this other than like keep everything working all the time, which means like make a small change and then test everything. It is really helpful in these cases if you have good test coverage on your entire application, because what I will do is make a small change a very small commit maybe it's even just a one line commit. And then I'll push my commit up to Ci and I'll let the tests run on the whole application. I don't necessarily always wait for the whole entire test suite to run before I, continue my work because with my application right now, my test take like twenty minutes to run and I'm, not gonNA. Just sit and wait for twenty minutes while that's happening but I'll make a small change push up to see I make a small change push up to ci there's a little delay but that way at least if things start breaking, I know the exact small change that made things breaking so I can So I can know what the culprit is and then also in addition to the CI thing because that's a little bit peripheral. I will make a small change go into my browser and manually test. I'll make a small change and then run the test case that tests that exercises that line of code, and if that passes, I'll run the test that the whole test file that tests that whole class and stuff like that. Because yet, if you if you work for like hours or days and let things stop working, it's so much harder to go from not working to back to working than it is to keep everything working all the time I completely agree and this actually touches upon the next one. So the other day I googled the concept of atomic commits and you might know this but you are the number one result on Google search exciting. So Jason, could you explain what an atomic commit is? Yeah it's a commit VAT is only one thing. So. This is interesting I I, find myself wanting to read my own blog post so that I can answer this question more more intelligently I'll explain how I do my own commits. I don't usually do more than a few minutes at a time worth of coding I don't usually do more than. A few lines well, maybe like five to fifty lines is the average size of of my comments and I try to stay more toward the like ten or twenty lines into the spectrum per commit not that lines is like a hard metric that I adhere to. That's just how it happens to work out. and when I'm when I'm coding in front of people like when I'm teaching a class or something like that, the students are often surprised by how frequently I commit like sometimes, I'll just change one character and they'll commit and the they'll be like isn't that like so much overhead compared to the amount of work you did. But. No. What I'm doing is I'm keeping my commits atomic because like for example, if I change a piece of configuration in my application. And then I work on this unrelated feature and I spent like. Twenty minutes, and then I commit that thing I commit the feature change along with that unrelated configuration change. then. What if that configuration change causes a problem? Later, I might be doing my debugging research and discover that this commit introduced problem. But to me looks like this is this feature that I added. But really it's this configuration change that's buried way in it. That's really not obvious and that's unrelated to all the other code I changed. So makes that debugging lot harder. So when I commend I'm not necessarily always committing for the sake of the change that I made I'm committing for the sake of whatever changes I'M GONNA make. I want to keep this small change separate from whatever change comes after that so that each commit is only one thing. So again, that makes the debugging easier, and if you ever need to roll something back I had to do this just the other day where I made a change that my boss asked me to do. But then the next day my boss said actually can you put it back to the way? It was before because my tom because my commit was Atomic. All I had to do was revert one single commit and it was super easy to roll back.

CI Google TOM Jason
"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on Product Manager Hub (PM Hub)

"With more right I. was looking for a credible product managers who have had teams themselves who have. Experienced, recruiting, interviewing, meeting, who meeting's who can identify good talent, right? WHO's got at eye for talent were very empathetic. But at the same time, we're not going to be like passing every person that will be okay being say, well, this person is great but they're still missing this. So I'm going to reject them give them all this advice and say, Hey, you can apply back in six months or even apply back in the year three months any art what they lacked. So the on the screen team, I was looking for people who are some sounds like But, people who are judgmental. But also people who are empathize watch great mentors, groomers, talent and identifiers talent, and then they got that is to say, okay, this person can be great right or did this precursor could mean need this kind of job And of we've got a very rigorous screening framework with retinal with the content being updated involved. But at the same time, we also trust our screeners to look for great personalities. Great passionate. People. In filter out people who are going to be a clashes with that right I mean there are some talented people out there. Some of them don't have the greatest attitudes on are are are fairly arrogant. It's fourth. So those may not be the greatest nashes for our clients because we want on hindsight experience as well. Right. So we're not only testing you you being a great product manager, but also you'd be a great freelance talent. So so so that's really what the screening team has to do, and that's what I moved for hiring. Now for matching it's more client facing and is much more out out. So say you know focus on be covering opportunities. So again, I know they're probably more senior than your average product manager at the same time they're really good at figuring out what people are saying. The tend to be really great peop- keyboards..

