35 Burst results for "Principal Investigator"

Oxford to resume trial of coronavirus vaccine it's creating with AstraZeneca, days after halt due to reported effect

Bloomberg Best

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Oxford to resume trial of coronavirus vaccine it's creating with AstraZeneca, days after halt due to reported effect

"A closely watched vaccine trial is back on the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca have restarted a UK trial of an experimental cove in 19 vaccine. The study had been halted September 6th after one of the participants got sick. Oxford said in a statement that the UK regulator had recommended that the trials resume Dr Own Yama Oh Beulah Gu, principal investigator of the Pfizer, Phase three vaccine, try alight, Yale Mentioned the case today. The good news for that one participant is that it appears they're already recovering, and I think it's still unwelcome question if the disorder was caused by the passing he was interviewed on ABC is Good Morning America.

University Of Oxford UK Beulah Gu Astrazeneca Principal Investigator Oxford ABC Yale
First American dosed with Oxford-AstraZeneca phase three COVID-19 vaccine speaks out

Tom and Curley

00:45 sec | 3 weeks ago

First American dosed with Oxford-AstraZeneca phase three COVID-19 vaccine speaks out

"Contenders are Corona virus vaccine has started a final round of testing in the US Get the latest from CBS Medical correspondent Dr Jon Lapook 23 year old Jacob Serrano is the first volunteer to be dosed in the US with either the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine or a placebo. He has lost seven family members to covert 19 and says he wants to be part of the solution to save lives. No matter the cost. I know there was a break because it's like it's a trial, but I rather have us one step closer matter what it takes. Serrano was dosed on Friday at Headlands Gem Research Institute in Lake Worth, Florida Immune response was very encouraging. Dr. Larry Bush is an infectious disease doctor and the lead principal investigator for this trial site. He says he's optimistic. This vaccine is effective. More

Jacob Serrano Headlands Gem Research Institu Dr Jon Lapook United States Oxford Astrazeneca Dr. Larry Bush Principal Investigator Cbs Medical Lake Worth
Man who lost 7 relatives to COVID-19 becomes first American to trial Oxford vaccine

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

Man who lost 7 relatives to COVID-19 becomes first American to trial Oxford vaccine

"For a Corona virus vaccine has started a final round of testing in the U. S. Researchers at Oxford University in partnership with AstraZeneca started dozing the first volunteers last week. During this third and final phase. The vaccine is tested for safety and how effective it will be of reducing or blocking cove in 19 symptoms. CBS chief medical correspondent Dr Jonathan Luke spoke exclusively with the first American participating in this trial. 23 year old Jacob Serrano is the first volunteer to be dosed in the US with either the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine or a placebo. He has lost seven family members to covert 19 and says he wants to be part of the solution to save lives. No matter the cost. I know there was a break because it's like it's a trial. Bye. I'd rather have us one step closer, no matter what it takes. Serrano was dosed on Friday at Headlands Gem Research Institute in Lake Worth, Florida Immune response was very encouraging. Dr. Larry Bush is an infectious disease doctor and lead principal investigator for this trial site. He says he's optimistic this vaccine is effective in the phase one in two trials. A vaccine has been proven that not only do you get where bus neutralizing antibodies to fight the coroner Corona virus you get a T saw response another arm of the immune system to fight off the cells that do become infected. That's crucial in treating infections. Oxford University has been conducting phase three trials in the United Kingdom, Brazil and South Africa. Earlier phase is there was no evidence the vaccine causes serious reactions. Headlands research says. They're focuses on enrolling members of the African American and the lap next community who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. The numbers are pointing to that those groups of people becoming infected at a higher rate. And therefore that's a group that would highly benefit from vaccination. AstraZeneca says it plans to enroll up to 50,000 participants globally and is planning to start phase three trials in Japan and Russia. The company expects to have late stage trial results later this year. That is

Jacob Serrano Astrazeneca Oxford Astrazeneca Oxford University Dr. Larry Bush Headlands Gem Research Institu Dr Jonathan Luke Principal Investigator CBS United States Lake Worth United Kingdom Japan Russia South Africa Brazil
This is What Most People Get Wrong About Willpower

Optimal Living Daily

04:21 min | Last month

This is What Most People Get Wrong About Willpower

"This is what most people get wrong about willpower by near a all of near and far DOT COM. You come home after a long day of work. Can you immediately curl yourself up on the couch and binge the latest Netflix's craze for hours while you scroll and Scroll your social media feeds and snack on potato chips even though you're on a diet, you look around and see that garbage needs to be taken out. Laundry needs to be folded in your child's toys are strewn across the living room floor. The list of productive things you could be doing seem endless. You can't seem to find the willpower appeal yourself off the couch to do them. Is a regular occurrence for you. Do you realize that you are in this? rut But can't seem to find the willpower to overcome it. You're definitely not alone in this situation this is called ego depletion. Ego Depletion is a theory that willpower is connected to a limited reserve of mental energy, and once he run out of that energy, you're more likely to lose self-control. The steering would seem to explain your post work defeat. But new study suggests that we've been thinking about willpower. All wrong. At the theory of Ego Depletion is true even worse holding onto the idea that willpower is a limited resource can actually be bad for you making you more likely to lose control and act against your better judgement. The real nature of willpower. In, a study conducted by Stanford Psychologist Carol to Wack and her colleagues published in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences too I concluded that signs of Ego depletion were observed only in those test subjects who believed willpower was a limited resource. They studied how people reacted when they were fatigued and told drink lemonade was sugar in it to give them a boost after the participants drank lemonade, the researchers evaluated how they reacted. It wasn't a sugar in the lemonade, but the belief in its impact that gave participants an extra boost people who did not see willpower as a finite resource do not show signs of ego depletion if to conclusions are correct that means that ego depletion is caused by self defeating thoughts and not by any biological limitation, and that makes us less likely to accomplish our goals by providing a rationale to quit when we could otherwise persist. Michael Ends liked professor of psychology at the University of Toronto and the principal investigator at the Toronto Laboratory for social. Neuroscience offers an alternative view. Dwight conclusions is like believes that willpower is not a finite resource, but instead acts like an emotion just as we don't run out of joy or anger willpower ebbs and flows based on what's happening to us and how we feel for example, to determine how in control people feel regarding their cravings for cigarettes, drugs or alcohol researchers administered a standard survey called the craving belief questionnaire. The assessment is modified for the participants drug of choice and present statements like once the craving starts, I. Have No control over my behavior and the cravings are stronger than my willpower. How people rate these statements tells research is a great deal, not only about their current state but also how likely they are to remain addicted participants who indicate they feel more powerful as time passes increase our odds of quitting in contrast studies of cigarette smokers found that those who believe they were powerless to resist were more likely to fall off the wagon after quitting. The logic isn't surprising but the extent of the effect is remarkable a study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and drugs found that individuals who believe they were powerless to fight. Their cravings were much more likely to drink. Again, the same theory could be applied to other things as well such as working out dieting, self control and a relationship, but CETERA. A new, decision, making tool. Seeing the link between temperament willpower through different Lens has profound implications on the way we focus our attention. From one if mental energy is more like an emotion than fuel in its tank, it can be managed and utilized as such. For example, a taller might throw temper tantrum when refuse a toy but will as they age gained self control and learned to ride out bad feelings. Similarly, when we need to perform a difficult task is more productive in healthy to believe a lack of motivation temporary than it is to tell ourselves we're spent and need a break.

Netflix Journal Of Studies On Alcohol Stanford Toronto Laboratory For Social National Academy Of Sciences Dwight Michael Ends Principal Investigator Carol University Of Toronto Professor Of Psychology
Russia approves first COVID-19 vaccine

Doug Stephan

00:45 sec | Last month

Russia approves first COVID-19 vaccine

"Russia claims it has approved the first Cove it 19 vaccine in the world. But there is skepticism about the product that came from the Moscow Institute. Meanwhile, work on vaccines in the U. S continues. Moderna is among the company's already producing a covert 19 vaccine before proof that it works. Everything has been Working remarkably smoothly. The patients are wonderful. They're here. They can't wait. Tio Tio make their contribution. Principal investigator Dr Paul Bradley says half the group gets the real vaccine. The other half a placebo. Everyone gets treated is that they got the same thing. On and we we wait. We watch We're looking for any side effects. Any complaints? I'm John Lawrence

Tio Tio Principal Investigator Moscow Institute Dr Paul Bradley Russia John Lawrence
"principal investigator" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

