35 Burst results for "Private Practice"

Judge Who Signed Mar-a-Lago Raid Warrant Linked to Jeffrey Epstein

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:51 min | 2 d ago

Judge Who Signed Mar-a-Lago Raid Warrant Linked to Jeffrey Epstein

"From love. Breaking now on the Mike Gallagher show. So the federal magistrate judge who signed off on the search warrant at Mar-a-Lago is a Florida federal magistrate judge sources are telling the New York Post, it was judge Bruce Reinhart, judge Bruce Reinhart, who approved the warrant that enabled the FBI to raid president Trump's home. Well, guess what? Reinhardt was elevated to magistrate judge in 2018 after ten years in private practice. Months after his appointment the Miami Herald reported, he represented several of convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein's clients. Oh my gosh. So get this. The judge who signed off on the search warrant according to the New York Post. Left the local U.S. attorney's office more than a decade ago to represent employees of convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein. Months after Reinhardt's appointment, the Miami Herald reported, he had represented several of Epstein's employees in connection with the sex trafficking investigation against the financier. According to the paper, according to the Miami Herald, this judge Bruce Reinhart resigned from the South Florida U.S. attorney's office on New Year's Day 2008 and went to work for Epstein's workers the following day.

Miami Herald Bruce Reinhart Jeffrey Epstein Judge Bruce Reinhart President Trump The New York Post Mike Gallagher Reinhardt Lago FBI Florida Epstein U.S. South Florida
Dr. Mark McDonald Explains the Dark Effects Lockdowns Have on Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:31 min | Last month

Dr. Mark McDonald Explains the Dark Effects Lockdowns Have on Children

"There's something deeply troubling happening in America. We have the most depressed, suicidal, alcohol addicted, generation, in history. Why is this happening? Did we do this to ourselves? Well, with us to help unpack and explore that topic and we don't have enough time to do it, but enough to get started is a great American patriot doctor Mark McDonald, doctor welcome back to the program. Good to be back, Charlie. So doctor, let me ask you from a psychological perspective. A lot of parents are wondering, now that the lockdowns are over and their kids are back into the flow, why are they now more depressed than ever? What's your answer to that? Well, my answer to that is, you know, I've been seeing children for ten, 12 years now in private practice. And in the last two and a half, I have never, ever seen such a rapid precipitous decline in mental health, anxiety, depression, suicidality, two children and my practice died during the lockdowns, both from fentanyl overdoses in their homes. I also see incredibly huge rapid increases in drug use, especially marijuana, which as anyone who's been listening to news lately has heard, is finally now starting to get it to do as a cause of significant psychotic breaks and executive functioning problems in young people. It should have happened years ago and finally it's now being heard. The reason why we still have problems, even after these lockdowns are over is that we haven't actually addressed the fundamental problem. And the cause of this mental health collapse. And in my view, it has a lot to do with alienation, particularly young men and young boys. We have not supported strengthened and encouraged boys to become men to explore, to grow, to challenge, to accomplish. We have essentially been telling them now for years and years that they are the cause of every problem and society that they are rapists that they are misogynists, that they're the patriarchy. And so what you see, and you saw this just a few days ago on the July 4th shooting, as you see a very disturbed young man, you can tell just by looking at his face, his hair has gone to expression. He's confused. He's wearing a skirt he wants to be a transgender girl. These boys don't have a place. They don't have a sense of purpose. They don't understand what their identity or their meaning is. And so they're leaving now this locked down period where they've been sitting in front of screens playing games and watching porn, not going to school, not being tested with reality. And they are completely at a

Mark Mcdonald Charlie America Depression
Supreme Court nominee Jackson heading to Capitol Hill

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

Supreme Court nominee Jackson heading to Capitol Hill

"President Biden's nominee for the U. S. Supreme Court will be meeting with top lawmakers on Capitol Hill today it's the first steps in the confirmation process for judge Catan G. brown Jackson face to face meetings with the legislative leaders who are pushing for a quick confirmation by mid April in his state of the union address president Biden praised brown Jackson former top litigator private practice a former federal public defender from a family of public school educators and police officers she's a consensus builder some Republicans say she's too liberal but Democrats are hoping they'll win a few votes from the other side of the aisle if confirmed judge guitar G. brown Jackson will be the first black woman to serve on the U. S. Supreme Court hi Jackie Quinn

President Biden U. S. Supreme Court Judge Catan G. Brown Jackson Brown Jackson Capitol Hill Judge Guitar G. Brown Jackson Jackie Quinn
A Little Bit About Joe DiGenova and Victoria Toensing

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:46 min | 8 months ago

A Little Bit About Joe DiGenova and Victoria Toensing

"In studio for one on one, none other than Joe digenova and Victoria Thompson. Welcome back, guys. It's been far too long. Merry Christmas. Yes. Merry Christmas. You're looking very festive. I like the red color. Love it. Yes, very much. Everybody who listens to America first nyon three years almost, it will generate first it will be our third anniversary. Right. Knows who you are, but say somebody's tuned in they're traveling. They've just locked onto this radio station. They've been living under rock for 40 years. Tell them who Joe is and who Victoria is the little bio introduction if you would. Became the United States attorney for the District of Columbia under the tutelage of Ronald Reagan, one of the greatest moments of my life was to have him nominate me, became an independent counsel of the United States, investigating things for the U.S. government, worked on the hill for senator Charles Matthias on the judiciary committee, and have conducted a happy private practice. And we've tried to with your wife. Look out for the good. Hang on. We'll calm down. With my wife. Who is Victoria Townsend? Victoria, tell us, give us a likewise a little summation of your journey to date. Went to the Republican convention in 1980 and was marching for the ERA and this guy came up to me and said, what have you got there? And I said, well, I'm selling ER ERA GOP pins. And we got married ten months later. Oh. I see. That's how it happened. And what have you done on Capitol Hill? Who have you worked for? Oh, well, my hero, Barry Goldwater, which was the only boss I ever allowed to call me sweetheart. And with a special remit Intel issues, right? You've done a lot of Intel stuff in the service chief council for the Senate intelligence committee. So I know this

Joe Digenova Victoria Thompson United States Senator Charles Matthias Victoria Victoria Townsend District Of Columbia Ronald Reagan Judiciary Committee U.S. Government JOE GOP Capitol Hill Barry Goldwater Intel Senate Intelligence Committee
"private practice" Discussed on Defocus Media

Defocus Media

07:04 min | 9 months ago

"private practice" Discussed on Defocus Media

"So it's been fun working on that project so so what's next so next thing. I think i really need to focus on just choosing a location now. I had to think a lot about this. Because i think when you want to open a practice you just think that everything's going to be perfect effort or think that this is my dream location and gonna be here forever right. I'm starting to think you know what let's get this ball rolling. Let's pick a good enough location and things change so none of learning to compromise is probably the next step of the way for me. Guess do notch without a location. Why think your i seven years show that you should expect change rather than assume that it's not going to happen now a daily occurrence sometimes. Yeah and you don't want. I may not have expected the trajectory to be the way. It wasn't the last seven years. But i have learned from every position i ever held. And it's brought me to today. Where i'm about to take this step opening private practice and i never thought i'd be saying so if all your moon's align when you think this could come to for wishing and do you foresee yourself maintaining employment somewhere else while you open this burgeoning practice or is it gonna. You're just going to go all in right from the gate. Get get go. How do you plan for that. So hopefully if the moon's do align I would say that this will take about six to nine months altogether so that six to nine months i have a great relationship with the corneal surgeons that i'm working with right now. And he's aware and knows that. I'm opening a practice so i'm going to continue working there until i have enough patience or yet busy enough that i have to take that step of moving onto the next phase which would be fulltime at the new practice so just look into your crystal ball and if everything goes as you plan it what type of practice you wanna have. Are you going to have. Just general practice adult practice. Pediatric practices these practice. And then when. I when i if i walk in your door for the very first time. What do you think the feel is going to be. So when it comes to the practice itself i want to do. General optometry with a focus on specialty lenses. I love seeing patients who have cataracts patients who have dry eyes young patients. I love seeing infants. Don't want to see general optometry patients. But at the same time i right now am a big I guess a specialty. Contact lens fitter and i have a lot of colleagues referring patients to me in that area and i love that. I absolutely love that relationship. That i have and i hope to grow that so i want to focus on specialty lenses but i also want to have regular patients that i see every year. I know a little bit about their family. You know their whole family might come to me. I'm hoping that's the type of practice. I build when it comes to the practice. Feel itself what. I've found with a lot of practices in rhode island. Is that just when you just based off of the location itself you get to see offices that have a very cozy feel to them and i think that matters to the patients when they come in they feel welcomed and i want to preserve that. Maybe it's a rhode island thing but reserve it where patients come in. They feel welcomed. But i also want to the latest technology there so i want patients to come in and feel like wow That's all that that's a new piece of equipment. Or what does that do right. I want them to be able to know that. I'm taking care of their vision. There is with latest technology. That's available for me and for that patient. Yeah i love it. Sounds like it's going to be a great next step of your journey. A super exciting opportunity to open the door for the very first time. So in in in in summary. Your completed dropped metric residency. Have absolutely no regrets if anything. That's encompassing three quarters of what she do each and every day You landed in this understanding that there are actually people out there. Companies out there to help relieve the fears and help you through every step of the process to get you going. Is there anything else that you can look in the rear view mirror on and say wow i wish i would have known that earlier or those some of the really two big ones running that i did can find. That was amazing. I did not think of this earlier on but right now. Even while i'm in private practice i have the wonderful opportunity to still be adjunct faculty and i love that. I still teach at peo. I work with the international students there. And i also work in advanced studies program which has been great because it still allows me to teach I'm also able to work in a consulting role with different companies which keeps me on my toes. Because i'm learning about new technology. That's out there but it's a balance between all this. If you told me seven years ago that there was an opportunity for me to do several different. Like or be a part of our profession in several different roles. I wouldn't have really thought about that. I just thought you pick one job and you do one job. And that's about it. But i really found that there are different opportunities that we have in our profession. And that's really nice. Part about optometry is that it's not just one. And i feel like i get a little bit of everything so the you really do. So as we close and the other words for wisdom that come your way for our audience absolutely are definitely think about residency I think if it's the right opportunity for you and it works for you. You will be happy that you spent that time investing in yourself and then the second thing do not be afraid of opening a practice. There are so many people that are out there to help you. And i never thought that. So with a lot of help out there and advisers. I think they make it easy for you to achieve a dream that you didn't think you could the for wonderful so this is part one of his journey. I'd love to bring you on again. Gritty certainly certainly after your doors open and give us some insight on how your next phase went in this really life. Exciting challenge if. That's okay by you accidentally. I won't share all the things. You should not do all right. Thank you again and hopefully we will chat soon. Everybody have a great day. Thanks for listening. Classes ended for today and we have no exams or grades approaching. Please email me at four professor at gmail.com if there are topics that you would like to hear and see through a professors is..

cataracts rhode island
Who is Dr. Jeff Barke?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:01 min | 11 months ago

Who is Dr. Jeff Barke?

