36 Burst results for "Product Development"

"product development" Discussed on Amazing FBA

Amazing FBA

02:17 min | 3 weeks ago

"product development" Discussed on Amazing FBA

"You can have a beautiful landing major all of this stuff ten thousand times easier once you have a really good product and then obviously whichever really the product. You get good. Branding you get really good packaging and you have a you have a home run product and then it's all it is just showing people this exists and then once they know that this exists. You know that it's going to convert because it's a really the product and then the word of mouth do were. You're very powerful. Yeah i think what you've nailed theories is that people get obsessed with that the whole private mentality which i was told about by the way in the beginning which i know that i'm not better than this is what with people who obsessive about so that you you have errors the the guy. He's like messianic fervor and passionate is so important to have that. Because i think everyone obsessive about how to sell june june kaku lipstick on a pig. Moxie unlike us. It's not gonna fly. It's twenty twenty one. You don't sell some rubbish packaged up. Nicely unexpected conversion rate to work because all will happen is people use it. They'll get some honest reviews. God forbid that we should actually get real us and then they'll hate to and then the commission rate will then goes your economics. The finance doesn't work anymore. Say love this. This has been a whistle-stop amazing tool through the whole process. If people want to contact you mean what was the best people get in touch with you or learn more from me so Among linden meena allies. Emma in a last name is l. a. s. and then facebook is the same thing and then instagram is at egyptian underscore prescription underscore allies. So hit me up anywhere. I'm pretty available and easy to find amazing awesome Thanks for listening to the ten. K collective podcast for six and seven figure amazon sellers. I really hope you find the show. Helpful t please. Don't forget to subscribe to the show. And if you're on apple podcasts. Please do leave us. A quick star rating. It will take you all have thirty seconds to do it but it does mean we can be found by and help many more e commerce business builders i wish you fast unprofitable scaling and i hope you enjoy the process of building. Your seven was in business. Thanks very much for listening..

linden meena instagram Emma facebook amazon apple
Fresh update on "product development" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:31 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "product development" discussed on Bloomberg Businessweek

"Is really a country of great opportunity and that the American consumer would be the ultimate judge of merit that they wouldn't really care necessarily who made the product if they liked the product They would buy the product And so I was really motivated around entrepreneurship as a way to create the world I wanted to live in and create the products I wanted to see Have you found that to be the case about the American consumer I do think so I mean we this is one of the best things about being American is that we have this huge Petri dish of several 100 million consumers who can buy your product and test your products so it's a fantastic It's why we are so good at product development and marketing actually because we have this great leave the great Petri dish And so that's exactly what's happened And that's why I wanted to pursue entrepreneurship and come to Stanford So when I came out I knew that that's what I wanted to do So what's the endgame And you know it's a Bloomberg question I mean it's gotta be nice being private but having investors involved right But I mean is the ultimate goal to be a public company How do you think about it 'cause there are options today I think it used to be it was a direct path You stayed private for a long time but as soon as you could get to the public markets it doesn't have to be that way There's a lot of cash out there with investor support to keep a business going for years We see that Yeah I mean I think we're always trying to keep all options open But you know it is an independent company in the sense that our artists are independent too It's a fungible community people can come and go And I think the idea of capturing trying to capture that community inside another company is probably a little bit of a forced forced It would be for some kind of strange probably Yeah So I think of ourselves as an independent business that we're building independent company and certainly we could continue private financing orgo public and we're just preparing for both paths that we always keep we always keep ourselves prepared for both We haven't raised money in a couple of years since 2018 But you are cash flow positive What can you share with us All know that you're a private company Sure Well I can share the several $100 million in sales We are cash flow positive We are growing rapidly And we haven't even begun to tap our international markets at all In terms of you know consumer marketing or sales So I think there's a lot of rumor had to grow And finally just give us an idea of how you made it through the.

Bloomberg
"product development" Discussed on Amazing FBA

Amazing FBA

06:00 min | 3 weeks ago

"product development" Discussed on Amazing FBA

"If i was creating a plant based protein. I would go to all the vegan. You know groups on facebook at plant based groups on facebook said. Hey guys like. I'm looking for a protein. I didn't like this one that one which is describing the problem in my life. Not letting them know that i'm coming thinking of coming up with a solution out safe. What should i do. Who's who should i go to the will you know. Is there a product that has xyz like is. There is my solution even out there already. Would you buy if it's out there. And so i get the conversation going a few groups. And that's kind of you know all of the different touch points that i would go through when i'm creating a product amazing miniature colson in product development in like ten minutes. Amazing a great stuff in your very very thorough. I like the idea of talking to a physical store and his. I've i've heard various things about that. I mean some of them don't necessarily have a great sense for continuous. Some of them probably do but what they will have a centralized right because they they will really be away if they have to keep reordering x. supplement then. They'll know very well that that selling so that's really concrete bit of information. I like it. not one thing. It's wanted to pick up a one thing. You just said sort of almost impossible like you said you should be looking close but not direct competition because you shouldn't really have any competition so you should be creating a new category. Tell me a bit more about what. What do you mean by that. And how do we actually go about. doing that. sounds quite difficult to achieve some. Not really because when you're creating a solution to the problem you're you're first of all look at all the solutions out there and that you know for example we were. Let's talk about the case. Study right the new tropic off l. Turn so out there. There is coffee alternators. And you know in all you know..

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The Gen-Z Beauty Whisperer

Fat Mascara

02:09 min | 4 months ago

The Gen-Z Beauty Whisperer

"Notoriously and not. it's not notorious. that's not the right word. I guess historically mixes high and low products. Because i think we're young to have the income to be able to buy only high end products and also it's the same with skin care and the whole rise of knowing product ingredients and only buying the ordinary. Because you feel like. You're getting whatever's cheapest and what's best if you're finding something that works and it's drugstore jesse is all over that they're not gonna pay extra money for the shiny packaging. I'm so curious about mabley. No because a lot of other brands disrupters that weren't like traditional retail outlets. Yeah consumer i and maybelline was like the same as Covergirl revlon back in the day. Clearly those two brands have been struggling with honoration but wise Like do you like mabley is popular. I personally don't use many between products. I think they're finney conceal her. Because i had a family member who had bought it for me. But other than that to me i think maybe it's just their hero products that are keeping them going like almost like the mascara. Scott yes yes. Sky high one s do that alone could have made this whole year's worth of data kellyanne. Oh you mean sarah being number two for skincare. It must have been all the boom and the take talk brands. That's why they're all and maybelline was really be well. I don't know if they did that. I mean they. They helped roll with it. But like you very guerrilla ground. Oh yeah and with fell says well. Speaking of you know. Perfect gen z. Marketing elf. I think is kind of like gen z. Whisperers they've used to talk marketing. They had a sound that was really highly successful. They did that elf. Tease which we talked about a couple of weeks ago. and also just like price point and product development wise. It's like they're creating really really specialized product. They know how to listen to z. In make what they're looking for and also historically like my sister vegan. She's been vegan since she was seven. And when i was making her wear makeup because she didn't really care to where makeup and i was like. No you're my sister you must. She would only by l. because back then. That was one of the very few vegan cruelty free

Mabley Covergirl Revlon Kellyanne Maybelline Jesse Finney Scott Sarah
Empowering Individuals Consent Using NFTs and Blockchain  Insights From Acoer

Insureblocks

02:02 min | 4 months ago

Empowering Individuals Consent Using NFTs and Blockchain Insights From Acoer

"Jim thank you for joining us today. Could you please give a brief introduction to yourself our listeners. We haven't heard our first podcast. I won't eat hurry. Thank you for having me back. I appreciate your kindness. And obviously in perhaps and in retrospect foolishness bag but as you know i'm passionate by work that we do and i think is also important so happy to be back in and just talk to you by some new ideas that we have as you mentioned the core and Basically where a product development company. I really our vision. And our work is all about building useful usable. Real time technologies that can be used largely healthcare space. We have some clients matter spaces as well but but really focus on healthcare as you may remember was Formerly chief software architect centers for disease control in alaska. A number of years particular last couple years coed unfortunately being such a big issue for all of us globally. I've been heavily involved in building technologies around. They just help out. Forms and supporting specifically kind of covert response with over last year so with mayo clinic and somewhere public health so very much in this bays but but really kind of our vision. I think it is no way soon to be more efficient to more effective in i. It's just shameful to me that in the us we are so Wasteful you know when it comes to healthcare where we spent an enormous amount of money united society almost twenty percent of our gross domestic product. It goes to healthcare yet. You know we're at the bottom of the rankings. When it comes to effectiveness the bottle rankings when it comes to expense Medicine

JIM Centers For Disease Control Alaska Mayo Clinic United Society
Co-Founder of Musiio, Hazel Savage, on the Product Development Process

Code Story

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Co-Founder of Musiio, Hazel Savage, on the Product Development Process

"It's always been my sauce that we bill the thing that people wanna pay spoil and so when you very very early sort of king. What will people pay for a few dangles based on your industry knowledge about what that might be but you know the roadmap in twenty twenty one is. It's very much tied to what biggest customers are entrusted in and where they see the industry gardner where i see it going in collaboration with but i'm also thinking about what we very first started the company as a set you know. Going from search to reverse engineer tacking. There are lots of points at which you have to make a decision one way or the other and another solar. Almost misstep of mine is a remember. What the first question out with any customer smile. Aids sounds great. Does it were right. Because i just sold them magic beans and it sounds fantastic. Hey i can do all of this stuff sis question. They want to know his sound. Good does actually do the thing that you'll say so i was like greg. We gotta we gotta have some kind of demo on the website where people can get some very very quick proof of concepts and we were like. Okay what's throw the timing. Api let's away the people contest the api and they can find out that it works of. We've gone through this whole planet. We will yet and right at the point at which we will go live. I just said guys. I feel terrible about this button. I need to go back to one of our sort of poor insights. Which is if you were to draw a diagram of the oglala of music industry people who wanted product people who can coat. The overlap is almost zero. The music industry is not savvy develop a heavy industry and so i just suddenly went. The people were trying to prove this to industry people's namath. A code right at the last minute we pivoted to a coach free solution. What people can just load an mp three an instant the get the tags back soul that trust so we used our own api to build an interface and so there are many many a -tations like the swat. You have to make the uncomfortable decision of saying. I suddenly realized we're probably wrong. And i wanna lay industry insight into this for the reason intensive how you guide a product. You have to go back to what you know about the industry and you'll cori- sites and you also have to be sort of willing to question yourself and and and be wrong on on many

Gardner Greg
Talking Cell-Based Meat Regulation With Upside's Eric Schulze

Smart Kitchen Show

02:05 min | 6 months ago

Talking Cell-Based Meat Regulation With Upside's Eric Schulze

"Eric What's just get the ball rolling year here people joining and what we're going to talk about today is really a building cell. Culture meet this current state of socotra meat. And you're kind of unique experience at this intersection between building product. And regulatory which i think is really pretty fascinating so so just to kind of accept the room and introduce you your actual title or fish title. Vp product reglation foods upset food for those who don't know was formerly memphis meets. That's pretty unique combination eric. I you don't often see people running product and also running regulatory affairs for companies. Why why do you have this unique combined job. Yes great well one. I think we'll taking one step back. I have you know as we discussed you know there. We have athletes. We professional athletes your professional artists. But we don't talk about scientists profession. But i really do consider myself professional scientists working alongside other professional scientists interventional engineers so once. I think that's really important. Call out and i think what's interesting. Also you're right. You don't often put product development and regulatory affairs together but at at upside early on our co founder. Whom lady i talked and i joined in in the late seed round As employee number seven we talked about the notion of really building out a program that considered safety first and foremost in a novel foods. Space like what we're doing for for culture products and so upset so decided and we talked about this of building a product development program that had the useful constraint of the regulatory system around. How do we even arrive at that. The short version is well. I worked at the food and drug. Administration is a policymaker for both food and drugs and novel biotechnologies and i walked many companies succeed and unfortunately many not succeed because they had failed to consider the regulatory system here in the united states. Well before They designed their

Eric Memphis United States
Making Data Pipelines Self-Serve for Everyone

Data Engineering Podcast

01:47 min | 6 months ago

Making Data Pipelines Self-Serve for Everyone

"Blake. Can you start by introducing yourself. Hey thanks for having me on the podcast. I'm blake birch. And i'm the co founder of shipyard and i'm primarily focused on product development and marketing previously was leading up the data teams for a digital advertising agency where we were building into end. Data workflows automation for brands. Like sephora open table and gap happier and do you remember how you first got involved in the area of data management. So i had a interesting transition overtime. I originally was not directly involved in the data field and i was working directly as marketing manager. Actually building out and managing marketing campaigns. But a big passion of mine has always been automation. I was doing the same things again. And again and looking at the data in the same ways and realized how could i potentially take this data from services that we were working with and rob the information and analyze it in the same way every day so sort started doing that by learning sequel and from that i figured out okay well i'm manually implementing things as you probably have a way that i can directly interface with this service via like an api. And so. I started teaching myself python and gradually all that kind of itself as we were building out solutions for bid management budget management at creation and whatnot for our marketing clients. I was able to build out the data team at the advertising agency where i was really focused on trying to figure out how we could get in the right. Data initially work with clients to use proprietary data sets to better manage their marketing platforms and ultimately trying to figure out how we could drive the most value to data. We have on hand so it's been a journey so far now i'm at the stage where from some of the things that i learned previously found some opportunities that i wanted to take advantage of in the ecosystem to help make life easier

Blake Birch Shipyard Sephora Blake ROB
Can A Son Lead His Mothers Business When She Sells Exclusively to Women?