05:52 min | Last month

"principal investigator" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"He is the principal investigator of numerous and I and I H funded clinical trials and is a world renowned expert in the field of heart failure. He joined the M C W faculty in 2016 and is currently the medical director of Advanced Heart Failure at M. C. W. Colleen McCarthy is the chief of staff and vice president of organ and tissue of versatile First. The tie is an affiliation of four Midwest blood centers, including Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan and Harland. Colleen began her career in health care as a critical care nurse in Denver, Colorado. She joined versatile I in 2010 and is responsible for the performance of Wisconsin's organ procurement organization and Tissue Bank. Well, thank you, Dr Salzburg and clean so much for joining us. Dr. Saltzberg, you are joining us by phone. Thank you so much for being with us today. If we could just start with you. If you could just tell the listeners a bit about what exactly are some of the reasons and causes that people develop heart failure. And why do people need a heart transplant? I know that's a very general question. But in general, what are kind of the issues that people develop that necessitate a heart transplant. I'm happy to try to address that the pathway toward Heart failure initially and then heart transplant long term really encompasses two primary pathways. There are patients whose heart muscles become increasingly weak. A weekend to the point where they can't supply the blood necessary to keep the vital organs alive on adequately functioning. That could result from things such as heart attacks, where part of the muscles damaged due to a restriction of blood flow to the heart muscle itself. It could result from a virus or even genetic causes. There's a second pathway, though, where patients may have heart muscle that continues. Blue adequately but increasingly And that's stiffening restrict the amount of blood flow that can go back to the heart and the final common pathway for both of these mechanisms developed in higher pressures inside of the heart. In the heart inability to meet the demands of the body, and as a result, the other organs of the body can begin to fail as patients progress through different stages of heart failure and increasingly symptomatic. They can get to a point will be labeled him and stage or stage D heart failure, and those could be patients with heart but extremely weak or heart puzzles that are increasingly stiff. Once they reached the point where more traditional medical options are no longer available to them, and the ability to perform data day activities increasingly restricted. Typically, when we begin to think about Heart transplantation as an option for these end stage patients. And how common is this heart failure? How often I mean, I know obviously, it's your specialty. So you see it quite often. But amongst the US population, how prevalent is heart failure? Turn estimates are that there well over six million Americans heart failure over a 1,000,000 people a year as well for patients with congestive heart failure, and it does remain the most common reason that Patient over the age of 65 are hospitalized in the United States, and it generates a tremendous economic burden for the health care system in the United States as well. Now speaking of Colleen, what does this look like? In people who live in Wisconsin? How common you know we talked about nationally? But how common specifically in our state is thean incidents of heart failure. You know, the incident in Wisconsin is very similar to the national system as well. So we see within our service area. Diversity is the organ procurement organization that serves eastern Wisconsin. So within our service area, we have 12 counties and 2.3 million population. So what then our population. It is our responsibility to engage our community and increasing awareness for organ donation and then also to response who all of our hospitals when there is a potential Ford Organ donor, So it's part of the organ donation evaluation process. We work very hard to optimize all the organ organ functions so that we can have a successful transplant and that that process is actually fairly complicated and and requires a quite a bit of resource is so once we identify a potential organ donor The way we really have. Ah, race against the clock. Organ function starts to deteriorate very quickly after brain death has been declared in so in conjunction with medically optimizing the organ donors so we can have a successful transplant. We're also dealing with the human side of it and dealing with a grieving family as well. So our team focus is on supporting that family through their loss. And all these don't donations occur as a result of Ah, sudden loss and families very much needs some time to absorb that grief. But unfortunately there's just not much time in order to have successfully coordinated transplant. So our team works with the local transplant centers here and and receive support from the local teams here so we can optimize organ function, which hopefully results in a successful heart transplant. And I know this is an incredibly complex answer, Probably to this question, but just for the listeners. How How does this system work on a basic level in terms of how it's determined? How and where organs get distributed specifically in Wisconsin? I guess if you were specific, sure, you know, organ donation is a national resource and The organ donation. Transmit communities have been, you know, working hard to ensure we have a fair and equitable allocation system, And that's that's challenging. Based on this incredible need..

Wisconsin M. C. W. Colleen McCarthy Ford Organ United States principal investigator Dr Salzburg Denver Tissue Bank Colorado M C W Dr. Saltzberg medical director Michigan Indiana chief of staff vice president
NASA to launch mission to Mars

Morning Edition

03:17 min | 2 months ago

NASA to launch mission to Mars

"NASA spacecraft bound for Mars launches from Florida Today. It's one of three missions taking off this summer. While Mars and the Earth are in a favorable orbit. The new U. S mission is carrying something unusual for a spacecraft a microphone. From member station W O M F E Brendan Byrne tells you about it from Hiss. When the perseverance Rover lands on Mars in February, it will unpack a suite of scientific experiments to help uncover ancient signs of life on the red Planet. High tech cameras, spectrometers sensors, and this is the voice of Roger. Weeks speaking to you through the bars microphone on super Camp. Roger Weans is the principal investigator of the rover super Camp, a slew of instruments, including a camera, laser and spectrometer that will examine the rocks and soil of Mars for organic compounds, a hint that there might be further evidence of past life. Tucked away inside the super cam is the Mars microphone. And so what is there to listen to anything interesting? First of all on Mars, and so we should hear wind sounds. We should hear sounds of the rover. We might hear things that we never expected to hear. And so that's going to be interesting to find out. The Mike will also listen as perseverance is on board laser blasts nearby rocks, you might think we're going to hear like you. But you probably won't University of Central Florida Planetary scientists Addie Dove says the sounds of Martian rock blast will help scientists determined if they might contain organic material evidence of life on Mars. But it will actually sound more like this. Microphones on spacecraft are quite rare, really, because there's not much to here in space for sound waves to travel. You need an atmosphere sort of like a slinky, right compressed the sound waves in between the source and your ear drums. And then they make your ear drums reverberate. That's how we hear sound. Still, spacecraft microphones have been used before. NASA's insight. Mars Lander caught a snippet of sound capturing wind vibrations from two of its sensors, not exactly microphones. The observation was a surprise to mission managers. Engineers converted the vibrations into sound, speeding it up and shifting the frequency up by 100 times for our ears to hearing planetary society, says hearing things from another world would help build public support for space missions. For decades, The organization has lobbied for microphones on spacecraft, but those efforts have fallen short for technical reasons or lack of funding. So what will Mars actually sound like? That's still a mystery. The atmosphere of Mars is far less dense than Earth's and made up of mostly carbon dioxide. That's going to change the way sound works on Mars, says Weans. You could not hear somebody scream from a block away on Mars. On DSO. That's just that's life on Mars. But what we what we will be able to hear is our things that are close up, and it's going to still give us just a whole new world of information from this new sense that we will have on Mars. The Mike can also listen for mechanical issues as the rover moves across its landing site, Jezreel Crater. It's like when you're driving your car, and here a strange rattling sound. You know, it's time to take it to a mechanic. For NPR

Rover Super Camp Roger Weans Nasa Earth Mike Florida Today Super Camp Brendan Byrne University Of Central Florida Principal Investigator Jezreel Crater Addie Dove NPR W O M F E
UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

Science Magazine Podcast

08:19 min | 2 months ago

UK moving forward with megatrial for coronavirus treatments

"A UK mega trial designed. Test Treatments Cove Nineteen Haikai Sarah. We're talking about the UK's It's called the recovery trial and it hasn't differences with other ongoing trials of drugs for Corona virus. What are some of the big differences with recovery? The main difference in some senses said it's a really really big trial they have. More than two thousand patients now. In an outbreak like this if you really want to have really good clear, robust result, one of the most important things to include a lot of people to get a really strong signal of secrecy, that's something that recovery has been able to do, and really no other trial in the world has been able to get those patients numbers. This isn't a UK. And the United Kingdom has a lot of cases for its size. Is that one of the reasons that this trial has been success? Yeah, absolutely I mean if they didn't have that many. Many patients in the first place of today wouldn't be able to enroll that many patients some of the people I've talked to so for instance one of the scientists. He's from Norway. He was saying. The recovery trial is really successful in the sense that one in six patients that goes to UK hospital with Kobe nineteen ends up in the trial. Well, you can kinda wonder why they managed to include that many patients. One reason is that they have the National Health Service all the hospitals took part in that and the top doctors in the. The Nation wrote a letter to all the hospitals and all the staff. Saying you know here are the three trials that we want to prioritize in. Please try to include patients in these trials. If you can, so that's kind of how they they ended up with those huge patient numbers in the first place that allowed them to in a very short time. Get some some answers as a result of having all these patients enrolled and kind of coordination at the national level for recovery. They've seen a lot of results in a short time can. Can you talk about some of the drugs? They've been able to either give a thumbs up to or thumbs down to I one. That was a really big deal. Was the hydroxy chloroquine arm of the study so much has been set written about hydro or Quin, banning a lot of that was based on trials, either with very few patients or trials obsessional, so whether patients were randomized to either get hydroxy chloroquine or a different drug or placebo, but basically looked in retrospect and compared how patients did who got hydroxy in patients who didn't? The recovery trial date has the best data we have for civilian patients being treated with hydroxy chloroquine, and they didn't see a significant difference in how the hydroxy chloroquine group did versus suspended care. Group And they put that out in a press release, and within a few days, a lot of other trials that were ongoing that would clearly not have stronger results were ended. I wouldn't say it's quite the end of that drugstore quance Saga Probably, but certainly mocked the attorney on. And on the other side of the roster here we have a drug that actually help patients that were in the hospital, so that sex method zone. It's a steroid drug that's also been known for a long time quite cheap. It's widely available, so it's really nice drug to be shown to be effective against covid nineteen. There's been a lot of debate from the beginning about how much of the severe illness at the end in patients is really the overreaction of the immune system, and that's of course where the steroid drugs attack the pathogenesis really so they can have damp and. And Immune System, and the hope is that that will mean that that the symptoms of patients will be severe and people are more likely to survive, and then that turned out to be the case I mean they. They found that mortality when one third in patients that received accent medicine. That was really the first big randomized trial in this outbreak that showed a clear difference in mortality, the national. Health Service within hours after the result was announced, changed its standard of care to include some episode. This is pretty surprising. These aren't peer reviewed results. These are press release results. Yes. That's been a huge point of contention. There's just kind of tension inherent in this fast-moving pandemic between you know having really robust results in getting them out there as fast as possible and I talked at length with Martin Landry, one of the principal investigators of the about it his argument. Is You kind of get? The baseline results I. You can look at the data and see okay. There is a difference in mortality and might be some changes in the percentages, but nothing major, but then there's a lot of other data that you want to put in the paper that takes some. Some more work, so his argument was. This is an important resulted to change the outcome of patients right now so let's put it out and then try to get the paper out as soon as possible. After that in the paper ended up coming out I think seven days after the results. Yeah, it's a bit of a wild west. Now place is different. Hospitals have different standards of care like in the US. A lot of hospitals are using convalescent plasma. This is a blood product from a person has recovered from cove nineteen and they're using that to treat patients in the hospital. But convalescent plasma hasn't been subjected to the same level of scrutiny at the same level of evidence has been obtained. You know for that as a deck of Methadone the drug. We just talked about right and I. Mean that's the two points though that I find really interesting and one is. If you're going to give patients these drugs, anyway, you might as well be using that to generate data that then shows whether the drug works said they aren't collecting data on these treatments, so they are collecting data, very. Very. Often right, the problem is I. Mean it does back to what I was saying about randomized patients, you can treat patients with something and then say okay. We're collecting a lot of data and we'LL GONNA look back at how the patients did that. Receive Drug and how patients did that didn't but there's a hierarchy of evidence and really in that hierarchy a randomized trial just because it gets rid of all the bias season, who would receive a drug or not otherwise so everyone? I talked to really agree. Agree that we need in this particular situation that's condemning when you want to see as fast as possible whether a drug has a big effect on the hard outcome like do people die or do they survive what you need, a large randomized trials, and when you ask people why they do, it also goes back to what you were saying. A lot of people said when they tried to convince doctors to take part. The doctor say well, but I have a good feeling I think. I know what works, right. Right maybe I mean doctors sometimes willing to accept a lower standard of evidence to guide their decisions. It then becomes very difficult to get to that higher level of evidence because to do that. You need to accept that half of your patients are not going to receive whatever you believe to be the most useful. That's inherent tension in the whole enduring these kinds of trials when you have some observational data already, but you don't really have the kind of strong data that let's say with confidence. Okay, this worse. I'm here in the US. We have many many cases, but there isn't this sized patient group being randomized. Is that because of what we just talked about, or is it more a lack of coordination? The US has done one big trial though the National Institutes of health the first. Study that was a randomized placebo controlled trial that included a lot of patients. And did give a robust result didn't really see a difference in mortality, but it showed that patients receive from severe. Stay in hospital for a short time period. Why haven't more trials like that I? Think it is a lack of coordination. You can argue that the whole response in the US to this virus has been marked by lack of ordination, and then, of course it does help when you have certain structures in place so again. The National Health Service in the UK with all of these hospitals. Part of this National Health Service. Of course, it makes it a lot easier. You put in place this one structure, one ethical board, and then you kind of do it from there while if you have to piece together coalition. Coalition of different hospitals and different investigators, it becomes a little bit more complicated. I think right, but given the the sheer amount of cases, the US has had i. mean certainly data could have been generated that would have informed both the US and the rest of the world a lot better about what works what doesn't.

