18 Burst results for "Prison Policy Initiative"

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"One of the things in the minds of many Texas lawmakers, regardless of the number of special sessions they may actually end up doing this fall is redistricting. As you know, every 10 years Once the census numbers are out, new districts are drawn all over the country to accommodate for population changes in the case of Texas to make way for massive growth. In theory, redistricting is about an even distribution of power and resources in reality. Redistricting is more about power than anything else, and a group called the Prison Policy Initiative argues that power and influence can be exponentially higher for communities with large prison populations. To tell us more. We welcome Alex Castro. She is legal director for the Prison Policy Initiative, which is based in Western Massachusetts. Alex. Welcome to the Texas Standard. Thanks very much. David. You call this phenomenon? Prison gerrymandering. Can you give us an example of what you mean with that term prison gerrymandering? Sure. So gerrymandering is the drawing of lines that gives some groups disproportionate power in the Legislature that aren't really warranted by the resident population. Prison. Jeremy Enduring is using the Census Bureau's Populations the way it counts. Incarcerated people are counted the location of the facility rather than the warm address. And in using those populations, it gives disproportionate representation to areas that contain a lot of prisons. So you point out, for instance, in places like Dodge County, Wisconsin, 31st district if I'm not mistaken 59% of the district of prisoners, so in districts like those Constituents get more than double the electoral power of other voters. Is that how how it works. That's exactly it. And it works at the state legislative level. When you draw a state legislative districts or in Dodge County when you're drawing a county commissioner District. Um and that happens at both levels in Texas as well. You have counties that created districts. For the county representation within the county government, where some people in the county get more representation than other people in the same county. One Great example of prison. Jeremy Enduring is in the city of animals to in Iowa. Where they had their city divided into four district or the City Council. One of those districts contained a state prison in it. There were actually only a handful of people in that district that were residents of the town. And when election time came One of the counselors was elected by two votes. Neither of them were his And that's when the town realized it had a real problem. That's the kind of inequity and representation that there was a handful of people in that ward. I had the same number of representatives on the town council. As everybody else in town. So prisoners shouldn't be counted if they're in prison, or how is this playing out in Texas? Everybody should be counted and represented in our democracy, but it's a matter of counting everybody in the right place. So the Census Bureau accounts people at the location of facility which doesn't make sense to count them in the community where they have No length, no family. They've never been there before. And there were never going to be there again after redistricting time. So it makes sense to count everybody back at the location of their home address where they have ties to the community, where they have representation where they represented by the representatives, no matter where they accounted. You know, this gets back to ideas about districting and redistricting that are deeply ingrained in people's notions of fairness. As we've said before, it's No, no secret. The districts are drawn with power in mind. Whether maps help the party hold on to power. They help the party get into power. Lawmakers are in neither way truly inclined. I don't seem to be inclined to hear from the people themselves when it comes to redistricting, and the courts have largely deferred to that as a political process. So what do you suggest ways to get a more equitable distribution of power and resources through redistricting? If there's a way to sort of draw that line better. That's the thing about prison gerrymandering is it underlies all the other forms of gerrymandering? Because with prison gerrymandering you actually skewing the underlying data? So you're not redistricting in the first place based on data that counts everybody in an equitable way. So a lot of states are taking the home address data that they have from their department of Corrections, mapping that out, overlaying it with the census data to count everybody back at home just in the data set that they're using for redistricting to fix this problem. We've been talking about prison gerrymandering with Alex Keister. A. She is legal director with the prison policy Initiative, Alex. Thanks so much for taking time to talk with us on the Texas standard. We appreciate it. Thanks very much, and you were listening to the Texas standard. Mm hmm. Wells. Dunbar is our social media editor, And he joins us again with more of the talk of Texas for this Monday. Howdy. Well, hey, David. Good to be back, You know, we mentioned earlier in the program how the FDA had given final approval to the Pfizer to Covid vaccine. Some developing news in the time we've been on the air the AP Associated Press reporting that the Pentagon will be issuing guidance to make vaccines mandatory for the military. Now that that vaccine has received full approval from the FDA, so continuing to see the ripple if I mean just beginning really, to see the ripple effects? Yeah, I think that's news today. David, and I think that's right. Lots more of these announcements in the days to come. Yeah, one of the defenses that had been used by people who had been fired from positions because they didn't get the vaccine was that the, uh, fighter Biontech vaccine had not received full approval, but Uh, just that initial her approval. That was emergency use. Yes, That's what I'm looking for. Uh, And apparently, that is no longer a defense. And so what? The Times and others are saying is that in coming days we're going to see more and more employers. Requiring that their employees and staffers get the shot. Yeah, fascinating stuff to watch for Sure, Sure, You know, we've been talking about the revolt against Greg Abbott's ban on mask mandates on today's show as well in the creative way. Some school districts are getting around that we talked. We heard about that at the top of the program. How some schools are sort of crouching this as a dress code. Issue that is, you have to wear a mask. It's part of our dress code interesting perspective here on the sort of reverse of that via Facebook from a listener, Kitty walk up Birkhead, she says. I'm appalled at my school district has a dress code regarding male students hair length and are sending those kids to end school suspension while at the same time they tell everyone that they respect parents' choice. When it comes to masks and seeing this born out in some other comments as well, You know, it's when we think about students pretty much. Everything they do in school is governed by some sort of rule. Dress codes included, and so it is interesting to see more and more school districts turn to this because, you know, quite honestly, you just don't have the rights and diversity that normal citizens do. When you're a minor in a school, so it's interesting to see how some schools are using this to get around the governor's prohibition on mask mandates in Paris, Texas was a pioneer here, at least in in that approach, decidedly, so we're so I think we're going to continue to see that develop as well as the school year gets underway, and it's interesting the sort of silence I think you could say from the governor's office, as these challenges have gone and several of them have been successful, at least on an interim basis. These challenges to the governor's mandate. So it's interesting to see his sort of silence and possibly the political calculation and not being more vocally.

David Alex Castro Alex Keister Greg Abbott Alex Iowa Paris Dodge County 59% Western Massachusetts FDA Jeremy Enduring Dunbar Census Bureau Kitty Pentagon Wisconsin today Texas Prison Policy Initiative
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Chicago Tonight

