35 Burst results for "Princeton University"

How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:18 min | Last week

How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

"Guest is michelle silverthorn. Michelle is a recognized organizational diversity expert and the founder and ceo of inclusion nation where she works with fortune five hundred companies tech startups nonprofits and universities to design authentic inclusive spaces designed on equity belonging and authenticity. Michelle is a graduate of princeton university and the university of michigan law school. She's also a ted speaker and author of the book. Authentic diversity how to change the workplace for good welcome to business confidential now. Michelle thank you so much for having me. I'm so happy to be here. One happy to have you because the subject of diversity and inclusion is more important than ever. And i'm so delighted to have you join me today. Because the idea of diversity being a good thing in business has been around for decades but when it comes to making things happen to delivering on the goods on the promises it feels like they're still so much room for considerable improvement. Why do you think organizations keep failing at diversity and that's a really great question. I think the challenge for a lot of organizations. They don't prioritize it. You know they say that ben prioritizing it they say that it's important to them but one of the activities typically have folks do when i'm doing my training with them. Is you know you think of a problem. I whatever your challenges when it comes to diversity in you know i tell. I've talked a lot about black people in the workplace. One is we don't have enough black executive right until you think that's your challenge. The reason is because there's a broken pipeline right. But then what i asked my attendees to do is to ask why five times so there's a broken pipeline wise and then ask why again because we're not recruiting at the rate schools because our executives think that you'll never recruit that these five schools because they are only comfortable hiring people from these schools because they only work with the people who attend these schools and by the time you get to the fifth. Why then you get to the underlying issue. That's really underlying all of that. But for a lot of people are going to get to that six or seven played the because our leaders don't prioritize it. They aren't willing to commit the resources. They aren't willing to commit the people they aren't willing to take the rest and when we aren't willing to do that. We're just gonna keep on falling behind on birthday and inclusion

Michelle Michelle Silverthorn University Of Michigan Law Sch Princeton University BEN
Kaley & Nate Klemp - How To Be A Good Partner

Untangle

01:59 min | Last month

Kaley & Nate Klemp - How To Be A Good Partner

"Two wonderful guests for you today. Not one but two nate and kaley clump. They're an amazing couple. That together co-authored the new book. The eighty eighty marriage a new model for a happier stronger marriage. Both of them are also incredible in their own. Right nate is actually one of the founders of a company that's partnered with mindful dot org. He's a phd from princeton university. And is the author of start here. Master the lifelong habit of wellbeing. So he's deeply steeped in mindfulness. Kelly is an amazing expert. On small group dynamics and leadership development her books include the fifteen commitments of conscious leadership. The drama free office. And let's say you could make a drama free office. You can probably make a drama free marriage and she created the thirteen guidelines for effective teams so between the two of them. They're here today to talk about the amazing power of bringing mindfulness into your relationship and how to have a happier one. Welcome nate and kelly. Which for having us here so happy to be here. It is my joy and pleasure. Let's start by talking first of all about what it's like to work together as a couple. You guys wrote a book together. You co create. tell me about it. It's a funny thing. Because i think initially. We had a semi conscious agreement to never worked together. We have created separate worlds as you described each pursuing our own areas and then it was really this project around marriage that clearly. We're doing as a joint project and our life and recognize that. Initially nate was going to write this book as a solo author which we thought was going to be really interesting but thought that it would actually be more powerful to do together so now working together living together parenting together being married there is a lot of together and i think that makes all the tools we talk about even more

Nate Kaley Clump Princeton University Kelly
George Shultz, Reagan's longtime secretary of state, dies at 100