"Talk about the truth. Let's talk about science with one of the few doctors who's out there telling the truth about what we need to know about. Covert therapeutics boston. Vaccines welcome to america. First one on one. It's dr jeffrey balki. Board thirty five primary care physician. Welcome dr to one on one so great to be with you. Thanks so much for having me on. Well we had you on the radio show a week ago. It was super. It was too short. So we've already invited you back for a one on one discussion for those who missed the interview on the radio show and who haven't heard of you before. Just by way of introduction. Who are you what do you do. And what is our ex liberty our expert liberty is my website sev- where people can go and learn more about me. I've got a newsletter that i put out every couple of weeks naked subscribed it out by the way i recently started. A podcast. informed dissent the intersection of healthcare in politics and that can be found at in armed descent media dot com. I'm a primary care physician board-certified. I've been in private practice for over twenty five years i've served as an assistant professor at uc irvine. I've also served as a board member at the orange county medical association and in my spare time. I work as a tactical physician role local law enforcement agency emily last year. I started a charter school. A hillsdale affiliated republic charter school in the city of orange here in southern california but my day job is treating patients that i've treated literally hundreds and hundreds of cova patients successfully by instituting early treatment with many of our repurpose medications. That were really well. You can get visions early

Dr Jeffrey Balki Boston Orange County Medical Associat America Uc Irvine Republic Charter School Hillsdale Southern California
Dr. Maria Montessori: Founder of Montessori Schools

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:36 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Maria Montessori: Founder of Montessori Schools

"Eighteen ninety six. Maria graduated with honors from the university of rome medical school. She was among the first female physicians and all of italy. Maria worked as a surgical assistant in low income areas of rome. She also had a private practice focusing on psychiatry through this work to came to have this revelation she said i felt that mental deficiency presented chiefly pedagogical rather than mainly a medical problem so maria began to study education. Theory and philosophy in one thousand nine hundred. Maria became the co director of a small school. That served as a training institute for special education teachers. The school's pupils were children with developmental and learning disabilities. Maria pulled from her background in medicine and approached the work. With scientific rigor she conducted experiments and made adjustments to teaching methods based on her observations. She offered unique materials to keep kids stimulated and it worked many of the children and the program made unexpected improvements and it was deemed a great success. Maria took her findings all over europe. She gave speeches where she explained her research and used her platform to advocate for children's and women's rights in her observations. Maria found that children were highly self motivated and curious. She saw that when children were allowed to pursue their in neat curiosities. They naturally learn from their environment. Maria advocated that teachers. Follow the child which was a radical idea for the time and to phrase that would define her legacy in nineteen o seven. Maria had an opportunity to fully implement her thinking she opened a full day. Child care center and a poor inner city neighborhood in rome. The students were children aged two to three or six to seven. Who had been historically under served in the italian education system. Maria specifically designed the space to allow children to self select between pre orchestrated activities or learning. Puzzles this attentive. Learning environment was called casa dei bambini and it was the first of its kind in italy. It became the first montessori

Maria University Of Rome Medical Sch Institute For Special Educatio Rome Italy Child Care Center Europe
The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:19 min | 11 months ago

The Life of Patsy Matsu Mink

"Hat matsu. Takemoto was born in pya. Maui hawaii territory. On december sixth nineteen twenty-seven patsies grandparents emigrated from japan to work in hawaii. Sugar plantations growing up as a third generation. Japanese american patsy witnessed heavy discrimination towards japanese americans and indigenous hawaiians when patsy was fourteen years old fighter jets bombed pearl harbor. Patsies father was subsequently taken by authorities one night and heavily questioned. Though her dad returned safely. The next day patsies family lived in fear from that point on patsy later said that that moment made her realize that one couldn't take citizenship and the promise of the. Us constitution for granted hats. He graduated for maui high school as both class president and valedictorian. She went on to study to different colleges in the mainland. Us before moving back to hawaii in nineteen forty eight. Patty graduated from the university of hawaii. With a bachelor's in chemistry and zoology patsies original career goal was to become a physician but no medical school would accept her so she decided to change career paths and instead pursued law she applied to university of chicago's law school and accidentally got accepted as a foreign student at the time. Patsy was one of only two women in her class in nineteen fifty one. Patsy earned her. Jd and married graduate student. John francis mink a year later. The couple had their only child. Patsy faced a lot of discrimination for being a working mother and having an interracial marriage many major chicago law firms rejected her application so her family relocated to honolulu in nineteen fifty-three patsy. He became the first japanese american and woman to pass the bar and practiced law in hawaii but many law firms in hawaii still turned her away instead. Patsy went into private practice and taught business law at the university of hawaii.

Patsy Takemoto Hawaii Maui High School Maui Pearl Harbor Japan University Of Hawaii John Francis Mink Patty United States University Of Chicago Honolulu Chicago
Dr. Valerie Rein: Coping With Patriarchy Stress Disorder

Live Happy Now

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Valerie Rein: Coping With Patriarchy Stress Disorder

"Brand new. We have not talked about before. And you pretty much have discovered this and are creating our solutions for. Can you tell us what patriarchy stress disorder is and why we're just now learning about it. Yes women have been oppressed for thousands of years on the patriarchy. Our bodies did not belong to us. We didn't have legal rights over our children over our own decisions. We couldn't make our own money. We couldn't love. We loved a we couldn't get a divorce etc etc oppression is traumatic and now we know from the field of epigenetics. That trauma is genetically transmitted so that laid the foundation for my discovery of patriarchy stress disorder. Which is into generational selective trauma that creates an invisible in the barriers. to women's ultimate success happiness and fulfillment. And how did you start doing work in this area and discover this. It probably began. When i was a little girl and i kept getting messages that some they was wrong with me. Don't talk so loud people don't like that. Don't act so smart. no wanna mary. I went down the road of studying psychology. What else would i to help me figure that out and after two graduate degrees i thought i really had it all. I had everything i had worked so hard for. I loved my work. i had a thriving private practice. I had a beautiful home was married to a beautiful wonderful human and A wonderful daughter and one day. When i was on the phone with a client the left side of my body went off line and i landed in the er where after scanning me up and down for hours. They gave me the diagnosis off. Quote unquote just

Trauma
Decluttering Deeper Without Getting Overwhelmed

A Slob Comes Clean

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Decluttering Deeper Without Getting Overwhelmed

"Hi jessica. Thank you so much for coming onto the podcast today in q. Suspend happy here so tell me a little bit about yourself. Tell me your unique life situation that you're living okay while i am married With two young kids sexually our tenth anniversary this year. Congratulations thank you. Thank you and we have a five year old daughter two year old son so you know toys all over the floor and making lots of meals and snacks every day. Kind of and let's see what else. My job stuff has changed a lot. This year i basically went from. I worked for twelve years in. Hr at a large company decided about a year ago to leave of leave the corporate world in job and now i'm basically at home with the kids part of the time like half of the week Self employed the other half and we can talk about what you know. Those jobs are a few kind of do a couple of different things. Yeah but listen yes. So we own a couple of rental properties so Sometimes it's busy usually. It's not but thanks kind of pop up out of anywhere out of nowhere with you. Know things that need repairs or stuff like that and and Just certified as ib seal c. Which is a type of lactation consultant. So i'm working at a private practice with that. So that is really variable. Sometimes some weeks. I have a number of consults working with a couple of clients and sometimes it's quieter and then we do a lot of professional training with that. Choose so that's scheduled kind of a little bit argue on call at all with that. No i'm not on call have set times. But they could those slots could fill up or they may not like. I kind of never know still that morning. Potentially

Jessica
The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

02:17 min | 1 year ago

The Populated Intersection Between Trauma and Addiction

"Today. Our topic is the intersection between trauma and addiction and recovery from both dr. Stephanie covington's a skilled clinician on inciteful author an engaging public speaker and our guest today. I've had the opportunity to hear. Dr covington lecture several times over the years. But this is the first time i've ever had the honor of interviewing her. Thank you stephanie. For joining us today bigger. Thank you. And i gotta ask you right off the bat. What is your interest in addiction and trauma and the intersection. Where does that come from. Well initially my interest in addiction came from my own experience recovering woman early in my recovery. I thought to myself. I wish one of the women could feel the way i do. A series of events led me into the addiction field. Abc focusing on women. And as i did that. I realized so many of the women i was seeing either in group in a treatment center or private practice i had had trauma histories and i realized nobody was talking about that. And begin to more and it was just. It was the evolution of my work really and those days. now. I'm talking about in the eighties. The addiction field did not want to talk about trauma. I mean i can't even tell you the negative pushback guy it was. It was fairly powerful in the mantra in the addiction. Field was when you're clean and sober. You have a trauma history you can deal with a year from now get a year recovery and then deal with it and i knew many people were never going to get a year pre covering. I wanna come back to having a couple of minutes. Let me ask you i. Can you define trauma for us. Sure the various definitions of trauma. I mean the one that mental health providers using the diagnostic manual is that it's really a life threatening event and it's a life threatening event in which can occur because you experience it or you witnessed so you hear about it happening to somebody else or you get it because you're surrounded by trauma and there has to be a particular response

Stephanie Covington Dr Covington Stephanie Trauma ABC
Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

Fancy Free Podcast

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Karyn Tapley's Unconventional Medical Career

"You are listening to the fancy free. Podcasts where my guests. And i tell our most embarrassing funny stories so that we all feel less alone and our imperfections and forge connection through vulnerability in humor. I'm joanne jared. And i am your host and today i have with me. Caryn tap lee. Karen is a fellow physician. She is an obstetrician gynecologist fellowship trained in integrative medicine and has transitioned out of traditional practice and is currently selling mercedes-benz as she completes her mba. So i think she's addicted to school. She calls it her covert career. She's a total car. Check and you guys. This is so fascinating. She started off her higher education with a ged. so karen. thank you so much for being with me today. Thank you for having me. I'm super excited to be here. Okay absolutely we'll fill in the blanks a lot of questions but first of all. Just tell us a little more about who you are and what you do. That is currently a moving target. You're right by tradition chaining. I'm an obgyn with a fellowship in integrative medicine that i got at the university of arizona down in tucson and i finished that in about twenty eighteen i was also establishing a medical spa at the same time i started off like a lot of. Obgyn's i went into a private practice. I where i was doing july only my husband was career military in the navy and so my first job out of residency was in oregon and he was stationed in washington. We had been separated for the better part of our marriage because of machine training and everything. So i tried to make it work as we tried to make it work as much as we could then. I finally decided to transition up to washington where i took a traditional employed job where i was taking q. Three call seventy two to ninety six hours at a time out about three and a half years into that. I finally went to our office manager to take some vacation time and is told that i didn't have any because i only accrued vacation time when i was physically in the office seeing patients

Joanne Jared Caryn Benz Karen LEE University Of Arizona Obgyn Tucson Washington Navy Oregon
Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

Healthcare Business Secrets

02:21 min | 1 year ago

Make Your Business Stand Out With Nutritionist Judy Cho

"This episode. We're talking with judy. Show judy's an author speaker and nutritional therapists she's nutritional there with a psychology and communications degree from the university of california berkeley and she also has a function utrition and hellenistic house private practice and house of patients with health issues with non finding the true root cause of the problem. Welcome to the show. Thank you thanks for having me. I really wanna get you on the show because you're doing some really interesting things nutritional space as well as the business space so give audience some context onto who you are what you do and what you're about sure. So hi everyone. I'm judy chohan for those of you. That don't know me. I go by nutrition judy. I am on multiple social media platforms so youtube instagram facebook and i just share nutritional content. I kind of follow a meat based diet and so you know. I find a lot of healing in the space and for a lot of people. There's not a lot of information out there. And so i'm just providing nutritional therapy bits of information in these bite size portions and you know just making nutrition easy for people to consume. And i know there's puns in there. I guess they're all intended. And you know the thing is. I came from a business background. So i was a business management consultant for like twelve years and i worked with these big corporations and we were trying to find the ways to have more efficient processes. So i manage these multimillion dollar projects and my health started declining. And so as i got ruling into the whole science at a nutrition and understanding. How food can either be a slow poison or it can actually be medicine for the body. I realized that you know. I think my calling is actually in nutrition and not in business consulting but you know learning from what. I learned in management consultant. I can now like streamline the process to provide education that's understandable for the general audience. And so you know. I married that and my psychology degree. And that's how i've been able to be successful as a speaker to grow my social media relatively quickly and to you know. Build my own nutrition judy community. A now i'm about to release a first ever carnival cure published book.

