35 Burst results for "Private Practice"

Decluttering Deeper Without Getting Overwhelmed

A Slob Comes Clean

01:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Decluttering Deeper Without Getting Overwhelmed

"Hi jessica. Thank you so much for coming onto the podcast today in q. Suspend happy here so tell me a little bit about yourself. Tell me your unique life situation that you're living okay while i am married With two young kids sexually our tenth anniversary this year. Congratulations thank you. Thank you and we have a five year old daughter two year old son so you know toys all over the floor and making lots of meals and snacks every day. Kind of and let's see what else. My job stuff has changed a lot. This year i basically went from. I worked for twelve years in. Hr at a large company decided about a year ago to leave of leave the corporate world in job and now i'm basically at home with the kids part of the time like half of the week Self employed the other half and we can talk about what you know. Those jobs are a few kind of do a couple of different things. Yeah but listen yes. So we own a couple of rental properties so Sometimes it's busy usually. It's not but thanks kind of pop up out of anywhere out of nowhere with you. Know things that need repairs or stuff like that and and Just certified as ib seal c. Which is a type of lactation consultant. So i'm working at a private practice with that. So that is really variable. Sometimes some weeks. I have a number of consults working with a couple of clients and sometimes it's quieter and then we do a lot of professional training with that. Choose so that's scheduled kind of a little bit argue on call at all with that. No i'm not on call have set times. But they could those slots could fill up or they may not like. I kind of never know still that morning. Potentially

Jessica
The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

02:17 min | Last month

The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

"Today. Our topic is the intersection between trauma and addiction and recovery from both dr. Stephanie covington's a skilled clinician on inciteful author an engaging public speaker and our guest today. I've had the opportunity to hear. Dr covington lecture several times over the years. But this is the first time i've ever had the honor of interviewing her. Thank you stephanie. For joining us today bigger. Thank you. And i gotta ask you right off the bat. What is your interest in addiction and trauma and the intersection. Where does that come from. Well initially my interest in addiction came from my own experience recovering woman early in my recovery. I thought to myself. I wish one of the women could feel the way i do. A series of events led me into the addiction field. Abc focusing on women. And as i did that. I realized so many of the women i was seeing either in group in a treatment center or private practice i had had trauma histories and i realized nobody was talking about that. And begin to more and it was just. It was the evolution of my work really and those days. now. I'm talking about in the eighties. The addiction field did not want to talk about trauma. I mean i can't even tell you the negative pushback guy it was. It was fairly powerful in the mantra in the addiction. Field was when you're clean and sober. You have a trauma history you can deal with a year from now get a year recovery and then deal with it and i knew many people were never going to get a year pre covering. I wanna come back to having a couple of minutes. Let me ask you i. Can you define trauma for us. Sure the various definitions of trauma. I mean the one that mental health providers using the diagnostic manual is that it's really a life threatening event and it's a life threatening event in which can occur because you experience it or you witnessed so you hear about it happening to somebody else or you get it because you're surrounded by trauma and there has to be a particular response

Stephanie Covington Dr Covington Stephanie Trauma ABC
Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

Fancy Free Podcast

02:13 min | Last month

Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

"You are listening to the fancy free. Podcasts where my guests. And i tell our most embarrassing funny stories so that we all feel less alone and our imperfections and forge connection through vulnerability in humor. I'm joanne jared. And i am your host and today i have with me. Caryn tap lee. Karen is a fellow physician. She is an obstetrician gynecologist fellowship trained in integrative medicine and has transitioned out of traditional practice and is currently selling mercedes-benz as she completes her mba. So i think she's addicted to school. She calls it her covert career. She's a total car. Check and you guys. This is so fascinating. She started off her higher education with a ged. so karen. thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Okay absolutely we'll fill in the blanks a lot of questions but first of all. Just tell us a little more about who you are and what you do. That is currently a moving target. You're right by tradition chaining. I'm an obgyn with a fellowship in integrative medicine that i got at the university of arizona down in tucson and i finished that in about twenty eighteen i was also establishing a medical spa at the same time i started off like a lot of. Obgyn's i went into a private practice. I where i was doing july only my husband was career military in the navy and so my first job out of residency was in oregon and he was stationed in washington. We had been separated for the better part of our marriage because of machine training and everything. So i tried to make it work as we tried to make it work as much as we could then. I finally decided to transition up to washington where i took a traditional employed job where i was taking q. Three call seventy two to ninety six hours at a time out about three and a half years into that. I finally went to our office manager to take some vacation time and is told that i didn't have any because i only accrued vacation time when i was physically in the office seeing patients

Joanne Jared Caryn Benz Karen LEE University Of Arizona Obgyn Tucson Washington Navy Oregon
Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:21 min | 2 months ago

Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

"This episode. We're talking with judy. Show judy's an author speaker and nutritional therapists she's nutritional there with a psychology and communications degree from the university of california berkeley and she also has a function utrition and hellenistic house private practice and house of patients with health issues with non finding the true root cause of the problem. Welcome to the show. Thank you thanks for having me. I really wanna get you on the show because you're doing some really interesting things nutritional space as well as the business space so give audience some context onto who you are what you do and what you're about sure. So hi everyone. I'm judy chohan for those of you. That don't know me. I go by nutrition judy. I am on multiple social media platforms so youtube instagram facebook and i just share nutritional content. I kind of follow a meat based diet and so you know. I find a lot of healing in the space and for a lot of people. There's not a lot of information out there. And so i'm just providing nutritional therapy bits of information in these bite size portions and you know just making nutrition easy for people to consume. And i know there's puns in there. I guess they're all intended. And you know the thing is. I came from a business background. So i was a business management consultant for like twelve years and i worked with these big corporations and we were trying to find the ways to have more efficient processes. So i manage these multimillion dollar projects and my health started declining. And so as i got ruling into the whole science at a nutrition and understanding. How food can either be a slow poison or it can actually be medicine for the body. I realized that you know. I think my calling is actually in nutrition and not in business consulting but you know learning from what. I learned in management consultant. I can now like streamline the process to provide education that's understandable for the general audience. And so you know. I married that and my psychology degree. And that's how i've been able to be successful as a speaker to grow my social media relatively quickly and to you know. Build my own nutrition judy community. A now i'm about to release a first ever carnival cure published book.

Judy University Of California Berke Judy Chohan Youtube Facebook
Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

"Very very excited today to have dr theodore belfour on the podcast. I heard about dr bell. Four in james ness doors. New book called breath. And we're gonna be talking about all of that today on the show and dr belfour. He's of new york university college of dentistry and a senior certified instructor for the international association for orthodontics in the nineteen sixties. Dr bell was sent to vietnam to work as the sole brigade dentists for four thousand soldiers of the hundred ninety six light infantry from the jungles of vietnam to park avenue in manhattan upon his return opened his own private dental office in new york city and has been private practice for more than forty years and dr belfour specializes in the treatment of the cranial facial system. And that's what we're gonna be diving into today. So dr bill for welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure excellent. So what are we. Start by talking about how this all began and go back to. You know what happened. That change the cranial bones the cranial structure our skulls that led to this epidemic of of airway issues breathing issues at all of the health issues. That come with that well How we develop. How would grow and develop is based on how we breathe Aloe and we chew so just looking at how we chew. According to the us department of agriculture today in us sixty three percent of diet is processed and refined foods so without the proper stimulation to the body. We are not fully expressing on jeans when not developed in to offer full potential because that particularly when off jaws do not grow forward enough Do you re trues. Those jaws helps to push the tongue backwards into the airway and down to throw sanal. We have compromised sleeping breathing.

Dr Belfour Dr Theodore Belfour Dr Bell James Ness New York University College Of International Association For Vietnam Dr Bill Manhattan Us Department Of Agriculture New York City United States
The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

Creative Therapy Umbrella

02:24 min | 3 months ago

The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

"All. Right krista welcome to the podcast thank you. Thanks for inviting me. I'm so happy to be here. Yes i am pumped that year here. We have so much in common of all the things we love talking about. And i think we could really do twenty episodes but i am pumped about so the topic for today's episode. So thank you for coming on and taking the time. Thank you i appreciate. I'm excited to be here. And i love to talk about. Creativity is so. I appreciate having a space where i can just share. You know part of who. I am as as an individual first of all and also as a therapist gas. Yes it so. It's nice to have that space. I think i haven't really thought about it that way but sometimes when we can share. I think that's what's so nice about listening to podcasts and people's experiences and who they are and what they bring to therapy is. It's really inspiring. So i'm i'm glad we have the space to this is going to be fun yes. I'm looking forward to it. Well for our listeners. How tell us a little bit about what you do currently in your practice okay. So i'll just start by just sharing a little bit about me as a person i is in. Yeah is krista. I'm i'm a hobbies photographer. I i'm a writer. I'm an indoor gartner. Probably going to talk more about. My love of plants is something that i just naturally like to share a to bring up in pop that in And i'm also a concert creator for instagram. I'm the owner and founder creative minds at play. I i work full time as a director of counseling programs at a nonprofit organization and part time and private practice at seven corners psychotherapy in northern virginia. I am a licensed professional counselor therapist. Supervisor i am naturally certified in cfc cbc. And i'm also a board approved licensure supervisor with the virginia. Born of counseling

Krista Gartner Instagram Northern Virginia CBC Virginia
Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