United Kingdom United States National Health Service Chloroquine National Institutes Of Health Norway Attorney Kobe Martin Landry Methadone Principal
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 5 months ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Will treating poverty reshape a childs brain?

The Big Story

13:41 min | 8 months ago

Will treating poverty reshape a childs brain?

"What does it mean to grow up for that sounded like a philosophical question? I didn't mean it that way. It's a real. How does a child's life change when they spend their formative years never having enough money living below the poverty line in some cases their family barely making it paycheck to paycheck? What don't those kids do because of that? What hurdles as a place in their path? How does it affect them? Down the road does the impact of poverty literally alter their brains. And if that's the case how can we change that a simple yep. Profound experiment aims to answer that question and perhaps even offer a controversial but effective cure for the damage. That poverty does to a child. What is that cure? While what do you think the cure for poverty is MHM Jordan Heath. Rawlings this is the big story. Shannon proud foot is a writer at Maclean's one of our favorite guests. Hope Shanna I don't either. Why don't you start by kind of level setting for us and in terms of research that has been done? What do we know about children who grow up in poverty? Okay okay so what has been known for years in all kinds of dimensions. Is that kids who grew up in poverty struggle across sort of staunching array of things. You know they tend to be physically smaller smaller. They tend to get sick more often. But for the purposes of this study the ones were most interested in are there's all kinds of of cognitive academic disadvantages. They have so that we know. Oh in very broad global ways. That kids who grew up in poverty tend to do worse in school than kids. Who Grow up more well off They have lower graduation rates. Their grades aren't as good. They have have less likelihood of going on to post secondary. But what was not known until sort of astonishingly recently is why I kinda Kinda came to think of the analogy as as you. You know we knew that that kids who grew up poor would kind of emerge from the woods when they finished childhood different point than richer kids but nobody had thought to look at the path of how they got there. Because there's different ways to have poor academic outcomes right which of their skills were lagging. What was what was going on there? And so one of the principal investigators on this new new study that I've written about Kimberly Noble who works at Columbia University. Her huge splash. She made early in her career. She's a neuroscientist was looking added. Exactly why it is. That kids who grow up poor tend to do more poorly in school and and and cognitively I'm so sh- she sort of unpacked the specific skills the specific regions of the brain the the wise in house of how poverty affects how kids process information and achieve academically later in their lives. And what does she learn so the big takeaway is that Kids who grew up poor tend to lag in language skills like reading and vocabulary and also in sort of what we might think of self restraint skill so the ability to ignore distractions to concentrate working memory that kind of stuff and then subsequently Noble Co authored authored. A big paper in two thousand fifteen. That made a huge splash again. In this area of academic research where they scan the brains of just over a thousand kids and teens and the average sort of the size of their brains they were looking at primarily. What's called the corneal surface area? So this is the the outer wrinkly part of the brain. It does a lot of the heavy lifting cognitively early and when they sort of correlated different different aspects of these kids profiles the one thing they found that was consistently associated with the size as of the coral surface area on the brain was family income so that raises all kinds of interesting questions about what's going on there and not immediately makes the leap to me. It's so compelling because it makes the leap from okay. There are different skills or different strengths. That kids were better off. You know have that kids who are poor. Don't but it's physically. We possibly reshaping their brains or at least associated with a different shape and size to their brains which is quite profound. It's something that you would just never expect to see proven. You might see the results of it but to prove that correlation is quite startling right and so using the word correlation Asian here is important because what Nobles Research and other people who've been working in this area consistently over the last couple of decades has shown is that we know that poverty is associated with all all these negative outcomes. That's correlation what nobody has been able to show is causation. Has What you could do is pull that apart and say okay but is it really. The fact that these kids are poorer that their brains are smaller. They have a harder time with these skills or is it that poor families are more likely to be in a single parent situation or have substance abuse or live in neighborhoods. That are kind of scary very like you just can't and scientifically say that it's the poverty that's causing this. You can only say that the poverty sort of shows us that this is occurring. So that's where this is new unbelievably ambitious but also incredibly simple and elegant study comes in that started about a year ago it will be ongoing for the next several years before we talk about that. Study because we're GONNA spend a lot of time on that. You mentioned that we tend to think and think of and treat the various disadvantageous effects of poverty offers. You know the the school skills that these kids can struggle within. What have we traditionally done to help them? When when those difficulties manifest yes there's sort of different steps along on the way where you could intervene if you start to notice that a child in grade one is struggling in school? And you know. They come from a disadvantaged family background where there's all kinds of ways you can kick in tutoring. You can have them go to special classes for extra support. You can make sure that there's an individual learning plan in place but those things tend to be a really ambitious that costs a lot of money either very time intensive and they happen quite late in the process because research shows that kids you know from from the age of two or even earlier you can already see the effects of poverty so if you're not able to identify the kind of downstream effects the symptoms if you will until they're in school and then try to sort of intervene and turn back the clock. Obviously that's a much much more difficult proposition. If you think about kids growing up in poverty have certain life experiences that appear to affect their brains in certain ways that then affects their learning potential potential. Well depending on where you intervene in that sort of stream of cascading effects it might be a bit easier. What if you could inoculate the kids against that whole all domino effect starting in the first place? It's almost like rather than intervening after someone has fallen ill with the disease in his experiencing symptoms. Would if you gave them a vaccine that prevented I'm from ever getting the disease in the first place. Now I'm certainly. This is just a creative analogy. I'm using calling poverty or its effects a disease but it sort of suggests that if the study study is born out there may be a more elegant more efficient possibly even simpler more effective way to kind of intervene earlier in the process before or the negative effects of already kicked in. And then you're trying to undo them so explain the study now and what it does. What is I guess it's called babies first years. Yeah babies first year so it's hugely ambitious. Seventeen million dollars in public and private funding very heavy hitting academic experts from across the US primarily so they're six principal investigators instigators who are sort of the top in their field at different institutions in different areas of expertise you have neuroscience economics sociology education. Things like that at what they did is they went to Maternity wards in four cities so they picked out New Orleans. Minneapolis Saint Paul New York City and Omaha and they deliberately picked cities cities where they would get kind of a nice cross range of rural versus urban different demographic make-up's and they recruited one thousand mothers within days of having their babies so they recruited created the right from the hospital to enroll in this study and there is effectively again because they're trying to establish causation. There's effectively a placebo group or control group and a treatment group and so all of the MOMS who are enrolled in the study will receive a debit card and every month money will be loaded onto that debit card. So sixty percent of the MOMS will receive. What's called a nominal amount of money? Twenty bucks so enough to be worth their while to stay in the study but not enough to really make a huge difference and that's essentially the placebo where you're giving them money. You're giving giving them a debit card. You're keeping them in the study and keep tabs on them and their kids but the amount of money is not really a difference making amount and forty percent of the MOMS in the study those in the quote unquote treatment in group are going to receive three hundred thirty three dollars a month. So that adds up to four thousand dollars a year which depending on your income bracket may or may not seem like a lot of money but all of the MOMS in this study are at or below the poverty line and so the idea is that because the families the MOMS and kids in this study are randomized into one group or the other? They're it just kinda drawn by a computer. If at the end of the study there are differences between the group that got more money in the group that got less then you can scientifically solidly say that. It's because of the money honey. That is the difference between the two and that would finally allow them to establish causation as opposed to just correlation in terms of poverty and all these negative in outcomes for kids. Well how will the study proceed. And how will they attempt to kind of measure this along the way. They've already started with what they call through to the year. One so what. The idea is that they will check in with the the kids and MOMS around the kids first birthday second birthday. Third Birthday the study is funded up to that point so far but they're now applying for continuous funding and there is is a pretty good precedent of really ambitious. Recall Longitudinal Studies that follow people over time being extended so you can easily imagine that maybe the study won't end when these kids are three. It might follow them until they're five until ten until they're twenty. There's fascinating possibilities there. But they will bring them into the lab and obviously the kids would be turning one to three on a rolling basis because the mom's been recruited all year. They'll do some brain scans of the kids. They'll talk to the moms about sort of how things are for them. On a day to day basis it will take a hair sample of the MOMS which allows them to measure stress through cortisol levels built a video of the moms playing with their kids so that allows them to kind of code for look at the quality of interaction between the parents and the kids and sort of how they're how they're mood is with each other and eventually down the road as the kids get a little older closer to three they will do more. Ambitious brain scans functional. MRI To show them better sort of specifically how the different areas of the brain are working size of the different areas and to really unpack sort of the differences that may emerge because they they don't know the end the research researchers very open about that. We can talk about what they think might happen. But they really don't know and either way the study should come out with a pretty fascinating fascinating robust answer about would if the real problem with an he's problem in quotes but if the real problem with poor families or four families is chess money and what if you just give the money like what if you don't worry about stuff like do. They have enough books in their house. Other kids enrolled in good preschool programs. You know do. The parents have a harmonious oneal relationship. Would have you just give them a chunk of money. Does that change everything a little bit. It's it's kind of has amazing possible implications or the answer might aby. No you know what it doesn't change that much. There is too much stress in the lives of these families. There are too many factors going on that money. Just can't cancel out so either wait you sort of end up with a really interesting answer will not put too fine a point on it but I can imagine that if this study did prove causation. Shen and did prove that look. It's not any of these other things it's just money that would really blow up some of the stigmas that are attached to kids in poverty. Yeah I mean there. There are obvious quite deep political implications here existential implications. You Know People's ideas about why some people have more. Some people have lost their ideas about how we as a society should help people or how much people should bootstrap themselves up. Those are pretty deeply held things right. Those are sort of the maybe the most hot metrics of by which we sort of see political divisiveness right now. So yeah I mean you're not going to convert vert everyone but it's always an interesting thing to have a solid scientific answer. You can point to know. The researchers are very careful to say they're not suggesting this panacea. They're not saying we should get rid of of all these ambitious. You know preschool improvement programs or parenting classes or anything like that and just give us families envelopes of cash. It's more that this is an interesting idea. That's worth testing. That hasn't been tested because there have been decades of testing that have gone on around. You know preschool programs parenting all that other stuff so we should road test this one too and no. It is a useful tool to have in the toolbox but absolutely if the answer comes back that guess what if you give poor families four thousand bucks a year. It improves a bunch which of things by enough to matter. Then that might suggest that maybe the only problem with those Pam families was that they were poor and if you give them a little leg up on the poverty already they can sort of solve all the other stuff themselves. There's also all kinds of other expectations baked into this about how poor people spend money and musicians about finances. And I when I asked I asked Kimberly Noble. Do you get us by people. Like what if the mom spend the money on crappy stuff like what if they make poor decisions in there you know buying liquor Acre cigarettes or whatever and she laughed and said we get that question all the time. It's one of the first things they get us because there's no strings attached to this money but the answer is that that just it doesn't really happen. They did a small pilot. Study to sort of test the feasibility of the debit card thing and out of I think it was eleven hundred transactions. Exactly three occurred at stores that could be considered liquor stores.