Judy University Of California Berke Judy Chohan Youtube Facebook
Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

Functional Medicine Research with Dr. Nikolas Hedberg

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Theodore Belfor on Cranial Facial Development

"Very very excited today to have dr theodore belfour on the podcast. I heard about dr bell. Four in james ness doors. New book called breath. And we're gonna be talking about all of that today on the show and dr belfour. He's of new york university college of dentistry and a senior certified instructor for the international association for orthodontics in the nineteen sixties. Dr bell was sent to vietnam to work as the sole brigade dentists for four thousand soldiers of the hundred ninety six light infantry from the jungles of vietnam to park avenue in manhattan upon his return opened his own private dental office in new york city and has been private practice for more than forty years and dr belfour specializes in the treatment of the cranial facial system. And that's what we're gonna be diving into today. So dr bill for welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure excellent. So what are we. Start by talking about how this all began and go back to. You know what happened. That change the cranial bones the cranial structure our skulls that led to this epidemic of of airway issues breathing issues at all of the health issues. That come with that well How we develop. How would grow and develop is based on how we breathe Aloe and we chew so just looking at how we chew. According to the us department of agriculture today in us sixty three percent of diet is processed and refined foods so without the proper stimulation to the body. We are not fully expressing on jeans when not developed in to offer full potential because that particularly when off jaws do not grow forward enough Do you re trues. Those jaws helps to push the tongue backwards into the airway and down to throw sanal. We have compromised sleeping breathing.

Dr Belfour Dr Theodore Belfour Dr Bell James Ness New York University College Of International Association For Vietnam Dr Bill Manhattan Us Department Of Agriculture New York City United States
The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

Creative Therapy Umbrella

02:24 min | 1 year ago

The relationship between creativity and therapist with Christa Butler

"All. Right krista welcome to the podcast thank you. Thanks for inviting me. I'm so happy to be here. Yes i am pumped that year here. We have so much in common of all the things we love talking about. And i think we could really do twenty episodes but i am pumped about so the topic for today's episode. So thank you for coming on and taking the time. Thank you i appreciate. I'm excited to be here. And i love to talk about. Creativity is so. I appreciate having a space where i can just share. You know part of who. I am as as an individual first of all and also as a therapist gas. Yes it so. It's nice to have that space. I think i haven't really thought about it that way but sometimes when we can share. I think that's what's so nice about listening to podcasts and people's experiences and who they are and what they bring to therapy is. It's really inspiring. So i'm i'm glad we have the space to this is going to be fun yes. I'm looking forward to it. Well for our listeners. How tell us a little bit about what you do currently in your practice okay. So i'll just start by just sharing a little bit about me as a person i is in. Yeah is krista. I'm i'm a hobbies photographer. I i'm a writer. I'm an indoor gartner. Probably going to talk more about. My love of plants is something that i just naturally like to share a to bring up in pop that in And i'm also a concert creator for instagram. I'm the owner and founder creative minds at play. I i work full time as a director of counseling programs at a nonprofit organization and part time and private practice at seven corners psychotherapy in northern virginia. I am a licensed professional counselor therapist. Supervisor i am naturally certified in cfc cbc. And i'm also a board approved licensure supervisor with the virginia. Born of counseling

Krista Gartner Instagram Northern Virginia CBC Virginia
Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

The WoMed

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Speaking From the Heart with SLP Lauren Sharpe-Payne

"Lauren. Welcome to the wo- med. Thank you in fact i to be here so for those of you who don't know morin. Sharp pain is a speech pathologist. And i have been dying to get speech. Pathologist on the wool med. So when you tell people what you do what's the first thing that they automatically assume. No people automatically assume i work with kids. I just can't sit kids and teach them how to say either s.'s. Or their ps. And i mean with all this do that but i actually work with adults since i think. The stereotype with speech pathology sitting down playing games working on different sounds But there's so much more to it than that so yeah well. I'll admit one of my good friends is literally dreading the day that her two year olds list goes away. It's really cute though because right now. Her z's literally come from the back of her mouth. Like all the kerr molars and she's just adorable. It's really cute it is. Oh my gosh yeah so you mentioned that you work with adults so did you. Is that kind of where you got started with. Everything or your passion really was but actually started my career working with kids. I worked with kids for about two years. Two and a half years and i liked it initially But i quickly found out. Just it wasn't like farc me like it wasn't my passionate area and so i worked really hard to kind of tradition over to the medical side of each pathology and i started working at outpatient rehab. I was seeing a lot of patients who had had strokes in like traumatic brain injuries and swallowing disorders. And i really found that that was really my passion and that's really what made me feel fulfilled at the end of the day. And so that's what i've been doing. Ever since that point. I love that i feel like i. I mean the only real interactions and stuff that i've had working with with speech was i used to work in the nikko. Nice and so. We'd have speech consoles all the time you know. We had like paralyzed vocal. Cords or you know. Cleft lip or palate premiums just couldn't quite figure out how to suck swallow breathe. Exactly yeah echo cool. Yeah so there's just it just sounds like there's so many different fields within so p. wrote there are there are. Mike said i think most of the time. Most people associate s. l. p. With you know working with kids like in the school. I think the school was really popular. But like you said there's so many different areas you know. We can work in hospital. We can work in nursing homes and you know fools and fire practices. So there's there's really a lot of different options in terms of you know where we can work which is really cool. So what led you into this career like how did you first hear about it and you know get interested in it so it's funny excellent to be a lawyer up until my senior year of high school and i remember i had already declared my major and a second of sociology class in high school and their story about the young girl. Her name was genie. I don't know if you've heard the story. But she was locked away for twelve years that her parents never interacted with hers. Get no human interaction and yeah it was. I saw that and like she had no communication at mike whatsoever and so she worked with the speech therapist and he was able to communicate. It wasn't all verbal. Nonverbal buys using pictures. But i thought that was so neat that there was something out there. You could help people communicate and the rest is history. I just fell in love from that point. that's really beautiful So greenwich some little video. Yeah what's the school pathway lake like do you guys have to clinicals. is it Like a bachelors. Is it a doctoral degree. Now or like how like if you're going to coach someone through eight or tell someone you know what they're in for. Yeah so it's four. Years of undergrad And then you have to go to graduate school so for me. My program was in graduate school. But if you don't have speech as an undergraduate degree typically a two and a half maybe three years for the graduate program and then after that your life and your certify after a nine month period. There's no doctoral degree right now. That recommended or like that's required to be a speech pathologist but you can most certainly get them back degree that not in my pets whatsoever But after getting your master's degree through what all the clinical fellowship here and so that nine months after you graduate where you're essentially practicing. Slc like getting a salary and everything. But you're still technically under supervision and so after that nine months Once you have all of your hours your than a certified speech pathologist so you don't need any supervision or you know no one's giving you feedback just kinda on your own completely after that point. Wow yeah is there different routes that you take if you want to be more on the medical side of things versus you know in schools or or working with pedes a good question so i know in graduate school. We do externships so typically if there are two externships one is medical. One is typically pediatrics. might be in the school. There might be private practice. But i know that's alive. Students really kind of narrow down where they want to be in terms of their career so a lot of students. We'll just try to warm more relationships with people a medical they feel like they wanna pursue medical side or vice versa with school side and then with the clinical fellowship years so that nine month period actor graduation many students will try and get their cf wire the clinical fellowship your and that desired area of speech that way after they're done they can't hopefully get a medical job or a pediatric job. You know what they don't need this revision to

Morin Lauren Nikko Mike
Emotional Maps And Mind Body Integrated therapy

Thinking Like A Genius Podcast

06:28 min | 1 year ago

Emotional Maps And Mind Body Integrated therapy

"Beverly thank you very much for coming on the podcast episode on quite happy that we've been able to shed gillette time to have the interview. We started talking about this on a forum. Forward to geogra- photon full balloon. Second brian and we started talking about the psychology side of things in how the brain processes things in various Topics we dogged in. And i decided to get you on because i wanted to find out more about some of the work that you're doing have got a specific interest. In how the brain processes information. But i'd like to find out more information about also how emotions play a key role in how the body processes information. You came out with some really interesting information of that and then also dive into some of the things that you're talking about the neural maps in and some of the biotechnology. So if you can start tell the listeners. A bit more about yourself. And then we'll dive into some of the questions for first of all thank you lance for me. It's really an honor to the on your podcast. A little bit about. I have been a mind body. Integrative therapist for over thirty three years in private practice in santa fe new mexico. And my buddy. Integrative therapist is an umbrella term that i developed quite a while ago to encompass all the different aspects of what i do my licenses etc cetera. So i'm a clinical counselor. And i'm a body worker manual therapists and i'm a naturopathic doctor and i also not for thirty three years but since two thousand and thirteen or thereabouts have been doing bio energetically in working to map the bio energetic field. So i work with clients. My specialty is and has been in trauma. Big t. little t and but it all boils down to helping people. Release the grip of that old patterning on their brain behavior of their perceptions emotions eccentric cetera. And so i've also studied a lot about the way. The brain works the way the brain patterns information and i've developed some ways of really beginning to change some of those old well warm neuro trackways that it's like the maps that we follow our default. I've really been able to help a lot of my clients. Get free of those old patterns and develop new trackways new pathways of behavior perception ways of experiencing themselves in the world in the world in relation to themselves so this quite a lot of topics. And there's quite a lot of information in that introduction. It's not a bad thing. I think this much interesting information in there. Which i think can be really valuable because i've been doing a lot of research on how brian processes out learns how things have subconscious ties into behaviors and also cognitive biases. The reason why. I wanted to get you on his actually find out more about the the areas that you're looking into specifically to actually find out how you change the mapping. That's quite a tricky thing to do. Because obviously when you start dealing with subconscious you talking about a lot of strongly program behaviors and they tied very deeply into emotional state and also the motions because i said tightly integrated it's quite interesting to to see how you're able to change that. I think we can. We can probably have a lot of really about just that part of it so the first thing wanted to find out a bit more is your research. How did you get involved with it. And what have you learned from that. That bioenergetics youth so years ago. There was a series of conferences being held in santa fe called science and consciousness. And i would go to those conferences and partake in a lot of the different programs offered for of years scientists from russia youth constituting caracal was invited to speak and he would show his equipment and equipment. I'm using the guests. Discharge visualization electron photonic imaging system and he would present the research teams doing spatially like like measuring and mapping the energetics and different sacred sites and the research that they were doing in hospitals and clinics universities etc etc and i was fascinated by that and determine that one way or another i would eventually get that equipment and start doing my own research and use it with clients and just not my own interests and in two thousand thirteen. I did manage to get a camera. And it's a camera equipment that there's a lot of different aspects because they have the professional system they use it in hospitals and clinics in russia about sixty to other countries. It's scientific research quality equipment and it comes with a very sophisticated suite of software based on different algorithms that have been tested and retested and to healthy years mostly in russia and and what it allows me to do is i can. Test spatial feels the effects of our energy. Thoughts are feelings. Different things that are providing em- put into a space a room and environment and see the effects of that. I can contest the same facts in water. Which is quite an amazing recorder and actually also transmitter works two ways and most importantly i can task. What's going on in individuals and this equipment enables me to be able to test the second emotional field which the russians referred to as the informational feel for very important reasons and also the the physical field. The functional energy of all the organs. How well they're working etc etcetera.