The WoMed

06:54 min | 4 months ago

Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

"Lauren. Welcome to the wo- med. Thank you in fact i to be here so for those of you who don't know morin. Sharp pain is a speech pathologist. And i have been dying to get speech. Pathologist on the wool med. So when you tell people what you do what's the first thing that they automatically assume. No people automatically assume i work with kids. I just can't sit kids and teach them how to say either s.'s. Or their ps. And i mean with all this do that but i actually work with adults since i think. The stereotype with speech pathology sitting down playing games working on different sounds But there's so much more to it than that so yeah well. I'll admit one of my good friends is literally dreading the day that her two year olds list goes away. It's really cute though because right now. Her z's literally come from the back of her mouth. Like all the kerr molars and she's just adorable. It's really cute it is. Oh my gosh yeah so you mentioned that you work with adults so did you. Is that kind of where you got started with. Everything or your passion really was but actually started my career working with kids. I worked with kids for about two years. Two and a half years and i liked it initially But i quickly found out. Just it wasn't like farc me like it wasn't my passionate area and so i worked really hard to kind of tradition over to the medical side of each pathology and i started working at outpatient rehab. I was seeing a lot of patients who had had strokes in like traumatic brain injuries and swallowing disorders. And i really found that that was really my passion and that's really what made me feel fulfilled at the end of the day. And so that's what i've been doing. Ever since that point. I love that i feel like i. I mean the only real interactions and stuff that i've had working with with speech was i used to work in the nikko. Nice and so. We'd have speech consoles all the time you know. We had like paralyzed vocal. Cords or you know. Cleft lip or palate premiums just couldn't quite figure out how to suck swallow breathe. Exactly yeah echo cool. Yeah so there's just it just sounds like there's so many different fields within so p. wrote there are there are. Mike said i think most of the time. Most people associate s. l. p. With you know working with kids like in the school. I think the school was really popular. But like you said there's so many different areas you know. We can work in hospital. We can work in nursing homes and you know fools and fire practices. So there's there's really a lot of different options in terms of you know where we can work which is really cool. So what led you into this career like how did you first hear about it and you know get interested in it so it's funny excellent to be a lawyer up until my senior year of high school and i remember i had already declared my major and a second of sociology class in high school and their story about the young girl. Her name was genie. I don't know if you've heard the story. But she was locked away for twelve years that her parents never interacted with hers. Get no human interaction and yeah it was. I saw that and like she had no communication at mike whatsoever and so she worked with the speech therapist and he was able to communicate. It wasn't all verbal. Nonverbal buys using pictures. But i thought that was so neat that there was something out there. You could help people communicate and the rest is history. I just fell in love from that point. that's really beautiful So greenwich some little video. Yeah what's the school pathway lake like do you guys have to clinicals. is it Like a bachelors. Is it a doctoral degree. Now or like how like if you're going to coach someone through eight or tell someone you know what they're in for. Yeah so it's four. Years of undergrad And then you have to go to graduate school so for me. My program was in graduate school. But if you don't have speech as an undergraduate degree typically a two and a half maybe three years for the graduate program and then after that your life and your certify after a nine month period. There's no doctoral degree right now. That recommended or like that's required to be a speech pathologist but you can most certainly get them back degree that not in my pets whatsoever But after getting your master's degree through what all the clinical fellowship here and so that nine months after you graduate where you're essentially practicing. Slc like getting a salary and everything. But you're still technically under supervision and so after that nine months Once you have all of your hours your than a certified speech pathologist so you don't need any supervision or you know no one's giving you feedback just kinda on your own completely after that point. Wow yeah is there different routes that you take if you want to be more on the medical side of things versus you know in schools or or working with pedes a good question so i know in graduate school. We do externships so typically if there are two externships one is medical. One is typically pediatrics. might be in the school. There might be private practice. But i know that's alive. Students really kind of narrow down where they want to be in terms of their career so a lot of students. We'll just try to warm more relationships with people a medical they feel like they wanna pursue medical side or vice versa with school side and then with the clinical fellowship years so that nine month period actor graduation many students will try and get their cf wire the clinical fellowship your and that desired area of speech that way after they're done they can't hopefully get a medical job or a pediatric job. You know what they don't need this revision to

Morin Lauren Nikko Mike
Emotional Maps And Mind Body Integrated therapy

Thinking Like A Genius Podcast

06:28 min | 4 months ago

Emotional Maps And Mind Body Integrated therapy

"Beverly thank you very much for coming on the podcast episode on quite happy that we've been able to shed gillette time to have the interview. We started talking about this on a forum. Forward to geogra- photon full balloon. Second brian and we started talking about the psychology side of things in how the brain processes things in various Topics we dogged in. And i decided to get you on because i wanted to find out more about some of the work that you're doing have got a specific interest. In how the brain processes information. But i'd like to find out more information about also how emotions play a key role in how the body processes information. You came out with some really interesting information of that and then also dive into some of the things that you're talking about the neural maps in and some of the biotechnology. So if you can start tell the listeners. A bit more about yourself. And then we'll dive into some of the questions for first of all thank you lance for me. It's really an honor to the on your podcast. A little bit about. I have been a mind body. Integrative therapist for over thirty three years in private practice in santa fe new mexico. And my buddy. Integrative therapist is an umbrella term that i developed quite a while ago to encompass all the different aspects of what i do my licenses etc cetera. So i'm a clinical counselor. And i'm a body worker manual therapists and i'm a naturopathic doctor and i also not for thirty three years but since two thousand and thirteen or thereabouts have been doing bio energetically in working to map the bio energetic field. So i work with clients. My specialty is and has been in trauma. Big t. little t and but it all boils down to helping people. Release the grip of that old patterning on their brain behavior of their perceptions emotions eccentric cetera. And so i've also studied a lot about the way. The brain works the way the brain patterns information and i've developed some ways of really beginning to change some of those old well warm neuro trackways that it's like the maps that we follow our default. I've really been able to help a lot of my clients. Get free of those old patterns and develop new trackways new pathways of behavior perception ways of experiencing themselves in the world in the world in relation to themselves so this quite a lot of topics. And there's quite a lot of information in that introduction. It's not a bad thing. I think this much interesting information in there. Which i think can be really valuable because i've been doing a lot of research on how brian processes out learns how things have subconscious ties into behaviors and also cognitive biases. The reason why. I wanted to get you on his actually find out more about the the areas that you're looking into specifically to actually find out how you change the mapping. That's quite a tricky thing to do. Because obviously when you start dealing with subconscious you talking about a lot of strongly program behaviors and they tied very deeply into emotional state and also the motions because i said tightly integrated it's quite interesting to to see how you're able to change that. I think we can. We can probably have a lot of really about just that part of it so the first thing wanted to find out a bit more is your research. How did you get involved with it. And what have you learned from that. That bioenergetics youth so years ago. There was a series of conferences being held in santa fe called science and consciousness. And i would go to those conferences and partake in a lot of the different programs offered for of years scientists from russia youth constituting caracal was invited to speak and he would show his equipment and equipment. I'm using the guests. Discharge visualization electron photonic imaging system and he would present the research teams doing spatially like like measuring and mapping the energetics and different sacred sites and the research that they were doing in hospitals and clinics universities etc etc and i was fascinated by that and determine that one way or another i would eventually get that equipment and start doing my own research and use it with clients and just not my own interests and in two thousand thirteen. I did manage to get a camera. And it's a camera equipment that there's a lot of different aspects because they have the professional system they use it in hospitals and clinics in russia about sixty to other countries. It's scientific research quality equipment and it comes with a very sophisticated suite of software based on different algorithms that have been tested and retested and to healthy years mostly in russia and and what it allows me to do is i can. Test spatial feels the effects of our energy. Thoughts are feelings. Different things that are providing em- put into a space a room and environment and see the effects of that. I can contest the same facts in water. Which is quite an amazing recorder and actually also transmitter works two ways and most importantly i can task. What's going on in individuals and this equipment enables me to be able to test the second emotional field which the russians referred to as the informational feel for very important reasons and also the the physical field. The functional energy of all the organs. How well they're working etc etcetera.

Brian Santa Fe Gillette Beverly Lance New Mexico Russia
Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

The Healing Place Podcast

03:55 min | 4 months ago

Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

"Hey everybody i always tells me that. We're preparing we are now. We're live on facebook so welcome back to our conversations on pandemic self care then. We'll go into some other care. Discussions as well and i'm very excited to have with me today. John d. bias. So welcome john thanks. I'm glad to be back. Yes i'm i'm happy to have you here. We had a little chat before we hit a record or not record going live which is so awesome. going to talk a little bit about some self care and then kuo regulation. And yes but i tell let people know what it is that you are what you do great. My name is john d. And the last name johnny whitest. Nobody remembers that anyway. But you know not having reached share. Proportions johnny widest. And what i do. Is i go around and i help. People feel better fast so i have a private practice. Yes of us probably listening. But also i'm a trainer on the master trainer of trainers with the oldest original and registered charitable educational association. Way too many words. What does that mean. It's a noncommercial Association of people like myself that train if turkey and tapping professionally and we do it at the highest standards that we can and were even a registered charity so it is not a smokescreen noncommercial kind of place non profit. We actually mean. And so what are we try to do. We try to stretch gary craig's original tapping Diaspora into an even greater than his own eight or nine million across the globe. We try to keep that going. It's a it's a legacy and a privilege and what does that mean. It means that this tool which we know from our last conversation if you missed that real quick. It's it does three kinds of care. Which is why it's so wonderful and i call it the people's toolbox self-care crucial and non negotiable. It's perfect peer to peer care. We all need that. That's the connection that ends isolation and we all need that perfect and then at deeper levels like an iceberg. Those of us who are skilled in doing it because of practice and certification and accreditation and all the things we go through to make sure that we give the public the finest we have to offer. That's when we use it at the deepest therapeutic care level for traumatic relief and release and things like that. But look i'll three of those things are so wonderful. Somebody is going to get some great relief out of any one of those levels and all over possible. So that's what i do. Yeah well thank you. And i love it that you said connection because i'm not kidding when i say you're maybe my fourteenth live of past podcast guests and i think the word connection or connect has come up in every single one of them and how critical that is at this time was what we're going through especially these times right because social isolation you know physical social isolation is not good for most of us. We're not paying too bears. In our not polar bears we are heard like critters and we do. Best thrive best in connection with others. And when that's impossible or the flip side of that little too much connection but we're not used to. It don't know what to do with it. That's also very very unsettling because now on top of being uncomfortable we have all these uncomfortable feelings about. I shouldn't feel that way about my family. My roommate my uncle whatever it is right and so inside double whammy.

