35 Burst results for "Proctor"

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | 2 weeks ago

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 3 weeks ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
Interview With Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

04:35 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good

Ebay Kiwi Co India Frank
Why Your Instagram Account Isn't Generating You Sales

Marketing School

02:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Your Instagram Account Isn't Generating You Sales

"Committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric. Su and I'm Neil Patel today. We're GONNA talk about why you're instagram account is in entering you any sale. So Neil, how many sales have you gone from INSTAGRAM's probably zero I'm trying to really recall I don't think I've made anything off of inscribe. So the first reason why usually don't generate sales as if you don't try to sell your Park Service, you won't generate any sales I don't ask people to buy from me, and if I did I would generate more sales. No Ma still you never ask you'll never receive and. That's one reason not just instagram. But why a lot of people don't generate sales the other thing too is they don't make their offers relevant to instagram audience like I mainly sell to BB companies. If all selling e commerce goods, it would be way easier to generate sales linked it on the flip side I've generated a ton of income sales from the. Target. Your offerings, maybe instagram isn't the right place is instagram at personal social networking. That's why I love it. I don't really use it to try to generate income from it, but you can. You just got to figure out what products service is right for your audience. Yeah. I think one woman to look at is Vanessa allow. So if you follow her on Instagram I, think it's La US Vanessa L A. U and you'll find that she sells this course called boss Graeme Academy and she integrates everything while everything goes back to that and it goes back to a program signing up for program so she. Sure, get sale sexy shares on her youtube channel as well. So similar to kneel get sales through linked in twitter has done really well for me. Facebook has actually done well for me as well. Youtube has actually done well for me too I'm assuming similar for you. Neil to me I'm like man on my instagram page I'm similar to Neil I, just like re purposing content and just teaching. But like the stuff they do when you look at their stories like these little millimeters, thirty stories, fifty stories today here's a new launch, right here's another lodge sign up for this. Here's a bunch of testimonials unlike. That's too exhausting for me. So I think it works is we aren't doing it because that's not exactly what we are pitching. Neil totally agree with you, and this is like look instagram isn't that hard to monetize. If you look at tight Lopez one of the best tragedies you just go live and then you push your audience to wherever you want and try to get them to buy products or services. So. The way I look at it is just tried the tactics that you already know that we're going live pushing your park services even impose your link url in your bio offering a special discount or promotion look at the proctor services that are appealing to the audience that you have. Make sure you're offering those. Constantly promote on a daily basis. Every time grant Cardona. Has a new fund. He

Neil Patel Instagram Youtube Marketing School Cardona Facebook Twitter Eric SU LA Vanessa L Lopez Graeme Academy
Why You Need to Optimize Your Content for Search Intent

Marketing School

03:49 min | Last month

Why You Need to Optimize Your Content for Search Intent

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we're GonNa talk about why you should optimize your content I search intent. What do we mean my search intent Neil So when people search for something a lot of times there's intent behind and what we mean by intent is i. Someone could be looking to buy a laptop fixed their phone. Those are all intent base searches. You don't want content that just ranks out there on. Google. For random things that could just be information all that don't have any intent behind because the moment you lack in tat, you'll see tons of traffic that don't convert into leads sales or anything like that. Yeah. So if you think about it, let's just take our agency websites as an example. So you know at the higher end of the funnel, what we're basically teaching people right like Oh. What is a marketing funnel? What is digital marketing? What is SEO, and we might bring in a lot of traffic from the top of the funnel but the intent there is people are just trying to learn they're trying to educate themselves. They're not necessarily looking to take action. Now, maybe closer to the, you have top of the funnel of middle of the funnel, and then you have bottom of the funnel bottom of the funnel might be taught. Digital Marketing Agency right in that scenario that person's probably looking for top digital marketing agency they want to take an action. Right. They're doing research probably further in the research versus like another query or if you think about ECOMMERCE I, might be looking for you know instead of saying what are the best basketball shoes I might be looking for top reviewed basketball shoes. So the intent there is different. So you got to think about like if you're creating content you create for top of the funnel but you got to think about the whole enchilada and think about how things flow. So you can drive more conversions that will affect your bottom line. And from all types of different keywords that you can go after ones that have by related words in there like by or cheap or affordable, or discounts or coupons, they tend to come while the other types of keywords that convert while is comparison keywords like male versus convert kit, right so people are looking at brand names, and if you have content that describes the differences, there's a lot of intent there and you could potentially get sign ups as well. So when you're doing your cured research, don't just look for what has a lot of traffic look for Cubans. Have High CBC because WanNa have high CBC, tend to convert more visitors into buyers and also look for keywords that are. Very specific when it comes to evaluating a proctor service or buying like mentioned top X Y and Z or X. Y and Z, brand name review right or competitor one against competitor to those are all examples of tears that have high intent and when you look at these keywords whether it's top of funnel middle, center or bottom on all and I know I've been focusing more on bottom of funnel. You need to make sure that your content goes over all those things like it's reviews you better have a lot of reviews from other people whether it's video tax. If it's brand comparisons, you better have a table the outlines what is your brand offers competitors and white people should choose you. The final thing I'll add for my side is used tools like uber suggest, and you can basically look at what keywords your competitors are optimizing for. The other thing I'll do too is I think over suggests can do this as well. You look they're paid ads, what they're bidding on. Okay. So youtubers digest and look at what they're actually bidding on because what they're bidding on historically does keyword probably convert. Well, if they don't have a high volume and they keep bidding on it over extended time period that means it's probably working or they're stupid which I. Guess You shouldn't be looking at your competitive stupid. But assumed that they're not stupid or I assume that they're not gonNA, burn the money in it not worth, right? Yeah. Then that's your research right there. You don't need to try to figure everything out from scratch

Neil Patel Wanna Basketball Digital Marketing Agency Eric Su Google
Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest Yearly Sales Gain Since 2006

CNBC's Fast Money

02:40 min | 2 months ago

Procter & Gamble Posts Biggest Yearly Sales Gain Since 2006

"Let's get the shares of procter and gamble. Also talking tape today, the company posting, it's the largest annual sales gain since two, thousand, six strength and the home care unit. That's like dishwashing detergent and all that kind of stuff all the stuff you do at home laundry detergent. PK? Well. Clyde gene right I mean, this one was a no brainer. Not only that is that you in early in the pandemic in most places, it was really difficult to get these products. So people bought extra, they hoard it, they put it in their pantry. So and I still think that actually could happen a bit I'm not convinced that we are done with covert I, mean the film mention that board is not thinking of thinking that there's not going to be a resurgence and that's not my. My view at all I think this this ball. We could have another very big resurgence. So I think this would actually go right into procter and gamble not only that let's remember we've had a pretty weak dollar proctor and gamble multinational should do fairly well. Is there any concern that if the economy gets rough that people aren't going to be paying up for cascade or some of these other brands and they'll they'll sort of down go down market? So to speak in terms of price. Yeah. I. Think People by two case point when people were hoarding. When you go into these stores, you buy anything that's on the shelf, and if they don't have a proctor and gamble products, you buy whatever's there. But obviously, stock price people reach for that investors reach for what they know and they know proctor. This is a p seventy four. Guy Do you pay a pe of seventy four for the seller of Tech Company and deter I? Mean it's a higher multiple than than apple. Look forward, I think forward, if you look at it against next year earnings to your point about trailing I mean it's a twenty, twenty, five years numbers, which you know it's expensive I mean the to your point, it's not cheap, but it hasn't been cheap for a while and I think if I'm not mistaken, it probably made it or close to an all time high today. Today. So people are definitely paying up on out on the risk curve evaluation carve, which is fine, and so your point, it's not and that's not to be Glib, but there will come a day when we look at each other and say, can you imagine people paying close to thirty times forward earnings for procter and gamble? We'll be shaking our heads and but we're not the. Market Right now. Kimmy like this quick. I actually, I was just thinking if I came up with anything less than cascade, my wife would leave me. So when I come home with with White Label Brands, I'm in trouble. proctor and gamble loves me I. Think the multiple is absurd. But this multiple been absurd for two years. Okay. Didn't just code for the stock to actually not make sense valuation. So I wouldn't buy it, but I wouldn't short it. All right.

Procter Gamble Clyde Gene Proctor White Label Brands Apple
"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

01:45 min | 2 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

"That's where you've been given an imagination to get out of the box. It's with your imagination that you build images of what you want. And if you can build image, you can do it. You can hold it in your head. You can hold it in your hand when we understand that. Like I would imagine, this goes to a lot of athletes as Well they can take an anything they want. They gotta pay the price. And when it comes in, kick it out, you can afford the dote, and you've gotta understand. If you're gonNA, do it. It's repetition. Get the idea from someone who's already mastered at say, what should I do and do exactly what they tell you until you find out? They're lying or they don't know what they're talking about. The real pros are not going to lie and they do know what they're talking about. It's repetition. Repetition of the right thing will alter the paradigm. It'll change the behavior. That's awesome. We have Dave. Meltzer here with one of his true heroes mentors Bob proctor empower others to empower. That's the true proctor legacy I'm just blessed to call you a friend now. And I appreciate your time. Really enjoyed your you're. I mean you're doing good work I'm trying. And now you're doing, you're doing great work, and you're doing it all over the place. I appreciate it this day. MELTZER biggest compliment I've ever gotten hope. You enjoyed this episode of the playbook, but more importantly I want you to join my text community. I'm doing a lot of fun things there. One on one conversations, trainings giveaways, and is the first place I release all the information that I'm giving so join me at my texts platform, nine, four, nine, two, nine, eight to nine, zero five. That's nine, four, nine, two, nine, eight to nine five. Join my exclusive community..

Meltzer Bob proctor Dave
"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

05:06 min | 2 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

"Will grow with just as great an abundance as the other, and that's the way your subject of mine works you put the wrong idea in it will grow. Put the right idea and grow. We have the ability to change. What's in there? We did not program it. It was programmed through genetic history where the. Confluence of genetic pool it goes back for generations that's at birth and then environmentally. And we have the ability to solve that. Up until around four, five were being programmed by our environment. Prior to that is genetic. that the programming is dictating results. When we change the results, we've got a gain an understanding that we've altered our own consciousness, but if we don't understand now that we will down towards him, it's her. It's it it's this. It's that we point to something outside. As the cause of what's going on inside as never what it is might have been someone that helped us shift consciousness, but we've moved and we want success. We've got to change. What's inside right so central, and it doesn't change until we do. That reminded me of two things. My Mom told me she was in real fan of of reading and especially history and I, said well. That's what. What You told me not to stumble on. The road blocks behind me. Why am I so? Is it so important to study history? She said because the one thing that never changes is human nature, and so I want you to learn about human nature. Your mother incorrect. He's amazing. What you teach to well yeah, and then the second part was Wayne Dyer was another mentor of mine, a good friend of yours power of and tension chain my life, but you the the one line change the way you look at things. The things look at change. There's no question about it. That's a Bob proctor and they'll in a nutshell. That's all you did in your life and someone asks you. That's what you did, she. The whole universe operates by law. Everything moves according to law..

Wayne Dyer Bob proctor
"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on The Playbook

"Training to register look forward to seeing you every Friday. This is entrepreneurs the playbook now I know that you're so humble and I don't embarrass you, but I'm with Bob proctor and he has so many not not pure speaker author but he's an inspiration to me personally and you've you talk about people that have changed your life, and there's those five or six people that you were talking about you. Not, embarrass you? But you are one of those people that changed my life and gave it a different direction. We're both thinking grow rich bands. I think we shared a part in the new movie that's coming out August fourteenth and fifteen. They're doing the premier but I thought the few viewers that haven't experienced or seen Bob proctor. If you give a little bit of background on who you are and some of your philosophy. Sure well. That's pleasure and I didn't know that told me the story. I. Could You well mine life was? My life was a mess. It was a total. it was in a state of chaos, absolute chaos. Until I was twenty six I wouldn't go to school. I didn't go to school I. Know Formal Education I had no business background. How parents feel about not going to school well. They didn't seem to. My mother raised three of us on her own Kosovo and my dad. I never saw him and mother was so busy trying to earn enough money I. Don't think he'd care. She cared. I was having trouble in school, so she was probably glad I was getting to work somewhere. And when I was twenty six, I had a man. That sat down with me. And he said. Why don't you change the way you're living? It never entered my mind that I could and looking back. And thinking about I think there's all kinds of people wandering the planet. All kinds of athletes. That are not getting the results they want and they don't know they can change them. Only, one person there's only one person in the whole universe that can change Bob and that's about. Yeah. There's only one person can change Stephen Esteve. Now. We get inspired by their people. We get helped other people, but we gotta do it ourself, and he gave me thinking go rich, and he said of you do exactly what. I tell you. You have anything you want. Why didn't believe that? But he was so adamant about I believed he believed. And so. I started to listen to him. And I set a goal. I wanted some money I. Want Twenty Five Thousand Dollars. This is in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty one, so it was more money than it is today, but I didn't even know anyone of twenty five thousand dollars, he said, listen right on on a card keeping the buck, keep doing right, tell you so I started to hear people talking about earning money and There was one guy said. There's good money cleaning floors. You should clean floors. Role I wasn't proud. I'd clean floors. And he's a bridge..