Brian Santa Fe Gillette Beverly Lance New Mexico Russia
Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

The Healing Place Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

"Hey everybody i always tells me that. We're preparing we are now. We're live on facebook so welcome back to our conversations on pandemic self care then. We'll go into some other care. Discussions as well and i'm very excited to have with me today. John d. bias. So welcome john thanks. I'm glad to be back. Yes i'm i'm happy to have you here. We had a little chat before we hit a record or not record going live which is so awesome. going to talk a little bit about some self care and then kuo regulation. And yes but i tell let people know what it is that you are what you do great. My name is john d. And the last name johnny whitest. Nobody remembers that anyway. But you know not having reached share. Proportions johnny widest. And what i do. Is i go around and i help. People feel better fast so i have a private practice. Yes of us probably listening. But also i'm a trainer on the master trainer of trainers with the oldest original and registered charitable educational association. Way too many words. What does that mean. It's a noncommercial Association of people like myself that train if turkey and tapping professionally and we do it at the highest standards that we can and were even a registered charity so it is not a smokescreen noncommercial kind of place non profit. We actually mean. And so what are we try to do. We try to stretch gary craig's original tapping Diaspora into an even greater than his own eight or nine million across the globe. We try to keep that going. It's a it's a legacy and a privilege and what does that mean. It means that this tool which we know from our last conversation if you missed that real quick. It's it does three kinds of care. Which is why it's so wonderful and i call it the people's toolbox self-care crucial and non negotiable. It's perfect peer to peer care. We all need that. That's the connection that ends isolation and we all need that perfect and then at deeper levels like an iceberg. Those of us who are skilled in doing it because of practice and certification and accreditation and all the things we go through to make sure that we give the public the finest we have to offer. That's when we use it at the deepest therapeutic care level for traumatic relief and release and things like that. But look i'll three of those things are so wonderful. Somebody is going to get some great relief out of any one of those levels and all over possible. So that's what i do. Yeah well thank you. And i love it that you said connection because i'm not kidding when i say you're maybe my fourteenth live of past podcast guests and i think the word connection or connect has come up in every single one of them and how critical that is at this time was what we're going through especially these times right because social isolation you know physical social isolation is not good for most of us. We're not paying too bears. In our not polar bears we are heard like critters and we do. Best thrive best in connection with others. And when that's impossible or the flip side of that little too much connection but we're not used to. It don't know what to do with it. That's also very very unsettling because now on top of being uncomfortable we have all these uncomfortable feelings about. I shouldn't feel that way about my family. My roommate my uncle whatever it is right and so inside double whammy.

Johnny Whitest Johnny Widest Oldest Original And Registered John D KUO Gary Craig Facebook John
The difference between a MD and DO Physician with Pediatrician Mona Amin

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

03:08 min | 1 year ago

The difference between a MD and DO Physician with Pediatrician Mona Amin

"You share a little bit about your background and the work that you do. as a pediatrician. Yes so i have been. A general pediatrician for five years. Going on six years. Always in private practice. I've worked in new york city. And now i'm in florida and i love being. A general pediatrician. My goal as an outpatient pediatrician is to help parents downstream and downstream meaning before problems arise before they get issues. I wanna talk about things in the first five years right and for me. It's healthy sleep habits. It's healthy eating habits a positive body image and also approach stress so my platform really tries to look at all of those things. Obviously that's why we're gonna be talking about baby led weaning because i love that concept for creating good eating habits. So that's kind of my background. I m a. Do physician so not. Many people know the difference between md's and so both of us go through the undergraduate work medical school but dio medical school or osteopathic medical school in the united states. We learn the whole body so when we're learning about headaches were also learning about environmental triggers. We're learning about nutrition. We're learning about everything related to a system issue or a problem. And i love the way that we were trained so everything is a whole body system will have we thought about the impacts food can have or the environment or stress to a problem. So it's what we call that whole mind body spirit medicine which i love item partial to deals mainly because i m one when i say that i do seek out does it doesn't mean that i am against. Md's my own husband is an amazing md. But i just find that. The philosophy makes a lot of sense to me especially in general pediatrics and outpatient. They just tend to be more welcoming. The bedside manner is more like this. It's just i love it. So of course i m once. I'm going to be talking like this. But that's basically the difference. And i think that's important for parents to hear a lot of our audiences like some of them are still pregnant like the learning everything they can about babies etc and. I don't think they realize that you have the option. When you're choosing a pediatrician to also consider working with the. Do so. i'm so glad that i connected with you. Because i think you could just tell again like from your instagram and your online persona which is so real like it is a little bit different. I think than what a lot of people would expect from your traditional pediatrician. Yeah and i find that a lot of md's again. This is not empty bashing this is just my understanding of my colleagues. Md's are amazing but they tend to fall into a very will have to do this a certain way versus looking at big picture when that goes pediatrics. Like baby led weaning for example. Right like winning has been around for decades and also in other countries and the ap had to treat a statement saying. Hey okay we support it. If this better the other went so many other countries have been doing it. So i find that a lot of the organizations needs to kind of come into the modern sense of parenting and say okay. What can we do. How can we do this in a safe way. How can we educate parents on safe. Sleep how can we educate parents on eating with baby led weaning so that it meets their desires versus okay. You can't do this. This has never been done before. Because parenting is evolving and we need to evolve with it.

Dio Medical School Or Osteopat New York City Florida Headaches United States MD AP
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Got like a little bit everything that you can do. We have definitely given everything ago amongst in the last five years. That's so wonderful. So what was it What was really the catalyst. I starting your private practice. You know when that started with it. What did that look wake up. It's funny because i. In retrospect i think i've always had that entrepreneurial spirit i can remember being a really young child and going to restaurants with my family and taking out a napkin in redesigning the logo for the restaurant and making a little. You know plan for how they could get more customers. I spent a brick back. I've always really had that. Had that in me. But you know when i when i was in school for music therapy and when i graduated i didn't really think about starting a business. I just wanted to get out there and start working. And so i i started subcontracting after university and i quickly realize though that something was missing because i wasn't getting that entrepreneurial side of me fulfilled like it really wanted to start my own programs and i had so many ideas needed a space for that creative and so i decided to make the leap and and start my own practice and was you know i felt fulfilled almost immediately once i took that leap so haven't looked back since. Yeah yes there's so much. And i think you're practices a perfect example of how how much creativity and there is in private practice of really. It's like the world is your sister. that's exact- that's how i feel and i just love. I love the you can. There's so much room for trial and error and that it's okay to to take risks into you know completely fail because you have that whole you have your whole platform in this whole opportunity to just try try it again and tried in a new way or try. Something else completely and i just loved that. Yes yes it's so exciting because I would imagine. Starting private practice is really like a blank slate. Like you have this canvas and it's like what do i want to do with this. How do i. Where do i start absolutely. I know everyone's different. I find every entrepreneur. Kind of goes about that blank canvas in a different type of way. And i think the way that i always go. It is just really following my my inspiration. Great my my gut intuition. And i like i am. I feel very grateful that i have the platform to do that to just you know. Say wow i. I think this is gonna work this week. So i'm just going to give it a try and see what happens in in a really like that about entrepreneurship.

private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"I yeah. Oh my gosh. Okay. Really related to I was like well done whoever figured that out and made it into little goes on their instagram somewhere they made it. Okay. Is really fitting. Yeah. Oh, I'll have to check that out. Because I may not have done the test by that point, but I'll take it. Absolutely I. Love Hearing. The catalysts for everybody's story as they go into private practice there's it's just. So everybody has a different story and it's just so interesting to hear what drives people the cat you know the big thing of like, why did I need that and? It's so different for everybody, but it's so you can see how fulfilling it is too. Yeah, you're able to go in there and just like create your own thing from nothing but yeah. Yeah like literally literally nothing you know I I have. Made a faith. So I'm just you know at the test I, live my life but you know it was just like literally just absolute. Okay. Here I go. I'm just GONNA go for like that's what it was and you know being the wild I guess seven than I am that back out there. You. Know. My our called my dad is he's in Missouri. How are you gonNA live? What are you doing I'm like You know just gotTa go up there and.

instagram private practice Missouri
"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"And it's all about learning the art of self promotion. Deal like is really hard especially as women I feel like it's hard to talk about yourself and not feel. Like you're being unladylike and whatnot though I feel like so far I've not done with the at, but it's been a really good reason I highly recommend it. Does it go into something like the grunt test where it's like, hey, focus on what you were. Yeah I mean. Bring the. Your conversation. Yeah. Yeah I. Like that out lexical watched. Downloaded read where you got conscious coaching by Bright Murphy Auto. Show. New. Accelerated method by Talgo. He's got them all on. I've called because we're not talk anything about marketing. and. So that's like where I'm. I this though but this is this is my soapbox right? which is all right. Listen if you're a physical therapist near at a backyard barbecue and your friend next door was a graphic designer and it was like, oh, my back hurts every time I play volleyball whatever and you're like, Hey, I'm I'm a PT knows volleyball you ascertain is going to Google and read a blog post out at you'd be so pissed, right Flip that around same barbecue couple of weeks later, and you're like, Hey, I'm a volleyball PT and I'm starting my practice in this graphic I could do a logo for you and you're like, it's how much I could just go to Canada I'll just do it myself. It's like, Hey, people are good at this. Sorry. In my life people artist higher the professionally, it works both ways. So you was books who are guys who know women men know what they're doing do that because they've done it they've also run into all the problems you've earned you and you're gonNA skip those problems because that fifteen dollars book. With our. Last question is a WHO question. Dr Will Start with you who stumbling the audience should know more about. Oh. Not Rachel. Yeah I have to just because they're both very instrumental in me starting my practice and really helpful one is them. He's WHO's an amazing of the therapist and she's actually in Amsterdam now but you be here in the bay area but not Amsterdam and Katie. Just, open her private practice in southern California. The practice we've kind of been co-founders in a way, but obviously separate entities, and though she somewhat I would recommend checking out all taking the same journey at the same time right and. Lucan Laya I don't WanNa bring it back to star wars but I just did. WHO's your? Who? Who should the audience more about? Would say tickle boom for. Say More, time. Jonty. The movie, Maestro Shanta. We learned a lot from her. Finalized and. Things. We weren't getting school about both business and treatment stuff like. this whole field like. About what she knows and Bring a lot. So you know exactly what moved to ensure does right her grunt is pretty clear. It's very specific clear Last thing would you on the show is called the parting shot let's do that right now..

private practice volleyball Maestro Shanta Bright Murphy Auto Amsterdam Google California Rachel Canada Katie
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Are. but there are some blog material on the website I'm currently working on an online course, which is called starting from scratch in it's going to be kind of all the things that you need to do to prepare yourself before you ever even the doors. So like all of the steps that includes you know a lot of the stuff that we were talking about about visiting and And then some other more like concrete stuff like how to choose what corporate structure you're. GonNa be out a name what what's in a name? how do you come up with a name? How do you come up with a logo Just like other things? How do you get your Your Federal Employee Identification Number I duNno. Just stuff that like normally you might not have thought about before. but I'm I'm working on that and my goal is to have that It's going to be a self paced course through the website and I'm hoping it'll be ready by September that's my goal I'm. Working on it. And then they can find me on instagram. And that is I want to say it's the creative clinician. Or creative clinician. Let me put my instagram account. I should know it like off the top of my head I always forget. I'm on the spot. Unlikely. And they're also all of this will be linked in the show notes to. If, you want to just be able to go through and click it. There will be links to all of that to yet. So it's at creative clinicians corner. Is the INSTAGRAM. And They can also check they want to see more about my private practice and what that looks like baking. Go to www Florida art therapy services dot, com?.