Johnny Whitest Johnny Widest Oldest Original And Registered John D KUO Gary Craig Facebook John
The difference between a MD and DO Physician with Pediatrician Mona Amin

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

03:08 min | 5 months ago

The difference between a MD and DO Physician with Pediatrician Mona Amin

"You share a little bit about your background and the work that you do. as a pediatrician. Yes so i have been. A general pediatrician for five years. Going on six years. Always in private practice. I've worked in new york city. And now i'm in florida and i love being. A general pediatrician. My goal as an outpatient pediatrician is to help parents downstream and downstream meaning before problems arise before they get issues. I wanna talk about things in the first five years right and for me. It's healthy sleep habits. It's healthy eating habits a positive body image and also approach stress so my platform really tries to look at all of those things. Obviously that's why we're gonna be talking about baby led weaning because i love that concept for creating good eating habits. So that's kind of my background. I m a. Do physician so not. Many people know the difference between md's and so both of us go through the undergraduate work medical school but dio medical school or osteopathic medical school in the united states. We learn the whole body so when we're learning about headaches were also learning about environmental triggers. We're learning about nutrition. We're learning about everything related to a system issue or a problem. And i love the way that we were trained so everything is a whole body system will have we thought about the impacts food can have or the environment or stress to a problem. So it's what we call that whole mind body spirit medicine which i love item partial to deals mainly because i m one when i say that i do seek out does it doesn't mean that i am against. Md's my own husband is an amazing md. But i just find that. The philosophy makes a lot of sense to me especially in general pediatrics and outpatient. They just tend to be more welcoming. The bedside manner is more like this. It's just i love it. So of course i m once. I'm going to be talking like this. But that's basically the difference. And i think that's important for parents to hear a lot of our audiences like some of them are still pregnant like the learning everything they can about babies etc and. I don't think they realize that you have the option. When you're choosing a pediatrician to also consider working with the. Do so. i'm so glad that i connected with you. Because i think you could just tell again like from your instagram and your online persona which is so real like it is a little bit different. I think than what a lot of people would expect from your traditional pediatrician. Yeah and i find that a lot of md's again. This is not empty bashing this is just my understanding of my colleagues. Md's are amazing but they tend to fall into a very will have to do this a certain way versus looking at big picture when that goes pediatrics. Like baby led weaning for example. Right like winning has been around for decades and also in other countries and the ap had to treat a statement saying. Hey okay we support it. If this better the other went so many other countries have been doing it. So i find that a lot of the organizations needs to kind of come into the modern sense of parenting and say okay. What can we do. How can we do this in a safe way. How can we educate parents on safe. Sleep how can we educate parents on eating with baby led weaning so that it meets their desires versus okay. You can't do this. This has never been done before. Because parenting is evolving and we need to evolve with it.

Dio Medical School Or Osteopat New York City Florida Headaches United States MD AP
Mayor de Blasio looks to speed up vaccinations with new sites across New York City

Curtis Sliwa

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Mayor de Blasio looks to speed up vaccinations with new sites across New York City

"Immunity Mayor to Blossom has taken a lot of heat over New York City. Slow covert vaccine roll out Now he's saying From this point on seven days a week, 24 7 has to be the attitude and the approach, the mayor says. Three vaccine hubs are opening Sunday. Now all medical workers in New York, including those in private practice are eligible

New York City New York
Native veterinarians

Native America Calling

05:23 min | 6 months ago

Native veterinarians

"This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining us live from my homeland of sheer doing via skype and people are often inspired to pursue veterinary medicine because of their love for animals but being a veterinarian is much more than just caring for adorable puppies and kittens. it involves years of schooling in the sciences. Today we're looking into what it's like being a native veterinarian. Some vets work with house. Pets like dogs. Cats birds bets also work with livestock. And they're also in an important part of reducing outta control cat in dog populations in and around native communities our guests on the show today. We'll tell you there's a need for more native veterinarians and technicians and we'll hear more from them about their passion to serve their native communities by working with animals. And you can join us to. Do you have questions about what it takes to become a veterinarian. Are there enough that veterinary clinics in your community. Tell us about it at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and right now we're going to start off in crown point new mexico. We have dr germain day. She is a director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program at the navajo technical university and she is today and is our pleasure to have her here. dr day. Welcome to native america calling and feel free to further. Introduce yourself good morning yet. And this is dr germain day. I would like to introduce myself in The net I am of the touch. Eat ni clan kiani buses. Chain a she does she say they. She doesn't let my pledge there. You said nausea that nasha so to translate that to english. I just said that my Clan is touchy knee. Which is the red running into the water. People claiming i am born and for the towering house clan. My grandfather's late grandfather's clan is salt people clan and my paternal Grandfather's clan is start of the ridge street people clan. I am from coyote canyon new mexico which is on the eastern side of the navajo nation and i Attended the colorado state university in fort collins. Colorado i graduated. I graduated from school in two thousand one. I've been in practice since two thousand one. So it's been about twenty years when i first Graduated vet school. I went into private practice Mixed animal practice where. I worked on small animals and large animals. In some exotics. I worked in the The gallup new mexico and the say benito area initially then moved on to Grants to a clinic and grants. Then i Did some relief work in georgia. Texas california before returning to new mexico worked in albuquerque For a little bit for a few years before i returned to the navajo nation. I started at navajo technical university in two thousand nine as the director of the veterinary teaching hospital and the land grant program. And i've been here ever since. Wow and there's been quite a journey to to those different places but what was it that drew you to this profession. Why did you want to pursue a veterinary career swell. So i as. I grew up on a a ranch. I was exposed to Large animals my family owned cattle horses. Sheep goats and I just enjoyed and enjoyed being around animals. I brody horses With my sister brother and cousins starting at the age of about three and Just spent a lot of time outdoors with animals then later as a preteen and teenager. I did some volunteer work at the local veterinary clinic in gallup and really enjoyed that work then as i moved into Graduated from high school and went on into college. I had a professor. That thought i should go to medical school but i realized at that point that i really wanted to go into veterinary medicine and

Dr Germain Tara Gatewood Navajo Technical University New Mexico Veterinary Teaching Hospital Dr Day Coyote Canyon America Skype Colorado State University Nausea Veterinary Teaching Hospital A Fort Collins Colorado Albuquerque Georgia Texas California Brody
What If Its Not Depression with Dr. Achina Stein

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:53 min | 7 months ago

What If Its Not Depression with Dr. Achina Stein

"To the broken. Bring podcast where we dive. Deep into the topics of neuro plasticity epigenetics. Mindfulness functional medicine mindset and more. I'm your host. Drew royden each week by team. And i bring on a new guest who we think can help improve your brain health feel better and most importantly live more. This week's guest is dr akina stein. Stein is an osteopathic physician who has been in practice as a board certified psychiatrist for more than twenty five years. Her story is super fascinating propelled by her son's mental health crisis in two thousand ten. She found functional medicine which result his health problems as well as her own and has since been practicing functional medicine. Doctor sign certified by the american board of integrative and holistic medicine and is a certified practitioner of the institute of functional medicine. She is a distinguished fellow of the american psychiatric association and was awarded the expeditionary psychiatric award by n. a. m. i. rhode island in two thousand and eight. She is presently in private practice in rhode island and she recently launched her online health. Coaching program healthy self boot camp to assist people from a distance to reach their health goal. Health goals super born covid and also is the author of the up and coming book. What if it's not depression doctor. Stein welcome to the broken brain. Podcast thank you. Thank you for having me. It's an honor to have you here. And i'd love to start with origin story. You know when. I read your book and i had a chance to meet you over email. Your story reminded me of the story of so many doctors who come on this podcast. Their interest in holistic health and functional medicine started with their own or a close family members personal health crisis. So if before we get to your son tell me a little about your own health over the years prior to finding functions. Oh wow where do i start. So i I had a pretty rough childhood so my health when their stress in the family from having a disabled mother in many ways and a father who wasn't really the best father will just be kind there in saying that But just having a lot of stress growing up as a child. I had a lot of Allergies and eczema. Asthma as a child But then as i got older i actually had a health crisis in two thousand and three where combination of things happen where i had a i had just delivered my third daughter had epstein barr virus. Which made me feel like. I was hit by train which then triggered a hashimoto's vira died is crisis coaster on that. Got me to be come. Very depressed and Was put on thyroid. Medication also is the first time in my life where i needed to be put on temporary disability or a couple of weeks and was put on an antidepressant at time and it's It's gotten better ever since ever since. I found functional medicine and i got my son. All his issues began in twenty ten. But i didn't really address my issues. Until after i got him settled. Because we you know we as moms. We was kids. I you know and then i use the functional medicine approach to handle my issues and a lot of things significantly improved. I feel twenty years younger and And people are surprised that i am the age that i am because of some of the things that i do on a fifty. I'll be fifty seven this year. And i play ultimate frisbee with twenty thirty year olds zil and so people are always shocked to hear something like that but i am the in the best shape i've ever been in in my life. Immensely is and spiritually. So and i am. I'm telling you're the first person for me to tell you this but i've actually been off antidepressants for a year. Yeah so. I want to mention that until i actually said. Been off of it or year. But it's actually a year anniversary will be actually a year on november sixteenth. So yeah it's It's definitely Been a journey for me in so many ways.