The Small Business Radio Show

02:06 min | 7 months ago

Can A Son Lead His Mothers Business When She Sells Exclusively to Women?

"We have forty one thousand investors out there that are selling beauty. They're selling wellness and they're also selling relationship ads for products so this business actually was started in nineteen three the base in our house. I was still in high school at the time. My mom founded the company and was out there because she solar niche. This whole need about people losing connection divorce rates creep in a sixty percent nobis out there communicating. Few new people needed more information on their bodies how to keep the relationship you know fresh and fun and so we have forty one thousand pastors that are during that exact same thing across the globe that are going out there in basically being like the petrous for some us in a relationship love life how to keep creativity coming back in to your relationship so i i was. I was fortunate that that my mom asked me to come into the business in two thousand Businesses doing about a billion dollars right. It was great. We had about three hundred and fifty people. I remember my mom sitting there going okay. So you know. I'm bringing you back in to come on lurking in atlanta georgia right. I'm having a great time and worked publicly traded company. There and i remember you were to come back now. I thought when. I come back and i started selling release student hansard products. This is in two thousand this list as being true today. I'm never going to get a job eating chris. What was your last job grades is. We have no no no. I'm saying people gonna ask you. Chris what was your last job. I mean this is the funniest part is that i didn't know it was going to work out the way it did when i came in patty stuck to doing product and product development and training a mindless strategy. Growth vision. Where we going. And either we really set back and dividing the concord in taking the company every asked what is the secret and the secret was we literally moment. I got in hugh hall and went from city to city to city in in looking for people that want to own and operate their business. You know they use the word side-hustle. Today i love the fact we've been new inside. House aligns their nineteen

Atlanta Georgia Chris Patty Hugh Hall
Daniel Martin Talks Tatcha and the Royal Wedding

Look Behind The Look

02:28 min | 8 months ago

Daniel Martin Talks Tatcha and the Royal Wedding

"So daniel. Thank you so much for joining me today. I am very. I've been wanting to have you on forever I just started this. in september. and one of my best friends is troy and nathaniel. And they they were like yeah. When are you having daniel on and so much better you in the city. Yes oh my god we yeah. I live on the upper west side. Oh okay we're we're getting together. I'm half vaccinated. So he to me totally okay. So we're we're definitely getting together. I can't lay god. I can't believe we're talking about like that now like it's happening we're actually able to plan like summer and spring get togethers. It's very a turning that cova corner. So my god thank god covid for you has been kind of interesting because you were blessed with this position at tasha. Yes hiding out did that. How did that come to fruition. Had been in the works before. Call it oak. Yeah yeah totally so I saw vicki of gosh. I wanna say it was the summer before the new year and She was like look this and it was during the time of the acquisition with her with now unilever. Okay and It just came out of the blue. And i was like well. I'm on contract with dior and on his beauty and you would have to. You know for me to accept this. You have to get me. You know basically me out of my contract and then see yeah. She came back in there like we can. And at this point. I was six years in with your three years. In honest i have such an incredible relationships with brands but i was always able to play with with tasha because they knew my history with vicky. They knew that in both were exclusive. They were non-exclusive able to have my hands with other brands. That were non compete okay so very fortunate to have that opportunity but at that point i was like i kinda. You know it'd be. I would love to get in full time so to speak to really get into product development education. And just kinda slow my roll down.

Daniel Nathaniel Troy Vicki Unilever Dior Tasha Vicky
Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:35 min | 10 months ago

Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

"Henry donahue is the executive director of save the music a national nonprofit that helps students schools and communities reach their full potential through the power of making music prior to save the music. Henry was the ceo and head of partnerships at purpose a digital strategy and creative agency that focuses on social impact projects. Notable clients included every town for gun safety the aclu oxfam international. The ford foundation nike. I- kia audi and liverpool f c. Henry has also worked as a media. Executive focused on digital product development is held senior positions at discover conde nast primedia and lendingtree dot com spent most of the nineteen nineties on the road across the usa as a fundraiser for political candidates including us senators. Jay rockefeller from west virginia. And ron wyden from oregon at the same time. He was playing guitar in an indie rock band and running into small independent record label. Henry has an abbey in american history from harvard college and an mba from darden graduate school of business at the university of virginia henry. Great to have you with us. Sharing the story of save the music and the lessons contained within the be here could see joe thanks. Hey i'm delighted to have you. So why don't we start sharing with our listeners. The origin story of save the music. What was the germ of its mission and tell us a little bit about the journey. Yeah i mean safe. The music's mission and vision are the same today as they were back. joni urine. John sykes aretha franklin one. Dvd's categories aretha flying sleep dion and Every student every public schools should be making music as part of their education. I think you had a great overview of why at the intro. We know for decades of research that when schools have music students do better. The school does better. The community does better In normal times. I travel all around the country even in the toughest schools when you get to that band room or that choir room. You know. it's that joy and inspiration and hope for the future and all those things. So i i love going to high schools middle schools elementary schools. I love interacting advanced features van kits. It's amazing the landscape out there. Is that most schools in the. Us do have music as part of their school day. there's a quote for geoffrey canada That i'm sure i'm angling but it's something to the effect of if you wanna see what a quality education looks like. Look what rich people do about. Eighty percent of american schools have music and art as part of their school day And the programs that caught over the years. And we're we do. Most of our work are in schools that serve black students immigrant students and in rural rural students as well. What do you love about your job. Henry donahue because you loved this i love so it you you mentioned. I mean i've worked in politics and advocacy and social impact in various ways for for a long time You know at purpose Which some of your listeners might be familiar with worked on gun safety. We worked on marriage. Equality we worked on A project involving immigrants and You know the fight for the fifteen dollars minimum wage. All of which were were were deeply deeply satisfying. But when chris mccarthy who's the guy runs. mtv now came to me in we had this conversation about the h. one. Save the music which five six years ago you know still had a very solid sort of core group of program team people working there doing amazing work but has sort of been what i call know an orphan corporate asset on. Cbs empire. You know. I was presented with the opportunity to do the thing that i did for my job. Which was you know corporate impact strategy advocacy and combined with the thing that i spent my whole life in love with which which is music. Which by the way you. You don't have the benefit of seeing henry. But i do. And i see a keyboard. And i see a guitar so yeah. This is a music guy. You're a. You're a an advocate Andrew musician and you get to do both in the same job. That's pretty awesome. Yeah i think this is sort of at the core of was eighth. music does Which is i remember myself as a pretty angry and somewhat directionless

Henry Donahue Henry Aclu Oxfam International Kia Audi Conde Nast Primedia Darden Graduate School Of Busi University Of Virginia Henry Joe Thanks John Sykes Aretha Franklin Lendingtree Jay Rockefeller Ford Foundation Ron Wyden Harvard College Liverpool West Virginia Joni Dion Oregon
Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:04 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

"Hello and welcome to muscat. Etv cly this morning. We're going to be joined by anthony. Stevens found the ncaa of six. This rise five million dollars. So we'll found out. Sort of the six clicks story and what they're gonna do with the money and then we're going to be crossing to the us. How should be logging in Greg ostrovsky at who is the original. Ti guys at don mx and stephen elliott program bonds president with day. Say so we're going to be looking at their application late security and then get some epic market insights from they say is wells but let me bring in anthony stevens search and founder of six anthony. Thanks for joining us. Thanks chris grads vanish wonderful and it was not so easy to get you on as well so i appreciate you coming on Five million dollars. What are you gonna do with it. Now let's start with them. It's quite a bit. We can have a really. Let's let's start with six clicks the platform that you put together and Yeah then now once you sort of rising the top of money. It sounds lucky. Ready to to expand out in the way fan at six backing twenty nine saying Mission was to was to build a technology platform to help businesses with risk and compliance particularly around Major issues locks obscurity privacy. So we did that. What mike sue platform particularly unique is the fact that it's been designed to be used by vases as well so We had a fantastic twenty twenty securing a number of partnerships with some of the biggest names in town saab pure security. A number of Oversight weaver is rice capital now to to global expansion. Is this your first rice. Is it like a series. I or is it privately. Funded years privately-funded. We've raised To win a million becca july last year so we sort of saw that as as precede round so you could call this a lodge saved around or early series. I am not as there's lots of different is described as things but yeah so it was probably founded. We were we were subscribed within a wake side Fantastic support and kids coming incentive pickle interested to invest and get part of what we're doing one of the taglines in the media release was on your whites becoming a unicorn. How has your you'll night is that just a pi. We'd been something in there. I think looking we've got. We've wasted a huge amount of opportunity here as amazing. I think it's way proudly as buys to and supporting the innovation sector in sort of technology around the world Uh think if we continue as we are we've got we've got every shot and i think is You know those sorts of aspirational goals I only have Up sawed in my experience you modest well shoot for those things and if you will join you probably doing pretty well to look at ways. Six has come from because it is a pretty good story. Considering launched in a few years ago twenty teens. So yeah that took a story the platform what you're doing and yet and then there's a bit of here is will. Yeah so we Sipa fully sort of founded a business at the start of twenty nine saying we spent most of the twenty nine saying period in product development developing us strategy looking at the market. Where can where we wanted to focus. launched up product in the market basically around christmas time. Twenty nine saints the twenty twenty and as we all know why I wake or ten weeks later. We were we were into And during that period. I think we Fantasies into position where we really need to focus. And we focused on the saab security improv. Assi market is i Big area of focus ferguson and looked and said the largest plasma successful plaza and the highest profile applies in that market not identified united. The locks of Security trust wide number of allah's Focused on establishing ships with is organizations to help them streamline This livery model. But also the provide technology today clause to help their clot sweets uplifting. Saab security Themselves that proved very successful for assaulted and thus partnerships were suitable september last year. And from there we've just with tons of demand and set up offices in the aci which is in the us as well. We've come from top full fem. Which obviously gave you that market in saw your sounds like a very well connected as well. So that's obviously helped. You already had those relationships moving forward so they kind of knew what you were doing. Yeah yeah i was. I was only pot. Chief digital officer at kpmg in my job was to think about the intellectual property across the fame. Likely globally and hal. We would back into software as a way to provide innovation to clients. And i guess that experience i and Appointed you around science technology. Lock zero has done for the canning industry where businesses use zero as an accounting system. But i also engage with it accountants to help them in that process on the same platform and it became clear to me that we needed when they did something like that. For risk compliance and helping organizations and advises shift off united spreadsheets and word documents. And stuff like that. So

Greg Ostrovsky Don Mx Anthony Stevens Chris Grads Mike Sue Anthony Stephen Elliott Muscat Stevens Ncaa United States Sipa Saints Ferguson Saab United Kpmg
Why CMOs Get Fired: Results Do Not Equal No Results Plus An Excuse