product manager
Becoming a Coder

Command Line Heroes

04:30 min | 8 months ago

Becoming a Coder

"Use spent the last few years fully immersed in the world of coders. You've interviewed over two hundred developers as admins, architects, engineers and programmers for your buck. Yeah I spoke to boy on awful lot of software developers all over the ecosystem. Great you the perfect co-pilot, so glad you could join me be here. Let's start with the most traditional path to becoming a coder going to college to get a computer science degree. I think for what I do as a product manager, it's important to have that technical foundation and glad I did it through a computer science program because I feel like I. Don't understand like. How do I program something to do this? But I also understand like what goes on under the hood. That was venom rot single. She graduated from Stanford University in two thousand sixteen with a computer science degree. She says her education set her up for product manager positions at facebook, Google and other companies. Clive. Voters out there, get CS degrees. If you look at the stack overflow survey, so that's the big gum coating site, and they do a fantastic survey of tens of thousands of their users every year. And their data suggests that about sixty percent of the coders that are on stack overflow that are professional. They have some sort of formal computer, training or something close to it like electrical engineering and and the numbers may be a little higher than that, but let's just say you know two-thirds, so it is still most common route far and away for becoming a coder. Is Go and get a computer, science, degree or something related to it. Is that because s degrees are lucrative. Yes, they are They are what an economist would call a costly signal right? You know they indicate that. Hey, I'm someone who's willing to spend a lot of time learning this stuff so you know I'd be a good person to hire. If you're developer, you're having to constantly learn all the time. New Frameworks new languages new environments. So, so some of the reasons employers would tell me that they like getting people from computer. Science degrees is because those people just spent four years doing nothing, but learning and they're going to need to keep on learning. When you get an undergraduate degree, you're learning, but you're also learning the theoretical math. You're also learning about algorithms, and you're learning about networking and computer systems, and I think all of those just give you very solid foundations so that if you were? Were like you know switch industries or not like? It would just be a lot easier for the Stanford degree helped with being taken seriously honest. You just confidence like that's a big part of it to dealing with imposter syndrome, and then also like People WanNa. Talk to you, even applying to jobs after like you just it's just a lot easier. Because of this big network you have do cs degrees make them better performers than those who come into the industry traditionally. That is a really a really great question. It's a hard one to answer. Because I got completely different answers from different employers I. had some people tell me that? Yeah CS people are just more confident and more self assured and can hit the ground running, then sell trained people bootcamp people, and then I heard exactly the opposite right like I heard you know for example, give it cult. He runs river, which is like a is becoming the dominant e commerce site for selling musical equipment, fantastically growing profitable firm and he's like. You know. I used to say I only wanted CS grads, but they just didn't have all the sort of life skills that you want to be a productive team member and more and more. He stood at hiring bootcamp. People self train, people people who. Are Musicians learned on the side. You also hear praise for the non computer. Science, people I think from a certain class of investor or even old school coder there in the fifties or sixties, and they taught themselves using like a like a commodore sixty four back in the eighties when they see someone who came along and said Yeah I. Just is in job in hospitality and I hate it. I learned. Learned a ton of stuff on Youtube and Code Academy. They're like yeah, I want that person. It is very by model. Shall we say there is a class player? Is? That is really rigorous about only during CS, and there's a whole of the class at actually sometimes regarded as a real mark of pride to be self taught or a scrappy person who change their career and went to a boot camp.

Stanford University Product Manager Developer Clive Youtube Facebook Google Code Academy
30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

