28 Burst results for "Print Magazine"

"print magazine" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

Unofficial Partner Podcast

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Unofficial Partner Podcast

"For all of my writing is at my newsletter. You can sign up for free. Because there's free post you can sign up paid subscription. And that gives you everything all the bells and whistles. But it's really it's not. Just sort of me pontificating you'll get some of that in the newsletter but it's real journalism the magazine style journalism that i've always done and i've got a big travel budget. I went to leipzig to do a story. On jesse marsch. The coach leipzig. Who very ted lonzo. Like by the way and i'm covering every single. Us world cup qualifier on site. I'm bringing the traditional sports illustrated quality. That i've always done there. That's going away from places like sports illustrated and hopefully there's going to be a market for that. Because i really do think that there should be places still for quality journalism. What's happened to sports illustrated. It's they got bought a couple years ago by a company that then licensed out. Its operation to a group that in my opinion had a strategy. That didn't match up with the history of quality sports illustrated. It was a clicks based strategy relying on advertising when facebook and google have taken all the advertising and only recently has that group changed the strategy for sports illustrated for the better and made it a subscription site again which incentivizes quality and. That's the only way. I think you're going to succeed but part of the big problems. The last twenty twenty five years was the sports illustrated didn't do enough in the digital space. The new york times has been the gold standard for adapting to the digital age in sports illustrated. Just like so many other places didn't do that and there was always enough money coming through for the print magazine that they didn't do enough digitally and didn't change enough. So that's what happened to sports illustrated. I have great affection for the place where i grew up wanting to write. I spent twenty five years there. I have a lot of friends who are still there producing quality work. It's just different now though. The print magazine comes out once a month. And i hope they can find a way to rebound. It's not a new story but society. One but i how you're out and people can find you and just finding what what was it like. Stepping out is illustrated into subset world personal journalism. It's been really exciting to to realize that. I can get interviews with big figures on my own based on the relationships that i've built over twenty five years. I can get your klopp to come on my podcast without having sports illustrated behind.

leipzig jesse marsch ted lonzo world cup The print magazine facebook The new york times google Us
"print magazine" Discussed on The DigitalMarketer Podcast

The DigitalMarketer Podcast

04:10 min | 9 months ago

"print magazine" Discussed on The DigitalMarketer Podcast

"Pretty brief long whenever you meandering path was sure. I've always been a huge advocate of small business in general Other having my own small business or helping other small businesses and organizations and sell probably over the last fifteen years or so. I got really into online content development between like videos and graphics and articles and books and even dvd's back in the day. So i've always been content. Jan print magazine was my original big organization that i built. But you know it's all been about content generation and really on that side. I've always really worked towards game experts. Who have the information connected to the public. Because a lotta times what you find especially with You know the digital environment is you have these people with just massive amounts of information on the profession or wherever they do but they don't know how to get it online so think from even you know since the start. When i had my magazine it was all about getting to those in helping them promote themselves by sharing the information with the world so my role has always been in the capacity of a organizing the information. so you take all of this data and these kind of disparate themes and pieces of information. How you connect them together into something cohesive so you know that's kind of my core skill set and i just like organizing thanks for coming in into digital marketer. Just the ideal environment is is is working with small business owners. It's working with a ton of content and it's working with you guys who created just massive amounts of information over the last. You know more than a decade. That i could get in there in organize in you know. Help share that with everyone. So that's kind of my abstract background. And how i got here today and what i love so much as you know really thinking of how you're partnering with with ryan with richard knowing ryan has this genius about messaging about offers enriches really like.

Jan print magazine ryan richard
How Mental Floss Evolved Over Its 20-Year History

The Business of Content

01:53 min | 1 year ago

How Mental Floss Evolved Over Its 20-Year History

"Hair. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. So you're the editor in chief of mental floss. Can we start with giving listeners. A little bit of context as to what mental floss is. It started as a print magazine right. Yes it actually was founded in a duke university dorm in two thousand one by two college students and Since then it has evolved into a website for curious minds where you can basically find You know answers to life's big questions or really fun and strange facts or interesting stories that you didn't know you needed to know And since we started the website has been visited by a billion people which is wild. So tell me a little more content focus so like it's it's not. It's not a newsy type magazine. A lot of its content is very evergreen. How would you describe like from land like an elevator. Pitch have what. What kind of world view is yes. So basically we are looking as you said kind of evergreen stuff were not You know we do cover like newsy stories but there are version of newsy stories. They're quirky they're interesting So we're not part of that news rat race which is nice because i do think people kind of look at mental floss as a bit of an escape from that And you know we're focusing on like weird historical stories and You know fun facts and and things of that nature. Speaking of fun facts. I i read that Mental floss print magazine made a cameo on friends. It did. it's actually been. I think it was on friends twice And it's been on a bunch of other tv shows including the oa and the magicians so Yeah for whatever reason. We've got fans in hollywood wishes which is nice.

Duke University Mental Floss Print Magazine Hollywood
MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

Media Voices

02:03 min | 1 year ago

MEL Magazine to Stop Publishing After Mass Layoffs From Owner Dollar Shave Club

"The main story which is focused on is the fact that Mal magazine has been funded by ohad rather been funded by dollarshaveclub since its launch in twenty fifteen butts on the twenty or god. When was it now. The announced that she was going to an end turn his sixth of much rights as was result. Tweet wasn't a tweet was was that twenty. Three staff has been left without jobs. So what does this mean. Does this anything about the wind branded content model or is this just a blip in terms of both malam magazine. And how we're gonna fill magazines. What is fundament. What's going here is fundamental to the brand to the brenda content model because the core and not from editor in chief. Just show mayer. He says let me put it this way. I don't think as aggregrate to have a single source of funding. Every every day of the company was praying sustainable. For me we part of the core dollarshaveclub business announce excite with a point. That's why you know. The print magazines that the matches company stopped all of these things. They're the male ceos whose funding will there. They're marketing channel effectively. And you know we've seen a particular last year we've seen so many marketing channels and platforms just kind of get excised from plans so to the point. That magazine was integral to dull shaped walls as a kind of you know obscure marketing channel. The i i didn't notice soon as it turns out. They didn't actually have the opportunity they weren't given the opportunity to fulfil they could have done it monetization cause remember thinking. Pt spoke to josh a couple months ago. And i remember listening to entering. Just thinking does a lot that they could be doing. Hasn't monetization head. The dollar shave dancing to be interested in pushing and that's great menendez's perspective and they got the chance to develop really restore voice without any financial pressure but the end of the let don't shape never gave the chance to really mayton self-sustainable

Mal Magazine Ohad Malam Magazine Mayer Josh Menendez
The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

Media Voices

06:06 min | 1 year ago

The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

"Hello everybody welcomes. This week's episode of media voices with the media focus podcast. It takes a look at all the news of the views from the medial past week. I must've thought that you just had was for my view. West hannah tila phone for the delicate mobile. A biannual independent print magazine creators collective focused on sharing experiences. How to get on independent field we spoke of how uninspired teachers land hana eventually stop own magazine carnage and women to all of it creative pasha. I love it. I love it. The best motivation to do anything is spite pop to begin with. We're going to do the news roundup. I want the two of you to pitch me. That's because while behind in principle. I don't see how it's going to practice. So twitter has announced paid super follows which are going gonna let you charge for extra content on its platform so follows that acquisition of new south platform review of ago. Which have said press going into this kind of subscription mentality and it's effectively. One of us are hit atrium but linked to your twitter account. That was going to say. That's my quick. What form is this actually going to take. Then it's not. Just it's not just gated access to tweets is it. I know i think it's i think it's about the freeth i've seen used a law is bonus content right so i think it's accessed other stuff. Additional stuff basically patron. Yes but with tegas or literally just like. Hey if you subscribe to this one-size-fits-all subscription thing then you'll get access to are the no drafts of things on writing or exclusive blood. Can you match access to earn released any details yet. Because i'm not really got time for launch. They just kind of floated the idea and at the end. This is what i call on the horizon. It's i think it's at the moment that said it's bonus tweets access like community groups and also announced like a community feature get the interest and policy usual. Twitter reaction was like the r.i.p to a hashtag that has been i swear to god. That's been going every time to has noticed any change for the past decade deb. When they went to two hundred eight character like this just the through twitter. Yeah so this is more. This is more tackle than just a new feature. This effectively away of i suppose helping people monetize twitter. There's also this that. I didn't onto as policy policy. You can also access to a newsletter subscription which is where the your view acquisition comes in. So that kind of trying to tie on. And if you're somebody like i suppose. Casey newton for water better example you can follow case in the entree to subscribed his news hour to get bonus connecticut community around his newsletter and because they will own the a platform loan a great new set. Apart for ill then be a way to kind of tile together around individuals. Yeah i think the the the package i spent to this is what's important not. That's what the twitter reaction seemed to be. People thinking that was going to make people pay for tweets say okay. Yeah that would kill the so. This is not the point now. Never feel competence websites free. And it's like well. It doesn't have any after you can help support. Your favorite creator is everything was moving. that way. anyway wasn't it. People are always looking for new ways to multistorey in hard heart created content. And this if it's tying into review an is offering bonuses. This seems to me something. That's some certain the southern people could potentially use well. I don't think it's for everybody. Yeah definitely so for instance. I do because everything i do is what's is garbage. I was thinking it depends on how you to the way we used to Typically is to respond to the people. See this is good. This is pod chip something other people that know. They've got phuong. Twenty tweet threads the half go insane value. Yes certainly and you know. This is a bunch of different tools. The people to round. But this the unroll feature where you can up great moments out sort of one long article almost so in a way if you can switch gate some of that behind the pay-cut not make sense for those people. As he said. I just at the the idea of paying for tweets. I'm reading up behind. But i think the community group that needs to subscription that i can see working. I mean is is one of these things where we're we're in. The bubble suit doesn't help people are looking at this from such bubbles perspective that i'd like to know what like a normal since the event normally. Yeah one of filthy moguls saviour exactly. Yeah some. I don't think that's what the twitter trenches day after day after day we go we go on about newsletters and actually most people. Most people don't get newsletters. I think you've got to see this as a beggar. Twitter play. I think twitter is collecting. Just is face because tunnel. War is collecting the best but all those pupils social media platforms you know this the newsletter pot of it and then those the audio part of the over and then they've also was it spaces so that that's that's the version club has a composting. Yeah and then if this community idea so it's a bunch of stuff coming together here that if no timeframe on any of that stuff but if you look twelve months or eighteen months the facts create interesting.