Kimberly Noble Principal Shannon Jordan Heath Rawlings Shanna United States Noble Co Maclean New Orleans Writer Nobles Research Cortisol Longitudinal Studies Columbia University PAM Minneapolis Shen Omaha
"principal investigator" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"A principal investigator with the Earthwatch institute he explains that beyond the lethal impact that a predator lie down lie and has on its prey they have another important effect the non lethal impact of phone lines in predators in general is a secure their prey and that has an impact on how the pre use their habitat without our nation Avery species potentially can feed anywhere wants to with the risk of predation it has to selectively choose areas where the risk of predation maybe lower and that can have a drastic influence on how they use their habitat and us the in fact if they would have on their habitat Andre is currently studying the way in which the mountain lions in the mule deer play out there predator prey relationships he wore in future programs we can listen to a program from our archives if you want to hear more check out our podcast I'm Jim Metzner five to one thirty five years town tramp is bounce out of the two ten and Baldwin Avenue have reports of two vehicle injury crash blocking the number two lane of bald with offramp starting to see some slowing as you approach the back of starts right around these saying get real Boulevard to stay busy till you get past Baldwin after that clears up heading out towards the Inland Empire north outside seventy one pretty busy as you approach hold Avenue slow to get past the ten clears up after that northbound side of the seven ten also busy from Firestone into east LA doesn't really shake free until you get past the five and over on the west side just a reminder because of the investigation into that building fire Wilshire Boulevard shut down between Barrington and Westgate until further notice authorities saying possibly twenty four hours before they get that investigation dot your next report one forty five more traffic ports more often contract can extend seventy newsradio.

principal investigator Earthwatch institute Jim Metzner Baldwin Firestone LA Barrington Inland Empire Westgate
NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting

Environment: NPR

03:22 min | 9 months ago

NASA Taps Snowstorm-Chasing Team To Improve Forecasting

"If you live in a place where it snows you probably know. The drill forecasters will predict a massive snowstorm. Grocery stores are emptied. And then there's just a light dusting getting. It happens every winter in part because we don't really understand how these storms work but a new study from NASA hopes to change that the impacts mission wants to improve our understanding of snowstorms and in particular of what are known as snow bands. Here to talk about the program. Is Lynn mcmurray. Principal investigator on impacts. Welcome thank you happy to be earned. So what exactly are snow bands. I've never heard this phrase before. Okay well within snowstorm which you have heard about the clouds associated with them Spent a large area. They can be you know is as far as Florida up to Maine but within those clouds. You have narrow regions where the snowfall is far more intense in the oftener organized in kind of a narrow narrow band and we just call those snow bands. Okay and how do you examine closely. These snow bands. I mean I understand that you're using to tair planes. Yes so this project a way we were going to investigate. These storms is fly to different aircraft. The first aircraft after fly high above the snowstorms. It will be equipped with remote sensing instrumentation. Okay and then the second aircraft will be flying inside the storm itself. I inside. It's making a different kind of measurements. It'll be measuring the environment in which the snowfall occurs. And we have these instruments called probes which which actually take pictures of the snow crystals themselves different altitudes you see different shapes crystals is absolutely fascinating. Eighty okay so how do these two planes help us understand how to predict snowstorms. So what we're going to be doing is investigating being the processes that create these snow bands. So trying to understand the science behind it and then also by because the one that's flying high has remote sensing instrumentation will help us be able to sense it from space better. The information from the remote sensing point of view view up above in inside. The clouds will also help us improve our forecast models which predict snowfall but need better Information about how that forms sue. How accurate do you think this study will help us get our predictions when it comes to snowstorms? Well hopefully much more accurate than we have now. right now do okay with the track of the large-scale storm certainly by twenty twenty four hours ahead of the storm but we don't have a good handle on a accurate predictions of the distribution of snowfall. Where it's going to snow heavily Lee where it's GonNa snow not at all and that's to do with these very small-scale narrow bands of intense snowfall so ultimately we'll have better forecasts of whether Boston or New York will get the most Snow Lynn? mcmurray is the principal investigator on Nasr's impacts mission. Thank you very much for joining us

Principal Investigator Lynn Mcmurray Nasa Nasr Florida Boston Maine New York
NASA ScienceCast 303: Exploring the Presence of Water on the Moon

NASA ScienceCasts

03:29 min | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 303: Exploring the Presence of Water on the Moon

"As NASA prepares to return to the moon one of the many exciting opportunity scientists are preparing for is the ability to use the water that exists there support human exploration the presence of water has been relatively recent discovery opening up many exciting possibilities for future exploration and just as many questions about the water's origins in the late one thousand nine hundred ninety s Nasr's lunar prospector mission found extra hydrogen at the polls and where there's hydrogen there might be water enter the L. Cross mission designed to determine the type and amount of hydrogen that might be present jess below the moon's polar regions. Tony Capri is a planetary scientist at NASA Ames Research Center and was the principal investigator for the L. Cross mission to determine the form of hydrogen at the polls we needed way to access material below the surface so we carried a piece of the Atlas rocket we launched on all the way to the moon and directed it into one of the large permanently title craters near the South Pole which caused a plume of dust and debris to shoot upwards we had a probe with nine different measuring instruments following the plumes ten mile or sixteen kilometer upward trajectory the lunar reconnaissance orbiter spacecraft was also making up of the plume while mapping the lunar surface from it orbit around the moon the lunar dirt in the plume hadn't seen the sun in over two billion years in the sunlight among other metals and gases we found after about five percent by weight now we know there's water on the moon research scientists jen helmet is also at eight does she explains why the discovery is much more than just a scientific curiosity ultimately I believe we'll be living on the moon for extended periods of time so we need to take advantage of whatever resources we can find their water is h two o a combination of hydrogen oxygen and we can break it apart so now we have a source of hydrogen and oxygen that may be able to be used for rocket fuel as well as a source of oxygen breathing water on the Moon gives you a new paradigm for future space exploration very exciting in the ten years since the outcross mission we've continued to study water at the Lunar Poles from but with instruments on several missions but we still have lots of questions where for instance did the water come from some believed that the water and other volatile could be remnants of comets an asteroid impacts over billions of years others point to recent meteoric shower hours they can be seen producing water vapor in where exactly is the water we've confirmed that water exists in the CABELA's crater near the Moon South Pole where the L. Cross impact occurred but how plentiful is it and can we expect to find it in other soup for cold regions we won't be able to answer any of these questions with certainty until we visit the South Pole with robots astronauts through the artem program NASA is planning to do just that thirsting for more information about the changing science of