Chicago Tonight

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Chicago Tonight

"Evening and welcome to chicago tonight. Black voices i'm brandon friedman and thanks for sharing part of your weekend with us on the show tonight. Women are the fastest growing incarcerated group in the country. We talk with formerly incarcerated women and community leaders about the coral systems impact on black women. Psychologists inger brunette. Ziglar is here to talk about the strong black woman's mental health in this week's black voices book club we want to be represented in this lifestyle too. So that's why black people outside exists and me to travel enthusiasts who are using talk to encourage black people to explore the great outdoors. I off tonight. More women are dying in. Us jails in two thousand. Women accounted for about ten percent jail in two thousand eighteen. That number grew to sixteen percent and black women are over represented in the nation's jails and prisons. It was six years ago this month. That chicago area native. Sandra bland was found hanged in her texas jail. Cell after a traffic stop led to her arrest joining us to talk about what women particularly women of color face in the cars roll system. Are nico jones tapia. A psychologist and the managing director of justice. Initiatives for chicago beyond. She also served as warden for cook county. Jail between twenty fifteen in two thousand. Eighteen will benford de corporation organizer at live free illinois. She was incarcerated for over two decades and celia cologne founder of giving others dreams. She also formerly incarcerated. And thanks to all of you for joining us to discuss this issue. Nica jones top. Let's start with you. please welcome back to chicago tonight. What factors contribute to the increasing mortality rate of incarcerated women. I liked to paint the landscape. We're talking about here. I think it's important for people to know that even though the number of women who are incarcerated is relatively small compared to men out the number has the rate of incarceration for women has increased almost seven hundred percent in the last forty years and unfortunately policies and procedures in these correctional systems have not increased with that rate Women are often overlooked when we talk about programs in in treatment and Access to healthcare within these systems because the number is relatively small compared to men in correctional systems as a whole are catastrophically. Dark places you know. They disconnect people from everything that they know and love a drain. Hope out of a person's life their dark in people especially women in especially black women and women of color are overly exposed to trauma with vendee systems like sexual violence in physical violence. We'll let what challenges do women and particularly black women. What are they face in in prison in jail. Well black women often face. You know the racism that is still going on outside. Racism is just as for vaillant inside as it is outside Black women are more likely to be overlooked and given a low level jobs. Like cleaning toilets as opposed to working in the offices or the administrative buildings inside being inside I had to fight for women of color to get a job. That afforded them more money days off their sentence and also to man sale which was often given to white women they had only hire to women of color. In five years before i wrote a six-page grievance on racism and discrimination after that grievance they begin to hire women of color rapids. So obviously the it sounds like. There's a lot that that that goes on there. So eighty percent of women in prison or mothers more than sixty percents are mothers to children under the age of eighteen. This is according to the sentencing project as well as the prison policy initiative celia. How does incarceration impact the family unit and a person's experience with the criminal legal system one of the most horrific things that has happened to our nation. There's plenty of data that shows time and time again. That incarceration does not make communities any safer. It doesn't stop the violence if anything it creates more violence and more chaos. Because there's more people that are catastrophically harm and it creates generational harms generational berries. There's children anicent children across the nation that are paying for debts that they do not. Oh there's children that are being blocked parents. Mothers that are being blocked from their children's lives. Were not allowed somebody with a record to be apparent when i mean by bag inside the full systems. If you have a record you can volunteer. You cannot chaperoned. You cannot do anything but cover report card. So therefore creating prison pipeline. That's creating disconnect between the child and the parent and there's a lot of that that's going on. There's jobs that you can't get if you are tied to someone who has a record. That's even working in the police. Were working for the fbi. You know a lot of schools. I'm someone who got my record sealed. I did what america said to do. I've been home for over twenty one years been giving back to my community. serve the most surf. People that are harmed. The most had my record seal. But yet i still don't have all my civil rights. I still can't run for office. I still can't work at school. There's a lot of things that i still cannot do. And that's what we're here to talk about ending generational harm really looking at the impact of what this does to children. Our future leaders are under storage before even given a chance it now. We mentioned this. That greg you know that there's an overwhelming number of people who are incarcerated who appearance men and women but what makes the experience of women unique is at most of them are the sole caregivers for their children. One of the first women that i encountered at cook county jail was a mother who was charged with murder of of her partner. She was experiencing domestic violence. Which is the case for a lot of women that we don't talk about And she was separated from her children. She was you know putting the squad car and driven away for a week. She didn't know where her children were if they were saved like. I just can't imagine that as a mother being experience in not knowing whether or not my children are safe and so i think the sole caregiving Of mothers were incarcerated has to be elevated way. Think about the impact of incarceration. So and you just mentioned this. A minute goes well nico. The number of incarcerated women has been rising for decades in one thousand nine hundred eighty about twenty six thousand women were incarcerated and in twenty nineteen more than two hundred and twenty two thousand four. Now that's an increase as you just said of more than seven hundred percent will let why. Why is that. Are there problems that women face that are unique to them and what are some of the barriers that they face when re entering brandis. Black women are often believes differently. That's why they make fourteen percent of the illinois adult population but over a third of everyone that's incarcerated and we know that in nineteen eighty. You know the war on drugs and then the nineteen. I believe it was ninety. Two prime bill. You know really said that it was the war on drugs but it was a really a war on black beauties. A you know. Black communities were decimated by police coming in kicking in doors arresting women and say you know the conspiracy law the federal conspiracy law. Where even if you're man sold drugs and you didn't even know about it you know. They wanted to link in with that so they really just destroy black families back then and many women are sitting in prison today with natural life sentences on drug charges that they acquire back when we know that there was such a disparity in the crack cocaine law. And the out. Okay because white people use powder more so they got lesser sentences and then crack cocaine was normally found in low income poverty stricken communities and really cavity as criminal last. If a black woman as a substance abuse problems she's criminalizes sent to prison for a couple of bags droves whereas our white counterpart is set to a rehab so that she can get our life together in return onto our children so harvey is really poverty and systemic racism is the underlying issue or the expansion of the prison population illinois. And across this nation celia cologne your organization. You obviously you worked for support women mostly on the south and west sides when they leave prison. What resources are necessary for them when they get home. Oh you know. Just being incarcerated has multiple layers of harm so requires multiple layers solution. I am just one of many vessels and.

chicago brandon friedman inger brunette Sandra bland nico jones tapia benford de corporation celia cologne Nica jones cook county Ziglar vaillant illinois celia america texas
'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

All Things Considered

06:35 min | 1 year ago

'A Death Sentence': US Prisons and COVID-19

"People are some of the most vulnerable took over 19 since March, researchers say more than 1600. People in jails and prisons have died of the disease, and tens of thousands have been infected. Some states have started to vaccinate people behind bars while others have not. And we're gonna look now at how this is playing out in three states. Alison Cherry is with Colorado Public radio and she joins us from Denver. Conrad Wilson is with Oregon Public Broadcasting, and he's in Portland. Joining us from Boston is dead Backer with W. B. You are good to have all three of you here. Hi. Hi. Hello, Dev. I want to start with you. In Massachusetts. Your state included prisoners in the first phase of its covert 19 vaccine plan. What was the rationale for that? Well, we know that the virus transmits quickly in correctional settings in the risk of contracting the virus and dying from it are much higher inside prisons and jails compared with outside. So in deciding to vaccinate prisoners. Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican, said that correctional settings are no different from other congregate living situation, such as shelters and group homes where people are living in Copan close quarters and the virus can easily spread. So here's what he said last month when he explained why prisoners were included in the first phase. Our facilities are congregated facilities and we need to make sure that the people who work there and the people who live there because of the possibility of outbreak that that should be a place. We focus early in this exercise. The governor says it's strong public health policy because it's not just vaccinating prisoners. Workers are getting the vaccine to any pointed out. There are lawyers to go in and out of prisons in jail's medical workers, visitors those who provide programming, so the states thinking is that offering vaccines and correctional settings will help prevent the spread in the community. And so far, how is the vaccine rollout going in jails and prisons in Massachusetts officials say it's going smoothly, but it appears that a lot of people are not taking it. Court documents in particular shows that about a third of prisoners in more than half of prison workers have not received the vaccine. Now. That number does not include workers who may have been vaccinated elsewhere. So some correctional facilities are holding vaccine education sessions to encourage people to get the shop. Okay, let's turn now to Oregon More than 40 prison inmates have died after testing positive for covert 19 in that state. So Conrad give us a sense of what's happening with vaccines there now. Almost 7000 inmates have been vaccinated. That's more than half of the state's prison population. Many of those inmates have received their second dose, prison officials say, but vaccinating this many inmates this soon wasn't something Oregon health officials were willing to do on their own. Took litigation from a group of inmates on din order from a federal judge here in Portland. Basically, the inmates argued Oregon's vaccination plan didn't treat them like others living in nursing homes and other congregate care facilities where the vaccine has been administered. Your state representative General Bynum. She's a Democrat and chairs the Oregon House Judiciary Committee. I didn't understand how our adults in custody, we're any different from any other group in a congregant care setting. And I certainly don't believe that a prison sentence is a death sentence. The judge's ruling at the beginning of this month force the state to offer inmates vaccines immediately, So that's why about half of all prison inmates have been vaccinated. Let me jump in here. This is Alison and Denver Advocates here wish that that would have happened in Colorado that court ruling con artist is talking about in Oregon. Is something lawyers here have been trying to use as a tool to get inmates vaccines, and I know there's been a back and forth over this in Colorado. Alison tell us more about what's been happening there. Yeah. Democratic Governor Jared Pulis hasn't prioritized inmates at all. And initially he did in one of the early plans, but then Was called out for that by some prominent conservatives, You know, people saying, Do you want the murderer to get the vaccine before your next door neighbor and he was apparently sensitive to that, and so he removed prisoners from the lists and put them in just the regular population. So in other words, he's making no distinction that these people are in a group setting a 70 year old prisoner would be prioritized. A 70 year old non prisoner and so on. So the majority of prisoners are not being prioritized. I will note that prison staff has been prioritized in those vaccines are being administered now. So tell us more about the pressure that Colorado's governor has been under Well. He's gotten a lot of pushback for his decision to not prioritize inmates for vaccine for getting a vaccine, and he's also been sued. He has thought that lawsuit successfully so far. Rebecca Wallace is an A C l U lawyer, she says. Public health officials have been universal in saying that people in groups heading should be prioritized for a vaccine and governor pull. It has actually not only ignored that guidance but rejected that guidance from his own Colorado Department of Public Health on by think it really stand out because he's such a data driven individual in his other decisions. I'm curious. Early in the pandemic, there was pressure to release inmates to create social distance inside facilities that were often crowded. Have vaccination efforts change those conversations in the states that you're all in? Well in Massachusetts. Despite the early vaccination of prisoners, there has been little movement to release people. The fight over that continues mostly through litigation. There are pending lawsuits, but with so many prisoners getting vaccinated now, it does weaken the argument for big releases. Yeah, and in Colorado. Interestingly, the state's prison population has gone down by a few 1000 people since the start of the pandemic, But state officials attribute that almost 100% to the fact that there were no no criminal jury trials last year at all in 2020, so there's this massive backlog in the States Criminal justice system. So you've brought us three very different stories about policies around vaccinating, incarcerated people in three states that are very different across the country. How does this fit in with what we are seeing across the US nationally, Conrad Well, every state is really dealing with this a little bit differently. And, you know, really, This is another symptom showing a lack of a national strategy. Despite the risks, it's another way of, you know, also showing how inmates are marginalized by society. And this isn't just about those who are incarcerated. In a recent report by the nonpartisan Prison Policy Initiative, researchers found that there were more new cases and counties that have large incarcerated populations.