Twitter West Hannah Tila Casey Newton Pasha DEB Connecticut
"print magazine" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Pantheon

"Eyes or the best affordable items. You know Gosh they watch what's great about this. Touch against and and something that was really importance of bill on Suzanne and the family as well as. If they wanted you know he's connected everything everything to him as the same meaning almost like it was attached to every every single item, but they wanted items in the bill ones I been there for. The. The every day. Fan Right. Absolutely. You know like there's a you know I'm looking there. Still wine goats head soup ner. Yes. Three hundred dollars, right? Exactly. A novelty t shirts two to three hundred dollars a person is top four to six hundred dollars. So like you know like there's ice at every vintage vintage, best six to eight hundred dollars about three to three to five hundred dollars. assigned hotel bills getting sick the hotel del find seven, hundred dollars. So you know don't you know I think it's Susan good programs extol amazing. The other chance to look at on I did. Three amazing books of histories in this amazing box with gives you the impression that it looks like a five cabinet I'm glad you brought that up because you sell those and our readers could buy those correct. Absolutely tune of dollars. Yeah. And if it's Bill Wyman and it's like three drawers and each yes. But the state is actually catalog three day auctions and even if you couldn't afford to own anything in the actual auction itself you can buy the Kellogg and like bill you have it on his coffee table everything now is it would take everything from him. He has the memory pretty has the catalog, and if he's not he can open the hell out flip truest. The amazing items look think of all the stories look at the phonograph looking they're just you know like every so much less. Burdened something him now he's not insuring storing and worrying about something happening to you know his stuff that he saved for all these years. Ago Now it's. It's going to be dispersed all over the world here and joins options. There's the time this entire collection working together. This is GonNa be gone visible museums and fans and collectors, and there's GonNa be a dome women all over the world because the rolling stones I loved all over the world and. People having up. Now people have an opportunity to old something and you know very rarely the stop come up for auction, and then I've been doing options for years and it's very rare. The because warning stolen. Kept having the rest of the time if you care about I, keep finding even don't in virtue diving like the no came stick. Pins. All that is four of us, but this is an event where the fans can be engaged. I went to the rolling stones in nineteen, eighty, two in saint in July eighty two with my cousin she was crying because this is the last to the rolling stones. This is all during. The last chance. I was younger and I thought okay I'm going and I loved the lessons but I watched. Emotional about this because I really wasn't hadn't got to know the stone as well at that time. But she loved them and. That's What we're talking You know. What would thirty eight years? and. The storms are still going. Incredible and but also what the Navy now is to have all this collection ears and the joining his auctions told them to be the ones to. Represent this auction present this option, and we'll be responsible for dispersing each of these two people hold on to continue to appreciate them love them, enjoy them, and they'll take on a whole united. Agree, and he also collected vinyl too. I noticed that the stones first EP air which is that is pretty damn cool. Be have a fantastic final collection and you know vinyls last few years we seem violence. Joe So popular again and yes, that's a whole. That's a specific collector collects finance to have it all coming from one. Person Member of the warnings tool. So. Many great items. It's just it's it's incredible and we're seeing great interest already online people are looking and you know so many hundreds of thousands of people come to see the catalog see the auction online. So it's GonNa be really historic house right and sat on the Sunday I think it's GonNa. Be Great Fun filled and it's just rolling stone takes to continue enormous senior lions and cultural. So he'll join it's been around since the early sixties we've we've had so many crisis we've all. Survived. We're going to get through they. We're going to get through the election with President whatever happens happens, but we stood have music. We all went up music and now people have an opportunity to own something from the one of the greatest bands of all the time I completely agree it's always a pleasure talking to you and thanks for taking. Really appreciated and you know. I know readers are going to go and check out everything and I. Think you make a great point is if you don't win something which your bid, you can always by that catalogue, which is beautiful. So you know. Luke. Luke appreciate through covering this and. Hopefully, you'll be you going online to see the auction wars. And you'll be entertained for sure I know that. Yes. Absolutely. I'm I'm a big stones fan. Wow good for you and you know. Whether he ever had to be better, but I was. Interviewed him, but I have not met him in person but yes, he's A. Interesting. So modest and so numb. CELEB-. Owned remind them like. Like your opinion that you realize know but. Anyway thank you. Talk. com. Really appreciate you. Good luck. Thank you. Mark Laser on stay healthy and pay into Marin. Thanks Martin thanks for taking the time to talk to Goldmine magazine. This is Patrick Prince. Enter Goldman signing off don't forget to go to Gold Mine, DOT COM conflict exclusive exclusive interviews stuff that you won't find imprint, and if you want the print magazine, you can go on the newsstand and Barnes and noble and books a million and pick it up. Well, we'll see next time and don't forget to go to Julien's auctions to just look if you want at the property from Bill Wyman and his Rolling Stones Archive Julien's auctions dot com and in this auction will be live in Beverly Hills live Friday September eleventh Saturday September twelfth and Sunday September. Thirteenth.

Bill Wyman Julien Luke Suzanne Kellogg Goldmine magazine Susan Navy Patrick Prince Beverly Hills President Mark Laser Goldman Martin Joe Marin print magazine Barnes
Chicken Nugget Money

Pop Fashion

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Chicken Nugget Money

"Her magazine is going further into membership. They've been doing membership for a little over a year and small pockets of their publications. The concept is they want to rely less on advertising and create more of a revenue stream that isn't reliant on that. The latest is cosmo unlocked. From Cosmopolitan magazine it's unlimited. Digital Access adds an exclusive newsletter for two dollars a month. They said it's cheaper than chicken nuggets. That is true. I appreciate that that's a good reference point for me. I detect zero lies. For Twenty dollars a year, you can get access to the website, the print magazine and the Newsletter Sarah for twenty dollars they throw in the print version to without any membership you can access up to four free articles a month, and they've put the rest behind a firewall. So you could still access some reporting, but they're starting to kind of go in this general membership direction not across all their banners they're just kind of experimenting with a few. Lisa. Is this a good idea? I hate it. Oh No tell me why Well look if I'm thinking like a magazine executive I, love it because in the olden days like twenty years ago you would just by subscription to a print magazine and that was it. I mean this is a similar price point. This is not offensive in terms of. Your pay walls that I have seen right so that's fine. The problem is that me as a consumer, I'm getting totally subscription to out like the biggest part of my budget in terms of just simple line items is just like subscription subscription subscription it's the music streaming it's the TV streaming. It's you know the tech tools that I use online it's the publications that I subscribe to and. I think if you can get people and have them forget that they're paying every month and it's just a little bit like two dollars and it dings and it just goes through I think you're GonNa get a reasonable amount of money. But? I don't think it's. A replacement right now for finding advertiser dollars because I think a lot of people especially in this economic environment right now don't have a lot of. Emotional bandwidth to be tracking all their subscriptions. I like us idea I disagree with you. Because I went journalists to get paid. That's true and I hear you that all of the subscriptions were kind of subscription. Doubt Idea agree with that but they're kind of getting more into a few youtubers have patriotic levels and I've been thinking about subscribing to that because I think that they're putting out great content and there is I, think an advantage to being a member where you get closer to those creators you get just more of what they're putting out because it does something really great if phil something or it. Gets you excited about something or you just think about this great people doing like time management projects that help keep you on track but the thing is the membership has to be worth it yes and I'm personally going to be very selective about. Who I want to latch onto I don't know personally if cosmo appeals to me to be a member, I really want to latch on to a personality versus a corporation. I would like to support an independent artists or a group of artists that are putting something out to the world or some. VEGGIES and entire company that I do not know. Yeah. You you make an interesting point there because I do want to clarify that I. Don't hate this because hearst is doing with Cosmo I hate it because it's hard to manage for me as a consumer but use something interesting, which was you're supporting several creators on Patriots and Patriots a platform that aggregates your subscriptions. So you make one payment amount which I appreciate I do and I think I think the I think what publications should be doing. Working with other publications to build a platform to manage to bundle my subscriptions and be able to buy one off articles for the ones that I don't subscribe to all time bundle that. That is a free idea. Also, why didn't they start this ten years ago like the seems like such low hanging fruit that. Two dollars a month you're a member you get exclusive whatever why wasn't this happening ten years ago I don't understand. Like late teens, early twenties. Lisa it would have been a really easy birthday or. Whatever gift to give me the cosmos subscription to the exclusives Done Twenty Bucks I don't think it's a bad idea. I think it's a good idea but people are going to be selective about who they want to align themselves with or spend that like Doug it money with which I understand I get it. We only have so much attention. We only have so many dollars especially right now

Lisa Print Magazine Cosmopolitan Magazine Cosmo Phil Patriots Doug Sarah Executive Hearst
Chicken Nugget Money

Pop Fashion

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Chicken Nugget Money

"All right. Let's get to fashion news first story. Her magazine is going further into membership. They've been doing membership for a little over a year and small pockets of their publications. The concept is they want to rely less on advertising and create more of a revenue stream that isn't reliant on that. The latest is cosmo unlocked. From Cosmopolitan magazine it's unlimited. Digital Access adds an exclusive newsletter for two dollars a month. They said it's cheaper than chicken nuggets. That is true. I appreciate that that's a good reference point for me. I detect zero lies. For Twenty dollars a year, you can get access to the website, the print magazine and the Newsletter Sarah for twenty dollars they throw in the print version to without any membership you can access up to four free articles a month, and they've put the rest behind a firewall. So you could still access some reporting, but they're starting to kind of go in this general membership direction not across all their banners they're just kind of experimenting with a few. Lisa. Is this a good idea? I hate it. Oh No tell me why Well look if I'm thinking like a magazine executive I, love it because in the olden days like twenty years ago you would just by subscription to a print magazine and that was it. I mean this is a similar price point. This is not offensive in terms of. Your pay walls that I have seen right so that's fine. The problem is that me as a consumer, I'm getting totally subscription to out like the biggest part of my budget in terms of just simple line items is just like subscription subscription subscription it's the music streaming it's the TV streaming. It's you know the tech tools that I use online it's the publications that I subscribe to and. I think if you can get people and have them forget that they're paying every month and it's just a little bit like two dollars and it dings and it just goes through I think you're GonNa get a reasonable amount of money. But? I don't think it's. A replacement right now for finding advertiser dollars because I think a lot of people especially in this economic environment right now don't have a lot of. Emotional bandwidth to be tracking all their subscriptions. I like us idea I disagree with you. Because I went journalists to get paid. That's true and I hear you that all of the subscriptions were kind of subscription. Doubt Idea agree with that but they're kind of getting more into a few youtubers have patriotic levels and I've been thinking about subscribing to that because I think that they're putting out great content and there is I, think an advantage to being a member where you get closer to those creators you get just more of what they're putting out because it does something really great if phil something or it. Gets you excited about something or you just think about this great people doing like time management projects that help keep you on track but the thing is the membership has to be worth it yes and I'm personally going to be very selective about. Who I want to latch onto I don't know personally if cosmo appeals to me to be a member, I really want to latch on to a personality versus a corporation. I would like to support an independent artists or a group of artists that are putting something out to the world or some. VEGGIES and entire company that I do not know. Yeah. You you make an interesting point there because I do want to clarify that I. Don't hate this because hearst is doing with Cosmo I hate it because it's hard to manage for me as a consumer but use something interesting, which was you're supporting several creators on Patriots and Patriots a platform that aggregates your subscriptions. So you make one payment amount which I appreciate I do and I think I think the I think what publications should be doing. Working with other publications to build a platform to manage to bundle my subscriptions and be able to buy one off articles for the ones that I don't subscribe to all time bundle that. That is a free idea. Also, why didn't they start this ten years ago like the seems like such low hanging fruit that. Two dollars a month you're a member you get exclusive whatever why wasn't this happening ten years ago I don't understand. Like late teens, early twenties. Lisa it would have been a really easy birthday or. Whatever gift to give me the cosmos subscription to the exclusives

Lisa Print Magazine Cosmopolitan Magazine Phil Cosmo Patriots Sarah Executive Hearst
"print magazine" Discussed on Swarfcast

Swarfcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Swarfcast

"We did not copy off that we've had a blog swapped. Blog will originally when we were print magazine, it was just swore F- it was. My Dad's swore F- column was like the gossip. Columbine everything machining and then when we went online, it was worth blog that I promise you. We didn't we, didn't it? Returned And Swansea fine. All Right? Let's talk about machining business in Europe and the UK in particular when I think of machining manufacturing, the UK is not exactly at the top of my list. Although you know because we, we sell a lot of Whitman screw machine so I? Know about Coventry I know know they used to just churn out back in the day and I know once upon a time the U.. K. was big for manufacturing and then I'm not gonNA pretend I really know the history I heard somewhere. People said like Oh Thatcher came in, and then all the manufacturing went away, and then it just became like service based financial based economy, so that's not totally true correct. True if you lived in UK, and you and you listen to our mainstream media, they would have just said when you dig a bit deeper in represents navy, twenty percent of GDP. It's a massive in its H. Eighty percents of selects pulse, so it's massive for US manufacturing. Average Sally Weaver Wind, three, two thousand, which is base above the national average, is an outrage to coastal All Industries, so the UK fractured sector continues to prosper courses by news megabits in the states as well at the my Monday night, but it's the bodies dying, but equally good news we day, so you have to balance the factories. The factors are more efficiency who we've been late to the adoption of automation. Clearly, we need to improve Larry Wins in top fifty two years ago, not something. That's the way Boston implies new employees compared to who like France and Germany or Germany date not by identified Francis of top of my head, but when we went in the top fifty..

print magazine UK Larry Wins Europe All Industries Thatcher Boston Sally Weaver US Whitman navy France Germany Francis
Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

Fashion No Filter

07:03 min | 2 years ago

Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

"Name's done thoroughly and I am. The editor in chief of a magazine curated by fashion and odds journalists based in Paris mistrial like I was born in Sydney and moved over to Europe in two thousand nine. And I've been working on this magazine since two thousand nine is its digital editor in two thousand and ten. I became the editor in chief. It's a magazine that was started in Antwerp in two thousand one with the mission of creating Belgium's first name fashioned title and it quickly became something quite different as the concept is to invite one fashion designer to curate each each issue of the magazine at say cut blonde to them to express their interests their that loves their obsessions and all about the universe in around two hundred pages and it is something that has really done a a world to a in nearly twenty years with designers from France and Italy from Japan from England and from the United States and really a covering a very very broad aesthetic scope as well so it started with designers like Martin Majella and had Iraq common and alleviate tastes skins people that were really based in that late nineties Belgian aesthetic And then moving forward. We've we've worked with the many many different types of designers like Alexandra mckelway at Gucci. We've worked with Palo Pitcher Lee at Gallon Tina and almost issue which is just about to hit newsstands. In the coming days and was announced last week is with. Luke and Lucy mayor who are the Co curated directors of Joe Sanders Milan. I'm such a fan of theirs. I'm really excited to read this. But I'm I'm wondering Dan. How how. How do you put together a print magazine while in confinement? How did you make that work? We're very impressed so we have. I mean it's always a long process in this initiative. We've been working on for many months. So certain parts of it were very luckily finished. Just before legal confinement and other parts of it was still in the process as we as we were shutdown lockdown here in France so I was very lucky to have program this issue more or less to come out around this Around this time but it was slightly delayed. But I'm what we don was actually done most of the physical productions in the months of January to March already. So what was the biggest challenge for US was That we usually design the magazine together without team in Cologne as we work with a wonderful office codes Marais and Mirae in a column and so usually we would have gone there with looking Lucia and whichever designer we were with the time for a couple of days and we sit in the office with them and we design all the pages and we go through all of the process of of the structure and putting everything together in person. And this time we were unable to do that. As actually there was a case of covid nineteen in the in the office in Cologne in the earlier. Part of of quarantine. It was really off the table before travel was actually Was actually restricted. So we were forced to do everything. And and work from home as as were everybody else. What we were lucky was that we'd had most of Al Photo shoots finished so I'm one of the challenges was that we had photographers rushing to their lab. Zola the All over the place to get prints developed in time and we did shoot Many different cities New York Bacelona Paris. I slammed we. We really were all over the place. Summer talk of traveled others were in their in their hometown during their own country where they could drive and and do something locally which was nice. It wasn't all baked productions Anyway but it was many small things happening at once and and so we did have the risk of getting some of our images in time and then everything was luckily through except for one or two things that we really had too late by the wayside and we set to work designing the magazine from fall which was very challenging. Because we had people in time zones on my colleagues Blake was in Vancouver with his family so he was able to come over for the design periods so we had people working from Vancouver to France to Cologne and Milan only lockdown so it was quite a juggling act but al lost real stroke of luck in the middle. That was that in fact we would for the first time printing with an Italian printout because they work with a special technique where the side of the magazine is actually invisibly bound. So it's bound with stitches. Which then all these small booklets stitch together and then glued on the side so you have this invisible spine with the stitches showing through and they were actually considered an essential service in Italy. Even though they were northern Italy area that was very very heavily affected by the virus and Due to their Status as an essential services provider we were able to print in April saw so that was really interesting and as I said a very serendipitous experience. The putting the print magazine together nut time of course like putting any media together in that period. It was something that had to be done very sensitively. It had to be done with a lot of thought to the well that we were living in at a particular time as well as The That we're going into and We were also very prescient with that because Lucy and Luke's same for the issue that was decided last. July was the idea of human nature and Mother Nature and the interactions between those things that have been decided way before because I feel it so APP. Yes so we've found ourselves with the same that we'd already been working on for months. It was already very much connected to current events. In a way you know we're looking at indicted environments. We were looking at different kinds of architecture that was linked to people's domestic lives the process of them creating work. We were looking at also different elements of of race. We were looking into also things that sort of pivoted around the way we deal with nature and environment. It was something that I of course have to think about when riding my editor's letter which is one of the loss things that goes into the magazine and A very timeless publication. We're not the kind of magazine like You were discussing earlier. The whether it's vogue or New York Times it has to be on the on the point of of the actually of the news and really making strong statements Thereabouts but what we did have in wanted to do. He was still a really acknowledged the fact that we were coming out in this time and in this year Wanted that we will never forget in our in our

France Print Magazine Editor In Chief Editor United States Italy Lucy Luke Cologne Alexandra Mckelway Paris Europe Belgium Palo Pitcher Lee Antwerp Vancouver Martin Majella Gallon Tina New York Times New York Bacelona Paris
"print magazine" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on KGO 810

"GPS device is you know why would you get what you want in your car when you have your phone which is better to be updated a lot easier anyway I just know all that stuff is great so tell you you keep in touch with us let us know if you go forward with this congratulations it's really good stuff around but I think he'd be dropped not a pleasure speaking with you thanks Jack okay thanks guy I saw that check it out there where you get your podcast it's called the great fail I I just listen to this one and you'll like it she's good right AT eighty eight ten as a phone number did you could you think of anything else you know surprises me that they're still print magazines out you know the only one I can think that's probably worth while as people magazine because it's like it's you sit on the toilet but now people take their phones in their and sorry about that but what else was one I've mentioned this earlier you know the idea of owning music I don't think people will own it anymore by the way you never really own music when you bought did you know that when you bought like can download MP threes to read the agreement you don't own it you're licensed to use it it you don't own it that's why you can't sell it to somebody or profit or for a loss or anything you don't own it arm I can I was trying we have a DVD player somewhere in the house or try to find it the other day because I was a dual DVD I want to watch couldn't find it at the watch on my computer because I still have one that I barely use for that remember when DVDs or just it our blockbuster is still a blockbuster some morning added states I don't know where but it is it is it's it's fascinating anyway though that's great to get a local person that's really found something special again that's her name is Deborah Chen C. H. Ian and the podcast is called the great fail I dug a wide coming up at five o'clock in the five o'clock hour we're going to be hi again giving away a great gift certificate it too if you like Italian food be listing that'll come up in the first twenty minutes in the five o'clock hour and also we're gonna talk about the emir could the whole idea of quarters for colleges I I I I didn't I was always conflicted on that we'll talk a little bit about that coming up but next we'll take your phone calls eighty eighty eight ten and ask you are you what are you ready to do just to get out of your house did you feel safe in doing what what is one thing for me it's golf I feel safe to go play golf I know it makes me sound trumpet on it but I am I put a mask on I think I got with my two sons we don't get near anybody else you know you don't even touch the flag anymore so what is the thing that you want to do when you feel safe doing right now phone numbers eighty eighty eight township the schedule sheltering in place isn't always easy you're going stir crazy may we suggest our nightly John Rothman show our evening began and Peter so shells comfortable study where the candle light was just right hi fi was in the background on the wine was delicious which wine pairs best with John it's not what you drink but how much you drink how about some champagne now wonderful now but that usually shelter in place children the Roffman white sixty nine on KGO eight tablet should.

"print magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"A line from Eric Holcomb to playboy is that what you're doing because I don't know if I can let that happen on I mean I let a lot happened I sit back and I just kind of snicker and I got to I have the the Eric Holcomb to playboy line I don't know I need some help understanding now yeah we're gonna need explain crap do you incidence and I think that you're gonna need to explain that on our show our goals playboy has announced it is closing down its flagship magazine for the rest of the twenty twenty and it seems unlikely given the warning of the announcement and the state of the print magazine making that it will ever return wow all now this is Eric's father it's not Eric's fault the globalist as a class as a collect okay you're putting him in a collective of globalists who have taken you're really focused on something random and completely made up that I said after all these years now you're triggered by that I'm sorry about your subscription being canceled yeah does that make sense I'm sure you can find a replacement you know new demag though right or just go online I mean that's that's really what killed get any Kardashian feet you're gonna be fine I mean really it is more essential it's the ninety three W. I. B. C. mash up hammering the.

Eric Holcomb playboy flagship magazine print magazine demag twenty twenty Kardashian
BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

Trent365

01:03 min | 2 years ago

BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

"May recall back in October last year. I let you know that ages spy magazine have announced. They closing the doors as at the end of October pretty abruptly too but they've just announced that they've got new ownership and the print magazine is relaunching. May Twenty twenty maybe. She is the launch date for the New Asia. Spa Magazine. The social media channels have been activated already so you can follow online with their social media. Channels you can subscribe to the newsletter and you expect to see the magazine on shows in. May Two thousand twenty so great news for those in the spire and wellness business in Asia in general. Because there's lots of interesting updates and articles from that particular magazine. It's always been a pretty high quality magazine and I'm sure it will continue to be the same. So good luck to the folks at Ages Zine. I think a lot of people are going to be pretty happy to see these back. A lot of people were pretty surprised when they announced they were shutting down so quickly. And so it'll happen. This year May Twenty Twenty Ages Bama gazillion open for business

Twenty Twenty Spa Magazine Spy Magazine Print Magazine New Asia
Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