Lochhead on Marketing

08:31 min | 10 months ago

Why CMOs Get Fired: Results Do Not Equal No Results Plus An Excuse

"Do not equal no results plus an excuse one of things. I love about sales by way of example is sales is pretty binary. Yeah they're make your number you miss your number or exceed your number and in sales if you miss your number couple of quarters in a row two quarters out of four you just gotta start being worried about your job and if you're a ceo. Certainly ceos of public companies. Don't get to miss very many quarters. And even if you're a private company you don't wanna be missing your numbers and so at the end of the quarter. The ceo has to stand up and tell the world and investors. How the company did that quarter and the interesting thing. If you're a public company is wall street doesn't give a shit why you missed the numbers. So if you're not he hitting or beating your numbers every quarter. They don't care. It's like the like a kid that sticks us their fingers in the net. We're not listening. They're just gonna tank your stock and if you're going you're going into the penalty box for a two minute minor and if it was a really big miss it'll be a five minute major. Those are hockey terms. If you're not familiar with hockey and so as a ceo you live and die by the numbers every quarter and as a head of sales chief revenue officer vp assails Whatever whatever whatever title is head of sales That's true too and the reality is that should be true in marketing as well so results do not equal no results plus excuse and i knew that i was getting somewhere in my life in terms of training myself to produce results when i didn't even give a shit about my own excuses so when you can't stand your own excuses for For not producing results. You're probably getting somewhere okay. So now this sort of leads us to the question. Okay so what. What are the marketing results that matter because there's lots of things that marketing do you could say. Oh we build a new website that that that's a result it might matter. It might not matter but it's definitely a result so let's talk about the results that matter i think at the highest level. There's only three things that marketing organizations should be focused on number one design and dominate category. That matters number to drive revenue near term mid and longterm and number three create enduring value as measured by market cap or company valuation. We wanna be creating the most valuable company in a category. That matters okay. So let's just hit those three things again number. One design dominated a category. That matters number to drive. Revenue and number three create enduring value as measured by company value market cap valuation and ultimately our objective is to become the most valuable company in the category. That's how you know you're the category queen now. If you focused on just those three results it can be very clarifying on a number of dimensions. And i'll get to that in a sec. Let's talk about why those three things matter so much number one design dominate category. That matters i think that is the seminal be hag the seminal focus of the entire executive team and frankly company itself and if your company's not focused on that i don't know what you're doing number to drive revenue you know there's a lot of cmo's who get all wrapped around the axle about leads or sales off the website or this or that or the other look creating leads driving revenue in the business. These are not hard things you got to go. Do them the work that the doing of the work is real work. But it's not rocket surgery So if you need to drive revenue you probably need traffic to your website. So go to the traffic store and buy some and get really good at converting traffic into customers. And there's a million marketing podcasts and books and and all sorts of tools and tricks and tips we can do to drive revenue but the bottom line is as marketers. We have to be illu air. Wars and ground wars the high level strategic steph and the ground level revenue tactical stuff in the truth. Is you gotta do both. It's not an either or it's a both and legendary. Cmo's particularly when you start your new job. go to the driving revenue. I if you want to score points internally drive some revenue sit down with your head of sales. You're ceo and say what do we need to do to create massive revenue upside problems in this company and get busy on that if you get overly focused on the strategic particularly early on in your tenures cmo. You're probably in for deep shit so design and dominate a category that matters that's the medical driving revenue if there's no revenue the medical won't matter. We need to put food on the family. As george w bush said so put food on the family legendary. Cmo's drive revenue and then enduring value. This is also the objective of the entire executive team but marketing needs to be focused on it. We want to be the most valuable company over a long period of time in a category that matters and We're the category queen of that Category all right so these things are very clarifying because you can look at any execution any activity any investment Any new hire that you're doing in marketing and ask yourself the question. Does this one design and dominated new category that matters to drive revenue and three create enduring value. And if it doesn't don't do it stop doing it. Just don't fuck do it. now. I've sat in the cmo chair. I know there's a lot of things that are distracting. I think the cmo gets pushed and pulled in ways that some other c. level executives do not and so there's a couple things i'll you to number one. Marketing is not an internal service bureau. This idea that marketing has internal customers. I'll marketings here. Just depart the business You know sales our customer. That's insanity marketing is the business. It doesn't support the business now. Yes marketing does need to work with sales. Es marketing does need to work with engineering and product development and product management and so forth of course and in that context every department needs to work with every other department but if we are at the beck and call of these other departments and they ring the bell and we salivate then. We're going to be in a constant state of stimulus response so be very very careful about allowing yourself to get turned into an internal service bureau. That's one Another one is a lot of marketers. Cmo's even ceo's get very focused on the competition. Let's say the competition announces some cool new thing they do so they re a bunch of money or they launch a new product or whatever it is people get very focused on the competition. They start talking about the competition. You don't want that shit in your head the more you talk about the competition internally or god forbid sternly the worse off. You're going to be now. I'm not saying you should be ignorant about what they're doing. I'm not saying that at all but you don't want them living in your head rent free. You want to live in their head rent free. So don't be overly focused. Be smart. Be savvy be knowledgeable but not overly focused on competition another area. We get distracted. A lot in marketing is typically The cmo and the leaders of the marketing organization get a lot of help. Because everybody's marketing expert. Everybody saw an ad The super bowl. They thought was awesome. And they wanna tell us about it or they see something that someone else is doing in the text or email that thing and they say oh. We should do that. We should do this and we should do that. And so marketing. I think gets a lot more help the. Cfo doesn't get that much saying help. In air quotes right the. Cfo does not get that much help about like how to close the quarter. All right she's in charge. She does it and You know the head of engineering isn't emailing the cfo. Saying this is how she she should closed. Quarters books whereas as the head of marketing we get those emails a lot and so don't forget everybody thinks they're an expert and they're

Hockey CMO SEC George W Bush Super Bowl
David Paull On Behavioural Storytelling

Leadership and Loyalty

05:48 min | 10 months ago

David Paull On Behavioural Storytelling

"Its well known that today's customers and employees far more sophisticated far more astute than ever before. Today's customers and employees are far more informed. But how can you make sure that they are correctly. Informed moreover ethically informed in such a way that they become evangelical about your organization about your brand about what you do. We'll stay tuned because that's exactly where we're going. You see our guest on today's episode. Is david poll. Now david pull is the founder of lillian. Labs and dial smith. David's air experienced davies. Lives at the strange and powerful intersection between sales marketing and research. You see lilly. Labs lillian. labs drama lillian. Labs is a quantitative research agency specializing in concept product and message testing while dial smith technology. That's used to capture real time opinion moment to moment to understand people's motivations and predict their behavior. His company's technology has among other things worked on getting instant feedback on. Us presidential debates specifically on what moves an audience at any specific time. David is team have helped media companies and customer product giants test and refine that products from concept testing and product development to content research and pilot testing. David has developed a communication framework called behavioral storytelling. Which will go into in quite a bit of detail that helps you to craft stories and narratives designed to influence them persuade based on how people process information and make decisions. David is also a sought after speaker and has presented repeatedly at story conference insights sociation. Many other research industry events ladies and gentlemen. Please put your hands together and helping da. Thank you thank you for having me and for that very very generous introduction. You're very welcome. David now where we always like to start. The show is by asking this question in this world. Full of influences in social media. And everybody's everybody's an employer and every every minute dogs and expert. Who is somebody who's been had a major influence on you who somebody who's really impacted your leadership and it may be somebody that we have never heard over net would know. Maybe it is. But maybe isn't that's a good question. I mean certainly a lot of the big names that people would know but for me. Most influential was a manager. That i had when i moved from more traditional Outside sales which is where. I started my career into market research and i was brought in to lead an organization and i was a little young in a little green at the time. Frankly i think part of part i think was by salesmanship was part of how i got the gig in the first place so i had to grow into it a little bit and i was also very ambitious and i was pushing pushing pushing. Not only those who are working with me and for me but also those above me to help me grow throughout the organization and I remember it very clearly. One day this manager of mine. Who i really liked and respected. He took me aside and he said one word to me and that word was patience. Just wanted to slow me down a little bit and remind me that The value of patients is tremendous not only with those on the team and the speed with which we have to get things done but also for my own sake and really taking things one step at a time not trying to leapfrog things and really just taking breath and being more patient and of all the lessons i've had in my career and there have been many. That's the one that i keep coming back to. I find most often when i find myself. Getting a little revved up a little anxious and wanting to push things a little harder. I just remember the that word in that moment because it really did help me a lot. It really grounded me and change the way. I looked at things and from there. I think my career path was actually smoother and and everything progressed at a very a very nice reasonable peso. How old were you when you got the advice. I got that advice in my early thirties. Because that's pretty solid advice. No doubt about it but it's pretty hard advice to swallow when you when we're young because when we young it's like everything's in hurry and i've been in. I've been in outside sales my whole career. I've been wrestling since a teenager working in managing retail through college. And then i went right into outside sales literally knocking on office doors and getting thrown out of office building so Came up the hard way through sales and you really can't be terribly patient with that. You've got a quota to make and your incomes based on command. Go go go.

Lillian David David Pull Lilly Davies Smith United States Wrestling
HOW TO DEVELOP THE #1 SKILL TO BECOME GREAT AT SALES

The Brutal Truth About Sales and Selling

07:02 min | 11 months ago

HOW TO DEVELOP THE #1 SKILL TO BECOME GREAT AT SALES

"What do we do with sales people. Aren't we like professional communicators and communication a performance and we have good days bad days. Good calls bad calls and we tend to fall into traps. Talk too much. Listen to little here things. We want to hear say things. We want to say that we're gonna talk about today. We've got an expert on this. Someone who's focused on helping sales reps and he now works in enablement and i think that is an overlooked part of the company sometimes just administration. I understand that but other times it's coaching training. Developing us helping us become better. I think you going to enjoy this conversation. And let's get right into it. Hey aaron welcome to the show way getting started gives a little background on yourself fussy. Thanks for having me on massey finals. Brian videos for very very long time. You will keep your leafy suburbs somewhere to look into fine My name's erin evans. I work for an organization called global. Data will the. Uk's fastest growing business intelligence company. My history is very much in sales. Enablement be look after the south function in For global data which is about four hundred and fifty people globally. I spent the nas thirteen years. Doing it always wants to sell in sales apron before it was cool with south ableman bs. That's that's a bit about me. Yeah it kind of had where everyone kind of unified around that term. What what was it called before then at least in your experience like missed a plate spinner basically is like a bit of every here to give it to him. He'll get it done exactly. He was like you will the cats Yeah my background. At a spice. My expertise is south. Trading south coaching probably more towards south coaching than anything else big believer in coaching. But yeah many everything from you know. Being the conduit between products marketing silos all the development or the coaching. All the training. That takes place. But when you're looking at off the four hundred fifty people between to do enough different hats and often absorb different responsibilities as well. And what interested you in that. Role versus staying in product development marketing or going directly as a route. Well it was in silence. I was in south not for too long but it was. It was really interesting station. I worked for was a huge multinational corporate. I started selling. And then i started helping people while i was selling very quickly realized that i was probably about helping people. Don i wasn't selling right. I was particularly bad at selling. I'm so very quickly. They transitioned into a raw which was a management role but then they realize that actually we can sort of scope this rolling out and get you dig more support trading coaching the rest of the organization. This value dana. So a love silos obsessively not cells. I left communication in general You know what can up so happy to wear the sows hot sometimes. But not not just the prospect of your head spring of the pillow every morning and your jaw assault job is to make some better than they were yesterday. And what what more do you want to do in life right. It's like it's such a such bonds in silence as well. It becomes even more interesting sign. And what do you think that came from was something through school or sports or growing up. Or i think of. I've always been obsessed communication since i can remember. Actually since i was a very very small chart have always been really interested in communication. How people talk the psychology of talking. I realized quite quickly that he he simplify certain things. If he can say things in a certain way you can get people to buy it and you can get people to do things differently and that fascinated me and a genuine and driven by helping people making people better as well seeking if you like the people because automating doug like you have to plaster smaller. You're facing your but particularly if you like people that that it becomes great and it gets for me like where wherever we've got a kick is working with young people because we're teaching them siles right. You don't really what you're teaching them. As communication you see every aspect of their life get better for being able to communicate better For me it's such a body such a kick out of it when you see people doing better in life. it's not just better in sales. And i'm not trying to kind of desperately scrape the nobility of what i do. I genuinely feel like you make people better human beings by making the better communicating. And what are they typically bad at as far as communication is it what they say is that they don't stop saying it or is it they they not using and understanding the other person's perspective so really really good question. She is a question are really enjoy answering. Because i think there's a multitude of different things in its light as well particularly as people progressing sales. When first starting cells you've got this obstruction of thousands. Which would you pick up the phone. Just talk people nights. It's really really far from that. Listening is the biggest one. I think the probably about fifty percent of most sales problems or sales organizations problems is both internally and externally in inability to listen correct. I think on top of that. It's taking quite complex ideas and stripping awhile the nonsense making it really easy for people to see value Get into the speed about value. Really quickly people see. Value quickly is really important but also another big thing is questioning. I think i think people really sold to people buy something from themselves if you can facilitate that process re fantastic questioning. Which in large part is listening. Then you've got the kind of burdens of a real quality. Salesperson person who saw real quality communicates notice people stay in sales. They progress as they become managers coaches. Ceo's directors unite and dot communication pc son critical. And when you meet a rap how do you go about determining where they are in their development. The first thing. I check for his credibility. If someone isn't coach -able you basically get spend the next hour banging your head against a brick wall so i'd like to ask a lot of meta cognition questions to get them thinking about thinking on getting them to explain how they think about things and very quickly you can get insight into how comfortable they are so to give some practical examples to your listeners. One of the best ways of doing this sparring listening in the interview stage as sporting country. But it's to be stage because somebody's comfortable you leftover lemon for the next six months. You know however long. Isn't he get rid of him right

Erin Evans Massey Siles Aaron Brian Dana UK DON Doug United States
The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