Massachusetts Alison Cherry Conrad Wilson W. B. Oregon Colorado Oregon Public Broadcasting Charlie Baker Portland General Bynum Oregon House Judiciary Committ Denver Copan Jared Pulis DEV Alison Boston Conrad Rebecca Wallace Colorado Department Of Public
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of 37 years. This hall was bitter sweet. His father died from Cove it just last month. This has been the most important loaded up hauled and to bring this back of feel Dad was in the truck with me today. The move as a second vaccine to the arsenal in the fight against covert 19 that is CNBC's Eva Pilgrim. There is a plan for distributing the vaccine already underway. Frontline health care workers those long term care facilities among the first group WBC, Sherry Small tells us about another group that's high on that list. Tens of thousands of inmates in Massachusetts jails and prisons will be some of the first to get vaccinated for Cove it there in line to get the shots right after health care and emergency medical workers and long term care facility residents. Prisons have had some of the country's biggest corona virus outbreaks. They're not exactly places where social distancing is a likely option, so inmates are in line to get their covert vaccinations ahead of home health aides, seniors and those with underlying medical conditions who are more vulnerable to the virus. According to the prison policy Initiative. 22,000 people from Massachusetts are behind bars. Sherry Small WBZ. Boston's news radio is tested negative, but California's governor, Gavin Newsom, you've seen Quarante I mean, after a staffer came down with coronavirus, the governor had come in contact with that person. He will be quarantined for 10 days and will be tested again Local library raising money by selling a book. Not just any book, though. WBC's Chris Farmer explains what's been cooked up. They're not even on shelves and you had. Still they're selling like hot cakes. As the phrase has been coined. The response has been great. We're on our way to hopefully selling 400 copies of what you ask a cookbook assembled by the Friends of Milton Public Library, chock full of tasty ideas and the road maps of how to make him But it's not just about the food, according to creator Connie Spyros, I mean, the recipes are all fabulous, but I was taken by the stories behind them memories that were so etched in their brains. From these recipes. One woman's mother used to get inspiration for recipes when she would make bank deposits. So one of the recipes we have was written on a bank deposit slip, probably in the 19 fifties for blueberry and pineapple cake. It's so funny, and it's so wonderfully warm. Chris Mama WBZ Boston's NewsRadio smart.

WBC Cove Boston Massachusetts Sherry Small WBZ Chris Farmer Sherry Small Gavin Newsom CNBC Chris Mama Eva Pilgrim Milton Public Library Connie Spyros prison policy Initiative. California
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Older should be next in line for Corona virus vaccines, however, States. They're going to make the final decision on that one and WBC. Sherry Small tells us about another group that is high on the cove. It vaccine list ends of thousands of inmates in Massachusetts jails and prisons will be some of the first to get vaccinated for Cove it there in line to get the shots right after health care and emergency medical workers and long term care facility residents. Prisons have had some of the country's biggest corona virus outbreaks. They're not exactly places where social distancing is a likely option, so inmates are in line to get their covert vaccinations ahead of home health aides, seniors and those with underlying medical conditions who are more vulnerable to the virus. According to the prison policy Initiative. 22,000 people from Massachusetts are behind bars. Sherry Small WBZ Boston's news radio, It's been a long road to get here and most lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Agree. The economic stimulus package is necessary and it's a start. They'll vote on the $900 billion deal later today. The devil, though, is in the details, and ABC is Trish Turner takes a look at what's inside this legislation. Every American who got a stimulus check in the first round. You should be eligible again all of those qualifying income levels. Like If you have $75,000 or less. You make that much. You're going to get a check again up to 99,000. You know this get the scale of that check. It's smaller and then this time around, rather than $500 a child, you're getting $600 easy to think of family of four. You're going to get a roughly $2400. Some Americans at wits, end and financial ends say that the $600 is nowhere near enough. Also. Inside that economic stimulus bill an extension of the eviction ban in the United States. It is 808, and it is shaping up to be a terrible day on Wall Street to take a look at the numbers now with Bloomberg business, Here's Tom Busby. Must be well. It's not looking good. Jeff Dow futures right now down 483 points. Ah, lot of worries about a new strain of the Corona virus. That's hammering great Britain and stocks in Europe down sharply right now, But the Federal Reserve here said After a pause during the pandemic lenders, big banks are once again allowed to resume buying back their own stock. You better believe they will big time the nation's sixth largest banks should be able to buy back $11 billion of their own shares in the first quarter of next year. So banks should buck the trend today and be a little higher and Fiat Chrysler got the European Union's approval to merge with the maker of Peugeot, the French automaker P s a group. The combined company will be known as still antis, and it'll be the world's fourth largest automaker. I'm Tom Busby Bloomberg Business on WBZ Boston's news radio. Looking forward to a better 2021. Many trying to hit the jackpot. Details coming up. It's a DOE nine.

Tom Busby Sherry Small Massachusetts Cove Boston WBC Bloomberg DOE ABC United States prison policy Initiative. Trish Turner Jeff Dow Fiat Chrysler Federal Reserve Europe Peugeot
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Then the pressure campaign started and to the backlash now over Colorado's decision to prioritize prisoners for receiving the covert vaccine first. This was Fox News on December 1st. Which means convicted murderers will get immunized before grandmother's joining us. Colorado's Democratic governor, Jared Pulis, quickly backtracked S. Oh, there's no way it's going to go to prisoners before it goes to people who haven't committed any crimes. That's obvious. So at this press conference, he said the state's draft proposal on vaccines would be amended. As we do 65 up. I would think that would include prisoners that are in that category, but the vast majority of people 65 up our free little first Sure enough, when Colorado's updated guidance came out, Correctional staff were in the high priority group incarcerated People were not Professor Sharon doll, a bitch direct U C. L A is Prison Law and Policy program. What you have is on the one hand a really urgent public health need to prioritize both corrections staff and incarcerated people. And on the other hand, you have at least four decades of tough on crime rhetoric, which is primed. The American public to think of people in custody is somehow less than human and less deserving. Even though in this particular instance, we know well that they are at a much greater risk of getting infected and dying from the virus than people who are outside prison. Even some people who work in these facilities think putting these groups on equal footing makes sense. I think the priority level would be the same. I don't necessarily think The staff should get it before the prisoners of vice versa. Byron Osborne is president of the Michigan Corrections Organization, the union and that state He's been a corrections officer for 26 years. I think anybody that's Eddie Correctional setting, whether it's the employees. Or the population because we're all together all the time. Where were sold on the shoulder with these folks, we work in there. They live in their Michigan has been dealing with an explosion of coronavirus cases, and that's especially true behind bars. At the Chip Awhile Correctional Facility where Osborn works. Now, more than 800 inmates have gotten covert 19, according to state officials, and more than 500 of those cases are considered active. That doesn't include staff anybody who's been paying attention to the outbreaks and the correctional system in Michigan for the test several months. Realized that this has been a significant disruption to the operation of these correctional facilities. It's cost the state a ton of money and testing. I can't believe anybody would not be able to rationalize that those two groups of people would be in that second tier of people that are being provided the vaccine. According to the prison policy initiative, only six states have prioritized incarcerated people to get vaccines as early in the process, as public health officials have urged. More than 20 states are prioritizing corrections staff before inmates. That's the approach the Federal Bureau of Prisons is taking to the decision. The CDC advisory committee makes this weekend could change the calculation in some states, depending on what the group recommends. In August, Robbie Dennis was released from prison in Louisiana. His wife picked him up from Angola and the thing he wanted most was to go home and hug his five boys for the first time in years. But he knew the Corona virus was all over Angola, and he didn't know his own status. So his wife took him to get a test because she felt like I felt like It was a month. Because I didn't know I didn't know my own faked being released because I have never been. I had never been tested. It took him four days to get the result. It was negative,.