Digiday Podcast

12:28 min | 2 years ago

Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

"Up to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Marcy today. Joined by you've guessed a few times. Keith Crespin President of time Have been on here before your Bloomberg. You've now been at time since July. I want to get to the decision to go to time because I think it's really interesting because you were at engine very briefly and all of a sudden. I was shocked. I was like you're at time Explain making them. I'm sure this was like a unique opportunity but at the same time I'm really interested from a career perspective about you know. There's probably pressured like pass it up now. No actually it was interesting when I loved my time at Bloomberg. I was there for five years. Yeah and every year we were there. We grew double digits and in the final year week. We launched tick tock which now quick take You know timing. By the way David I just in You know launch to the New Economy Form. We had really successful year. We ended the up sixteen percent and for me like what I was. Struggling with personally was My entire career. I was very much in the revenue track and The advice I kept on getting was in order to one day ultimately become a president or CEO. I had to diversify myself. Move myself into a horizontal sort of role coo role and the opportunity to engine presented itself. And I thought that I was going to be there for two years or so And really begin to understand how to think about Bringing together thirteen disparate companies and and really sort of turning it into one cohesive unit and I was talking one day to A Greg set lock over at Spencer Stuart and this just goes to show how weird and serendipitous life can be at at. I asked him his advice on something and at the end of our conversation I was walking out and I turned around and I said to Him Greg. Thank you. That was really helpful advice. Like how can I ever return the favor? And he said to me. Do you know anyone who wants to be president of time and I said what are you talking about? And he said well you know mark and Lynn bought time back in November. And they're looking at how they want involve evolving and where they want to invest in it and They need more than just a cro and building up the team and They're they're just looking at the marketplace right. Now do me a favor. Send me the JD for it. I'll give you some people who I think might make sense. And that night. He sent it to me and I read it and I sort of was like Whoa. I've done everything here. Other than run consumer marketing and I went to bed and I woke up the next morning and I couldn't stop thinking about it and I wrote Greg a note and I said Greg if I wanted to throw my name into the game for this would you Allow me to sort of Be considered for the role. If not no worries I'll send you some other names. And he said let me speak to Edward Edward dealt with the CEO and Next thing you know Edward Said Let's meet on Friday. We had half an hour and the half an hour went two and a half hours and Edward at the end of the meeting. Said what are you doing a Monday and I said well? I'M GOING TO LONDON. And he said it's a shame if you're free Monday at heavy meet with mark. I said Benny off said yes. So I said we'll get meeting with Mark Benny off a Monday. And it was Friday at five thirty. I go I will I'll move my trip to London and so Edward takes out his phone any texts mark and gets back. He says Cheryl on Monday I think it was nine. Am and so. I changed my my trip around London Monday morning. I met with Mark coincidentally was the day that salesforce bought. Tableau so the nine meeting moved to twelve because he was on on the news and everything and three and a half tests. I is right. I mean that's not like a small deal no not not in the slightest right I was I was blown away. The then he's still kept the meeting but it was an amazing Do some multibillion dollar deal like before lunch and then and then you know I. I don't know how to respond to that regulate from from my end but I It's like how was your day. spent a few billion But but then You know he met with Lynn his wife. And you know everyone at time and and You know the Family Office. Because we are privately owned entity any offs and So what attract? But what attracted you to the opportunity? Because I mean I think a lot of people would look time as a quote unquote legacy publication. Obviously having A billionaire benefactor. Maybe we can talk about whether it's a benefactor or like an owner wanting to make like a real profit is an advantage but you know from the outside it would seem like a pretty challenged brand went through a several Tough years shirts changed hands. I think the answer to that is how I think I look. Industry is I look at the Industry. Ultimately is it's it's an amazing industry loved this industry. I think that more people should come into this industry as as people think it's a scary industry I remember we talked about one time. Doing like a confessions of an optimist. I love like these like distraught. Well it's all anonymous pessimists and I'm going to go on the record optimist and you know like Warren. Buffet has a great quote of you know. Be Fearful when others ingredient greedy when others are fearful and. I think that this is a great moment. Where if you have the support And you know the intent of time is to be a profitable business ended is moving in that direction and we are up in Q. One and we are. We're up in January. We'RE PROJECTING UP IN Q. One we are going to be. We're aiming to be profitable this year from a cash flow basis but And that's our intent is to run a responsible business but If you look at my career I went to wired and I started at wired the week after it was about to be closed for the DOT COM bubble. That was my first job. As a sales associate I worked on the launches I work on turnarounds and I work on saves right so like like I like the idea of If the business is ultimately debate called Meets Investment Advisor. The time brand is one of those incredible brands. Incredible Ninety seven year history it actually has great foundational elements of it. But it's gone through say ten years of neglect Through mismanagement through transitions of owners. And now that it has dedicated focused resources. I think that we're in a really strong position to Evolve the time brand to really capture the attention of of the next generation of consumers and from my perspective as I kept on looking at the deck and assessing this opportunity would I really saw was the challenges at the end of the day was evolution of Time magazine to Time. Right because everyone. We'll call it. Time magazine and you have to sort of evolve to the time brand and then is it relevant to the next generation of consumers. Yeah right and when you look at the second part I and you look at all of the hard work that Well that's critical right to the strategy. Because I mean you can milk legacy brands. That means something to a certain demographic I mean like good housekeeping is a fantastic. It's a good business That doesn't mean it. It's gotTA challenge so. Let me ask you a question. Who Do you think reads? Time magazine from Demographic Perspective the magazine itself Give me the most general demographics. You could possibly imagine my mom really seeing. It's an older female. Yeah okay so I either get older female older male right If you look at time on its social feeds right on twitter. We have sixteen and a half million followers on instagram. Eight and a half million followers on facebook twelve and a half million followers linked in two million magazine hold on. I'm going to second the demographic of that sixty one percent under the age of thirty five Fifty two percent female and thirty three percent non Caucasian. And so what you find is is that you have this entire aspect of the time brand not the magazine that reaches a completely different demographic that is showing the value to the next generation. The issue has been that none of those areas have been productized. None of them has been marketed as time. The brand is always been sort of presented as Time magazine. And so when you think about it you don't want to discount the magazines value. The magazines values tremendous the reason that we have such huge footprint socially is because of the history of ninety seven years that we have is the magazine but The brand has evolved to a new generation to mean something totally different. But I guess how do you square both sides right because when I think of of time the end from the outside Lake I think of two halves there was like these sort of d day commemoration issue half and ensure that is like outrageously profitable Which is obviously for a different generation. And then there's a kind of like I like time went into that sort of viral content sort of thing where like ton of facebook friendly fair and and Social content that gets gets big numbers and a lot of people. Got Those kind of big numbers but mostly on differentiated. Kind of stuff that You know it just. It's it's feeding the Internet beast. Now I think that that's a fair assessment of the marketing industry of the media industry. I don't necessarily agree that that's where we've gone with time on social but I think that what's happened if I can sort of step back for a second is is if you look at sort of the industry at large Historically a brand Served as the demand within the marketplace in the supply was the consumer right and that was when time was just a magazine. That's when everyone was just magazine prior to the Internet prior to the equity of connectivity of all of these devices when all of a sudden everyone is connected. I'm really interesting thing happens. Which is that. The supply becomes the brand right like time becomes a supply and demand becomes the consumers time right And that's the only thing that everyone is sort of focusing on is is like. How do you capture consumers time? Now what's interesting against that equation is is that when a brand is. The supply and supplies ultimately unlimited. Like your job is as you have to think about. Sort of. What's the value that you provide them? What's The utility you provide? But it doesn't mean that you have to do that. Holistically across everything in a In a synergistic way what it means is that you have to think about what is the experience that the consumer wants and then how do they actually perceive your brand so in a world of infinite choice? You think that's actually dream. But what actually happens? Is that the consumer with their timers paralyzed because they have like unlimited selection. And so we're the time brand actually presents a tremendous amount of power is in this red border now. The red border for some people manifest itself as a print magazine right and that's one way of experiencing sort of the red border for others just manifest itself as as online video right we produce four hundred digital videos a month For some people it is how we do our twitter handle and how we give will sort of information and news in that area. In some instances it's digitally in some instances like we will move into to the audio space. But I think that for us what we WANNA realize is that people don't have relationships with platforms anymore. They have relationships with how they want to experience the content and then secondarily Certain Demos are going to experience the contents completely differently. And it's an advantage to say. Well we know that the magazine reaches an older demographic and we know that time for kids is a younger demographic why wouldn't if we ever consumer is D- And productized time for kids in a manner that can be sort of a a toy for a child or a kit for child's surrounding education. Why wouldn't we promote it to the older demographic that's probably the parents or the

Time Magazine Mark Benny Edward Edward Greg Twitter Facebook Bloomberg President Trump London Lynn CEO Brian Marcy Keith Crespin COO Spencer Stuart David Family Office Cheryl Buffet
"print magazine" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Elevate: The Official Podcast of Elite Agent Magazine

"Elevate Your Business. On Samantha McLean editor relief agent. And I'm joined once again by market but that's me that is you and I have something a bit different for everybody today. I well fine cold really. That doesn't happen that often. Does it get cold all the time. But I can tell you that the CEO of doesn't call me all the time you WanNa take take so basically at the last couple of weeks so we've been doing some marketing for prop twenty this fantastic new initiatives that are going on. Friedman's for all our customer this all around the country. Choose your adventure. So this special coming up in the print magazine says everyone's going to see that you know when it comes at a week or two so I had owen on the firing talking about kiss thoughts on top twenty so sit Dream Soy oh and one record this conversation and we contend inward podcast like. There's nothing like you know. Repenting content there on the spot on the fly with the CEO of Rei put on spot but anyway he was really great about it and he said Yeah. So let's see how we go and I think we're kind of trying to get back into the graces of Twenty twenty but I think you've also covered off on a few different aspects. Not just dropped twenty. We're going to be awesome. I mean the last time he's without any more actually on a podcast about twelve months ago. Organized podcast twelve months ago. Yeah where we talked about like he just stepped into. Ceo's role to warm up. Now Yeah Yeah and so. We looked at the future back in what he'd hoped for in two months and I think even his podcast you'll hear is by saying that we would terawatt predicting that feature toward nineteen. Once out of the few people did it was It was near extremes. Really think we've perfect to that. She talks but anyway. And I want you guys to know that this is really great because I have a Christmas a lot of things happened bushfires and because now and I want to talk about these people that still want to rinse out this bedrooms two victims of bushfires Christmas Can do that. Freon flat might still come like they're really Kane on bringing people to get the heavier hitter sales in Kolzig and also this great news about Prop Twenty. So yes. This is a conversation is supposed to even rei update if you like with big boss. Cotton talk so so what you've got here you'll have to forgive the audio a little bit because it does kind of cutting in and out and it was something that we decided to do on the fly which is pretty exciting that we can do that here. Late agent so be really great. Feta listening to what owners had to say about the. That's gotten eat. It's coming in what piece predictions for the Real Estate Industry. Off Twenty Twenty and obviously get in there and register for prop twenty. We've talked to a lot of the speakers and it sets shaking up between amazing event. It's a great event is going to be a good one and if you want to register that good appropriate dot COM dot. Au absolutely and also if you're on the notes from this podcast. Unusual elite agent elevate dot com joy. Sam's without.