Drew Royden Dr Akina Stein American Board Of Integrative Institute Of Functional Medici Stein Rhode Island American Psychiatric Associati Epstein Barr Depression Hashimoto Eczema Allergies Asthma
Nutrition for Gravel Cycling with Kristen Arnold

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

05:22 min | 7 months ago

Nutrition for Gravel Cycling with Kristen Arnold

"This week on podcast. We've got sports nutritionists and professional cyclists. Kristen arnold kirsten has a masters degree in science and human nutrition from ohio. State university is a usa level to cycling coach with source endurance. End racist professionally with the butcher box racing team. I've always got a million questions about nutrition and it certainly a topic. That's coming up in the new ridership for them. Kirsten helps us break down. What to think about eating the week before an event during an event and after an event i thought it'd be useful to think about it in that context just because a lot of us these big events. One hundred miler. That's a big unusual ride for us. We're not doing that every month in are cycling career. We're just kind of peaking for something. That is really extreme in terms of what our body is used to. So it's important to kind of think about that not only in your physical preparation but also nutrition and hydration. Christine does a great job of breaking down the things you should be thinking about before the event during the event to give yourself the best chance for success. She's got some fantastic takeaways for us. All and a few little tricks that i hadn't thought about so. I hope you enjoyed this episode. Let's jump right in kristen. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me craig. I'm excited to get into the topic of nutrition with you. But i always like to set the stage for the listener to get a little bit more of an understanding about your background. Since you've got a background both professionally. Nutritionist but also as a professional cyclist once you give us a little bit of both okay So i kind of make my living in three different ways right now and I went to school for nutrition. So i have an undergraduate degree and dietetic and then got my registered dietitian or credential Ended up getting my masters of science and human nutrition then became a certified specialist sports dietetic. So i was in school for eight years Nutrition and So open my private practice. Sports died headaches. Company in twenty fourteen and then started coaching Cycling in sixteen hour with source endurance. And i've been reading on the professional road circuit and twenty sixteen and now rethink for butcher. Box pro cycling. Wow that keeps you busy. Yeah we've had a couple episodes recently where we've touched on things that i would fall in the realm of nutrition and i was excited when we connected just to bring you on board and talk from the athlete's perspective about how my listeners might improve their overall nutrition nutrition and such because such a massive field and something that everybody needs to spend time thinking about and integrating into their lives. I thought we would just think about it from the perspective of an athlete. Who may be only doing a handful of events a year so not a professional cyclist by any means but someone who's peaking for an event that may be way out of the ordinary for them so think about like a two hundred mile gravel race an sp t gravel or amid south gravel event. So let's try to break down the conversation by starting. You know if you have one of those big peaks senior year. How should you be approaching it. Nutritionally in the week leading up. And then how should you be approaching your nutrition during the event. Okay all right so we're gonna talk about the week before and the day of a big event There is some research to show that what people call carb loading is effective. And what this means is that you are eating High proportion of your calories up to seven to ten grams per kilogram body weight of carbohydrates per day. and what's that doing. it is super saturating or glycogen stores so for endurance athletes especially cyclists with these long gravel event Even though a lot of the time you'll be below threshold the majority of the type of effort. You're going to be doing it. Relies on glycogen and so the main goal with Going into the event to make sure that those lijun thursday or as full as possible if not fuller than they normally are And then that also goes for hydration so ulta making sure that we have adequate hydration stores and meeting knows with fluid and electrolyte so short version of that is to Continuously e carbohydrate rich foods throughout the day for up to a week before the event and then also making sure to hydrate well with electrolytes every day consistently throughout the day.

Kristen Arnold Kirsten Kirsten State University Ohio Christine Kristen USA Craig Headaches
Sustainable Meat with Diana Rodgers

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

04:40 min | 7 months ago

Sustainable Meat with Diana Rodgers

"So is a registered dietitian. I am so fascinated by your background. And i know you're registered dietitian as well as wondering if you could just tell our audience a little bit about the work you do and then how you got to be in a position where you are dietitian specializing in this very unique area. Yeah i mean my current. What i'm doing is i have a part time nutrition clinic where i help people i mostly focus on moms That's just who tends to gravitate towards me folks who are looking to either lose weight or fixed gut health. Those are the two specialties and actually lately though during covert i've had a ton of binge eating and stuff like that so it's really interesting to me kind of didn't really work a lot with that population but it's just kind of come out. I think of cove it. So i'm learning more about that. I think it's really interesting. And then the other part of my time just to mix things up a little bit. Is i just finished. Producing and directing film called sacred cow. The case for better meet. And i released the book this passer. So i'm doing a lot around the promotion and advocacy for especially meet the value of meat for women and children worldwide and. Really sort of debunking all of the concerns around meat so it's sort of attacked on three levels and it's really beef that i'm focused on but i'm pro all animals foods. But it's you know we've got the tricia arguments meets gonna cause cancer and heart disease and all of that. We've got the environmental case against me. Cowards are ruining the planet. They take to up too many resources. Why not just eat directly from crops. You know it's inefficient to eat me. And then we have all the ethical concerns of course around me and i address ethics last in the book because i feel that you really have to fully appreciate the nutritional environmental contribution that well raised. Animals can make before we can even talk about whether or not. It's okay to kill beautiful animals to eat them. Because it's you can't just start with that rate and how i got here is a little wind. E i had undiagnosed iliac disease as a child and was extremely malnourished and muscle tone. Basically everything i just went straight through me and i also had a lot of neurological issues from that to just like words swirling around the page kind of almost like dyslexia kind of thing and it wasn't until i was twenty six when i got diagnosed and i couldn't believe that you could be allergic to wheat. I mean i was like that's what people eat you know So really took me by surprise. And i gave up way and it did make a huge difference but i also at the same time still kept waiting my doctor saying. I think i'm diabetic. Like why. I need to eat every hour or two. I was always had my gluten free granola bars on me. All of that stuff. So i've always been interested in like. How do i fix myself. Because gosh if i miss lunch i have like tunnel. Vision asserts sweating in. You know just it was horrible and so i really entered the field of nutrition later in life just to figure out how to fix myself and at that point i then decided to become a dietician with two little kids and at the time it felt really overwhelming but i just decided i really wanted that medical credential. I wanted to be able to take insurance. And i wanted to have some credibility in the space and so having that medical credential of our d really was important to me for while the rating speaking i do and so i just made it my part time job basically to date biochemistry and all these courses that i didn't take undergrad is an art major and so it took me a very long time. It took me about seven years to complete it and it was really rough. Because i was already sold on no processed foods and kind of the real food. Wait life as going through the program and so it was tough for me. And especially when i was working in the hospitals and nursing homes. Where like boost is your only solution for. Everybody is just so depressing. So i'm really happy to be on the other side to have a private practice. Where i can help people who want to learn more about the new tradition and i don't have to necessarily follow guidelines of my boss telling me what to do in a more clinical setting

Iliac Disease Heart Disease Dyslexia Cancer
Altogether You with Jenna Riemersma

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:14 min | 7 months ago

Altogether You with Jenna Riemersma

"Hello everyone welcome to the addicted. Mind podcast my guest. Today is jenna remers. mma and i'm really excited to have gone. She's going to talk about internal family systems and how that can be helpful for anyone. Who's struggling with addiction but A lot of different issues as well so jenna. Do you want to introduce yourself please. I'd love to thanks to gain. I'm jenna riemersma and i'm the clinical director of the atlanta center for relational healing. I'm also teaching faculty for the international institute of trauma and addiction professionals as well as at a recovery network and every released a new book on internal family systems called altogether. You awesome. so. I'm so excited that they're coming on because i have had some experience. Some training in internal family systems. And i really like it. And i really like it. As a way of relating to yourself so i'm excited to talk about this topic but before we start i want to know a little bit more about you. And what got you into this work. And how did you find this and stuff like that. Absolutely well i'll tell you what the day that i encountered internal family systems really turned my life upside down. I have been in private practice for a long time. I've worked in residential care and you have been trained in every model of therapy under the sun an i f s which is abbreviated version of internal family systems. Suddenly made it makes sense and it made sense of my own struggles and of the struggles of my clients and it gave me language to really find healing much more effectively into really name. The positive intent of all of the things that we struggle with at ifs as a way of approaching our struggles with literally no shame with only the embodiment of grace and love and compassion for ourselves and for others that truly has the power to transform everything. And i think that's such a struggle when you talk about shame. How do we relate to ourselves in a way that especially for shame bound and we've had a lot of trauma our life. It's like it is hard to talk to ourselves absolutely and when we know as you and i do as addiction professionals that shame is one of the driving forces of addiction then sometimes the way that we have an internal narrative about our addictive behavior or our struggles or our feelings that we don't like or want it only serves to make that shame worse so in our minds. I if we conceptualize ourselves as a monolithic entity as one singular entity than. We're going to say things. Like i am an addict. I am depressed. I am anxious but when we understand that actually at our core we are a dynamic loving undamaged compassionate connected courageous curious self and that it's actually are parts that have become burdened with addictive behaviors or with depressive feelings or anxious feelings and they take over sometimes and they caused us to feel a certain way or to do certain things but they're not who we are at our core intrinsically that changes everything and not only that when we actually grasped the core principle of ifs. Which is that. All of our parts are actually good. And i'll say that again. Because that's about as counterintuitive. Comes all of my parts all of your parts. All of the parts of everyone of our listeners are good even if they are stuck doing or feeling things that are not good like acting out addictive or feeling yucky feelings. The parts are good and they're carrying are trauma and they're trying their best to help us not feel pain

Jenna Remers Jenna Riemersma Atlanta Center For Relational International Institute Of Tra Jenna
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Got like a little bit everything that you can do. We have definitely given everything ago amongst in the last five years. That's so wonderful. So what was it What was really the catalyst. I starting your private practice. You know when that started with it. What did that look wake up. It's funny because i. In retrospect i think i've always had that entrepreneurial spirit i can remember being a really young child and going to restaurants with my family and taking out a napkin in redesigning the logo for the restaurant and making a little. You know plan for how they could get more customers. I spent a brick back. I've always really had that. Had that in me. But you know when i when i was in school for music therapy and when i graduated i didn't really think about starting a business. I just wanted to get out there and start working. And so i i started subcontracting after university and i quickly realize though that something was missing because i wasn't getting that entrepreneurial side of me fulfilled like it really wanted to start my own programs and i had so many ideas needed a space for that creative and so i decided to make the leap and and start my own practice and was you know i felt fulfilled almost immediately once i took that leap so haven't looked back since. Yeah yes there's so much. And i think you're practices a perfect example of how how much creativity and there is in private practice of really. It's like the world is your sister. that's exact- that's how i feel and i just love. I love the you can. There's so much room for trial and error and that it's okay to to take risks into you know completely fail because you have that whole you have your whole platform in this whole opportunity to just try try it again and tried in a new way or try. Something else completely and i just loved that. Yes yes it's so exciting because I would imagine. Starting private practice is really like a blank slate. Like you have this canvas and it's like what do i want to do with this. How do i. Where do i start absolutely. I know everyone's different. I find every entrepreneur. Kind of goes about that blank canvas in a different type of way. And i think the way that i always go. It is just really following my my inspiration. Great my my gut intuition. And i like i am. I feel very grateful that i have the platform to do that to just you know. Say wow i. I think this is gonna work this week. So i'm just going to give it a try and see what happens in in a really like that about entrepreneurship.