Marketing School

04:45 min | 9 months ago

30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

"Committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric, Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're going to do part three of thirty lessons after thirty million Su visits, so we are on what number seventeen right now. so seventeen focus on branding Google wants to rank sites have a strong brand because there are less likely to create fake news or bullshit contents at what I mean by branding is the more people that are googling your name, the higher going to end up ranking because like everyone does seo everyone at least most big companies do it? Everyone's already doing link building again. At least the big companies are doing it so if multiple sites on the same issue like BMW N. Mercedes right, which go head to head for a lot of type of cars. If. They both have millions links. Who should you rank higher, the one who has an extra hundred thousand at that point, it doesn't really matter but what you are looking for things like brandy. If five times more people are searching Mercedes and BMW would tell Google that people prefer Mercedes branding. Is that important? Right number eighteen. Look at your competition. Your competition teaches you good lessons. Don't obsess over them, but look at your competition can give you ideas ideas go a long way, so leave it or not. I like using Lexis Seo tool for this. Alexa does a good job of their similar websites. Tool does a good job of There's like a net that you can see of similar websites. And they showed that Alexa score as well sites that are very similar to you. The net of five and he can expand. It's like a spiderweb. Spiderweb almost but I like looking at competition to draw ideas from every now, and then what I will like to do is I'll look at the idea and I'll modified. A little bit becomes my original idea. That's where good ideas come from number nineteen. Don't be afraid to have duplicate content what I mean by this is people always say? Oh, king contents, not goodwill. Google doesn't penalize for. This doesn't mean that you should take other people's content. Just slap on your site. What I mean by. Don't be afraid of duplicate content is. Published blocks on your site. Why not repurpose it on link Dan facebook pushed the content out there because extra traffic and extra brand awareness is better than nothing number twenty. Similarly. Think about how you can create power pages on your website, and this is a concept created by Brian, Deane also known as back Lingo and the whole idea. What they power pages you have imagined you have one introduction overview at the top of the page, and it's a long page with just a bunch of content and you can. You can have links that was you. Two different sections almost imagine like little chapters that you have for A. A long and power page what tends to happen there is let's say I'm writing about conversion rate optimization, and it's almost like a complete guide. Sure you can split it up into different pages and just have like a table of contents at the top that's a pillar page, but a power pages you have a lot of content on there, and that ranks well because you have a lot of long tail traffic on that page, so if you. You want to write something. That's more comprehensive considered doing type of setup instead of having a bunch of different pages that are split up number twenty one. We talked about how when you're creating content, you WANNA create amazing content going to create long content you WanNa, keep updating your own content, but one thing that people forget to do with their content, and this is a huge important lesson that many of the struggle with is interlinking if you're not. Not interlinking your content together, you're not going to as well a lot of people will take their new content and linked to the older pieces of what they're not doing is taking their older piece of content, and then linking to the newer ones, so you needed to both ways, not just with your your content, the also want to go back to your older content and adjust links and push more links out to the new content as well. All right number twenty two. If you think about doing us ill, you can't really do it alone. It's it's a team sport, so think about who you need. You need content writers. You probably need developers to get things done quickly on your site. You are going to need perhaps designers, and if it's a really big website talking, you're getting millions and millions of visits a month. You might need product managers as well so you think about it, it's. It's not really just about you. You got to think about how much help you can get to grow faster, and that's going to allow you to scale your traffic a lot faster number twenty three, so you guys are all going out there. Doing S IOS spending a lotta time, and you're familiar with a lot of the strategies, and some of them are old like a MP framer. The amp framework in theory makes her pages low ver- mobile. What you'll find is in the United States and other major English speaking countries. Having a impede doesn't really give you a big boost in traffic, if any,

Google BMW Alexa Mercedes United States Eric Neil Patel Dan Facebook SU Brian Deane
Ethics in Voice With Brooke Hawkins

Design for Voic?e

02:22 min | 1 year ago

Ethics in Voice With Brooke Hawkins

"Example. Can we talk about ethics from a higher level with getting a basic understanding. What does the scope of ethics really include especially when we look at the voice space. Sure yeah for me as a designer ethics takeover raising part of what. I'm thinking about all the time so sometimes it feels big But i think other times it can be more actionable but in terms of how my job typically works working within a company outside the scope of ethics for me is kind of embedding. The question of what means good for this easier for the users the for the people that i'm designing for In the context of the service that i'm providing them so definitely. I think a lot of designers are good people and we always wanted to make sure that what we're designing is influencing people for the better I think some obvious aspects of ethics are things like is this interface easy to use. Am i making sure that i'm getting people formation. In a assistant easy accessible way not preventing them from getting important information or access to certain things. Because of roadblocks that way i think a lot of us are embedded in that for primarily through the principles of you ex design But i think we're my questions. Get a little deeper. Were trying to kind of push. The industry in also people that i work with is kind of thinking about aside from the designs that were creating kind of the ecosystem network within Constantly kind of posing questions about what is the worst case scenario Gonna what is the most negative outcome of of what we're creating. I'm the kind of pushing against that. So increasingly my work. I'm finding that it's not just the role of the designer to s those questions but trying to involve higher up in other kind of lateral teams with these questions. So things like sales or things like our business project product managers tangentially critically about even how we're framing our product in terms of our recreating something. That's actually useful to people. Is this infringing upon their access to things may be more positive in some way etc etc but basically thinking while essex says something. The entire company in the product itself should be critically