instagram private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Each other when you're doing it that way. Totally totally it says it's Definitely it's interchangeable and it's influx and there's always like, okay let me go back to that vision. Am I staying clear to the Vision? Okay here we go and expand again expanding going in the wrong direction am I saying yes to too many things that don't align with my vision. Let me go back to my vision. And you know. Opening and closing and and reexamining process as we move forward and grow in our business is that something you strategically do it kind of going back to your vision and is it or is it something that kind of happens naturally as things start to really do that expanding? Calm I think. It. It wasn't something that I Gave a lot of thought to initially it but it has been something that I give a lot of thought to now especially as I've grown and I have far less time to. You know to take on new things that I wanNA take on now I'm I'm much more intentional and thinking about going back to the vision if I say yes to this, invite to do this over here does this invite and what I'm doing that I'm giving my time an energy is that aligned with what my vision is is that going to take me to the next level in my business if yes then okay great but if it's not then I have to. Work at that process of saying no, because I'm. Definitely. Like the Espersen like Oh. Gosh. It's a great idea. Let's do it Yup, and and so I have to work really hard at that because I just don't have the time For All of these other projects here and there anymore, and so I have to be more strategic about about that. Definitely takes more. which is hard I. think when you're an idea person and you want to jump on it, you're like yeah. Yeah Yeah. Okay No. Hold on I'll take a couple teams I. Think about it. It's hard to do, but at that point to become so necessary. So then you're not overloaded and then become that all of that transference and everything comes in because you have too many things to do and that can be really hard place. It can be and I think it it. It could be easy to for somebody else to look over here what I'm doing and being like, oh my gosh, that's overwhelming. I don't know how you're doing all of that and what I would say as I'm not doing it alone are not doing it alone. I have a lot of support extremely fortunate in that I have a lot of. And and what I'm doing both from friends, my husband, my my family and then with the. The colleagues that I work with a have a distant who I brought on at the beginning of last year at which was essential because I knew I had the foresight I knew what was going on in my life at that time and I was like oh my gosh. If I don't get an assistant to come on and really helped me with the administration stuff in the office physically. I am I'm GONNA crash, and burn big because I already like new at the beginning of the air like emotionally and psychologically where I was with the impending nature of the situation with my mom. and. So by hiring her and she helps with my billing, she helps with you know creating new. Paperwork. She helps with the podcast she helps with managing my website. She helps with managing the social media stuff that I do and Just she does she's like jack-of-all-trades she does a lot. So I'm not doing it alone I i. have you know other people that are doing a lot for me. I couldn't do it all alone. There would be balls that would be constantly like hitting me in the head. Yes and I think how something you said earlier to of that this is your dream and this is how it looks and somebody else can do something similar, but it might look totally different. You know maybe it's Way Down into something else. But how different everything can look? -solutely absolutely, and that's like one of the things that I really try to highlight on the podcasts by interviewing different people and talking to them about how they're working and what they've done. That's different and out of the box and like it could be maybe your dream is, will I white working at my agency and I'm comfortable here but I really wanted us something outside where I'm still using my skills and knowledge by I wanna be able to earn money outside of that for whatever but you know it could be writing a book it could be creating therapeutic product or an APP it could be. A whole variety of things it might be an online course. there's just so many different ways that we can and help people that goes beyond the one to one based face time in the therapy room. and I love hearing how other people are doing that and making an impact, not only for themselves. But for the clients and their larger community, I really believe the healthier we become as individuals, the healthier the communities that we live in our and it's only when we have a healthier community that we can make really profound and lasting change. In the world and so like what we do is there is really important and it is a huge value and in that. Again, it doesn't necessarily have to mean that you only reached twenty five people a week in your office You know imagine if you created a book a using Your Voice, your voice, which nobody else has you know sometimes people say, Oh, well, that's already out there. You know that's already been done or written. Yeah. But not from your perspective, not from Your Voice, not from your wisdom and experience in like pudding putting your stamp on it. You know that could reach thousands of people and how much of a ripple effect could that be? Yeah. Yes. If that's not inspiring for listeners to like, go do the thing. Go do thing. Whatever it is that seed that's in your mind of I it's just so valuable of hearing how as therapists we have the drive we WANNA help people, but sometimes it is so were so boxed into this is how you do it. You see twenty five clients a week, but there's eight many other opportunities and so many other needs people need something else besides just the and they're you know there's a place for that and we need that but there's also the other needs that surround that. Totally and I and I think like, I didn't even see that until I was in private practice myself like I remember leaving. The group practice that I was in and I had like a young a client at the time who was really struggling Mustang,.

private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

07:03 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"It's the fee is step by an emotion rated. We'll just I feel like this should be how much I should charge or they look towards other people in the community that are chart. That they're practicing and they're looking to see what they're charging, and that's not really a good model for determining how much you should be charging for your services. because it, it really is based on what you need to take care of yourself. So that you don't have any resentment towards the work that you're doing in your clients. You know it's easy to be like, Oh, I should be taking people and a pro bono level or low sliding fee scale level and and then you are strapped because you're not making enough money. and. That's not helpful. Also a focus on that in that is nece and that's where that creative psychotherapist podcast came about because. I wanted to be able to provide some of that knowledge other people even if they don't want to or they don't need to have like consultation services that there's a resource out there specifically for other creative arts, therapists hearing from voices of creative arts therapists. And I mean I talked to other people that aren't necessarily creative arts therapist but. The way they work is very creatively. and and and so there are some other voices there too but I really wanted to speak to our colleagues. So that's what I'm doing. That's phenomenal I One of my favorite things we talked about this previous before the podcast was How that you are the kind of person who likes to do a lot of things and not just one saying, can you talk about a little bit about that if that happened before you went into private practice or if that's when you learned it I feel like this is kind of a Meta question because this really goes into how you can create a business to fulfil all of the things that you want to do instead of just one pocket. Now. It is an awesome question and. I always talk about how I feel like I as a kid like knowing what I know now as a therapist I truly feel like I had undiagnosed add my whole life. I just didn't know at and I, and so that has led to be very curious about a lot of different things and to always have like lots of ideas at once play around with and an experiment with. And And then when I ended up going. Out Professionally, I did find that it was very hard for me to maintain my energy level. Working in one space where I was doing the same thing every day. At work or serving the same kind of population every day And and I was finding myself like starting to feel you know burned out a little bit and Mike not. It's just not as energized to do the work and questioning I'm like Gosh I'm like a moving jobs pretty frequently every one to two years a can't seem to. Stay in an agency setting I. think part of that too was my like resistance in frustration with the system. In addition to Like just struggling with the routine of ED. that. What what is going on but what I realized was like no I, I do better I do better personally when I have a variety of. A variety of activities that I'm doing in my job that. I'm more excited about it. I'm I'm challenged all the time and I need to have that challenge. I need to have that level of challenge in order for me to maintain my excitement an her Geeta I'm doing if I get bored, it's just it just doesn't work I feel. Yes like having Really a lot of diversity and how I serve and where I work and what I do really helps break up the day into these different parts. So it's dynamic and it's changing. It's not It's not the same it's not monotonous and that for me is energizing an exciting and it's what draws me to continue to push the boundaries in terms of what I'm doing as a therapist entrepreneur. there's always more ideas of like what am I gonNA do next? have to like organized the ideas of like, okay. Can't take all of those on right now. Right. Right I do I do like half to like edit myself a lot and like, oh, that's a great idea but I do not have time to dedicate to that right now I have to stick with this and get this moving an automated, and like once it's moving and automated then I can go to this next step but. There's definitely always a bunch of different ideas in the hopper for sure. About That's I think a struggle for for anybody listening and relates to that experience I definitely relate to that I've had to. Physically right the things out that I'm doing that on my plate I have it right here and just the things that are on my plate and things said, yes to, and then there's all the things that I wanna do in the ideas and like okay I'll just write it down and if I can plug it in or if something comes off, becomes automated, denic can take it on but it's a struggle when you're an idea person and you get excited and there's potential and creativity and and then to be like won't will. Israeli though it is it is.

private practice Mike
"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Yes and It's funny. Our podcast has a similar title. The so much creativity. The emphasis on the creativity process it really is that's why I love your podcast. And it's it's you yeah both so cool to have. That alignment, and then with a really different, your podcast has this awesome niche that you dive into that is I think so helpful for so many listeners that listen to my podcast if they haven't found you yet and vice versa, there's that you know really important element were were doing these other niches that are supportive of each other. Yeah absolutely. Absolutely. Yes. Well, for our listeners, can you tell us a little bit about how and you can tell us even podcast wherever you want to dive into because you do so many things but? Yeah, a little bit about what you currently do with your practice. So, a number of years ago I started out in private practice because it's just really hard to find Hard to find a fulltime art therapy position where I live and it's still hard and I really wanted to focus on being able to practice the way, I want it to practice and I wanted to have more of like a studio setting versus office setting and And so I opened my practice and quickly still back then realized oh my gosh, I need some help. And and so I have several other therapists that were with me now. So it's more of a small group private practice, but it's still very small and intimate and and I love all the therapists that work with me here and We just have a really great relationship and I'm support one, another and We do individual therapy we do group therapy in The practice office itself I provide clinical supervision for art therapists and licensed mental health counselors and Florida and So we do individual supervision and then I have group supervision other week since covid Kit, we've been doing them online, which is different because when they were in house, they were very arts focused and. It's a little bit more challenging to do that via the technology piece we tried but it it I've found that. The other people aren't as motivated to get into the art or maybe they're in their workspace and they don't exactly ob all the things that they wanna work with or what have you or it's just not feasible. So we do supervision and do continuing education training So the practice is a continuing education provider for. A Florida board of licensed clinical social work marriage and family therapy and mental health counseling, and so we do some continuing education offerings to the practice, which is really fun and I really enjoy doing that and? Goodness. What else do we do I feel like there's more but? My head. I think maybe I'm I'm I'm running out of Yeah Yeah. I think that that there's probably something else that I'm missing but. It it's it's vibrant and it's an edge diverse. Go Out and contract. We serve contracts out in the community group art therapy services that was it. And then with the podcast that's something that came as an offshoot I've been teaching on doing like conference presentations on building a private practice as a great arts therapist because I just feel like there's a such a greater opportunity for people to grow to be able to earn a living far more sustainable than what we potentially earn in an agency typesetting and then you. have so much more creative control and and you can experience a level of fulfillment that might not be accessible in the construct of one of those systems which has to play by certain rules So I'm just really passionate about that side developed. This other business called the creative clinicians corner which provides consultation services therapists that want to step out and create their own private practice and. have. Teach them what are some of the things that you need to do in order to do that and by thinking about fee structure like I have a very. Large focus on that helping people understand how to use the actual finances of business plus your personal your personal asset like budget that you need to take care of yourself. In order to determine what your fees need to be oftentimes I feel like therapists get caught in this. Difficult space where they like feel like why have to give back I At or or.

