39 Burst results for "Producer"

Fresh update on "producer" discussed on Colleen and Bradley

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 min | 3 min ago

Fresh update on "producer" discussed on Colleen and Bradley

"Way got some celebrity gossip mysteries for Colleen in Tana to solve. Here's our 1st 1 Nash on this, As I told you Well over a year ago, I would be anti lawyer. The person who wrote this Yes, this foreign born permanent a list model host and producer knew and partied with the billionaire pedophile. Everyone makes a big deal of saying they were never on his plane. But he had access to many others through the corporation, which gave the model her big break and paid her tens of millions of dollars. She can play semantics, but the truth is out there. You got it. You got it. No, you go. Heidi Klum. Oh, no. I did not see this story. And what is the corporation that she used to work for? That's on you are. Rita. Is this a media? No undies. Oh, You know, Bras and Victoria Jackie O thiss. Do you call it? No offense to jockey that she was a victory that Yeah. I mean, it makes sense. She was an angel. And they were well, let me fill in the blank. OK, so As anti lawyer told you over a year ago, Heidi Klum new and partied with Jeffrey Epstein. Everyone makes a big deal of saying that they were never on Jeffrey up Seeds plain. But Epstein had access to many others through Victoria's secret and L brands because, remember, he was Thief financial advisor of Les Wexner. The founder of a story a dirty bird. Thankyou. So Heidi Klum worked for Victoria secret, and they paid her tens of millions of dollars. So Heidi Klum complacent antics all she wants with the story, but the truth is out there. Yikes. That's not go. Yeah. So you know, that doesn't look good, So I'll start there. Yeah, I got lots of thoughts, but I'm uninformed, So I'm not going to say any more of them for now. Okay, well, then we'll move on. Thank you..

Heidi Klum Jeffrey Epstein Host And Producer Victoria Jackie O Colleen Les Wexner Victoria Rita Founder
A Look at Police Body Cam Technologies, and Where They Fall Short

The 3:59

08:10 min | 4 hrs ago

A Look at Police Body Cam Technologies, and Where They Fall Short

"The nationwide protests over the killing of George, Floyd brought many things alight from racial inequality to police brutality. One issue that's come back to the forefront is whether or not police body cams are effective tools to hold officers accountable. I'm Roger Jiang. This is your daily charge with me senior video producer Butch Kerry who was a video out today discussing this various you welcome bridget. Thanks for having me. So body cameras really spiked popularity with the police back between fourteen talk about what really sparked this move answer where we are today yeah. It really began with Michael Brown because when he was shot by a white police officer in two thousand fourteen, there was no video footage to show it happened in the officer didn't face charges. So the family came out and Please request thought you know there's a movement that police can wear body cameras that was pushed even further by President Obama also saying that this should be the change for the future. Then there were federal grant setup to help departments pay for them. So you did have this big increase in police departments trying to help their relationship with the community and saying, Hey, we're going to have body cameras now but I mean that was present fourteen and I feel like we're still at the same place which. Is why I wanted to do this report and look into how do they work and why are we still at the same place and it really comes down to how different departments are using the cameras zero zillion talk a little bit about that and just to give our listeners a sense of how broadly there used. I, know you mentioned those grants to the Justice Department awarded place apartments in thirty states more than twenty three, million dollars for body Cam. So how many police officers actually use them? That the data right now, when you look at the statistics, it's looking like about half of our nation right now has officer some way or another obviously is hard to be exactly of small apartments, large departments but right now the idea looks like about half the country has law enforcement wearing some kind of camera or has tested out cameras some. In some way I, mean issues basic the you have officers wear cameras people will change their behavior when they know they're being recorded right there's more trust now when they're when there's a cameras more accountability these really lofty goals for one piece attack at there have been a few snags along the way. Of them being cost of storage because you have all these officers recording when they come into a situation every day. So figure, every officer has maybe three or four hours of recording everyday they have to store in the cloud. Well, how long are they storing that and how much is needing to be saved It's all different depending on every single up police department. So sometimes, it's months sometimes years and you're looking at costs in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. One department only had five police officers in the little town of Nebraska, and they were looking at something around fifteen grand. A year and this is like not folk is not feasible for every department to pay this because those those grants we talked about they don't cover ongoing storage costs. So some departments have been pulled out of using them because they don't see it's it's useful for them to be paying for it because the storage storage is definitely issued cost is an issue. These unforeseen costs are a real. Red Flag but bring it back to you know the ultimate idea that these cameras were supposed to bring accountability and to prove relations with the community was twenty and we're still protesting about police brutality Take things are worse than they ever are they have been. So what happened how did they fail to accomplish that goal? I wouldn't call them an outright failure, but it certainly is a failure in A. Couple of aspects one It goes back to how these tools are being used for one A officers have the ability for the most part right now to start and stop the recording on their own because they they really feel like you should have that kind of freedom. Do you really want a camera to be always turned on in every instance? No not when you're visiting someone at the hospital Having a private conversation or just you know having your lunch that said, what are the punishments if you don't hit that record button when you were supposed to or finding that there isn't a lot of incentive to do the right thing or I should say you know punishment if you miss a recording when you're supposed to at least that's what a lot of the researchers I talked to were saying that. If if you don't activate your camera, you know what's the consequence for that That's that's one area that's missing. Other area that that's missing is how can the public get access to this footage to be accountable? You countless studies have been done, and most recently they looked at all the studies and said, all right. What's the data we're seeing that there are fewer complaints against police officers. That's a good thing. We're seeing that police officers have footage to say, Hey, look I was justified that this was a false complaint against me. Great cameras are showing the truth in different aspects but a cameras show every angle of the story that happened and the cameras only as good as being able to release the footage. So some researchers I talked to said. We WanNA. See more data on can the public access when they want to receive some change now in New York City the mayor said that anytime now there is an incident where someone killed or seriously injured they will release footage but for a while there was this law that said, they don't have to release anything. We'll as a camera that you know. So so that's really the problem. I it comes down to not having a uniformed a set of rules or standards on win. This footage can be released in how it can be used. To the point of consistency, you mentioned New York City Mayor de Blasio a changes law he's fairly alone. He's he's sort of serve an isolated case right? Because the the rules are very greatly I don't think there's any kind of national mandate to be more transparent about when they released this footage ride, we're starting to see changes win the public points, their camera at a situation and out that officers didn't have their cameras turned on over in. Louisville when there was a shooting at the restaurant owner those officers who did not activate. Their cameras were put on leave a might my questions are okay they're put on leave but they're suspended. Where are you know the the more serious deterrence there? You know what's happening people are losing their jobs over it out win when government realized that the spotlight's on them you know but we have to look at what's going on in terms of using them. There is some technology though that is kind of starting to change that part of it like having a camera automatically turn on when it senses something's happening it could be win a Taser guns pulled out of a holster. It could be also not so serious like when it detects a police vehicle going at a certain speed or detects other kind of check marks author software so that Way If an officer is in the heat of the moment and can't remember to turn on their camera. It does it for them There's also talk about live streaming. So some of the cameras are able to have a superior back at home base tap into what that officer is seen in real time. That is a great advantage. When something serious is going down, they get a real time feedback. But. It's something that they're also can be push back with with police unions going wait a second I don't want someone seeing what I'm doing all times I don't live streaming only a few departments really have started to use livestream I. Think Cincinnati was one of the first that used the teaser brand of version of livestream on their cameras, and that was just February so very early for that technology but there's a lot of talk about that.

Officer New York City Roger Jiang Butch Kerry Producer Red Flag George Bridget Justice Department President Obama Nebraska Michael Brown Floyd Louisville Cincinnati
Fresh update on "producer" discussed on Mark Thompson

Mark Thompson

01:30 min | 10 min ago

Fresh update on "producer" discussed on Mark Thompson

"Oh, is that too? A leap? That's ah, that's ah, remaining wow mix of my favorite girls song do a leaper. Mark comes in here and do it And that's bread. Of course, you've got to have fresh producer Albert Anthony, the rock and roller on the board. Let's get to the phones because They're two things at play here. We're talking about the release of prisoners now and in the face of covered 19 but also The Renters who are facing the Issue associated with losing their jobs and losing income. And not being able to pay the rent. And now the eviction moratorium being essentially upheld in extended so I mean it's extended indefinitely, so Anyway, that just to give you a sense of the label and Steve Hi, you're on KGO with Mark Thompson. Yes. I'm very interested in everything I've heard in your show this morning. Well played, sir. Yes. Well, thank you for that. That's a very unusual position. No, thank you. We like Steve. All writing is what you're saying. Okay? Yeah, thank you. However, I do disagree with something. So it's about the I was thinking about the corporate landlords like Veritas and Skybox, I believe is another big one. That's probably what the supervisor is. Art are thinking about when they defend Renters against evictions because they know that it's It's nothing in terms of paperwork and procedure for them to evict someone. And then usually, they flipped that apartment for a much higher rate traditional and that may not be the case now because of the Terrible thing that's out there. But in the past, it was definitely a good move to get someone out and you'd remake whatever you'd taken to renovate. And at least you know, two, maybe three months, and then there it was all gravy. That's absolutely true. I mean, in general, that was the past. And that was the thinking of behind eviction. You get rid of whoever you've got, Whatever you gotta do. Sometimes there's some brutal stories of landlords, you know, making life. So uncomfortable, you know, letting things go not taking care of certain things like hot water that sort of thing and making it unlivable if you will, just because they want to get tenants out so they can raise the rents. Certainly, history is replete with examples of that. But all had saved as you suggested. It's not the case now. And they want those renters to pay the rent there, not a lot of renters in behind them. And they may have targeted the bigger institutional landlords of the sort that you're talking, but I think if they end up affecting Also mom and pop, you know, but Thank.

Steve Hi Mark Thompson Albert Anthony KGO Supervisor Veritas Producer
Who should replace Ellen?

Who? Weekly

08:22 min | 11 hrs ago

Who should replace Ellen?

"News is ongoing. Generous. Ongoing News that won't stop are one nemesis might be replaced by our other nemesis. On their talk show the Ellen show. Well, these are that this is them news, but I do feel like Ellen could be replaced with a WHO, if this all comes to fruition or like a WHO thinks so too person because I'm seeing a lot of people nominate various talk show e people although apparently the rumors are like James Corden is going to replace Ellen, but like he has a show so. That makes no sense to me on any. That's what blows my mind. Why he has eight hundred shows. He has just made another daily show like that doesn't make any sense to me at on. The also has carpool. Karaoke. And then he also has the cat sequel like he has plenty, oh. Yeah. Let's replace a supposedly nice person with another supposedly nice person like. Haven't. We learned anything from this thing. These people are Nice. They suck. I think always be wary of people who say their thing is being. I think the number, one person who should clearly replace Allen is Kiki Palmer. There's literally no. Better obvious. Getting a lot of a lot of traction and she showing up a lot of tweets because it's like she just had a talk show that got canceled for no reason on ABC. Well, it was like that one hour of Commerical Strahan. Michael? And Kiki Sarah? There was A. Third Sarah. Sarah. And Michael and Kiki It just give it to clean working it. Just everyone likes he. We Love Kiki. She's a great host. Who else do you think if if we're going if for skewing young? I think we to Kiki for skewing older, I think it should go to fucking the woman who should have gotten David Letterman, amy. Sedaris like give it to amy sedaris because people like her. She's silly. I don't know that, amy, the thing is I. Don't know that Amy Sarah's would want to do that I. Feel like. I don't need that. We're talking about this on the Patriot. If you WANNA. Go listen to that about how drew Barrymore also has daily, show a daytime show coming out, and I'm like who would want this job? Drew Barrymore wants this job since when like it's just to meal a a weird job that you wouldn't want that could turn you or probably. Turn you into a monster, right? Yes. but the to provide a context in case you've been under a rock people are like there. There have been the rumors for years and years and years, but specifically the past few months they've really you know the hit a critical mass and started being reported publicly like Ellen is an asshole to everyone. Ellen is an asshole. The people she works with Ellen makes people not talk to her ellen cruel. But now there are reports by like news and variety and insider that it wasn't just ellen being a to everyone and celebrities and not liking Ellen like being on Ellen show. It's that the executive producers were actually like being abusive like in sexually harassing the employees. So it's like a culture. Culture of toxicity. That is the sort of thing that I don't that Ellen is deciding up allegedly that she doesn't want to deal with anymore. So she's like this sucks like I just rather not do this anymore. Right. So but this rumor, this isn't this is in fact, this is rumor because people keep their keep going back and forth and saying some some sources say she's not leaving this show sums his sources as she's leaving the show. I. Can't imagine somebody as likely a annoyed with the whole situation who is known to be not a very nice person would want to continue to fake be nice and have to apologize and half to like kind of whatever because these rumors have been. Kind of like I for some reason I, keeping you Kevin Spacey Pre the abuse allegations like when everyone knew he was gay, but no one knew he was gay like it was weird thing where it was like if you knew, you knew if you didn't, you had no idea what be totally shocked it. Kind of feels like that type of Hollywood news where like everyone knew that Ellen was secretly mean except for Ellen fans who had no idea where living happily with ellen everyday of their life and like the show was wildly successful, right? very strange. A very strange thing. Do you think that this will happen because people are so bored in their craving, the Gospel, and then somebody just this is this is what I mean I, think it's I mean. It's a combination of a lot of things at one of is like the people finally speaking out about their employers. It's like finally like shutting down like the. The systemic issues and leg, not being corporate America and knowing that people will support them and believe them and believe them, and that like the media machine of Ellen isn't powerful enough to shut down. So many voices if enough come out and and we'll talk about it later in the episode, but it's like the it's similar to the. Vanessa. Morgan thing, it's it's shades of an ESA Morgan being like I'm going to speak up against the riverdale creators and the Riverdale producers because people are people are realizing that they can do that and they won't get like dumped on by the press or of their fans they will be seen as like heroes. But. It's also just like, I, Think Dakota Johnson had a tiny bit to do with it because Dakota Johnsons like Open crubaugh open open. Rudeness to Ellen SORTA. Gave People. I don't know permission to speak about rumors that she's an asshole more openly. They're like, it looks like that's what Dakota's referencing. So I didn't even know you liked me. Of course, I. Like you. You Knew I. Liked you. You've been on the show many times and don't I show like. But I did invite you and you didn't come. So this time you invited me, are you sure? How do you? I don't think. So ask everybody. Jonathan. Your producer. I was that, why didn't I go? I don't know that became a meme. You have people like Brad Garret and who else replied to him. Leah Tom's Tom's joins. She is mean she is. She. Yes. Now, I can't believe I just called the Thomson. So Deutsche US minor. That was obsessed the disease of this show right here. Yeah. Leah Thompson also respond to that and said Yep I mean, I just think that it's like no one was a true story note once you lose grip on the fear, you are the power you had over I mean, and it's funny because then you have scooter Braun coming out her being like Ellen is great. I. Love Allen is like so people still. Look at the people coming out and say L. Like scooters, hedging his bets at this, all go away and back to normal and Ellen will still be powerful and whatever, and then you have people speaking out i. just it's a fascinating reveal of a monolith almost kind of crumbling that you didn't think would ever. Be exposed like this. I didn't. It seems like Palmer is getting a lot of A lot of press over like a lot of tweets being could replace. Ellen is trending key Palmer got a lot. Tiffany haddish. Got A lot that woman who does the like trump impersonations? What's her name? Sarah? Cooper. She got a lot of people tweeting about her I mean, I think it's just bomber just someone who someone who actually. Got Some tweets booing reply Oh doodoo be from drag race also got A. Drag. Race. Got I. saw that. Yeah. But I think he palmer when you when you want someone who has like the resume as well like. You of don't WANNA, pick someone random like Sarah Cooper. As funny as she is on twitter, because like her her her skills as a as an interviewer, not proven whereas Kiki, Palmer is a link interviewer host. Yeah I mean I would say like the Ellen slots, big slot made we just move up the ladder. We get Kelly Clarkson in that slot. We get Drew Barrymore Kelly was and we get key. Palmer. Work. Curse, lot I know these are all people on different network. So it makes literally no sense but you. Better like we. We cannot confuse the audience. We must replace the Ellen show with someone named. Ellen. Ellen Ellen. Page's like don't look at me like another gay. Just like I will not I will. Zone POMPEO, she wouldn't do it. I. Don't I don't need Elon Pale. Ellen Page Ellen Popular, and Never Would Ellen Pompeo every interview Ellen Pao's ever done. It's been like I. Love Grey's Anatomy I. have nothing but free time like. She will never do that. You know who would do it. Who Ellen Barkin? Embark and all Ellen Barkin wants is a soapbox like did someone say soapbox?