Essex
The Road to Building Products with Nick Lesec

The Esports Startup

06:50 min | 1 year ago

The Road to Building Products with Nick Lesec

"You've worked, it might not work in sports. Priority did working gaming. Yeah, actually. So after college I went and got A. An associate's degree actually. Went from a bachelors back to an associates. In game production. So. We learned the basics of everything that goes into making a game. Things like design arts animation programming all that fun stuff. and. From there actually was a QA tester to K-. If you've ever played the game, x Com. You're welcome. I mean I was just the tester but. Actually not the funnest job, but What what is quickly because I know that's a lot of people when they wanted to get into sports or wanted to in the gaming. Gaming particularly. Yes, cigarettes entry level it like the dream job right? Yeah, yeah, and I! I was imagining like Grandma's boy. Everyone just sitting around playing video games all day high fiving each other. But? It's basically you're you're playing. A broken piece of software. Over and over. For eight hours a day. Minimum. There's lot of overtime. And you're you're looking for bugs and logging the bugs. Wow, that sounds thrilling is grueling. Prefer too late to the game comes out. Yeah Yeah. And then. From there action went to t h Q, which is now defunct. Publisher for for Video Games. They were up there with like EA Knack Division things like that. I was doing trade marketing there, which is like retail marketing, so we worked a lot with. basically like physical stores for the marketing that goes on in there like you know these big displays in the store, or you know how to position the game on the shelf and things like that. It was a mix of that as well as trade show coordination, which is really fun I. Really Liked doing the trade show stuff. There's a lot of moving parts. So I got to flex my project. Management skills there That's where I learned a lot of those skills and. You get to travel a lot. which was superfund fun. There would be like six months out of the year where it's just like nonstop travel going around the country even got to go to whistler. Canada, which is like Super Nice. Snowboarding slash ski resort town. That was really really cool and I found out that Canadians are just way way more active than. than all of Americans every day there, let's go bungee jumping and. Let's. Let's go skiing and snowboarding and let's. What is it called? Let's go zip lining unlike. Anita NAP. Yeah, I think Austrailia goes to whistler to work on the mountain. So many Soviet, my friends throughout like this, a high school and college years ended up going to whistle to like train people. Get to work out the lift operators or trade. kind of stuff. So. Yeah, you make a lot. Australians there as well. How did you get into product management specifically? Well. As well with a lot of product managers. That was kind of something that. Is Not something necessarily planned on. Something I kind of fell into and then fell in love with it. So basically I was at. A Marketing Company for beauty products. In their digital department, for like their websites and everything and I was doing what they called I was digital producer. is mostly because they were a TV company. They made a lot of infomercials. That's their bread and butter and where they came from. Then they introduced. They found out about this thing called the Internet and. You know. Put their products on the websites and everything and they were just like you like you coordinate and. Developers and all these people to build stuff. Oh, you're your producer digital producer your digital producers. But it became clear pretty quickly that like for this company to succeed and grow. You need to embrace this whole. Internet thing. It's not going away. So they decided to get really serious and build out this department and and start to treat this department and the rest of the company more like a Internet company like an e commerce company. And so that entailed redefining some roles so one day they were like. Your product manager now and I was like what is i. don't even know what that is. So I looked it up and I did all his research and. Along with my fellow digital producers now recently product managers. And it was really cool like it. Like opened up this whole world I didn't even know was there at the time. And I. Remember One of my my co workers. He's like. This whole product management thing this is this is a really big deal like this is a huge step forward for us like take this very seriously and so I did and I studied the hell out of it. You know trained myself on a lot of best practices and things like that reading books, articles and Talking to people and was actually able to help. Build out the product management discipline. there. Since I seem to be. One of the folks that cared. To do so and. Yeah just. Being able to learn and teach these things and then apply them in real life. was just so cool and it's one of those jobs that like. You can see the results with with numbers and everything and you can. You can gauge success. And I mean that's how I got started. And then from there I went to that that learning company I was telling you about would that have made sure product management organization already in place and. was able to learn a lot more there

Product Manager Whistler Producer. Ea Knack Division Snowboarding Anita Nap Skiing Austrailia Publisher Canada