Moon South Pole Nasa L. Cross Nasa Ames Research Center Nasr Tony Capri Principal Investigator Artem Scientist Sixteen Kilometer Two Billion Years Five Percent Ten Years
NASA shock: Scientist makes stunning confession as he claims life already found on Mars

Doug Stephan

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

NASA shock: Scientist makes stunning confession as he claims life already found on Mars

"Is a very interesting story floating around about a NASA scientist who says they found life on Mars back in this seven days hello Gilbert Levin principal investigator on NASA experiment they said the Viking lander to Mars in nineteen seventy six published an article in Scientific American Journal arguing the experiments positive results were proof of life on the red planet what do you think of that labeled release as the experiment was designed to test Martian soil for organic matter scene we had answer the ultimate question there is life on

Principal Investigator Scientific American Journal Nasa Scientist Gilbert Levin Seven Days
"principal investigator" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A principal investigator in two and i h funded studies on alzheimer's disease sharpen your mind and feel common center tricalm clever go to calm and clever dot com enter the promo code radio for five dollars off again calm and clever dot com enter the promo code radio for five dollars off heart disease is on the rise clogged arteries high blood pressure high cholesterol levels may not be fully detected by you the symptoms are their loss of energy blood sugar spikes and drops poor circulation and irregular heartbeat are just a few of these that can alert you that something is wrong here how heart and body extract is making a difference in thousands of people's lives across america blood pressure has normalized my diabetes has totally improved it wanted to go with me now how much he'll be i look and i'm going to have the feel in extract everyone anybody over forty and the north american continent could be using this product at the preventative to keep their cardiovascular system healthy order your two months supply today by calling eight six six to nine five five three zero five at eight six six to nine five five three zero five four order online h._p. extract dot com heart and body extract eight six six to nine five five three zero five four h._p. extract dot com ancient life oil dot com for your c._b._d. needs just remember ancient life oil dot com was it do for the body west i can't see do the people in the suits run the industry big farmers all over c._b._d. because of its h. e. you know what i mean research the benefits of c._b._d..

principal investigator alzheimer's disease america five dollars two months
NASA ScienceCast 297: Cementing Our Place in Space

NASA ScienceCasts

04:15 min | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 297: Cementing Our Place in Space

"The main thing are placed in space presented by science at nasa as you're done drugs you around the block for his morning book you're probably not thinking about the wonders of the neighborhoods sidewalk but that concrete is pretty great next to water it's the most widely used material on earth in the future concrete may be equally useful off the planet when humans construct a permanent base on the moon they'll need sturdy stuff the weather bombardments from solar radiation and media right no one wants a crack in their moon days the key to making out of this world concrete maybe just study it out of this world to experiments have taken place aboard the international space station or i s s to do just that the microgravity investigation of cement slid vacation or mix and multi used variable jeep processing facility or mvp sell five researchers from pennsylvania state university end nassar's marshall space flight center are analyzing the study's results concrete is a mixture of sand gravel and rocks glued together by cement paved made of water in summit powder and it's not as mundane is it looks under the surface it's quite complex what goes on there is key to strengthen durability yet scientists still don't understand all the details of concrete's chemistry in microscopic structure processing methods aren't cast in stone there's plenty of room for improvement alexandro berlin scott principal investigator for both experiments says or experiments are focused on the pace that holds the concrete mixture together we want to know what grows inside summit based concrete when there is no gravity driven phenomenon such is sedimentation it all begins when water is added to the cement to put it very simply the cement molecular structure changes when the summit grains dissolve residents get explains as be old molecules dissolve calcium silicate hydrate end calcium hydroxide start to crystallize myriad of these tiny crystals for all through the mixture interlocking with one another and with each other concrete ingredients such as gravel iss experiments are researching how this all plays out in space ribbons says it could could change the distribution of the crystalline micro structure and ultimately the material properties the ratio of the water cement powder is critical to making the concrete components combined effectively in determining the strength and durability of the final concrete well this ratio need to be different on the moon where gravity is about one sixth of earth that's the kind of question you experiment will shed light on for the mix experiment astronauts added water to a series of package containing dry cement powder then added alcohol to some of the packets just stop the hydration process at specified times for mvp so five astronaut also hydrated dry cement but for this experiment they used a centrifuge on board the iss test to stimulate gravity at a number of strength including lunar gravity and martian gravity for both experiments the samples were returned to earth for analysis were already seeing an documenting unexpected results says marshall's richard google co principal investigator for mvp sell five ribbons get ads what we find could leave to improvements in concrete both in space end on earth since summit is used extensively around the world even a small improvement could have a tremendous impact we might even end up with better sidewalks for walking her dog for more from the international space station go to www dot nasa dot gov slash iss tash science for

Nasa
A Constellation of CubeSats

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

A Constellation of CubeSats

"Significant damage to two space shuttle windshields was caused by debris. No larger than a Fleck of paint. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Current technology can't pinpoint orbital debris in the sub millimeter two millimeter range, but something only a fraction of a millimeter in size can be dangerous to spacecraft or robotic missions in the near earth environment. A team from the university of Maryland college park has found a way to detect these tiny particles and Nasr's innovative advanced concepts program has given the team funding to evaluate their mapping technique. Here's principal investigator, Christine Hartselle. So our Nyack concept is to use an Equatorial constellation of cubesats to math, small orbital debris by detecting. The plasma saw Tun's produced by the debris salt on waves are really a signal. In the plasma density. We can measure them using using relatively simple instrumentation like Ling their probe a fleet of small satellites equipped with sensors could enable real time mitigation, which would mean fewer on orbit collisions and a safer spacecraft environment for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulling now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

TUN Principal Investigator Christine Hartselle Nyack University Of Maryland College National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Ling Jennifer Nasa
"principal investigator" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Training laser light on earth sports presented by science at nasa the international national space station or i assess is sporting a new light fixture the global ecosystem dynamics investigation or djeddai will being down laser light on earth from orbiting laboratory to reveal more about our environment in men in how it is changing nasa's jet i sense laser pulses and a tree canopies imprecise only measures the light reflected back the timing it intensity of light bounces back to jeopardize telescope will reveal the height in density of trees and vegetation and the vertical arrangement of the leaves and branches with any overall canopy doctoroff the bio jetta principal investigator at the university of maryland says this instrument will map forests in high resolution in three dimensions revolutionizing the way researchers monitor them forested areas are an important part of our planet not only do forests provided a habitat for many species end a source of raw materials heels for human news such as paper and lumber they also play a key role in earth's carbon cycle deforestation enforced degradation in addition to other types of forests disturbances such fires in insect outbreaks leader increases in atmosphere carbon dioxide forestry growth sucks that carmen back down into trees and soils knowing how forests grow and change over time can allow us to better understand the contribution and that forced me to earth carbon cycle and help people better manage this important resource djeddai is the first base born instrument designed specifically to perform sustained mapping of the spatial distribution of the carbon content content a forest the buying notes one of the most portly quantified components of the carbon cycle is the net balance between force disturbance in regrowth jet i will help scientists fill in those missing piece by revealing the vertical structure of the forest information we really can't get with sufficient accuracy any other way djeddai will provide scientists with insights into the amount of carbon stored in forest when combined current in historical record's of changes captured by earth orbiting satellites such as lance at this information will enhance the ability of researchers to identify changes happening across our planet researchers also will incorporate jeopardize his observations along with those of the eagles stress instrument on the station with daddy from other current and future earth observing sensors these data will address important questions about relationships between for structure function composition opposition in changes in carbon content combining all of these datta will allow researchers to gain an unprecedented understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the role plants and trees play in earth's global carbon cycle these

nasa principal investigator lance eagles university of maryland
NASA ScienceCast 296: Shining Laser Light on Earths Forests

NASA ScienceCasts

03:42 min | 1 year ago

NASA ScienceCast 296: Shining Laser Light on Earths Forests

"Training laser light on earth sports presented by science at nasa the international national space station or i assess is sporting a new light fixture the global ecosystem dynamics investigation or djeddai will being down laser light on earth from orbiting laboratory to reveal more about our environment in men in how it is changing nasa's jet i sense laser pulses and a tree canopies imprecise only measures the light reflected back the timing it intensity of light bounces back to jeopardize telescope will reveal the height in density of trees and vegetation and the vertical arrangement of the leaves and branches with any overall canopy doctoroff the bio jetta principal investigator at the university of maryland says this instrument will map forests in high resolution in three dimensions revolutionizing the way researchers monitor them forested areas are an important part of our planet not only do forests provided a habitat for many species end a source of raw materials heels for human news such as paper and lumber they also play a key role in earth's carbon cycle deforestation enforced degradation in addition to other types of forests disturbances such fires in insect outbreaks leader increases in atmosphere carbon dioxide forestry growth sucks that carmen back down into trees and soils knowing how forests grow and change over time can allow us to better understand the contribution and that forced me to earth carbon cycle and help people better manage this important resource djeddai is the first base born instrument designed specifically to perform sustained mapping of the spatial distribution of the carbon content content a forest the buying notes one of the most portly quantified components of the carbon cycle is the net balance between force disturbance in regrowth jet i will help scientists fill in those missing piece by revealing the vertical structure of the forest information we really can't get with sufficient accuracy any other way djeddai will provide scientists with insights into the amount of carbon stored in forest when combined current in historical record's of changes captured by earth orbiting satellites such as lance at this information will enhance the ability of researchers to identify changes happening across our planet researchers also will incorporate jeopardize his observations along with those of the eagles stress instrument on the station with daddy from other current and future earth observing sensors these data will address important questions about relationships between for structure function composition opposition in changes in carbon content combining all of these datta will allow researchers to gain an unprecedented understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the role plants and trees play in earth's global carbon cycle these