Bob proctor Stephen Esteve Kosovo
Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

Squawk Pod

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

"Companies combating bias many American. Corporations are taking a closer look at their impact on employees and customers when it comes to issues of diversity and inclusion one of the most visible examples, the stop hate for profit campaign, encouraging advertisers to boycott facebook amid calls for the social media giant to better moderate racist content. We've discussed this initiative at length here on squawk. SQUAWK pod check out Wednesday's episode for our most recent conversation with one of the campaign's organizers, but one of facebook's and Google's biggest advertisers has remained uninvolved in the boycott. That's proctor and gamble the consumer-goods Giant that owns household brands like Gillette. Bounty tied down vicks crest. The list goes on, but while fellow consumer giants like Pepsico Coca Cola and Unilever have pulled or paused their advertising. Advertising with facebook being Jay has not even though PNG has a history of calling out big tech platforms about this very issue in twenty nineteen, the company spoke out against digital media platforms. SUGGESTING PNG could move its aunt. Dollars to services do a better job at keeping their platforms free of offensive content, and they weren't kidding. In two thousand, seventeen and eighteen proctor and gamble had boycotted. Boycotted Youtube for over a year after its ads showed up next to terrorist content, so why his PSG remained on sidelines in this boycott, the company's strategy has instead been to double down on its own approach to combat racism with ads like the look and the talk about conversations. Black parents have with their children in this country. The talk actually won an emmy a few years ago. You were not pretty slow blood. Beautiful period. Okay. I'll never forget that. This week proctor and gamble released another short video choice encouraging white Americans to speak up and stand up against racial bias as well as the Hashtag. Let's talk about bias fostering conversation about race between strangers. Everyone has bias as might be uncomfortable. Can you imagine that officer having his knee on a white woman's neck like that for ten minutes it all starts with biased. Each video is a powerful watch. Damon Jones chief communications officer at proctor and gamble joined squawk box this morning to discuss the strategy. Here's Andrew, Ross Sorkin Damn Good morning to you. The morning before we get into some before we get into some of the details, just just tell us how this came about and I'm curious about what kind of debate there may or may not have been inside the company about how to approach this. Will for years we've been using our voice and position as a leading advertiser to spark these constructive conversation on race and unbiased. You know back in twenty fourteen. We launched a campaign called like a girl to talk about gender bias and twenty seven be launched a campaign all the talk that really shine the light on the conversations that black mothers were having with their children. Children to prepare them last year, bid on a campaign called the load, and recently with the choice we wanted to catalyze even more conversation, giving all that was happening in the world so we know that a lot of the core evil that we're facing right now. Racism sexism than up over. They all start with biased and we can't tackle these problems until we begin. Begin to talk about them, so the challenge is always. How do you do that in an accurate way? How do you do that in a way? That really brings people voices by invite them into really become part of solution. That's our objective with the talk about bias campaign. You know it's an important message, but we're. We're living in contentious time, and amid what some people. People might describe a cancel culture and I. Don't know if you remember when starbucks many years ago, put together their race together program, which immediately drew criticism despite I think it's well intentioned, and my question to you is how you think about that sort of a mix in terms of how you approach this issue, and what kind of feedback you've gotten us for. Sure well I think what we know because we're all about serving consumers, consumers want to know the values behind the brands they buy everyday and as we consider these types of programs, we do it in a fear and accurate in a respectful manner, and we're very clear on our goals, and we want a society that fosters great public discourse, even when we disagree, so we bring multiple views to the table, and we handle those using a very responsible way were clear on the objectives were clear on the outcomes, and we acknowledged that eight. Not everyone's a disagree, but we want everyone to come to the table, bringing their lived experience, but also bringing perspective that are beyond. Beyond their own, so what we did talk about bias. Perish Rangers together right. People who were different have different lived experiences, White, black gay shrink all these dimensions of diversity, and we said let's talk about these things right and sometimes disagree sometimes you'll get a little hurt, but that's the proper process of learning. We've actually taken that same process within the wall to P. and G. writes. The were walking the talk when it comes to bringing people together and getting through some of those difficult conversations at the end of the day. It's not about a popularity contest, but it's about getting to the culture of respect and understanding that we all want to live in.

Gamble Facebook Gillette Vicks Crest Pepsico Coca Cola Youtube Rangers Damon Jones Google Officer Unilever Chief Communications Officer JAY P. Andrew Ross Sorkin
"proctor" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

01:44 min | 2 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on Ologies

"Janet. Koranian remarked carrier. People who? Also being taught now in in Europe. And There's the Arrestees Conway Book Merchants of doubt there's. Are Agnes. Book the I post. A lot of other books on one is called the Golden Holocaust, which is about the use of scientists, a form of deception by the to the tobacco industry. You know so there's so many great. I just finished assigning to students the wallace wells uninhabitable Earth. And before that, we did the shock of the Anthrocene, which is such a great book so? Those are some of the hot topics that we liked to explore and the. Natale world great I will put links to those in the show notes as well as to yours acknowledgee making an unmaking ignorance. Make sure that we put that up to. This was so amazing. I can't thank you enough for doing this. This is. An episode. People couldn't be more thrilled already for so great. That's very timely. It isn't so ask smart people stupid questions because the only thing worse than ignorance is when you don't want to do anything to get rid of it, so yes, that was Dr Robert Proctor. You can grab his book. The making and unmaking of ignorance, which was co edited with Lunda Chaib anger wherever books are sold and also came through with some book rex. So if you hit the link in the show notes to Allie dot com slash slash agnes policy. There will be links to all of those books. He mentioned including his. So I hope you'll call a local bookstore and order those up We are at allergies. Allergies on twitter and instagram. I'm at Alley Award, one l.,.

Conway Book Merchants Allergies Agnes Europe Dr Robert Proctor Janet. Koranian Lunda Chaib twitter Anthrocene
"proctor" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on Ologies

"And side note it's easy to look back on horrible ignorance and injustice, and lies and say of course that was wrong. How could people not know then? How could their intuition or moral compass be so skewed by outside sources from cigarette commercials to Misogyny and more now what will future generations look back on now with utter mortification? What would they profess to build a time machine to come back and fight how? Are Marketed, have led to an epidemic, our daily dependence on oil. How we've APED ON TIKTOK or America's love affair with cheeseburgers. Sure. That's why you have these ag gag laws in so many states where you can't even fill. Inside. A slaughterhouse. There's a recognition that if people saw the horror of some of the ways, we process animals that. This might give us give us pause, so there are a lot of things we do in life that. Are really made possible by kind of invisibility. kind of distancing that's something that's important to realize. Is that a lot of what we are able to see is? Is, only because we are allowed. To See it, I I remember when I was at Penn State. We were calling. Ranger Electra series called up and it was like this department of Undersea Warfare, and this wasn't even card in the. In the Catalog College Catalog that we whole section or division on Undersea Warfare And, so there are a lot of things that are kept from us, and again that's why I like to expose secrets. I like whistleblowing. have to see these things to let the sunshine in. And and I have questions from listeners. Is it okay to to pepper you with them? You're. Good so so many questions, and before we get to questions, some words from sponsors of the show who make it possible to donate to a cause each week and this week will researching I learned of a lecture. Our guest gave citing some extremely hurtful racist tobacco advertising in an effort to teach students about how big industries use systemic racism as a weapon, and he read off the names of a few of the brands that many people in attendance were deeply hurt to hear a loud and Lee released a statement, saying it was in effort to illuminate the wrongness of the messages saying quote. My whole career has been devoted to exposing analyzing in condemning Roy. And White Privilege and I wanted to support the National Black Law Students, association, who spoke out about the incident and educated so many on the pain that words can cause even in historical and scholastic context so this week I'm choosing a donation will be going to them and I support the shared goal of dismantling systemic racism and I think organizations who work to keep all less ignorant especially when it comes to intentions versus impact, which is so important. Dr Proctor also wanted to support saving black lives dot org, which is the African American Tobacco, Control Leadership Council which educates the public about tobacco products and their effects on black. American and African immigrant populations. Populations and he's been working closely with them for years, so donation goes to them, and why not? Let's do a third donation is important topic. It's GonNa go to the Public Health Advocacy Institute. They use the civil justice system to improve public health by focusing on litigation, targeting tobacco, industry products and unhealthy foods and deceptive health marketing. Maybe jade eggs I'm not sure but deceptive gambling practices, also all to advance public health and social justice, so a lot of great donations is weak and a lot of ignorance on all of our parts, but what's important is the willingness to learn so those donations were made possible by sponsors. Who may hear about now? Who Do, you have a painting project. You've been meaning.

department of Undersea Warfare Dr Proctor Public Health Advocacy Institu Catalog College Catalog National Black Law Students African American Tobacco Penn State America Roy Lee Control Leadership Council
Coca Cola gives up on social media advertising entirely

CNBC's Fast Money

02:20 min | 3 months ago

Coca Cola gives up on social media advertising entirely

"We've actually got some breaking news here. Coca Cola pausing advertising on all social media, the companies saying there's no place for racism on social media so coca-cola, just the latest company in addition to her. She's in addition to Unilever earlier today, announcing that they are going to halt advertising on social media, and of course, this is a direct team at facebook which has been under pressure because of this flow of advertisers deciding to support this boycott Tim. extraordinary. Wow, the follow through here again. Give credit to the early stage advertisers, but when I hear this. I think I know it's very difficult. TIME FOR AD dollars. Every media company is assessing that and going through potentially painful time, although if you listen to facebook and their numbers. That was the extraordinary thing you really hadn't seen in effect, but there are other options. There are other media companies that are hearing this news. FACEBOOK's loss is their gain and again singling out social media as being a wild maybe. You know untethered environment of uncertainty in terms of the messaging. Advertisers want to control the messaging and the context in which their ads are placed they may be able to do that and other places. I'm not well-versed in the crisis management companies here in the US who knees, but I would suggest that facebook higher one this weekend, and that's not in a vacuum. We talked about this earlier in the week and we said. Those companies on Tuesday with I won't be the last, Coca Cola. That is a huge huge deal. and. The fact that he mentioned proctor and gamble earlier I mean it's no Bueno. Is they say I mean you gotTa? You gotTA. Think that there are a fortune five hundred companies, S. and P., five hundred companies this weekend that are going to be meeting and reevaluating their avs, ben whether or not they're spending on social media, and on Monday. We started the show with when the LEVEE BREAKS PK. I don't know about what Monday brains. All Over the LEVEE. At this point, it's broken. I mean you. You know companies like Coca, Cola and Hershey this. Is it you you as a corporate board member as a CEO cannot? CanNot continue on. You have to go along binds be of what Apple closed their stores for cove. Everybody followed behind I think Monday morning you're going to see a lot more people pull out of this advertising on social media facebook in particular

Facebook Coca Cola Levee Unilever Coca-Cola United States CEO Apple TA Proctor Hershey
Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:42 min | 3 months ago