Colorado Jared Pulis Michigan Angola Fox News Michigan Corrections Organizat Byron Osborne Federal Bureau of Prisons Professor Sharon doll CDC Osborn Robbie Dennis president officer Louisiana
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group. Dr Paul Bidding her who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one. Another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities. So once it's introduced, it spends really quickly can, you know? And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of Coptic coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decided prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is playing and coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks. Then you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. And if that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on on their estimates. They say that 20 million people could get there first vaccine shot this month if they pull what they have for both the Visor and Madonna vaccines. And they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all those right maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much. Thank you for having me That's NPR's science reporter Ping Wong, along with Martha Beeping Garnet member station W bur in Boston. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thistles. NPR news. Let's check in with Joe McConnell with some traffic.

Food and Drug Administration prison policy Initiative Dr Paul Bidding NPR Coptic coronavirus Joe McConnell Massachusetts federal government Cara Ping Wong CDC California Boston Martha Beeping reporter Texas Florida
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin, and this might pinch just a bit. People applauded at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center as critical care nurse Saundra Lindsay got her Corona virus vaccine yesterday. Working on the front lines alongside my team. I saw a lot of pain, hurt suffering death, and so I felt a huge sense of relief. A similar moment came at the Ohio State Medical Center in Columbus. 321 that today about 30 health care workers got shots there and awe. Schnur Medical Center in New Orleans, Dr. Leo Swanny was among the first in line. It's been a privilege to be up here and get vaccinated and to tell all of my Hispanic brothers and sisters. It's safe. It's okay. And we need to do it. He says that because he knows communities of color have been especially hard hit. This Christmas is gonna be a tough Christmas for us. Next Christmas. We want to be with our grandmothers or I will eat. That said No. I will eat those now as we consider the next steps. Let's make an analogy to war. When we tell stories about war. We focus on stories of individual courage. But the war may be won by logistics, getting people and supplies where they're needed. Something similar is true In this pandemic. We tell stories about government that focus on speeches that conflict and hot takes. Hot button issues and tweets. But saving lives in a pandemic takes logistics, most recently getting a vaccine where it's needed. So how's that going? NPR's science reporter Ping Kwan is here, along with Martha Beeping, Girded member station W bur in Boston. Good morning to both of you. Good morning. Morning. Okay. Martha will start with you in the shrine of Medicine. Is the vaccine starting to reach Boston? Well, the shrine got shut out, Steve. No, I'm kidding. A little banker. Here's the deal in Massachusetts. Five of the 75 hospitals that expect to start visor vaccinations this week received a shipment yesterday. Had the explanation seems to be shipping glitches and delays during a crazy time. So while there was some grumbling, all of the large hospitals are expecting vaccine shipments today and the smaller ones tomorrow. So in the end, hospital leaders say, what difference does one day really make? Yeah. Hopefully it is only one day now. Once the vaccine has arrived, how's the rollout work? Well, we have already started to vaccinate a few people out of a hospital north of Boston. They started yesterday with a 96 year old World War two veteran named Margaret Claessens. Few hospitals will have media events today, vaccinating hospital leaders or range of employees, especially staff of color. You just heard on the show a little bit about why that's important. It's to build more trusting the vaccines. Then tomorrow on Thursday, we'll start to see the clinics with a couple of 100, nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and members of the cleaning staff coming in and out every day. Okay, so that's one location across the country. This is happening everywhere or as many places as possible and ping as you Monitor operation Warp speed. How do the next few days and weeks look? Yeah, well, Boston's not alone here, you know, around 140 Your 150 sites got there. First Vaccines yesterday and more than 400 are expected to get them today. Here's Health Secretary Alex. These are speaking in Washington, D C yesterday by Wednesday. Accident will be delivered everywhere from sites here in Washington to the shores of Guam to the northeastern corner of main. All in all, around three million vaccines are going out this week, and government officials were saying this is just the beginning. You know, every week, states will be getting more vaccine shipments. And most of those first doses we've seen so far have gone to healthcare workers. But next week, some states we're gonna start immunizing nursing home residents as well. Or they're expected to you through a federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens. Teams from these pharmacies will be visiting nursing homes to give shots to both residents and the staff. Martha Ping is just there talking about who gets this first. Is there any debate about who is getting the vaccine first? There's been some controversy in Massachusetts, Steve about including prisoners in Phase one, along with people who live in other group settings, like homeless shelters. In Massachusetts prisoners will follow hospital staff who care directly for covert patients, nursing home residents and staff and they'll follow first responders, but prisoners would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group. Dr Paul Bidding her who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one. And another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities So once it's introduced, it spreads really quickly. We can you know, And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of caught the coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decide to prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is planning on coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks, and you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. And if that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on. In their estimates. They say that 20 million people could get there first vaccine shot this month if they pull what they have for both the Visor and Madonna vaccines. And they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all goes right, maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much..

Boston Massachusetts Steve Inskeep Food and Drug Administration NPR News Long Island Jewish Medical Cen Martha Ping Rachel Martin Ohio State Medical Center Schnur Medical Center federal government New Orleans Saundra Lindsay Dr. Leo Swanny Ping Kwan prison policy Initiative Martha Washington
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"30 health care workers got shots there and awe. Schnur Medical Center in New Orleans, Dr. Leo Swanny was among the first in line. It's been a privilege to be up here and get vaccinated and tell all of my Hispanic brothers and sisters. It's safe. It's okay. And we need to do it. He says that because he knows communities of color have been especially hard hit. This Christmas is gonna be a tough Christmas for us. Next Christmas. We want to be with our grandmothers or I will eat. That said No. I will eat those now as we consider the next steps. Let's make an analogy to war. When we tell stories about war. We focus on stories of individual courage. But the war may be won by logistics, getting people and supplies where they're needed. Something similar is true In this pandemic. We tell stories about government that focus on speeches that conflict and hot takes. Hot button issues and tweets. But saving lives in a pandemic takes logistics, most recently getting a vaccine where it's needed. So how's that going? NPR's science reporter Ping Kwan is here, along with Martha Beeping, Girded member station W bur in Boston. Good morning to both of you. Good morning. Morning. Okay. Martha will start with you in the shrine of Medicine. Is the vaccine starting to reach Boston? Well, the shrine got shut out, Steve. No, I'm kidding. A little bit Good. Here's the deal in Massachusetts. Five of the 75 hospitals that expect to start visor vaccinations this week received the shipment yesterday. The explanation seems to be shipping glitches and delays during a crazy time. So while there was some grumbling, all of the large hospitals are expecting vaccine shipments today and the smaller ones tomorrow. So in the end, hospital leaders say, what difference does one day really make? Yeah. Hopefully it is only one day now. Once the vaccine has arrived, how's the rollout work? Well, we have already started to vaccinate a few people out of a hospital north of Boston. They started yesterday with a 96 year old World War two veteran named Margaret Claessens. Few hospitals will have media events today, vaccinating hospital leaders or range of employees, especially staff of color. You just heard on the show a little bit about why that's important. It's to build more trust in the vaccines. And tomorrow on Thursday, we'll start to see the clinics with a couple of 100, nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and members of the cleaning staff coming in and out every day. Okay, so that's one location across the country. This is happening everywhere or as many places as possible and ping as you Monitor operation Warp speed. How do the next few days and weeks look? Yeah, well, Boston's not alone here, you know, around 140 or 150 sites got there. First Vaccines yesterday and more than 400 are expected to get them today. Here's Health Secretary Alex. These are speaking in Washington, D C yesterday by Wednesday. Vaccine will be delivered everywhere from sites here in Washington to the shores of Guam to the northeastern corner of main. All in all, around three million vaccines are going out this week, and government officials were saying this is just the beginning. You know, every week, states will be getting more vaccine shipments. And most of those first doses we've seen so far have gone to healthcare workers. But next week, some states we're gonna start immunizing nursing home residents as well. Or they're expected to through a federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens. Teams from these pharmacies will be visiting nursing homes to give shots to both residents and the staff. Martha Ping is just there talking about who gets this first. Is there any debate about who is getting the vaccine first? There's been some controversy in Massachusetts, Steve about including prisoners in Phase one, along with people who live in other group settings, like homeless shelters. In Massachusetts prisoners will follow hospital staff who care directly for covert patients, nursing home residents and staff and they'll follow first responders, but prisoners would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group. Dr Paul Bidding her who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one. Another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities. So once it's introduced it, Spence really quickly or can you know? And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of caught the coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decide to prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is planning on coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks, and you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. If that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on. In their estimates. They say that 20 million people could get there first vaccine shot this month if they pull what they have for both the visor and maternal vaccines. And they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all goes right, maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much. Thank you for having me That's NPR's science reporter Ping Wong, along with Martha Beeping Garnet member station Deputy bur in Boston. Thanks so much. Thank you. This is NPR news. It's 5 42 on KCRW. Plenty Still to come on this Tuesday installment of Morning edition, including you'll hear from Dr Anthony Fauci,.