Nasa Principal Investigator Lance Eagles University Of Maryland
Space Navigator

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Space Navigator

"In deep space timekeeping is vital to navigation. But no regular clock will do. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Currently a spacecraft's position in space is determined. By measuring the time it takes a signal from earth to reach a spacecraft and rebroadcast back to earth the ground station can only track one spacecraft at a time space craft must wait for navigation commands from earth rather than making decisions on board in real time. But Nasr's deep-space atomic clock could change that here's Dr Jill soy Burt. The deputy principal investigator for de sac with the deep space atomic clock would allow is for us to have very very stable frequency source on board the spacecraft allowing us to switch into this one way navigation paradigm from two way to one way it allows us to morph it. Currently track spacecraft with our deep space network as the navigator as the person who will in the end be benefiting from this clock. It really can make my job easier. In a lot of ways I'm excited to see what we can do with it next for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook and let us now. Produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Dr Jill Soy Burt Jennifer Pulley Principal Investigator Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Nasa
"principal investigator" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"He is the principal investigator of numerous NIH funded clinical trials and is a world renowned expert in the field of heart failure. He joined the w faculty in two thousand sixteen and is currently the medical director of advanced heart failure at MC w Colleen McCarthy is the chief of staff and vice president of organ and tissue of versity versatile. I is an affiliation of four midwest blood centers, including Wisconsin, Indiana, Michigan and heartland Colleen began her career in healthcare as a critical care nurse in Denver, Colorado. She joined versatile in two thousand ten and is responsible for the performance of Wisconsin's organ, procurement organization and tissue Bank. Well, thank you, Dr Salzburg and Kaleen so much for joining us, Dr Salzburg you are joining us by phone. Thank you so much for being with us today. If we could just start with you. If you could just tell the listeners a bit about what exactly are some of the reasons and causes that people develop heart failure. And why do people need a heart transplant? I know that's a very general question. But in general, what are kind of the issues that people develop that necessitate a heart transplant? Happy to try to address that the pathway toward heart failure, initially heart transplant long-term, really encompasses two primary pathways. There were patients whose heart muscle, become increasingly wink, weakened to the point where they can't supply the blood necessary to keep vital organ alive. An adequately functioning that could result something such as heart attacks where part of the muscle damage to do special blood flow to whole muscle itself. Could result from a virus or even genetic causes a second penalty, though, we're patients they have are both of it continues to adequately. But increasingly. And the differing restrict the amount of blood flow that can go back to the heart and the final common pathway for both of these second of the vote in higher pressures and fine of a heart and the heart's inability to meet the demands of the body, and as a result, the other organs of the body can begin to fail and patients progress through different stages of heart failure in increasingly symptomatic, if they can get to a point will be labeled them and stage or stage, D heart failure. And those could be patience with her extremely weak or heart muscle better. Increasingly stiff once they reach the point where more traditional medical options are no longer available to them and the ability to perform day to day activities increasingly restricted typically when we begin to think about heart transplantation as an option for these states patients, and how common is this heart failure. How often I mean, I know of. It's your specialty. So you see it quite often. But amongst the US population, how prevalent is heart failure. The. Over six million Americans. It's heart failure over a million a year as well. For patients with congestive heart. Failure does remain the most common reason that patients over the age of sixty five or hospitalized in the United States, and it generates a tremendous economic burden for the healthcare system in the United States will now speaking of Colleen what does this look like in people who live in Wisconsin? How common you know, we talked about nationally, but how come and specifically in our state is the incidence of heart failure the incident in Wisconsin is very similar to the the national statistics as well. So we see within our service area adversity is the the organ procurement organization that serves eastern, Wisconsin. So within our service area, we have twelve counties and two point three million population. So within our population, it is our responsibility to engage our community in increasing awareness for organ donation, and then also to respond to all of our hospital. When there is a potential for an organ donor. So it's part of the organ donation evaluation process. We were very hard to optimize all the organ organ function. So that we can have a successful transplant, and that that process is actually fairly complicated. And and and requires a quite a bit of resources. So once we get dented by potential organ donor. The we really have a race against the clock. Organ function starts to deteriorate very quickly after brain death has been declared and so in conjunction with medically. Optimizing the organ donor. So we can have it. So successful transplant. We're also dealing with the human side of it and dealing with the grieving family as well. So our team focuses on supporting that family through their loss. All these don't donations occur as a result of a sudden loss and families very much need some time to absorb that grief. But unfortunately. There's just not much time in order to successfully coordinator transplant. So our team works with the local transplant centers here and receive support from the the local teams here. So we can optimize organ function, which hopefully results in successful heart transplant, and I know this is an incredibly complex answer to this question. But just for the listeners how how does the system work on a basic level in terms of how it's determined how and where organs get distributed specifically in Wisconsin. I guess it'd be more specific sure you organ donation as a national resource and the organ donation and transplant communities have been, you know, working hard to ensure we have a fair and equitable allocation system, and that's that's.

Wisconsin Colleen McCarthy United States Dr Salzburg NIH tissue Bank principal investigator MC Denver Colorado medical director Kaleen chief of staff Michigan coordinator vice president Indiana
Mapping Orbital Debris

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Mapping Orbital Debris

"Significant damage to two space shuttle windshields was caused by debris. No larger than a Fleck of paint. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Current technology can't pinpoint orbital debris in the sub millimeter two millimeter range, but something only a fraction of a millimeter in size can be dangerous to spacecraft or robotic missions in the near earth environment. A team from the university of Maryland college park has found a way to detect these tiny particles and Nasr's innovative advanced concepts program has given the team funding to evaluate their mapping technique. Here's principal investigator, Christine Hartselle. So our Nyack concept is to use an Equatorial constellation of cubesats to math, small orbital debris by detecting. The plasma saw Tun's produced by the debris salt on waves are really a signal. In the plasma density. We can measure them using using relatively simple instrumentation like Ling their probe a fleet of small satellites equipped with sensors could enable real time mitigation, which would mean fewer on orbit collisions and a safer spacecraft environment for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulling now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

TUN Principal Investigator Christine Hartselle Nyack University Of Maryland College National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Ling Jennifer Nasa
Navigating in Space

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Navigating in Space

"In deep space timekeeping is vital to navigation. But no regular clock will do. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Currently a spacecraft's position in space is determined. By measuring the time it takes a signal from earth to reach a spacecraft and rebroadcast back to earth the ground station can only track one spacecraft at a time space craft must wait for navigation commands from earth rather than making decisions on board in real time. But Nasr's deep-space atomic clock could change that here's Dr Jill soy Burt. The deputy principal investigator for de sac with the deep space atomic clock would allow is for us to have very very stable frequency source on board the spacecraft allowing us to switch into this one way navigation paradigm from two way to one way it allows us to morph it. Currently track spacecraft with our deep space network as the navigator as the person who will in the end be benefiting from this clock. It really can make my job easier. In a lot of ways I'm excited to see what we can do with it next for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook and let us now. Produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Dr Jill Soy Burt Jennifer Pulley Principal Investigator Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr Nasa
"principal investigator" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Created by scientists curt Hendrix, a principal investigator in two. And I h funded studies on Alzheimer's disease. Sharpen your mind Anfield common center. Go to calm and clever dot com. That's calm and clever dot com. Enter the promo code radio for five dollars off. That's calm and clever dot com. You've got America's First News. Breaking news first, America's First News. We'll be right back. Hey, folks, what the number one phrase that life change t received by Email? He ready. We love this tea. We love this tea time after time week after week, we love this tea life changed gives you more energy a beautiful cleansing and fulfils its slogan perfectly that teed. It makes you go. If you wanna be on your health game, log on to get the tea dot com and order life change, super t- packages. Come in a one month's supply and win you brew this stuff. Wait until you see the results. Are we all about the results? And with a lot of people's health struggling we can use a little bit of help. Doctors will tell you disease starts in the gut. So log on to get the tea dot com. That's get that T dot com. Be our next Email saying I love this T. I mean, I love this. T get the get the tea dot com. Helping America one teabag at a time. Which won the one at back. Oh, that's okay. Only my kid could strike out and T-ball. Looks like he's having some trouble running. He's wandering way off the baseline. If like you can't. Oh my gosh. It is too big. It's as big as a bucket. You know, I must have gotten them in adult one thinking, you're out. When safety equipment doesn't fit. It's game over that goes for your kid too. If too big for a car seat at doesn't mean the right size for an adult safety belt. If you're under four foot nine they need a booster seat. It raises.

America curt Hendrix Alzheimer's disease principal investigator five dollars four foot one month
"principal investigator" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Away. Principal investigator Allen stern says it went past an object named ultimate to lay believed to be from the early solar system and made history conducting farthest exploration in the history of humankind. And did so spectacularly the first images showing an elongated almost peanut shaped object. Many more images and data expected in the coming months. Correspondent Dave Packer. Uber polls. It's employees every six months, according to the most recent survey conducted in October. Uber employees are feeling better about the company and about their own work. The positive survey was leaked to business insider, a financial website. According to the US department of transportation, only a handful of the nation's rail systems have met a deadline for installing positive train control. Just four of the nation's forty one rail systems have implemented that positive train controls that are meant to avert collisions and derailments the others which include Amtrak have either applied for or been granted extensions. The technology involves equipment on look motives and tracks. That communicates information about the train's speed as well as the position at the train and track. Switches federal investigators say at least one hundred fifty accidents with the resulting three hundred deaths could have been prevented by the new technologies. Jan johnson. Washington wins news time ten fifty six. Now, Bloomberg money watch on ten ten wins in this edition in our series on trends in the new year. We look at China's.