private practice
Interview With Kaely McDevitt

Real Talk with Dana | Nutrition, Health

05:29 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Kaely McDevitt

"Haley thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. I'd love to get started. If you could talk about your journey to become a dietitian and then how your philosophy towards nutrition and working with clients has changed over the years to where it is now for sure and thanks so much for having me then. I've been excited about this for a couple of weeks. So I get my journey started back in undergrad and we just recently found out at least you live in DC now. I don't know if that's where you started but I was around that area at James Madison University and I always was interested. In fact, I was an athlete growing up in high school. I wasn't an athlete in college, but I was always interested in how different foods made me, you know feel a certain way during games and I had what felt like a like a ritual before my games with like a smoothie that I would make but really it was just like Common Sense Sports Nutrition that made it work. So I was undecided in undergrad and I was spending a lot of money. I'm reading nutrition research for myself. And then I realized like well, there is a career option in this direction. I might as well make use of what I've you know spending all of my time doing so I started researching nutrition. I got into the dietetics program there and when it started out, you know, I was very much trying to learn about nutrition for myself because I couldn't quite figure out how to feed myself correctly. I was just into college and I just realized like I didn't know what to do. I might eating dining hall food. I'm not an athlete for the first time in my life. How does that like, how does somebody exercise and they're not an athlete how did they feel themselves? So I'm honestly just looking for information for myself and trying to find the quote unquote perfect diet and I was meticulously following everything. I was being taught in school. I was like looking for a low fat labels. I was eating Special K cereal like it was my job and I was logging so much time on ellipticals and getting into distance running and I really watch dog. A health decline as I was doing all of these things, and I was doing them really well to like I was typing with how I was approaching my nutrition and this carried on into my internship off a whole lot of stress in that year. I'm sure as you remember a lot of late nights little sleep lots of work. I was in a master's program at the same time, too, and my health health was really getting worse, and I couldn't find information that I needed cuz a lot of my symptoms were in the hormone realm, which I'm sure we'll get into and I just felt like really alone and honestly kind of like a fraud because divorce quote unquote a nutrition professional and I was following the rules and I I wasn't feeling good. And so I ended up spending a lot more of my free time diving into the Women's Health specific stuff and realizing maybe I am doing this wrong. Maybe I'm approaching this from a completely incorrect standpoint and instead of trying to find the perfect diet. I really just needed to support my body and listen to the signs and symptoms that were popping up dead. And so as I was getting my Rd credential and transitioning into into the workforce, I had this big change of philosophy and approach and it was really sick around. How do we listen to the signs at their bodies giving us? How do we interpret those things at the body sending? How do we use food and movement and lifestyle to actually support and nourish ourselves instead of like meticulously counting and restricting and using food as a manipulation versus using food is nourishment. So really like my own personal health evolved right along side that approach and ended up where I am today in private practice helping women navigate hormone and digestive issues that are typically at least in some part caused by not really understanding that connection between food wage supporting your body, but it's so true. I mean, I think a big problem and one of the reasons why so many people seek out these diets in addition to weight loss, right which is what we've all been told. Oh you need to birth In order to be healthy, right but it's like we don't know what to do in order to be healthy. And so we seek out this external information and then lose the ability to stay in tune with those internal cues from we're we're kids and we know how to eat intuitively and in line with our bodies and like don't demonize cravings and everything until you get to the like bombardment of everything that you experience. I mean really starting in like Elementary School at this point for us. It might have been like a little bit later cuz we didn't have that much social media, right but it gets to the point where you just don't know how to interpret the signals of your body anymore. So like of course people are looking for this external information. It's not like you've been doing something wrong dear listeners, right? Like it's of course you're going that way and so now it's time to like you said instead of trying to like manipulate your food. It's trying to learn what your body is telling you so you can learn how to nourish it and help it get better by helping it along. And just eliminating everything and meticulously counting calories. Yeah, exactly. I think you hit the nail on the head with it's just a big disconnect. Like we basically are are taught to ignore those signs and symptoms. The body is giving us and the fact that our body does a great job at regulating what it needs and informing us of what it needs and somewhere in that mix which probably Elementary School now between social media and the way things are marketed, we just lose that ability and we're taught that that's actually not what we should be following.

James Madison University Haley DC
Healing Radicalized Trauma: A Conversation with Resmaa Menakem and Tara Brach

Tara Brach

07:25 min | 8 months ago

Healing Radicalized Trauma: A Conversation with Resmaa Menakem and Tara Brach

"Welcome Friends So, glad to have you with us, and I am thrilled to be able to introduce to you Rasma. Menachem, who will be joining me for conversation this evening just to let you know the title it's healing of racial is trauma and resume has served as the director of counseling services for the Tubman Family Alliance as Behavioral Health Director for African American family services. In Minneapolis as domestic violence counselor for the Wilder Foundation as certified military and family life consultant for the US Armed Forces as trauma consultant for the Minneapolis public schools and as cultural semantics consultant for the Minneapolis Police Department now wanted to read that because so many rich serving and he currently teaches workshops on cultural semantics and I think that term is incredible for audiences. African. European Americans and police officers saw. So they're oppressed in private practice and the author of my grandmother's hands, racialist trauma and the pathway to mending our hearts and bodies. And I have to say welcome. So glad to have you with us as my bigger terriers get. I'm I'm I'm really excited about this Wash a bunch of your stuff and in looking at things and and everybody is. Number of my friends found out that I was coming on your show, they were like all so so so even in shop you're you're pretty big. People were saying when I told you. So funny. And I just say, thank you I for my grandmother's hands because I have read and reread and flagged some. Cages, and I just want you to know I feel like you delivered this world a book right at the time we most needed it. So. So thank you, I appreciate that I really do. That the book came from a very personal newbury, deplace and. Hopefully people felt feel it and experience it when they're reading it and so I'm just glad it's touching people. So. Well either way you did the buck made so clear that we weren't reading it if we weren't stopping and actually coming into our body with the exercises. Before. I. Get to that because the title is such a grabber. Would you let us share? Absolutely yeah, absolutely. So so so if people read the story or read the book, there's is pretty salient story at the beginning of a book. About the relationship that I had with my grandma. honestly, my grandmother was wanted to funniest people that I that. Date at my grandmother was always be laugh and she'd always be plant jokes all at different types of stuff and so are all of us me and my two brothers both have a very had very good relationship with her and so the one particular story in the book is about how? She would so in. So some of the black people listened to this are going to culturally pick up on what to say right now other people may not. But so when I was growing up in my family, you know black families when I was coming up all heads, two TV's and we had one that was the big one. It was ornate was probably color right and then you had one that set on top of it will the reason why the ones that On top is that usually the one on the bottom never the sound would go out. So we had to win atop the sound in one at the bottom. So my grandmother was sitting there watching TV and listening three other through the other TV. So we were sitting there and what she would do with would would would be to put her legs across my thighs or across all types of my brothers. Sisters do that right in so she would sit there. And put her hand on her thigh and in. We would be sitting here watching TV together and she may do some stupid right. She may pass gas or do something start laugh do something. Right. But that's what we all set right and so when we would be sitting there would be rubbing her hands because she would always complain. Of A. Interesting thing at after she passed I would talk I was talking to my mother about my mother said, you know she never really had outlet she would always act like our hands. And so. I was rubbing her hands. One day I must've been about somewhere between seven and nine. I'm not quite sure what the ages the sobers rubbing her hands and I was comparing her hands at the time to her hands in my hands. My hands are very thin and angular my mother's hands. It's very Phantom Angler but my grandmother's hands had these. Fingers were they were thick digits. She had thick very thick fingers and in thick thick thumb, and then in the inside of her hand, it was bad. It looked like it was padded and then on the back, it looked like it was padded there. So I was rubbing her hands. And she's watching TV and I said grandma. Your. Hands kind of half joking right like why your hands so fat. Like that, and she she without even looking at me she goes upward from picking cotton. And I'm sitting here. And she must have heard a pause and she looked at. She goes boy, you ever seen a con plant. And I said no issue. So complaint got these Berkeley master wish he's talking to like energy is like a lot and I'm just sitting there looking at her and she goes got these burs in she said I started walking up and down and rose when I was four years old. And you reach your hand him that you format day was sharecropper when you reach your hand. Burs cut your fingers up right and she said when the coaches go, she said go inside your fingers they go all around and she said asked ripping a hands up as she said until your hands get them calluses, they gonNA bleed. And that's the way she was talking. And and so. That that interaction with her so I'm looking at it and issue broke. She broke an started watching TV again. And so I'm just sitting here with her hand in hand. And I'm like. I don't know what to do with that. I did not remember that story again until I started writing my grandma sands. After I had gone through my own trauma in Afghanistan after I'd done seeing things that I shouldn't sing experienced things and that story came together with all the other stuff and so that tiled the name. That's how it came up with the title of the book because it if representative both the historical intergenerational, persistent, institutional and Personal Traumas all together like yarn ball and so So it's both representative of my relationship with her in representative black people's relationship to this nation. Until