private practice Florida
"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

"Hybrid more cash phase Private practice without losing any quality of care for patients yeah. That's so funny. I'm glad you said that because that was gonna be the next question, I asked. How the heck do you do all this when you're seeing patients? Jenner try to build your own business. You're also coaching so many other doctors. I think I think the most important thing is you gotta? Have Mentors you know I really believe in power of mentors because he cannot do it. Again. You can do it, but. You'RE GONNA waste your time and energy. If someone has proven, and if someone has that system I'd say, invest in yourself and take advantage. Get the shortcut, and you can always modify and create your own, but you need that I wound of success proven by someone else. Mentors who believe in yourself than you believe in yourself by yourself, you know. Now that that is so good. Man, also afraid to ask this doctor on, but what's next? I continue to help patients, but I'd love to. I just hate my colleagues. Suffer and go out of business. It happens every corner of every city now. Almost every couple weeks, some surgery center go down. Some private practice closed a darker on or Hey TJ I I decided to quit. You know I just applied for salaried physician in the hospital I hear this every week every couple of weeks. Some kind of stories like that. If I. Can you know utilizing this? The whole, modern technology. I want to help private practice owners to continue to serve for public health. Sacrificing their own finance or their own lifestyle and After this whole, pandemic and covy thing going on actually it's for me more opportunity for private practice owners because now patients are scared to go to hospitals, you know. Like yourself, you said you did surgery at the surgery center, but what I've been preaching is that you can do in-office surgical suite for specialist, Yossi patient money convenience, but also you can control your time and schedule so. I'm thinking. Future is bright. I'm not continue to serve doctors and patients. That's awesome. While I mean so I do business without about a dozen or so doctors right now which that means I'm going to buy at least that many of that book and ship them to them, and I just feel like every doctor. Every doctor should read this book based upon what I've heard today, and then any doctor that is considering going into private practice should be reading this book so I'm going to figure out a way to get this in everybody's hands because you know again I always enjoy having conversations like this on. On the podcast getting to know people learning about what makes them tick clearly, you have a very compelling story as to why you have become the person you have and mindsets key to that, but there's something that that really stands out to me about you. Is You know a lot of times? People write a book. They build a blueprint and create the funnels in. It's a marketing tactic and and I understand. These are those are all great ways for you to market your practice and to market year coaching programs. It is but. You're proving that it actually works, and that's something that I just don't feel a lot of people, have so I, just I. Really Appreciate Your Passion for your practice for for caring for people, but not just your patients, but also caring fellow doctors so just thank you so much for that I mean it's. It's just it's awesome to hear this nice of you. Thank you. Thank for inviting me again. I had a great time talking to you. I fairly just talking to friends, you know. Well. Maybe we'll become friends. I no way they even the abundant surgeon hammer to I perform what we call minimally invasive surgery, so I learned from Masters and what I do now for minimal invasive bunion and hammer toe, my incisions like three millimeter and I don't use fixation, so no scruffy sation, no pins or wires, and then patients immediately walk in boot, but immediate walk weight-bearing, and I'm done traditional surgery before, but passed several years. That was kind. Keep momentum to different. I realized that while this is completely different from what I have learned being trained. Yeah, no, so that's when I realized okay. This is the niche and it does so. I started focusing on my niche. Since then it is minimally invasive. rankle care. That's awesome well, if I'd known that, maybe how to fly into Chicago, both because I love the city of Chicago, and because I could have had even less invasive surgery thankfully enough. I had a pretty good. Results and you're happy, and that's great a year later I still have a big smile on my face. Okay so people I know can definitely get taunt contact with you at your website, which is Dr TJ on T. J. H. N. dot com, so that's a way. How else can people get in contact with you? Follow you, you talk about social media's aware you out, and and how can they follow you? He pretty much. Everything's like the are key jags. Dr John So my website Dr Teaser Dot Com. facebook same thing slash four slash Dr. TJ on Instagram Dart, John. So you know once you come to my site and check out some of my webinars replays and you know you connect with me. Hey, you know! I came to Ryan. James Mueller Show I. I saw your Info. Let me know you know I might be able to send you a free copy of my book..

private practice Dr. TJ Jenner Dr John James Mueller Chicago bunion Yossi Ryan Masters J. H.
"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

06:17 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

"Like you know the America Right Free Country and the now I feel like someone's trying to control me every day now even to my my work, my personal life I felt like okay, so that's the point two thousand fourteen. I made a well I was just like you said I headed to see more patients volume. and. Obviously quality of care per patient has to suffer because I had to see more patients in limited time, and you know expenses going up. Reimbursement is not catching up the inflation rate so. I decided to this the moment. I decided to opt out. So that's why you know. I wrote a book called opt-out. Meaning sometimes you know you need to fight right when you get getting face the obstacles on struggles. To fight through, but even. If I cannot fight against the insurance, giants and government. We need to develop our own way to thrive so for me. My conclusion was I'm going to slowly gradually opt out of insurance plans and increase patient quality care niche myself. differentiate myself to be. A. Good enough different enough that e patient can make choice. Instead of going to insurance based physician or specialist, they decide they can come to me by their own choice, so I provide you know higher level better level than what they typically now pays become like commodity to you know. Like big HMO network or big insurers network. On Everything has to be referral based before they see specialists. If you have a painful bunion and hammer till you told me and you had to see regular primary care doctor six weeks later, you barely get an appointment just to see A. Insurance based specialists end from dead. If even if you need a surgical treatment, you have to wait months to get your order so. There was about my time, and that's how I kind of decided to go on my own again. I can breathe again. Just like I left South. Korea in nineteen. Interesting how things continue to repeat themselves in our lives? Yeah so okay, so I heard a really good a bit of wisdom that you shared there when you said that you slowly began to opt out and I, liked that because I'm speaking to a lot of. Now, through my networks that are fed up with working for the big hospital, systems are being run ragged, they are they feel like they're just stuck. And and I think part of the reason they feel so stock is because they feel like. I either I have to cut it all. Cut It all off at once or I have to stay here forever. So if a doctor that was working for a large hospital system came to you and said Gosh. You know I I would really like to follow your path, but I don't know what to do. And so you know what? What are some of the first steps that you would share with somebody like that because they don't get to control like you know they're. They're taking a paycheck basically and so are. Are there some steps that you give to them Up So. Not because this is mindset base, but I think mindset is everything right so my said is the most important thing when I helped doctor doctors transformed. However. It's kind of unfortunate that when we talk about mindset I is not like immediate results or outcome that they can see or take home with so I tried to go with the mindset I. But that's the key lesson for maybe people who are not doctors, online marketing, world or Business World that I'm sure you've heard or read this. has to be. We have to provide them. What they want right not necessarily what they need, but we know that that's what they need, but he. As soon as we say, Hey, this is what you need. Then they're not going to do it. It says because everybody's focusing on themselves. Everybody is a human being. So what's for me? So that's my marketing message. I always like off tangent little bit by you know. So anyway. Even if I know what they need is mindset I don't I don't. Tell them necessarily right away. Hey, you need to change. You need to shift your mindset. What I give them something that can help them like a Kinda fast win. Quick, win I or get them really interested in and then kind of resonate with me than I slowly add mindset aspect into it. But again doctors coming out of big hospitals or even private practice who are based on insurance if they do their own, opt out of insurance, plan is saved basically three pillars. I'M GONNA. Can I reveal these here? Yeah, for it, so three pillars, basically, the first one is a niche selection right so doctors cannot become successful as a hybrid concered or out of insurance plan. cannot easily be successful if you try to. Focus too many things so like I'm calling it generalist of specialist. CANNOT BE A. You cannot be successful if you say I provide A to Z so you know I try to help them. Okay, let's select a few things only a few things, but you love. Fixing your passionate about so niece election an offer creation. That's the one pillar. Offer creation meaning. If you chose your niche, and then you say, let's say bunny on..

A. Insurance bunion America Korea private practice
"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

05:59 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

"Fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars a month. but then deductible, which means that you still have to pay out of pocket. It's like three thousand to five thousand dollars a year almost not worth the having it just. You know it's you know I'm actually. I'm revealing this. I don't even have that insurance anymore because I feel like it's a waste of money. I have what they call catastrophe catastrophe insurance now says Moore for major accident major like heart, problem or cancer or you hospitalization. I pay otherwise I. DON'T WANNA. Keep paying two three thousand dollars a month, and then having five thousand doctoral, so I actually opted out of insurance by myself, and I'm just paying cash for most typical specialized specialists to visit, and then just have insurance where major big accident or incident, reason Yep Yep now absolutely you know, and and again you face an even greater challenge being podiatrist because you are Y- you know. You don't face that many urgent cases right. It's not like people are coming into you for emergency needs, and so then, and I know this and and many people that follow me on social media is shared a lot of this story actually almost a year ago to today, I had a large foot surgery where I had a hammer toe in a bunion, and it'd been causing me. Discomfort for years will buy insurance standards that was not covered under insurance. That was elective because it. It wasn't doing any. You know complete detriment to my body, so if I had insurance I would have paid completely out of pocket. Thank the Lord I did not have insurance and I'm in medical cost sharing program that allows us to share those costs because that was seventeen thousand dollars by the all was said and done for me to have both of those procedures done anesthesia surgery center all that stuff, and so again for you here. You come where you used to get. Those types of things reimbursed reasonably easily. Then they kept getting cut and cut and cut and cut and cut as every other reimbursement, including Medicare was getting cut so far, and so, how did you start to pivot than to replace that income or start generating new sources of income? When you started seeing your revenue in the practice, it had to be going down and quite drastically. Yeah, yeah, I mean. I physically saw that money going down, but most doctors by the way every he's a student loan. Medical school bed is two hundred fifty thousand right so we need to pay bills. We need to pay for mortgage. Mortgage? You need to pay for our family and you know, but anyway my point is that revenue going down and then so can you stop there i? Don't why I don't WanNa. Be Disrespectful, but this is a really important thing for me to say it, because I'm not in your field, but I observe enough of it to to make this statement I. Think Right now, especially America and now health care is at the top of the conversation, because we're in the midst of the corona virus, and we're seeing an over utilization of services, and so I feel like the doctors are too often lumped into and other. Nurses they're off there, too often lumped into this problem that we have in healthcare which you know, we know that there's this misalignment of entities. The insurance companies the providers the pharmaceutical companies, and then whoever the sponsor is for the health plan, so we know there's a misalignment, but the problem is is no at the end of the day. Regardless of how we've seen the fluctuation in costs, the insurance company continues to make more money, no matter what like they're reporting record profits, and so if they're continuing to get paid. Their money, no matter even though like they're reimbursing last to you. That means we aren't lining your pocket. The doctor were lining the insurance companies pockets, and it's not that they're always the bad guy because there are needs in which the insurance companies come in handy but I just think people need to know and be clear with the fact that the doctors really don't have much handling this like you don't get. Yes, you can charge ten times as much as you. You would like your for a service, but you're only going to get reimbursed with the Insurance Company wants. Wants to pay you and so like I just feel like people need to hear that the doctors there actually suffering through this, too, because you're probably making less per patient than you ever have, which means you have to see more patients. You have to get creative with your services, and like you said you have a family to support. You have bills. You have student loans like there's so many things that I. Just don't think we have enough empathy for the way. The doctors have paid the price. Especially private practice doctors have paid the price as through this so anyways. Thanks knowledge in that I. Mean Doctors are humans? Let's not forget. Just what you pointed out a lot of times nowadays modern World Society, you know we tend to. Kind of lump sum into commodity right so like doctors are just a part of healthcare system, but we are human beings, and you know we have our our responsibilities and. Errands to run every day. Just like anybody else so would that environment I feel like you know kind of going back to this story I was suffocating again from pressure from government pressure from the big dogs in big brothers, which I cannot handle. I don't Li- I don't like to be handled I. Don't like to be controlled. I came here for Free Spirit and..