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

"Hello and welcome to this edition of the Green Wisdom Health. Show I'm Janet Lewis Sir. Lewis and we're here to give you a very informative show today, Hopefully we'll try to keep all this straits can is going to be a bunch of information and we hope all of you enjoy it, and we hope all of Y'all are doing well out in green wisdom land. this show is going to be called our vitamins, just expensive urine, and for those of you that are taking vitamins and know what they can do. There are many of you out there. That are new to listening to hell shows and are taking vitamins at. Maybe you're buying a big box store, and you don't really notice any difference and could say well. Maybe they're just expensive urine, so Dr Lewis is going to dispel some of those myths. He's GonNa tell you the differences. He's going to tell you. What a good vitamin and a different! Grade of category will do on lab work. What it what it can move for as far as lab value numbers, which is why we run lab and what a bad one can do as well but I I think we WANNA. Start this show off. We've got a bunch of questions but we have got a letter from one of our very loyal patients for many years at was kind enough to refer his friend to us. Who in turn had his wife do her lab with us? Michelle and so. Eric the one that actually did the referring to start with. Thank you very much Eric we love you. wrote a very nice letter to us over the weekend. And you guys as much as we try to inspire. You really helps when you inspire us as well and this did that for us, so I'd like to read that letter to you and then I'd like Dr Lewis to comment if that's okay this. He's ready to comment I know he is. So he wants to pass on, Eric wants to pass on some really good news Michelle did her lab with us and followed our instructions after a doctor visit that said her blood was out of whack, and she needed a bunch of prescription medications, and honestly that's when we get. A lot of people is when they don't want to take all these prescriptions. They Kinda. Wait until they've been hit with Oh my gosh, you're you're really sick, so let's lay all these drugs on you. So she got scared and her lab with us. Fast forward to this week when she went back to the doctor and told him well I. Did this Doctor Lewis Thing, and he looked at seven labs of panels and gave me some supplements to take. The doctor looked at the nurse. They chuckled and said you're peeing that down the drain, and they don't work, and you just need this ten dollar prescription and your cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure will be fine. So. He ran her blood work again call two days later and said he apologized I. Don't know who this guy is, but keep doing what you're doing and don't take these prescriptions. had better than fifty percent improvement in three months. How cool is that? Thanks for all you guys do. And you know the basics the. Of this I guess. The doctor actually wanted to know who Dr Lewis was so that was pretty cool. So Dr Lewis you want to tell us a little bit about What made you different? What made you do something different with her lab? Been What? Anybody, else would do I. Guess Well, because I'm a car proctor. I wouldn't prescribed drugs. Even if I could which I can't, but and I'm not against drugs, at all I love her medical profession, and but I've seen many many years ago where the medical doctors and osteopaths. they got were. They cannot really practice the the the and they have so called standard of care, which is not necessarily what's in the best interest of the patients, and they're frustrated, too. I've never seen an MD or do that wasn't just a wonderful person and had good intentions. But they're not trained that way. You know. I'm a contractor I. think everything's nerve supplier nutrition and he know sergeant everything's What can I do surgically to fix it, so we're all good people they're trying to help. Just you know one has opinion you like and so. Eric sent this email and he told me said. Don't let Janet Reba below the line. He had a little colorful remark about what he had to the doctor to see it at all. Eric, actually, she didn't until I pointed it out your Eric you're funny. I'm going to go down to port. Nitrous Texas wherever that is southeast. Texas Word Northeast Texas I'm. Go visit them sometimes. Some David I talked to Michelle. and. She's a sweetheart and she told me the story also and you know I'm not anti medical. They've saved my bacon more than once, but here's the problem. And unfortunately I'm pretty simple guy. Maybe unfortunately but. Since. When do we think that God is not involved in this process and why you know this thing, Oh, you just have expensive urine and I said on this one huge huge podcast I was a guest in. This guy has like quarter million listeners. Said something about expensive year and I said well. I just had a forty two dollar rib. I do. I have expensive excrement? You know it's foolish to think that your body doesn't take what it needs from that and use it for good. you have to take vitamins. You have to take good ones I've seen vitamins. Put out by famous doctors. You get famous by paying somebody ten or twenty grand route a book you know. Most of these books are not even written by the doctor. That's the only reason I could write a book. Have somebody do it better than me, but what happens is. Are The reason why you need vitamins and they have to be good ones. You know I've had a good wife and a bad one, so there's a difference in women. There's a difference in vitamins say. one of the things you have to realize that God's in control and he works in your body. Whatever you think God is, but North America is probably the most well fed, but undernourished people in history, the the souls been depleted of this nutritious at least for one hundred years. and now we're saturate and it with chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and it's Kinda. Killed The microorganisms that allow the nutrients to get up into. into the plant itself, and then we're feeding mannerly in inside and vitamin deficient. Food to our livestock, so they're not what they should be.

Dr Lewis Eric Janet Lewis Michelle North America Janet Reba Texas David Michelle.
Blaming China for coronavirus is Trump’s dubious re-election plan

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:54 min | 4 months ago

Blaming China for coronavirus is Trump’s dubious re-election plan

"Donald Trump has certainly attempted to put all the blame for the corona virus outbreak at join US door but Gutu that helped him get reelected? Let's get more on this now with Scott Lucas who is a professor of American studies at the University of Birmingham? Welcome back to the briefing scores. So all these stuff talk about China by Donald Trump. How seriously all you taking it all or is it just tempt for trump to get reelected? Well DONALD TRUMP's priorities to be reelected. Now how serious you? View that depending on whether or not you support these tactics. He's carrying out. Let's be clear. There was tension between China and the United States of for years. Donald Trump's two year trade war with Beijing conflicts between the two countries In areas of technology military competition In the region including the South China Sea. But you have. These added layers of corona virus and trump's reelection bid precisely because krona viruses such route to trump. Because if you have the continued economic downturn if you have the death rate which is now officially now. More than eighty two thousand continue to soar. He's in a shaky position. How does he get the second term? Will he doesn't blaming someone else. And that someone else's China first of all by putting the store that is responsible for corona virus and secondly by saying that Joe Biden is corrupt because he is basically in China's pockets. Now that's not true but a man who's looking for a life raft in a storm. We'll grab it. Donald Trump thinks anti-china sentiment. Is that life around. We don't know where we will be with the corona virus outbreak by November. But do you think China cue to be a big election theme in the presidential election then an also each anyone mentioning Russia anymore? China has to be an election thing for trump. I think if the economy Shows no signs of resurgence when you have unemployment nowadays highest rights officially since the Great Depression and indeed unofficial rights have even higher well above twenty percent. So what do you do? You have to play this blame game now. The proctor questions are what type of effects does it have economically and politically militarily in other words. How does China respond? Does it actually stoke up military competition with the Americans? Does it? Try to push back on the United States I think by extending its alliances partnerships across Asia. That's probably the wildcard here. In other words we know what trump will do how far this unsettled region really depends on how much China wants to basically go back and pushback at trump as he tries to falsely. Put Up. This idea that there's a Chinese Biden conspiracy against him. What do you think how successfully has trump dill's with Beijing so fall then have Americans felt any benefits of his America? First Approach. Well no I mean. Americans are not feeling benefits in terms of economic in terms of social in terms of political. It's been an absolute oil but to pick up your question on Russia. What trump has dawn alongside trying to make China? The bad guy is now spend days and did weeks with his allies in the media with his allies on Capitol Hill basically portraying quote that there was a conspiracy to get him out of office through the Russia hoax that is extended to of course last week. the intervention to try to wash the conviction of Michael. Flynn the foreign national security adviser and now this Hashtag Obama Gate that somehow Obama and Russia were in cahoots with one another to do trump down to take him out of office. It's all

Donald Trump China South China Sea United States Russia Beijing Joe Biden University Of Birmingham Scott Lucas Professor Barack Obama Gutu Asia Flynn Michael America
Hot Pockets heiress wants to serve prison sentence at home because of COVID-19

WBZ Afternoon News

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Hot Pockets heiress wants to serve prison sentence at home because of COVID-19

"An update tonight on the college admissions scandal you might remember one of the heirs to the hot pockets fortune was recently sentenced to five months behind bars Michelle Jim knobs admitted to paying a consultant a hundred grand to have a proctor correct exams for her two daughters in new legal filing lawyers for gin all say she has underlying health problems and it's just a server time in jail she could be especially vulnerable to the corona virus they're now asking she served that sentence in home

Michelle Jim Knobs Consultant
Stock market gains alongside economic pain

CNBC's Fast Money

01:08 min | 5 months ago

Stock market gains alongside economic pain

"Economy is completely shut down and yet a lot of stocks are still outperforming. Can you please help us help me make sense of what's going on? Well Ryan. I'm not sure that that was the case. If you look back to when we hit those lows on March twenty third I mean we have come back about thirty percent from that point in time and you do have certain sectors certain companies that are gonNA benefit from the situation. We're in now. Obviously proctor and gamble gave really good earnings numbers. And you saw that. They had sales moving higher. That pantry. Stocking. That's going on you've got other. Companies Tech companies are going to benefit from what we're doing so it's not surprising that you have a handful of companies that are driving the market higher but across the board. We have come back quite a bit from those lows. I think the market said maybe twenty two hundred was too low but three or four hundred was too high so it's trying to find somewhere in the middle and that's a little bit higher than where we were a year ago but a lot of this that we saw today was purely on the optimism for the economy reopening and on the Gilead News. I think some of that might be given back next week.

Gilead News Proctor Ryan
Meg Whitman, CEO of Quibi: Leadership in crisis is about getting down into the trenches.

Skimm'd from The Couch

09:42 min | 6 months ago

Meg Whitman, CEO of Quibi: Leadership in crisis is about getting down into the trenches.

"Question I wanNA start off with is weakened asked all of the time by people in our audience who are thinking about taking their next step in their career and they always ask us about how should they think about joining startup and ward. Should they consider when making that decision you joined Ebay what was relatively small at the time? Watergate things that you've thought of back then given what it later on became. Yeah well I was at Hasbro running the Preschool Division. Which was Barney Arthur teletubbies? My personal favorite Mr Potato Head and I got a call to go. There's no name. Startup called Ebay. We were barely on the Internet in Nineteen Ninety Eight. We're doing email so it was really you know completely new horizon. It's hard to imagine where we sit today and I have no to the haven't her? I said definitely not doing this. What do you call back later? That makes should really think about it. You're hooked for Ebay so I went out and met with hero media who was the founder twenty six years old time and at the end of the day. I went out there mostly because I didn't WanNa make the head hunter math and I got to San Francisco airport that night and I called my husband and I said we should do and some of the things that I would look for in. Consumer companies are is there a features and functionality benefits? If it'll allow you to do something you couldn't do before so like in my proctor and gamble days later why's cleaner fresher breath And do doesn't is there an emotional connection and if you have both of those a consumer product Bingo? Pm? Many are told me that people have met their best friends on Ebay and they were deeply connected to this website. And so I saw something that is very unique you know and then I always look for. Who's the founder or the CEO who is on board of directors? How well is the company funded? What is the consumer need that this new idea is delivering and it can be a B. Two B. Customer or the customer? But I always go to seamer going to think about this. You know in the end you jump into the abyss honestly and you have to ask yourself. What's the worst thing that lettuce like one of the craziest things that happened or something when you look back at those early days and Ebay they were like oh I did not think we are going to get through this well? I'll tell you one funny story in the recruiting process. And then I'll tell you the thing I worked wasn't sure we'd get through so when I went out to interview with Pierre and was super glad because I got to this office building and there was a receptionist and for some reason the fact that they had a receptionist to seem like it legitimized the country. Nothing I was very relieved my first day at work. I go in and where the the receptionist she used to sit. There was never sections. There was no desk. Don't make sure no receptionists. Go about my day and I sit down. I'M GONNA cube next year about. Halfway through the day I said appear what happened to the receptionist. They looked at me and he said Oh. We hired her for the day because we were pretty sure that we had a receptionist. He wouldn't think we were like big enough for legitimate enough to come work for and say well how right you were so the biggest thing that happened at Ebay that I wasn't sure we would recover from is on June tenth nineteen ninety nine. We had a twenty two hour outage for twenty two hours. You could not get to the website. Think about this. We had all these fires all these sellers. Nothing could happen. The CNN truck was parked outside of Ebay. Wanting hourly updates on the status report was it was the most frightening thing I've ever seen because we really did not know what had happened as it turned out. We have corrupted the entire back end database and took us twenty two hours to read about two hours before we brought the site backup. I looked at here and I said well. We can't bring this back up and he said don't worry right about now. Db database administrator will come running in here and they'll tell us what they found and that they're about to bring back up and I looked up here. Yeah okay. That's wishful thinking literally as if on cue about ten minutes later a DB Guinness Okay. Site is coming up. I mean obviously. That's hugely stressful. And an example. That's clearly marked in your memory. What are you like in a stressful situation? How do you react when stressed? Yeah I dive in really deep because I think leadership in crisis is about getting down into the trenches by actually slept at Ebay for over a month. Wait what yeah my system to get cops. You slept at Ebay for a month. Yes because I was sort of just have to be there like port of leadership. I was not a very deep technology executive at the time. I'm much deeper from a technology perspective today and so the only thing I could do was to be by being there lead by taking the temperature of the engineers leave by making sure all of our partners. Cisco OR VERA sign or Sun Microsystems. Were all on board to help us and so I figured that I really just couldn't leave. Because the thing was so unstable. We had a girl confrontations conference room and we use the bathrooms so when I'm fascinated by is obviously this was over twenty years ago. Workplaces look very different today. Era Trying to look different today. There's a huge movement around wellness and avoiding burnout in protecting employees from. Burn out when you look back at those days and the decision to sleep there. Would you make the same decision today? Absolutely one hundred percent because you know when there's and this was truly a crisis this was not just like sort of something that happened. This was really a crisis I mean the future of the company was at stake air and you know people have different leadership styles from my leadership style. It was absolutely the only thing to do. He considers no substitute for being there to say the truth is on the whole face. It's not at headquarters and the call was are not our network operation center and so to be there with the engineers talking to the vendors and partners just made all the difference. You know. We're interviewing you right now in a crazy time in our world where nobody is in the office now and leaders in you know us. Included are trying to figure out how to be strong. Ceo's how to be strong managers and how to show leadership them curious like you. Are you know in new leadership role at a new company However you being there. How are you showing that you're digging in? You can't physically be there. I feel like I live on zoom and we do too and I'm trying to drop into meeting. So my management style in the workplace is by walking around. I mean especially with a company of two hundred and fifty people like you know everybody above ground. See People go up to their desk. See what's happening so now. I'm dropping into meetings that I'm not actually necessarily invited to per se. Sometimes I just listened this Friday. We're doing it a company meeting on slack Which we have planned. I had breakfast with Nag which I did once a week. Which literally was breakfast with Mac? So we're still doing breakfast with meg only as coffee with MEG. And Its bring your own so we're just kind of keeping up some of those things I just got off the slack chat with women in the workplace at pretty and You know just spend half an hour answering questions from our women employees which by the way about fifty one percent of our companies. When you mentioned earlier that you become a much more technically proficient leader curly and I do not have a tech background. We certainly understand what it's like to check in with engineers and show up and show support without necessarily knowing the INS and outs of what they're talking about. How did you start to dive in to that skill set? I think for a lot of people. It can be intimidating but doing it. I mean honestly. There was no substitute for being there when the website went down. I mean just by sitting there listening to what they're talking about asking questions understanding what's happening understanding you know. Actually what a back. End Database actually does and what is corrupted what happens so it was really being there and asking questions. I think those of us who do not have a technology background you just have to ask questions and interestingly when I first started asking questions I thought they're just going to think I'm not smart. Or what the heck am I doing here if I if I add value from a tech perspective and in a funny way but I've found. Is that engineer? Plug to tell you about what they're doing and so. I just learnt by asking questions by doing it was completely on the job training for those ten years and then a different kind of tech at. Hp is that is that was big. Iron servers storage networking. Pretend trying new. Nothing about And so I just out below questions you obviously. Dramatically changed the trajectory ebay. Under your tenure. It became an enormous team generated. Billions of dollars in revenue. When you think back to what that did for you and we're going to dig into the next parts of your career. What do you think your core skill set is? What are you best at? People have sort of a core competency I think at my core I am a strategist and a market and probably on a strategist because my really my first job after Fangio was banned so I was trained in cost customers. Competitor Sustainable Competitive Advantage financial architecture. And so I think my core competency is probably strategy and I have a belief that if you had to rate strategy and less than perfect execution he'll be okay. If you have the wrong strategy and perfect execution you will not be okay and so I think that's probably my first company. See my second is from my training at PNG. Probably is marketing. Just been a marketer. You know almost sort of as a domain expert my whole life