Institutional And Personal Tra Consultant Minneapolis Representative Minneapolis Police Department Menachem Us Armed Forces Tubman Family Alliance Rasma Private Practice Behavioral Health Director Director Wilder Foundation Afghanistan Berkeley
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

03:47 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"I yeah. Oh my gosh. Okay. Really related to I was like well done whoever figured that out and made it into little goes on their instagram somewhere they made it. Okay. Is really fitting. Yeah. Oh, I'll have to check that out. Because I may not have done the test by that point, but I'll take it. Absolutely I. Love Hearing. The catalysts for everybody's story as they go into private practice there's it's just. So everybody has a different story and it's just so interesting to hear what drives people the cat you know the big thing of like, why did I need that and? It's so different for everybody, but it's so you can see how fulfilling it is too. Yeah, you're able to go in there and just like create your own thing from nothing but yeah. Yeah like literally literally nothing you know I I have. Made a faith. So I'm just you know at the test I, live my life but you know it was just like literally just absolute. Okay. Here I go. I'm just GONNA go for like that's what it was and you know being the wild I guess seven than I am that back out there. You. Know. My our called my dad is he's in Missouri. How are you gonNA live? What are you doing I'm like You know just gotTa go up there and.

instagram private practice Missouri
"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"And it's all about learning the art of self promotion. Deal like is really hard especially as women I feel like it's hard to talk about yourself and not feel. Like you're being unladylike and whatnot though I feel like so far I've not done with the at, but it's been a really good reason I highly recommend it. Does it go into something like the grunt test where it's like, hey, focus on what you were. Yeah I mean. Bring the. Your conversation. Yeah. Yeah I. Like that out lexical watched. Downloaded read where you got conscious coaching by Bright Murphy Auto. Show. New. Accelerated method by Talgo. He's got them all on. I've called because we're not talk anything about marketing. and. So that's like where I'm. I this though but this is this is my soapbox right? which is all right. Listen if you're a physical therapist near at a backyard barbecue and your friend next door was a graphic designer and it was like, oh, my back hurts every time I play volleyball whatever and you're like, Hey, I'm I'm a PT knows volleyball you ascertain is going to Google and read a blog post out at you'd be so pissed, right Flip that around same barbecue couple of weeks later, and you're like, Hey, I'm a volleyball PT and I'm starting my practice in this graphic I could do a logo for you and you're like, it's how much I could just go to Canada I'll just do it myself. It's like, Hey, people are good at this. Sorry. In my life people artist higher the professionally, it works both ways. So you was books who are guys who know women men know what they're doing do that because they've done it they've also run into all the problems you've earned you and you're gonNA skip those problems because that fifteen dollars book. With our. Last question is a WHO question. Dr Will Start with you who stumbling the audience should know more about. Oh. Not Rachel. Yeah I have to just because they're both very instrumental in me starting my practice and really helpful one is them. He's WHO's an amazing of the therapist and she's actually in Amsterdam now but you be here in the bay area but not Amsterdam and Katie. Just, open her private practice in southern California. The practice we've kind of been co-founders in a way, but obviously separate entities, and though she somewhat I would recommend checking out all taking the same journey at the same time right and. Lucan Laya I don't WanNa bring it back to star wars but I just did. WHO's your? Who? Who should the audience more about? Would say tickle boom for. Say More, time. Jonty. The movie, Maestro Shanta. We learned a lot from her. Finalized and. Things. We weren't getting school about both business and treatment stuff like. this whole field like. About what she knows and Bring a lot. So you know exactly what moved to ensure does right her grunt is pretty clear. It's very specific clear Last thing would you on the show is called the parting shot let's do that right now..

private practice volleyball Maestro Shanta Bright Murphy Auto Amsterdam Google California Rachel Canada Katie
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

02:58 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"Let's segue into something a little more chipper that Elliot meets the janitor Elliott finally meets the janitor which thrilling and he pretends he's a very nice guy. Yeah, he does not want Elliot to know now his crush hasn't really developed yet. He develops a bit of a thing for her I. Think this is the beginning of it. This is the beginning. And she call him janitor yet Najia. Janitor. Now, on scrubs Zwicky, they said there's some misinformation about Miss Pacman in this game. First of all someone claims that I think it was Kelso claims you've got forty one million points. That's not possible. The top score ever on Miss Pacman was nine, hundred, ninety, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, I believe it was done by an AI. Microsoft. Computer. Then it turns him after that goes back to zero after that, and then also Miss Pacman does not store initials. So, you could never have known that it was DR K. While it's Pacman is not miss pacman. It is Miss Pacman. Our is it arise That the todd wants to fuck this pacman. Your rob is todd is turned on by by anything and everything including Miss Pacman. The one thing that doesn't turn the todd on a married woman though he says, eat those dots you naughty girl. That's what rob says. Todd says robbed Azaari. Rob Probably does. But that's what the concept. That is a funny bid though when when Carla's got her engagement ring finger on every time, she puts it on. He's like just talking he goes doctor business takes it off and he starts being totally inappropriate inappropriate. Yeah and then he he likes he literally she has it often he goes bubis and she puts it on the US charts. Once again Rob Mashego Very Funny Rob's funding this there's a moment fourteen fifteen when the when the elevator Kelso's banging on the on the elevator door in a flashback and when it opens a lot of our crew John Inwood are cinematographer. is in there and E. R. R. A. Gaffer Sean Our Paul Protrero are first eighty and bought Bobby Forrester are grip are I don't know if no one called for background performers that day but our crew filled the elevator. That's awesome. This wasn't my first time on a golf course but this is my first time hitting a golf ball. And it doing what I wanted to do in real life and this isn't where the I got bit by the bug. But I remember thinking when you and I and Josh went to play golf that one time at bills. Birthday. Party in the snow which was freaking amazing. I remember thinking I know how to hit a golf ball because I did it once and this was the episode that I did it..

Miss Pacman todd Rob Probably Elliot rob Kelso golf E. R. R. A. Gaffer Sean Our Pa Carla Elliott Rob Mashego Microsoft AI Zwicky Rob Josh Najia US Bobby Forrester Azaari
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

01:37 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"Words. This next one's got into scrubs but everything to do with your eyes because they deserve precise vision and dependable comfort and precision one contact lenses deliver no matter what twists and turns happening your day precision. One Lenses won't get in your way running a five k before dawn go for it. Lance GIG that goes all afternoon that to video gaming after dark precision one daily disposable lenses won't stop you and did religion how easy out aware just pop them in when you wake up and go that's part you don't have to clean them, throw them away before bed.

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

04:53 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"And thunder. Applause. James is GonNa Watch every one of your movies even bring lantern. Ryan James has promised to watch every movie you've ever done, and if you come on the podcast and Donald is sorry for for the leg situation, I'm sorry helping your leg you didn't lose. You didn't finish. You didn't finish do not. Know I well. Well well, I set I set out I did say after I'm finished with you and push. Oh, this is. I wish you would have told me the story because I've been trying through back channels through agents and publicists to no avail and for all I know he's going Donald Phase, on the Guy Tried to book my knee and a party. No. So. embarrassed. All right. James, we're going to segue with this theme Song Daniels GonNa play to a new segment called fix your life and I hope you have something where Donald and I can can fix your life because we're very good at this. It's America's favorite segment on any podcast. Ever I just read that online. James It's time to fix your. Own..

Ryan James Donald Phase James It Donald America
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

04:59 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"One of my big when I was a kid that was my one. We're going to need her name because I. Don't know that I know her work is it he says or betty the redhead. Overly hold on now she's gotTa go look for what she looked like when she was young come on you're making do well do all the work. I don't know her name. All I knew her was. How did you know her? She was like in a bunch of things she was she was she was always like the guest star on things never really disturbing it, but she was my oh, my God like I would have dreams about her. Ryan, Reynolds were trying to get Ryan Reynolds to come on for the finale I. Know People have asked for it Donald and I love him but we not. Like, day-to-day friends with him. So if anyone's listening and knows Ryan Reynolds, tell him to come on the podcast I have a really embarrassing Ryan Rental Story to Oh God. Maybe he's not gonNA come on because you did something embarrassing because you're bad was celebrities do I'm so bad with celebrities so oh no. What did you do Ryan Reynolds or do you want to hear this story James Yes, of course came? One Night Zach takes me out to Hollywood swanky Hollywood party. Right. It was Jeffrey Katzenberg's Party as a matter of fact and I remember we get there and George Clooney makes a joke like to Zaki goes I don't bring no Awali disease parts. Why are you bringing while you bring face? ADDS a good Jews analysis and I remember thinking I. Would you like I know Noah wyle serve No. Awhile Awhile is a very good actor but I remember thinking that was kind of rude anyway rent a party and I managed to by the way has us a great actor I mean I was just joking I think no doubt. I remember getting. So fucking drunk at this party boy not like I felt like somebody might even slip me something. So that's right. You fucking slipped yourself something. So that's my excuse. I? Think somebody was trying to get at me and China and China do. You Do to Ryan Reynolds, this is crucial. If we'll come on the show talking to a bunch of people talking like three other people and I come up I like Ryan. He looks at me he goes all God Donald. Orion. On he's like I don't want to. Hug Donald. No I'm not going to give you a hug. I was like, Ryan give me a fucking. Own. News. Like no I'm not gonNA. Hug You. And I'M GONNA take it and I grabbed Ryan Reynolds. I start humping his leg like dom by. Talking show. He'll never come on the show..

Ryan Reynolds Donald Noah wyle Jeffrey Katzenberg betty George Clooney James Yes Hollywood Zaki China Zach
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

02:41 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"I hear you check them out at the refrigerated section in your favorite grocery store. Yeah. Go to the refrigerated section because they got to be kept cold as they make it as fresh as possible for you. Learn more at GT's living.