Ellen Ellen Ellen Ellen Page Ellen Popular Ellen Barkin Kiki Palmer Ellen Pompeo Ellen Pao Kiki It Kiki Sarah Cooper Kiki Sarah Drew Barrymore Amy Sedaris Michael Allen James Corden Amy Sarah Sarah ABC Kevin Spacey
Fresh update on "producer" discussed on One Bills Live

One Bills Live

00:35 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "producer" discussed on One Bills Live

"50 to 5 50 Tweet us all the time at W Gr 5 50 Welcome back to one of those life task along with Chris Brown. The reason I'm taking this out of break is that it is now time for me to reverse roles with my good friend Brownie. Uh, Chris s o. We had We had a lot of people that come on. We got ton, dozens and dozens and dozens of guest we have on the show one of them and a lot of them are friend could be construed. I wanted to call and congratulate you on your promotion to host of one bills. I'm on a permanent basis, which were all you know extremely excited about. Do we have, like canned clapped her like from the studio audience here? No, we don't. OK, so we go. There we go. The guys in the control former clapping. Okay, so I'm gonna give you a couple of clues. I want you to try And guess who this secret admire. I'm going to call in the secret admirer is And it is a male Eso because our producer erstwhile producer Jay Harris is a bean. Spiller. So,.

Chris Brown Producer Spiller Chris S Jay Harris
‘The Bachelorette’ Casting Shakeup Expected for Upcoming Season

Comments By Celebs

03:52 min | 15 hrs ago

‘The Bachelorette’ Casting Shakeup Expected for Upcoming Season

"And I know we don't normally cover bachelor bachelorette stuff but this one thing kind of just took our interest and personally having watched bachelor in paradise. I have a real liking towards Teixeira. So we just wanted to discuss because I think it's interesting. So. As you guys know Clare Carly was the Bachelorette her season of course was interrupted with the whole Cova situation. And nothing is confirmed with basically the rumor is that she refused to continue shortly after filming began. Because she fell in love with one of her contestants. This guy named Del Moss he's thirty one. You know he there was a little bit of drama I think early on with his social media activity according to reality Steve which I can't speeches reliability but I can say he has been right. A lot of times said the basically she fell in love with him night one she gave him the first impression rose and she you know think about anyone else she felt so hard and she was done. and. So. I guess she really just didn't want to continue filming and so. The producers obviously were freaking out and Teixeira Adams who is twenty nine years old she was on Colton season she was basically the runner up. Her and Hannah after Colton basically quit to get. CASSIE and she was on Bachelor in paradise and she was dating John Paul. Jones. She's just a bombshell. I've always thought she was a class act. She's stunning. She's really good energy. I actually am really surprised that she was not always the choice now that I'm looking back on it although. I. Remember when Clare was initially announced we were thrilled because I think it's really exciting when. The woman is a little bit older maybe want something different in her life at that point whatever. But what's interesting is if you remember when they had done the initial casting, they had to let some people go because they wanted order contestants. So apparently, and again, I can't tell you this designed to present. This is what's being reported apparently, they kind of were calling back on both some of the contestants eight initially lecco because they were too young and also some of the contestants that Clare had eliminated. So I don't know what's going to happen, but you know Franz Verbs, let's just take this as factual. I think it's more fun to analyze it that way. And I have to say like while I'm thrilled if this is the case these I would so much rather watch tasty to be honest I think she's just really fun and lively and I didn't I got a bad taste in my mouth from Clare after initially liking the whole Matt James Situation I just thought that that was a little bit. I don't know I was not into it when she kinda call now for basically doing charity work and like I'm happy that Claire Found love that's going on. But what's the fuck? How many people think they found their person the first night you know what? Yeah. I mean listen I'm not a bachelor watcher. So I don't like there's a lot of I guess. Details and and patterns and things that happen over the seasons like with different people and people who nuclear people don't like I'm not involved in any of that I really don't know I have a very like personal view of the situation but to me I always thought the whole point was to find the person you wanted to be with the bachelor and a lot of people probably knew in the beginning but continued to date throughout the show like I just I just thought that was the point maybe I'm off with all of my lack of experience in the bachelor but from the very beginning watcher beginning understand her it seems like that's kind of the point of the show. No. I mean, yeah you know listen I do believe that there are certain times when you just know and you're like, this is my person and there's two sides to that one one I'm sure one side could say like. She's right. It wasn't paired the other guy she was doing them a favor, but the other side is. Okay fine. You have that in how much better of a story will be that at the end of the day you knew since day one I don't know the whole thing seems weird. If this is really the case, all I will say like of Clare's happy and she's with this guy in their happy he's hot For her but if tastes the Bachelorette, that would be some shit.

Clare Carly Jones Teixeira Adams Del Moss John Paul Steve Clare Cassie Colton Claire Matt James
Fresh update on "producer" discussed on The Breakfast Club

The Breakfast Club

00:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "producer" discussed on The Breakfast Club

"Enjoyed had a lot of fun that was terrific. I'm looking forward to some of the business people like Mark Cuban what think's going to be a really interesting and strong be important part of that. But I think we're GONNA have some compensation and lots of different people and and also some folks from overseas as well. I'm looking forward to some some people from overseas joining us to try to get a couple of world leaders to join us on the show. We appreciate you for checking brother and good luck with everything. Yeah. She'll be watching Louis appreciate you guys have the on hope everybody stays say and. Come back and see you guys actually would love the up all three of you on the show. So off with you about that sounds great. I will shout to call Watson for joining us this morning and also shot to Taylor rooks for joining us this morning shot to Taylor rooks. Yes. That's my girl. May Show, you follow her so you can see everything that's happening absolutely is like one of the people who in media that I definitely have always followed but I follow her now a lot because she is in the bubble and she gives me like these inside peaks the bubble. So saluted Taylor, doing a great job. All. Right. We'll show them. You got a positive note. Yes. This positive note comes from Bonnie Blair. She's a speed skater and I think we can all apply to star life. She says winning doesn't always mean being I winning means you're doing better than you've done before. I'm John. Horn posted of the podcast Hollywood the sequel on every episode where challenging producers, actors and directors to tell us what's broken in. Hollywood, and how they'd fix it. Here's producer Eva to name unending systemic racism. Just not enough statement is not enough one black executive is not enough to is not enough. Your accompanying must look like real world and we're tackling other problems like keeping everybody safe on sat and fixing Hollywood's broken GIG economy. Here's Moulana producer Jason read the financial pressure to. Do less with more in terms of days. Running, a crew twelve or fourteen hours six days a week wasn't a sustainable model before and it's definitely not a sustainable model. Now listen to Hollywood. The sequel on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts..

Taylor Rooks Hollywood Bonnie Blair Producer Mark Cuban EVA Apple Louis Watson Horn Jason Executive
Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

Fresh Air

05:02 min | 20 hrs ago

Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

"Our film critic Justin Chang says, she dies tomorrow feel surprisingly in tune with our present moment of unease. Everything you need to know going into sheet is tomorrow is pretty much right there in the title. This moody and more deadly funny psychological horror film opens on a young. Woman. Who Awakens one morning with a horrifying from edition of doom she believes that she's going to die tomorrow and it sends her into an eerily calm. Almost Zombie like trance. She wanders the rooms of her recently purchased lock home. She plays Mozart's requiem repeatedly on a record player and shops online for an urn to hold her cremated remains. She never explains why she thinks her death is imminent, but the look on her face is so grave and haunted that we find ourselves believing it to. The woman played by the excellent actress Caitlin she'll is named amy. Not. Coincidentally, that's also the name of the filmmaker amy scientists who has said that the movie was inspired by her own experiences with anxiety and her recognition of how easily that panic could affect those around her. And she dies tomorrow the fear of death proves contagious. The mere act telling someone that you're going to die tomorrow is enough to plant the idea that they are going to die tomorrow and so on and so on. The first person amy tells is her friend Jane played with a sharp comic edge by Jane Addams who thinks she's being ridiculous but the seed has been planted by the time Jane stops by her brother's house where a birthday party for her sister in law is in full swing she too has come to believe that she's going to die tomorrow. And once she voices this fear, the other party guests, it's only a matter of time before they also succumb. In the montage you're about to hear Simon's uses thunderously loud music written by Mondo boys and wild strobe lighting effects to achieve startling moments of operatic intensity. I'm going. To die. Tomorrow. Throughout the movie in these feverishly heightened intervals, Simon seems to be expressing level of horror that the characters themselves cannot. Jane's brother and sister in law. That's Christmas Gina and Katie Nolan do panic a little over what will happen to their daughter when they're both gone. But for the most part, everyone here tends to retreat into their own private moods showing little concern for others Jennifer Kim plays a party guest who abruptly breaks off a relationship something she'd been meaning to do for months. Her now ex boyfriend played by tune had been bay does something much more frighteningly impulsive. Interestingly no one really tries to ward off the crisis or even figure out what's going on a sense of futility sets in and stays there. There's something troublingly resonant for me about the characters inertia. Speaking as someone who's able to work from home and hasn't suffered so many have during the pandemic I'm not afraid of dying tomorrow but I recognize something of myself incitements as characters, the ones who retreat into a state of false calm maybe because screaming and expressing how they really feel might be too horrible or flat out exhausting to bear. I don't want to overstate the metaphorical implications of she is tomorrow, which was made well before the pandemic. But Simon's clearly has her finger on something about how people might respond or not respond to an invisible threat. She's made a fascinating disaster movie of the mind. This is the second feature scientists as written and directed seven years after her debut film. The lovers on the run drama sun don't shine. She's worked for more than a decade as an actor writer director and producer rooted in the independent film world, but with increasing forays into Hollywood. She's one of the key creative forces behind the TV series, the girlfriend experience, and you might also have seen her performances in recent studio thrillers like Alien Covenant and Pet cemetery a role that helped her finance this much lower budget horror movie. Depending on your persuasion, don't like she dies tomorrow might not sound like ideal pandemic viewing but I think one of the great virtues of the horror genre is that it can put our own fears into perspective. There can be enormous value in confronting our feelings of dread had on and feeling a sense of kinship with characters who are confronting there's to. Sign it's doesn't provide easy answers. She also doesn't tell us if her characters worries are justified. She closes the movie on a note, picked between serenity and alarm leaving us to wonder if the end is as near as it seems or tomorrow might, in fact, be another day.

Jane Addams Simon AMY Justin Chang Mozart Caitlin Mondo Jennifer Kim Pet Cemetery Gina Hollywood Katie Nolan Writer Producer Director
Former 'Ellen' Producer Says DeGeneres Was Aware of Abuses

Todd and Don

01:43 min | 1 d ago

Former 'Ellen' Producer Says DeGeneres Was Aware of Abuses

"Former Ellen Show employees, they report sexual harassment and misconduct by top executive producers. And it runs rampant behind the scenes. That's the word on it all starts at the top. It does. I guess it does go. Apparently, ex employees say one executive producer had a reputation of being hands E with the women and then another solicited aural sects at a work party. Never do that at a work party. No, no, and I'm sure it was well received. Sure, yeah, Always a good move. So what? So now the Twitterverse, everybody you're trying to side who's going to be Ellen's replacement. She's not coming back. Well, will the requirement. Be that that it's Ah gay person? I bet I, It has to be otherwise it would look horrible. I'm sure that's going to be the number one priority, and hopefully they have talent. Beyond that. You may be right. I would kind of lead towards funny and entertaining. Well, that it's not that easy anymore, Todd. I guess it is you got you got more, but it's hard to be funny these days. Hopefully, yeah, yeah, ISS it is It's It's hard. It's hard to To know when it's okay to be funny when it's not okay to funny when it's be OK. They said. OK to laugh. Is it not okay? I don't know. S O just got rid of bullying in our schools. That's why that's what happened to make bully and great again. The tide had done shall making bullying great again. How do you pronounce it? Marga? I don't know how you pronounce it AA aa. You're right. It worded the good old bullying Go.