Principal investigator Allen stern US department of transportatio Dave Packer Jan johnson Bloomberg Washington China six months
"principal investigator" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Away. Principal investigator Allen stern says it went past an object named ultimate to lay believed to be from the early solar system and made history conducting farthest exploration in the history of humankind. And did so spectacularly the first images showing an elongated almost peanut shaped object. Many more images and data expected in the coming months. Yeah, they say too late looks like it's about about ten miles wide and about twenty miles long, and it rotates they're going to use the data now to help tell us more about our solar. System where it all started, and where we fit some fascinating information out of that expected to come out of this expedition AccuWeather says Greenberg with forty two degrees right now as we take the roll call. It's forty five in Patterson and mascot with forty six degrees outside Studio B here with forty five going down to thirty degrees tonight is already with a real feel of forty out in central park. We'll have a complete AccuWeather forecast. Coming up a little bit later in the broadcast up lamented. Stay with us wins. News time five twenty six. Bloomberg money. Watch on ten ten wins. This hour presented by the breakers. And here is Gina. Cervetti, addition and our series on trends in the year ahead. We look at stealth pricing or the ways companies go to great lengths to separate you from more of your money. Bloomberg BusinessWeek editor Jim Ellis says shrink flation takes the less is more approach. You normally think of pint containers of ice cream, they reduce them down to fourteen ounces, which actually is not a fine. But it still looks like a pint Hannity prices pint the auto industry has long used stealth pricing to swell sticker prices with upgrades like lead. Either seat more recently, it's touch screens, and driver assistance features that command big bucks, you'll find stealth pricing in the airplane cabinet where premium economy costs twice as much as coach for a few extra inches of legroom. And then there's the so-called pink tax, the New York City department of consumer affairs. Actually did a study about this. And they found that women pay about thirteen percent more than men for personal care products for essentially the same product, stealth pricing. One of the trends to watch in the year ahead, Bloomberg money watch at twenty six and fifty six past every hour. I'm Gina Cervetti for ten. Ten. Win wins. News time, five twenty seven as the tech world grows. More and.

Bloomberg Gina Cervetti AccuWeather Principal investigator New York City department of co Allen stern BusinessWeek Patterson Hannity Greenberg Jim Ellis editor forty six degrees forty two degrees thirteen percent fourteen ounces thirty degrees
"principal investigator" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on Science Friction

"Basically, you know, this is a rich history of principal investigator, scientists setting themselves up as semi experimental subjects as well. As the late side has their own experiments. Definitely at the beginning of memoir. He does say there's nothing here that can be published under strict scientific conditions. But yes, it was it was viewed by the faculty that funded it as an experiment. It's very difficult to read what happened to Lucy and radio lead. Compatriot's in the US did a really profound episode on what happened to Lucy they investigated. And it's just made me I was driving along way ping as listening to what it was actually cried. When I I could not break what happened to Lucy Lucy at the age of eleven basically was a very very dangerous. Individuals to have living in a family home. They did build a section of the house that had reinforced concrete at first they wanted her to leave in a bedroom and run around and use the lounge room in the backyard, which she did for a while. But as she became stronger and stronger and more dangerous they built a separate section. She would accost the mailman follow people into the bathroom. She was she was a curious being and being chimp that she was being Jim. And in a very ill advised move. She was sent to. To a small river island in Gambia for rehabilitation in inverted comments. She had never seen another chimpanzee. She'd never been outside of Oklahoma or Florida. She had never seen anything, but a human being as far as she was concerned, and it didn't go. Well, there was a really. Woman called Janice Carter who some people say did a great job. Some people say that she she made things even worse for Lucy. Janice, moved to the island, and she lived there inside a cage for several years looking after Lucy, but also trying to break the link between human life that Lucy was so dependent Lucy, very hard to let go of she found area hard to let go she she, you know, she drank out of glasses, and she used a knife and fork, and all of a sudden she had other chimps who she was terrified of she. She slipped on top of the cage that jenness Carter set up in the middle of the island eventually after a few years. She did get the confidence and the ability to look after a self a bit as chimp, and Janice was was able to to leave the island, but there's a very famous very very sad photo that somebody took of Janice going back to check on Lucy and loose. She finally essentially being being a real chimp coming down to the water embracing, Janice and then. Some other chimps coming down to meet her, and then they all walked off together and left jenness. And that was the last time that she ever had an encounter with a human. Because the next time they went to the island they found her body. Some people say it was poachers. Some people say that she was may be attacked by the chimps because she was never quite accepted by them. I found her body, but her body was not complete. No, that's right. So some people say that maybe she was her hands were dismembered by churches, but there's a bit of evidence that that weren't really poachers in that area. And that I don't know it's something that will never really no, no, I get teary every time. I think about it. It's just the most up breaking story. Been would Lucy happen today. That's a good question bodies have ethics committees that these days one would hope would never ever allow anything like what happened poor Lucy. But it's a tough one. Because there are there are benefits that come from this sort of research studying non-human, primates relational Whitelock. That's right. I mean, Lucy learned sign language, and she was able to create new phrases, which is something that people didn't realize was possible at the time. She knew how to say a variety of different separate words. The first time she tried watermelon. She called it candy water. So she actually started to put together language, so we can learn so much. But yeah, how far how far should we go? I mean, I guess that's the whole point of today's. Should science go when it wants to enter these poet Benjamin Dodds on a science friction. We recorded at the quantum words. Science writing festival now Margaret Morgan brings her life as a criminal lawyer turned TV screenwriter turned scientists turned novelist to her debut, novel the second cure..

Lucy Lucy Janice jenness Carter principal investigator US Benjamin Dodds Gambia Oklahoma Margaret Morgan Florida
"principal investigator" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:50 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on WJR 760

"Then might not surprise. You pot usage is at a thirty year high among college students, at least that's the finding of a new school study. We're joined by the principal investigator. John Schulenburg psychology professor at the university of Michigan. John thanks for joining us this morning on the Frank Beckmann show. Thank you. I appreciate your interest. So should we be surprised by this with the amount of marijuana that seems to be available in store fronts, and to people who have who have cards as patients, or is this something that we would be experiencing even if marijuana wasn't headed towards decriminalization? What I think it's all related, and and perhaps we should not be surprised, but what we should be concerned about is high levels of what we call daily or near daily use. That is people who say they use a given three day period on twenty or more occasions. Well, that's that's something that I just heard from a new college student who was talking about some of his friends, and some of the people like, you know, I I want to go out and go to parties or want to go out to concerts. I want to go out to do cool things happening on campus. And some of my friends say, no, I think I'd rather just hang out here because the party had already started and it involved a little bit of the old cannabis. Sure. Sure. Yeah. And in the field, we call that a motivational syndrome that is people get so high that they don't really want to do anything else. But what we're finding is that that this this level of dealer near daily use is really shooting up for non college. You've it's below five percent for college students, and it's. Close to fourteen percent for for non college. Student says those people are the same age dry school graduates. They're just not in college from nineteen to twenty two. So it's not just kids on campus getting baked it's kids all over the place. Who are you know? I mean, I I personally you have my own views on the decriminalization of marijuana. But but I don't like the kids who say. I don't really want to do anything because I'm just I'm sinking into this chair that seems to me to be very very detrimental, regardless of how you feel about whether marijuana should be legal or freely available. Absolutely. I and that's our concern. We're concerned with the health and wellbeing of young people. And we when we see marijuana use especially since it. So potent compared to what it used to be at such frequent use. We know from other studies that interferes with cognitive processing it gets in the way of of good mental health, and it probably interferes with what we call the transition to adulthood. Well, this is this is a terrible thing. I mean, what was we're talking about this. I'm just thinking. About childhood obesity. I'm thinking about kids with the the video games. I'm thinking about the social media. I'm thinking about the phones I'm thinking about all these things that seem like they are just. I just keeping kids sedentary. And now, I find out there's more and more of them who are not doing anything because they're just they're high. Right. Certainly the majority are fine. And I like to emphasize that. And you know, as well as I do that for forever. The older generation has both at the gover- generation said, oh my goodness. They're not doing it. Right. But but I think there are some real concerns. But I want to emphasize that you know, most are doing fine. And and. Yeah. It's important to get that point across the everything's not going down down the drain. Okay. Yeah. And I don't I don't want to be alarmist here at all. But what's what what do we learn from this study? And what should we be trying to do with these findings? I mean where where do we go from here? Well, first of all young people in college are having difficulties especially with the potency. We're seeing marijuana's well to other drugs. They should absolutely go. See college student personnel. The the the dean of students office that sounds like a scary place to go. But if they're having difficulties they should not hesitate to one thing we've learned in the past year and transnational occurrences. National media is if you need help you go get it. There's plenty of eligible for not college use. There's also plenty of elbow with our county and citywide services, if you know for parents, I think the best thing to do is as we talk to your kids. Just because they go off to college doesn't mean your job is done. And that they they need to be open one thing that that we find in our going on for four decades drug use goes up and down. So even though these were high levels now they're not a little bit lower than they were thirty five years ago. And you start doing the math and you start looking at the parents of today's young people, and you think well, they probably drug experienced as well. And and the point here is that parents ought to be open with her kids about the dangers of this. You you can get that across without making it such that it's acceptable from your perspective. Do you think? Do you think that this is a trend that having looked at it over four decades is going to either go up or down? I mean is there any way to plot where we're heading with this or is some of it has to do with just changing changing attitudes and greater availability of marijuana. Yeah. It's great question. Availability never really been a problem. It's seems more available now. And it certainly is. But that was never a problem in the past when we asked people young people can you get marijuana. Very most always say sure if they wanted it. So but attitudes are changing as you say, and and young people and probably all adults. Do not do not all but but in general. Frequent marijuana. Use is not much of a problem anymore. It used to be and when people when the people view it as a problem is dangerous they use Wes now for the future. Who knows what's going to happen? But my guess is that it will eventually go back down. But I don't see that any time soon given what's happening with legislature and attitudes in this country. Wow. I I'm concerned about anything that keeps our kids from getting up and about and maybe even just engaging in a lively conversation because they're the can in their own little world. That's our major concern. We're worried about the health of young young people. Why I think bringing this this issue to to people's attention and making sure we keep the conversation going is important, and we appreciate your study. And hopefully next time we talk maybe this usage will either be going down or people say, yeah, I was having some edibles or I smoked a little bit of weed while I was. Participating in the triathlon. That'd be a nice headline. Well, we do this every year. So we'll be back next fall with the new findings. We'll see what happens. Okay. Well, hopefully, we'll catch up with you. Then we're not as far as anybody knows high here. So we are high energy. That's the only highway are in highly engaged with the issue. So John Schulenburg now the university of Michigan a psychology professor who's been studying pot usage. Among college aged students for past forty years. Thanks to the time. We appreciate your expertise slight. Thank you very much. Appreciate the interest. As the likes of Friday night. Again, burn bright. It's time for seven sixty WJR high school football game of the week. Listen every Friday, WJR sports. Steve Courtney talks with the coaches and breaks down his pick for the week's..