Boston Massachusetts Martha Beeping NPR Food and Drug Administration Steve Martha Ping reporter federal government New Orleans Ping Kwan Dr Anthony Fauci Schnur Medical Center Dr. Leo Swanny Martha prison policy Initiative Washington
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin, and this might pinch just a bit. People applauded at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center as critical care nurse Sandra Sandra Lindsay got her Corona virus vaccine yesterday. Working on the front lines alongside my team. I saw a lot of pain, hurt suffering death, and so I felt a huge sense of relief. A similar moment came at the Ohio State Medical Center in Columbus 321. Action Age about 30 health care workers got shots there and awe. Schnur Medical Center in New Orleans, Dr Leo Swanny was among the first in line. It's been a privilege to be up here and get vaccinated and to tell all of my Hispanic brothers and sisters. It's safe. It's okay. And we need to do it. He says that because he knows communities of color have been especially hard hit. This Christmas is gonna be a tough Christmas for us. Next Christmas. We want to be with our grandmothers or I will eat. That said No. I will eat those now as we consider the next steps. Let's make an analogy to war. When we tell stories about war. We focus on stories of individual courage. But the war may be won by logistics, getting people in supplies where they're needed. Something similar is true In this pandemic. We tell stories about government that focus on speeches and conflict and hot takes Hot button issues and tweets. But saving lives in a pandemic takes logistics, most recently getting a vaccine where it's needed. So how's that going? NPR's science reporter Ping Kwan is here along with Martha Be bigger, beeping Garnet member station W bur in Boston. Good morning to both of you. Good morning. My name. Okay. Martha will start with you in the shrine of Medicine is the vaccine starting to reach Boston? Well, the shrine got shut out, Steve. No, I'm kidding a little bit. Here's the deal in Massachusetts, Five of the 75 hospitals that expect to start visor vaccinations this week received a shipment yesterday. The explanation seems to be shipping glitches and delays during a crazy time. So while there was some grumbling, all of the large hospitals are expecting vaccine shipments today and the smaller ones tomorrow. So in the end, hospital leaders say, what difference does one day really make? Yeah. Hopefully it is only one day And now once the vaccine has arrived, How's the rollout work? Well, we are. We have already started to vaccinate a few people out of a hospital north of Boston. They started yesterday with a 96 year old World War two veteran named Margaret Claessens. Few hospitals will have media events today, vaccinating hospital leaders or range of employees, especially staff of color. You just heard on the show a little bit about why that's important. It's to build more trust in the vaccines. And tomorrow on Thursday, we'll start to see the clinics with a couple of 100, nurses, doctors, respiratory therapists and members of the cleaning staff coming in and out every day. Okay, so that's one location across the country. This is happening everywhere or as many places as possible and ping as you Monitor operation Warp speed. How do the next few days and weeks look Yeah, well, Boston's not alone here. You know, around 140 Your 150 sites got there. First Vaccines yesterday and more than 400 are expected to get them today. Here's the health Secretary Alex Laser Health Secretary Alex Cesar, speaking in Washington, D C yesterday. Wednesday vaccine will be delivered everywhere from sites here in Washington to the shores of Guam to the northeastern corner of main. All in all, around three million vaccines are going out this week, and government officials were saying this is just the beginning. You know, every week, states will be getting more vaccine shipments. And most of those first doses we've seen so far have gone to healthcare workers. But next week, some states we're gonna start immunizing nursing home residents as well. Or they're expected to you through a federal partnership with CVS and Walgreens. He instantly. Pharmacies will be visiting nursing homes to give shots to both residents and the staff. Martha Ping is just there talking about who gets this first. Is there any debate about who is getting the vaccine first? There's been some controversy in Massachusetts, Steve about including prisoners in Phase one, along with people who live in other group settings, like homeless shelters. In Massachusetts prisoners will follow hospital staff who care directly for covert patients, nursing home residents and staff and they'll follow first responders, but prisoners would come before home health care workers at all the hospital and clinic employees who do not care directly for covert patients. Told this was a unanimous recommendation from the States Vaccine advisory group Dr Paul Bidding. Gir, who chairs that group, spoke on a webinar last night. He said the recommendation was based on the large number of outbreaks in prisons and other group residential settings. Group elected to consider all congregate Cara settings with high priority because of the risk of spreading transmission so quickly to so many people, both affecting staff and, of course, patients residents themselves. Massachusetts is one of six states that include vaccinating everyone in prisons and jails in Phase one, and another seven plan to vaccinate in clinics in prisons. But just for staff, not inmates, That's all. According to the prison policy Initiative. Ping I can imagine someone saying, Hey, that's unfair. But what is the public health reasoning behind vaccinating prisoners? Well, sure. I mean, prisoners and other people who are jailed or who live in correctional facilities are a group that are at a particularly high risk recovered because of their living situations. You know, they live in cramped quarters with poor ventilation. They can't physically distance and You know, Staff and prisoners moved between facilities, So once it's introduced, it spreads really quickly or can you know? And at this point more than one in 10 incarcerated people the U. S of caught the coronavirus. More than 1500 have died and a lot of staff have been infected as well. States like California, Texas, Florida, you know, states with large incarcerated populations have had the most cases and the most deaths so It is up to the states who they decide to prioritize for a vaccine. And there are a lot of other groups that could also be next in line, you know essential workers, people who work in grocery stores or die Busses, teachers, farm workers. And of course, you know people with underlying health conditions. So these are all open questions in the CDC is planning on coming out with more guidance and priority groups in the coming weeks, and you can understand the logic. You have a super spreader event in prison that can very quickly spread throughout the community because you have guards and other staff that go back and forth. And that seems to be the same logic of some of these other groups that you mentioned like teachers or in contact with lots of Students or people in a grocery store in contact with all kinds of shoppers, so they're making these choices now because there is a limited supply. When does the supply get to the point where it's not so limited? Absolutely well. One big decision that's coming this week could really increase the supply of vaccines. The Food and Drug Administration is considering a second vaccine made by the drug company Madonna for authorization this week. If that one gets authorized, the government says they have six million doses of that ready to ship out. And in fact, that's actually something that the federal government is banking on. In their estimates, they say that 20 million people could get there. First vaccine shot this month. If they pull what they have for both the visor and maternal vaccines, and they say 30 million more people could get shots in January. So in terms of when there's going to be enough vaccine for everyone to get one, they're estimating the end of the second quarter next year. So if all goes right, maybe around June, but tens of millions in the next couple of months Ping Thanks so much..