Fat Mascara

07:25 min | 11 months ago

The (Beauty) Business of Philanthropy with Karissa Bodnar

"Lot of people you know. They write gen generals and they say i wanna be in. You know this part of the business. How do i get there and to be really honest. I don't always know how to respond. Because you know. I know where i am in the business and i know the steps that i took but You know they might say. I wanna be a perfumer. I wanna start my own liner. I wanna be a makeup artist. And i don't always know how to respond How how would you respond to a question like that because for you. You didn't know how to get to where you were but you got there. What was the thing that means you get. There was just focus or asking around. Like how did you get to where you are. Oh it's such a great question just so specifically to being beauty product developer. I took any job. I could get in the beauty industry and ben was always looking at it through the lens of okay. I'm a makeup artist right now. But how would i create a product. Let me learn everything i can about. Let me google got ingredient. Means if i don't have access to expert and really a lot of it is just that passion coming through. And i think when i got hired on xtra. Sonic graduated from college. I got my foot in the door always with an eye. I wasn't directly to impact development. When i started but it was always expressing how much i wanted to be in product development so then when i finally got the chance i was like i am not gonna let this go by and i think just so many of the skills when you're starting out in your career or transferable whether it's product development or marketing and so at the end of the day when you're first starting out a lotta censure making power points on spreadsheets. You're you're doing a lot of a lot of tasks that you can. You can transfer But i would say a showing that initiative in the passion for whatever you want to do so for me. It was product development. I think people will pick up on that and they'll wanna mentor. You okay. that's really great advice. Okay thank you. plus your husband's a product developer. So we have to save his his advice matches up with choruses. I'm gonna ask him later. He jesse my husband. I meant chris's husband or something. Yes yes i. I just think it's interesting because i really do feel sometimes a little bit after somebody writes. I don't know how you feel john. Somebody writes us like why be x. Person i don't really know if i'm giving them the best advice I can just tell them how. I reached my thing but yeah like absorb as much as you can express your interest to anyone who will listen. I wanna be you know here and hopefully you know not everyone is going to care and take you under their wing. Unfortunately that's the reality but somebody will know somebody will hear what you're interested in that i'll tell you this person or that's and showing expressing that interest but i just think it's awesome that you did know that you wanted to do product development and you just kept on finding away you know that. Make up artists to product of outbursts. Such a cool trajectory. We don't always hear that on fat mascara t tell us more. Let's keep going. Let's keep going into your story. Yes well and and i do have to say like i recognize what a gift it was that i knew that when i was so young. And not everybody's past and so what i do want to say is that first of all. I don't have all the answers. Second of all you're never too young and you're never too old to be who you always be so you can always invites You know you can always change your mind and at the end of the day my wife and my driver is philanthropy that i get to do every single day. Our incredible employees in product development. Like i get to do the thing that i have dreamt of doing my entire life so i feel really blessed awesome. It's very inspiring. You're never too young. Says like twenty eight year olds for you when you when you started your company. Well that's that's the funny thing about the term ceo. I'm such a work in progress right i. i'm. I'm absolutely not oh come on to answer. The question pat started. I believe was twenty-five but please it's a person. Thank you so much. Yeah you know. it's funny. I have really long hair out saving. Cut it for over a year. Oh my gosh. Look the pandemic who and i have always had longer hair in one of the things i love to do as locks of love but i was actually just talking to some of our team members about it. I said you know to me when i when i started writing. Cosmetics is really tried to look older because nobody really took me. I like to wear that right Cut my hair shorter to look more mature. And look more like i could fit in manhattan and everything like that but So so now. Having longer hair is like. I'm by thirties. Now and i can have longer hair but you know it was the. I've made plenty of mistakes an absolutely a work in progress. But it's i've had a lot of grace From from people around me throughout this journey can can. I ask you about when you started this company. I mean from the very beginning you know. Social good was sort of baked into the premise. Right yes can you tell us about why that is if and do you think that's a necessity of every business. These days or was that was that unique. That the time that you did it. So i'm not here to say what other people should do for their business. But i can absolutely say that my y. End what has truly been in. The dna of thrive cosmetics from the very beginning is our philanthropy giving back that we do from the very beginning. When i started the business in two thousand fifteen that every time somebody bought a product we would be giving back and now it's grown bigger than i ever dreamed given over one hundred million dollars worth of products. Now it feels it feels so surreal to say it out loud dollars. Isn't that crazy. But honestly it's thanks to our customers. Our community are giving partners and our boys are are giving powered by our community which you know our employees have a say in who we give back to our customers have a say in how we give back and that's why it's when a say do have like vote. How does that work literally are if you want to tell us a charity that you want us to give back to. You can go on five. Cosmetics dot com and we have a giving page where you could nominate a giving partner. And then we do have internal giving committees. You know in the beginning when it was just a couple of us in a room working together and shipping product and everything like that we mer service all same time as worshiping product of everybody went to every single giving events and We're involved directly with every Charity and we want it now that our company has grown from an employee perspective. We wanna make sure that our employees are still involved so people do have the option of one nominating a charity that they want us to give to whether they're an employee a customer or somebody who's never bought from us but they just in our our community and then also we haven't internal Committee where people any employees no matter what department their engine joined the committee.

BEN Jesse Google Chris John PAT Manhattan
How to Choose a Safe Seat for Your Baby to Eat with High Chair Designer Kirsti Vandraas

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

07:07 min | 11 months ago

How to Choose a Safe Seat for Your Baby to Eat with High Chair Designer Kirsti Vandraas

"Today. We're talking about the seat in which your baby learns how to eat. That's right highchairs. And when it comes to hide your design there is no one more well known for icon design in this space than peter obstacle of norway. Peter offset designed the trip trap highchair in one thousand nine hundred seventy two. When he looked around for a chair that allowed his son to sit in a natural way at the grownups table and because nonesuch chair existed he designed what is now known as the iconic trip chair basically so he could include his son in as he says life round the table. So many of you may have this chair that trip trap or recognize it. It's sometimes like to a ladder so the trip trap is a wooden chair with an adjustable seat and adjustable footplate and grows with your child so the company that peter designed it for which is called. Shutt- is headquartered in norway. And they've actually sold more than twelve million trip trap as so it is one of the. Most globally recognized chairs. Personally i love this chair. I have in us seven of the trip traps around the table for my seven children. They've really been fabulous investment wonderful. Especially if you have a smaller space where you're feeding your baby or babies or if you're feeding multiples it's wonderful because it has a much smaller footprints like not one of those highchairs. It's gonna take up your kitchen. So while peter fix trip trap was designed and launched in one thousand nine hundred ninety two when his son was little forty years later in twenty thirteen obstacle launched. Another chair called the nomi and this was really his realization of his vision for designing the next generation highchair one. That's dedicated to his grandchildren. So peter obstacles now eighty one at the time of this recording. He continues to work every day. And cures deep vandross is a physiotherapist and an ergonomic who works very closely with peter. In fact she's worked with peter object for the last thirteen years. So kirsty is going to be on the podcast today. Sharing peter's vision and philosophy about the chairs that he originally designed for his child and his grandchildren. Now that millions of families of used around the world. So if you have a trip trap or a nomi- or if you're in the market for a highchair that will continue to serve your family and your child long after these initial stages of starting solids. I think you're really going to enjoy this interview. Because the scandinavian design principles and the philosophies held by peter and explained today by st are so very different from what we may have in mind when we go to select a seat for our baby to learn how to eat so today on the podcast. Kirstin i are going to be talking about the difference in american and european safety standards. Why norwegian families do not actually strap their babies of their toddlers into the degree or the extent that americans may think is necessary. This is going to be very eye opening for a lot of you certainly was for me as kind of a control freak. Mom we'll be chatting about why the trip trap and the nomi were designed with the very obvious absence of trey and what that means. and then. How the adjustable foot rest is probably the most important safety and design component missing from most highchairs today. So i hope you enjoy this interview with cure. Steve andros from the peter obsta company. Kirsty thank you so much for joining us. I am so excited to have the opportunity to interview you. It's catching get now. If you can. Would you tell us a little bit about your background. And how you know the whole life story maybe. How did you get into product design. And then how did you come to. Work with. Peter ops vic. Oh it's a long story. I am a physiotherapist anais. I started working in our major hospital here in in ostler with people with back and neck problems you know. People came into the hospital more or less paralyzed with pain and never thought they would be able to come up and walk again and with a treatment lots of guidance we build them up again and they went home and they were fine and had a lotta for knowledge with how to behave to avoid back and neck problems then. I saw that it was difficult for them. To use to knowledge they had when they went back to back. So i sold our institution equivalent to osha would been interesting place to work to see if i was able to get other people to create positive working environments where you could work but still keep your health so i spent ten years in our show in charge of ergonomics and then i started sinking. What about getting into detail. The totality because their via opium much more than chair tables but share and tables reports on the totality and. I wanted to see if we could make chairs in such way that you didn't talk to have problems with your body after sitting. Who working so. I started working ritual. Company that developed sitting solution for the working person unlock was contested. Interesting period thomas there for six teen years and then i met peter ops week. One of a number of designers. We used not process another lost twelve years. We're solely read. Peter and peter's sir designs promoting them talking about taking part in the product development. So that was a long story. But you know the background and How i ended up here. And you're still actively working with peter. Is that correct. Yes yes wonderful. Can you tell us a little bit about the history of the design of the trip trap and then the nomi highchairs and especially with regard to promoting freedom and fellowship. The trick drop chair was developed in the beginning of the seventies piotre just had his son wounding sixty nine will sitting on an ordinary highchair s. You know the high chair has been around for for generations. you know egypt. They use highchair. the hunt. Chance in their mini is an pizza hut his son sitting in hijab but then when he reached a year and a half you know he didn't really need to sit with the sort of support all around his waist. He was looking for other chairs that he could place his son around the table together with the rest of the company that did not exist so he had to make his own amber trip chapels but one then in nineteen seventy two and i think he did something very clever back then because he did not make it to fit into what you call the design of the seventies he had the distinct bischel feature in the seventies and the result is that the chair still look quite Modern had he designed it giving it the visual design of what the kitchen look like. Back in nineteen seventy two. It would have been outdated very old looking chair today.

Peter Peter Obstacle Shutt Norway Peter Object Steve Andros Peter Obsta Company Nomi Peter Ops Vic Vandross Kirsty Kirstin Trey Peter Ops Osha Piotre Thomas Egypt
Trader Joe's Seeds the Conversation About Plants & Plant-Based Products

Inside Trader Joe's

07:21 min | 11 months ago

Trader Joe's Seeds the Conversation About Plants & Plant-Based Products

"Plants and plant based products are certainly in these days. I remember the time when if you put the word vegan on a package it could actually hurt its sales. I swear there are things that we put the word vegan that afterwards. We're like what we do that because we killed it but maybe in the last five years in certainly more intensely in the last couple of years. We've seen this tremendous increase in customer interest for plant based foods. We have a new guest on the podcast today. I m amy. I am a category manager of a few different categories within our store deli fresh beverage and meet meatless an seafood in the frozen set. You head a lot of plant based things that are kind of obviously plant faced right like like the the juice shots for example you also manage what we call these meat analogues. The turkey lists protein patties and the protein patties. They don't say beef louis but there. That's kind of implied right. There has been huge growth in the meatless set. These new iterations of products are really going after the flexible -tarian customer and as people are looking for ways to have a healthier lifestyle improve their overall general health but then a better impact to the environment or incorporating meat. Free days meatless. Mondays in those sorts of things so these products really target customers that want the full meet experience but just a better version of it sweatshirt this as a better version of the full meet experience. Please don't i know it's implied. Did the two product types classic meat or now. New meatless does the product development sort of inform one category over the other. Like we gotta have a meatless bacon because we sell so much regular bacon or or does it work independent of what sells well in the traditional meet category. That's a great question. The new products that were developing our specific target to what does well in the meat or seafood set or chicken. For example i mean great tenders new sausage product that eats differently than our older or i should say first generation sausage links that we have. It wasn't that long ago when when we had to sort of change our expectations and we'd often wind up saying that's pretty good for vegan or vegetarian. Or an analog a stand in and now i feel like the products have changed to the point. Where oftentimes it's like. whoa. I wouldn't have known that was vegan. If you didn't tell me these days you see especially at fast. Food chains and in restaurants Like fried chicken. That actually looks like chicken. Sausage that eats tastes like sausage. It's gone beyond the burger to all those other food products that people normally crave And to get that texture in by it's really a lot more complicated than most people assume otherwise it tastes rubbery or it doesn't have that richness. doesn't cook the same to. That's been keep in mind that some of the proteins remain raw looking as opposed to really cooking and having the char in the grill so that you get that full experience not just the flavor the texture and the presentation of it. You don't have to give up your burger to have something plant based you can still enjoy those comfort foods. You just eat less calories or less fat for that occasion and you're doing something good for yourself and for the environment at the same time. Mimic mimic Animal based products. What's what sort of a holy grail product that you've not seen yet that that you're interested in in having developed bacon is one of them but then also a range of charcuterie. I have yet to really try anything that does well as far as texture and flavor. That's it's kind of more rubber which is a plant based material could could qualify fifteen years ago. I wasn't interested in picking up something that said vegan. Because experience told me it wasn't gonna taste very good. A great things taste good now. Oh they absolutely do. And even beyond just the meatless items the dips and dressings and whatnot with implant based cream cheese. I mean you would never know that you weren't eating a full cream. Cheese product tastes. It has the same mouth. Feel the same flavor profile the dips are at. That's an interesting topic because we've we've approved a number of them recently. Have i'm we're very excited to that. We have to zeki and a caramelized onion as well. That will launch in two thousand and twenty one and within panel. I wanna say everybody agreed that they actually tasted better or the same as a full dairy version. So you'd be hard pressed to differentiate them in a blind tasting. I don't think you could necessarily tell what else in the in the world of plant based stuff is top of mind for you or interesting things. You're looking forward to or. I'm looking to do more work on the seafood side. We don't have options yet within our stores for a plant based seafood product. But they're crabcakes out on the market or scallops ortona replacement so really looking more at the seafood to make sure that we've covered all of the proteins that customers are familiar with and bringing in the best versions of those. We have every single meal covered. We have breakfast options with links and patties we have burgers for lunch or even replacements for something as popular as our orange chicken so we've got a full spectrum so that you don't have to pick and choose which meal you can really incorporate it throughout your day or your week and really find what you're looking for ten years from now it will look completely different again know when you can mimic those flavors and textures. That people really love to have as part of their diet. Then they can feel freer to say okay. I'm going to have less meat in my diet. I'm not going to become a complete vegan vegetarian but maybe this day. I won't eat meat this day. I will absolutely. And i think it's becoming almost cool to say that you're you know you eat plant. Based that it's becoming more acceptable. More understood. people are trying new things so protein patties to sort of beef analog protein patties the texture is a little too soft for me for eating on a bun. Texture is a really big part of something being delicious or not Even though it's not flavor. I think one of our adams that we've really nailed on. Texture is the meatless meatballs. It's one of my family favorite items and we use it as a substitute spaghetti. All the time is just a way to swap something out. That's quick and easy you know and then add some shredded carrots and we've got plenty of plants and it's lower in fat and calories than the meat version that we sell as well and you would never know that you weren't eating meat. I think they're really great tasting meatballs. But you're not super focused on. Is it a perfect replication of the meat version. Because there's so many other flavors happening and the texture. I think to the point you just made the texture of those Meatless meatballs in the freezer. Case is perfect. They are perfectly meaty meatballs without without the meat. They're they're my personal favorite just the way you are