Ellen Show Executive Producer Executive Harassment Marga Twitterverse Todd
Ellen DeGeneres’ Talk Show Drama: Everything to Know

Pat Gray Unleashed

03:17 min | 1 d ago

Ellen DeGeneres’ Talk Show Drama: Everything to Know

"We're. About to cancel. Ellen. She might cancel ourself I you might recognize. Allen. As part of the LGBTQ I eight, two plus community. Also very beloved. Until. Until what happened last fall when she had the unmitigated gall to sit next to George? W Bush had a cowboys football game in Dallas Texas at unforgivable. Well, then we had to go after her and we had got her with everything we got and so that's what they're doing right now and that's what they're doing now could she be mean? To I guess it's possible. It's Kinda surprising to me that if she is so mean and nasty and there's you know sexual harassment running rampant backstage at her show. Why didn't this come out a long time ago I haven't heard sexual harassment to now. Yeah. Something sexual in the she's just a mean person. She's just she has mean and the reason that were pointing out the cheese mean is because she hangs out with George W Bush well, she has to be mean if she'd hang out with your. Share Point Chicken and the egg right. So, Australian TV. Exact reveals a incredible demands from Ellen. He I guess she terrified his staff as she's she said, don't look at her you don't talk to her or approach her. And he she didn't say that her staff members. Yeah. told him that was the case. So a former executive producer of Australia's Today Show Claims Ellen staff walked on eggshells during the stars guest appearance in two thousand thirteen, he was apparently told. To don't approach don't look at her. got. GotTa look at your demand those that's my. Look at me. Great. In fact, if we pass each other in the hallway, you turn around and face the wall right and that's why there's such a stash of patch kids. Yeah. And the studio because people have learned that that's actually how you get them to talk to you. Is If you walk up and you and you extend your hand in you have a pack of Sour. Patch. Kids the pats like okay. Well, maybe give you thirty seconds get. Well, I mean I don't want them from your bare hand though who knows where that's been right. gloved. How about like Okay. That's acceptable. Yeah. Earn thirty seconds with the man earlier this month several employees blasted the Ellen. Degeneres. Show toxic work environment accusing three executive producers of bullying. What does that mean really mean have you ever worked with famous people successful people. They're successful for a reason usually because they can't tolerate bullcrap for one thing and if you don't do a good job, you're going to hear about it. Stunned unbelievable. In April there was outrage over pay-cuts due to the COVID nineteen pandemic and Warner, media employee Relations Group and third party firm will be interviewing past and present staff about their experiences. Okay we're GONNA get to the bottom of meanness

Ellen George W Bush Harassment Pats Allen Dallas Executive Texas Executive Producer Australia Media Employee Relations Group Warner Yeah. Degeneres Cowboys
Apple still #1: podcast listening via mobile apps

podnews

02:56 min | 1 d ago

Apple still #1: podcast listening via mobile apps

"If you thought apple was under pressure from spotify. Lipson. The largest paid podcast host in the world says otherwise from their official PODCAST, the feed, Pero, Walsh, the big dog in aggregate are APPs is still apple with apple podcast and itunes coming in at sixty eight point two percent of all downloads for June, which is up a bit from April Sixty six point five. So. Yeah. The death of apples podcasts is been greatly overstated. Another stat from Lipson is the only not point two five percent of podcast to listen to on a smart speaker. Tom. Webster. Has Thoughts about that. We linked to them from our show notes and newsletter today. For advertising how well do podcasts convert pod sites has posted their conversion benchmark reports based on one point two, billion Ad Impressions from twenty eight, Million Dollars Worth of advertising podcasting convert significantly better than social media they say an embedded ads were twice as well as dynamically inserted ones. Dylan, pugh spotify's former head of podcast monetization in London has launched his own sports and lifestyle podcast company Komodo launched at the end of July the first podcast is all about themselves Komodo the startup journey, it's hosted on Spree Cup. Pot chaser has added the ability to connect your twitter account to discover new podcasts and friends listen and audio production company London is looking for podcast producers. You'll find that pod jobs dot net ads ways has added additional targeting for podcast advertisers who use their programmatic advertising platform podcast Garden, company that promised free. Unlimited web hosting has surprise suddenly gone off line the company last posted on twitter or facebook in. December. It hosted at least two hundred podcasts. Arabic podcast platform podium has to seed funding round of Eight, hundred, thousand dollars. They've launched ten new shows which will be exclusive to podiums APP for the first two months and podcast. Makes podcasts out of news websites according to a writer willing to. And in Paul Cost News here's Conan. O'Brien guess what my podcast was not supposed to come back until September. But surprise my new season starts this Monday August third today podcast junkies interviews. Dave. Zohrab. From charitable and previously on we fakes space junk and so left leftovers flirting helpless and space. We fix space jam returns on August. It's a comedy fiction podcast recorded entirely in lockdown and parts of the fable and folly network,

Apple Lipson Twitter Spotify Komodo Pero Webster Official TOM Paul Cost News Walsh London Dylan O'brien Facebook Writer Dave Conan
Champagne losing its fizz as global pandemic clobbers sales

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:21 sec | 4 d ago

Champagne losing its fizz as global pandemic clobbers sales

"Out. The bubbly champagne sales are falling flat this year. Producers in France's eastern Champagne region say sales have dropped by 1/3 demand has been smashed by draconian restrictions on restaurants, bars and Celebratory gatherings like weddings. The drop in Pops will likely leave 100 million bottles of champagne on court is where the

Pops France
And They Will Inherit It

Latino USA

03:31 min | 4 d ago

And They Will Inherit It

"The film, salt of the Earth was made only a year or so after the strike and released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, it tells the story of our group of Mexican American miners to Ghana. Powerful mining company to demand their rights their fifteen month long strike includes some unexpected heroes and we'll explain that soon. But I you need to understand how radical the film was for the Nineteen Fifties. Politicians at the time were determined to root out secret communists from Hollywood. There were even public interrogation of filmmakers. Are you now have you ever been a member of the? Communist Party, this is audio of the interrogation of filmmaker Herbert Bieber Bearman in front of the House UNAMERICAN activities committee. To use this to. The motion, picture industry and. The Right? Not only be be Berman ended up serving time in prison and was blacklisted in Hollywood because of his suspected communist sympathies, and then he made salt of the Earth along with two other men who also been blacklisted. It seems pretty clear that salt of the Earth was an act of defiance. The government had sanctioned the filmmakers for his sympathies. So they made a movie that was unapologetically leftist. In one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, four, the film was so controversial, only a few theaters across the US would show it. Salt of the Earth was essentially buried from public sight for decades. But in one thousand, nine, hundred seventies, she gano and feminist movements embraced the Phil. They saw it as an example of what social justice movements could actually look like. In two, thousand, eighteen producer. Traveled to Grant County New Mexico to uncover the story of what would come to be called the Empire Zinc strike. He wanted to find out how is sleepy mining town erupted into protest, and if almost seventy years later, anyone still remembers Sayer give them is going to take it from here. Before I tell you about what things are like in county. Now, I'm GonNa, tell you the story about how things were and we're going to start with our to Florida's. He was an important figure in the empire's ING strikes. Please come in. Thank you. My Dad Arthur. Florida's one hundred years old. One of the first. President Sir Locally. Local. Late Ninety is the name of the miners union in Grant County. By the way, we're going to hear about it a lot and our to Florida's was a union leader there in the nineteen fifties. Here, it's OK. Okay. I ever I have no problem with talking. Hundred. Be. Dumb. You're doing just fine. Sits in a wheelchair. His thin silver hair is neatly combed. His son. Larry leaves out a set of old photographs on the table. Here's head. Here's some of the actors from the movie, Clint Man Walking Out of the Union Hall Women Flannels and big brimmed hats smiling triumphantly at the camera. There's two is a full head of thick black hair. The photo is labeled local eight, Ninety Activists Nineteen fifty-three.

Florida Hollywood Sayer Ghana Communist Party Herbert Bieber Bearman Grant County New Mexico Miners Union Berman Grant County Union Hall Women Flannels United States Gano Clint Man Larry Producer Arthur President Trump
DA Seeks To Bring Harvey Weinstein Back To Los Angeles To Face Sex-Related Charges

The John Phillips Show

00:19 sec | 4 d ago

DA Seeks To Bring Harvey Weinstein Back To Los Angeles To Face Sex-Related Charges

"Los Angeles County District attorney's office filed court papers to move the extradition process forward for imprisoned former film producer Harvey Weinstein. He's facing sex related charges in Los Angeles involving three women. A hearing date is expected to be set in New York, where Weinstein was convicted of sexually assaulting two women and is serving a 23 year prison term.

Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles County District Los Angeles New York Producer Attorney
Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

All Things Considered

00:56 sec | 5 d ago

Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

"Has reinstated actress Ashley Judd's sexual harassment case against former movie producer Harvey Weinstein. NPR's Mandali del Barco Reports. The ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed a lower court's decision that had dismissed Ashley Judd's harassment lawsuit. The actress claims movie producer Harvey Weinstein blocked her career after she rejected his sexual advances. The lower court had dismissed the lawsuit because Weinstein was not her employer. But the appeals court cited a California law that says she didn't have to be a direct employees. The ruling said the relationship consisted of quote an inherent power imbalanced, wherein Weinstein was uniquely situated to exercise coercion or leverage over Judd. She's also suing Weinstein for defamation. Now both lawsuits Khun move forward. Weinstein is currently serving a 23 year criminal sentence for rape and other sex crimes. Handle it. Del Barco NPR news At the close

Harvey Weinstein Ashley Judd Mandali Del Barco Reports Circuit Court Of Appeals NPR Harassment Producer Barco Rape California
Tracy Morgan, wife to divorce after 5 years of marriage

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 d ago

Tracy Morgan, wife to divorce after 5 years of marriage

"A a major popular religious comedian been handed actor down is in getting a high profile a divorce lawsuit against disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein Tracy Morgan and his wife an appeals are going court their in Los separate Angeles ways a rule after that five Ashley years Judd of marriage can go a forward rep for the former with one Saturday of her main Night allegations Live and against thirty Harvey rock Weinstein star has she emailed wants to sue a statement him saying under that the Morgan terms of and the sexual Megan harassment wollover laws in California have filed for under divorce rules in which a the person statement could quotes be legally the actor considered as saying to have it is power a challenging time over for another's all involved career and asked the law for applies privacy to people like for his teachers family professors the couple and has landlords a seven who are year not old considered daughter employers the two married after Morgan but recovered can wield power from the twenty over another fourteen judge highway claims after crash she rejected in New Jersey Weinstein's one sexual of Murphy's advances friends and he fellow smacked comedian her in was Hollywood killed as being Morgan a nightmare and two other friends to work were with seriously I'm Oscar injured wells Gabriel I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Tracy Morgan Los Separate Angeles Judd California New Jersey Weinstein Murphy Hollywood Producer Harvey Weinstein Ashley Harvey Rock Weinstein Megan Harassment Oscar Wells Gabriel
Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

"A major religious been handed down in a high profile lawsuit against disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein an appeals court in Los Angeles a rule that Ashley Judd can go forward with one of her main allegations against Harvey Weinstein she wants to sue him under the terms of the sexual harassment laws in California under rules in which a person could be legally considered to have power over another's career the law applies to people like teachers professors and landlords who are not considered employers but can wield power over another judge claims after she rejected Weinstein's sexual advances he smacked her in Hollywood as being a nightmare to work with I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles Ashley Judd California Hollywood Producer Harassment Oscar Wells Gabriel
Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:34 sec | 5 d ago

Court says Judd can sue Weinstein for sexual harassment

"For for Ashley Ashley Judd Judd in in her her legal legal battle battle against against Harvey Harvey Weinstein. Weinstein. Pasadena Pasadena Appeals Appeals court court ruling ruling that that the the actress actress is is sexual sexual harassment harassment claim claim against against the the imprisoned imprisoned former former film film producer producer can go forward. A Los Angeles judge tossed out the claim in 2018 finding that a state law covering sexual harassment did not apply in Judd's case. She maintains that because she sexually rejected Weinstein after a meeting at the Peninsula Hotel in Beverly Hills, he torpedoed her career opportunities, telling producers and directors that judge was a nightmare to work with and should be avoided. At all costs.

Ashley Ashley Judd Judd Harvey Harvey Weinstein Harassment Pasadena Peninsula Hotel Producer Beverly Hills Los Angeles
Hollywood's Good Looking Debate

Daily Pop

02:47 min | 6 d ago

Hollywood's Good Looking Debate

"There is a great Hollywood debate igniting as we speak and we need to talk about it. So it started with this tweet from one of the executive producers of one day at a time asking what male actor is the perfect level of good looking. But also seems fun funny and Goofy twitter collectively seems to think the answer is Paul Rudd. D You guys agree with that? I do. Agree with I. That is like the perfect. He's handsome. He's attractive. He's not intimidatingly attractive. But he's cute and he's also has a lot of personality. So he's just like he's he's Fine look you know what I mean like he's not like the sexiest man alive, but he's got something. Out. Here. Beers. I think he is sexy and especially when he did a man and he was only like chicken breasts, Barroga's leading up to it with all training. Okay. He turned to ninety Zadie looks going on. Who would be your picks? Yes and who did you pick? You know what is going to have to go down a rabbit hole. So follow me here. My pick was Chris Threat back in parks and rec days where he was a goofy and hard. But didn't know he was hot before he got around all hank, we'll see. The hottest NF heiress God is at that time and you know the minute he got hot s. she was like wait what. I didn't sign up for this. This is not what I wanted to go back to the. Keep on eating your Rama noodles like do not get on this diet. So. Unfortunately. The Globe show inevitable like it just happens. No matter what and it's. It's so welcomed by the person that's going through. But the people surrounding it is like I did want this. I chose Zach braff. I don't know. He was the that popped into my mind. Don't you think that makes sense like he's definitely sexy, but not overtly sexy, and he's just he has more of a specific luck. He's not liked so like he's kind of on that call ride. Oh this. Never, thought that he could. Kind Kinda. See when he's in a good suit like right there in the nice tie women minute. We were we supposed to pick someone that wasn't like overtly beautiful, but just like attractive, like has a thing. It's. Assignment I guess. So everyone just. Zach Braff to be employed. That's when he is at his sexiest is when he's consistently employ and that hasn't happened for quite some time. So he's not that sexy anymore. Why? Don't they every time I do see that graph weather that Craig I saw him at the Hollywood bowl, he always had the hottest girl with him.