Ebay Engineer Hasbro CEO Barney Arthur San Francisco Preschool Division CNN Founder Pierre Fangio Administrator Executive Cisco MAC HP
An Interview with Jim Host, Author of 'Changing the Game'

The Paul Finebaum Show

11:22 min | 7 months ago

An Interview with Jim Host, Author of 'Changing the Game'

"About to introduce Jim Jim host to the audience who book changing the game. And I don't know if the gym host even remembers but When I was a newspaper reporter I thought of a great idea for a profile of talking about one of the great entrepreneurs in the SEC. Someone who created the Kentucky Broadcast Network and then moved onto the AA. But for whatever reason Jim Oh just did not like Google doing interviews back then and I never even asked him why because it's irrelevant but thank you. Thank you very much Jim for for joining us. And congratulations on the book. Paul thank you very much before we start. I want to say that You meant so much to Mike slide. And he was like a close friend of mine and we had several conversations. But you and job. You did the eulogy at his. Fennel is something. I'll never forget so. I just wanted to make sure that I got that cost. Jim Thank you. Thank you very much For saying that I remember talking to you at the graveside and I know how much you meant to commissioner slot as well well thank you for that and let let me let me start at the beginning for those. Who Don't know your fister who haven't had a chance to read your book you. You're a baseball player. Uk and then you went onto a minor league ball. And I'm sure you've wondered what would have happened. Had you matriculated to the big leagues and had a different career. Well I got one of the first to pull baseball. Scholarships every given at UK. And I'm the first person I've got sixty one first cousins and I'm the first one on either side of my family ever to go to college and I would have never gotten the college that had been for the athletic scholarship at UK and as it was all of that by major radio and television journalism and the rest of its history so there is an example of somebody. You've got a college scholarship who Because he blew his arm out and pro. Baseball couldn't continue on it for baseball. Was able then to build a business based on my college education. I'll be forever grateful to University of Kentucky for allowing me to play there as you moved on from from your baseball career You dabbled in a number of things From the political arena to to business I think all of us would be fascinated by how you ended up moving in into the the genre that now you get so much credit for And been given credit by by leaders in the field as one of the if not. We'll forget one of the innovator when it comes to sports marketing well if I was I got the radio rights by asking the question that final four MC. One goal the final four. This one. That's basketball championship in. Nineteen seventy five in San Diego. I was on the floor Uk It got to the finals. And I was doing the UK broadcast with Kayla Leopard Packer and As a result Bias the question. How much bitch will paying for the radio rights and Tom Johnston? They came with round the foreign. They said three thousand dollars. I said well how much you getting? All the rights for people like me and they said twenty one thousand dollars plus Nice of. I'll tell you what I'll give you thirty thousand dollars. I'll take over the administration and I'll do a whole lot better job and that's how I got started just as asking the question at at that point. Nobody really wanted to radio. And then as I started to try to sell the radio I'm standing in front of of the press table and nineteen seventy seven that the championship in in Atlanta One Alma. Choirs last game and One of one of the members of the committee was complaining about how bad the final four the championship program book. Because those years the program was produced by the arena and I stepped around I said. Would you guys like we do that? And they said well you're doing a great job with radio network out one or two do that That's how I started doing programs and and then I had one problem. I really couldn't sell it very well. Because I had no national distribution as it related to sales people so I have spent time with proctor and gamble and learned that that They they had a Cava issue having to do with how they got their packages sold at supermarkets. I'm sorry I came up with a scroll down which turned out to be pretty good about. Why don't we see if we can't Put a MCA championship on So Fox's and on bar soaps and so on and see if we can't create some revenue and that basis and I went to wall virus and made the suggestion. It took them two years to agree that it might make some sense and that's kind of how it started and I love the chapter in the book. When when you're dealing with Walter Byers who was a legendary figure but based on I never met him but based on what I've read he wasn't always the easiest person to make a point across to Paul He. I've been in the Oval Office of every presence that's Nixon. A Nineteen Sixty. I live never been at all of anybody in my life other than Walter. Byers he was the smartest single individual I was ever around He would meet with you one on one he knew more about Your Business and then you did. He had his homework done. He never had a piece of paper in front of them and He and I learned a great deal problem. So that's my analysis of you did so many other things and I know I don't WanNa diminish the body of work but when I read about your involvement in the building of Arena definitely got my attention because it's a building that's been there more than forty years. It's still one of the Meccas of college basketball. How how did how did that? Come about well One of my first the first of all I ran for governor state and got my buddy thank God and And I was going to do it the right way so I wouldn't take any campaign. Contributions I spent all the money I made in the sixties and the real estate and insurance business and Came out of the campaign. Had One hundred seven dollars in my pocket. Looks Seventy six thousand eight hundred eighty seven dollars the campaign? That didn't happen. The income could put my real estate and insurance businesses back together so The mayor and the county judge came to they said We'd like you to be the first executive director the lesson I eventually commission and I said how much does it pay? They said eighteen thousand dollars a year. And I said I'll tell you what you can hire them a company I get to do other things and And the first meeting we add. They said we're gonNA tell you why we are hired you there's a There's a good much tracks through downtown. We've taken they've been taken offline urban renewal and we've got in-kind contribution of twenty percent that if we don't build a civic center on the west end of Bovine Street We've got to pay three million dollars back in the city that have that kind of money so you got to build civic center in the arena. So that's how that got started I wanted stop for just a second and talk about How you've done And maybe some some basic tennis. We talked to a young person our staff who who talked about growing when he went to University of Georgia recently. Everyone wants to go into sports. Marketing. And and that's not really what I want to ask you about to Jim because you wrote in the book about some very basic tenants Simple things that we probably should learn at an early age that that you had certain I would say rules for yourself and for your employees that were as simple as this kind of things we heard as a kid but I wish he would explain and share those with all of us to rules of business one is you do not misrepresent. Lie about anything if you do. You're fired and number two. You do not Take five cents from the expense account. If you do your part everybody that came into business. Understood it and violated. I immediately called him in and fired him They didn't get a second chance. If somebody had a drug problem and I'll call problem. I gave a second chance. I paid for the Rehabilitation GonNa back and in the second chance of the violate that that they were those who are rules and business. I also said that In any guy. I never got sued by any school by any conference by the. Mcaa TAB for one. Reason is that I believe that it's either black or white if it's black that's in their favor of its whites in my favorite. It's great and their favorite and that was on the way. That's the way a random business before you go and I would strongly encourage any any young person who's thinking about getting into this business to read gyms book but but I I would like to ask you about some of the big issues that we're facing today certainly They are countless. But but the one that's front and center is the the name image likeness Situation I know having been an athlete having been involved in sports marketing and the industry at the front a at the front row for so long. What are your thoughts on today? And where we go from here in intercollegiate athletics. I wrote my epilogue at the end of the book that I fully believe that time has come when student athletes need to be compensated for the likeness and people think that this has to do with Just basketball football. It doesn't They've we've we've had some unbelievable track athletes at UK One of whom has gone under set world records Young Woman has gone on set world records. We take great tennis players here We've had other individuals who have done well and they would. They would benefit from this as well. So Mike my contention is that they need to be compensated It needs to be done. Under the under the scope of the university because it media right holder at this point as revenue coming from corporate sponsors. So the way to do it. I believe is to Get The individual Have the university Media Group represents individual have the flow through them have the bunny then put into a separate account and they once the individual graduates or leaves the university the individual gets the money Jim Hosts the name of the book changing the Game Career in collegiate sports marketing. John I cannot thank you enough all the best on the book and it has been all of our pleasure to be able to share with you with our audience. You're you're great knowledge and history. Thank you so much I wanNA make one other point The other they call the fuck Dr Eric. Moyen Is a professor at the University of Talk Miss Up Mississippi State and he's done unbelievably great job. Thank you certainly Dr More in. We appreciate that as well. Jim Hope to see you very soon. Thanks for coming

Jim Jim UK Baseball Basketball Paul He Walter Byers Mike Slide Jim Oh Tennis Google Kentucky Broadcast Network Reporter University Of Kentucky Jim Hope San Diego SEC Fister Commissioner
Managing Stress with Adaptiv Featuring Dr. Marissa Heisel

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

08:09 min | 8 months ago

Managing Stress with Adaptiv Featuring Dr. Marissa Heisel

"Today. We're excited to sit down with Dr Morris Heisel a chiropractor era proctor and a midwife to talk to her about using adapted to manage stress versa. Thank you so much for taking the time to sit down with us and talk about this really important topic. I know this is something that a lot of people deal with in their everyday life and we WANNA make sure that we're giving them the best resources that we can to help them manage this this summer. So why is managing stress so important first of all thank you so much for having me on. This has been a topic of huge importance to me in my professional life long before I even was new of dough. Tara was Indo Tara. You know the reality is that about two hundred sixty four million people. In North America America experienced stress on a regular basis. We know that stress Cortisol levels in our body rise. That's something that I saw regularly. Even even in my chiropractic practice I had left midwifery and gone back to Chiropractic and I was doing testing of patients and I and I had a lot of pregnant women in my practice who were showing incredibly significant signs of stress and when I dug into that a little bit one of the things that I learned is when women are extremely stressed during pregnancy they tend to give birth to children with a lower threshold for stress. meaning that it takes far less to stress those children out and at the same time I was is as I was seeing those women. I was also seeing children from a very young age. Some fairly a significant I would say symptoms and signs of being stressed even at the age of three and six and definitely once they were in school and so even before. I was Indo Tara. I was really thinking about how we can go about addressing these things because the impact so many people so significantly and that is incredible. It's really impacting in every aspect of your life every aspect of your body and what kind of effect does that have on our day to day lives as we go throughout the day. What kind of effects are we seeing being? We're seeing things like impatience avoidance procrastination. It's constant worrying what would be called catastrophes and even and what we really want to see is an adaptability based on the needs of that moment and that day so if something feels stressful we would respond to it appropriately in a healthy way and then be able to to relax and settle back down again. But in a stressed brain we really don't see that adaptability we start to see an inability ability almost to shift back into relaxation. And that definitely is something that I want to avoid. I think everyone wants to avoid. We want to have less stress. We WanNA avoid those uncomfortable. Consequences that come with stress. Those impairments that we can encounter when we have a lot of stress going on. I know one of the things that a lot of people worry about is finding natural solutions to these things. We don't WANNA add more toxins indoor body or more strain on our body by introducing unnatural solutions. So what are some natural ways we we can go about reducing stress. They are quite a few things that we can do. I mean it starts with even a little bit of physical fitness or exercise in a day and by that. I don't mean you know having to run a marathon having to go to the gym even but even walking can be extremely helpful getting back out it into nature into the the healing nature of the healing ager box you understand echoed side rounding ourselves being close to through the trees. All of that will help any form of meditation. And we're North American unless we're in certain cultures. Perhaps we're not familiar with meditation taste or it feels really challenging but wasn't really simple way into that even is breath. Follwing are breath and it doesn't have to be anything fancy it can literally be closing our eyes and breathing in slowly and breathing out slowly and really rounding ourselves feeling our feet on the floor. Our hands in our laps laps dropping our energy down in our bodies because one of the things that happens when we're stress is if you could visualize stress it would almost like a whirlwind going on in somebody's head and we need to remember that we have a body in those and breath is one of the things that really helps us with that. You know interestingly even nutrition plays plays a huge role in this there was a massive connection between gut health and brain health and if we are eating really poorly choosing a lot of processed food eating a lot of sugar. We're not going to be affecting good healthy brain chemistry in the way that we can be and so I would say getting back back to that more natural lifestyle now. One of the challenges with that though is when we're feeling really stress those things that I just described that sound like they should be simple. Polk do not feel simple all that feels really challenging the thought of getting outdoors and getting outdoors in the snow. Somebody would be like. It's too cold or Ryan trying to breathe when you're feeling super stressed is one of the things that becomes even more stressful for people. And they don't understand that if they can just stick with it for thirty a seconds it starts to shift that brainwave pattern that they're in it starts to shift that state of alarm that were in and we start to be able to get into shaft our brain chemistry and settled down but that is where we can bring in a water ridley beautiful solutions to help us. When we're we're in such a stress state that even doing simple things feels like it's too challenging? I love that point that you brought up of sometimes even these simple things face. Lisa like an insurmountable mountain and we just don't even have the energy or the capacity to do those simple things even though we know they might help us. So Oh shifting then into the essential oil side of it doe Tara has created this new adaptive line that they released last year. So what does the adoptive line do to help promote relaxation. So what I know about. His goal and developing adopted was that it was to provide tools for people to be able to manage the stress in in their lives in the moment that they're experiencing it. So it's it's when we're in that state bringing hint NAFTA USING IT opening a bottle applying it jusque ask smelling. It even helps us in that moment that were that were experiencing with stress so that we can the word use pivot so that we can hit it in that moment moment and find the tiny little opening or the space that we need in order to be able to stop to regroup to breathe to to settle into our bodies. He's again and shift out of that. State immediately. Adapted was really developed to help support our ability to return to calm and balanced state when we've been thrown off-course adaptive provides us with that that complementary or synergistic palate between both the oil blend and the capsules that we can and shoes from to really support us in a way that we most need to be supported. And you're absolutely right and like you mentioned with the adoptive line. There is the oil blend. There's the the touch roller for topical application. And there are the capsules that you can take internally which gives it a lot of that versatility and makes it work for everyone in the way that they we need mercy. Can you tell us a little bit about the oils. That are in the adaptive blend of course so adoptive oil blend has a number of really a beautiful oils in it. It's made up of wild orange which we know as that uplifting joyous oil lavender which we all know is a we know what is a comming oil copay which has such profound effect spearmint which is also uplifting Magnolia at which which I love to think of as a really hurt centered blend rosemary. NEURONAL E-I and sweet gum which is new to Tara and the beauty of all of those voices that some of them are uplifting being and some of them are coming but it helps to support. Imbalance is really whichever way that we need