Twenty twenty Rei CEO Samantha McLean editor Friedman Freon Kane print magazine Sam owen Kolzig
"print magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Quarterly in the print magazine for girls ages five to twelve is now ready to release its first graphic novel and biology which showcases the lives of twenty five extraordinary women whose courage and accomplishments transformed history I'm talking about noise makers twenty five women who raise their voices and changed the world is going to hit the world speaking of it February fourth with more than two hundred pages of inspiring story telling and fantastic artwork joining me on the line right now is the editor in chief and founder of kazoo Ehrenfried Erin first congratulations on this anthology and secondly welcome to the program how are you I'm wonderful thank you so much for having me when I saw this project I was overjoyed if only because and I'm gonna be selfish there are certain names that I expect to see I expect to see someone profile and Eleanor Roosevelt I would expect right on one to profile something like maybe Julia child but when I see names like madam CJ Walker it warms my heart because these are stories in names and great contributions that are not often celebrated so let me start there how did you go about creating this list and biographies of these fantastic women you wanted to profile in this particular graphic novel medium yeah it's so you know when we said we're going to profile twenty five women who raise their voices and changed the world it feels like an overwhelming task to kick the twenty five women but the book grew out of because the magazine and in the magazine we cover certain topics in every issue we cover engineering we cover cooking we cover science and biology and so those sections in the magazine form the chapters of the book so we had those tellers ready to go out and it becomes a much more do of all task to try to say okay we need for our five activists that we wanna profile we need for athletes who want to profile so it made it less overwhelming I wanted to include women that kids might already know like Frida Kahlo or Rosa Parks it was so important to tell them stories that they had never heard before we don't learn new things in school and it's so important for girls to know that they can be the heroes of their own story they don't have to be the side kick and women have been raising their voice and making history and changing the world since the beginning of time I love everything you said about that and there's something else that I love that this book is not and I repeat is not coming out during women's history month I believe we should not section off the contributions of people in a given month or anything and I'm glad that you're saying this is not just the women's history is American history it's all year round history and with that in here's my question did you receive any type of push back against doing a project like this now you know so it started with the magazine we launched it and twenty sixteen and we took its Kickstarter because I wanted to see if there are enough people out there who would support the idea of having a magazine for girls with no ads that celebrated girl tripping strong smart fear center themselves seems like such an obvious concept but it's really radical when you see what's out there on the newsstand for girls right now the only other yeah it's like a princess there nothing go through your only in let me get you but yeah it's sad but it's so painfully true right yeah within thirty days we rate the hundred and seventy one thousand dollars from over three thousand people so there was a ground swell of enthusiasm to make a project like this and then the book noise makers was just a natural extension of what we are doing in the magazine you chose the people I'm quite sure you did the research for their biographies how do you go about bringing their stories to life in this type of medium well I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to work with the most talented women and non binary comic artists working in the median today so they made my job easy they are just a rock star I telling stories in the comic form they're making beautiful art the hard part was making sure the stories provided enough contact for our readers to ask you that our girl five to twelve or kids so there are some cases where we have to make things that are very scary a little less scary or we have to sort of explain the history behind certain story but whenever I was talking to any of the artists like that okay if a kid reading the comic feels like she wants to dress up as best person for Halloween which is one of the highest compliment to kid can pay to any figure in history then you've done your job right so let's go there let's tell these stories capture their imagination let's make them exciting and thrilling and that's what they did I know that your mother and I know that you're very sensitive to the imagery that you put forth for your children so I want you to remember back to when you were a child what were some of the images or the people or the movers and shakers who most impacted you as a child now my goodness oh wow that's a good question I probably should have thought most of what he tells yeah the funny thing is like when I went back to my childhood like I just adored Wonder Woman Lynda Carter I had Wonder Woman under route I had you know the whole the dolls everything she was like her medical Jatin her golden lasso like that was just so powerful and strong and smart and she is like white you know who I idolized by gas in terms of women in real life I mean I always looked up to my grandmother who help one of the first elected offices in Pennsylvania she went to the Juilliard School of music and raise a family she was a single mom and and she was always such a strong figure in my life and I looked up to her a lot when you have all these fantastic women who some people know about some people don't know about I'm quite sure they would open these pages and they say yeah I know who Mother Jones was or I know who Josephine Baker was how do you go about putting them in an order and I know you've group them but it's but how do you put in an order which makes sense and doesn't let's be honest offend a certain group of people funny I never thought about offending anybody who come on you know the world we live in everyone's offended about yeah maybe I just don't care I mean I I just wanted to make a book that kids would love to read and would be fun to read and they can learn about powerful women throughout history that those were the book doesn't feel dusty or distant I think that's one of the hard things about teaching history the kids you're so far away and what I wanted to do with this book and keep everything close and that's why at the beginning of every chapter we have this sort of checklist of character traits that you can compare yourself to each of the women you can say I like to do profissional too just like merry ending maybe one day I can become a paleontologist I like to sing too maybe I could be like Josephine Baker I like to dance to I mean I think it's so important for girls to be able to be themselves in all of these powerful women and also like we live in a time like you mentioned in our political culture where everything feels so big and so overwhelming and can feel so scary and I feel like this book let him know that you can be one person one person and you can be up against whatever the world's gonna throw at you and if you keep calling you could make a change if you're just tuning in my guess on the line right now is Erin breed she is the editor in chief and founder of because you which is the quarterly in the print magazine for girls ages five to twelve they're celebrating the impending release on February fourth the new book graphic novel noise makers twenty five women who raise their voices and changed the world more with Ehrenfried just a moment KFI am six forty we're live everywhere on the I heart radio app now to the news room for.

"print magazine" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

The Kindle Chronicles

11:58 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on The Kindle Chronicles

"And then I'm just going to can lend limited so okay so I just click that button and so so now it's part of and I do subscribe to some of the other newsletters from Amazon. And now that's activated as one that I receive but now does it turn orange if I've selected or if I haven't selected own Orange if you have I don't right now okay okay so I think I was actually subscribed so that's not weekly. It doesn't seem like shows. Does it show up just occasionally about once a week does okay. There's different versions of it. That go out depending on different customer groups right and so if I subscribed to it I'm going to see things in the newsletter glitter that take into account how actually using my kindle unlimited subscription but the other thing I'll say is we want to show you that right because we want it to be customized for you pull we also hear from customers is. She'll be something different. That's why apart it kindle limited not to just read one kind of book but to have a little bit of the freedom Without necessarily to spend more money but I can browse different categories. I personally have used the service that we hear that from customers as well. Yeah one thing. I like about the magazines that show up. You've got two different views. One is sort of the kindle view. It's just the text and and you can Read it like you would a kindle book and then the I don't know what you call the other view it looks more just like a pdf of the actual magazine page. What do you call those two views? Let's the global view. Yeah refillable is more like a reading kindle book it did doesn't have all the art in it and then the other one is like a page view that looks more like you're just looking at the print magazine replica. Yeah yeah and I find it. Nice to be able to switch between those two views because sometimes it's it's pleasing to see how magazine it's taking the time to lay out an article. But then other times I just want to read the words and I. It's my choice. I can just switch between the two. You said that the magazines start showing up at twenty sixteen so three years. Here's what kind of customer reaction have you had Two adding magazines too can limited because your reaction has been positive. We know with magazine editions and all of the other additions editions that we've made people like variety they they. I remember one customer anecdote that I got was. It's it's just nice to see different things coming in. That's what keeps the program fresh exciting and we you know that's what we're working on as well. Yeah exactly now another thing I don't. I don't think I noticed when it happened when Kennel Unlimited started I think it was just available in the US. But at this point I take it. It's available overseas as well. Yeah it's available thirteen marketplaces so UK. Germany France Italy Spain India China Japan Brazil Mexico Canada in Australia and so in each of those markets the kindle unlimited selection would be in that language and tailored to the readers in those markets as soon correct and then when customers sign up. They're paying in their local currency. Reut interesting I think one challenge I felt in in Kimberlin unlimited is just knowing how many things I could take advantage of in read but how to find them. You know. There's some general all categories. But I think sometimes I'm thinking well who are the Jodi Pico or or Andy we're level. Authors versus there's many authors that would be less well-known because they're coming in through kindle direct publishing. I assume so. What are some of the ways? The team has come up with just to help a busy reader find what they might really enjoy reading and kindle unlimited. Yeah so a couple of things. I talked about the newsletter. That's one one is just the storefront storefront right. That we're constantly curing so Amazon dot com slash kindle limited that will be that storefront another thing that we know we hear from customers and we readers as they like you said they really WanNa find their favorite authors. So we've worked it. Integrate kindle limited with different features in the kindle store in Amazon John so I'll give an example of one that centers around authors. Today if you go on to say a book Page on Amazon Let's let's say you go wolf by Hugh Howey name is a hyperlink when you click on his name you go to his page and when you go to his page page you have the option of following him as an author so there's a button called follow the new follow author. You're basically saying I'm interested in this author author and if you're a kindle unlimited member when that author adds a new book to Kindle Limited you'll hear from us they're in-app notification or in email now and so it's pretty cool when you you know give us you follow all these authors that were able to tell you. This new book is in the service because like I told Oh you were working really hard to add new books of the service all the time. Oh that's smart and you would alert me to the fact that not because you might have book that isn't available through kindle unlimited and you only use that notification for me if it was one that was well I would tell you. He has a new book available. But I wouldn't say that it's in Kendall unlimited unless it is oh I see right yeah cool. That's good any other tools that that we can use to get the newsletter you get the the storefront and the notifications anything else that helps people find. Ku books that look. Yeah you know for e reader customers and in-app customers we have one curated view called based on your reading and Kendall Unlimited and so you'll see again books that are in the program that we recommend to you based on books that you read in the past I I personally get a lot of recommendations out of that particular. We call placement. So that's another one to watch out for out so in the APP or on e reader we have lots of customize recommendations for customers. So that's another place that they can go to to refine on my iphone kindle APP. Where would I find find that now? Did you discover K. Discovery. Yeah Yup Oh then there's can limited so tap on that uh-huh and that's showing me new notable but also there's that's telling you the storefront okay. Oh that's just just that's my That's another way to get a storefront when I'm actually on my device and if I was reading My fire tablet a AH Kendall. BUHL combined fire tablet. There'd be a similar way to navigate to the kindle unlimited storefront correct. Yeah all right this is good. This is good glad. Go Ask all these questions can be power user for New Customer right so new when a new customer signs is up we also have a selection of three to five titles right right in there sign up flow that we think that they'll be interested in so they can immediately at least start picking a few books for and to start their membership. Okay and you're going to be able to suggest those based on what what they bought for other books or we can suggest based on what they've done in the past weekend suggests some things that are popular from other readers. Lots of different ways is that we can do that now. It's still nine dollars. Ninety nine cents a month as it was at the beginning and and in terms of break even I guess that kind of depends on the average cost of books that If you if you bought got them instead of US them through kindle unlimited you'd be buying them and you might have some sense of how many books you'd have to read in a month in order to make k you break even but would kind of guidance. Do you give customers on that question. I think it's you know. Obviously it's a very personal decision. There are books and Kindle Limited that are nine ninety nine so if you just read that that book like you're good the editing I'll say is we have a thirty day free trial we have other introductory offers so for folks who are just trying to figure out whether this is the right service for then you know you can do that at a lower price point right. I am matched by this time. You know the most common reason somebody tries is a thirty day. Subscription to kill limited sticks with it I think in my own case I like it as a way to kind of. It's like a long sample audits. It gives me a chance to try books without buying them book by book. So it's not really turning out to be away. That did I read a lot of books but I'm using it more for discovery. Is that a common reason that people are attracted to the program and stay with it. Yeah that's one reason Another one is while the books that I I love these series. Kendall Limited has lots of series and that's valuable to me. I love it for trips. That's when I do a lot of reading at I don't want to think about the price tag on every single purchase that I make I just want to be focusing on trying different books. I feel less guilty. I don't like something because you know I can. I can quickly go to something else. There's so many types of readers. There's so many reasons and so we're just trying to do is make a service. That's really valuable compelling to delight readers. My wife is a veracious reader of mysteries and I assume that you've got a robust library in that Joe Ruble at what can you say in general terms about how How much good stuff a mystery lover is going to find a Kennel unlimited? It's definitely one of a popular genre within the service. So I'd love to get her feedback. Doc Tell her she can tell me how we're doing. Okay Good I. She's she's a little shy when I say hey I want to see what's on your kindle so I can talk about on the show. I don't always get a positive reaction from that so I'd have to couch carefully Well now one thing that I think is probably still the true as it was was it with the beginning of kindle unlimited this that None of the big publishers were making their titles available. Is that still the case. Now we actually have had participation dissipation from big five publisher. One example is harpercollins and we have other publishers. Well that have been Involved in the program like Houghton Mifflin Norton and open road are other good examples and some of the Well maybe the big four there are some that just aren't participating at this point. That's right okay. I suppose you'd say ask them. But what's what's your sense of why they aren't participating. We might all authors and publishers to participate in Kendall Limited. So I guess you're right lead we probably would have stuff okay and Amazon. Publishing books are available. I assume yeah. All of those are incandescent limited. Well another Thing that your general manager of his prime reading launched in October two thousand sixteen. What what does that program so prime reading is a benefit for prime members? So if you have a free membership you have access to over a thousand fee books six audible.