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

04:55 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"That wop song that rap song is fired dude I'm sorry man and not. You. Keep listening it's not that I keep listening to it. It's just keep visualizing video from Nesh Shit Dude I shouldn't. It's really her. You like the visuals. To come on. Come on man. One person doesn't like no. Other than all the Republicans that are out there fucking saying that this should is not good for kids. I gotta ask this, and then we'll get back to the show but did they really mentioned freaking Cardi? B. At the Republican National Convention? What's her name really come up? Cardi's. Cardi all. That's what I'm talking about. I'm talking about. My catch phrases in effect for that. That's what I'm talking about. She ruffled some feathers gum. All right. Let's talk about basketball The show opens with the US playing one, thirty, seven I go. How the HELL DID WE LOSE? We have chat enchants like eight feet tall. And he's like, sorry, man I'm like Jed you suck. Yeah. Now I don't know there's that many times only a handful of times JD's playing basketball I don't think it's A. Lot actually. Replay play a lot actually. Yeah. Because you're all, we always need a fourth. Okay. Sorry. Dave Myers was also I don't mean to to minimize Dave Myers contribution. He was also a huge music video director. He directed work, which if you haven't seen, you should go check out a really cool video for missy Elliott Song Work It. Missy had some great videos now Aloma. Gets into Dunking I. Think I remember there being stunt double because I know a woman wasn't doing all that right. And she's doing she's definitely doing a dribbling part for a second but then there's the cuts your legs in some woman's doing like through the legs stuff. and. Then some woman hits a trampoline and doesn't like a major dog does not Aloma. Could be and then she lands and she goes y'all got hockey. Yeah No. I'm going to be honest with you. There aren't a lot of black people who play hockey in the NHL Right now it's growing but are there more than other more than two? Yeah, absolutely more than two. There's more than a handful there's more than ten..

Cardi Dave Myers Aloma basketball missy Elliott hockey NHL US
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

04:24 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"Lot of money, it'd be like. Like how much? How much for that Brian told you wouldn't win when when what's his name was on good times Jay Walker he was like I'll do the show, but dino Mike costs more loving I and I understand that he's like it's my catchphrase I'm going to run with it. Yeah I bet you have Gary. Coleman if somebody said when God rest his soul to the late. Great Gary, Coleman peace rest in peace baby. If somebody said Gary. We. Need to what you what you talking about. What you talk about somebody at this point, he'd be like that's GonNa cost extra of course of course, get money make money make money I I bet you Mike Mike if you had Mike Jackson on a song. Soul if you had recipes if you had if you had my Jackson on the Song Michael, Jackson Song he's said. Or. Shimon I bet that costs more money. Chevron I gave you a Shimon. Pay Ten thousand. Yeah. Well, I bet a lot of producers I mean not not saying Dj Colter Puffy because they're obviously very successful but a bet, there's other producers who have little catchphrases who like really didn't do anything else but come on and be like it's me I'm a producer. Whenever their catchphrases. Equivalent. One of another one is right if you right or. Take. Take take it. Maybe putting longest was like major key puppy for the longest was like. Can't stop won't stop can't stop most. dwells. Told you that we won't stop. Told you that we won't stop I. Thought I told you. That we won't stop. I. The fact that Zach knows that people is a you know because I was he asked him how he knows it ask him how he knows it. I know knowing I was peeing on all those music videos, Ip and a lot of rap videos in ninety in the in the in the in like let's say ninety five to nine. When all that Shit was going down I? Don't think I've done high Williams video but I worked on a lot of videos. I wanted to work on hype Williams video because he was he was the cool guy well, high come on man hype had the whoever was a semi target for for hype Williams videos it.

Gary dino Mike Mike Jackson Zach Williams Dj Colter Puffy Jay Walker Coleman Chevron Brian Shit producer Michael
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

05:04 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"We're. We're back with my own private practice. Jay more our guest more. Yeah. Very Frank did by A. Directors. Mark Brooklyn. I gotta say Jay more. I haven't seen in a bit. I knew he was a famous He was a stand up right and I think he may have been on snl yeah or season or two maybe we look that up for me I know that Anthony Michael Hall was on SNL..

Jay SNL snl Anthony Michael Hall Mark Brooklyn private practice A. Directors Frank
"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

05:00 min | 10 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Fake Doctors Real Friends with Zach and Donald

"Like chickens like going airframe. You're not gonNA FRY. ME At some grease. Did you We don't have to say we were talking about but Donald was. Having a disagreement with his spouse and I texted him in quotes what I thought he should say to her. and. I wondered if you tried out what I what I wrote no no, no no no, it's. It's. It's not a good day to do that. That was not a good I thought it was kind of funny I was of trying to be like your Cyrano where I say this I appreciate that. But no, you know this whole homeschooling Zoom schooling that the schools are doing right now with all the students. It really does put a lot of pressure on parents to make sure the kids are doing their job and know are sitting in front of zoom and are doing their lessons and stuff like that and. Run our second day and she is she's not happy about the fact that she her day is. She's a teacher also. We have yeah. We have teachers at school and then. You're supposed to send your kid to school for. School and not have to worry about it. But it it's not like that with this whole zoom school thing I have to say it made me a bit sad when I saw your kids in their adorable. School uniforms, and then in my brain I was like, oh they, they're not going to school. So they they wear the uniform when they sit in front of the computer. Yeah. The scope prefers that. I, mean I don't know that that as as someone who's not a parent and just witnessing that just Kinda made me. Sad. I would prefer that than them being their pajamas all day I'm going to be no no I. know I understand the idea behind it. It's just that these poor kids are are all I. Don't know just. Not to be Debbie Downer but I don't know what this does to like this these kids that are in such crucial times of their lives where they should be socializing and. Say there's a little bit of a lump in my throat I got. Yeah. Honest. I will say this my kids right now are into it because they spent a whole summer. Social distancing from everyone you know what I mean like there were very few play dates this this summer because. Of covid. Not to say they'd we didn't meet up with friends and do outside activities where the kids couldn't you know where the kids weren't all upon each other. But social distancing has thrown a monkey wrench in. If you're a kid, it's fucked up, you know to be a kid right now when you're supposed to go out in the summer and run around with your friends and explore and everything like that, and you guys can't get close to each other or you know what I mean. So with this whole zoom thing, it's really interesting to watch but my kids are into it. They have their own space like my son goes into his room and he gets to Chit Chat with his friends on Zoom and let us network though like during the class. So like the teacher is leading a class but then like do they have time where they can..

Donald Debbie Downer
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

08:17 min | 11 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Each other when you're doing it that way. Totally totally it says it's Definitely it's interchangeable and it's influx and there's always like, okay let me go back to that vision. Am I staying clear to the Vision? Okay here we go and expand again expanding going in the wrong direction am I saying yes to too many things that don't align with my vision. Let me go back to my vision. And you know. Opening and closing and and reexamining process as we move forward and grow in our business is that something you strategically do it kind of going back to your vision and is it or is it something that kind of happens naturally as things start to really do that expanding? Calm I think. It. It wasn't something that I Gave a lot of thought to initially it but it has been something that I give a lot of thought to now especially as I've grown and I have far less time to. You know to take on new things that I wanNA take on now I'm I'm much more intentional and thinking about going back to the vision if I say yes to this, invite to do this over here does this invite and what I'm doing that I'm giving my time an energy is that aligned with what my vision is is that going to take me to the next level in my business if yes then okay great but if it's not then I have to. Work at that process of saying no, because I'm. Definitely. Like the Espersen like Oh. Gosh. It's a great idea. Let's do it Yup, and and so I have to work really hard at that because I just don't have the time For All of these other projects here and there anymore, and so I have to be more strategic about about that. Definitely takes more. which is hard I. think when you're an idea person and you want to jump on it, you're like yeah. Yeah Yeah. Okay No. Hold on I'll take a couple teams I. Think about it. It's hard to do, but at that point to become so necessary. So then you're not overloaded and then become that all of that transference and everything comes in because you have too many things to do and that can be really hard place. It can be and I think it it. It could be easy to for somebody else to look over here what I'm doing and being like, oh my gosh, that's overwhelming. I don't know how you're doing all of that and what I would say as I'm not doing it alone are not doing it alone. I have a lot of support extremely fortunate in that I have a lot of. And and what I'm doing both from friends, my husband, my my family and then with the. The colleagues that I work with a have a distant who I brought on at the beginning of last year at which was essential because I knew I had the foresight I knew what was going on in my life at that time and I was like oh my gosh. If I don't get an assistant to come on and really helped me with the administration stuff in the office physically. I am I'm GONNA crash, and burn big because I already like new at the beginning of the air like emotionally and psychologically where I was with the impending nature of the situation with my mom. and. So by hiring her and she helps with my billing, she helps with you know creating new. Paperwork. She helps with the podcast she helps with managing my website. She helps with managing the social media stuff that I do and Just she does she's like jack-of-all-trades she does a lot. So I'm not doing it alone I i. have you know other people that are doing a lot for me. I couldn't do it all alone. There would be balls that would be constantly like hitting me in the head. Yes and I think how something you said earlier to of that this is your dream and this is how it looks and somebody else can do something similar, but it might look totally different. You know maybe it's Way Down into something else. But how different everything can look? -solutely absolutely, and that's like one of the things that I really try to highlight on the podcasts by interviewing different people and talking to them about how they're working and what they've done. That's different and out of the box and like it could be maybe your dream is, will I white working at my agency and I'm comfortable here but I really wanted us something outside where I'm still using my skills and knowledge by I wanna be able to earn money outside of that for whatever but you know it could be writing a book it could be creating therapeutic product or an APP it could be. A whole variety of things it might be an online course. there's just so many different ways that we can and help people that goes beyond the one to one based face time in the therapy room. and I love hearing how other people are doing that and making an impact, not only for themselves. But for the clients and their larger community, I really believe the healthier we become as individuals, the healthier the communities that we live in our and it's only when we have a healthier community that we can make really profound and lasting change. In the world and so like what we do is there is really important and it is a huge value and in that. Again, it doesn't necessarily have to mean that you only reached twenty five people a week in your office You know imagine if you created a book a using Your Voice, your voice, which nobody else has you know sometimes people say, Oh, well, that's already out there. You know that's already been done or written. Yeah. But not from your perspective, not from Your Voice, not from your wisdom and experience in like pudding putting your stamp on it. You know that could reach thousands of people and how much of a ripple effect could that be? Yeah. Yes. If that's not inspiring for listeners to like, go do the thing. Go do thing. Whatever it is that seed that's in your mind of I it's just so valuable of hearing how as therapists we have the drive we WANNA help people, but sometimes it is so were so boxed into this is how you do it. You see twenty five clients a week, but there's eight many other opportunities and so many other needs people need something else besides just the and they're you know there's a place for that and we need that but there's also the other needs that surround that. Totally and I and I think like, I didn't even see that until I was in private practice myself like I remember leaving. The group practice that I was in and I had like a young a client at the time who was really struggling Mustang,.