Boston Martha Ping Steve Inskeep Massachusetts Food and Drug Administration NPR News Long Island Jewish Medical Cen Sandra Sandra Lindsay Rachel Martin Ohio State Medical Center Schnur Medical Center federal government New Orleans Dr Leo Swanny Secretary Ping Kwan prison policy Initiative Washington
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:42 min | 2 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Republicans weren't really talking about how big the prison population was getting. It's never been a traditional Republican. Core issue. Like any good conservative Republican, As Chris said he believed that you make neighborhood safer by putting people in jail political Value was seen and being quote unquote tough on crime, and we gave very little thought to the actual cost. Every year, Lawmakers would introduce a new offense or a new crime that they thought people should go to jail for. Or they would introduce new bills to increase the amount of time Oklahomans should spend in prison, and Chris says he voted for probably every one of those measures. Then, in 2008 Chris gets more responsibility over the state's budget. The thing that jumped off the page for me at that moment in time. Is that spending for corrections? Had become Oklahoma second fastest growing expenditure. After what Medicaid and at first, Chris's like, OK, that is fine if it's keeping us safer, But when he starts looking at crime stats, he realizes, Oh, it's not. It's not doing that. It would be one thing if Mass incarceration actually worked in and reducing crime or improving public safety. It does not. In fact, not only does Oklahoma have higher incarceration rates. Our crime rate is not decreasing nearly as rapidly as in other states and And so it just doesn't make any sense. For Chris. The whole system goes against a core conservative principle. I would even go as far as to say that it's Impossible to identify oneself is a fiscal conservative. And continue to be okay with wasting money on an inefficient System that is not producing the results of what it's intended to produce. And for Chris, That was it was a lifelong Oklahoma. I would tell you that that our faith Is part of our culture, and we boast about how important it is to us when we run for office, and yet we have created a system that is almost entirely based on retribution. In punishment. Chris was no longer going to be a part of it. He decides to dedicate himself to prison reform. He says he has a lot to do to make amends for some of his past decisions. Chris also happens to be a Baptist minister. And so I would like to challenge my faith friends and ask the question where the elements of grace and mercy And forgiveness and restoration and redemption. And all of those things that I think, make faith attractive. Chris Deal starts trying to find other Republicans like him. And he finds another conservative in Texas who was thinking along the same lines. Oh, good. I'm Mark Levin, vice president, criminal justice of the Texas Public Policy Foundation and right on crime, right? Well, it's just that kind of double meaning that both were correct and our solutions for crime but that were also conservative, meaning nonpartisan. But from a conservative free market perspective, Okay, there was a time when prisons were much cheaper to run. It was a long time ago, there were less rules and requirements. And many prisons were basically slavery under another guy's prisoners were forced to work for free, often even literally picking cotton. But that kind of was the plantation system that evolved out of slavery and everything. And of course, it was, was awful, but but they became non self sustaining and started costing billions of dollars. When you put So many people behind bars, the costs add up, and this is the part of prison reform that Mark is looking at. Today. According to the prison Policy Initiative, the whole incarceration punishment system cost the government and the public at least $182 billion a year That includes prisons and jails and the parole system and food and guards. Everything and a lot of this money is being spent on people whose offenses are pretty silly, Mark says. Like a lot of people are in prison right now, not because they committed a crime, but because they broke some weird parole. Rule after they got out of prison, whether it's missing a meeting drinking alcohol, leaving the county without permission. These are all things that you or I could do course marijuana and marks like you, Khun go back to prison for years and years because you drove out of the county for a bit or drink of beer. That feels very big government and like a waste and making people sit in prison for years and years or forever doesn't sound super fiscally responsible, either. He's thinking we should really kept the years 40 years. That's a lot of punishment that you've served in prison and we've accomplished the punishment purpose of sentencing. So let's take a look at Have you been rehabilitated? Or are you just so geriatric at this point that you can't pose a threat to anyone and let's let's just try to act in the interest of the taxpayers, if not in the interest of mercy? Yeah. Old prisoners. Marcus Thinking is keeping 90 year olds and 95 year olds in prison really a great victory for public safety Mark starts approaching all the bigwigs in the Republican Party with his ideas. Newt Gingrich, Grover Norquist, major conservative donors and packs. I think that he was to say You weren't necessarily wrong, Theo 30 years ago, but we we did that stuff. In other words, we incarceration rates went up six times from the early seventies, too early two thousand's. We went a bit too far. But you know, we needed to do some of that. But we we went overboard. Mark does get a lot of pushback. Republicans are like, Why is a conservative organization pushing for these things? But eventually, many Republicans start listening in part because the call was coming from inside the house. Right? Exactly. Yep, there's there's no doubt about that, and we just want to say Democrats were having a parallel conversation about prison reform, but Mark says. For them, it was more about how prisons disproportionately impact black people and people of color. So everyone is coming at this from a different place. But they arrive at the same destination and then the 2008 financial crisis hit and states hemorrhage money, it suddenly becomes a lot easier to look at prison budgets of the place to cut costs. Blue States and Red states. They all start changing their laws, saying those weird parole violations. They're not going to send you back to prison as easily and we're going to devote a bunch of crimes..

Chris Deal Mark Levin prison Policy Initiative Oklahoma Texas Public Policy Foundation Texas Republican Party Newt Gingrich Baptist marijuana Marcus Thinking vice president Theo Khun Grover Norquist
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:04 min | 2 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Republicans weren't really talking about how big the prison population was getting. It's never been A traditional Republican. Core issue. Like any good conservative Republican, As Chris said he believed that you make neighborhood safer by putting people in jail political Value was seen and being quote unquote tough on crime, and we gave very little thought to the actual cost. Every year, Lawmakers would introduce a new offense or a new crime that they thought people should go to jail for. Or they would introduce new bills to increase the amount of time Oklahomans should spend in prison, and Chris says he voted for probably every one of those measures. Then, in 2008 Chris gets more responsibility over the state's budget. The thing that jumped off the page for me at that moment in time. Is that spending for corrections? Had become Oklahoma second fastest growing expenditure. After what Medicaid and at first, Chris's like, OK, that is fine if it's keeping us safer, But when he starts looking at crime stats, he realizes, Oh, it's not. It's not doing that. It would be one thing if Mass incarceration actually worked in and reducing crime or improving public safety. It does not. In fact, not only does Oklahoma have higher incarceration rates. Our crime rate is not decreasing nearly as rapidly as in other states and And so it just doesn't make any sense. For Chris. The whole system goes against a core conservative principle. I would even go as far as to say that it's Impossible to identify oneself is a fiscal conservative. And continue to be okay with wasting money on an inefficient System that is not producing the results of what it's intended to produce. And for Chris, That was it was a lifelong Oklahoma. I would tell you that that our faith Is part of our culture, and we boast about how important it is to us when we run for office, and yet we have created a system that is almost entirely based on retribution. In punishment. Chris was no longer going to be a part of it. He decides to dedicate himself to prison reform. He says he has a lot to do to make amends for some of his past decisions. Chris also happens to be a Baptist minister. And so I would like to challenge my faith friends and ask the question where the elements of grace and mercy And forgiveness and restoration and redemption and all of those things that I think, make faith attractive. Crystal starts trying to find other Republicans like him. And he finds another conservative in Texas who was thinking along the same lines. Oh, good. I'm Mark Levin, vice president, criminal justice at the Texas Public Policy Foundation and right on crime right on crime. Get it? Well, it's just that kind of double meaning that both were correct and our solutions for crime but that were also conservative meaning in consumer, nonpartisan, but from a conservative free market perspective, Okay, there was a time when prisons were much cheaper to run. It was a long time ago, there were less rules and requirements. And many prisons were basically slavery under another guy's prisoners were forced to work for free, often even literally picking cotton. But that kind of was the plantation system that evolved out of slavery and everything. And of course, it was, was awful, but but they became non self sustaining and started costing billions of dollars. When you put So many people behind bars, the costs add up, and this is the part of prison reform that Mark is looking at. Today. According to the prison Policy Initiative, the whole incarceration punishment system cost the government and the public at least $182 billion a year That includes prisons and jails and the parole system and food and guards. Everything on a lot of this money is being spent on people whose offenses are pretty silly, Mark says. Like a lot of people are in prison right now, not because they committed a crime, but because they broke some weird parole. Rule after they got out of prison, whether it's missing a meeting drinking alcohol, leaving the county without permission. These are all things that you or I could do course marijuana and marks like you, Khun go back to prison for years and years because you drove out of the county for a bit or drink a beer. That feels very big government and like a waste and making people sit in prison for years and years or forever doesn't sound super fiscally responsible, either. He's thinking we should really kept the years 40 years. That's a lot of punishment that you've served in prison and we've accomplished the punishment purpose of sentencing. So let's take a look at Have you been rehabilitated? Or are you just so geriatric at this point that you can't pose a threat to anyone and let's let's just try to act in the interest of the taxpayers, if not in the interest of mercy? Yeah. Old prisoners. Marcus Thinking is keeping 90 year olds and 95 year olds in prison really a great victory for public safety Mark starts approaching all the bigwigs in the Republican Party with his ideas. Newt Gingrich, Grover Norquist, major conservative donors and packs. I think if he was to say you weren't necessarily wrong here 30 years ago, but we we did that stuff. In other words, we incarceration rates went up six times from the early seventies, too early two thousand's. We went a bit too far. But you know, we needed to do some of that. But we we we went overboard. Mark does get a lot of pushback. Republicans are like, Why is a conservative organization pushing for these things? But eventually, many Republicans start listening in part because the call was coming from inside the house. Right? Exactly..