Chris Douridas

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

George Shultz, Reagan's longtime secretary of state, dies at 100

"Reagan's longtime secretary of state, George Shultz, has died. He was known for his efforts to boost US relations with the then Soviet Union and to forge a course for peace in the Middle East. NPR's Barbra's front looks at his life born in New York City and 1920 salts enlisted in the Marine Corps shortly after his graduation from Princeton University. He went on to hold a string of high profile positions in President Nixon's administration, including Secretary of Labor, the first director of the Office of Management and Budget and Treasury Secretary. Schulz served as President Reagan's secretary of state, playing a significant role in the easing of tensions between the U. S and the Soviet Union. In 1989. Reagan awarded Schultz the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. In a statement. Schultz, his wife says he died Saturday evening and their Stanford home He was 100 years old. Barbara Sprint NPR NEWS

George Shultz Reagan Soviet Union Office Of Management And Budge Barbra NPR Princeton University Marine Corps President Nixon Middle East New York City Schulz President Reagan Schultz United States U. Stanford Barbara Sprint Npr News
Powell signals Fed will keep aiding economy with bond buying

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Powell signals Fed will keep aiding economy with bond buying

"Share Jerome Powell says the federal reserve will keep taking steps to support the economy during the pandemic there were worries the fed may start to pull back but Powell says they are not even close to reaching economic recovery goals were strongly committed to our framework and using our monetary policy tools until the job is well and truly in a discussion sponsored by Princeton University the fed chair says those goals are maximum employment and stable two percent inflation when the time comes to raise interest rates you know what will certainly do that in that time by the way is is no time soon Powell has high hopes looking forward once right now is taking care of the vaccines go and we get covered under control there's a lot of reason to be optimistic about the U. S. economy and Donahue Washington

Jerome Powell Federal Reserve Powell Princeton University U. Washington
Law enforcement response to Capitol breach questioned

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Law enforcement response to Capitol breach questioned

"About how the pro trump rioters were handled by law enforcement after they breached the U. S Capitol, breaking down barriers and smashing windows. Versus how protesters against police brutality have been treated around the country for people died in yesterday's insurrection. Eddie Glaude is a professor of African American studies at Princeton University. He tells NPR's morning edition. There's a difference between how police interact with white and black protesters. Woman was shot and then they just walked out some of them right. On, but I could hear all across the country at least a. My Twitter feed people just in amazement. Not that they wanted the police to be violent in their response, But it gave evidence to the fact that some people are courted. The benefit of the doubt are given certain kinds of leeway. Our space and other people are not. In the summer

Eddie Glaude U. Princeton University NPR Twitter
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:25 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It is really bad out there right. Three hundred s why young detected until now very cold very dark hard to spot. i guess. None of the techniques that be described Would be useful if this sounds crazy that we can detect ten earth match star not own solar system. And that's because we don't have the anchor. We don't have the way in that. We do with exercise. We don't we can't measure the doppler shift anything tax this planet the way will be detected is is the old fashioned way of searching sky with why field cameras. Just look for any little dots. That are moving. The way planets should move in hot stars as how cluedo was detected that neptune was detected restaurant owners at the moment. Who are doing the same thing. Trying to seek evidence for planet nine. See the problem of siri. This offices is it tells you the massive planet or religious telling we're pointer telescope exactly where sky sheep here so you do a lot of searching. Here he's going on so yeah this is one of those situations that perspective actually helps you a lot of any look to another under the solas under the system or another galaxy you have a much better perspective than out from feel as extra planet. It's helping us gain perspective on our own right excellent. Yeah this is some great josh plants. Take thanks so much bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on ever righty of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com..