kindle Kindle Limited Amazon US Kendall Unlimited Kendall Limited Kennel Unlimited Kendall UK print magazine Houghton Mifflin Norton Kimberlin Hugh Howey Ku
NBC extends exclusive ad sales contract with Apple News, to expand to Apple Stocks

Mac OS Ken

01:22 min | 2 years ago

NBC extends exclusive ad sales contract with Apple News, to expand to Apple Stocks

"And NBC universal or getting a little closer axios says the peacock network has extended its partnership with Apple News to now be the Gustav Seller of ads in Apple stocks as well as apple news assuming the platform staying power it's a pretty good deal while each publisher apple news can sell ads paired with their own content NBC universal will be able to sell ads paired with all of it on both the general news feed as well as the feed for stocks how much does NBC make from the deal a meaningful amount is the most one exotic would say Sean Bhatia NBC Universal's executive vp of business operations and strategy wouldn't give hard numbers though he did say it's a very meaningful Lee sized business compared to what we do on Youtube twitter or snapchat if you are an Apple News Peru's earlier you're of a rarefied apparently according to the Peace Bhatia has found that the verticals that sell well on Apple News or the same that ten frequent print magazines like financial Sir pisses luxury and entertainment. You know what doesn't work well on apple news perfume samples the technology is just not

Apple News Apple Nbc Universal NBC Peace Bhatia Sean Bhatia Peacock Network Executive Vp Peru Publisher LEE
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 2 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
"print magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

08:13 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"What they all boil down to is this and we've exposed on the show back awhile ago I don't wanna go deep into there's a great piece night I did not find it because the print magazine is not the same as the website and maybe if there someplace but they they tend to put those up after you after the magazines out of circulation so the most recent is up there right now but anyway all of this negotiation around we're gonna work on agreement were we have trade with Mexico and Canada and the U. S. and are gonna do through T. P. P. or nafta or whatever you wanna call MS MCA whatever it's all be S. all of it even the most current one because here's what's really happening they are laying the foundation for more government huge Leviathan bureaucratic government more bureaucracy tons of it and the whole thing is around it let's put it this way it takes away from an American farmer contacting someone and say Englander China or chill or as a chief and say Hey I wanna I wanna say some stuff okay let's do it no no no does go like that you have to go through some kind of a a trade board you've got to go through some kind of possibly all get together every all the farmers and put their stuff in one big band who are paid a certain amount based on currency exchange or currency devaluation you get the point it's all B. S. and it's scary because what this really comes down to is these let's call them soon sovereignty that's exactly what they're who said it was on in fact it's on the peace in the in the print magazine that the best way I was Kissinger Henry Kissinger the best way to bring about a war the New World order one world government I'm paraphrasing it was exactly what he said is to bring about these these bureaucratic sovereignty is you get America Canada and Mexico all linked together I think I always play this a hundred thousand times and now you've got a country based on trade that that those three mixed together yes they still have their their names and therefore he will only borders which are becoming more meaningless by the day and that's it now would you do with that well now you like that what the one down there that's got Bolivia Paraguay Venice with whatever in and then that gets linked at some point with the European Union which is already semblance of the borders off of every country in it there there are irrelevant other federal currency standing army the whole nine yards so that's what it's all about getting rid of the nation state these trade agreements are about getting rid of the nation state and the this is not paranoia this is that eight chance stuff where they're willing to make an arrest me was a bit of an upswing but the the bottom line on this is this is not tin foil helmet paranoia it's the way of the world now with the swamp with the one world of the New World order one world government clowns running everything and it in in in in the immediate it's somewhat comfortable for some people but are you gonna be comfortable down the pike talking about with regard to this GM they were GM is pretty much outsourced to the rest of the world no matter what we do and and there's no out of it because again the car companies are not in business to subsidize workers it's not the way it works never has been that way never been that way the union overplayed their hand way back when making the whole thing out to be Hey with that and that and the union is a socialist construct instances make decorate for the get go communist less socials construct unions are that's it has nothing to do with a somebody saying hammer started business make product when I heard these guys to make the product of their pay them agreed upon wage and I'm gonna make a bunch of money no the union came in and said no you're gonna give us this this and this or else we'll shut your business down dead in communism I don't know what it but the bottom line is is that right now other ways of the world this is becoming a let's call standard operating procedure and kind of up a stealth way of bringing about a globalist well one world New World order your talks about all the time has in public hearing this everywhere they're great expose on this one of them have been several of them is in the new American magazine it was the I think the last issue or second less issue back got to see this stuff so that's for rent so that don't think for one minute that this will not all be tied together these these choirs I sued all countries if you will sovereignty is this call because it'll be for example music as example the European Union there there are exactly that so that some point will be melded with the Pacific that's what the transpacific partnership was all about by the way remember that we expose that on the show as soon as we found exposed by Jeff sessions yeah and that's what that was all about trump came and said no we're not going to do that but on the other hand trump's guys are working on this New Mexico Canada in the new deal were recall on it and it's the same kind of thing and much of it borrows from the trans Pacific partnership so the end is always couched in we're gonna have cheaper goods we're gonna have easy easier access to goods products services everybody was going to be better but what they're doing to make people's lives better is there sand blasting off of the world the sovereignty of the nation state and the sovereignty of the United States of America the look at as evolution I look at a strip evil because this is the first country ever ever ever ever based on the fact that we don't need a king telling us what do anyway you can see that in the new American magazine which you should be subscribing to talk to that Tellem don't hang out we've looked yep I'm still blown the face to our bonuses I just posted something up on Facebook that I found quite by accident mess around over there looking for the the the piece I wanted to share with you which I'm telling you is a new American magazine and it's about how the farm subsidies that came down fact let me reference it here now I'm completely lost it anyway farm subsidies are not going to the farmers here yeah here it is right here it says billions in farm subsidies going to giant multinational agricultural business not family farms well I got I got caught up in something called the hunt thank you Wendy exes looks fabulous it's a trailer for a movie called the hunt the trailer for two thousand nineteen off that's going to make it to a media to Netflix I hope it does I can't go to a movie theater I can't mingle with the general public on movie theater I'm like it's on me but anyway this pieces looks of standing up the billions in farm bailouts going to giant multinational Agra businesses not family farms and they point out in here we're not gonna get too deep into this one but the family farmers get maybe five grant where as a somebody like archer Daniels or whatever companies like that they're getting millions millions of ounces numbers come here often one deal information a lots of fun every Monday through Friday three to six PM eastern standard thank you so much for supporting the people support us about them we are nothing that's literally we're going over by others from a bunch of right now we'll be right we said it somewhere how do they keep up.

print magazine nine yards one minute
"print magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Know so you can make some dough. Excuse, though, blooberg market on seven hundred jealousy. Well, yes it is. Patrice sikora. Right. Mike McConnell about money stuff here. All right. US businesses, the China watch continues. And a lot of people need China to make their money to make their money into grow, and they're watching the trade tensions heat up, especially President Trump's decision to blacklist while we technologies that course it's big spot phone maker, and the most obvious target right now for Beijing is while ways rival apple apple gets a fifth of its revenue from China and it makes phones there so they could be hit, but then Marriott international? They have plans to open more than thirty hotels in China, this year, more than three hundred new hotels are planned, eventually for the country, China, also increasingly important market for Nike, believe it or not Nike sponsors. The Shanghai marathon and even drugmaker Merck is involved here because China's regular recently east restrictions on drugs from overseas and Merck's HP vaccine Gardasil the cancer, drug, Katrina fueled a first quarter, jump a fifty eight percent in China sale. Nls, but it's a big deal. That is a big deal. All right. Elsewhere. In the world, what do we have Sports Illustrated is being sold? Yep. It's going for one hundred ten million dollars to authentic brands, which plans to license the name the current owner is Meredith corporation, and they will continue to publish the Sports Illustrated print magazine, and manage the website for at least two years, but authentic brands is going to go from the licensing deals. So we could see the Sports Illustrated named come up on everything from consumer goods to sports gambling services. I'll bet the sports gambling thing is going to be I wouldn't be surprised Warren Buffett I could get lunch with Warren Buffett. What does it usually go for the fundraiser will mention right? Five grand? I saw somewhere that was the first that was the first auction in two thousand twenty five thousand at twenty five thousand has already been bid. So you're gonna have to go above that for the bidding this year. Let's see last year's bidding topped out at three point three million. But the all. All time. High is a believe it's three point four six million. Really? Yes. And of course, you have lunch with him at a New York steakhouse and the auction benefits glide essential Cisco charity whose programs dress, hunger, poverty and homelessness, so we're Votto online once, and it was Paul McCartney and Warren Buffett sitting outside a steakhouse, the photos like a ten year old kid who recognizes them, somehow and is taking a selfie of himself with them sitting on a bench behind a ten year old. The young kid. Well, I'm like okay onto what circumstances those two casually sit outside a restaurant like they're waiting for a table, Photoshop, it's got to be Photoshop. I'll fund. All right. Funded futures are looking at what actually they've turned mixed now s and p futures down. But just about one point NASDAQ up seven from the Bloomberg newsroom, I Patrice Sikora on NewsRadio seven hundred wwl.