Tara Indo Tara Dr Morris Heisel North America Cortisol Polk Ryan Lisa
Chicago Woman Is Second Patient in U.S. With Wuhan Coronavirus - What is the Impact on Markets?

WSJ What's News

04:01 min | 8 months ago

Chicago Woman Is Second Patient in U.S. With Wuhan Coronavirus - What is the Impact on Markets?

"Second case of the Corona virus was confirmed today in Chicago. It involves a woman in her sixties who had travelled to the Chinese city of Wuhan where the outbreak began. Chicago's health. Commissioner says. The woman has been isolated in a hospital and is doing doing well. Meanwhile the virus continues to spread in China the state run broadcaster now reports twenty six deaths and at least eight hundred eighty one confirmed cases cases authorities or canceling large public gatherings and locking down cities. The outbreak is also rattling markets here in the US and abroad. Some are predicting it could have an even bigger economic impact than the two thousand three SARS outbreak joining me now with more on this Wall Street Journal markets reporter Gudgeon Banerjee Gene so gun. It's still relatively early and to this outbreak but how our economy is feeling about the potential impact of the corona virus on China's economy. Especially especially that it's hitting during the Lunar New Year celebrations sure so investors and economists are closely watching how this mysterious pneumonia causing virus will impact act the economy and even stock markets. It is too soon to tell but there is a worry that the sickness could spread and hurt areas like transportation shopping business meetings and therefore ended up crimping economic growth for example this week luxury retailers travel companies and casino stocks were hit by news of the virus what about consumer consumer spending and the impact there especially as we head into the Lunar New Year holiday which formerly begins today on Friday. Does this outbreak complicate any other headwinds ends. We've been seeing in the Chinese economy. That's a really good question. The timing of this outbreak is important with China. Entering one of its busiest travel periods of the year heading into the Lunar New Year holiday the Chinese consumer is really important to the global economy and the Lunar New Year is the busiest travel season and the world's largest annual human migration Chretien so millions of Chinese travelers are estimated to visit families or go on vacation during the holiday but even before all of this. The outlook for economic growth in China China was a little bit cloudy. Chinese officials recently said the country capped off twenty nine thousand nine with an official economic growth of six point one percent so that was within the government's target but also the lowest level in nearly three decades we've also been reporting that. US businesses and just reminder listeners. There now now to confirmed cases here in the US US businesses. Operating in China are taking steps to mitigate the impact and you found. They're also facing some questions from consumers and investors esters exactly so the Chinese consumer is really important to the global economy and Walt Disney recently said that it would temporarily close its park in Shanghai. Starting Saturday and McDonald's said that it closed doors and parts of China and some cities that had suspended public transportation. So China is one of McDonald's largest foreign markets. And I've been tracking corporate earnings as they trickle in this week and just yesterday proctor and gamble executives said that they're monitoring the virus and they also said that it could affect consumer confidence in large parts of the market because it can affect travel which also affects proctor and gamble's business us now. This particular outbreak of the corona virus is also drawing comparisons to the SARS outbreak even though it's currently believed to be a milder illness but SARS did to have a substantial impact on the Chinese economy right. The SARS outbreak did weigh on China's economy at the time and again. It's still a little bit tough to tell what impact this virus this will have on the Chinese economy or the world economy but previous outbreaks. Like those of SARS or Ebola in two thousand fourteen suggests that markets tend to see short-term turbulence but can bounce back pretty quickly for example stock indexes in mainland China and Hong Kong saw double digit percentage drops after SARS before bouncing back all right Wall Street Journal reporter Engine Banerjee joining me here in our studio in New York. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me.

China China Sars United States Wall Street Journal Chicago Wuhan Reporter Engine Banerjee Gudgeon Banerjee Gene Commissioner Mcdonald New York Walt Disney Hong Kong Proctor Shanghai Pneumonia
How to Deal with Mean People Who Suck at Work

The Small Business Radio Show

08:21 min | 8 months ago

How to Deal with Mean People Who Suck at Work

"You'RE GONNA meet a lot of great people out there that are really going to help you out but you're gonNA meet a lot of people that are really going to suck here to help us how to deal with those people that suck is Michael. Brennan has been recognized as Forbes. Top Cima influence influencer a top business keynote speaker by the Huffington Post and the top motivational speaker by Entre magazine. He's got a new book out. Called mean people suck how empathy leads leads to bigger profits and better life Michael. Welcome to the show me well. I'm so glad that someone wrote a book about this. Because I mean people do suck and I and keep thinking that to folks who are really great. Innovators leading great companies like Elon. Musk and Steve Jobs. Do they have to be mean people know they don't and that's really the You know one of the things that led me to write. This book is is. There's some surprising counterintuitive research out there actually almost the weight of all the research found shows that organizations and you leaders and cultures that are focused more on on empathy more on on carrying a and less about creating an environment of fear are actually more successful and you know we think I think sometimes it you look at jobs you look at other influential inspiring leaders and we saw they they ruled with a heavy hand and actually if you dive into it what we find is a lot of those leaders. There's a myth of of kind of culture personality about those folks. The actually created cultures where they showed some concern care whether it's for their customers for their employees as or whatever but they actually weren't the mean people thought they were and you know so sometimes I think we have to dig a little bit deeper into some of those but the fact is that cultures organizations positions that are built around empathy and concern for other people are more effective and successful overtime. And I always say just because I do believe because I know enough people have worked for Steve Jobs. One of my friend says you know I. I left apple for the second time when he flew when he threw a coffee pot in my head. I think Steve Jobs was mean right. But as you said just because Steve Steve Jobs was able to create a sessile organization dime being mean or Elon Musk by being you know he's just very compulsive it doesn't mean that you can do it in your organization but the thing is that in more to get people to do stuff you gotta be mean you know you gotta scream you gotta yell but what you're saying your book is that's just not true. It's a myth and that's twice as we hear these stories and you know I'll give you a steve jobs. As an example Steve Actually owned two companies. They'll to companies in life. We we all know apple but we forget about Pixar right and Pixar th-they're founder cofounder wrote a amazing book. One of my favorites called Creativity Inc where they talk about. The secret of their success was a culture of openness finesse and where they had these you know these meetings where they were talking about the movies that they were they were trying to produce in anybody's from the CEO. Down to the janitor could provide an opinion so you know even in those mis of personality around Steve Jobs yet sure but he threw coffee should people but the fact is that he built a company that had an entire sort of culture of empathy empathy built right into it and it was the reason for their success. So you know that's that's one simple thing another another step that I love to use as A good friend of mine. Jim STANGL. who was the former? CMO At doc proctor and gamble wrote a book called grow where he looked at companies that were built on some sort of purpose or values where they weren't just putting profits over people they were putting people over profits fits those companies were four hundred percent more successful based on their stock price. And so yeah we hear these anecdotal stories about me leaders but the simple fact is that companies that we're built on cultures of acceptance and diversity and inclusion and and concern for other people or the environment or whatever it is concern for others and not just you know leadership worship There are more successful so if you want to build a successful company have a little bit of concern for the people around. You know. It's interesting because now that I think back on of course we'll never know is maybe Steve. Jobs was like like that because I didn't want there to be leadership worship right because certainly apple is a company built on concern for other people in diversity inclusion and those kinds of things. Well that's exactly right. I mean you look at you. Look at their headed resigned. I mean he's he's he's a famous person in in his own right. And their whole company was built on obsession over customer you know utilization and amazing customer experiences. So Yeah Steve Maybe was obsessed with an you know sort of forceful in making that an important point. But that's what apple was it was a company built around providing an amazing technical customer experience. So you talk about on your bother. You've had fifty three jobs in your life. See you must have seen your fair share of mean people absolutely. Yeah Yeah I mean you know the story is I I was. Somebody sat down with me for an interview and they were like. Hey you've been a successful executive and you know for the first time I actually never had considered third myself as accessible. I I still feel like I have a lot to accomplish. And she asked me why and You know I give her an answer but afterwards thinking about it and then I started thinking well how many how many jobs have I actually had. And I counted them up and and I thought you know a lot of the reason I've had so many and a lot of them were within one company. I spent nine years at at one company. Seven years of another. I mean I've had some long stints but many jobs within and what I found was that in most cases I liked the company or I like the work but I just hated my boss and and You know I think a lot of the reason for the fifty jobs is I left my boss and and in some cases gave up too soon. I think I think slowly over the course of my career. Learn how to deal with What I look back at and considered some mean people One great example. I had a boss who I really didn't like and We're not friends and what happened was I learned how to deal with him. I learned we were both fathers. We were both parents of a couple of kids and and once I got to know him as a person once I got to understand what he really wanted to accomplish and once I took the I think the courage to stick up for myself and let him know like you know. Hey if you want something accomplished hired me to do that job and I'm good at doing that job so let we do it. We became we had a great working environment refreshing. Today it's interesting. You said that you left your boss when I left IBM and in Nineteen Ninety I actually. He did leave my boss and I always tell a joke when I'm speaking that this guy used to have sales contests where first prize was lunch with him. And I always said what second price to lunches with you and I realize is it. I didn't just leave IBM. I really left him. So based on your experience Michael How do you deal with mean people that suck at work instead of just getting out of the situation but that's not always the solution. That's not always the right thing to do. That's that's right and and and it's true and in fact. The data shows that most people do leave. I think it's something like sixty plus percent and people that leave a job or leaving the boss. It's not the company of the work which is sad you know? It means that we have a crisis of leadership in our in our culture. The simple as that I've kind Touch upon this but the first thing is find out what your boss really wants If you find out in that conversation that your boss just wants to feed his ego he he or she is a narcissist. Then you need to leave. That's that's step number five but but the first thing is find out what they really want. you know. Make sure that's clear between the two of you. The second thing and this is something I I I did it almost every job I had is. I would interview a neat with the people that were appears of my boss. I would meet with the stakeholders that my boss was supposed to be serving customers which choose a lot of fun but really try to kind of get a three hundred sixty degree view of what. What your leader really is looking for what they're trying to accomplish? Then the third is what I what I what I mentioned. You have to have that courageous conversation. I call it the cake. Baking conversation you WANNA sit down and have this conversation with your boss where you say. Listen I know you want me to you WANNA cake. You want it to be chocolate chocolate chips with chocolate icing and guess what. I'm a good chef. I know how to make a really great cake. So let me go big that you can't ask me for a cake and tell me how to bake it and so that's the conversation that too few of us. Have we get into this kind of victim mentality where we think our bosses yell at us and tell us what to do and we get mad and miserable and then we leave. So that's the third step is making sure you have that conversation. The fourth I mentioned as well get to know them as a person you know try to just subtly find out you know are they mean because they're going through a divorce or or they've got you know health issues. They got problems at home like you know. Sometimes we learn these things we find that they're people too and we can understand and a little bit more about why they're acting the way they are and so once you go through those steps if you still find that your boss Jerk Ben step number five is either commit to delivering what they want or leave and and I think at least having a formal systematic profits go through those steps can really help a lot of people.