josh
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

06:43 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"We speak to this moment is hundred. Thirty light years wet hundred ladies. Okay ed so just to sit. Set context The the star or nearest started begin c. alpha alpha singer. Alison tari back. There are three stars in that system. They're all out yet. Four point three light years away just four point three light years so we have because some stars that see by naked eye a few light years away and and the closest one beacon of see. Because it's too dim right when you look at the night sky without telescopes with just your eyes you see i know thousand or so bright stars but those are not the nearest stars what happens in stars whi range uprightness of luminosity as some stars are tens of thousands of times more luminous than sun. And so you can see those things much farther away than you would be able to see some mike stop. And that's what host of the stars in the sky over lewis giant stars. The most common kind of star like you said is tiny. Little red dwarf star that i have one ten thousandth of the luminosity of the sun. And they're very calm. They outnumbers unlike stars but we hardly any with our naked is in fact there might be a few But they do not call attention to themselves and so so. Hr eighty seven. Ninety nine is something that people look up on youtube and And so that's one technique that was used many parameters have to fall in place for that but there are more calmer methods said to us to identify exoplanets. Yes most of the great majority of those forty five hundred known exoplanets came from two different not imaging as you said before those that are more indirect we do not see planet we do not receive any light from the plan that we can distinguish we track the light from the star as precisely as possible and we use that dr knowledge physics to deduce the existence of the planet and in fact sometimes we can make progress we can even measure the mass size of the platitude in a few percent. Even though we can't see it. So what the methodist conceptually simplest because based on eclipses moon goes in front of the sun. We get relief. Dramatic solar eclipse in. Skyros are a little while but sometimes venus or mercury will pass in front of the sun and nothing really happens you have to be told by astronomers taking place because you never noticed because venus or mercury only block a small percentage of the sun's light yet but we're getting really good at monitoring the brightness of stars precisely and so if something like that were to happen to distance store we can. We can tell. So that's that's idea is that you wait for planets orbit to carry it directly in front of the star as viewed from our position in the galaxy and notice that the star. Here's why we feature right to make it practical. You need the stock. The move at some reasonable speed racing. You have to mesh up before the star Is in front of the saudi before the planet is incentives. The star afterward ed. So so the orbital of durations. I think it's going to be important for the measurement this right if you were looking back at the time from honor light years away from some alien planet with with telescope similar to ours any if you were just the right place to see the earth crossing france. What would happen first of all happens. Once a year he said me monitoring it pretty continuously order to catch it happening. it only lasts for. I think it's ten to twelve hours. And during that event you would see son fainter by about hundred parts per million relatively small. So that's the game. You look for these short duration dinner events by monitoring hundreds of thousands of stars in any as you can as precisely as continuously as possible. So so what does sort of the the distribution jar of that forty five hundred a not. Have it handy. But so so what's the maximum orbital Duration cabin brands so the methods that we have our best at picking up plants that are very close very tight orbits around star with short orbital periods. Superior is the time it takes to go all the way around and so most of last now about have orbital periods shorter than a month or two months. And that's kind of remarkable. We didn't know that such planets zits in the solar system. The closest planet to the south is mercury and mercury takes eight days to go around and we think that was pretty close most of the planets that we have available to now much closer to their star than murder areas. Two of them have periods of just a day or even i think the record holders about five hours over there are planets that are about as close as it is physically possible to be their star. Yes these These variables have related right so the orbited the distance on the saw the star the mass of the planet and mass of the star. That all all sort of relate things linked are massive star of the planet and the.

Skyros Alison tari youtube murder mike france
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