AMY Adams
Piyanka Jain On  How To Growth Hack Using Data

The $100 MBA Show

05:07 min | 11 months ago

Piyanka Jain On How To Growth Hack Using Data

"Hello welcome everybody. Thanks for joining me. My name is guide today. I'm gonna teach you how you can use attacking to grow your own business. So before i start how you can use growth hacking. Let me start by describing or explaining what growth hacking is. And for that. I'm gonna read an exit from my book behind good decision. So he goes growth hacking discipline within organization with the senior focus of driving. Scalable growth. Hacking team typically consists of product development design analytics and marketing and it uses a pole strategy to attract customers that is the include engagement driving experiences within the product by understanding uses motivation behavior and provide immediate value to engage customers. What's his the traditional margin approach of marketing department reaching each customers after the broad theme has This again is expected from my book behind a good decision for those who are interested. So you guys thinking some of you. Maybe you have a million dollar business. You have a few team members in your thinking okay. You're talking about a multidisciplinary approach with broader development design analytics marketing and his team of three or team of one. And nobody's folks at what we are trying to. What would this is trying to say. Is that essentially. The growth hacking needs input from different aspects of business so it needs a product in the design put. It needs analytics. Marketing put and it can be done by that same person. And i'll show you. What are the key components of attacking so therefore key competence of growth hockey. Go through one by one by one. And isaac go toward that also a showcase this with an example from facebook. How facebook did that so the forest competent of growth hacking is a must have product so fullest. You need a product or service that is currently able to engage majority of your. You must already coming to your side and that is your based products and so much. You must understand so growth hacking chicken. Take you you cannot take you from zero to ten it. Can you know if you already have on. You already. Taken your your your website. You have someone gives you. You already have your water to take an exhibit. One wrote hacking bake you from one to ten and so that is the kind of exponential growth if you do it systematically can be enabled. So what does it mean so you. For example for your product you already have a product or service that is you know that that that your end users are quite enjoying and they're coming back for your side That is your must have products. The second competent of growth hacking is undestand must have experiences. What does that mean. So you need to understand your most Engaged consumer and through research analysis figured out what their needs are what they love their side and you know and so this would include finding girls drivers you know for example things that uses do which engages them we use a framework call. Three questions to be going through. This will rock lines or teach our We teach Through courses entrepreneurs like you of how do you. How do you understand how you unravel the growth drivers for your own business. And that's called tricky questions. Famous miss by the way framework is also dead book behind every good decisions for those of few interested in the book is available on amazon and other places and the chapter you're looking for is under leadership section. It's called tricky questions book. So what essentially the key questions framework is is the three pillars three key questions. You ask the first question. You ask your a day business. How am i doing and through asking this question. You define the defining the key metrics with which you're to measure the success of your business. You know the top. Kpi's the second question to ask. What are my business. Diva's dynamics what drives on doing that. You answered by what for your assists and these will help you unravel the key drivers for your business. For example if y'all measurement you know how you doing By growth and profitable. Maybe a bit then the drivers of business you know. Maybe it's an acquisition strategy. Maybe it's engine started so you'll you'll need to figure out your own business and third competent off or the third party. The third part of the third key question is who my customers. How language so once you're used this approach this'll help you 'unravel the must have experienced. That is the driver for example for for facebook. What they found was that point when they suppose that was voted five million customers already out when they established us. What being both hacking

Facebook Isaac Hockey Amazon Diva
Should You Set Goals for 2021?

The $100 MBA Show

07:12 min | 11 months ago

Should You Set Goals for 2021?

"A lot individuals at the start of a year will sit down with a paper and pen. And say i want accomplish this that and the other thing this year these could be revenue goals. This could be number of team members. This could be the projects they want to accomplish. But the problem with that and this is why don't recommend goal. Setting is that by definition it starts and ends with you setting a goal. I want this and that basically were ends instead. I'm a big believer in building a strategic plan. A strategic plan takes things that beyond. Then i want this. It takes an idea. It takes a reality which will be your overall goal and reverse engineers it into quarterly. Strategic plans milestones. If you will markers actual things you will do to reach that destination so the first thing we are going to do is we want to set a vision for the year. What state do you want your business to be in the end of twenty twenty one and this is going to be different for every business. It could be something. I need a little bit more breathing room. I want to be more profitable. I wanna be at least fifty percent more profitable so i can sleep better at night for another business semi be. I want a bigger pie of the market share. I'm curly off five percent. I wanna make sure. I'm ten percent by the end of the year. Now many of us are going to be tempted to want to do many of these things during the year. I want you to do is force yourself to focus on one theme one reality that you want have at the end of the year. The one that's causing the most pain that you want to alleviate and guess what next year you can choose something else. So let's say the example where you wanna take a larger size of the market share. So you wanna go from five to ten percent of the market share. That's the theme. That's the reality. You wanna manifest by the end of the year. How you gonna do this. What are the actions you have to take. What are things. You need to focus on in order to do that. And this is when you're going to do a brain dump you're going to just write down all the things that you can do to make that happen so it might be. I need to improve my products. So that i am a competitive products almost superior product to my competition so start taking their customers so i need to work on product development. I also needed to better job promoting my product and really selling and describing the benefits on my website through my content. So you might want to double down on content marketing double down on your website design. That will also help you gain more market share while you also want to say hey. I want to get new customers from different markets. So let me start doing some partner webinars or doing some partnerships so that i can get in front of audiences that haven't heard about me by my want to implement a product led growth strategy. Were i offer a free trial to lower the barrier of entry to get more people through the door so as you could see. I'm listening a whole bunch of things that will get me closer to that reality to get me closer to that. Ten percent market share. And we're going to do now is look at that list and you're gonna put them in order in the order of impact. How much impact will any of these tasks have on you reaching the goal some will have a bigger impact than others so put the one that has the biggest impact as number one. And then go down in descending order so now you have your marching orders. Now you know how you're going to get to your reality at the end of two thousand twenty one your overall big goal. You know this is what you have to do now. When are you going to do it. It's not just enough to know what you're going to do to accomplish the goal but you have to know when you're gonna do you have to actually allot time bound so the actually happen. This is going to allow you to have milestones. And i recommend to do quarterly milestones. Every three months you have to hit a certain number of these some of these are going to take a longer or require more effort to you might have just one milestone one task in one quarter but some quarters. You'll have three so you basically farm out or you divvy out these tasks to get you to that goal into each of your quarters so january through march is your first quarter april through july second quarter. You get the point and you can compile all this who can write all this out in a word or in a google talk. This is very simple to do. And this is important document because you're going to refer to the strategic plan regularly throughout the year to make sure you're hitting your goals to make sure you're hitting the milestones to hit the goal. Here's another step that a lot of people do not do as you're riding down the tasks you have to do each quarter under each task. Ask yourself the question. What's going to stop me from achieving this task. From completing this task. What are the blockers. What are the things that are going to hinder me from completing them for example i might want to introduce a new free trial. That's one of my tasks for the quarter. What are some of the things that might block me from doing this. Well you might need to hire developer. You might now have a full scope of how long it's gonna take in terms of development hours right down. What worries you so that you can come up with solutions to them before you get started so you know. Hey i need to hire a developer before the second week of january or by the end of january so they have enough time to develop what they need to develop so i can release the free trial announce marketed by the end of the quarter as you can see as we mapped out our strategic plan. This is something completely different from goal. setting goal. setting is just something that you'd like to have. This is a plan of action. This is stepping stones. A mouse on sa- get there. This is going to increase. Your likelihood isn't an increase your confidence and it makes failure not an option. Because you're actually just doing the work to get there. So why do people not do this. Create a strategic plan. Why do they do goal setting instead. Well honestly it's more work. It's gonna take more time. It's going to challenge you more. It's going to ask you hard questions. It's in our choir you to commit and everybody who's involved and this is what creates resistance. But i have to tell you. I've been doing this for a couple of years now and this is a whole lot better than goal setting. This allows you to have a game plan. You know exactly what you have to do. And now it's just implement you even know what challenges are ahead so you can preempt those challenges and it's such a satisfying feeling at the end of each quarter. We cross off the things that you accomplished. And you see yourself getting closer and closer to the goal to what you want at the end of the year. An often a lot of the people that use strategic plans will hit the goal like the ten percent marketshare even before the end of the year. So i highly encourage you to create a strategic plan instead of goals for twenty twenty one.

Google
Interview With Karen O'Mahoney

Marketing Spark

05:44 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Karen O'Mahoney

"Marketing world increasingly dominated by data brandon still matters. Karen manny the ceo and founder of brand. Loosen montreal heads up a strategic branding agency that works with tech companies to harness the power of their brand welcome to marketing spark iraq. Thanks for having me as i said off the top in a bb world dominated by data. I'm curious about your thoughts on the state of branding. How much of a focus. Our bb companies putting on branding. These days given the fact that there's so much noise there's so much content. There's so much social media out there. And what i actually find that a lot of people really have honed in on their brand and because of that because there's because of all the noise reading and what we want probably see a lot in large companies that they're really starting to focus in a back to the core back to already makes them different when you think about brand it's companies. Dna is impacting sales and marketing but also obviously has pace in leadership and decision making direction so for a lot of people. It's coming back to. What do i want my company to be whereas my company direction taking me. And how does that affect all of our teams so everything from product development to hate your operations the whole company and so from that point of view we find that a lot of these companies are coming back to their brand and really start to think about it a lot more to say okay. Well we have the power in our hands to reading wheeled this company and adopt whatever landscape comes up but now we wanna see where we want to take this on where our vision is gonna go so before we move forward. Let's take a step back to wire brands coming back to the brand. I mean it strikes me as as a brand person myself as that. Brandon is always important branch. Always be part of what you do and how you position yourself. Why are they coming back. What does that mean does that mean. They they didn't pay attention to brand. They were focused on other things. Maybe provide a little bit of context. Fisher so i think what. It is a lot of the time. It's people are thinking about their brand. Does one done right. So it's like a lot of the time they will think about doing lebron's strategy for example. Say oh you know. We've done like a while back and they're like that's been fine. It's kept us going so far. It's kept us going for the last years. And they take that you can bring out loud. These brown strategies messages through marketing through content. Through all of the ways that you're engaging but the thing is there. They have been noticing over time as as the company as a changes. If now time to refocus on say okay. Well we've changed we've role we've Started to open to new markets. We've started to look different directions. And that's where it's coming back to the bronze strategy. I would say not. Maybe i should say it's coming back to a brand strategy to see where next right so it's it's keeping that focus on on a appointed the future the minute. The point in the future is suddenly behind you. You should have done your broaden strategy again it sounds like that idea of like keeping it ahead of us that you can continue to have it as your north star. So how do brands not adopt the one and done or our brand is written in stone approach. Because you know as you know well. I'm being immersed in this. It's brand very fluid. It's very dynamic it evolves over time and and it and it can evolve very quickly so you you always have to be on top of the to make sure that your brand is relevant it resonates and it's aligned with the way that people are thinking and talking and acting from your perspective header brands. Make sure that they're they're always being brand focused. Always making sure that their brand is refreshing date. Yeah so. I mean from our point of view. It's coming from that central core rights coming from that central leadership team and moving out from there so the first thing is commitment. It's really say okay. Well are we committing to for our brand is gonna take us. And if that's the case nets keep it relevant. Let's keep on top of a. Let's build into our company. Values is built it into our company goals and start to actually reflect that in all of our department. So this is that idea of having your brand with something. That's actually adopted and taken to actually run your company and i think a lot of people see brand a lot of the time in terms of marketing only and they don't see it in terms of the full patch of your company so when you know the marketing the messages around marketing can adopt as long as they're still on brown right. The you know you can have campaigns that are about different things as long as they are within the bronze dna itself right so they don't go against the brand values they don't who have company mission they don't against the company purpose however while we don't see a lot of time is maybe people adopting the brand across their companies. And that's something that we tried to help people to do which is to build in those company goals For each department around the actual brand itself so see adoption on the actual usage of the broad in an everyday sense. And that's how you keep it relevant one to the employees but also to every new work with because again if your employees understand the broad. They're living as well right. So if you imagine you're an operations person you understand the brand you lived around you talk about the brown. Do you work with your teams anew operate within the bronze structure now whenever you ever time you work with clients for example you're going to bring that same dynamic you're going to bring that same elemental the with you so that experience translate across how we work every day as well one other question. Why the ask you in terms of making sure

Karen Manny Brandon Montreal Iraq Lebron Fisher Nets
"product development" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on The Product Experience