Chris Mark Levin Oklahoma prison Policy Initiative Texas Public Policy Foundation Texas Republican Party Newt Gingrich Baptist Crystal Marcus Thinking vice president marijuana Khun Grover Norquist
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"The coronaviruses forcing district and state courts to shut down around the country thousands of cases will be in limbo and there's growing concern about people awaiting legal decisions sitting in jail cells joining me now in the studio is primal Daria she is a former public defender and now the director of the defender impact initiative welcome thank you you know people have raised concerns about how coveted nineteen might affect the prison population we've been here in a bit of that but jails our our care little different turn today they are yes generally speaking they are places that people who have not yet been convicted of any offence go and where people who are serving short sentences or who are detained on so called technical violations of probation or parole go the turnover rate is enormous and very different than that of prisons and so does that already raised a red flag about how vulnerable those who are locked up in jails might be to something like a crown of ours absolutely it's a huge concern we have more than three thousand jails around the country having the constant churn of people coming in and out just exacerbates the problem and exposes everybody on the outside and on the inside in Florida alone two thousand people are admitted and released in county jails per day according to the prison policy initiative what about medical attention again a prison which may have lots of long term people in their family their doctors available we're going to jail because a lot of jails are in rural and or poor places there are inherently resource issues in lots of them medical treatment and resources are not equipped to handle certainly not pandemics of this magnitude and we don't have epidemiologists or infectious disease experts there often also understaffing issues so that when people who are in jails request medical attention it might not happen right away statistics and studies show that people who have pre existing or underlying conditions that are very vulnerable to cover nineteen heart conditions are heart disease asthma diabetes are disproportionately represented in jails well are there any lessons from history what methods did say jails use to contain past outbreaks like the H. one and one swine flu you just a few years ago historically jails around the country and prisons as well have engaged in this sort of attempts at containment by a creating isolation or segregation are locking down their facilities this is not going to be effective creating solitary confinement conditions for people particularly people who are legally not permitted to be punished they they have not been convicted correct of anything yet correct I just say could make bail cracks I think this is going to lead to a lot of frustration on the parts of people who who need and deserve to have their cases heard we are seeing court starting to shut down already we're seeing jurors not being called in we're certainly seeing lawyers teleworking and and I think what would be much more effective at keeping the most people safe is releasing as many people as possible from incarceration prosecutors can start to decline seeking the tension on the front end courts can decline to detain people or can release people sheriffs and other people overseeing jails can start to move to advocate for the release of the people inside facilities parole commissions and governors can start to release people as well a lot of people are held on parole or probation violations or could be granted early release through through other means that's primal Daria she's a former public defender and now director of the defender impact initiative thank you for joining us in our studio thank you for having me in.

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Prison six here in hi about one in four people is locked up behind bars it's because this rural predominantly white town is home to three state prisons including this one on correctional institution most of the prisoners insider people of color okay my name is Kenneth McGowan and I'm from Milwaukee wi galley who is black was transferred here more than two years ago from another state prison if he is still locked up here on census state twenty twenty you will be included in the town opponents official population as because ever since the first US census in seventeen ninety the federal government is kind of people locked up in prisons and jails not as residents of where they're from but as residents of where they're incarcerated these days some state and local governments use those census numbers to redraw voting districts do you feel like residents of what Wisconsin not at all I don't even consider that there is a community outside these walls but outside lives in neighboring the gallon has never met before an older person kind of like a city council member for this local voting district Peter has more ski he's technically representing you have you have you ever heard not at all yeah until you came that older person Peter Kashmar ski is white represents this district were more than three fourths of the constituents are prisoners who cannot vote because they're serving time at Waupun correctional institution this is a building I guess you've seen very often or pass by yes it's right down the street from my house but his mercy says he's never been inside the prison it's Adam Levine's official website says it's older people rely on quote input from residents to quote in short a citizen centered process when for example voting on budgets are proving plans to repave streets because Marcy says getting input from constituents who are behind bars can be difficult no one is there for me to knock on the door to say what do you think and he says it also can be hard to represent people he's never met before you almost have to think for them because you don't perhaps have the day to day interaction there's no way that he can say what we feel unless you decide to come in and talk to Robert Alexander who is black is another one of cats Marcy's constituents serving time inside what punk correctional it doesn't sit well with Alexander that he can be counted for political representation in a place he doesn't consider his residence forgive me for not having been I've got to relate this the way I want to but it's almost like your body being you Alex case is the legal director for the prison policy initiative a research and advocacy group that wants to change how incarcerated people are counted there are lots of places across the country that still suffer from prison gerrymandering the federal government considers prisons the residents of prisoners because the census bureau says that that's were incarcerated people live in sleep most of the time okay store argues that policy has become out of date since it was first carried out for the seventeen ninety census what has changed is the massive scale of incarceration in the United States even up until the nineteen seventies the incarcerated population was low enough that it did not impact redistricting when people are counted in the wrong place this year Nevada and Washington joined a total of six states with laws requiring that for redistricting after the twenty twenty senses the senses beers count of prisoners be relocated from where the prisoners are incarcerated to their last home address is on record in Wisconsin democratic state lawmakers introduced a similar bill that could lead to major changes to another voting district and what pond is represented by an older person who's white and says he's never tried to meet the people inside the prisons who make up close to two thirds of his district there's no reason to communicate on property I don't have access to older person Brian no king was reelected early this year unopposed with a total of four thirty three votes no he represents a district that includes Dodge correctional institution a spokesperson for Wisconsin's department of corrections says milky and other older people are welcome to visit have you ever entered the facility.

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on KCRW

"Here in what pine about one in four people is locked up behind bars it's because this rural predominantly white town is home to three state prisons including this one upon correctional institution most of the prisoners insider people of color okay my name is Kenneth McGowan and I'm from Milwaukee wi galley who is black was transferred here more than two years ago from another state prison if he is still locked up here on census state twenty twenty you will be included in the town opponents official population as because ever since the first US census in seventeen ninety the federal government has counted people locked up in prisons and jails not as residents of where they're from but as residents of where they're incarcerated these days some state and local governments use though census numbers to redraw voting districts do you feel like residents of what Wisconsin not at all I don't even consider that there is a community outside these walls but outside lives in neighboring the gallon has never met before an older person kind of like a city council member for this local voting district Peter has more ski he's technically representing you have you have you ever heard not at all yeah nine two you game that older person Peter Kashmar ski is white represents this district where more than three fourths of the constituents are prisoners who cannot vote because they're serving time at Waupun correctional institution this was a building I guess you've seen very often or pass by yes it's right down the street from my house but gets more ski says he's never been inside the prison it's Adam Levine's official website says it's older people rely on quote input from residents to quote in short a citizen centered process when for example voting on budget Sir proving plants of repave streets because our ski says getting input from constituents who are behind bars can be difficult no one is there for me to knock on the door to say what do you think and he says it also can be hard to represent people he's never met before you almost have to think for them because you don't perhaps have the day to day interaction there's no way that she can say what we feel unless you decide to come in and talk to Robert Alexander who is black is another one of cats Marcy's constituents serving time inside what punk correctional it doesn't sit well with Alexander that he can be counted for political representation in a place he doesn't consider his residence forgive me for not having been I've got to relate this the way I want to but it's almost like your body being you Alex chi story is the legal director for the prison policy initiative a research and advocacy group that wants to change how incarcerated people are counted there are lots of places across the country that still suffer from prison gerrymandering the federal government considers prisons the residents of prisoners because the census bureau says the bats were incarcerated people live in sleep most of the time but I store argues that policy has become out of date since it was first carried out for the seventeen ninety census what has changed is the massive scale of incarceration in the United States even up until the nineteen seventies the incarcerated population was low enough that it did not impact redistricting when people are counted in the wrong place this year Nevada and Washington joined a total of six states with laws requiring that for redistricting after the twenty twenty senses the senses beers counter prisoners be relocated from where the prisoners are incarcerated to their last home addresses on record in Wisconsin democratic state lawmakers introduced a similar bill that could lead to major changes to another voting district and what pond is represented by an older person who's white and says he's never tried to meet the people inside the prisons who make up close to two thirds of his district there's no reason to communicate on property I don't have access to older person Brian milky was reelected early this year unopposed with a total of four thirty three votes no he represents a district that includes Dodge correctional institution a spokesperson for Wisconsin's department of corrections says milky and other older people are welcome to visit have you ever entered the facility.