bunion WanNa Moore Medicare America cancer private practice World Society
"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

10:31 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on The Exsellence Mindset Podcast

"All right well. Welcome everybody to podcast looking forward to today's conversation with DR T J on. He is by practice a podiatrist in the Chicago area but beyond that he has a passion for building businesses. He's an entrepreneur. He's a coach. He consults other physicians that desire to do the same thing which is really break. A from the large practices better out there in healthcare today, and helped them to take their businesses private and as you know being part of the audience here have a huge passion for healthcare, and I really believe in private practice and been supporting a lot of primary care providers and things of that nature, and some really looking forward to digging in today, so Dr on. Thank you so much for joining me. Thank you so much for inviting me. Mean I've checked out your podcast. You bring very interesting guests and I'm I'm honored to be here. Thank you, thank you I appreciate that. So I want to jump around a bit, but I'm interested to hear so I read in your bio that at nineteen. You emigrated here from Korea. And so what what was that what was what was the desire to come to America And and what did you do when you got here? Well Korea is smaller than especially. South Korea were from smaller than one st of United States right, but it's the whole country and is so congested in Seoul capital of South Korea When I was growing up Korea was still under development, and we went through a lot of economic hardship turmoil of political. Kind of outbreak, you know like military dictatorship and then fought for democracy democracy. So it was kind of crazy time, you know when I was growing up in fell very confine. You know one of those I know you. You're focusing on also mindset. I I couldn't almost like I couldn't breathe, you know. I felt like I was suffocating. Obviously Asian culture. You know in kind of typical sense. Parents want to control kits right? There's future their school their education. So that I couldn't handle when I was growing up like in teenager, but then whole society was just. For me is suffocating so since I was fourteen hours. Telling myself without knowing any mindset you know. I was telling myself every day. I'm going to America for some reason I'm going to America like every single day and I even went to very small used. Bookstore looks more corner of Korea downtown. They used foreign magazines in that I remember. I got G Q. I was fourteen. The. Magazine kind of all used and worn out. I remember the like ads in there and. And I was thinking and telling myself I'm going to America. I'm going I just need to go to bigger country. I need to breathe. I I need to open myself to kind of felt like it's more bigger opportunity so nineteen years old I head opportunity. I just. I felt like I was getting out of exodus. Showed that good I didn't. so anyway. That was December thirty to the nineteen ninety. United States by myself yeah wow. You know. It's it's. It's very interesting to me and you know this is. Somewhat of an ignorant statement because I was born and raised in the United States, but You know in in much of the Asian culture. I think that we they get a bad rap for being Overly, burdensome on you know on their families on their children on the society and really pushing them hard to perform to work hard. You know to be smart in yet. I have so much respect because while that always hasn't been used for the best in show for the best outcomes I do feel like man it does. Or create this culture that does desire to achieve excellence. You Know I. Mean you're just you're born into a society that is like. Give it your all, and and do well or don't even bother kind of thing, so I really respect that and I feel like that's not recognized enough everywhere else around the world, and then too I think you get the short end of the stick, because especially in today's Day and age north. Korea is always the one in the news, and that's just a terrible mess. If we've ever seen one up there and south, Korea's all but forgotten. About Oh. Okay so you come here in one, thousand, nine, hundred ninety. And at what point did you decide? You wanted to practice medicine because nineteen years old I. Seem You got? You're GonNa go to college, and so, what was the desire to practice medicine? you know again naturally I believe now I look back I am entrepreneur at heart rights I kind of. Wanted to do my own thing I don't want to be told by anyone. I don't want to work for somebody. And for me, the America was the perfect A. Perfect ground. For that and I decided to go for computer. Science I so I wanted to program in all back in the days. Nineteen Ninety S in net has not even come out yet. But you know P. C. World Rope right like a Microsoft apple, and then like computer virus. Just start coming out. And that kind of fascinated me like there's a people who make fires. There's a people who kill virus so I wanted to study computer science and you know, get into programming world. And then while I was doing I was interested in business side of it so I added a business major as a double major. And then after I graduated. I went to even Japan again I'd love to explore I. Love The experiment. Myself. That's my personality. So I, read a lot of books, but I wanted to experience. Meet myself in it, so I went to Japan for year and a half during those time I. You know I I started while practicing a Japanese martial arts aikido. In I went to Japan headquarter of it too. So I can learn from the masters directly and also work so I did that however my mother's side? They were healthcare professional. My mom was a doctor. My Mom's father was a doctor so again they try to control me. Since I was kid, you got to be a doctor so dead kind of made me repel from that idea and go to computer science in business. But then suddenly, I realize okay I I. You know. Maybe parents were right. Maybe I, I love helping people. So. That's why I came back to the United States. And did a BIOCHEM and look at look into different specialties. You know, but my time already. My Age I was like twenty six. At the time and Deiontrez I visited local podiatrists. They're they're having fun. They're you know not typical doctors like war on coal the time they have their own private practice, and then they create their own schedule. They get paid well. And helping people again, not not like hard core, heart, surgery or anything, so that's why I think i. went into podiatrist school. Okay and so. Okay, so. This is starting to make a whole lot more sense which this stuff that i. don't get to read in a bio, but. Now as I fast forward all the way to today which we're GonNa, go back and talk some more about the past, but as I fast forward all the way today in read that you've had the successful practice for all these years as a private practice which. Offers don't survive when they go private. You've written a bestselling book, your speaking at conferences. You're consulting other businesses so now it makes sense because you know most. I will say practitioners, or in even creatives artists. So whether you're a doctor, you could be a lawyer. Even a musician. The challenge always when they start a business is that they're in it for their craft, but they don't have business acumen, and so that's why so many I'll just go right to the doctors. That's why so many doctors fail is because they don't have an understanding of business and you by. No coincidence at all just happened to go into business I, and so then when you get into practice for yourself, you already understand the business mechanic, so that must've just been a huge leg up for you because you could actually understand what your business needed to look like in order to be healthy apart from just working on people's feet right right, correct, yeah! I mean obviously theory and books as a major in business. It definitely did help. So I wasn't like it wasn't completely four into me, but once I start actually applying does to healthcare industry. Obviously, there's there are a lot of gaps so I had it to steal invest myself. In you know modern technology you know modern application of business side finance i. You know so I still need to..

South Korea America private practice United States Asian culture Japan Korea DR T J Chicago Seoul Microsoft P. C. World Rope
"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

Relentless Dentist

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

"Practice is a good thing. It is not inherently good to just open a privates. Some go out of business some their own profession. And, some are just miserable with every with with life because. It was set up the wrong way. My desires to make sure that. That doesn't happen so above everything else. I'd say it's right for people who are who know what they want and are willing to put in twelve to eighteen months to get there with a lot of courage. I think he said a mouthful there a lot of the clients that I work with or mid career, and they still lack that clarity. Therefore, it's this hustle group game right, which is a miserable existence, the great short-term strategy, but a horrible long-term strategy. More going back to purpose like if your team's not clear on why you exist, then you're gonNa just GonNa get the net effort of everyone who shows up with lots of ego, lots of finger pointing lots of drama, so everyone is trying to targets. They can't see like as we explain it. We think okay. This is immediately toxic environment yet. That's where a lot of. Of our industry exists as without courage in without clarity so I I think you stated very well as like. We get way ahead of ourselves and think okay I need a new. I need to add something to my procedure mix, and then my practice will take often miss these very foundational things, and then we act surprised when the topples over so to speak like. Any other way if we don't have these structural things for people understand this is what we're doing. This is why we exist. This is where we're headed. Certainly can pivot and change course along the way by by and large. If you can't cast that vision, you're GonNa get the net effort, and that can be asleep last night with a newborn like there's no extra given to you when strictly punching the clock for a check. Yeah well like you, said the hustle and the grind mentality is rather than using the same word as you, but it's a dead. End is a short lived. It's a sprint knows sprint can last forever, and even if the Hustle and grind does get you what you want, the short-term it not replicable. If you can't Redo it, which means, it's just a short burst, so the Hustle I think there's there's like an Internet meme society that believes Hustling Ryan Life Philosophy. For private practice ownership? I'm not saying there isn't hard work because there is a lot of focus and commitment. But Hustle and grind. I've worked with so many startups who. They say they work hard, but they don't feel there grinding. Say they're enjoying and I. think that feels a little better at least to me like I want to show up every day and be inspired by the people I serve. I WANNA show every day motivated by the people around me. So. I think it surprises people we..

sprint private practice
"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

Relentless Dentist

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

"Upward. I'm one of those people you know. Not Everybody knows this. I, think you've probably pieces of this story, but my first business out of Undergrad I have a degree in international business. I've started overseas. I've been really fortunate. Even even in boardrooms of places like Goldman Sachs credit. Suisse Mercedes like really crazy like what selects twenty something stupid kid like doing there. But I figured I'd four goal that kind of international business stuff and start. My own company had nothing to do with industry, but I started this company and grew really fast even back whenever to teen almost twenty years ago now it would by cousin and I started it. We did a million dollars a first year. It was awesome it grew really quick. I thought I was. SMART and I wasn't. I thought it was really successful than I was just kind of Osho, but is getting interviews is getting requests getting ton of respect? I had a personal painful experience in my life, maybe another story for another day, but I ended up losing my brother too drunk driver accident by driver. He and his fiancee were both killed instantly gave me a reset. With a lot of things in life very painful experience royal family obviously. In that reset. Moved back home with my parents, and I ended up selling that business, and through that sale process at gave me a chance. If I'm allowed to say fortunately I mean I can say that, but it gave me an opportunity to fortunately be able to look at things afresh and realize that weight. I. Had this like business. I had this money. But it was like empty. I don't just mean from like a soul perspective. There's that also but like. For what young I felt like I didn't have any impact. I had had some money I had. Some success has whatever accolades. But. What then? What like? There's nothing there for for me? It was really. A hollow. Observation on myself. oftentimes people hear about our startups focusing on purpose. And I say oh, that sounds that sounds fluffy. Sounds released special. I think no, you. You'll understand like. If you show up every day, and it's just about a Patek, and it's not about purpose. You'RE NOT GONNA. Make It, and and you become an. You'RE GONNA. Become. Hollow Yourself. Really, empty dead end place to go, and I think we all know this as individuals. We know that at a core level. But how do we put I? Would put it together. What do we do? I think the one of the reasons of startups is we get to start from a place of defining what the purpose is, and then even before the doors open, we build a specific plan to enjoy that purpose at an if that purposes is established on the front end, and if that purposes of quintal pass to become realized even before the opening day, then like a hang onto those words like before the opening day. If that can happen, your reputation in the community is one where you're like. You're recognizes the practice of values, not a practice of discounts like. That's a world of difference if the town saying. We. That's the one who stands for this. Client like boldy passionately say this is no longer just about industry. This is about so much more. And that's what I love. When when a when a startup has this unique opportunity this moment to become so much more for the doors open. It's really really special, so yes, so when it comes to purpose. Count me like Apple Bill does ladder to get there real fast so. So, can be enjoyed. A real level is such a difficult sell. Because dental industry these are seen as soft skills and I think defined a secondary skills and get to things like culture. They don't realize like back. If if if you're looking at bottom line activities like a really strong meeting around vision and culture and values, like there's no better arline that can you calculate it like a crown chair known I really, but can does it end up? Reducing drama. Does I mean talking about purpose like that's the ultimate marketing tool? Right like basant feel something at forty five that they've never felt dental office. Is that Dr Reviews? Does that drive referrals like s the best marketing ever, and he's saying like it's not money or revenue generating activity it just it's insane to me, but yet I appreciate because I was there in the first five years I thought it was hustle, grind work harder, and we had elements of like small town practice because I grew up in a small town, but I didn't appreciate like. The one hour meeting is far more valuable than the when our crump former value, and it's easy to say I'm not doing something. NOPE, somebody's mouth. Therefore it's wasted time, and it couldn't be further from the truth song by the that out as the. That's one thing that we push away to the time this leftover when it should be the big rock, the scheduled I the mission values the meeting rhythm, the training, and the thing that I talk about my client as We have to embrace this identity of CEO. CEO's job is really simple. We cast the vision. We build the team to support division in. Give them the training and tools to succeed. If we're not willing to carve out time to do that, then we get on the treadmill. And what you said is like this default of. More is better money. S We can get pretty far down that line and have a really comfortable lifestyle and be miserable. Thinking was the True Path along. So you, you said getting on the treadmill. I've never used this example before, but I remember back in eighth grade I hated running I I was like my. My mom even said you're like the GALUMPH. Galumph when you run your Galumph Golan. Running scared to death of running and I knew on that Jim Day as like. Oh crap your gums. Whatever the Friday that? Jim Day? We have to go run a mile. We're GONNA time for the. Or, they called the American fitness tests or something, presidential fitness, award or something. He'd better. The witness is A. Friday I remember before school started I was like okay. I, to get ready for my run, and it's the same day like stupid a greater rate. I don't know how to run a Galumph, and so I started running ads like cool I did about a mile on us, so tired like exhaustedly tired as like now I'm ready for the run. Run was the same day. Totally bombed the presidential fitness thing for the running. Because I didn't know how to prepare for it the right way I eastern running on a treadmill sometimes I feel like. For those. In Dentistry who WanNa step into practice ownership. The first time can't very sadly create. These permanent mistakes that you don't get to undo. More than running on a treadmill. It's like running a race. That actually hurts your performance for me. It was before the school day started. Running effectively running the wrong way on the track you run, run run, and you're actually getting further away from what you really want. You're getting. You're making it harder on yourself to perform well when it actually matters, and the byproduct is completely unknown until a later date when you might not even be able to pinpoint it, then you're one of those doctors and we all know that. One of the doctors who's like. Not Retirement Age who's. And sometimes we can. We can pinpoint them like you and I. Both we can pinpoint them. Those are the ones who who say. Dentistry is dead I would never have any of my offspring or my heirs or my family members ever consider this profession. It's crap. It's gone to like you know stem is that they ran the wrong way and they missed it. So you get one shot like. Yet one shot so when I when I hear about running the runway and the when it comes to purpose, you modify riff on that for a second. So, specifically for a startup anybody.