"I think the main difference is how these two things are structured. Right epic is very loose and. Within epic depending on the team in in how folks? Are Communication is happening internally right in it can be effective with more often than not it's it's a box it most people check because There's not a ton of information that's happening epic to to help the salesperson. There's not a ton of information in that. That helps on leadership or pretty much anyone else that is not. A product person engineering sometimes designer. Meanwhile, the products that were working on. Come in they affect everybody in the organization in one way shape or form, which is why when. When you brought up like who you should be aligned with right everybody comes into play because everything that happens from these different disciplines, affect your product development. So why why the initiative? Well, the initiative is very clear. I think it's it's five pieces of information. That's of that means something to everyone involved. In the product development. Life Cycle. What the other thing that's super important is stat. It forces conversation versus ethics epics very easy to just make a sentence or to cross check a box off in say we did what we're supposed to do rather than epic. Initiative document. Has a bunch of questions that a product person cannot answer by themselves. So. It's going to force that product person to go out on the team level to talk to the people that you know their product is going to affect internally and to start conversations I think. On or I've seen Conversations I've seen. Really Really help alignment just inside of that team but also in terms of the organization because now, not just the people internally. Have something to look at their other people in the organization they have artifact. Now, they can look at and see what's happening with at other team if it aligns with, there's if there's any synergies that exist. So that they can maybe lends resources or an idea or to it's just sitting on their teams heads that will be helpful. So ethics are very closed and I think the initiative documents had been had that tool specifically is designed to be very open. To help teams. Really. Really..

product development
"product development" Discussed on Inside the Healing Room

Inside the Healing Room

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on Inside the Healing Room

"From UNC and I in product development in merchandising for a while and. I did not like that job at all it was. Incredibly stressful and just not the direction that I want in my life. So I went back to. quit that job now back to school. And always made me laugh when I hear people complaining about something. So silly and those meaningless because in the back of my head. I knew what?.

product development
"product development" Discussed on Special Conditions - A Pokémon TCG Podcast

Special Conditions - A Pokémon TCG Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on Special Conditions - A Pokémon TCG Podcast

"That's awesome. Well, I. Guess I'm the last one left. I'm Whiz As far as possibilities go with TI comics. Mostly I handle working with the website I also obviously deal with clients on a daily basis I like working with everybody. I also work on kind of product development type things. So we have a few things that are coming out, obviously, you've heard a few times already here. The Pack battle-kit. I've been working really hard on that over the past. I don't know net. What does it maybe? Four weeks, six weeks we I kinda came up with the idea of up until now. Yeah. I'd say you've been you've been chugging at it pretty hard for about four weeks and we can't teased it a little bit. We thought about it, and then once we once we felt comfortable we knew it was a good time to get it started We had a good foundation for it. You just pretty much I, mean it was like someone lit a fire under you. I don't know you just went down in kicked. It's but. While I knew I had to make it happen like it's a situation where you see so much community at interaction with happening already in I wanted to kind of try and figure out a way to bring everyone together rather than having it. Be You know? Right. Now, you see it as a situation where people are doing the pack battles in it's all separate events throughout the month. Or you know? There's not really any structure to it. So ordination. Yet. So I wanted to you know especially with their product particular figure out a way to get everyone together and Kind of goes with our core values. We're GONNA touch on a little bit. Definitely. We'll. We'll definitely get there. But what is your histories with with Pokemon the franchise like did you watch the cartoon? Did you game Boy Games? Yes. So do you interact with Pokemon? Do you play? POKEMON GO as well I play everything pokemon it what I consider to be a fairly high level. So. You keep things that level..

product development
"product development" Discussed on Spice Catalyst

Spice Catalyst

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on Spice Catalyst

"We've been tracking product development methodology adoption since two, thousand twelve. So let's take a longitude and a look at the data on the next slide. You look at the bar on the left that's two thousand twelve. So we've got, we've got the six studies two, thousand, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen sixteen, and then jumping to the nineteen twenties study to doesn t doesn't twenty study. If you look at the bar on the left, you'll see that agile scrum the yellow on that bar was just twelve point eight percent in two, thousand, twelve by two, thousand, sixteen, it was nearly fifty percent basically what it is today. Agile scrum predominates today. Notice that waterfall the pink bar above yellow. Waterfall has continued to decrease from eighteen percent back in two thousand, twelve listen nine percent today. So it's experienced a steady declined to half of its previous numbers. And then finally blended methodologies the purple bottom. have. have slowly shrunk for more than fifty percent. To stabilize it roughly forty percent as agile adoption has grown and waterfall is shrunk. Moving onto the next slide. We looked at what which methodology is associated with increasing the profitability of your product. And as in prior years, agile is the method that respondents consistently associated with increased product profitability. In fact, every when we looked at. the teams that were using the various methodologies in fact, more than not every group. Regardless of what they were using said if we were using agile. ANDROID EKSTROM it would be it would make us more profitable. If, you compare this year's findings to two thousand and sixteen responses. When we last asked the question, the response rate is quite consistent it at fifty, two point, one percent, and now fifty two point seven.

product development
"product development" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on KOMO

"A couple of years ago and just to show you how faster product development is going to be that was the launch of the vehicle two years ago and were already feet but there were a technology that very rocky patients product development which I like by the way because when you change vehicles from year to year I can pick him out I'm useless now I mean I was a member as a kid I could tell you what car it was just from the headlights behind us but now as an adult I'm like what you hear is that I can't tell anymore because things remain the same so much so it's kinda interesting let's talk a little bit about this well the sound does it have that today A. M. G. goodly beautiful rough sound in the fifty three thank you usually think of it in line engine after that what hello but the the fifty three models especially if you performance Dr I have a really great software and you can hear it especially well with that Capreol course top down but you can add the cool it it's definitely noticeable talent that'll still burbling downstairs I still have a really great corporate challenge that it's not quite the DHL that AMG our traditional customers are used to but it sounds really really interesting and you have to think R. all of this challenge engineering it's it's kind of like cat had a hole or selfish pretty easy to get at the edge of town right the firing order makes for good exhaust L. we'll have some pretty cool like header set up to look our car in line six each it's harder to be found engineers can make this down South Korea does not often here either he or his wife I have a really get up but he shot you know I think we we totally out that it might take you three bottles I have not met an AMG good I didn't like the sound off so I think you're doing pretty well so far they will sound amazing technology has always been something that say you've excelled that I remember driving the eclass and Canada when you introduce the coop M. and first discovering caught to ex I think it's cold this is where different Mercedes because can talk to each other and let them know about houses on the road ahead and is that still a feature of this new eclass yeah sure if and when you first wrote that he class it was really each of our state there weren't many cars on the road hi thank you each or that that we once thought now there are hundreds of thousands of Mercedes that are all able to communicate with each other that that that amount thank you call the call record to act just not showing it now you are not sure sorry the card well I thank you traffic light the card you have the vehicle off thank you thank you the card out to start growing exponentially over the last couple of years at that if you want me starting she's a partnership and cooperation from other OEMs that are integrating college I love it I'm I'm super excited about it I will say diss have what three words available and as well or is that because that coming or does it have it already yeah it does happen yeah he he he complained cap have a receipt that user experience UX system and you are able to you what three words yeah he said that I I'm sure you're already aware of it but if they're not basically instead of having to memorize threat memorized three forty eight call or whatever he dresses you can memorize three random words that might be light blue streaks thanks and that would be future how much simpler than the traditional I'm hoping I'm saving it I'm saving it Brian because we're gonna have the guys from what three words on coming up in the next few weeks I'm super is the best technology and a bright color from Mercedes Benz he's in charge of the AMG product line will be right back your radio tuned in common use more on our.

product development
"product development" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:52 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on 710 WOR

"In guiding product development teams from concept to viable product and has a passion for product acceleration and digital manufacturing welcome Marcello tell us about ten X. beta Dennis payday is a product development firm that has been around in New York City since two thousand and Pam we are located in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and data we share space in your lab with one hundred other companies will all focus on hardware we're one of the few inside the space that do product as a service but also product as a mentor most of the tech industry in New York historically focused on digital products consumer internet banking fintech apps and while we do work on software and firmware most of our work in those areas is in support of hardware so robotics a Thomas vehicle S. and medical devices fun stuff consumer products to do you also work on those yes so we cover consumer products as well we have a series of products that range from simple way unique commodified goods all the way to complex vertical takeoff and landing aircraft wow so if I came to let's say I got really smart and invented a medical device and anything let's say I had an idea in my head and a drawing is that where you would start with me it could be yes you know smart is I would say is and I think you're very smart and there's plenty of days you've given me drawings I haven't been able to do anything with them so well yes we would they say ideas are cheap and execution is everything but the reality is that we can't do our work without a client or partner figuring out the late in need well the problem that we're trying to solve we're very good at solving simple and complex problems and helping those problems to see the light of day as product but without the need identification there's nothing so you play the most important first step so give us some examples of some of the types of problems that you saw a couple of years ago many years back I would say a two thousand and eight to two thousand nine a friend had type one diabetes we were having lunch he mentioned that he always forgets whether you took a suggestion or not so I went back to the lab took apart a Nike sports watch and duct taped their sports watch model to a diabetes insulin cap for a tough one a doctor and I have impressed the timer every time it took me at every junction to test whether it would be viable or valuable to him to know how much time elapsed since his last injection that became a large company that we sold to AB to fund the company into the combine a couple of years ago wow what a great story yes so you also invest in companies that come to you is that correct I do so in two thousand twelve I set up a fund with my dad who's a surgeon yeah out of Cape Town so he brings photo and legacy medical expertise in multiple verticals cardiothoracic surgery soda general surgery and other areas and I bring the product development experience and we set up a hundred K. fund specifically to invest even medical devices and products all of those we've sold some of the investment we are finishing two of the after the final stage all of the investments for the majority of the of the early stage tests that we did and that was before can next be the reedy took off so now we're with ten X. beta we typically trying to look at we go shooting an equity stake in every product that we touch because we believe in math three thanks that if we just invest cash we're not valuable to them Dr premiere in that sort of isolated state because we also want to provide expertise we do want to pack create long term partnerships with the people that we work with and you know our longer stag from your client has worked with us for five years has done multiple products with us and this one multiple awards for these products so we are we do believe in legacy relationships with our clients and then lastly you know we are emotionally invested in the things that we choose to work out and dabbed investing in them also creates alignment so how do you choose what to work on originally I would say that be faulted for relevance and scale and that's why we did a lot of medical devices in the early days now we work on not just medical devices but also on more challenging products for large corporate or fortune five hundred companies and for nerds alike we recently researched whether or not there was an opportunity to invest or build a new product in the vertical takeoff and landing aircraft space and until that research opportunity came about we have never done anything in our space it doesn't matter because we had a network across the US it came from I have both academic and professional networks that was able to answer the question of where the opportunity lies so then we figured that was relevant because there's a hundred companies in the US today building vertical takeoff and landing aircraft for single seater or taxi use all of those are military applications are they for commuter application I would say ninety plus percent of those all for civilian use Manchester community use and other areas and I found the premise of the challenge of figuring out where the value line as being one of the most intriguing intellectual challenges that was posed in twenty eighteen so the first step was I need to figure out whether we should build a plane or not and we decided that given where the industry was going and we given where every other company was investing their money it made more sense for our clients to invest even range extension technologies and that did overlap with interest that the DOD and other government applications would have because it implied to more than just medical takeoff aircraft so the project started as trying to make a decision about whether you are actually going to build one of these vertical take off planes and then it kind of morphed into I'm trying to understand you know what is the market need and then based on that you extending the range of these planes was where the market was going and where you felt you could make a contribution yes that this challenge we have with every product that comes as an idea or a napkin sketch is that we still have to validate whether there is a product there whether any opportunity for new technology or a new product exists or whether something already can be purchased off the shelf so how do you go about figuring that out I mean what are some of the things that you look at to make those decisions so we we typically divide are projecting to at least three phases so there's a discovery and development and then a commercialization phase the discovery phase is there so that we can de risk because the process for both us and our client so that we can answer the tough questions that have not yet been answered relative to the cost of product development the novelty of the technologies that would need to be developed or that exist that need to be integrated in this new product and all showed the long term commercial liability because that's what everyone cares about so you would suggest to an entrepreneur that I mean a lot of people have ideas and they make something but they haven't really tested the market some I'm hearing you would suggest that they really look at the market and see if it needs what they have for starters just doing a Google search tell Google knows everything it's the it's a good starting point so this three sites that you know when especially when I deal with a lower cost commoditized goods I do a Google search I do numbers on such and I do not involve a search because one of those three sites are most likely to throw back things that you could buy well the somebody else is selling the next layer you know that's where you guys come in it's really looking out of the path of landscape I do have one more question on this topic though just because somebody else is doing it doesn't mean you necessarily shouldn't if you can do a better or cheaper right like I always use the example of Martha Stewart she sells sheets around forever right there must be some decision point research okay there really aren't any improvements that can be made this technology that are significant enough to go forth with this project yes I think and also looking back at your previous question there is definitely a need to assess how are you going to make money with what you're doing and how you doing it differently Casper our shoot all these companies that are some commodified M. scaling how we buy mattresses and bedding on doing nothing different than what fears that but fears going out of business because they'd end of all of us in terms of how they serve their clients this is a great discussion we're here with Marcel Botha from ten X..