Zach Braff Zadie Hollywood Paul Rudd Barroga Executive Craig Hank
Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:19 min | 6 d ago

Getting Ready for the 2020 Emmys

"The Television Academy has just unveiled the nominees for this year's edition of the Emmy Woods Nichols Fernando Augusta per checker and colossal rebelo went through the list and brought us the highlights. Let's have a listen. Pelada. Lovely to have you here. Let's talk about the AMI's but first of all, I mean, you have quite an experience with the amas right while I was very lucky last year while working out of our Los Angeles Bureau to attend the ceremony last for the seventy first. Edition of the Emmy Awards it is amazing. It really is a celebration of all things television not only of course, you're able to see the ceremony yourself and how it all unfolds that the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles, you get to sit right next to some of your favorite stars as they celebrate you know a year worth of work you get to watch as some of them lose some of them when at last year was quite. Special because it was of course, the last year that game of thrones was nominated the end of the saga of game of thrones, which was, of course, a really big deal and one thing that I really liked about that was also how they marked the series that were coming to an end last year by bringing all the cast in the production team that was attending the ceremony on stage and kind of acknowledging any TV show that's on. Air for. A few years it is a bit sad one. You know the last time modern family was also the last. So it yeah, it is. It is quite an experience. I mean we are still a few months to go until this year's edition. Hopefully, we'll be able to have it in person by then by September the television academy still hasn't exactly unveiled the plans for that. But yeah, it just feels as much as it is A. Celebration of television it feels very different to watch it in person than on. TV. Sets and if he's going to be a special year because I mean we've been watching lots of television during lockdown effing and one of the things don't you grieve me. Colada that I like about the Emmys they are. You know what they are actually fairly diverse compared to the film awards and that just shows TV can be actually quite progressive away. Absolutely I think. The nominations this year as well. Reflects that diversity is well and yeah it does show how TV has been able to catch up with only momentum that has been happening in Hollywood about asking for change when it comes to diversity. But even if you look at the shows that are nominated or even just a shows that we're watching now they are reflection of different stories that are a reflection of different themes it's not as standard I would. Say, for example, with the Oscars and I think that's what makes it quite an interesting and exciting. Well, let's talk about some of the favorites I did like sheets Greek being nominated for comedy series of things surprise it started as a very little Canadian series but then apparently people saying that my win actually because the critics love it oh, it is a fantastic show I definitely has been one of the ones I've been watching this year and I was very happy to see it getting nominated for the outstanding Comedy Series Award another one on that category that it was really happy to see their it's the kaminsky methods. This is a Netflix show and yes, it is very lovely with Michael. Douglas starring in it and it is very funny as well and it was so nice to see you know it. They're in the category as well and I just I was very happy I. Think. As we were saying the nominations this year do justice to the TV. We've been watching I mean drama succession I know we're both big fans and you know Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong both be nominated for best actor in a drama series very well deserved extremely well deserved and it is, of course, we're talking here about a big categories. As if you go down the list, there are more awards being given to all the shows we've been mentioning. Not Awards, nominations I mean. But yes, I was very, very happy to see succession I think personally, it has been one of my favorite shows over the last few years I can't remember being dad excited about a show in succession was already nominated for Fiore's last year. I. Know that Nicholas Brutal do who composed the sound score for at won an emmy last year. For. For the score, he composed for succession that would be nice to see it how it's catching momentum and that fans quite disappointed that due to coronavirus sat filming restrictions. The third series did not come out this year as planned but this is a recognition of TV done very very well, there's been other recognitions for example, the morning show had quite a few nominations. And again, it was a show that it was not like loved the beginning by tics but I think people kind of were said, you know what actually was a good series especially the last episode of series. So another one I'm very happy also have very significant for apple as well as the morning show was you know the show that apple try to use as? To make its mark as someone that could compete with the network giants and streaming giants as well. So not only is a very good sign for the a seeing Jennifer Aniston Steve Carell nominated but also to see apple when they've been investing into the right series hiring great actors, great writers, Great Producers, and that it actually pays off and Collado. So what if Jimmy Kimmel? This time I mean, as you rightly said, we don't know how ceremony is going to be, but you know what bt awards they did try and they did like a special ceremony. Names might have to do that because it's happening on the twentieth September. That's very the as the television academy has said that the creative emmys, which you know the creative emmy is usually happen a few days before the Primetime Emmys and they've already said that those are happening on an online platform a few days before didn't haven't clarified yet for the AMI's themselves. We still don't know exactly what are the plans now? What is interesting about Jimmy, Kimmel here hosting I think it's his third time hosting is that he is nominated as well. His show Jimmy came alive is on the outstanding variety talk series, and there's always very endearing one. You know one of the host sometimes even people introducing the award end up being nominated. So yeah, I'd be curious to see exactly how that's going to pay out I don't know. was there any surprise nomination here on this list for you? Fernando as F- in the morning show was A bit of a surprise for me and also in the drama category I mean, we saw men hurriedly having quite a lot of nominations itself Jeremy Pope for his role in Hollywood for a best actor on limited series or movie because Lotte I think competition program should go again to Rupo's drag race. Oh Yeah. His love rapport figured they will he would win again just shows how you know when Ru Paul's drag race started. It was a very Niche not known at the public, and now they've been doing this for over a decade now, and there's just shows how you know there is an appetite for a show like that that it is mainstream, there's no way you can't say that anymore and is so empowering it is, of course, one of my personal favorites as well. It was really nice last year to be there when they won and to see Europol come on stage with a lot of the. Of the show as well and some of the judges when we look at that category I'm partial to and I would love to see them winning again on that category.

Television Academy Jimmy Kimmel Emmy AMI Fernando Augusta Hollywood Apple Emmy Woods Nichols Los Angeles Bureau Los Angeles Ru Paul Microsoft Amas Netflix Jeremy Pope Kaminsky Nicholas Brutal Europol Fiore Douglas
Hot Pod Creator Nick Quah on How He Got His Start

Digiday Podcast

04:25 min | Last week

Hot Pod Creator Nick Quah on How He Got His Start

"You are the. Proprietor of hot pod. Explain explain the start it was back in like two thousand fourteen I mean this is like a classic story. Right of of a side project. Yeah, absolutely I was actually working in the same newsroom. Our producer appear RE businesses added together I was working on something else. I was focusing on Commerce and then, but I've been sort of podcast consumer in a fan of for quite some time by that point, and you know twenty four marked by the sort of first season of being as big as it was and generate a lot of headlines, a lot of sort of. Of Coverage, but as a is consumer looked at a coverage didn't quite see that It accurately captured what I thought was happening space so I started project to to cover it as as you know as a way to learn how to report and write about stuff and six years later it's it's a it's my company. It's a fulltime job and it's It's you know it's overwhelming reading a business. It's overwhelming. Okay, I want to get into that, and then we'll get into the state of the podcasting so tell me. When did you decide to make this a full-time GIG? around late twentieth, Fifteen I was just antsy enough and the news that are had gone to a point where I felt like a good just take a leap and try to slap on. Some sort of premiums have structure and see what happens I, don't know I am kind of a hyperactive itchy person and a comedy set in one job for too long and so I saved maybe like three months worth of rent, and and took the shot and and that sort of when I left my job I was then at panoply, which is packets company I was there for a couple of months. It's complicated when you're writing about a pockets industry, and so also working for eight co packets, company and then I decided to just go independent because I just wanted to spend more time writing thinking about this stuff without being beholden to another job. Okay so it was a news, mostly a newsletter. Yeah, yeah, it's still Muslim. Is that her? Yeah, so how many subscribers do you have when you made the leap? Wasn't lot. It was about maybe five thousand, a decent like sixty percent open rate, so I knew that was like a couple of thousand people some of percentage of which would probably end up being paid supporters, and that was that was again by the time I just needed to get to a point where it could just pay off milkjam hosting expenses and my rent, so that's that was the calculation there. Okay, I mean this is pre. Sub Stacks A. You were a bit of a trailblazer their. Sub Stack has you know capitalize on an interesting trend? We'll see if it plays out. But Ya not everybody can love his life. So when you say, we'll see I. Mean I'm sure there's look this is we? Will we talk on this podcast about accelerations and it's also causing. People to think about what they're doing. And what what's been the hardest part I mean you. You had mentioned before that. It's hard to run a business. Explain the hard part of of of when you decided to go and make this a full-time gig to. Making it like a true living. So I, think we. We're talking about this structure. Were we're talking about a very specific kind of media at newsletter business, right? It's you know. There are a couple of news editor driven businesses that have multiple. You know employees that I. Multiple Writers Hop often most part every I handle everything from to handle ad sales. I handle troubleshooting when it comes to customer, service and stuff like that and I think that's the wave that we're seeing of these sort of. Largely single person let newsletters even off. A couple of contributing writers is still like run books and managed back end. That's a lot and that can be quite lonely, and that can be quite a difficult. You can't take certain kinds of swings because there's only one of you and also you know. I've been doing this for six years and. Telling variations on a story and telling the same stories for six years is create take surveys, specific kind of creative person you know some of US think some credit folks and some journalists they like to spread their wings, and and change beat once in a while. You can't really do that with this kind of business. And so that's been part of the creative friction that have been feeling You know six seven years into this business now.

United States Sub Stack Producer News Editor
Eisenhower Matrix and When You Should Launch Your Show

The Podcast Domination Show | Grow your audience, make money and have fun doing it

05:47 min | Last week

Eisenhower Matrix and When You Should Launch Your Show

"What is going on a friend today I want to share with you a question that I got recently about whether you should launch right now during a pandemic, and while this world is just really a crazy place. We've had riots. We've had the pandemic. Of course you'd have tons of other things that are just really odd for near normal midway checkpoint through the year so I got this question the other day that was a good one, because sure a lot of people who haven't launched it, or maybe they're thinking about launching, or maybe they know that they WANNA launch. Launch. They need help with a strategy or the need. Help some of the technical aspects, and they're letting that be an excuse to get them going and get the moving the right direction when they know this is the podcast is something they want to do. They know it's GonNa make sense for them. They know it makes sense for their business. They know they get a lot of value out of out of it, and they know they can give a lot of value more importantly to the world doesn't make sense to launch a podcast during this pandemic during this. Time of economic corrections. What a lot of people I guess the politically correct term it according to Internet experts. Honestly, I think yes, and it's not just because I'm a producer and yeah I. Make my living off of helping people with podcast. Doubt about it, but it's yes, because my question to you is what are you going to be doing where you're GonNa? Be when this is all over, and are you going to be further along, or are you going to be kind of in the same spot with the same platforms or the same place? You feel like you are right now. Your Business personally for me, I've taken this as a way as place to grow my knowledge in other places that week at such as facebook. Advertising platforms like spotify ads. A lot talk, allow learning and testing that space in honestly, this is the time for people who are smart to actually grow and continue to expand where you can in a podcasting is one of those things I don't want you to be stuck on the fence. Who you think launching there are during a pandemic doesn't make sense if you have the ability to grow and expand right now, and you're leading the pandemic excuse, or maybe even just like I. Don't have time for it. Stop you. I think that's really really ignorant. I think that's really really not the best thing for you. If you look long term in your life or in your business so. So! I had a coach teach me. Something recently shot to Greg Hickman from the all agencies and amazing guy and slowly I've learned from Greg. Is something called? The Eisenhower Matrix, and the Eisenhower made is consistent, consists of like four boxes right on the top. You have urgent and not urgent, and then on the left hand side. You have to think of a four part boxer Google Eisenhower Matrix. You have important, not important. podcasting falls into the important, but not urgent bucket for a lot of people. It's something that they know they should do. They know they want to do the. No, it makes sense, but they don't have. They know there's no timeframe on. Any pushing you to podcast with. There's really only really urgency comes from is from yourself internally nine times out of ten from what I've seen, so you don't want to let those needle moving tasks or needle moving objectives fall to the wayside and doing this personally my own business until Greg called me out on it and I credit him for that 'cause. I couldn't see with my own eyes so if you're being me. And being stubborn about and focusing on things that are urgent and important, or maybe urgent, not important right now. If that's where a lot of your time is, then I would challenge you to go and take a look at the Eisenhower Matrix and go and see if you really want to do a podcast. What makes sense with you for you and you are saying you don't have the time for it. Flat out all of the things you're doing and put them on one of those four buckets. You have urgent, not important but urgent. That's like. Email and things like that. You have urgent and important. Those are like creating content every week. That's like fulfilment for your clients. That's you know things like that. Those are the main two for me, and then you have -portant, but not urgent. That's like. Maybe ads campaign or building a Webinar or launching a podcast or launch a YouTube channel or going to this event. Maybe one Kobe's over the pandemics over, so we got important, not urgent urgent. Important not important, but urgent, and then not important, not urgent, which should not be on your list to do it all

Greg Hickman Eisenhower Facebook Spotify Youtube Producer Google Kobe
"producer" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

03:26 min | 4 months ago

"producer" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"And off the track and the Docu series gives viewers exclusive really intimate to the people in one of the world's greatest racing competitions. I knew Jack Squat about Formula One. I stumbled across the show and I have to tell you. I got sucked in quick. I'm totally fascinated by this business. Now I love shows that kind of peel back the layer in a world that I don't know anything about and MRS PERSONIFIES THAT SO FORMULA. One drive to survive reveals the true story of this high-octane sport which goes beyond just the fight to be number. One there's also a battle for the heart soul and direction of the multibillion dollar business storylines include changes that a team under goes after an ownership change and the pressure felt to outperform other drivers. They follow some incredible drivers. You kind of get to go home with them. And to see their extended family for one of the racers. He is a second generation. He shows us his family and Spain. His cousin is his manager. So they're all these great personal stories that are tied into it. It's sort of like hard knocks on. Hbo which is for the football industry. American football this is kind of like their version. And I have to say you're gonNA walk away feeling emboldened by this knowledge about this incredible sport and touched by some of the personal stories. You're gonNA find yourself wanting to follow them on instagram town. You it's a great show for couples if you've got boys at home that are really into car. Racing was actually thinking about my son in kindergarten Yearbook the boy said what they wanted to be an I. Now that I think back to my son had said soldier but there were like three boys that wrote Formula One race car drivers and I kind of just didn't even think about it. But now. In retrospect and like totally get it. These are really incredible athletes and I was really interested in the workouts that they have to do because they have to have the best hand eye coordination of any athlete and then I had no idea but Lewis Hamilton. Who's one of the drivers? He is the highest paid athlete in the entire world. Apparently so it's a great show and I asked Travis Clark Executive Vice President of Action Sports at Wasserman Media Group to to Kinda give me insight into this world. He loves the show too. So if you're like I don't know I'm not totally into this yet. I don't know he is going to. Kinda give you the lay of the land so you can start watching it now. The other show. I'm crazy about is a six part documentary series from executive producer Mark Wahlberg mic millions. Chronicles the stranger than fiction. True Story of how? Twenty four million dollars was stolen from McDonald's monopoly. Game of the nineteen nineties. The mystery master. Mind behind the scam and the intrepid FBI agents on his trail. I'm sure all of you have at some point played that monopoly game. I used to Babysit for a family and they were so crazy about that. Stupid Game Am I. I have to go out and get you like. How many happy meals to get you some points. Paul turns out all these people had been playing and there was no chance that they were GONNA win. So for over a decade McDonald's fast-food Empire ordered prizes in its monopoly promotional game-tying on aware that the biggest.