marijuana John Schulenburg university of Michigan professor Frank Beckmann principal investigator WJR cannabis Steve Courtney Wes four decades thirty five years fourteen percent five percent forty years thirty year three day
"principal investigator" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"You talk in the book about that postage stamp which also backed this mystery there was such an accomplished in the united states the early days of the space program made a commitment to start sending robotic spacecraft to the planets in the space of quarter century from nineteen sixty two to nineteen eighty nine all the planets out to neptune were explored and voyager gorsuch was the headliner mission of the eighties that i went to unison neptune and win voyager triumphantly finished at neptune the us postal service issued a set of stamps for the exploration of the planets nine stamps eight of the nine have been explored of course they didn't know what it looked like in the no spacecraft had been there so the nice then just had this fuzzy ball and it said not yet explored pluto not yet explored there was an artist conception because all they could do and that became a bit of a dare to a lot of people but exploration dare a little unfinished business eight at a nine we're not gonna leave it that way of course the ultimate irony in that is that not only did that help foment people who are in the story of jaycee new horizons to go and and formulate a mission to pluto and fight for it but as we were getting very close to launching i made a decision as mission principal investigator that we would pace that stamp on the spacecraft and flight and pluto's face and get cancelled and we did that then at the fly by in july of twenty fifteen when i told that story and we.

united states jaycee principal investigator
"principal investigator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It this is a fascinating story now obviously we have a better understanding of our place in the universe but there's still so much that we don't know what is this experience new horizon what does it tell us about our own lives as humans here well there are a number of levels in which it sort of eliminates things for us for one thing you know in terms of the historical significance and and the achievement marked by this team it tells us that we're capable of doing incredible things if we work together in teams have perseverance over long periods of time and you know i think that you know particularly right now in this country when you know there's a lot of division and sort of doubt about our role in the world and people are you know a little apprehensive about the future to be reminded that you know this is america at its best you know doing something for all humankind these images are now available for everyone the knowledge the expansion knowledge is available for everyone and you know an arc is and gals did this by applying incredible ingenuity and working together as a team sometimes against odds for a long period of time and then as far as the scientific knowledge it really expands our awareness of the kinds of worlds that are possible in our cosmos we were so surprised and now we're starting to understand the the activity on pluto was not what anybody had predicted and it really enriches our knowledge of sort of how planets work and what planets can be and that feeds back on this topic we this area we call comparative planetology where we've actually learned about about how all planets work including the earth by understanding the variety of of of planetary processes out there every time we understand a new type of planet it makes us better at knowing how planets work and of course here on earth we need to know how this particular planet works and that effort is enriched by this exploration we're doing of other worlds so there there are practical and i would say even kind of spiritual dimensions to this thank you so much are practical and also spiritual dimensions to it if you're just joining me i'm duarte geraldino and i've been speaking with the principal investigator of.

duarte geraldino principal investigator america
"principal investigator" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Associated with psoriasis when it's bad so it really is a whole body disease but it's a common one s which are about one in forty people have serai who has millions of people ya watts right now i always say look you see a guy in atlanta in august wearing long sleeves long pants he's probably got to rise lewis orient skin cancer the we'll get back to that right are so and again it's an an inflammatory disorder on and kind of a revolution over the last decade in treating inflammatories voters on using initially tumor necrosis factor hitters so i didn't tell you this earlier but in the site so i actually i had the first orrell presentation on tnf um i think in this in the country so i was an md anderson i was doing research in developmental therapeutics this was thought to be a drug that was going to be huge in cancer and i had the first twenty a patient phase one trial of which we had zero responses on but um i and i as a fellow you normally wouldn't beyond the stage and doing the presentation um but the principal investigator for the trial um had just been awarded this fellowship to go study another institution and it just dumped by lap in there i am at lasko emergence iconic apology in the first major all presentational tina never knowing that it was going to become the huge blockbuster drug two of the most i guess the two largest by cost drugs or total dollars involved or embroil uh and you mira and they're the drugs among many others now the treat this does he absolutely light chanke drugs for many patients and it probably the first time in history medicine were the equation more and more effective drug means war side effects that equation.

psoriasis atlanta cancer principal investigator
"principal investigator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Other sources hi i'm jim green director of planetary science at nasa in this is gravity associate for them i'm here with alan stern the principal investigator of the new horizons mission and it's all about pluto today you know what an amazing body that has turned out to be just a matter of a few years ago we renew virtually nothing about pluto but in july 2015 new horizons changed all that and changed everything in our lives in planetary science you know what really surprised me is what we found one we should biggest surprises on you know i think my two biggest surprises were first just how utterly amazing put a turned out to be how many different kinds of features were on the surface and even in the atmosphere there was something for everyone and the second amazing finding was how many people uh really wanted to participate in it uh in the public and just be a part of this exploration we expected it would be a big response but it was much bigger than we thought and even for months i would say at least a year afterwards there is completely unparalleled a public reaction that uh our team members would go places we were getting or quests for literally hundreds of public presentations now we just couldn't fulfill at all i think some of that still going on i mean you know when i was in japan a desist the last week i went to a girl scorn and wanted to know about pluto here now well let's cool.

director nasa principal investigator japan alan stern
"principal investigator" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KOIL

"A principal investigator in two nih funded studies on alzheimer's disease try calm clever for two months you'll feel the difference call one eight hundred seven five eight eight seven four six or go to calm clever dot com japan was sue lowreturn wounding warning henry cavill robert daffy moore's law great met king let's listen joe all the new shoes raw jarmusch rai spa jon heyman i assume news bathenay a man as soon as you what a great talent met king cole was it just makes me so emotional listening to that i mean the beauty of our nation the time when we could merry christmas now everyone is afraid everyone's saying seasons reading happy holidays i'ma go merry christmas we're going to say merry christmas again happy holidays merry christmas merry christmas this is what we are about our judeochristian values crowder louder.

time merry christmas japan principal investigator disease alzheimer nih jon heyman raw henry cavill
"principal investigator" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Really odd magnetic field jack conerning joins me in the studio to tell me all about it he's a nasa scientists and the deputy principal investigator of the june emission thank you so much for coming in thank you take us to jupiter what is it like it depends on where you stand for many years show of jupiter where familiar with is the one you from the equator that bidders good ridden white band in it's got the big storm the grid great ridge bought move got the white oval floating by but judo for the first time to images of jupiter from the polls and when you look down from a pole down upon bolton totally different image it almost will simply almost it is unrecognizable jupiter and what you see these shows cyclones groups cyclones dancing around the polls intricate storms it used to be thought that if you were to land on jupiter you'd never hit a solid surface like the earth has that it's just sort of a big ball of gas now that you have all this new information what do you think well at jupiter is still a big bold gash rotate but of course much of that gas is under such intense temperature pressure that you would recognize the and if you were to fall into jupiter you would be crushed long before you got to anything that would substantially different from what we see surface why would i be crushed what is driving that force so it shows similar to when you're swimming in your diving the weight of the water above you increases the pressure yes show jupiter issued descend into the atmosphere the way to all the atmosphere above you just increases the pressure increases the pressure in increases the pressure as you go further down but let's say i was wearing some wonderful exoskeleton suit that would allow me not be crushed what what i see as i was falling through the atmosphere as the matter what you were you would be crushed eventually i'm gonna but all right matter what but let's say i but i think of argument for the sake of argued enter the atmosphere.

principal investigator jack conerning
"principal investigator" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"principal investigator" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"Name's ian a which principal investigator rotella me which is still on the surface of common sixty seven of the we say i was because of course it's an app now i am principal investigator coast seen was after being switched off to the ruins were emotional but interestingly filling still switched you know we never switch the lender all so it's actually still alive technically technically it is rocky films just keep some technically although unlikely it is possible to detect the carrier signal from philly from earth and there's been talk about a compelling to actually do that nothing comes of it was no scientific value to doing it but you know it's one of those challenges to sort of seen almost delicious so what was it light and i was from outside the van with a vat editor so i with slightly i got a sense of excitement from just seeing on screen within i actually being among scientists won't be very very strange personally am not sentimental so to me the the end of a mission so what if we knew it was going to be the end of the mission but of course the collective emotion from colleagues and people who worked on it for a long time together was pretty powerful and yeah you could sort of the atmosphere with a knife in in the room i was in we were getting oversee the feed from the control room those guys and they were very emotional.

ian editor principal investigator philly