Jim Day CEO Goldman Sachs Mercedes Galumph Golan Osho boldy crump Apple Dr Reviews
"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

Relentless Dentist

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on Relentless Dentist

"Some good value sales out of it. Our friend Jamie Amos. Aloe Aloe. Awesome to be back I. Think I some of My fondest memories of interviews actually with you if I think the. What one of the things that I. Remember from almost every discussion we hold is like these wisdom bombs that dislike come dropping out the Mohloli, airplane. Bombs to start dropping into. Man They might not be like. They're not scattered spread, and like making little impacts across the land like making huge explosions in one deep profound hit. Whereas I. I just love being like having conversations with you, so I'm excited to see what we're talking about today. Thanks for having me, so we first met probably almost years ago in two, thousand, thirteen, two, thousand fourteen. Amongst, try maybe four or five original podcasters who didn't know each other, but. There's a podcast Talk Dunno others podcast that you may Jonathan. A couple of other so I'm glad that those friendships are maintained. It's amazing to watch your company and grow, and the way I've seen firsthand your events as I start up some I know a lot of your clients very well personally and they were really off on the right foot I. appreciate that. That as we talk about and I like to start off on a negative note, but I will others a lot of people in our in our space that aren't willing to deliver that value in its bad prophet meeting. There's somebody there, but the fee is so extraordinary above and beyond that, and then just don't hold them accountable and I take that personal. Preyed upon environment that we see so often trade chosen whatnot, so I appreciate you being the anticipated antithesis of and being very strategic, I sometimes joke. We joke off line that I did everything the opposite as what you say? And therefore it was the school of our knock for five or six years, but I'm glad that a lot of dentists are being really set off on the rape foot with some really sound strategy, so. Yeah, or For Associated Dentists about I mean you, you were one. I have never been won so i. don't really know but I. Mean You come out of dental school so I'm here and your head is overloaded. You're ready to get chair side. You've been kind of emotionally beat up through dental school, but you know you wanted to own a practice, or at least you think you have wanted to become a practice owner and the. The way I see it as the is about one hundred and fifty thousand ways to make the wrong first few steps, or should I have always loved about what you stand for Davis protecting colleagues in dentistry, like it's like bold and through and through you are there to stand as the advocate for dentists, and particularly I've always seen for younger and associated so as I. Look at it as what I'm able to. So gratefully have a position of being able to do help associates build the confidence. Open a startup at all I. do only know how to. Helping associates, open startups did as I look about I think. I think that's one of the reasons why you and I get along so well. Because in that relationship of taking an associate from this idea stage, where perhaps they did have some things that they were misdirected on before my team I across the country were were gratefully. Granted this immense amount of trust in the process, and and and I look at that as a massive responsibility and being able to guide dentists through properly and safely something a treasurer, so thank you for hold. Everybody accountable to that because that's. I mean I i. Am a big advocate of controlling your own destiny, and your and I think you and I also see that the practices vehicle to ally for a life contribution, a life of value to patients alive of building a culture that gives team members something more than just a paycheck, so it's like this ultimate vehicle, but you and I also agree that it's not for everyone yet let's. Let's talk briefly about if somebody was gonNA. Come into your office or my office are getting all with us. What are some things that when defined somebody who should be an owner from somebody who distinctly should not be an owner or go back to the drawing board and get really clear? If you're made out for this, and this is how you want to chart out the next segment of your career. So I. think There's there's one real easy indicator that. I think private practice ownership could easily become a not agreed option th. There's one simple indicator. It's frankly it's not the one that most people think of the generally I think if if you're if you're pursuing practice practice ownership for the sake of more money. I think that's actually a bad idea I do believe there's plenty of money to be to be had in a lot of clients of million dollar collection practices in their first year. So I know what start up in. Can get somebody in there quickly. But if that's the driving force. I hope this doesn't come off the runway, but there's easier ways to make more money. The goal is just to make money. It's corporate dentistry. Go go become an owner of a big corporate chain or something I don't feel. Does it easier ways to do that in ways that don't. Create personal conflict or uncomfortable motives. For private practice under survey, one of the things I would say Lang's disqualified from stepping into practice ownership if the primary goal is if more money. So that's my own opinion i. I couldn't agree more. A lot of my clancy work on deep purpose work, and the thing that we know is that if money is the purpose that wears out very quickly and running a business can be an endurance game you get the unwelcome resignation on somebody moves away or the unhappy patient when your heads down on a difficult root canal like it's an endurance game and snow, sometimes you need. Need something far more than paycheck. Because most of us has, dentists will make a comfortable paycheck weather. We're an associate whether or not owner, but there has to be a deeper meaning there otherwise there's troughs in the economy or things like that will the real heavy scratching your head and you need something more than a dollar. Son I think the plow through those and.

private practice For Associated Dentists Jamie Amos rape clancy treasurer Davis Lang
"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

16:22 min | 3 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Here the month Amok Tober looking inside each of the Various components of sections in the academy's that make up the American Physical Therapy Association. Today we're bringing in Somebody who lives and dies in in October though loves Bourbon And Baseball and and talking Jerry. Durham on the show Jerry. Welcome back Ma'am thanks jamming great to talk to you and I loved it. Yes discussions overby even when it's twelve noon. We don't have to share that I'm drinking PM somewhere. I have no idea what you're talking about. This is just a complete audio. Wouldn't even know but in the month Dr we do celebrate. PT Months but also we celebrate in really in the thick of the baseball playoffs and I know you're a big fan big fan of baseball huge fan My San Francisco giants good news is as people may or may not know. I preach a lot about managing expectations in healthcare. And when it came to my San Francisco Giants Rienscher. My expectations were set. Were set in stone before the season started so my giants will not be playing in October. But that's what I expected so we can leave all right. Well we're taking a look at the One of the sections that you're a member of the private practice section and with all these episodes. I'll do the back of the very apropos with you. To the back of the baseball card view private practice section while four thousand seventy one members strong strong. The website is p P. S. T. A. Dot Org private practice section eight PTA DOT ORG and.

"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

12:01 min | 3 years ago

"private practice" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Doctor we do celebrate PT month but also we celebrate in really in the thick of the baseball playoffs right about managing expectations in healthcare and when it came to my San Francisco giants all right well we're taking a look at the one of the sections service section is Well four thousand seventy one members strong special interest groups also breakdown you got to in the private practice section the administrators council stuff you can get just by looking on a PTA dot org but we bring you in Jerry to talk about Christ I mean you know I'd like to meet people like to network I like to grow brainer for me I actually had belonged to more sections not GonNa lie and then interesting I think we come in with too many expectations I think we we have to she being more than I was achieving I think that's really important and I think that applies to any section the peop- es has its own advocacy group they do fly in every year at the capital largely around payment issues yet you know they were advocating for the student there's a whole so those are a couple of big reasons why I've stuck with them and and and then you you just Kinda talk about what what you've experienced from that first of all you and I do know that information is available on the website so I'm going to put only physical therapy generated magazine Journal whatever a yet and it's it's worth every penny I read it cover to cover news monthly you say you read it cover to cover that that gives a pretty good not yet and you said something I and other ramp like marketing and sales and and there is bringing experts outside of the field because if we keep talking to each other access if you're a member to the annual KPI benchmarking program designed to establish industry so you stand and or if you're not even innate yet in a private practice all of those you have to make sure what in understand what the industry is looking at and where replace you can you can measure a lot of things and we're almost drowning and information especially there's peer to peer network available your member of the private practice section yet this is fairly abilities slash Therapy therapy as physical therapy maybe there's Ortho maybe there's cash pay maybe there's out of network maybe there's an because all of a sudden you learn everybody is having the same issues saying fifty pasta failures so that we can all learn from each other and so the peer to peer again is a huge elaine I won't make this claim for any other groups yet I would say you if you if you yeah well you have your own private practice section annual conference gene have to look to bigger places which is kind of fun yeah you talk about networking be speaking and some years ago they're just listen to everybody else yet the quality also administrative council in PBS just for those right you're admiral gene so you bring your whole Admin team and they've got a whole conference find me another section that train Gernon license people so you nation resources they've got that business promotion free monthly marketing toolkits other resources go inside people outside again a lot of that stuff road stage through P. PMS gene and we all know repetition is a good thing and so they're just always hitting me change in Washington or State to state you've got legislative updates that come out monthly twice I love the fact and still support the people that go to US our profession yeah so that advocacy avenue PBS Specifically Schnur That access alone has got to be valuable yeah you know again you move to probably more than likely a little further ahead than you so again you you're in this group will follow up with anybody so it's not like Oh am too busy oh it's GonNa Luke and I have some questions about starting your own practice or something absolutely nobody I you get an e newsletter weekly so you got weekly monthly monthly monthly yearly always we all know we're here with a lot of stuff I opened that is what I like about the PPI Thima what's important of a members maybe.