China Warren Buffett Patrice sikora Sports Illustrated Sports Illustrated print magaz Mike McConnell Merck Nike apple Meredith corporation Shanghai Marriott international US Beijing Gardasil President Trump Bloomberg
For Netflix, what's old is new again

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:25 min | 3 years ago

For Netflix, what's old is new again

"I'm Matt Bellamy filling in for masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me is Lucas Shah entertainment reporter for Bloomberg news and Lucas this week. We are endlessly talking about Netflix. But Netflix, again, did some interesting things this week. They are buying a movie theater a famous one. They're in talks to buy the Egyptian theater in Hollywood. And that is seen by many as a way for Netflix to debut its films and TV shows and very splashy setting and make talent feel very comfortable. And we also learned through your reporting this week that Netflix is launching a print publication. Call it. Netflix magazine, whatever the name ends up being and they're doing that for the same reason to tell talent we can showcase you and your shows in a glossy fancy print magazine and make you feel good about working for net. Flicks. What do you think about these moves hemming in the past few years ever since net? Flicks made house of cards, and it's very early original theories. It has prioritize. Is winning awards as a way to signal to consumers, and perhaps even more importantly to the industry, the entertainment industry that it serious, and it is a place that you go to be seen as the best. And so it has spent a fortune over the past several years on campaigns to try to win Oscars tried to win Emmys if had some success got the most EMMY nominations of of any network last year, it just won best director for its its movie Roma. It hasn't won the top prize at either one, but this is still such a priority that you know, what's what's old is is new again, it's buying a movie theater. It's starting a magazine. And it wants the us these so that it can control the messaging around it's a ward and really make the campaigns pop in a way that it might not if it has to to rely on another people. Yeah. I mean, the magazine is interesting. It's not the first time. Several others studios have done. This kind of thing Warner Brothers has put out promotional magazines. About its content. CBS has done something similar, but you make a good point there. These might seem like they are moves to try to win over awards voters and convince them to vote for their projects, but they are more likely trying to make the talent in their projects feel good about working for net flicks. And that is the interesting thing here because the the the knock on Netflix is that you put all your heart and soul into this project. And it goes direct to the service and disappears. And nobody, you know, they don't tell you who's watching you may or may not get feedback from the public. It's not like when you release a movie in theaters, and you know, what the box office is. And you know, you know, what the marketing campaign is. And all that other stuff, you know, Netflix. It's less transparent. So they're trying to make talent feel good about the experience and say, you're on the cover of Netflix magazine. Congratulations. I don't know how much that's going to matter. But at least it's something it is something, especially because Netflix approached a promotion and Mark. Eating is so different from traditional networks and studios with a big movie release. You see trailers for months leading up to its release. You see billboards everywhere, especially if you live in Los Angeles or New York, Netflix has biolog- avoided that because there's a huge up front cost, and that's wants to wait and see what works when it releases. So I remember listening to the creators of stranger things, which is which is far away net. Flicks is biggest hit show, and they were talking about how nervous they were ahead of the show's initial release because they didn't see any promotion for it. But then once it started to be popular with fans, then Netflix flooded, the zone with magazine covers and promotion and all that. And so that has been hard for producers and writers and other folks to adjust to because it is so different. Netflix says tried to educate them in its ways. But having something kind of more normal tactile that they can feel like a magazine may help however in however small away. Yeah. I agree. But there's still going to be that talent that lives for that Monday morning when the box office results come in. And you've got the biggest hit in America. Or you've got the most watched show in America. And everybody knows that in talks about it. And you know, I don't know how much this is going to actually win over talent. But we'll see. Thank you Lucas, thanks about that was Lucas Shah entertainment reporter at Bloomberg news. And this is the Hollywood breakdown.

Netflix Netflix Magazine Lucas Shah Flicks Bloomberg Hollywood Reporter Matt Bellamy Emmy Warner Brothers America CBS Director Mark Los Angeles New York
"print magazine" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:50 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And conditions. Really go down. These businesses just lost a big part of how they market and hope to make money for the day. Explain to us exactly how this Facebook economy works that people pay to gain impressions people pay to gain conversions there's all sorts of stuff that that are at play has its formal ads service, which is where you can set a budget. If anyone can do it. You can set a budget. You can tell you what your goal is. You could say impressions, which just means. I want three hundred people to see this. I want to get as many is on this as possible or conversions which is like I want four hundred people to click through on my website. And what Facebook does is actually very interesting because they've kind of set themselves up for situations like this where they only charge advertisers for the results. So they're not going to charge you a baseline and then not actually deliver. They promised to only charge on what they deliver. Why I talked about in my story is how kinda decide economy that's built up around influencers? So people who are really popular. Typically on the champion is for Facebook to where these companies can make deals with them off the platform. It has nothing to do with Facebook formal program. And in those cases, I mean, you're kind of flying blind only recently have contracts and influence negotiations. Become a things if you've a formal negotiation and contract, you might not get your money's worth and get a guaranteed. What you want out of that influence her deal? But the person I profile Jason Wong who sells fake eyelashes. Also, he has various products that he sells made a deal with an influence or multiple influencers. And in his case he made that deal through private DM's. So they didn't have a contract, and he's not really sure if he'll be able to get his money back because they technically their side of things they posted about his product. But unfortunately for Jason no one was online. But that's how it is for a lot of businesses even businesses that aren't particularly relying on direct sales things like that they expect to lose money. Just because they didn't get this clicks, the didn't get the engagement to setup future business. Jason smart businessman. He talked about how they've diversified how they market so because he lost that revenue that date. He didn't sound very stressed. I was like, okay. You you're really then good for you. Like knobby worried. I mean it came back. I assume he figures he'll make up the lost revenue somewhere else. But if someone had built their business solely on Facebook. And Facebook went down the problem. And I heard that from another source that I talked to who mentioned that this whole situation stressed for her that they need to diversify. They need to make sure they're not vulnerable outages. Because if you put all your basket, you never know what's going to happen and even people that are advertising specific events. Like, hey, I need you to sign up for this online training class or something something that is time sensitive. I mean, those people if you're doing a last minute push the day before or something then and nobody saw it. Then you have no sign ups. You have no people showing up to your vents. Yeah. That was a very interesting situation. I actually hadn't really thought about because the beauty of Facebook and Instagram is that like I said anyone can access their ad tools. You and I could go on right now and make an advertisement. Probably four this podcast. So easy. Exactly. And so you have people like this woman. I talked to you candy who is in wellness coach. And she happened to be holding a training the next day after this outage. And she was like I'm going to put ads out try to get more people into my training, which is a free training. But for her she tries to put them on her Email list, which brings them into her universe where she might be able to sell them products to like, it didn't cost her money in that exact moment by it cost her potential clients in the future, which is very interesting. How Facebook money plays out? Not just the name media. Also in the future. A lot of people are dependent on it. And as you said really and whole economy can go down when these platforms are not online Ashleigh Carmen tech reporter for the verge. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having me. To my absolute favorite story of the week is just incredible. It's a story about finding family living with the new reality that you might have fifty brothers and sisters roaming around in this world. It's a story about Jacobo Ballard who knew she was a donor conceived kid and wanted to find some of her half siblings. Who might have had the same donor investigation letter to find some other siblings for sure, but then something more unexpected all of these siblings that she was finding everybody pointed to the same man Donald Klein Klein was a fertility doctor who was accused of using his own sperm to impregnate women who came to him for artificial insemination treatments. We supposed to Sarah Zang. She's a writer at the Atlantic to talk about this crazy story and all these newfound siblings, and how they live in this world. Now that the truth is out. It's a small town where they live and they're constantly seeing each other unbeknownst to them. So it's just a wild story. When I first started partying the story. I was like oh my God. What a weird story, you know, like what kind of weirdo would do this? But the more I got into reporting it the more. I understood the history of how donor some nation worked away doctors kept secrets from there. Just a just a jump on. Right. At this moment. I mean, the first success in artificial artificial insemination and a bunch of lies behind that one. Also, and you wrote about an article great. And this this story is not just about Donald climate. It's about his children also who found each other and have to live with new realities of now that all this has been unearthed. So like, I said, it's a great story. But let's start with Donald and what the accusations against him. Donald Klein was Dr in Indianapolis. He retired a few years ago he's in his eighties now and for a while he was sort of the fertility doctor in Indianapolis. If you eat it for treatment that was probably a guy he you went to. And so what happened is that unbeknownst for all of his patients who are coming to him for donor, sperm and lives cases. The the men and husbands were infertile. Instead of actually getting a donor as he promised. He had said, it would be a medical resident he had apparently been using his own sperm and. We don't know exactly how many children he has. He said he did it about fifty times. There are currently fifty people who've been carbon through DNA tests, they're biological children in between publishing the print magazine. And like when the next few weeks, we put online two more people found civil really don't have a good sense. Exactly. How wide the scope is. And the thing is like all these kids. But a lot of them say still live in Indianapolis, the pads of cross in weird ways. And then they now they found out there have siblings that one of the weirdest. Parts of the story is how their paths have crossed throughout the years. I think one of the kids sold one of his half siblings like a lawnmower through a garage sale. And you know, this was before they knew it was happening. So let's start with the siblings. Now, tell us how the kids about fifty of them now that we know how they started to find each other. And connect the dots that this all happened and that their family, quote unquote is bigger than they thought. Yes. So this sort of all start around twenty fourteen with. A woman named Koba Ballard Jacobo someone who she'd done since she was a kid that she was her parents had you the sperm donor. So she knew she was dinner conceit, and she was sort of interested in not necessarily finding out her biological father was, but she was interested in maybe finding out other half siblings. And she thought she'd tell me she thought she may be water too. So she did was that she went to a forum for people who are adoptees or Jenner can see it, and she knew her mother's fertility. Doctor was Donald Klein, of course. And she met another woman whose mother had gone to the same doctor who knew another woman who had a sister. So now there are four of them. They thought oh, why don't we all get tested. You know, who knows we might be have siblings. So they all take twenty three in the test results. Come back. They are all half sisters, and what's more is that we have four more half siblings on Twenty-three me. So that's eight half siblings. Total and away. This kind of sets off some alarm bells because Dr Klein had supposedly told patients he used any single general a few times. And now are eight he said that they're supposed to medical residents. But their ages are long enough that it would have been more than any single person would have been a medical resident. So they started doing something that is actually kind a lot of attention now because the Golden State killer, which is using DNA to look for family trees. You're listening to the daily dive weekend editions, I'm Oscar Ramirez, and we'll be right back with more this.

Facebook Donald Klein Klein Jason Wong Indianapolis Oscar Ramirez Jacobo Ballard knobby Sarah Zang Ashleigh Carmen Koba Ballard print magazine Instagram Atlantic writer tech reporter Jenner
"print magazine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"All of these siblings that she was finding everybody pointed to the same man Donald Klein Klein was the fertility doctor who was accused of using his own sperm to impregnate women who came to him for artificial insemination treatments. We spoke to Sarah Zang. She's a writer at the Atlantic to talk about this crazy story and all these newfound siblings, and how they live in this world. Now that the truth is out. It's a small town where they live and they're constantly seeing each other unbeknownst to them. So it's just a wild story. When I first started partying the story. I definitely was like oh my God. What a weird story. You're like what kind of weird it would do this? But the more I got into reporting it the more. I understood the history of how Joyner and some nation worked. Doctors kept secrets from there. Just a just a jump on. Right. At this moment. I mean, the first success in artificial artificial insemination and a bunch of lies behind that one. Also, and you wrote about an article great, and this story is not just about Donald climate. It's about his children also who found each other and have to live with new realities of now that all this has been unearthed. So like, I said, it's a great story. But let's start with Donald and what the accusations against him. Donald Klein was Dr in Indianapolis. He retired a few years ago he's in his eighties now and for a while he was sort of the fertility doctor in Indianapolis. If you eat it for Chile treatment that was probably a guy he you went to. And so what happened is that unbeknownst all of his patients who are coming to him for donor. Sperm and lives cases. The demand husbands were infertile. Instead of actually getting a donor as he promised. He had said, it would be a medical resident he had apparently been using his own sperm, and we don't know exactly how many biological children. He. He has he said he did it about fifty times. There are currently fifty people who've been carbon through DNA tests that are his biological children in between publishing the print magazine. And like when the few weeks on line two more people were found civil really don't. That's exactly how why this is. And the thing is like all these kids, but a lot of them say still live in Indianapolis, the pods of cross in weird ways. And then they now find out there have siblings that one of the weirdest. Parts of the story is how their paths have crossed throughout the years. I think one of the kids sold one of his half siblings like a lawnmower through a garage sale. And you know, this was before they knew it was happening. So let's start with the siblings. Now, tell us how the kids about fifty of them now that we know how they started to find each other. And connect the dots that this all happened and that their family, quote unquote is bigger than they thought. Yes. So this server all started around twenty fourteen with a woman named culpa valor Jacobo someone who she'd done since she was a kid. That she was her parents had use a sperm donor. So she knew she was dinner concede, and she was sort of interested in not necessarily finding out her father was, but she was interested in maybe finding out other half siblings. And she thought she thought she may be one or two. So she did was that she went to a forum for people who are adoptees or concede, and she knew her mother's fertility. Doctor was Donald Klein, of course. And she met another woman whose mother had gone to the same doctor who knew another woman who had a sister. So now there are four of them..