private practice
"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

"Like you know the America Right Free Country and the now I feel like someone's trying to control me every day now even to my my work, my personal life I felt like okay, so that's the point two thousand fourteen. I made a well I was just like you said I headed to see more patients volume. and. Obviously quality of care per patient has to suffer because I had to see more patients in limited time, and you know expenses going up. Reimbursement is not catching up the inflation rate so. I decided to this the moment. I decided to opt out. So that's why you know. I wrote a book called opt-out. Meaning sometimes you know you need to fight right when you get getting face the obstacles on struggles. To fight through, but even. If I cannot fight against the insurance, giants and government. We need to develop our own way to thrive so for me. My conclusion was I'm going to slowly gradually opt out of insurance plans and increase patient quality care niche myself. differentiate myself to be. A. Good enough different enough that e patient can make choice. Instead of going to insurance based physician or specialist, they decide they can come to me by their own choice, so I provide you know higher level better level than what they typically now pays become like commodity to you know. Like big HMO network or big insurers network. On Everything has to be referral based before they see specialists. If you have a painful bunion and hammer till you told me and you had to see regular primary care doctor six weeks later, you barely get an appointment just to see A. Insurance based specialists end from dead. If even if you need a surgical treatment, you have to wait months to get your order so. There was about my time, and that's how I kind of decided to go on my own again. I can breathe again. Just like I left South. Korea in nineteen. Interesting how things continue to repeat themselves in our lives? Yeah so okay, so I heard a really good a bit of wisdom that you shared there when you said that you slowly began to opt out and I, liked that because I'm speaking to a lot of. Now, through my networks that are fed up with working for the big hospital, systems are being run ragged, they are they feel like they're just stuck. And and I think part of the reason they feel so stock is because they feel like. I either I have to cut it all. Cut It all off at once or I have to stay here forever. So if a doctor that was working for a large hospital system came to you and said Gosh. You know I I would really like to follow your path, but I don't know what to do. And so you know what? What are some of the first steps that you would share with somebody like that because they don't get to control like you know they're. They're taking a paycheck basically and so are. Are there some steps that you give to them Up So. Not because this is mindset base, but I think mindset is everything right so my said is the most important thing when I helped doctor doctors transformed. However. It's kind of unfortunate that when we talk about mindset I is not like immediate results or outcome that they can see or take home with so I tried to go with the mindset I. But that's the key lesson for maybe people who are not doctors, online marketing, world or Business World that I'm sure you've heard or read this. has to be. We have to provide them. What they want right not necessarily what they need, but we know that that's what they need, but he. As soon as we say, Hey, this is what you need. Then they're not going to do it. It says because everybody's focusing on themselves. Everybody is a human being. So what's for me? So that's my marketing message. I always like off tangent little bit by you know. So anyway. Even if I know what they need is mindset I don't I don't. Tell them necessarily right away. Hey, you need to change. You need to shift your mindset. What I give them something that can help them like a Kinda fast win. Quick, win I or get them really interested in and then kind of resonate with me than I slowly add mindset aspect into it. But again doctors coming out of big hospitals or even private practice who are based on insurance if they do their own, opt out of insurance, plan is saved basically three pillars. I'M GONNA. Can I reveal these here? Yeah, for it, so three pillars, basically, the first one is a niche selection right so doctors cannot become successful as a hybrid concered or out of insurance plan. cannot easily be successful if you try to. Focus too many things so like I'm calling it generalist of specialist. CANNOT BE A. You cannot be successful if you say I provide A to Z so you know I try to help them. Okay, let's select a few things only a few things, but you love. Fixing your passionate about so niece election an offer creation. That's the one pillar. Offer creation meaning. If you chose your niche, and then you say, let's say bunny on..

A. Insurance bunion America Korea private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

Relentless Dentist

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

"Practice is a good thing. It is not inherently good to just open a privates. Some go out of business some their own profession. And, some are just miserable with every with with life because. It was set up the wrong way. My desires to make sure that. That doesn't happen so above everything else. I'd say it's right for people who are who know what they want and are willing to put in twelve to eighteen months to get there with a lot of courage. I think he said a mouthful there a lot of the clients that I work with or mid career, and they still lack that clarity. Therefore, it's this hustle group game right, which is a miserable existence, the great short-term strategy, but a horrible long-term strategy. More going back to purpose like if your team's not clear on why you exist, then you're gonNa just GonNa get the net effort of everyone who shows up with lots of ego, lots of finger pointing lots of drama, so everyone is trying to targets. They can't see like as we explain it. We think okay. This is immediately toxic environment yet. That's where a lot of. Of our industry exists as without courage in without clarity so I I think you stated very well as like. We get way ahead of ourselves and think okay I need a new. I need to add something to my procedure mix, and then my practice will take often miss these very foundational things, and then we act surprised when the topples over so to speak like. Any other way if we don't have these structural things for people understand this is what we're doing. This is why we exist. This is where we're headed. Certainly can pivot and change course along the way by by and large. If you can't cast that vision, you're GonNa get the net effort, and that can be asleep last night with a newborn like there's no extra given to you when strictly punching the clock for a check. Yeah well like you, said the hustle and the grind mentality is rather than using the same word as you, but it's a dead. End is a short lived. It's a sprint knows sprint can last forever, and even if the Hustle and grind does get you what you want, the short-term it not replicable. If you can't Redo it, which means, it's just a short burst, so the Hustle I think there's there's like an Internet meme society that believes Hustling Ryan Life Philosophy. For private practice ownership? I'm not saying there isn't hard work because there is a lot of focus and commitment. But Hustle and grind. I've worked with so many startups who. They say they work hard, but they don't feel there grinding. Say they're enjoying and I. think that feels a little better at least to me like I want to show up every day and be inspired by the people I serve. I WANNA show every day motivated by the people around me. So. I think it surprises people we..

sprint private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

Relentless Dentist

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

"Practice is a good thing. It is not inherently good to just open a privates. Some go out of business some their own profession. And, some are just miserable with every with with life because. It was set up the wrong way. My desires to make sure that. That doesn't happen so above everything else. I'd say it's right for people who are who know what they want and are willing to put in twelve to eighteen months to get there with a lot of courage. I think he said a mouthful there a lot of the clients that I work with or mid career, and they still lack that clarity. Therefore, it's this hustle group game right, which is a miserable existence, the great short-term strategy, but a horrible long-term strategy. More going back to purpose like if your team's not clear on why you exist, then you're gonNa just GonNa get the net effort of everyone who shows up with lots of ego, lots of finger pointing lots of drama, so everyone is trying to targets. They can't see like as we explain it. We think okay. This is immediately toxic environment yet. That's where a lot of. Of our industry exists as without courage in without clarity so I I think you stated very well as like. We get way ahead of ourselves and think okay I need a new. I need to add something to my procedure mix, and then my practice will take often miss these very foundational things, and then we act surprised when the topples over so to speak like. Any other way if we don't have these structural things for people understand this is what we're doing. This is why we exist. This is where we're headed. Certainly can pivot and change course along the way by by and large. If you can't cast that vision, you're GonNa get the net effort, and that can be asleep last night with a newborn like there's no extra given to you when strictly punching the clock for a check. Yeah well like you, said the hustle and the grind mentality is rather than using the same word as you, but it's a dead. End is a short lived. It's a sprint knows sprint can last forever, and even if the Hustle and grind does get you what you want, the short-term it not replicable. If you can't Redo it, which means, it's just a short burst, so the Hustle I think there's there's like an Internet meme society that believes Hustling Ryan Life Philosophy. For private practice ownership? I'm not saying there isn't hard work because there is a lot of focus and commitment. But Hustle and grind. I've worked with so many startups who. They say they work hard, but they don't feel there grinding. Say they're enjoying and I. think that feels a little better at least to me like I want to show up every day and be inspired by the people I serve. I WANNA show every day motivated by the people around me. So. I think it surprises people we..

sprint private practice
"private practice" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Or maybe just one doctor's office if i heard it correct but that was private practice as well so interesting to me that two out of the three are private practice and it's also not interesting it's actually very normal for me to hear trepidation in fear in your voice when you throw that out because you see arm and dad and my g ev mom and dad been crazy successful or just breakeven cleveland breaking an yeah so that's the story in your head is that the people closest to you the people you love and respect the most have not really knocked it out of the parking you're going they can do it i don't know if i can do it is that a voice you here yeah yes by the way if you're listening to the show right now you need to call in with this kind of information to the best you run out for those you don't have this information i'll help you but when you have this kind of information this is the most fun art if i could give you right now we and i mean i snapped my fingers and i deliver job that page you the money you need to make or more and i say 'alright lien i'm gonna give you you're gonna be a dietician at a health club or sports club or at a spa or i'm gonna give you on a plate you get to have your own business but you're going to be in consultation and where the doctor's office are multiple doctor's offices about it but it's your own business and you're a dietician in a private practice which one do you choose credit package now that's what i thought what if to mitigate your fears but to also make this transition not just in your mind and in your heart but on a practical level make this transition into owning your own business.

private practice cleveland