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"A lot of money in the long run for the notes the wide ranging koss illustrates straits the need for specific site assessment most of the school buildings were constructed before nineteen seventy five the year washington adopted a statewide building code according to this study washington ranked second in the nation for earthquake risk with the highest risk in the western part of the state eight in washington state lawmakers set aside two point two billion dollars in current by adding him that will continue these schools seismic safety project which will survey about critter fifty buildings and focus on schools threatened by an earthquake triggered sudani already as a march for public funding of political campaigns is well say presidential town hall capped off the independence weekend in new hampshire the sunday march was inspired by granite state data door screening they had who at the age of ninety walked across the country in two thousand and promote campaign finance reform had attracted bipartisan support back then including then you as senators russ feingold and john mccain olivia's inc of the group both in democracy in an organizer of this week's march sees that aspect critical polarized political environment issue of campaign finance reform as harry by partisan we want every candidate republican and democrat party is to be talking about what we need to do the fixer democracy we really need a system that represents all of our voices shut down the march beginning kittery maine in ended in downtown portsmouth maine has a system of voluntary public campaign financing so zinke says the march with symbolically bringing similar election reforms to new hampshire following the marching speeches in market square some marches walked up the street to the democracy townhall co hosted by the group equal citizens meantime the costa being transported to a hospital in a medical helicopter jumped by sixty percent in just four years daddy a robbery those are report between two thousand twelve in two thousand sixteen according to a new report patients in kentucky end across the country are getting surprise bills for thirty nine thousand dollars on average for these life saving trips the findings from johns hopkins university researchers come as hospitals in at least four kentucky townies adair fulton nicolas an owen have shut their doors whitney corby as a nurse who survived a car wreck six years ago she says without access to a helicopter ambulance she might not be here today on the helicopter i want coma and then when i got there they did all the tests and everything in the doctor came out and he told my parents that if i hadn't been i would not have survived some experts say insurance companies should be required to cover emergency medical services most currently do not recent public outcry over high medical bills has gotten any attention of congress but there is no legislation on the books that specifically addresses air ambulance cost that report says people living in rural areas of the most likely to be affected by air medical service fees and finally dan hyman reports across america the population nation of local and regional jails has tripled in the last forty years in prison policy initiative examined usa justice department and pass census data from the nineteen eighties to twenty sixteen wander bertram you should have says they found pretrial detention is a major factor as many detainees either can't afford their bail or judges won't release some on personal recognizance the pre child population which is much bigger than it was ten or twenty years ago is primarily what's driving crowding local jail people that have not yet been convicted of a crime better being held

thirty nine thousand dollars two billion dollars sixty percent twenty years forty years four years six years
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:14 min | 3 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"In a lot of money in the long run for the notes wide ranging costs illustrates the need for specific site assessment most of the school buildings were constructed before nineteen seventy five the year washington adopted a statewide building code according to this study washington ranked second in the nation for earthquake risk with the highest risk in the western part of the state in washington state lawmakers set aside two point two billion dollars in current by adding m that will continue these schools seismic safety project which will survey about critter fifty buildings and focus on schools threatened by an earthquake triggered sudani as a march for public funding of politically cab pages well say presidential town hall capped off the independence weekend in new hampshire the sunday march was inspired by granite state data door screening they had it who who at the age of ninety walked across the country in two thousand the promote campaign finance reform haddock attracted bipartisan support back then including venue as senators russ feingold and john mccain olivia sink of the group both in democracy in an organizer of this week's march she's got a critical polarized political environment issue of campaign finance reform as harry by partisan we want every candidate republican and democrat party is to be talking about what we need to do the fixer democracy we really need a system that represent percent off i four shutdown the march beginning to remain in ended in downtown portsmouth maine has a system of voluntary public campaign financing so zinke says the march was symbolically bringing similar election reforms to new hampshire following the march in speeches in market square some marches walked up the street to the democracy townhall co hosted by the group equal citizens meantime the costa being transported to a hospital in a medical helicopter jumped by sixty percent in just four years w robert muller's report between two thousand twelve in two thousand sixteen according to a new report patients in kentucky end across the country are getting surprise bills for thirty nine thousand dollars on average for these lifesaving trips the findings from johns hopkins university researchers come as hospitals in at least four kentucky townies adair fulton nicolas an owen have shut their doors whitney corby is a nurse who survived a car wreck six years ago she says without access to a helicopter ambulance she might not be here today on the helicopter i want coma and then when i got there they did all the tests and everything in the doctor came out and he told my parents that i would not have survived some experts say insurance companies should be required to cover emergency medical services most currently do not recent public outcry over high medical bills has gotten any attention congress but there is no legislation on the books that specifically addresses air ambulance cost that report says people living in rural areas of the most likely to be affected by air medical service fees and finally dan hyman reports across america the population of local and regional jails has tripled in the last forty years in prison policy initiative examined usa justice department and pass census data from they nineteen eighties to twenty sixteen wonder bertram with few initiatives says they found pretrial detention is a major factor as many detainees either can't afford their bail or judges won't release some on personal recognizance the pre child population which much bigger than it was ten or twenty years ago is primarily what's driving crowding local jail music people that have not yet been convicted of a crime that are being held for their child some jurisdictions have seen promising results by doing way with cash bail instead releasing folks headed there trout and following up with reminders i mike thanks for starting your week with public service we are member elicit supported it rob line at public service donna archie manning america

thirty nine thousand dollars two billion dollars sixty percent twenty years forty years four years six years
"prison policy initiative" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"prison policy initiative" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"All of our rights. That's florida. Senator Rick Scott who previously represented Florida as its governor. Shelby. What's your take on the appeal of Alex to lawmakers? Sure. I think what the appeal is is it will look happening in DC right now. Right. They're they're not functional and the states are the places where innovation can take off is what we discussed earlier that so much attention is focused on DC. But the majority of particularly your domestic policy happens at the state level, whether that's education criminal Justice. College campuses, all of these things usually for the most part are funded appropriated and dealt with at your state level. So it's imperative for state lawmakers to be able to come together and either learn from a state that did something horrifically wrong or learn from a state that did something the right way, and maybe tweak it a little bit to fit their own way to address the quotes that were just used. He said exactly what it is that we do. We are limited government. We are for free markets, and we are for federalism. We are for states rights. We believe at the end of the day the state's nine times out of ten can do it better than the federal government. And I think that's kind of demonstrating itself right now down the street from us with regards to the influence, though, I am still trying to kind of suss out where the line should be. If there is one answer to that between the public sector and the private sector. I mean, the Lisa mentioned that documentary United States have Alec PBS documentary wanna play a clip from that documentary with regards to the prison population, which has grown dramatically in recent decades, according to. A twenty eighteen report from the prison policy initiative there about two point three million people in America's legal system incarcerated in the legal system, the largest prison system in the world. Here's a clip from that documentary in which a member of the private sector speaking on criminal Justice reform said this at an Alec event. Crazy, not to know that you've already figured out that if I can talk you into doing this Bill. Mark Lawrence Simoni on the bond premiums..

florida DC Alex Senator Rick Scott Alec Mark Lawrence Simoni Alec PBS United States Shelby America Lisa