Steve Steve Jobs Apple Elon Musk Michael Steve Maybe Elon IBM Huffington Post Brennan Entre Magazine Forbes Pixar CEO Creativity Inc Jim Stangl. CMO Executive Founder Doc Proctor Gamble
Are Pringles Really Potato Chips?

BrainStuff

02:31 min | 9 months ago

Are Pringles Really Potato Chips?

"Express look into brain stuff production of iheartmedia. Hey brain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here. Chances are you probably haven't given much thought to any given can of pringles other than wondering. How do we get the last few potato chips out of the tube as it turns out out this salty? Snack has quite a story. It once was in the middle of a massive controversy that questioned the ingredients and whether the chips were actually potato chips at all from two thousand seven to two thousand nine the makers of the once you pop you can't stop. Chips stood in front of three different levels of the British judiciary trying to defend and the decision. That pringles chips were not by definition potato chips or in British parlance potato crisps. Here's how this comically complicated. Located problems started in the mid twentieth century attacks was born by way of France and England called the value added tax. This consumption tax started off as a a ten percent tax on all goods bought from a business. More than twenty percent of the world's tax revenue comes from the value added tax. Making it a pretty big deal. In Britain most foods are exempt from the value added tax except for potato chips or similar products made from potato or from potato flour. This led to a long arduous journey to figure out whether or not pringles which by the way we're once touted as the newfangled potato chip where actually potato chips if they were ruled as chips pringles parent company. At the time proctor and gamble would be subject to a seventeen point. Five percent value added tax. proctoring drink gambles initial argument. was that no pringles. Were not potato chips. Because they didn't quote contain enough potato to have the quality of potato nece they also argued pringles didn't resemble the shape of a potato chip and were therefore instead a savory snack in two thousand and eight a lower British court agreed and ruled the pringles were in fact not potato chips mainly because they contain only forty two percent potato and had a quote shape not found in nature The rest of pringles by

Pringles Lauren Bogle France Gamble Britain England
"proctor" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:37 min | 9 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on KGO 810

"Hello proctor however the lower third also read Vikings win could mean Seattle NFC championship the side but also show highlights from two different forty Niners touchdown drives an impossibility if the Niners indeed only scored ten points he was the other way around as the forty Niners beat the Vikings twenty seven to ten to move on to the NFC divisional playoffs against the Green Bay Packers who to add insult to injury be the Seahawks twenty eight to twenty three eighty as Terry rows reports the Niners host the Packers on Sunday at Levi's stadium kick off as a three forty administration officials are stressing a regime change in Iran is not official U. S. policy however Bob Constantini reports president trump is urging anti government protesters on word the killing of Qasim Soleimani set off a chain of events including retaliation by Iran which launched missiles into a rock toward American military bases hours later Iran now admitted shot down in Ukraine airlines plane mistaking it for US war planes over to Iran in Tehran and elsewhere anti government protesters took to the streets angered by the jetliner downing which killed many Iranian citizens and foreign nationals the demonstrations are presidential tweet of support with Mr trump writing to the leaders of Iran do not kill your protesters thousands have already been killed or imprisoned by you and the world is watching more importantly the U. S. A. is watching Bob Constantini Washington the next step in the impeachment proceedings expected this week correspondent Tina Jones is on Capitol Hill with the latest from house speaker Nancy Pelosi house speaker Nancy Pelosi signaling the wait is almost over saying she's ready to send the articles of impeachment to the Senate this week I've always said I would send them over so they should there should be any mystery to that we have confidence in our case that is impeachable and this president is impeached for life the delay has been focused on a still unsettled disagreement about whether Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will allow witnesses to be called during the Senate trial the nominees for the academy awards were announced in Los Angeles this morning you heard it on KGO eight ten actor John show read from a list of nominees for best supporting actress members of the academy's actors branch nominating these performances by an actress in a supporting role Kathy Bates in Richard Jewell Laura Dern in marriage story Scarlett Johannson in Joe Joe rabbit Lawrence view in little women and Margot Robbie in bomb shelters oesa ray leads the red from the list of nominees for best Supporting Actor the nominees for performance by an actor in a supporting role are Tom Hanks in a beautiful day in the neighborhood Anthony Hopkins in the two pope in the iris Mann well see the iris Mann and Brad Pitt in once upon a time in Hollywood nominations for best film include four verses Ferrari the Irishman Jo Jo rabbit joker little women marriage story nineteen seventeen once upon a time in Hollywood in parasite we will update your drive with mark the other next on KGO are you an over thinker hi Rick Adelman here host of the Rick element show right here every weekend in three decades of serving folks like you and almond financial engines we've made a lot of folks were trapped because they were over thinking their financial decisions we get it this can be scary stuff you work really hard and you make a lot.

proctor
"proctor" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"proctor" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

"So I actually got some accountability so I worked with a trainer. Now that's trauma he's insane. Obviously he liked pushes meets only limited. But I enjoy it actually gotten to the point where now I like walking away feeling sore orcas I feel like okay now making progress but yeah really actually really loving acas gives me that natural energy and just to really recommit to taking taking care myself. Were you playing basketball so I usually go to the park. I usually play pickup games league. No not an elite just yet I'm out if I'm ready for just yet but in a couple more months with your trainer you'll be ready again. You're loving working on your body just kind of taking care of it. What else so I am also again? Just kinda reading. I'm I'm such a bookworm. You love to read at do I have more books than I'll probably ever arena I have books everywhere and so I'm really getting back into do that. Space of just like say just reading some things that are that are enriching me in areas where I feel like I'm really ready to grow and stretch in and saw one of those things we talked about route was Just kinda really figuring out the single season and where what's next and so I'm reading Again that book waiting dating by Dr Mouse Monroe and I'm enjoying back to read mostly nonfiction or do you read fiction as well so I read mostly nonfiction now but I actually am reading And I don't I can't even think authors author's name style I'm well if the underground railroad. It was actually one of Oprah's yea I had that book I haven't read it but yeah so I'm well and my freezes ashes. Stop saying reading because I'm listening to it on audible. Hey It's the same difference is the same difference we let those go so yes. You're listening to listening to that so I have actually. I started putting back in some more fiction books in there too. You know. I only enjoy listening to fiction. I don't enjoy listening to nonfiction really cause nonfiction I kinda. I don't WanNa hold it in a reread it. I want to underline but fiction. I'm just like it's a story. Just tell me a story like that too because I love the highlight and bake notes and doggy the pages and all this. Yeah Yeah I'm reading right now and I don't know that the author's name but it's called a woman is no man. It's a fiction book so I'm actually reading it whenever I have the time. But it's a really interesting and I think that you would like it. It's about women who were came over to the US. And I'm get. I can't remember if they're Palestinian dan or it does matter but I can't remember right now. But their cultures way different than American culture in the oppression that the women were under. And it's the story of a mother in law and mother and daughter and it's it's I'm really liking it so wow I'm reading and it's fiction so I should be listening to it okay. But I'm reading it. Yeah but I listen to podcasts. My car all the time. Yeah you packed listener. I I am. What are you love so I have been listening to Johnny Allen's podcasts to allow lady of course to happy hour oh you're and I've also been listening to the Bible we'll recap with barely Kabul Let her love her. She's favorite guests on the show. What could you not live without Probably I believe I didn't even think about it. I've never asked that groans funny evernote ever know so. You're never know girl. I'm my husband's in evernote person like I've had ever know ever percents. evernote was a thing. Yeah like I love ever no you just keep everything. There I keep hearing is for my my idea system like anytime I get an idea or even I mean just my notes APP my notes APP on my iphone like I love it. Yeah I just started realizing that I could speak to my notes APP. I know I'm way behind the Times but it helped me so much. Yeah I just kind of speak in and make a note install yet I know see. I've just figured things out Rachel I am so glad that you came in and sat down with me I love what you're doing Wayne and the thing that you send out the daily encouragement. Yeah the people sign up for that so you could just go to the APP store or the Google play store if you're in the android world old And it is the emerged online devotional APP and it's a free APP. It's free ninety.

"proctor" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

10:15 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"I think she only better every year old her race. The other day at colonial was pretty good kind what is looking for so another step up would be good and then get her a couple of months off and have her for next year the the pretty nice. I'd like to see your step up up a little more though and I think she will well. She's out of a out of a cool more Galileo mayor and so they're feels like you know there's there's a quality about or on the page anyway yeah yeah one of the worst things I've ever said. My Life is when I had marketing and band I got leap back to those Galileo's. They come over from Europe Matto Craig. We had to get a budget for Galileo that was that was a mistake. The first one we bought without store get married and he could run the rest of them the statement that every everybody's everybody's got a few of those. I love it the Tommy I'm just happy to get a chance to call you and these international you know one of those kinds of races that you know somebody like you think to have on the resumes grew up reading the Maryland Horse and you know Calcio Bald Eagle Beau purple isn't it means a little something to window races and then you know maybe they're not what they used to be but it's still canonized to have that that she wanted my jump back up still and this might be the start of it getting in providence well and stronach group has had you know has been trying to try to do that. They've been trying to upgrade and get it back back into the kind of position that it that it had for for many years I mean it was it was a big target yeah. There's a lot more grass racing these days but at the time I mean for many years right it was that when you think about that rights and the rights they had at Atlanta Atlantic city and stuff like that those were racist he went for like I said you know I grew up. It was bowled Purple Airport Bald Eagle Kelso gun bow. You know 'cause I was Kinda. Horse's teeth remember running in this race in their sixty. You know you made me think of one other thing is we started talking about turf racing and the Arlington million comes to mind Tom. What are you what are you what's your view of this situation with Arlington liked and the potential that there may not be in Arlington in the near future well the IT's pretty bad? It's been a disaster for a long time and it just has never and I don't know it's just bad and I probably put you know I just don't like really what they now ownership there has done you know they kind of got all horsemen's backing whether that Wytheville pass they're not to get all the slots and then you know pretty much said well started. You know we're not gonNA have raising her. We're not GonNa have casino that. It helped tracks. You know I'm I'm not there so I say to just a bad shane. You know we're looking at a place that was special to me. Outweighing the races air and I really liked Arlington and even you know would consider having a fable there with have no problem because always when I write kit Arlington was there in the summer I always got ballot a good horse. The weather's good surface we could turfs good in our thought. When I went to Chicago I would come out of there with a horse there to good fraud and that's important when you go like that he ended up you leave there you have and they don't have the biggest jack now a lot of your I think about a lot of lot of your wins a poor forum Arlington classic and the one one the Arlington Matron with Indie groove and the Arlington Washington Washington futurity and your your your career and of course being tied to being tied to Mr Laven Avenue and Glen Hill and Craig Chicago a lot of years a lot of good seasons the rate of an Arleigh like we always I developed some really nine horses there and and it's a shake it really is you know we're talking about a major city? That is a major market more just to let rates in the guy. you know unfortunately I'm. I think a lot of are these people that are in play have a lot of say I'm more qualified to meaning of them to do. It and I should be doing any of it. That's how I feel about. You know a lot of these decision making scary. That's the PROB very scary to watch and people that like you whose whole life is tied to the game feel the same way and I the the pro. One of the most alarming parts of Tom is that to hear you say that and and to get the sense that there's a lot of people that feel just sort of powerless to to change any directions yeah you know I always looked up to the horse trainers and you know you think about it. You know the good trainer Alain Jerkin Charlie waiting. Damn you know I looked up to my father. These guys were horsemen. Owners were horseman but what we really lost businesses this Chino Jimmy Chiro Tommy Trotter under guys that ran race track guys at work for the horses for the horsemen for the race track. We is not have those guys and play right now. Bobby young freeze great rates at the secretary. You just go you know we don't have the guys around anymore and maybe they would be around and the way that day is now dislike. Some of those trainers would not be play with the wipe. The game is sal because we really don't have that many horsemen owning horses so it's Kinda sad always a pleasure to have Tom proctor on this show and Tommy. I'm anxious to anxious to hear how how much progress you've made stronach guitar. Oh I'm telling you we had a day off here. Friday you got kudos host. made a motion. They have this real Ryder Cup right. Yeah it played a few songs but we had a fan there. It couldn't have been any better I played a few songs by myself a few with him but it couldn't have been nicer event and made them more did a great job. The horse show good the riders were good. We had a bunch of young girls dancing around afterwards it would be great Dale Guy to show up next year because I think it will only get bigger it wiscon- of a lot of fun was a great event and then the more she yeah proud and oh you know this was a good good the thing that was fun a lot of fun. I delighted that you went of course at Fair Hill and the third year of the Real Ryder Cup we add Maggie Kim it last last week to talk about it and I know that they raised I the last count I saw mid week. They were over fifty thousand and I'm sure they raised more by a Friday and into the weekend we'll have to give everybody the results you know D- How about the team up with Dale Dale and with Geo Incipient I don't play I'm more of a rock and Roller crack there. Everybody Buddy the one and only the great one topic. Thanks so much all right. I'll talk to you down the road down the road. Tom proctor folks always a treat and all right. I was trying to be nice and I didn't want to say it's been a down year but Tom. You know you don't get too. Many punches pulled by Tom proctor doctor. He's the greatest what what a treat t proctor racing. If you're not following him on twitter you should be is what one one of my one of our first first major guests going way way back. Take a break here. We're about the we'll be ten minutes into our too so johnny will join us got to spend much of the weekend with Johnny and we'll we'll give you all the all the highlights and there were so many Larry Jones will follow. We'll talk to the big cowboy. Oh boy street bands win that could tell Ian Larry Johnson phillies. He's he's murdered how about Joe Sharp to we're going to get sharpened sharpen today Joe sending out lady t and T who was an explosive winner in the Charleston House and here's another horse like math wizard that was a little dirtied up but it run races at oaklawn over the winter that absolutely was good as anything on the in the field and she got away at a.