Donald Klein Klein Indianapolis Sarah Zang Chile Atlantic Joyner print magazine
"print magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"States in the Special Olympics to read more on this story. Visit Catholic review dot org. Well, the Swiss guards helmets and uniforms have remained largely unchanged over the centuries. It's ceremonial helmets. Are now product of twenty-first-century technology. The four pound hand forged metal helmet has been replaced with new lightweight headgear. It is now made using a three D printer and tough weather resistant thermoplastic the same material often used for automotive exterior parts Swiss guards using new helmets during a special ceremony. January twenty second of the data again commemorating the five hundred thirteen th anniversary of their foundation to read more on this story and many more as a Catholic reviewed org from the news room of the Catholic review. This is Emily Rosenthal. Do you wanna know more about what's going on in the church and the world that you can get from your daily newspaper or local TV? The only publication in the archdiocese of Baltimore. They covers the church full-time. The Catholic review pick up the print magazine monthly at your parish. Or have the Catholic review delivered to your home every month? You can get fresh news every day online at Catholic review dot org subscribed to the Catholic review e newsletter for twice a week updates. Just see our media two eight four five seven six app on apple and Android and follow the Catholic review on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest wherever your faith takes. You Catholic review? Media is ready to inspire. Teach inform and engage read.

Emily Rosenthal Olympics print magazine Baltimore Facebook apple Twitter Instagram Pinterest twenty second four pound
"print magazine" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Newspaper that's on our doorstep or subscribing to print magazines or even going to visit a particular website means that for a while people thought that if you could just game these algorithms then that was the way to succeed. And as you said, that's exactly what BuzzFeed did they did it better than anybody else? And now even BuzzFeed is finding that it can't support quite the kind of journalistic enterprise that thought on this advertising economy. So where does that leave us? I mean, clearly, Facebook and. Google are. Consumers. Choose to go there. People. Choose to go there to find their news. I don't think I don't know that you can stop them from doing that. Because they bring together all these different sources that appeal to you on the other hand, there model seems to be predicated on the fact that they don't have to actually pay to create this content. Right. I mean, fundamental to to being tech company is that you're not the one paying huge teams of humans to produce the content. You're just you're just aggregating that you that maybe wouldn't be possible to stop people from relying on Facebook and Google as primary pulled portals. And I think that we're in the relatively early stages of a pretty tremendous backlash against Facebook. It's a bit of a cultural revolution counter, cultural revolution, where I think this broad sense that the media environment has gotten directly that Facebook played this role in the election of Donald Trump in the spread of misinformation and that it's Navarre. Were also objected to tremendous amounts manipulation in you do see users at least at an elite level. I think starting to talk about retreating. And I think that it's cultural prestige at the very least his plummeted over the course of this which suggests that maybe we can make ourselves less dependent on the platform. Not that I think that this is necessary. Just a consumer issue. I emphatically do not. But I do think that as consumers we do we do make choices, and we do have we if we don't like this environment. This ecosystem we can make a series of personal at the goal changes about how we interact with it. So then I do think that there their policy questions, which that we for generations. We were sleeping on the question of questions about corporate bigness, you do so. See antitrust burning as a topic? That's not just a fringe lefty area of conversation. I think it'll be important issue in the next presidential campaign. I'm sure you saw as under a custom Cortez's tweets over the weekend about the peril of big tech in the threat that it specifically represents to media. And I think it's really telling that she is trying to she said, she I think she used the phrase that it's it's basically the moment she she said, it was one of the most important issues that we face in. So I do think that that is evidence of his I said headed in direction where you have people talking about breaking up these companies into smaller pieces. So I think one of the areas that you'd see antitrust potentially go straight after is this advertising monopoly with journalism, though, it seems there might always be fun. Nding struggle unless there is just like a rich magnate that wants to Ford, you know, their agenda or wants to put money behind something because they believe it's in the public interest. And I'm curious what you think about the idea of there being some sort of like, you know, one percent tax endowment or something that that kind of big internet companies have to pay, you know, this is something that I've heard some people flow. I think Emily bell had some version of this. But to fund journalism, you know, away to to kind of make sure that there's always money for this public. Good. It's hard in the United States doesn't have a tradition of government subsidizing media at least not one that that we can call upon the part of our immediate memory..

Facebook BuzzFeed Google Cortez United States Donald Trump Emily bell Navarre Ford one percent
"print magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Channel 33

"An also Jonathan Van Meter from seven days, that's almost two Autry for me. And I'm interested in this stuff. That's like when you meet a Robert Altman fan, and they say have you seen secret honor have you seen health? No, I haven't and I have not read seven days. So I'm sorry. But anyway, that's that's that. That I also think it we said this on this podcast before. But he is the only guy from that. You know, pantheon of magazine editors to me who really took the DNA magazine translated to the web. Yeah. No Graydon Carter didn't do that. Tina Brown didn't do that. And it went to her hasn't done that in the way that he did which is to make a great magazine into a great website. And that was that's amazing to me. And that's that's that was his kind of, you know, final act and kind of final bid of magic was to was to do that. And it's not easy. No. But but he really did know. I mean, I think that well two things one I mean to to to do more. You know, armchair psychoanalyzing. You have to imagine that the move that near magazines moved to the pay wall had to be just crushing for someone who who achieved that you know, who. Who almost solely achieve that? Right. I mean that you would create a website. Do you be able to turn a print magazine into an incredibly vital website? And then to have that sort of corn off all the sudden, I mean that would that seems to be totally you know, to just kind of tear down everything that you built up. But you know, I think that that there's also the the fact that as much as they were publishing online as much, you know, kind of importance if they're publishing online, and then there there is also the stuff that they're publishing sort of simultaneous simultaneously or in conjunction with the print magazine. It always felt it always felt comfortable on the on the on the, you know on a web page as comfortable as it did an apprentice page, which is not a small thing. And that and that the success of the website never seemed to hurt the print magazine. I mean, there were they did go to go from a weekly know, a weekly magazine to buy weekly in twenty fourteen I believe, but you know, this is at a time when monthly magazines are going by month. Earlier, you know, I mean, everybody's everybody's printing publishing less and less than the print world. And I mean, even in its by weekly even in its biweekly years. It has been it's consistently stunning to me the amount of content that that magazine drops off at your doorstep every two weeks. You know, I mean, it's just the highest quality journalism and the smartest front of the book stuff, and the the the the the consistency. And the identity of the magazine, I think is is really really the the great. I mean, obviously to Moss's never never-ending in credit here here. Do we have time for quick notebook? Dump david. It's it we called the segment the kicker before. And I was informed that the the the Columbia journalism view has a podcast name the kicker. So screw that. It's now the notebook dump are twenty twenty update Kirsten gillibrand democratic Senator from New York was campaigning in Iowa this week. I wrote down that she's she's. She told the New York Times described her talking about her love of RV's and her family vacation last summer to see a NASCAR race. Now, you don't think she's trying to appeal to rural voters? Do you? David. Somebody tweeted at me and said, you know, now you pick NASCAR would it serve. Like, you know. Lost all its luster. Now you pick NASCAR. Yeah. Yeah. Wow. Well, I don't know that NASCAR is the place. I would go with that. But anyway, you know, I do like the hierarchy of where you get to announce Jill brand got Colbert that was big that was unusual, right? Tulsi Gabbard gut the van Jones show on CNN that I'd never heard of. That's didn't know isn't. That's on you for not watching. I know. I like, I just didn't know he had a show that didn't know in other twenty twenty news..

print magazine NASCAR Graydon Carter DNA magazine Tina Brown Robert Altman Jonathan Van Meter Tulsi Gabbard david Autry Kirsten gillibrand New York Times CNN the Columbia journalism New York van Jones Jill brand Moss
"print magazine" Discussed on The Editors

The Editors

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on The Editors

"And in this case, there's a notice that Lenny Dykstra was following me. And I just always loved Lenny Dykstra this this hardnosed leadoff hitter for the Mets and the Phillies, and I was just so excited. Lenny Dykstra, had had followed me I told my wife, you know, who's who's Lenny Dykstra, like ISIS baseball player. He's so fantastic. You know in the ninety s and nine hundred ninety three World Series one game. He hit two home runs. And she's like, oh, you know, you should invite Lenny Dykstra to your next national review of. And I was like I don't know about that. I had I had to go do something. So I couldn't explain. And then when it came back in the. Room. She'd actually looked up lending doctors. No, maybe you shouldn't Lenny Dykstra. To your next national review of that. So that time in the podcast for our editor's picks jar the Kip, Charlie cook. I don't why said it that way. Charlie cook, what's your pick? I guess. Pick was influencing my pronunciation of your last name, Charles just happens rich when I don't talk for a long time during my name gets to go. I liked Alexander to scientists is calling a post on the. Well, the bigotry I suppose that we've seen in relation to the knights of Columbus. Certain figures within the Democratic Party of starts to cost membership in the knights of Columbus is some insidious thing. And a so Trey us to disqualify one for job as a judge as Aleksandra points out. This is of course, not too far away from imposing a religious test. But more important may be a preview of what is to come. If Donald Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett to the supreme court, which given the state of Ruth bay against books health looked for a while a couple of weeks ago, as if it might be imminent, thankfully, repeat against book seems to be making a recovery. But for a while there was a great deal of worrying talk, and Alexandra noted I think smartly that suddenly membership in religious organizations was cost us beyond the pale. David french. I'm really enjoying Jim guarantees series. He's doing this interesting thing where he's rather than profiling some of the democratic presidential candidates is doing a list of things that you didn't know about them. Joe Biden is on the block right now. And it's great in refreshingly different way to look at some of these democratic presidential contenders. I mean, we're going to have a lot of writing about them in the coming weeks and months, but this is a great way to start. And I've learned something every time. So I I would urge you to check out Jim series MVP. Was yours. Rich Lowry your case against even French that you made in in print on the web. Sorry. I was kind of on the fence. I was I was I felt that's always surface. This argument. I felt going in sort of on the fence in which really brought me over. Yeah. See David see there's hope for you to David. I got another aisle of my we need to restore the. All right because the rest of your Philistines and are not nearly as literary as I am my pick for the first time editor ever on. The editors podcast is a poem by Jessica Hornak. It's called other distances it has her fourth appearance in the print magazine writing poems. She's subscriber and everyone out there, and our plus member, which all view should be Jessica we very much appreciate your contributions, and please keep at it. So that's it for us. We actually have Sarah. Should he the incomparable assertion here in the podcast studio? How long has this this podcast? We our fifteen minutes here. It's kind of close to a record some SaaS. Someone tweeting like the last one was eighty three minutes. So anyway, that's it for us. You've been listening to a national review podcast, and we broadcast reaching transmission or account of this game without the express written permission of national you. Magazine is strictly pro Hibbitt at this podcast has been produced by the aforementioned incomparable, Sarah Schutte, who makes a sound better than we deserve. Thank you, Michael. Thank you, David. Thank you. Charlie. Thanks, especially to all of you for listening. We're the editors and see you..

Lenny Dykstra David french Charlie cook Rich Lowry Jessica Hornak print magazine Sarah Schutte editor Jim Democratic Party baseball Mets Joe Biden Columbus Phillies Donald Trump Trey Alexander Charles