Lewis Hamilton football McDonald Spain instagram Executive Vice President of Ac Mark Wahlberg Wasserman Media Group executive producer FBI Paul Travis Clark
"producer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:01 min | 5 months ago

"producer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Producer Harvey Weinstein has been hospitalized as a precaution after being convicted of sex crimes correspondent bridging grasses guilty verdict bringing redemption for the two women at the heart of this case and likely for dozens of others who accused Harvey Weinstein of unwanted sexual acts over decades the disgraced movie mogul handcuffed and led out of the New York City courtroom after a jury convicted him on to sex crime charges it's a busy week for Congress the house votes this week on a measure to make lynching a federal hate crime also on the agenda is a bill to ban the manufacturing and sale of flavored tobacco in the Senate members will take largely symbolic votes on two anti abortion bills one would ban late term abortions except in cases of medical peril for the mother the other bill would penalize doctors who do not provide adequate care to babies who survive abortions the votes are largely symbolic because they are not expected to reach the sixty vote hurdle required to proceed they come as the conservative political action conference holds its annual gathering starting Wednesday Linda Kenyon Washington investors around the globe are nervous as a number of coronavirus cases now top seventy nine thousand this is a classic selloff in financial markets it was triggered by emerging markets particularly in Asia who are exposed to the downturn of China this spread to the commodity markets like oil with a drop of four and a half and five percent and even to Europe after seeing the cases from Iran to Italy that was perhaps the most shocking sell off of the day John the Farias Riyadh on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrial average fell one thousand thirty two points the S. and P. five hundred dropped one hundred twelve points the nasdaq fell three hundred fifty five points that's declines of three and a half percent for all three indexes I'm in case do you have concerns about mild memory loss related to aging and have you thought about taking a supplement to.

Farias Riyadh John Linda Kenyon Senate New York City Producer Harvey Weinstein Italy Iran Europe China Asia Congress
"producer" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

Podcast Brunch Club

12:27 min | 6 months ago

"producer" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

"Today we'll be speaking with Raina Cohen the producer on the hidden brain episode fake news and Origin Story from this month playlist the episode we feature this month featured Andy Tucker a professor at Columbia University who shares the history of fake news and objectively in the media. The besides her work with hidden brain rain aucoin worked at ABC News this week with George Stephanopoulos and her writing has appeared in the Atlantic and the new republic rain. Welcome to the show. Oh thanks for inviting me to talk. Yeah I'm excited to talk to you. So he told me a little bit about your role a hidden brain a little bit about the team behind the episode. We listen to WHO this month. Yeah so I am an associate producer and as a producer. It means kind of doing everything from start to end with. I think about it is essentially that I I'm involved in all parts of the process minus the business and the like actually being on air part and I'm on a team where there is the host a supervising producer and then and five other producers. who kind of had similar roles to me? You know what I get to do and the rest of us get to do is pitch stories. We do a lot of reading to figure out WHO's going. CBS on the show. You know once story is in process we are setting up interviews getting to prepare shocker for the interviews which means reading the books six or doing pre interviews or reading someone's journal articles so I'm a nerd. I'm just GONNA leave that out pretty early. So this is it's very fun for me that that part the refund for me and we have hours of tape in hand we get to start scripting and we go through collaborative editing process and then there is all the audio media production work and I've been on hidden brain for about three years and I think as time goes on we've played more and more with sound design so that is also sort of a fun rich part of the process to think about how to use music to tell the story and other forms of sound design that can bring ideas alive so kind of from from conception Shen to the actual execution. That's that's what a I get to do and the other producers on the show get to do. Yeah as a producer you might be the host but it sounds like you're really in the trenches. Yeah for sure I mean that's the that's the fun part is how long does it take from beginning to end for an episode like that too. I mean from what we hear listeners. It sounds like an interview with Andy Tucker sure seems like maybe the host and her sat down and they did over the weekend and the show went out on Monday. Yeah no not not that quick at this was actually a quicker turnaround one just because the way that ended up working in our schedule but that was first trying to figure out. Who are we going to have on the show and then Andy has more than one book? Could you know other articles so I remember trying to figure out. How do these different things that she's written out about over the years you know fit together and figuring bring out like how do you convey ideas through a story arc where each segment of the episode feels like? You are traveling somewhere you know if you listen to a lot of the questions shins and on on handwriting. They're kind of driven by stories. So then. There is the interview with Andy which meant some logistical setup. And then the interview I you no. I don't know what the raw interview was exactly somewhere between an hour and an hour and a half. I'm sure and that episode is about a half hour so we cut things down considerably and that that means trying to figure out what what is essential. How do you keep the momentum? Have to find music. I had to search for tape and that can take a very long time to find the exact thing that you're looking for four and they're all sorts of other things involved like making everything the right volume and sort of finessing so those are the parts of the process and it's usually happening over the course of of months while people are working on multiple projects. But yeah this one. I think we were able to turn around within several weeks. Yeah and it was done so effectively. I mean you really followed the human in Germany of news and how people interact with it over a hundred years really well done team. This month is fake news as someone who works Islamic widely respected new source such as NPR. How does this current era of fake news shape your reporting there are organization in wide standards? So the first thing that I think of is our beloved former standards and Editor of standards and practices Mark Moment. He had add a memo. That was about it truth Sandwich which I think actually is something that other journalists have written about as well but the idea is I mean no this from the kind of psychology research that we've shown that if you just tell somebody something that's false and then afterward you tell them that the thing they previously heard was wrong. It's not really going to be very effective active in debunking the this false belief. So what meant suggested. was that people who are presenting something that you know one person said that was false. Is that you start with the truth. And then you say the thing that is that is wrong but his new newsworthy. And that's why you're there to talk about it and then you reiterate that it was wrong. So they're kind of fun. Example that he had in this memo was despite the fact that Korva Coleman has accurately said mark commits name all the time he falsely claimed that she mispronounced it by you know emphasizing the wrong place and we looked back and she said his name correctly seventeen eighteen times on the air like that kind of idea. Have the truth as your bread and the thing in between to be the the the false belief so I think that's like a organisation-wide idea in terms of hidden. I mean we have the luxury of not having to cover the news as it's happening and that allows i. I saw things like we have. We have a very thorough fact checking process which newsroom has to do with a much quicker way but it also means that it affects what we get to cover so you know besides this story on Fake News. We've also done other stories that are about how people come to believe things that aren't true. So there's an episode tally Sharon about the psychology of false beliefs. And I think it's pretty humbling to think about why we are are are drawn to ideas that are not true and we also had an episode around specifically false beliefs in science and even even among scientists how these ideas spread so even if we're not covering what politician said that was inaccurate. We get to step back and give people information that allows them to maybe reflect on whether they believe something that isn't really accurate and so I think that's the way it kind of comes out most prominently innately in in brain. Well it makes sense that your practices at NPR hidden brain would be so granular seeing as you're so respected. I would just say you know this whole episode had to was just talking about objectively in reporting and really there was a lack of objectivity throughout history. I mean it seems almost like our modern beliefs of fact checking is a little bit of an outlier in terms of what people have been consuming for so long. I mean I'd be interested in hearing how the hidden brain team the values I mean. Is that part of your process. I think the way that we you know the way that objectivity comes into the work that we do is We are interested in ideas that make us uncomfortable and instead of turning away from them to try to understand them and to try to get them from different vantage points so I think really obvious example of this was there is an episode about explanations for why White voters voted as they did in the two thousand sixteen election and they were two different scholars who had different arguments that were in conflict with one another to quite an extent and about why white voters had gone for trump. And you know whether this was like basically whether you want to emphasize the class part or the or racism in their behavior so you know I guess the way that I think about hidden brain is that it is a show that is interested in investigating all sorts of ideas even ones that make us uneasy. See you know to do it with a lot of nuance and to not be pursuing controversy but to shed light rather than he and I think about this with the episode in the air we breathe breathe which was about the implicit association test. So it's Y- vary widely used to kind of determine someone's level of implicit implicit bias. So like sort of bias that they would not themselves maybe even be aware of. We were focused on race. But it's a test you can do for all sorts of prejudices and there are pieces in the media at the time that we're kind of very negative on the Iot because there were issues with how much it was actually able to predict people's behavior and people sort of saying well. This is useless and I think the you know the episode turned into wasn't just basically a hit job on this. I'm really really important task. But instead was an investigation into A. What does this test explain? And I think we got a much more interesting answer from that so I think maybe like geico willingness to look at all corners and not do a very simple story is part of what it means to. You know to be objective like I I think there are. There are other things that reported on about implicit bias. And maybe we could just not report on the problems with the you know the debate over the problems with the test because is it would undermine other things that have come on the show. But that's not the way we go out things well. I really appreciate you taking the time to explain that to me. I feel I feel a little guilty that the episode that bringing you on is about fake news and objectivity and I am really grilling you hear practices as a journalist. I hope that's alright. Alright yeah I mean. I think it's important to have a lot of integrity and I I mean actually this story behind how Andy Tucker got on is is is related to journalism practice because I encountered her work through fellowship that I went on that was about professional ethics and I was specifically in the journals and program and she she was one of the leaders of it so she gave this presentation on the history fake news that was pretty extraordinary and when we were thinking about people to have on the show that she had she'd come to mind mind but anyway that's just to say that I'm interested in thinking deeply about the ethics that go into how journalists carry out their work and a lot. The stuff we do can get into tricky territory. Even if you're trying to be careful well and I would say we're very interested as well at least me personally. I mean as a podcast consumer. I think I'm someone who's yearning for information so the Morgan here about your processes excellent but I'd like to move on a little bit past this topic here about what you working on now. Like what are you doing personally. Or what is hidden brain rain doing that. We can look forward to so I am at the early stage of several different episodes. So yeah one. I'm excited about where still so figuring out exactly the you know the angle. But it'll be related to anger in some way and I am pretty certain we're GONNA have on this philosopher who I I've disliked adored her work for a very long time. So that's pretty exciting to get You know be helping with an interview with somebody who's WHO's working like. I you know in my outside life fine really interesting people working on all sorts of things. There's an episode. That's coming out in a couple of weeks that I am really eager to hear from my colleague Laura and it has been in the works for a while but the general idea as I understand it is that you know well past the period when people have imaginary friends we actually are kind of communing with different people Mentally so whether it is like a celebrity or the author of a book or somebody who you kind of feel like you know and you're in conversation with even though you actually don't know them she's sort of looking into what those sorts active relationships look like and I think the some of those sort of interesting psychology around so It'll be it'll be new to me once once I get to hear it. Abbas she she is in the trenches right now trying to Produce that episode and there's also there is another one of my colleagues has an episode. Kosovo coming out. Soon that I like for me has changed the way the I think about political activism and yeah has made me observe certain.