Tom proctor Arlington Jimmy Chiro Tommy Trotter Europe stronach group Matto Craig Maryland Horse Wytheville Calcio Bald Eagle Beau Bobby young Dale Dale Johnny Atlanta Atlantic Dale Guy Alain Jerkin Charlie Joe Sharp Ian Larry Johnson phillies shane Larry Jones
"proctor" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"Can't do not really walking new non given back to new ball ooh back at the races fifty to the top of the hour what I story I I can't get over the the sappy Joseph success. There's been a few other obviously between maximum security again a different kind of story but what about tax tax was another one right that got up to win the Jim Dandy and so I've been a good year for for claiming success and and taking taking claims to to stake races Tommy proctor looking forward to talking to time about the win by Caribou Yearbook Club and you know Tom has won so many big races and and certainly with the Glenn Hill you think about the Glendale he'll mayors mostly a lot of times on the grass going long and this one though to win international when I looked it up I said wait a minute as proctor one one and I was surprised that the time had not won a DC international another outstanding staked add to the big collection and and the big man joins US Tommy proctor good morning congratulations. Thank you appreciate it. We were at Philadelphia and was I was watching it. I saw go in the gate and the the silks are so distinctive you know they didn't have the audio on but I knew right away that it was Caribou club getting that outside stalking tripping talk about winning a DC international well we can't him brother. Maybe we were joking and Craig's exist I don't think anybody's ever win the lower thirty in the DC international same horse. I sure would he hadn't how about that. I'll tell you what you you're going to send us into the record books well. It's funny. I E Wendy Laurel Fraternity. It was five five and a half on the grass you know of course trying to get the racist coughed up after being Kinda for twenty years so but it was just kind of funny. You know you gotta get giggle out of it anyway so well he he's been good. I mean so you've had you had a couple of different a couple of different occasions. I mean the trip to the trip to May Dan. I mean the feel that that ah that that was not worth not worth it in retrospect or not. Well you know the whole deal in California have the China this horses overcome them screwed him up. You know he was definitely you know there was racism then they wouldn't run and they quit running down the hill and the trip by Dan was really because we couldn't run in California kept cancelling the race and you know the maze in how things will make you make bad decisions sometime. In May Dan he'd have been fine but I I thought as going to the desert to run on the turf and I figured I'd get firm turf that Hail. They wander decor per day. It was soggy course I've run on over here other than but Breeders Cup last year so that's how that worked out interesting and you know he he's certainly a horse. It is versatile. You bring up you. Bring up the downhill. Course I mean I it's six and a half but it really plays longer and ah he's he's a miler essentially yeah well you know last year you win the state down the hill and you asked me if I ran him in the Breeders Cup where I'd rather run and a my plan was down the hill all year you know powers to be decided after all these gear that it's unsafe to run down the hill we we know what we think those powers to be and you know well. There's let that slide yeah because it it's just it's such a different equation. Ask Horses you know to to sprint a sharp. You know five five and a half I it's it's a different horse. It's a different equation. I mean there are some horse. There's a you know one thing about it or good. Screener can do it in in a good miler to do it. stormy liberal has no problem running five eight or five and a half California flag was that type that won the Breeders Cup run five but it definitely puts a lot more horses in pledge well a coming off that trip to mountaineer ear where he went the the Mile Seventy win the speakers cup Fergal Lynch and really he's got to be applauded Tom. I thought he gave it was like a it was like bumper bumper pool. He absolutely timed the move perfectly yeah. He's actually road in good an ad they run and fast together. E set the American record in that race mindset track record and this one which you know the American records Kinda funny because it's a Mile Alad seventy. Where do they run that Park Delaware floral yeah? It's only thank up but it's still a lotta horses run run faster than anybody just like a a lotta horses run a mile on the turf at Laurel so now this was this was really a beautiful trip and you know he he moved on the turn and ensnare the leader at the time mccague and glorious empire and at the same time if he moves earlier he probably ends up susceptible to frontier market who was running late. You know only thing is you know he's got outside blinker so he probably went and seeing those horses. you know why they price me about this race. If I've always thought he had is good a three six tenths of a mile our run is anybody in the country and he wins a lot of rights 'cause when he makes his move he makes it like now and he's very handy and and he's got that little quick I thought he had a big bigger. Sustain run their day more like three eight which is unusual and he did flow little bit the wire but he's only saying horses went by. Where does this leave you with him because he is he on a par with the top turf milers in your mind well? Maybe we'll see it's my decision because I don't think he has points to get into Breeders Cup but he's also set two track records showed okay. These numbers were good. you know we'll see he's a fast horse and he's win. Seven stakes and you know circe am knocking the earnings earnings are careening upward. Let's see what did he make. what do you make excite by six seventy. Now you know twenty times the his records pretty good on a firm turf going mile or six and a half mile and a sixteenth speaks pretty good horses if you go back so you know I think he deserves to run but one day okay. I you know I didn't ask. They're not GONNA ask me to pick the field well it and the mile. The mile always draws a big crowd. Yes yes have you toy just the peop- might be Pisa a dozen lines. Have you got any further with him. Distance wise is if you tried them a little longer just a smile in sixteen. It's not worth. It's not worth writing down. Maybe down the road you you know you might try go a little farther. He's a city zip so I always thought he was a sprinter is mother was a screener Meyler. She wind going a mile but she he also win the Mattie twice but you know maybe as he matured now the race the other day made me think about it a a little more relaxed so well into fast pace and sustain run that I hadn't seen him before well. You WanNa talk about a sustained run of success. This is of course you mentioned the mother broken dreams. We Talk How many times we talk about her. Tommy over the over the years ver- of her nice career and before her she was a daughter of our dreamer yeah well you know like I said every time I run this first thing in any wins and everything I think Mr Lamb and and I also think you know he had the six day and everything and I think that baseball the bad horses the fair because each family didn't have by Brunner's they had one or two run by bad points what well and it's funny. You say that because it's it's it's a weird situation. Caribou club was was broken dreams. His first foal and the things haven't gone as well for her since him yeah. Well you know I've got a three year. Old now can run but he he liked the family. They all tend to. You know that he's he's aren't the best in you gotta gotTa manage take care of them and let them grow up so so he was the first foal five and then she didn't have a four year old but the three year old acts likes well. She did have a four year old but he was slow he might as well not existed. you know the three year old might be okay and then we've got a yearling filly. That's all right and then we have a curling wingless looks nice nice and who was she bred back to you got me there. I was pretty good well. We'll find out we'll find out for all right. We'll find out from Craig. Well the you're under a little bit of pressure with the brother because fly the W with with with burn vertex cubs mania kind of like they are a boasted a w rallied he did he did finish second in the debut so we'll have and he's and you gelded. You made the decision to Yes well Tom but a couple the notes you've you've really had kind of a I'm not gonNA call it. A It's not a down year but bad year win in and never could've hey it hadn't rained on a drier field. Let's be honest. It's bad year but you know kind of counting on some two year. Olds and there be in two year old so you know get back to your old. If you take care of them you'll have arose but it's been a bad year and it's nice to win a race. you know that's the way it goes well. You haven't really sent out very many starters just to be honest. I it just a hundred hundred and fifteen starts. That's kind of my stables dwindled. I've got older. You know how that goes. When you get older the people forget you can train your horse but we're not going to be that old crappy guy you know he's hanging in there trying to win when we well speaking of trying to win when you can what about coming up on Friday three sided story a warfront philly making her third start yeah yeah? She's a Nice Philly. She's got she's a war front which they tend to be a little they wanna come around a little later so I'm thinking we're going to run this fairly one more time then give her a little time..

Tommy proctor California Tom Dan Caribou club Craig Philly Glenn Hill Joseph Caribou Yearbook Club Philadelphia stalking Jim Dandy Wendy Laurel Fraternity Laurel Fergal Lynch Glendale China Park Delaware Pisa
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"The best way you can get back to me is to subscribe to the podcast and leave a review. I don't care if you leave a one star review a five star review. I just want to hear your thoughts on what you enjoyed about this. Tell me how i can improve it and make it better for you and be of service to you at a greater level level moving forward. My whole mission is to serve you at the highest level and it doesn't matter if you think again one star five star just connect over there. Leave us a review. We'd love to hear from you as we like to share those with our team we like to share that with our audience and it's going to help us spread the message of even more so. This is your first time here. Go subscribe grab over on apple podcast again. Leave a review and to bring it back to the beginning full. Circle roomy said the universe is not outside of you. Look look inside yourself everything that you want you already are and bob proctor said thoughts become things if you see it in your mind and you will hold it in your hand. I love you so very much and you know a comedy is it's time to go out there and do something great breath they..

bob proctor apple
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"And learn more about everything there but you continue to show up and serve and give and i think it's very it's very inspiring for me and so many people to witness as a as a mentor and a role model. There's so many people that the more success you have you continue to give the more you continue to learn and continue to share and i want to continue to be that example like you of living for so long so i'm really grateful for you. I'm really the knowledge you for your gifts your wisdom and your humility in your sharing not just acting like you have all the answers but costly learning and constantly sharing now for for everything i listen. I really enjoy being here yeah but i love this so much. It's great. I mean i i would feel deprived when there's some reason i can't do this because i just love doing it. I love wake up in the morning and you mentioned refers started. I knew when i could change like i'm happy healthy wealthy today. I have have over world. I got wonderful. Friends all over the world is that when when i guide that was losing the way i can start winning antibody but he can't yeah so i mean i don't care i've gone into prison to assist own into she. Maximum security in canada and i had let a guy out that was warden. Consider my mad dog. Put him on special pro. I got the canadian government limited tear up his his parole and give them a passport to move with me. I mean i've seen situations that you wouldn't believe leap could happen. I've seen them happen. You miracles. I mean they're. They're happening every day right so i knew i could win. Anybody can win. It's just a matter of getting the radio formation from the right people. I think we get too much information from the wrong. People and personal development today is such a well known thing that for anybody not to be developing themselves personally is it is rather sad. I think we have to help them resolve we can like. I don't think person deliberately destroys himself. I think they're misguided. Yeah they're ignorant. They don't know they don't know how to shift. They don't they don't know they don't know they're lost and so i believe do responsibility help uh-huh yeah. That's great yeah. Well you share a lot of information on your website. Bob proctor dot com. You've got all the information for your books. You do conferences all over the world seminars. When are you doing one here in l._a. All the time it seems like you've got them all over the place where people can find you bob proctor dot com social media dan on instagram or twitter anything yourself offer..

Bob proctor canadian government twitter l._a canada
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Brakemanship. I mean she was damn good. She by bank cell banks turned banks the public work in community banks but a lot of money and she came to a seminar around the time the secret. I kept hitting people. What are you really want. She'd been very successful. She graduated as the top banking lawyer in every a university in united states she was number one. She studied in europe in england and <hes> should never thought it what she really wanted. Her dad was is a banking lawyer. She sort of followed suit. She'd be damn good person free at interview sometime. Larry larry king interviewed her one time <hes> she's. She's really a breakout and i'm anchalee. She lives in a different frequency altogether. She's very very bright but we were doing a seminar. In phoenix. Six and i was leaving town and she was staying. She was doing and she said. Could you get together with me for a cup of coffee. She had some personal problems. I should share so are we sat down to coffee shop and she said could you keep me stay thinks i should do shower personal problems ensure again and tell her so. I took like you know how they have these napkins on june here rate down down ten things. You're grateful for that done any nia to send loved the three people that are bothering you while yeah hard thing to do somebody really obsessively audi. They assemble up to three people that are bothering you and then share it with somebody. She had peggie something like here's an iphone gina genucel thomas this is gina. Can you get a pad made and i told her what i wanted and i said she made a pat. She had it where <music> <unk> within an hour she went to cancer someplace inner computer and she had this bad with her name is and she was going to hawaii the next day with her mother and sister so she took a pad for her and the three of them every morning. There's really dumps it down every morning. Write down ten things. You're grateful so for the whole their lives changed well. It had such an impact on her mother and sister. We started to do it in every seminar now l. now and she she chews on their teachers if she doesn't the seminar and she's almost always in it and she tells the story about me doing that with her now she does everybody and so on then in this pad ponant there's ten things on the top and i have to read it with my left hand every day doing that for a year. That's a very powerful thing to yeah. Gratitude is everything is the antidote to all stress anger for the entire process of mental adjustment there it is that's a stress and it doesn't matter what your problem any you change perception you change your life like you said yeah and it might only be for a minute minute changes. Your whole world changes your vibration to attract more what you want chris. I want to acknowledge you for bob because you've been doing this for a long time. You've been doing this before. I was born or you know twenty years before i was born born the fact that you continue to show up with the same focus intensity generosity day in and day out on your seminars ars which i hope everyone listening goes to go bob proctor dot com.