Marcello product development Dennis
"product development" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"All of those parts manufacturing goes and just product development and distribution what we're breaking ground on excel Hey rob what's what's the status of the S. P. S. T. right now obviously that all hands on figuring out a vaccine that all hands on figure out testing but there also has to be I mean there's also other disease that they have to fight this drug delivery like your space they have to fight obviously improvement a life like the cannabis thanks that you guys are working on the cannabinoid extraction and stuff highly from where you're sitting how are they you know moving the chess pieces around the FDA to get everything done still yeah less red tape yeah maybe actually yes yes for certain things less red tape especially working with anything relating to the culprit nineteen situation even come out you know secondary complications and and actually if you look at sabbatical for example which is direct how dysfunction products I've been shown to be very effective for pulmonary hypertension and one of the big issues with the code nineteen viruses that the pulmonary the longs have constricted vessels duty infection and inflammation so there is potential for this product as an ancillary you know products for treatment of belongs in pulmonary you know construction so bad and you guys working on it you can just put a presence out just last month I think about that maybe a month before you guys are you know way before the the curve on this and and by the way are you when you guys discover some of the things that you guys are producing and have and have been in trials when you discover it helps other maladies like this did to somebody let you guys know what your response will say Hey wait a minute we you know you look your hand up and say you know the stuff we've been working on the past as is and then you have to get in line at that do you know do not writing to Hey I just got approved over here now does this align start over again for for a long time it ends up being you know what a what a drug accidents already approved and it can be used for another indication you need to have the show saying advocacy but it's not a long haul is not the beginning it's not like running a brand new chemical entity it's actually it's fast track and and if we can like this idea want to see things that the Saudis because we need help I mean you know it's all hands on deck I think they're making it possible for companies like us to be a part of the solution for you just as a CEO of a publicly traded company I don't expect you to talk about you know stock numbers and such but I do want to ask you what your put the crystal ball in from here what do you see the eighteen months looking like for a company like your obviously you're in the right place I'm your slot in the right lane well I mean you do treatment lot of people are staying home what I'm talking help your long basis what do you see him rob yeah that's a great question well we are in a critical point here for the company with some clinical research that idolizing and that's bearing fruit but the delivery system itself in a cannabinoid space so I I was you know in the next you know six to twelve months will have some very good information and and data points on that and which will allow us to drive the technology to the next stage in you know delivering other pharmaceutical companies capitalize on molecules is a lot of companies working on that right more effectively and then the you know the US dental product we will be pretty far along on the approval process and we're looking at launching it in multiple countries I don't know if you've noticed the press release a couple weeks ago of course on said that it still happens in China yeah you know really gives us a nice card entry the company is exactly right rob Kelly to come back in studio with us when safe to travel and we can't wait to come here and hang out with people that rob Davidson the CEO.

product development
"product development" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The VP of product development at purity products he's been there for more than twenty years and as you're about to hear this is what he considers the single best way to fight the visible signs of aging a supplement they can literally deliver Jason welcome aboard Sir well great to be with your pad and as you know we've done a lot of the shows together we really don't like to promise locals on the radio but today we're going to promise something akin to a miracle at least as far as fighting the visible signs of aging goes it's college and I'm sure you've heard of it it really works it does some amazing things and we've got a product we call ultimate collagen people are really loving this product and it's just been a real sensation so I'm excited to tell you all about it well let me jump in here for a second what exactly is the streets and I I know it's collagen okay we know that you just said it but I I really want to know what it is can you give me a quick overview yeah so you are hearing a lot about collagen it seems to be everywhere you're seeing bone broth products with collagen powders with college and it's in your health food stores it's in your supermarket you're seeing ads online in magazines on Facebook it is probably the biggest thing in the health and wellness space and you know it's really interesting because the way I can gauge the popularity of it a product of one of our product is pretty much through my friends or my wife's friend and all my wife's friends for example if they know that I work for purity products of vitamin company and they're always asking me about the latest and greatest things and frankly they're always expecting me to get them free bottles and sample stopped and you know and of course I usually do and I can honestly say that in my twenty plus years ask your IT products I have never been asked about a product as much as I am being asked about college and everyone wants to know about college and everyone seems to want to try college and they're curious to see what it can do how it can work you know does it really help my joints more importantly does it fight wrinkles is it going to help me look younger and how long does it take to work and then they always have can you just give me a free bottle I'm going to go broke giving away a free bottle that getting out of here we know that sounds pretty awesome but you know we went when we talk about collagen it's such a big thing right now so the question is why is collagen so important so collagen is they key structural components of your body of something like seventy or eighty percent of the dry weight of your skin for example but it's what makes up the fibers in your tendons in your ligaments in your joints in your bones the walls of your arteries all of your connective tissue it's important for wound healing for your digestion but especially in your skin it is what gives your skin its structure and at the last the quality it's literally the glue that holds your body together and unfortunately what happens is as we get a little bit older our body makes less and less of it our product is called ultimate collagen and we call it the ultimate collagen because it is a breakthrough in skin health because it delivers something called bioactive collagen peptides and these are the actual building blocks of collagen itself and so the big story today is that when you take all the college and these collagen peptides that I'm talking about they do something very very special in your body and what they do is they're going to stimulate little cells in your skin called fibroblast and these are like little collagen production factories that are in your skin it's what makes collagen in your skin and so our products give me away your fibroblast to start churning out its.

VP product development
"product development" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"The VP of product development at purity products he's been there for more than twenty years and as you're about to hear this is what he considers the single best way to fight the visible signs of aging a supplement they can literally deliver chaser welcome aboard Sir well great to be with your pet and as you know we've done a lot of the shows together we really don't like to promise miracles on the radio but today we're going to promise something akin to Americal as least as far as fighting the visible signs of aging goes it's college and I'm sure you've heard of it it really works it does some amazing things and we've got a product we call ultimate collagen people are really loving this product and it's just been a real sensation so I'm excited to tell you all about it well let me jump in here for a second what exactly is the streets and I I know it's collagen okay we know that you just said it but I I really want to know what it is can you give me a quick overview yeah so you are hearing a lot about collagen it seems to be everywhere you're seeing bone broth products with collagen powders with college and it's in your health food stores it's in your supermarket you're seeing ads online in magazines on Facebook it is probably the biggest thing in the health and wellness space and you know it's really interesting because the way I can gauge the popularity of the other product of one of our products is pretty much through my friends or my wife's friends and all my wife's friends for example if they know that I work for purity products of vitamin company and they're always asking me about the latest and greatest things and frankly they're always expecting me to get them free bottles and sample stopped and you know and of course I usually do and I can honestly say that in my twenty plus years at purity products I have never been asked about a product as much as I am being asked about college and everyone wants to know about college and everyone seems to want to try college and they're curious to see what it can do how it can work you know does it really help my joints more importantly does it fight wrinkles is it going to help me look younger and how long does it take to work and anyway that can you just give me a free bottle I'm going to go broke giving away free bottle that getting out of hand well you know this sounds pretty awesome but you know when we when we talk about collagen it's such a big thing right now so the question is why is collagen so important so collagen is a key structural components of your body of something like seventy or eighty percent of the dry weight of your skin for example but it's what makes up the fibers in your tendons in your ligaments in your joints in your bones the walls of your arteries all of your connective tissue it's important for wound healing for your digestion but especially in your skin it is what gives your skin its structure and at the last the quality it's literally the glue that holds your body together and unfortunately what happens is as we get a little bit older our body makes less and less of it that's what it is called ultimate collagen and we call it the ultimate collagen because it is a breakthrough in skin health because it delivers something called bioactive collagen peptides and these are the actual building blocks of collagen itself and so the big story today is that when you take alternate collagen collagen peptides that I'm talking about they do something very very special in your body and what they do is they're gonna stimulate little cells in your skin called fibroblast and these are like little collagen production factories that are in your skin it's what makes collagen in your skin and so our products they merely your fibroblast to start churning out its own internal collagen production name tell your body.

VP product development
"product development" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"product development" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The VP of product development at Shorty products he's been there for more than twenty years and as you're about to hear this is what he considers the single best way to fight the visible signs of aging a supplement they can literally deliver chaser welcome aboard Sir well great to be with your pet and as you know we've done a lot of the shows together we really don't like to promise ripples on the radio but today we're going to promise something into Americal at least as far as fighting the visible signs of aging goes it's college and I'm sure you've heard of it it really works it does some amazing things and we've got a product we call ultimate collagen people are really loving this product and it's just been a real sensation so I'm excited to tell you all about it well let me jump in here for a second what exactly is the streets and I I know it's collagen okay we know that you just said it but I I really want to know what it is can you give me a quick overview yeah so you are hearing a lot about collagen it seems to be everywhere you're seeing bone broth products with collagen powders with college and it's in your health food stores it's in your supermarket you're seeing ads online in magazines on Facebook it is probably the biggest thing in the health and wellness space and you know it's really interesting because the way I can gauge the popularity of a of a product of one of our product is pretty much through my friends or my wife's friend and all my wife's friends for example they know that I work for purity products vitamin company and they're always asking me about the latest and greatest things and frankly they're always expecting me to get them free bottles and sample stopped and you know and of course I usually do and I can honestly say that in my twenty plus years as purity products I have never been asked about a product as much as I am being asked about college and everyone wants to know about college and everyone seems to want to try college and they're curious to see what it can do how it can work you know does it really help my joints more importantly does it fight wrinkles is it going to help me look younger and how long does it take to work and then they always have can you just give me a free bottle I'm going to go broke giving away free bottle that getting out of hand well you know this sounds pretty awesome but you know when we talk about collagen it's such a big thing right now so the question is why is collagen so important so collagen is a key structural components of your body at something like seventy or eighty percent of the dry weight of your skin for example but it's what makes up the fibers in your tendons in your ligaments in your joints in your bones the walls of your arteries all of your connective tissue it's important for wound healing for your digestion but especially in your skin it is what gives your skin its structure and at the last the quality it's literally the glue that holds your body together and unfortunately what happens is as we get a little bit older our body makes less and less of it our product is called ultimate collagen and we call it the ultimate collagen because it is a breakthrough in skin health because it delivers something called bioactive collagen peptides and these are the actual building blocks of collagen itself into the big story today is that when you take all the collagen these collagen peptides that I'm talking about they do something very very special in your body and what they do is they're gonna stimulate little cells in your skin called fibroblast and these are like little collagen production factories that are in your skin it's what makes collagen in your skin and.

VP product development Shorty
"product development" Discussed on The Product Experience

The Product Experience

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"product development" Discussed on The Product Experience

"They need to be early and the only ones having it so debts to quote factor but i always advocate to think more of a brand and marketing coolness in los and maybe a bit less about the product coolness because the product needs to really help the customer getting things done. He wants to get them yeah often. It's more the marketing and the brand kunas. Do you need to add on top so that people are attracted by the product <hes> <hes> and for sure customers are never attracted just because you thank you are working in a cool company when i think about product development and when when i used products there are some things that product stephen i'm trying to think of an example that brings an element of delight so it edna affect you know even though you for sure should look for this stuff. You should understand what <unk> lightest to your customers. That's an important thing and an important conversation station. If you listen to them you will never ever find those so that's always the small innovations you could bring or the little thanks to add on top to the nitty gritty details to add on top to really make it nice so you should think about those. That's important but that's not the the the coolness i am talking about. It's more like this pretending to be cool because we are a cool company called brand. Everybody should love us. Hey it's this us here we are. Nobody will use products just because you are trying to pretend to be cool so that's the thing that's the coolness we don't want to have if there is something where it uses its in front of his mobile screen. Installing the new app and thinking on boarding was so nice which would never it's not a thought that we'll have they always seem seemed as a set up something like this and it would be really happy with. That's the coin issue one to have obviously you don't i want to get rid of this and just one you only find if you listen to the users really understand the situation in which <hes> settings on a using in my product oughta in a hurry up. There may be screaming kids. Why a using this out in subway subway. Oh where <hes> internet access might be limited or interrupted or this kind of things and if you find answers to this you want to have yeah okay. I'm going to try unexplained two different. Let me see if i've got this this right looking forward okay so there's the kind of cool that you're talking about that. It comes from from having delivers and things like that in your product and that's it sounds like we're talking about the kano model there of having the the essential things and everything else and cold air comes from i'm having every all the basics covered but having some delivers in there and that's the good kind of the bad kinda cool is kind of going back to using a real world for example <hes> theranos a really cool idea one drop of blood. You can do one hundred tests but it never worked it was all marketing bumps and and flimflam <hes> <hes> and and they were actually doing the same standard test behind the scenes but they were just trying to appear.

product development
"product development" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:14 min | 2 years ago