Andy Tucker producer NPR supervising producer Columbia University George Stephanopoulos ABC News Raina Cohen aucoin Atlantic Shen CBS geico professor Iot Germany Abbas Editor Kosovo Laura
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:57 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> this is <Speech_Music_Male> Lowell. Bergman <Speech_Music_Male> investigative <Speech_Male> journalist <Speech_Male> and former producer <Speech_Male> for sixty minutes <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> was the basis for <Speech_Music_Male> Al Pacino's character <Speech_Music_Male> in <Speech_Music_Male> the insider. <Speech_Male> I'm recording <Speech_Male> from a beach in <Speech_Male> the Caribbean <Speech_Male> where. It's almost certainly <Speech_Male> nicer than <Speech_Male> wherever you are <Speech_Music_Male> listening to this podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And I'm going <Speech_Music_Male> to read the credits <Speech_Music_Male> now. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Catch and killed. <Speech_Music_Male> PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> is a production of <Speech_Music_Male> Pineapple Street studios <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> Ronan Farrow. <Speech_Music_Male> It was produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Sophie. <Speech_Music_Male> Bridges Serena <Speech_Music_Male> on <Speech_Music_Male> Janelle a <Speech_Music_Male> Piper <Speech_Music_Male> Bluejean Lee. <Speech_Music_Male> Laura Dodd <Speech_Music_Male> our senior <Speech_Music_Male> producer. Is Eric <Speech_Music_Male> Mental <Speech_Music_Male> editing <Speech_Music_Male> by Joe Level <Speech_Music_Male> Executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> at Pineapple Apple <Speech_Music_Male> Street or gender <Speech_Music_Male> wise. Berman <Speech_Music_Male> Max Linski <Speech_Music_Male> reduction. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Help from emily. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Becker Maddie's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tyzzer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> newer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Abraham and <Speech_Music_Male> Alex Patrick's <Speech_Music_Male> Kovic. <Speech_Music_Male> Back <Speech_Male> checking by Sean. lavery <Speech_Music_Male> music <Speech_Music_Male> in the episode from <Speech_Music_Male> Blue Dot sessions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> said and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I com- <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special. Thanks thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to John Lovett. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Next week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We're going to hear the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> story of the secret <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recording <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that helped Undo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Harvey Weinstein <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> from the woman in <Speech_Female> who made it <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> I thought that <Speech_Female> it <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> heard it <Speech_Female> I was saying <Speech_Female> the truth <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and instead they <Speech_Female> they ask. Ask <Speech_Female> Me <Speech_Female> Ambra. <Speech_Female> Could you <Speech_Music_Female> do <Speech_Music_Female> something for us. <Speech_Music_Female> Oh and he said <Speech_Music_Female> yeah absolutely <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> they said <Speech_Female> Would you want onto <Speech_Female> meet them <Speech_Music_Female> tomorrow <SpeakerChange>

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

09:05 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Silence and when I kept banging on doors asking for answers I was finally told that the matter was under review even higher up the chain by our parent company NBC Universal and its CEO. Steve Burke a few days after that I was told by Noah Oppenheim to pause are reporting he said the company was worried about the legal implications of me talking to sources who had signed nondisclosure agreements with Weinstein he cited an illegal concept concept tortuous interference with contract. It refers to an someone deliberately tries to mess up a contract between two parties usually to gain some kind of business business advantage. If you remember the phrase at all it's probably from a movie is a legal concept that has been getting some new attention. Recent tortuous interference appearance. Yeah that movie the insider about CBS News as parent company shutting down. Its Big Tobacco reporting using this same mm-hmm specious argument. Does he go on television. And tell the truth yes is it newsworthy. Yes are we going to air it. Of course it's not it was baffling because it was like it was like the script of the movie playing out for us in slow motion. I remember Jonathan May partner at one point just through shouting outing. Frustrated like has no one in his building seen the inside your questioning our journalistic integrity questioning your hearing Here's what I can tell you. Now that I didn't know was happening at the time as I was working on this story three top executives executives at NBC conducted. At least fifteen secret calls with Harvey Weinstein in some according to records and sources who listened. They had assured heard him that the reporting had been stopped before I knew it had been Weinstein. Also later claimed in legal threat letters to me that NBC had given him written assurances that they'd kill the story. The network has denied reaching any agreements or making any assurances to Harvey Weinstein or his legal team. Almost all of this had been concealed from me and rich so I'd kept pushing as NBC. Kept stalling as the network continued to drag its feet McGowan facing increasing pressure from mounting legal threats sent. NBC season desist. Letter over her interview. We still had a lot and even gotten legal to sign off on a draft of the script But the decision would ultimately fall to the executives. Then on August Eighth I went into a meeting with Oppenheim after the meeting grabbed rich and found a side room and thirty ready rock to hop into I turned on the recorder on my phone. We were doing that a lot by then so at three. PM I went. In with Noah Oppenheimer's concerns weren't always coherent. He would go on to argue. That the story wasn't news pattern. He's like my view. Is that the tape and Harvey Weinstein Gene Grabbing Ladies Breasts a couple of years ago. He's like that's not national news and he said that we didn't have enough like look we have. There's animus sourcing in here in any seemed to slip up saying Harvey says and then walking it back. And saying he'd been told Harvey said that there. It was a bigger issue that because of my sisters assault allegation against Woody Allen had a conflict of interest I also and then you know he said Yeah but you wrote that Hollywood reporter order piece a year ago in that conseco slash and like the public narrative is going to be terrible on this that like you know. You let Ronan Farrow. Who just you know came out as this kind of crusader Seder on sexual assault issues? You know hating his father so he's likely that you let him do this. You know this reporting You know despite the fact that you were aware that the guy that he decried in this Hollywood reporter piece Woody Allen have you know fruitful business relationship with Harvey Weinstein to be clear. Caring about an issue is not a conflict of interest I had no animus against Harvey Weinstein. My sister's allegation wasn't related to him in any way At the outset of the reporting Greenberg even sat with rich and me and we gould and checked out any contacts between Weinstein and my family turns out both of my parents worked with him like most people in Hollywood. I'd had only a friendly cocktail party interaction with him. Anyway we all agreed not a conflict of interest Oppenheim told me the story was dead that day at thirty rock rich and I struggled to make sense of what was happening was continues to get off good. God it's amazing can win by or at least hold this off and get an organization journalists and producers to story. This is amazing over the following days. There was some effort to put window-dressing on the decision decision with the network briefly saying they're going to review the evidence but the kill order held firm and when I secured another major interview that one in Los Angeles I mentioned and Oppenheim mortared me and Greenberg ordered mccue to cancel it Oppenheim told me. NBC couldn't have anything to do with the story after NBC killed. The story got a warm email from Weinstein burying the hatchet. He mentioned how Great Megan Kelly show US quote. I'm GonNa send you a little gift to celebrate. They wrote then Weinstein's staff got the email they typically got when a gift was mailed out. Update it read. No Oppenheim received a bottle of grey goose so I took the evidence to the New Yorker and they looked at the same reporting. NBC had sent away and ran on all cylinders to to build on it. And get it out. You'd be surprised. How many leads start to pan out? Once you aren't being told to cancel interviews every time you reveal their happening. It took a little more than a month to go from green-lighting the the story to publishing it rich had encouraged me to take the story elsewhere. Even though it meant he couldn't be a part of finishing the reporting. I was a contractor who worked in print print occasionally he was still fulltime employees at NBC and add to keep his job to support his girls. He felt conflicted about staying at the network other journalists suddenly NBC Investigative Unit did two in the same way that we were asking you know victims of sexual assault to come forward and tell their stories like we had a responsibility then on what was happening at NBC. The day the story broke. I went on the Rachel Maddow. Show joining us. Once again. Is Ronan Farrow. He's a contributor for the New Yorker magazine Zine who broke this explosive story today about further revelations concerning Hollywood mega producer Harvey Weinstein again the NBC executives asked me not to talk about why the the story didn't run on the network. I told them I wouldn't bring it up but also wouldn't lie but let me tell you folks that Rachel Maddow. She's got a nose for we're good story outlets. NBC says that you didn't. The story wasn't publishable that it wasn't ready to go by the time that you brought it to them but obviously is ready to go. By the time you got got Anthony Yorker I walked into the door at the New Yorker with a explosively reportable piece that should have been public earlier and Immediately mmediately obviously a New Yorker recognized that and it is not accurate to say that it was not reportable in fact there were multiple determinations that was reportable NBC. After the show I texted rich. I was was out celebrating my wife. Dini's birthday We are at restaurant and you send me a text in the middle of it saying Boom you know I told the truth I I guess that's former. NBC correspondent now. That was my last appearance on. MSNBC for a while rich however are still had to go into work the next day he and the investigative team more called into a meeting with Oppenheim where Oppenheim largely went on the defensive. We tried and want to correct the noise out there and we supported the story in Romans. Jones you know we've been putting him on our air he. He tried to go down this road and I literally. It was like the second most mad I've ever been in my life and and people in the room described it like we could feel like the back of your neck getting red like I was like. I'm witnessing a cover up but I mean there's no other way to I was it's like I'm witnessing them rewriting my history. There was a point where I was like. You know what I'm Gonna I'm GonNa just bite my tongue or or I'm going to have to actually confront this in this meeting and it was terrifying. 'cause I was like the sky's the president and I'm you know a senior Peru or supervising producer. And so I said I just went in. I was like you know what what forgive me but I have to correct you on some things and It got it got messy a lot of the members of the investigative unit like like really got upset and ask some really tough questions to the point where he was like you know.

Harvey Weinstein NBC Noah Oppenheim NBC Universal Harvey Weinstein Gene Hollywood Ronan Farrow Rachel Maddow assault Harvey CBS News Steve Burke New Yorker magazine Woody Allen Megan Kelly
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

02:52 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Rich and I were both worried. We decided we needed to work quietly without alerting our bosses and come back to them with a story so locked down. They couldn't tell us to keep it on the back burner so for the next few months we scheduled Weinstein interviews around trips. We had to take for other stories like we were shooting the story out in California we can sprinkling doing some interviews around that. You're keeping some of the files associated with the story in a folder associated with an another earlier story that we had been working hon. Called Poison Valley Valley is about Dow in Shell Chemical Putting toxic waste in California farmlands it just seemed fitting in some way. The reporting was getting stronger and stronger. I was getting more and more interviews with women with allegations and with people around Weinstein who had seen abuse. But I'd heard about one piece of evidence that might blow the whole thing open an audio recording of Weinstein made by an Italian model named number Gutierrez who was wearing a wire and she'd managed to capture this moment where Weinstein appeared to confess to repeatedly assaulting women women Gutierrez had been assaulted by Weinstein the day before he grabbed her breasts without consent. Here's what I'll say about this recording the actual story of how it was made and how eventually got a hold of it got it is truly surprising recording and I will tell that whole story in the next episode this podcast but for now just know I got the recording. Look the audience. Come on and rich was the first person I wanted to play it for. L. Never forget the first time I heard the audio you walked into NBC and we want until aside room and he played it for me. I'm counterweight to shower. You sit there and drink water on. The bar must have unit. I I remember thinking of the time like his voice was like so monstrous and chilling moment. You saw at least I heard for the first time. What all these other women had talked about to be one of the most damning portion of the recording comes when Gutierrez asks asks Weinstein why the day before he touched her breasts and Weinstein says? I'm used to that. It was the first time in my anything that fear Kinda just all of a sudden when injected itself into it. The thought I had that moment was this is the beginning of the end of Harvey Weinstein.

Harvey Weinstein Gutierrez California Poison Valley Valley Rich NBC
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

07:45 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Almost one billion people worldwide lack access to glasses which is crazy because glasses glasses were invented seven hundred years ago. We should be on top of this so Warri Parker partners with nonprofits like vision spring to ensure that for every pair of glasses sold a pair is distributed to someone in need worby. Parker believes that everyone has the right to see. And if you need help picking out glasses you can take their quiz wiz. Answer a few quick questions and they'll suggest some great looking glasses that are totally personalized to fit your face and style glasses. Start at ninety five dollars dollars. Including prescription. Lenses lenses include anti-glare an anti scratch coatings and blue light. Filtering lenses are also now available. have an iphone ten. Make sure to download worby Parker's APP where you can use their brand new virtual try on allowing you to try on eyeglasses seeing the realistic color texture and size of each style style using just your phone and more Parker has a free home triumph program. You order five pairs of glasses and try them on for five days. There's no obligation into by it ships free and includes a prepaid return shipping label so had to war parker dot com slash. Catch to order your free home. Try on take a quiz to find in a pair that is perfect for you today. Hiring is challenging. But there's one place you can go where hiring is simple fast and smart and we're growing businesses can connect to qualified candidates. Kotal co-founder Gretchen. hubner experienced. How challenging hiring can be after unsuccessfully searching reaching for a new game artist to grow with her Education Tech Company but then she switched to Ziprecruiter and saw an immediate difference? And you can too by signing up for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash. Catching kill Ziprecruiter. Doesn't depend on candidates finding you. It finds them for you. In fact Gretchen said Edgy hired a new game artist in less than two weeks with results like that. It's no wonder four out of five employers. Who Post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day Ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire see why Ziprecruiter's effective for businesses of all sizes trust Ziprecruiter for free at our web web address ziprecruiter dot com slash catch and kill that's ziprecruiter dot com slash C.? T. C. H. A. N. K. I l.. It was April twenty seventeen about two months after we first interviewed rose McGowan. I got a phone call. I called rich to tell him about it right after. Hey there you governor so I got another call from another I'm Harvey's interlocutors this this guy the call was from a guy named Matt Hilt Sick. Hilton is a PR strategist. He's pretty well. Known in celebrity and political circles works with a lot of clients. I I know for time. He was Weinstein slack. At Miramax he was at an event called women in the world being headlined by Hillary Clinton he was calling. I'm from backstage. Hillary speaking you know Blah Blah Blah schmoozing smallpox. And he said so. You Know Hillary here and Harvey here who have worked for years. And I'm like Oh okay. And and he was like a harvey just walked in. Actually he said you know He. He said he who says Ronin guy laughing question investigating I told held sick. I don't do ambush stories if this were to make it to air. At all I'd be calling Harvey Weinstein for comment or an interview long beforehand and then while I was relaying all this rich perfect just texted me again now staying up Harvey. He has sort of Larrea. Dave your message. He asked me to call you back. Right Merrill Yeah. He's put you on the phone with his. I don't know I think the possibility he's at this. I I just quoted. You attack gave your message. She asked me a call you back. I haven't responded and That sound from rich by the way It'll be hard to overstate. How much of being journalist comes down to that sound My Golan's situations is always to be as fair as possible. Talking with Weinstein early might help him realize that it might make him feel less under siege. I mean I could see arguments on both sides of that like if you're gonNA spend a Pi to go through my trash and try to build a narrative against me I don't know a UAB Either the kinds of things people do in there. I don't know I know on the other hand. There were risks. The more Wednesday new the more opportunity he'd have to move the chess pieces around trying influence people involved in the story. I think if they know that it's a long way out and they'll just try to go all about US eighty to try. Chill it in some capacity Right I'm just GonNa go to somebody else not you you know. Some some MHM Konczal. He's just going to try to find ways to sabotage it and now she's GonNa probably do anyway Shit I duNno confusing won't rich and I went back and forth like that for about twenty minutes. We I decided I should just text back sick the PR guy. Put The ball back in his court. I'll just I'll say always happy to talk. Okay are you gonNA be around. I'm driving okay. How she did heal sick did call me back later? Though not with Weinstein the line he said Weinstein was upset. Agitated that he dealt with this kind of reporting before he also implied that Weinstein eighteen would likely be taking some kind of action though. It wasn't clear what that meant. I could hear applause in the background. It was for Hillary Clinton who had just stepped on stage. She'd been in the Green Room talking to Weinstein the very next day. I got a call from my boss. US Richard Greenberg the head of the investigative unit at NBC. He started off with small talk asking about another book. I was working on. I called rich again. Stop Date Him Anyway then he goes to what I assume. It's a real conversation. He was sort of like you know so. I think you know where where we stand now is lake. Let's just Kinda give it a rest like you know I'm not saying don't work on it but like keep it on the back burner. You have so many other promising things or working on you. Know what what they don't have to necessarily focus on this. I just find it. Ominous is a long and short of it. I don't know you know me I'm sick or cynical so And soon rich was getting the same signals. He'd raised the Weinstein story got a suggestion that he should focus on other things. It was hard not to speculate hard not to ask ourselves. Do you think Weinstein reached out to NBC. Tried to get around us. We both knew the decision about whether to put this on air would ultimately be no Oppenheim again. The president of NBC News. The Guy who wrote Jackie him decry the art by. You're more likely describe screaming black. My husband was a great man I wonder where no relief on this. I believe that he would not ah back down to pressure. You know just from what I know. A guy.