Larry larry king bob proctor audi phoenix europe hawaii england chris twenty years
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Y. Y y so that's right so it becomes a new action the conditioning still there just on a higher level what are thoughts that we should be thinking every day. You give his habits learn study. Have mentor have a goal or multiple goals. But what out of the idea should we be saying to ourselves internally and did you have an affirmation it positive statement from yourself. You give to yourself and that has something to to do your goal. That's how you change the paradigm. The paradigm can only be changed. One of two ways one is an emotional impact which doesn't happen often and the other was example for that what's on the example for that would be nine eleven now. Nine eleven wasn't an emotional impact for me. It probably wasn't for you but for people people who lived right near there or lost somebody that was emotional impacting. Just something hit you so hard. Just knock you off your pins emotional impact act and repetition conscience-based repetition. She you take this affirmation of saying. I want to change and you've got to keep repeating to yourself. You're going to keep seeing it through the repetition asian of it pretty soon. It becomes fixing your mind then the thing you're afraid of becomes a habit. You just automatically do it yeah. They're saying do automatically today then you don't even give a thought to at one time you're afraid to do it sure so that's i think that's how you keep. Changing thought is a very powerful saad is the preamble to everything. Some waves are cosmic waves. They penetrate all the time and space. I could fortunate working with ed mitchell. He was the captain of the lunar landry montiel and one of the apollo flights and he did transfer. Its exercises neither side of the moon. Let's sherman and ford here on earth. They're all all gone now but here doing south transferred exercises all the time and we have not got to a point really understand that if i dial your number i'm on your frequency. <hes> i will never get tiffany's phone to ring right. Get your phone to ring if i take a picture picture of tiffany and i send it to a friend of mine in singapore simultaneous with me hitting sent here in los angeles. They've got it in singapore. You know that yeah well sought works same way. I could be thinking of you. I'll trigger cells in your brain and your cells. If you're not thinking go sales will start juggling your started thinking to me and maybe i'll phone say there's a damn thing was just thinking of you. How also uh well. We understand what's happening. You think on frequencies now this has to do with goals. When you set a goal you you have to flip your brain onto the frequency that the good that you desire or that you need for that goal. Is there so you most people don't make the decision because they don't know how to get it. You don't have to know how to get it. That's why von braun said when kennedy how to get to the moon the will to do it. You're gonna make the decision. You don't don't make the decision when you've got enough money. When you've got all the resources you make the decision. When you make the decision you flip your brain onto a higher frequency and then you're on the frequency you begin to attract everything on that breach of the law of attraction comes she the secret brought to the love attraction but it didn't explain it and then explain i didn't even extending you didn't get the time. Most people don't even understand it. You can only attract according to the frequency that you're operating on attraction is a secondary law. The primary law is the law vibration. That's a that's a primary the universe everything in this room is moving..

ed mitchell singapore tiffany landry montiel kennedy saad los angeles sherman ford von braun
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"I was afraid. I was very shy very sell. It's fair yeah very insecure. I had all this knowledge. I was earning money in there air. I did well outside of their forget. It and gilles tapes on the recording. Come on the magic word on attitude. It's a familiar familiar with oh. Let's check it out. You got it. I will get an original original copy and send it talk. We got it. You got all this. I will send it well. He said no right. There's an attitude. He said no right here. We come to rather strange fac back. We tend to minimize the things we can do. The grocery can accomplish and for some equally strange region. We think other people can accomplish things that we cannot. Is you want to realize realize that you have deep reservoirs accountability within you now if you'd asked me you understand that i'd say of course anderson. I've listened to it a thousand times at least well. I was in the back corner of the room at the o'hare hiatt bill g-o-v speaking speaking to a thousand people out in back corners rim now is watching him bill go the fraction speakers one of the best speakers in the world and i watched him he come off. There was a thousand people about five hundred bank here five hundred another essential. He got this corner corner. Get a handhold mike and his hand up. You said if i want to be free i've gotta be me not to me. I think you think i should be not to me. I think my wife thinks should be nothing. I think my kids think should be if i were to be free and i was watching him. Nothing my cut this guy so good and if only i could do that i could never do that all of a sudden record rural starting to play in my head a right here we come to a rather strange fact. We tend to minimize the things we can do goals. We can accomplish cam. That's what romains remains and i suddenly realized i haven't listened this thing for years. If both could do it i could do and i made up my mind. I was going to learn how to speak like he did. I was going to get him to teach meanwhile and so he became a mentor of mine. I paid him a lot of money just to sit down and talk to him for a few minutes a number of times now. I speak nothing like i mean. I'm nothing being like him. He speaks totally different than meeting. Although i'll speak to people same time what he taught me was wish to be relaxed in front of the audience that was big lesson. <hes> if you're not relax in front of an audience the audience will know it. How do you relax in front of an audience when you're terrified. You've got to think of the audience. You've got to think of how you're going to get what you're helping. Oh you're going to teach them something. Another mentor monica years ago told me because i was i've been training and toastmasters had coaches is and how to overcome a lot of my fears was speaking in front of big crowds and i got pretty good. I was getting paid big fees and things like that but i've still nervous a little bit before four and felt a little insecure. I remember calling him about fifteen minutes before being like. Can you give me some grounding can he is smoking and he said don't making about you. Make it about them. You're gonna mess up. Be okay with it. You're not going to remember every word you wanna say. Don't beat yourself up focus on them and how you can serve served. Don't focus on yourself and that's when everything started to shift. Just when you said focus on service to the audience you gotta fall in love with helping that audience helping giving <hes> doing it every campus serve you stop worrying about everything the way you look. It's the same thing when you're having a interaction with a group of people and you're listening and you're not worried about what people think about you just being interested and then you kind of a very confident.

mike bill g-o-v gilles monica fifteen minutes
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Into the menu view there's a special special bob proctor in there where they had me do about thirty or forty five minutes. I did it. My office on a green screen. Screened just started talking about it and stop. They never edited it and they put that so. That's in there is a yeah and i think that's online for. I don't know two three a billion viewers on it. Yeah wow inspiring yeah it was it was a great. It was a great hit guy and you but you already had a successful business you. You were teaching doing seminars. I've been in the business since that was in two thousand and six. I'd been the business since nineteen sixty eight. Wow i started in nineteen sixty eight. It was nice job conan. Okay yeah yeah wow and you didn't go to high school in two months. Is i went to high school for two months john. They kicked me up. Why kick you out while i was useless. I was just going. I was going nowhere doing nothing. I mean i was a useless human being really i i had the word goal. I would think of a hockey game or soccer game was not something person would work toward. I i've been in the navy in factories and working in bars. I mean i was going nowhere and i was twenty six when i woke up but prior to that nothing was happening. I think very effective at what i do because i always figured if fish fish worked for me. It would work for anybody. I was such a loser and my world changed so dramatically that i've never it never ceased to be fascinated with what happened to me and i wanted to happen to other people and again. What do you think you're such a loser because i feel like we're brothers then well light. I've thought about that many times. I was born during the depression. I've been around a long time eighty five next week. Wow so it was born during the depression listen and the war the second world war broke out. I was just five six years old. My dad went overseas. I never really knew my dad. Had i had a brother and sister sister older brother younger so is in the middle and i had my grandmother's buddied up with my brother and my mother was my sister and i felt like i was sort of lost and your dad was gone yeah well. There was no father. I mean he come home after the war and then he was gone again so i didn't have any real direction as a kid and i i was very sin as always underweight. I has had very low self esteem. I knew nothing about who i was. Nobody ever taught me anything about that. See in those days. I mean things were tough for everybody. You know during the war during the depression your parents i guess my mother was happy just to be able to feed us and put a roof over yeah yeah now mind i just she was really a phenomenal woman because she did everything on her own and she made it happen and so my brother and sister and i talked about it we always say god bless mother because she kept going and so we look back and i think we'd good gene there. Wow what was the biggest lesson your mom tell you i think basis she taught me was to be generous. She was she was a great chooser. Generous person. I give a lotta money away. I give a lot i give i'm considered a very generous person. I think i think i learned it from her. I remember we were kids and there was a family on the street..

bob proctor conan underweight hockey soccer two months forty five minutes five six years
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Thank you to our sponsors today and i'm so excited about this so without further ado let me bring to you the one and only bob proctor welcome back to the school of greatest podcast. We have the legendary bob proctor in the house. Is there going to be super. We're glad you're here. You've been an inspiration of so many people since the sixties really i learned about you from the secret which i think a lot of people learn about you in the mainstream world and we're just having a conversation off camera about how you almost missed being in the secret some curious if you could tell that story how you can it was an interesting story. I had a message on my phone but the message was very garbled. I didn't delete it. I hit pound in just this. This is a recording morning box voice message yet record and yeah. I was in an airport and a message thing was full so iphone gina gina ed's been my assistant. She'd been with me for thirty three years next week. Wow anyway. I said gina my phone's fo- help me clean it up. I was in an airport and so i said i think this is a number. That sounds like an easy number and i said i think this is the person's name glenda was rhonda. Byrne made sacred glenda was her sister and she was doing the heavy lifting. I guess any rate gene and i said and they said something about a movie but i said everything. I'm telling you could be wrong well. She phoned me back in and she's no in your telomeres right. She said there's a film crew in there doing this film from australia and they really wanted to him but they haven't been able to get a whole year and and <hes> they couldn't have been trying to they phone my phone they did have they found the number and <hes> but she said they're gonna actress trillion next week. They've been trying for a month to reach you and they're shooting an aspirin all weekend and genus says isn't that strange bumps during the seminar aren't aspen this weekend. I hadn't been aspen for two or three years wow and so. I just walked next door. I was working in a hotel next door and walked into a little room was much bigger than this and they had cameras and of course it was no air and his sweaty. The lights was terrible. I mean you wouldn't believe the way that was set up and they had two cameras. One that was real one fakes and that's the story so i answered it cillian questions for them and they got a role on and i just started to talk and they loved what i was saying because it was long they were looking came for and so i opened my computer and i put a page of powerpoint sub to trigger my mind on different things so they had me in there for a a couple of hours and i never heard anything from them. Then i think that was in the summer until the next spring or something really and i got a c._d. By fedex now you get a lot of c._d. Sentiment i there were back then and this is what the ninety s or two thousand well. I don't know your before promoted two thousand six okay yeah and i put it on my coffee table table and i said to my wife. You know we got to watch this thing. I didn't even know how to start the senior unit up and anyway she put it on. I looked and i i said my god. This is gonna rock. It was because i saw the trailer and it was a trailer. They're sold the secret and it just took off like a rocket. You guys were everywhere for years. Yeah yeah and you were one of the main people that they focused on a lot of your you'll i was i was <hes> i think i'd probably studied their subject more than anybody right and then they had me do a section if you go into the c._d..

glenda bob proctor gina gina ed Byrne fedex aspirin cillian australia thirty three years three years
"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"proctor" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Thank you to our sponsors today and i'm so excited about this so without further ado let me bring to you the one and only bob proctor welcome back to the school of greatest podcast. We have the legendary bob proctor in the house. Is there going to be super. We're glad you're here. You've been an inspiration of so many people since the sixties really i learned about you from the secret which i think a lot of people learn about you in the mainstream world and we're just having a conversation off camera about how you almost missed being in the secret some curious if you could tell that story how you it was an interesting story. I had a message on my phone but the message was very garbled. I didn't delete it. I hit pound in just this. This is a recording morning box voice message yet record and yeah. I was in an airport and a message thing was full so iphone gina gina ed's been my assistant. She'd been with me for thirty three years next week. Wow anyway. I said gina my phone's fo- help me clean it up. I was in an airport and so i said i think this is a number. That sounds like an easy number and i said i think this is the person's name glenda was rhonda. Byrne made sacred glenda was her sister and she was doing the heavy lifting. I guess any rate gene and i said and they said something about a movie but i said everything. I'm telling you could be wrong well. She phoned me back in and she's no in your telomeres right. She said there's a film crew in there doing this film from australia and they really wanted to him but they haven't been able to get a whole year and and <hes> they couldn't have been trying to they phone my phone they did have they found.

bob proctor gina gina ed glenda Byrne australia thirty three years