"product development" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Product development that's hard and Miskito Scott resistant to the the most widely used one the same thing for the most typically used anti malarial the mosquitoes get resistant so so we need not only excellent product development we need to hurry up because if if were complacent about the games that have been had a malaria the the promise is all these gains the threat is this rapid emergence of resistance to both the anti Miller as for humans and the things that you put on the bed nets to protect people in their sleeping or on the walls of their huts that's why pennies team can't be like okay you know twenty years from now the their movement you're listening the technician I'm more again and my guest today is Dr sue Desmond Hellmann CEO of the bill and Melinda gates foundation and doctor penny Heaton CEO of the bill and Melinda gates medical research institute also known as the gates MRI penny what keeps you up at night it's exactly that it's it's about having impact our mission is not small our three goals are to as I alluded to earlier radically area in diarrheal disease staffs and accelerate the end of the TB epidemic and so how are we going to do that and that's what my team and I are all about taking a different approach and I don't think you know the pieces of what we're doing or similar to what you would see a big farmer or in biotech I think it's how we're bringing in them together that makes the difference first of all we're building certain areas act expertise that have been road blocks and bottlenecks and product development in the past for my past life you know and and and the private sector we are bringing and good translational scientists who know how to ask the right questions design studies to get the right data and it it rate on that data to make progress we're bringing and get seem seem manufacturing specialist because so often especially in vaccines are biologics that's a bottle neck we are bringing and people who understand the importance of biomarkers and immunologic correlates of I think you see that can be used to streamline development accelerate development and get to that urgency that we need and then finally we're bringing in quantitative scientists is area that's been highly under utilized in the global health space I think I using modeling simulation trying to predict what are the outcomes here what are the factors that we need to be looking at how do we need to be looking at them and to do that before we go into the trial in a low income countries so what what kind of excited about the youth I think that's something that's very important to me is to make sure people understand that you guys didn't start here he has did other things in a former life penny you worked on a rotavirus vaccine tell people about that what was IT solving what happened where did it go when I was out I said it was an incredible experience and it's still on going the eyes study that I dead in Kenya where we were looking at the Larry I was also looking at diarrheal diseases and I thought what children for two years for diarrheal disease and at the end of two years a four hundred children and I had followed fifty two had died and twenty six ad diarrheal disease at the time of death twenty six had pneumonia at the time of death what we had to offer them from the public health perspective things like Listerine safe water those things weren't feasible for people in this very poor area and so I was really in a country as to what I was going to do with my life and how we were going to help these people and I got an email from a recruiter at Merck and said you know we need someone to come and help but the road about respect see I was like wow laugh yes that is something that could be very feasible and so I started to work at Merck in nineteen ninety nine and out the interesting thing is while I was out working with my team at work to develop the rotavirus vaccine development when the gates foundation was being born Gabi was being put together and the first two programs that Gabi sponsored the first one was exploration of rotavirus vaccine introduction into low income countries so at once we got the vaccine licensed in the U. S. and recommended for U. S. children then I get to travel with individuals from the World Health Organization and from path setting up the rotavirus vaccine studies in Africa and Asia and it was just an incredible experience at that scene has since been by by the World Health Organization and recommend it for all children universally and I came to the foundation I have that six years ago got to help other companies of low income country manufactures with making their read about respect scenes and literally I would say every few weeks there is another article that comes out about the impact of rotavirus vaccine and low income countries in fact I was waiting for you to do this interview I read an article where they did a study in the Gambia looking at the impact of read a Paris at that scene and reduced severe rotavirus hospitalizations by fifty percent just after the first year of introduction so super exciting so now we know why penny was hired Hey that's a clue good where are we smart yeah yeah qualifier there you know I I go back to the days in which you are at Genentech and you have all kinds of titles you were chief medical officer president of product development you were all kinds of things my biggest memory and I was reminded today because I was reminded that you are one of the names on the patent for herceptin but I remember the story you told about the results coming in the phase three results provide people let herceptin dead and tell us about the results tells that story again yeah so the it was one of the highlights of my life it's nineteen ninety eight and you know everybody's at asco right now SO levay cancer cancer conference in though they're probably on their way here from Chicago if they're smart and if you think about the field then so for me personally I had just moved from Bristol Myers Squibb why were contact cell and I worked on the approval of taxol a for metastatic breast cancer in the US and then in Europe with great colleagues who taught me so much about how to think about regulatory and all the acronyms like I. N. D. and C. M. C. and all these things so I get to gin and tonic and herceptin is struggling were struggling to do the herceptin trial taxol had been approved and there had been a study that showed that you should use Adrian mice and in the adjuvant setting this is way back when and attacks with so it was a seat in the adjuvant setting back then and so taxol increasingly was being used we had a trial using herceptin with after cycling and so the the big move was to amend the trial to put in tax all that was new and remind people what herceptin did and was the first is the first drug that I remember that came with the diagnostic he has so herceptin is a monoclonal antibody and it's a monoclonal antibody that was specifically designed only for women who have her two positive breast cancer and so if you don't have her two positive breast cancer you it's not the right drug for you so when people today talk about precision medicine drugs like Gleevec and herceptin were the first approved precision medicine drugs so now it seems normal back in the day it didn't seem so normal and so no one thought herceptin would work it was just not it the people are very very very skeptical so in nineteen ninety seven we're Texan was approved idex struggle than idec Biogen's an anti cat a collaboration but the the were talks and was a chi Merrick antibody it was approved in ninety seven late and it was approved for lymphoma and the skeptics said oh that's a liquid tumor you can do but that's a low bar it's maybe a circulating that anybody can get to it and advice too big to penetrate a solid tumor there's just a ton of skepticism so so after all of that we had a randomized phase three trial that real amazing heroes like time for them Alan and Hank Fuchs and Steve shack people who are who are still driving great things in in in biotech firstly time for dell passed away but there was a massive uncertainty so Shaq is at Genentech and he's the clinical scientist on herceptin at the time and he comes to my office and he he tells me the results there was that there was a product also I'm the chief medical officer and he tells me there is and Jack and I are just absolutely trust beside ourselves that herceptin extended the time to progression in her two positive women with breast cancer it was just it was it was as F. like a lightning bolt came out this guy for me I just like even thinking about it now I get the servers so I say Steve game face game face you've got to let you know because it's it's like a huge material events and people can't trade stocks you know all that stuff so I say Shaq not a word to anyone game face we have a hold on blinding plan right we have a whole plan for how we talk about the trial and Shockley's my office and I pick up the phone and I call art Levinson and I said art Jack just told me the herceptin results and he's he was down at the bottom of the hill at all Genentech and I said to art check just tell me the results he said you can't tell me on the phone and you have to come down here I've been speaking with doctor sue Desmond Hellmann CEO of the bill and Melinda gates foundation and doctor penny Heaton CEO of the bill and Melinda gates medical research institute also known as gates MRI we'll talk more after a break cast of technician and technician health are available at NPR one iTunes stitcher and other.

Product development product development Miskito Scott two years fifty percent twenty years six years
"product development" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"product development" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Soon can present a product development a purity products about an exciting new product available exclusively through purity products call the omega three super pill we've got a special offer today a free bottle offer stay tuned we're gonna be given out that phone number Jason let's get to ingredient number two because this omega three super pill does something that no other fish oil product can do it actually lowers cholesterol talk about these plant sterols explain how this works and why it's so important right well I don't know anyone who isn't concerned about their cholesterol if you have high cholesterol obviously you want to lower it if you have normal or healthy cholesterol obviously you want to maintain it well in the world of dietary supplement there is one compound one ingredient that stands head and shoulders above anything else their coal plants there all they have over a hundred and forty human clinical studies shown to significantly lower LDL cholesterol and again LDL is the bad cholesterol HDL the good cholesterol right and the studies are pretty dramatic they show that in as little as a few weeks four weeks you can see anywhere from five to fifteen percent reduction in your LDL level safely and naturally absolutely no side effects very effective they've known about plants there all since the nineteen fifties and they work via a very different mechanism then Staten trucks so I want tell people to stop taking Staten drugs were not trying to position this is an alternative to Staten Statens work by preventing the production of cholesterol in the liver plant sterols block the absorption of cholesterol in the intestines plants their roles are similar structurally to the cholesterol molecules and they basically can fuse little sales in your intestine called my field into thinking that the plants their roles are actually the cholesterol particles within my field pick up the plant sterile instead of the cholesterol particles and the cholesterol particles instead just get passed through your intestines the point is if you're on Staten you can take plants their roles as an addendum therapy to help control your cholesterol studies actually have been done to show that they can amplify the benefit and of course this particular product you get obviously first off the full clinically tested amount of the plants their roles to deliver the benefits as shown in the study that's something that's very important because a lot of products out there that you'll see that have plants fellows on the label may only deliver a tiny fraction of what any study has ever shown any benefit for purity delivers the full amount that you need to get these benefits Naji simplest talk about the third ingredient in the formula co Q. ten which is also becoming one of the more popular nutritional ingredients all over the world tell us about co Q. ten and why it's valuable for our health what is it what does it do well Cokie tennis found every single cell in your body they're from the moment you're conceived till the moment U..

product development fifteen percent four weeks
"product development" Discussed on Startup Sales

Startup Sales

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"product development" Discussed on Startup Sales

"Your outfit tracking system. I bet if you're like most of these people, you probably try to reach out to these folks on linked in, and nobody response you or if they respond to you, they tell you to go pound Santa that kinda sucks, but the good news is that we've got this thing, and it's gonna make your life way easier. It's gonna reduce the pain like you might be manually trying to find Email addresses. Right. Oh, don't worry. We've already programmatic identified those might be like manually sending these messages. Don't worry we automated that those marketing all this sort of it really like you should be spending your time closing candidates as opposed to doing all of this. Grunt work, isn't that fantastic? And people loved it. The only reason why we able to do this because we knew exactly what the problems were. We were able to identify. So you can go out then you can start doing inbound stuff as well. But even your inbound is going to suck. If it's on a line to the problem that you're addressing like you can make all sorts of you know. Silly whatever like infographics out. Here's like immigrants. Totally like it's funny and viral totally not related to our value proposition. Like that's silly, right? Like all of this kind of stacks on having good product management that goes to good product development that goes to good product marketing that goes to good, you know, go to market of a either an Alabama and inbound nature. I was tell people that all the founders that I'm working with our or the first sales people that when you're going outbound don't make it about you make them and make it I understand what pain points. It is that you're solving. Once you understand what pain points to solving. Then you could write that in that message. Like, you said say, no, you got that broken window. It's getting cold. Gotta.

product development Alabama
"product development" Discussed on Marketing School

Marketing School

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"product development" Discussed on Marketing School

"Get ready for your daily dose of marketing strategies and tactics. From entrepreneurs with the guy and experience to help you find success in any marketing, capacity. You're listening to marketing school with your instructors, Neil, Patel, and Eric SU. Welcome to eight another episode of marketing school, I'm Eric SU. And I'm talk at they we're going to talk about how you can use Amazon content and product development so Neil while while meals with title idea. So let me tell you what's good about Amazon guys. So the amazing Amazon is people feel compelled to write good reviews, bad reviews, okay reviews, and what can you actually glean from those reviews? Guess what you get valuable insights about what people think about certain industry. It can be certainly used for product development. Okay. You can use it for caught development too. So I'll start with the park development side. And I'll kick it over to kneel for for content velvet side too. So when you look at let's say I wanted to okay, let's put it this way. Squatty potty Squatty potty helps you better. Okay. Optimize the way you poop. Right. So if I wanted to make Squatty potty competitor, I would just go to Amazon type and Squatty potty look at the reviews, not the five. Star once right. I'm looking for maybe like the two or three stars one. I wanna find out because I know it's a great product. Because a lot of people use it. They done a lot in sales. So there's validation right there. But I wanna see the issues that people are struggling with is there a way for me to look at the issues people are facing and make create a better. And if I think maybe the things that people are writing are, maybe really small, and maybe really miniscule, and I don't think I could make a much better product that. I'm not going to do it. Right. That's gonna save you a lot of time and effort because people are spending their valuable time to put in there. Like, right, actually, write these reviews. Right. So you get the good you get the bad. You get the average. But it's going to help you save a lot of time in general when using Amazon I loved one Sar to three star reviews. I don't really care for the foreign five star because all gives me ideas for proactive element content, ideas, marketing ideas, because everything if you think about marketing in general, it's about problem solving when p. People do Google search. They're not just searching random key where they're searching for a solution to their problem, and you start having that viewpoint, and you understand what issues people had you now have ideas on content that you can end up creating and you can then discuss how to solve it. Maybe your products that maybe your services, maybe a dozen, and if it doesn't make you wanna add it in if enough people complained about it, but taking this approach of looking at marketing as problem and solution. So when someone searches they're looking for a solution to their problem, or even when you're reading these reviews, you're looking for problems that people have because people aren't rude leave a one star review, if they had no problem with your product if you can take that and you can harness it to go. Craig good information that solves people's problems. Even if your product doesn't solve it. But you're just telling him how you're teaching them. How you're gonna win over audience. That's highly relevant to the product or service, you're selling and then eventually hopefully, you can provide them with the solution. There. Looking for all right guys. This one's really simple. Right. So you literally go to Amazon, it's free all the data's there for you. But don't look for the five star reviews. They don't teach you much you kid look at the four star, but more. So you wanna go for three and two you can even look at the one, and I do love looking at the one that you had to take more. So though one-star reviews with the grain of salt and to star and three star is usually more of where it's at a lot of times, the one star reviews aren't providing reasons more so just pissed off. They're providing a one star review typically find the two star and three star reviews are more productive in the information. They're providing which will help you more. So with your marketing, right? Bill Gates said look success is a lousy teacher. So you don't really learn from the fours and fives. Like don't get me wrong, especially when people give give us fours and fives. We love it. I think it's great. But we really learned from the twos threes, and sometimes I like the ones to know, the ones aren't bad. It's just a lot of times the ones will be like, I hate you guys. Okay. Well, or I hate this product that doesn't teach you. The through. So you're looking for stuff that can provide you feedback on how you can improve instead of just stuff that's opinion base. But that's it for this episode as we mentioned in previous episodes. We have hit the one million download number. So thank you guys for all your support and help that means we're throwing a free in person event in downtown LA, check out marketing school dot IO to learn more about it. All right. And the review we have for today is from baby one one this person says worth daily. Listen, it's consistent the post, and they post an episode every day, the info is applicable, and they are usually entertaining. Thank you. We tried to be usually entertaining. And this person says it's fun to listen to the attempts at analogies from thinking, I try to do my best there that's tomorrow. But make you goodbye. This session of marketing school has come to a close be sure to subscribe for more daily, marketing strategies and tactics to help you find the success you've always dreamed of and don't forget to rate and review. So we can continue to bring you the best daily content possible. We'll see you in class tomorrow right here on marketing school.

Amazon product development Eric SU Squatty Neil Google Bill Gates LA Craig Patel