Harvey Weinstein Hillary Clinton Ziprecruiter Parker Warri Parker NBC rose McGowan US MHM Konczal Gretchen UAB NBC News Larrea Richard Greenberg Hilton Education Tech Company Kotal Oppenheim Miramax
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

04:05 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Natalie Portman and if I don't demonstrate but my silence however they have brow furrows eh children. She heard back it is but she can't get up and I also heard about the tweets and so we we kind of left there with Not The mandate but like the blessing of wellbeing. Get rose McGowan to do an interview. Then you might be a good idea. Yeah it was a very casual interjection and and you know ultimately obviously proved to be something of a Pandora's box so very quickly. It became apparent that I would have to make these calls. Because you had just written this article and now you had some credit in in the space and it might be good coming from you as opposed to some unknown producer sitting in New York. NBC and that proved to be true on a lot of those calls. Also the name Harvey Weinstein came up. Weinstein had kind of reinvented the business model for the independent film. He knew how to turn them into events. Sex Sex lies and videotape pulp fiction. Shakespeare in love. His movies had earned more than three hundred Oscar. Nominations at awards shows. He'd gotten literally more. Thank yous used God Meryl Streep once even jokingly referred to him as God I met up with The source again. Rich and I would debrief after my reporting calls or he's GonNa find a way to talk to and think about it a little more but you know. She seems like she's still in. She's not freak out. In February twenty seventeen to executives who had worked with Weinstein and seen abusive behavior went on camera they asked that we obscure their faces and shadow shadow. Which is a pretty common technique used sensitive investigative stories and I also got a firsthand account one with no shadow at all leading up to it? We we're not Sheriff Rosewood talk and if anybody else would talk and then rose you know. God lover decided to do it. I don't think it's is possible to overstate. What a risky move? This was from a gallon. She felt her career had already been derailed. After the initial incident further exposure hoosier could make things worse and she knew Weinstein had a reputation for using elaborate tactics to intimidate those who spoke out against him in mid-february rich and I headed up into the Hollywood hills. To See McGowan. We brought a camera crew. She came to the door to show us in. She was wearing a floppy sweater only a little makeup makeup. Her hair was bust. Rich helped set up the lights in our living room. I sat across from her and we turned on the cameras. I thought I was for an hour. Four at a meeting and then on the way out it turned into Nada meeting McGowan wept recounting are allegation at all happens very fast. And I'm very slow. I think any survivor can tell you and again you separate from your body and then all of a sudden you have no clothes on. Was this a sexual assault and this was a rape. What's I mean I've I've been through probably hundreds if not thousands and thousands of injuries over the course of my career? It was not like any other interview I've ever heard it was gut wrenching. I remember at the end of it and after we talked to her after for the interview I thought to Myself Holy Moly this is real it got real right there at that point. She was identifying defying Weinstein. Clearly without naming him referencing his movies describing specific wards heat one asking people to connect the dots soon after she would name him fully on on the record and volunteer to do so on camera McGowan told me she was worried. NBC's leadership wouldn't see the story through half the lawyers. Watch this. Yeah Oh they will be but not just read it and I hope they're brave to because I tell you what happened to their daughter their mother their sister.

Harvey Weinstein McGowan Natalie Portman Rich NBC Meryl Streep Shakespeare New York Oscar Hollywood hills assault rape
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

10:50 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"This is the catch and kill. PODCAST I'm Ronan. Farrow much of my reporting on Harvey Weinstein has become synonymous with the New Yorker magazine. That's the story ultimately ran and they're the folks I've kept reporting with in the months and years since but what's not as well known. Is that much of the reporting actually started at NBC News an outlet that decided not to run the story. Now stories get killed all the time. Sometimes you just don't have enough reporting. Don't have enough evidence but that wasn't the case with the Weinstein story worry at NBC. We had a lot and plenty more promising leads. We could have pursued and the fact that NBC passed on it the fact that they it didn't let us pursue those leads. Raise a lot of questions. Both outside of that building and within the network zone ranks the story of what unfolded at. NBC is a case study in the power of news organizations to safeguard the truth and in how devastating the consequences can be so when they do the opposite and nobody had a clear view of that drama or was placed in a more difficult position because of it. Then rich McHugh admin. We're GONNA probably get fired today. We're going to tell you that story how it happened in real time when you couldn't go to L. A. That one really got me right. The cutoff offer. That really infuriated me which lives in suburban New Jersey with his wife. Dan and their four daughters two sets the twin girls and you deserve some crazy metal for just surviving. That rich grew up in the suburbs to outside Chicago. The youngest of four kids Irish Catholic Catholic family to Jesuit schools played ice hockey like a lot of hockey. He drove himself to Detroit for Games even went to a special school for it. He was still playing when we worked together. He'd limp into the office with all sorts of weird injuries but riches dreams of playing in the NHL didn't quite pan out. He wound up studying English in college. I never actually thought about being a journalist and tall. You're gonNA find this interesting I Columbia and I watched the insider if you got vital insider stuff the American people for their welfare really do need to know you feel impelled to disclose it and violate major agreement doing so. That's one thing if you haven't seen it the insiders great journalism movie. It's a dramatized version of a true story. Al Pacino plays as reporter Lowell Bergman a sixty minutes producer. Who convinces a big tobacco whistle blower to go public about a massive cover up at his company and break his nondisclosure Russia Agreement Bergman's problem though is that executives at CBS? Do not want the story to air on sixty minutes. They're worried you'll get sued and end so Bergman winds up fighting his bosses at the network since when has the Paragon of investigative journalism allowed lawyers to determine the news content on sixty minutes. You won't be satisfied unless you're putting the company and win. What are you are you a businessman or are you a newsman? And I was is like low Bergman that that guy's amazing Sir Richmond into broadcast news. He started out producing at Fox. News than MSNBC EH. Then he spent nearly a decade at. ABC's Good Morning America. When I met him he was trying to settle into a new role at the investigative unit at NBC News? You know I was trying to find my a my spots. I was working with several correspondence. And you know enjoying some of the work I went overseas and did some crime stories about the NYPD. The but I hadn't found a lane at didn't have a correspondent that I was gelling with particularly you know there wasn't somebody that we haven't Egged with and then and then we met and then you come into the picture. What was your well? Tell me your side. First impression of you was watching you on under cable show. Hello and welcome to Ronan Farrow daily. I'm Ronan Farrow. I'll be here daily. And as it turned out briefly my own career was pretty up in the air when rich and I met I was in my mid twenty s I've been hosting this midday show on. MSNBC got some bad reviews news at the start some good reviews by the end and pretty much know. Viewers throughout pay. Cable is tough enough about me. It's time for today's headlines. So it was cancelled I got bumped and I became an NBC. Investigative correspondent. I was working with a rotating cast of producers on stories. That's when rich and I got assigned to work together. We weren't exactly Ham egg ourselves. If I'm being honest I was like I. You know I'm I'm not sure I'm going to like this guy. You asked me to be honest. I just remember I you were you. Were texting all the time. Like what is this right is what are we doing and I was like I. Ah Haven't hadn't been used to that level of hands on. I'm sure that the producers were here on this podcast to have any experience so far Are laughing at this because my my worst is very much like I am so invested in every aspect of it and like very controlling and I love to be collaborative and bringing other people but I also so demand a lot of involvement one text. Like yes you'd send me like seventeen more texts like okay. Now that you're listening. Okay like home. Yeah thanks for putting up with that literally. Everyone I've ever worked with I actually wondering retrospectively thought we would just cancel each other out and like the problem would be solved and they could just put us over like okay McEwen Pharaoh. They're done on the next problem like did they think we would actually develop some good work together. I I honestly don't know. I don't know what the expectation was but I doubted that we would develop good work together and they're always been unspoken norms about how mainstream outlets cover wealthy and connected men accused used of sexual abuse like when I try to cover the allegations against bill cosby on my show. I sometimes push back from veteran producers. It was is old news. It wasn't news but things were starting to change. In Spring Twenty sixteen. The Hollywood reporter ran glowing profile profile of Woody Allen glossing over a long standing allegation. My sister Dylan had made that. He molested her when she was seven years. Old and for the First Time Time magazine got a lot of backlash for not asking harder questions about it so they asked if I'd write something about the media's responsibilities when it came to this issue as you for most of my adult life I'd avoided talking about the allegations at one point I even told Dylan to basically quiet down about it. I've been trying to build my own career on my own merits but now I'd basically been cornered into confronting it. I'd begun interviewing my sister and Looking Ping through court records and I realized that this was something credible backed up by a mountain of evidence even eyewitnesses. So I said said I'd write the article. Farrow wrote very often women with allegations do not or cannot bring charges very often those who do come forward pay dearly league facing off against the justice system and a culture designed to take them to pieces by this point rich and I had been traveling the country and rental cars together for about a year working working on stories often in the middle of nowhere. The story came out as we're sitting in line at some fast food place and I remember we go to sonic and go to sonic. You had told me that this article come out and I remember reading it. That was a real turning point for you. Everything we've done prior was good but I felt like there was a little bit of a change in you that you realize a need to cover stories were victims need to be heard. We got some stories Green Greenland that we're about sexual abuse one of the interesting ones was about How sexual abuse allegations are handled on college campuses? I did everything a rape victim supposed to do. I reported it allowed the rape kits taken. I gave a statement Eh. I learned a lot in that process for sure. I remember talking to that Harvard student and she. She didn't WanNa go on camera. She didn't want to go on camera and for days and then finally as you said you know what I'll do it because it's important and I was like whoa there. Is someone out there who had attacked me and we'll probably attack someone else flying with that. Do you blame Harvard for that. I do that was my first experience with that story. I don't think he'd watch that piece. And not have a different opinion on the matter after it there was a precursor to the the Weinstein story for sure that year I pitched a series about bad behavior. You're in Hollywood. And for months I got a crash course in how hard a sell. The topic is a story on. Pedophilia was deemed. Too Dark. One on race was dinged because her bosses said no one would care hair but I held onto a green light on one tough story. I pitched casting couch the casting couch. It's a euphemism in the industry. It's when powerful people seek sexual favors from newcomers trying to get a foot in the door and that fall the term was coming up again because of something. The actress interest rose McGowan had tweeted. She used the Hashtag. Why women don't report and wrote quote because it's been an open secret in Hollywood slash media and they shamed me while agitating my rapist? She said she'd been raped by a powerful studio head and that when she'd looked into reporting boarding at lawyers had told her she would quote never win because she done a sex scene before the tweets came up in our planning meetings we went up to Know Oppenheim office and pitched kind of the the the the stories that we wanted to go in on no Oppenheim again is the president of NBC News. He's a former senior producer. Chris Matthews and for the today show he also had a career in Hollywood where he wrote screenplays including one on for Jackie. Kennedy bio-pic starring.

NBC Ronan Farrow NBC News Lowell Bergman Harvey Weinstein Hollywood MSNBC hockey New Yorker magazine rape New Jersey Detroit NHL Chicago Russia Dylan First Time Time magazine
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Now on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey we're going to be talking a lot about sexual violence in this series. There's also some language if either of those things are upsetting for you. Please take care while you're listening. So it was a couple days before we were going to go to L. A. to interview a woman with a credible allegation of rape against Harvey Rich. McHugh is a news and documentary producer and back in two thousand sixteen and twenty seventeen. He was my producer at NBC. He was alongside me. While I was reporting on allegations against Harvey Weinstein the Hollywood executive and we were about to book our flights. I think you might have already booked your flight or might even been in route and the the decision was handed down to me by virus. Greenberg Rich Greenberg runs the investigative unit at NBC News. He was our boss and just below the president of NBC. News is Noah Oppenheim. I'll never forget it. He said Knows very very clear you are to stand down. You know done. We're done here. I don't think I've ever been more angry my life than I went back to my desk and I wrote you in myself. An email about what what was said to me in that meeting. In in that moment I realized a couple of things one the story was added. NBC For all intents purposes for me but also there was another story right now that that I had a certain responsibility to pay attention to at the very least like pay attention to which is the NBC killing the story..

NBC Greenberg Rich Greenberg Noah Oppenheim Harvey Weinstein Harvey Rich Apple rape Hollywood L. A.
"producer" Discussed on The Critical Path

The Critical Path

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"producer" Discussed on The Critical Path

"Producer that that creates the raw, you know, the beef patties in the in the in the freeze dried fries in all those things are also made in factory settings that are that are distributed to some degree not as much as the stores, but then the distribution of the the the inputs that go into burger those those are also standardized globally. So what you end up with his light. You have a pipeline. You have you have into the pipeline. You you put in some raw materials, but you also you you replicate this pipeline everywhere. And then you decide centrally how to adjust the the recipes in to adjust the menu. So that you can pump out the same stuff global. So it's a it's a manufacturing business and the distribution business and what you're offering is for the franchisees. You're offering basically you can plug into this. Enter this pipeline for for an operate. The the local outlets that that take the output from this pipe in and give them to the consumer. And so this is very very sophisticated when you look at it on the grand scale, and you realize what happened in the restaurant business to enable this this broad distribution of of of consistency across the world in terms of food production, which was a revelation. I'm sure probably fifty sixty years ago. This was finally perfected. It was. It was a breakthrough that enabled again tens of thousands of of restaurants globally. It's not just McDonalds, but everybody else replicated this process now, I same thing. And we have to stand as as a process what it is I ki- as again manufacturing of typically, you know, furniture, some woods some glass to some plastics and those are made probably with contractors, but they're also made in a consistent manner. Her the the also have to have a high degree of precision. Because these these things have to screw together. Very very very precisely. I haven't example, though, they don't always pretty good pretty good in my opinion. I haven't example, I once I bought something from the same store, but there were multiple the nightstand or something like that. And when I opened it up like one was made in Poland and the other one he's always identical was made in Thailand. And or maybe I forget, maybe it was somewhere else in the in south southeast Asia was, but it was like a you couldn't tell them apart. They they had designed for the the the I kid zainur in presumably in Sweden, the they are sitting there, you know, trying to figure out. Okay. What would what the what tools that we need to cut this wood than drilling than all these things to it? And and then, you know, get those get that done. Globally, and then have those shift back throughout the globe in all directions? Having them be so consistent. So both was I the I can't McDonald's do exactly the same ways as managed consistency at scale. And so so even though it's a distributed network. Things are done globally sourced, globally, the operations are global. So that the store in in here in Palo Altos gonna be more or less the same as store in a motorcycle Spain L or or or Helsinki Finland. Right. And that's okay. So we kinda really got off the off the apple threat. But but in in many ways when when you look at these two franchises make Alden in I ki-, you people aren't saying there might be some differences in. Yes, I do know for example, difficult by Kim to operate in. Let's say Russia or maybe in the. Middle east. I don't know depending on on the country that, but usually it's a permit process that they they are unwilling to let's say situate the locations in the they have to have some location decision making about you know, the land has to be cheap. But it has to be kind of within reach of a city..

Kim Producer McDonalds Middle east Asia Palo Altos Alden Sweden apple Thailand Russia McDonald Poland Helsinki Finland fifty sixty years
"producer" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"producer" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Do any of you guys have any differences I may have missed in what? What's the difference between a producer and executive producer on the film, get the the bulk of it. The one thing I will note though is executive producer means different things for television. TV tends to be the creative hands on type. And so what Peter said is very comprehensive for film, but once you start branching out into small screen, it's completely different thing for sure. That's usually the Showrunner, right? It's the, yeah, usually, yeah. Okay. Let's move on to Damon p from Saint Louis. Missouri writes in, he knows that a lot of our team reads books and he wants to know if we believe that breaking up a film into multiple parts like deathly hallows or mocking Jay, to make the book more the movie more complete. Like the book is a good thing. So many times we hear the book is better. Why is that? Is that because the movies are limited by time to incorporate additional pop points or anything like that? What do you guys think? I'm guessing the person who reads the most books here is who Jakup maybe I mentioned me or t. but I'll chime in real quick, then I'll I'll pass baton to her since I've been talking too much, but I think that the splitting a book in the two movies has never been crave decision. I don't believe anybody who said, I think it's always been a financial decision to make more money because w hollows in mocking, Jay are books that do not demand to movies. I like both books. I like both movies were all four movies even. But there's nothing in that narrative that demands those additional hours. I think that both of them could be improved even if they were sharper. More critical adaptations when that knew what to pick and choose a new, what was important? I think a better adaptation is one that isolates the feeling of a book Riceland towards important and reconstructs it into a film rather than trying to our laboriously recreate that feeling because I think that a book and movie are so different things that trying to just say we need more time to do more events is not as good as let's find a brisker way to recapture that feeling in a new medium. But what do you think HD actually agree with most of what you said except for the splitting of deathly hallows locking. Jay was definitely a very financial decision. Thusly hallows actually provided a good splitting point in which you they gave kind of two very different films out of this very gigantic, very dense book. And I will say deathly hallows part one is my favorite book because favorite movie. Sorry, because it is so. Limited in that sense to to this one adventure in this one story that we're telling. So I think that actually works in that kind of felt like it came from both financial and creative decision, but anything that came after that such as mocking Jay, the hobbit trilogy, which was like the dumbest leading of of a book ever definitely felt more financial than anything. And as for that common phrase, the book is better than the movie. I don't fully believe that either. I think that people who who like to spout that off often are upholding the movie to different standards than the what they should. They are wanting to see their favorite parts of a book adapted and thus want that laborious that stilted at uptake to take place which don't doesn't suit movie making at all. It's something that is a very medium. It's if you want something that's closer to that feeling of the book or whatever you wanted to see from a book adaptation. Often mini series is better and. That also is a very different medium than film as well. I kind of wish that they're like filmmakers. I know that this does not make sense, but I wish film makers were given the Rome, kind of like Peter Jackson with given on the original Lord of the rings films to shoot a watt more of the book in included in a director's cut or an ultimate cut later on, like I would've loved to have seen more scenes in the Harry Potter films, you know, added back in to the the movies. I mean, I guess I guess as a screener, you have to, you know, cut it down to the the story that you wanna present onscreen, but I also see that holy Hollywood could make money by these, you know, ultimat- cut free releases and whom video Ben..

Jay Peter Jackson executive producer producer t. Missouri Damon p Saint Louis Hollywood Rome Harry Potter director
"producer" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Toure Show

"You have a dream career, but one that most people don't understand what does a movie producer actually do. That's true. Everything he said is true. Edit is a dream is very, very hard. But so here's, here's say, you Oscars, and you have all these various categories right best director and best costumes and score cinematography. At the end of the night, the final war goes to best picture and the producer gets the award for best picture because producers responsible for pulling together all those other categories. All those are the elements, all that other talent in order to make the total film the best picture. So and that's true, whether it's movies, TV of the content. So my job is put it all together, fine script project manager get the are yet the actors to sign on. Right. Get right to radio to thing. Yeah. If it's independent gotta find you should be getting the money. Yeah, that's the number one thing. Yeah. Well, I mean, you know. In in order to get the money needed town Italian needed money. So it's kind of neat distribution for any of that. So I don't know that there's a number one thing that all is important all goes together. You know, you can have money, but without like talent distribution, I'm not sure how valuable that is. Right. You can have a great project, but if you can't finance it and you just got a great project, you know, completed movie. Are you tinkering with the scripts? Oh yeah. Yeah. I'm a creative producer so I'm not just a business producer that like goes and like talks the banks financing and walks away. No, I'm very involved with coming up with, you know, concepts ideas, I don't, right. I don't direct, but I'm involved with the creative process and I support my writers and directors developing this are. So are you a big part of what produces as developing? Somebody told me that casting is critical. That is it's it's ever not. I'm not gonna not to you. I mean it cast, listen, you know, you take a, you pick a movie and you you. Change the cast elements out, and that's going to be very different movie. So there's no question. I have had a fair amount of success with on Sambol pictures and ensemble movies, rushing on samba comedy. That's very intricate, delicate balance because you've got a lot of different skill sets that you gotta bring together. You gotta have him all kind of we've together seamlessly, which is very difficult thing to do comedies harder to John. Anyway, I think the hardest, but we got on SABA comedies even harder. Well, one of the things that you do this really intelligent, I think, is that you are aiming at a niche audience. And so many artists and creators say, I want everybody to like my product. Whatever that product is, you understand, I'm gonna make this product for a certain group of people and they will love it that will make a success. I think that's, I think that's a true statement. I would just add some flavor on top of it. Right? So I don't know that I am making a project that is solely aimed at niche audience. However, in today's ecosystem, there. So much accusation that unless you have. One of those projects that really works across all, you know to call four quadrants of the demographic spectrum. That is really for everybody, marvel movies and star war. What are the four hundred? It is actually not sure exactly. It's it's, but it's like male, female young old, right? And so basically you, you divide them up and so it's like for older males and females and young young female. So that's basically out is. And so when you think about a project that is for everybody, very few projects actually appeal to everybody. So I think that what you have to content today, make something that definitively appeals to somebody yet. So I'm not going out saying, I just want everybody. I'm going out saying, listen, this is for you know, housewives and Tacoma between ages of thirty and forty, right? Hopefully we're not that narrow. No, but I'm saying it's for that audience if nobody else comes, they're coming. And I hope to make the movie in such a way. Way that audiences outside of my core audience also will come and enjoy the picture. And if I pick the right Corradi, it's one that is persuasive one that is when it is loud one that is influential that I have a better chance of expanding my audience beyond the core..

producer project manager director Tacoma Corradi Sambol
"producer" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Org, slash hot dates. That's a great website and you can look out for the final episode of the series on September. Fifth, they will check in with the summer daters to here where they've landed, and you'll also hear some terrible dating stories that other listeners were inspired descend in. All right. Again, find the series of death, sex, money, dot org, slash hot dates. There are not a lot of women producing Rb or hip hop or anything. In that vein, did you like in your production in your work? How many times have you cross paths with another woman? Female producer enough you? I know quite a few nowadays. Yeah, I run into more songwriters that are women in a couple of female engineers now too. I'm trying to advocate for more of that kind of stuff. Why do you think has been a lag to get women into the production engineering side? Not so much the writing singing side. To be honest, I think a lot of it is interest, general interest. I don't think there's as many women interested in that career path. It's maybe it's a nurturing thing. You know how it is when you grow up, not thinking that something is possible because you don't see it as something that's common. So maybe there's that. I know my mom wanted to be a producer really? Yeah. So I find that out there at already started doing it, but I always knew she loved music and for her, you know, she's, she's just like, yeah, it's a man's industry. And she would say that, well, a man told her that like when she was coming up and like she was sitting in on some mixing sessions. She told me that once one of my mentors actually became one of my mentors for a little while later on, but she told me that one time he told her like MRs industry really. So. And I don't know if he said that to mean like you don't belong or just to say, look, there's mostly men in here. Just a fact you wanna do this more. No. The driving force behind might desire to to make beats is just being able to take credit for for fire beats. I wanted to ask you about your influences because there are sometimes when I hear you saying when I hear the songs where I'm totally hearing channeling one in particular, can we hit no. I get a lot. That sounds like a leader. Everybody says that crazy that I'm flattered a lovely voice. Would you into her growing? Yeah, I got her greatest hits CD from the swap meet when I was a kid. It's amazing. Like even her just like even her stuff with genuine, like final warning. All. Yes, the static major background arrangements. Yeah. We add. Snow. And you can hear it so like she's singing size fairly at your sing. Like about you and Eliya is that like there can be these moments where you're singing very delicately. But I can still hear that you're in total control of your voice. Do you know exactly what you're doing? There's some people where they sing a little down because they don't because they can't do more put like you're doing this on purpose. And I, I don't know. It just works for me. It's interesting. 'cause like I'm, I'm not definitely not the best singer. I started late and I know a lot of singers who can only do one or the other like they can't either can't use their false settle or the head voice where they can't use their chest. I'm better at the delicate stuff.

producer Eliya
"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"There are people who who exist in that space doing giving the advice you're looking for and really those are sales agents in festival publicists so the full tida questions so let's say that you are a person who loves movies and loves minute film but you're not ready director yourself how does one become a person who's making films is it what what you're describing where you're you find a filmmaker you like at a festival in like hey i wanna help you make your next thing what is the process of becoming a producer upcoming producer becoming sort of like what you're doing yeah you know what i actually do think that if you if you live really anywhere in the world and you want to be a producer i do think your best that forward is to go to your local film festivals and i i'm where ever you live there's probably one within driving distance and see what the local talent bases like and see if you can build a local make community of some sort and make movies that way i don't think that that is necessarily a path to financial success and kind of success within the larger industry but it is a path to working within the arts and making making movies in the same way that i think if you want to do feeder you can go be in your local theater production you don't you shouldn't have an expectation that that's gonna lead to you starring in a play on broadway i don't think there's anything wrong with making regional cinema i think that's actually a great way for people to to spend their time and i think you can you can do really cool work that can expand way beyond that but.

director producer
"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"The sales agent because especially if you're making your first movie you you don't know how to a manage the the sort of market process of getting distributors to show up screening but certainly you don't know how to manage the process of handling proposals in how to counter the proposals in win and went have went to have filmmaker meetings in when not filmmaker meetings and there's there's a whole rigmarole to selling movie at a festival that you just won't know how it works on your first movie or probably your second movie either and then with the publicists and there's a lot of things that you can do as a as a savvy producer to help promote your movie but the publicist while the better sense of how target it towards critics how how which critics again to which screenings a lot of the times they'll be helpful thinking about sales strategy but they'll also give you good advice on what not to do so they're simple things that that i would advise filmmakers not to do when premiering a film at a large festival and a lot of those things go against what the festivals encourage you today so i think that you don't want to release a ton of still images i think usually would wanna release one maybe two and i don't think you should be putting up your own trailer and your own promo and i don't think you should be releasing clips for the movie and really all things that on the surface seem like really logical things to promote your movie i would advise against so why i think that that if you have a movie that has intimidation where either it seems like it's a commercially minded movie or it seems like it's a real the launch of a really interesting film maker or interesting acting thailand and you have a good a good screening slot in the festival i think you have to have confidence in your movie and confidence in the festival you're in that people will want to come see it and i think that the more materials you release the more you're potentially seeming desperate which i think doesn't help the market around your movie and i think the more that you are.

thailand producer
"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"Producer oregon go to someone who is actively trying to sabotage movie they just end up with a credit anyway let's go to the ranch of this possibilities and i will talk about what country are you mostly producer who is onset every day get in the shots being should at the booby happens our personal financing what is your role in the movies i described i think traditionally i'm a i i would say i i work with producing partner who's my wife jazz that we've worked together on almost all movies we've made so to certain degree when i'm answering where i'm really answering is how we as a unit work but i would say that predominantly were beginning to ending producer like where they're from often concept through to marketing campaign and that means being in the room casting sessions it means being there deciding the directors it means being on set with usually one of us at the monitor all the time and the other one if not at the monitor then kind of preparing for the challenges of what's coming up later in the day or the or the week or the rest of the shoot what i would say is that as i've grown as a producer i've come to realize that that's not necessarily always the right answer like i think that a lot more what i do now is i do what the job requires i think on some films it means you have to be there for everything and some films you don't you actually shouldn't be there for everything there's other people that can make those decisions and and be there and that and that your job is choosing when to to actually step in and whatnot not to step in so on projects where you are the producers are getting to end so this is the thing we found either the filmmaker or you found the script and you've here's mason idea for a movie and you're the person who gets to the next step talk about that part of the process light so often what creggan are talking about so in the background you're going to hear this is lambert by is the best dog but he's very excited have guest in the office so if you hear some whining background that's lambert that was very kind of you to do excuse my horrible whining sound.

oregon producer lambert partner