08:58 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guests. Today's dope josh mccown. Who is a physicist and as roma at princeton university switch goals have to explode the properties of planets around other stars understand how planets form and evolve and may. Nba pufus on the age. Old question of that are other planets capable of supporting life. His group uses optical telescopes to study exponentially systems especially those star and planet eclipse one. Another belco josh. Hello having sure. Yeah so i went to a used one of your papers. Do of the context for our conversation. And it's entitled the oakland's architecture of excellently systems in which you say the basic geometry of the solar system the shave spacings orientations of the plant. We orbits kessle long been a subject of fascination as long as Well as inspiration for planet formation theories for excellent systems those same properties have only recently come to come into focus. So you know this paper in twenty fifteen And i think there has been a lot of exoplanet discoveries right so what. What does count now. How many exoplanets have you flown. So far the closest thing would official count we have has about four thousand five hundred extra planets. Four thousand five hundred and it's all over the place And in general that would imagine that some limitations beyond which we cannot really find them. So could you could you sort of set the Set the context for that. Are that three different methods by which we find them Could you describe those at webster. Sort of the maximum distance we can target fight it exoplanet. Yeah you're right to begin with the technology because this is a very technology driven field yet there have been speculations since the ancient greeks about whether the other are like the sun and whether those stars have planets and at seemed increasingly plausible as the centuries went on and we learn. More and more strongly would really wasn't until the mid nineties that this field of x plant science scott going and that's entirely because of limitations in our ability to measurements yet answer. The measurements are well. The first thing you might think of doing if you wanna find a planet coming around another star is to use some big telescope and make image of the art and then look for the little dots going around start at the very direct method. Fortunately it's also extremely difficult and it has worked but only barely in a few cases. You actually see the planet has a little dot of its own. Watch the Blocks distance approximately bear. We can actually actually image planet the distance from from us from our scale so we reckon distances we one way to measure distances in light years. Yes That light travels in a year and the nearest stars are few. Let's say or tan light years away. And most of the exoplanets we know about our within a few thousand light years and with with with the more being on closer to us that far away and that's again for practical reasons. It's much easier to perform the necessary measurements if you have a star and then it a nearby star so we clearly quickly lose the ability to detect planets. If they're all the way across the galaxy we were really exploring our tiny little neighborhood of the galaxy but even Even thousand light years so you can actually a planet at that. I think the ones that have been emerged are are closer than that. Mitt me maybe fifty two hundred years ago. I would have to look it up to be sure. Maybe maybe several hundred that sounds like a lot or a little too you to to most ordinary non-scientists. It's distance louis mentioned bodily distant. Yeah stronger that is really next door. There are astronomers who study things that are name many times yes so so. I was just sort of looking at the finding an image at that distance from an earth based oath based Is now the biggest issue as su- is the stalled itself like star so bright anything around said Becomes difficult. So i know that there are some techniques that allows you do actually actually fee doubt the light coming from the star to to actually see the planet's Is that possible. Yes so the basic problem is that we cannot focus oranges as tightly as we might want and some of his make into the to the laws of optics that is this phenomenon called. Diffraction that whenever you interrupt a lightwave with a telescope then lightwave develops curvature of that is boring of the image in your camera and so that's kind of an irreducible problem. And it means that if there is a tiny little dog right next the star than the blur of the star will overlap the dot from the planet. We won't be able to see it so one approach is to just make tighter entire images in one way to do that is to have larger and larger telescopes because the blurring factor in principle those down with large telescopes. Another way is to put your telescoping space where is possible to Make sharper images on the ground. Because on the ground in addition to the problems with optics and fraction the atmosphere salih messing up. The path of libraries and causing additional blurring are images. But then when you alluded to there are special cameras you can build that manage to zero out. The light from a very specific point in the image which star and thereby allow the surrounding area to be searched without the severe problems of the glare from the star. Those instruments are are very advanced and finicky and high tech they go Most of them go by the name of corona graph because these same kinds of instruments were originally used to image the corona the outer layers look blocking the sun's glare and they basically work by putty carefully designed obstruction to obstruction of different shapes with immolate. So as to block the light and direct flight from star to to other areas of the and prevented from reaching the detector right yummy the beauty of seeing an exit planet actively walls around the star itself as a is a magnificent day But we have a couple of other other techniques. Do not to see them but at least to Sort of Speculate the excess. Do say exists. They did this before we leave. The topic of i want to direct your your listeners to particular video that i think every human being should watch you need to look up. The name of the star. It's age are eight seven. Nine nine does very glamorous name. I use a new tune elsewhere. You will find a movie of four planets as tiny little dots circling around of a small portion of their orbits around this nearby star. So that is greatest success of this tanking method so far and how flawed As.

josh mccown Nba princeton university oakland physicist Mitt official su louis
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:55 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest. Today's episode edvin toner. Who's a professor of astrophysical sciences at princeton university. He also serves as co chair of the innate. Oj princeton astrophysics collaboration council. He gets carried out extensive as phenomenal observations at mount. Tabor surgery lucky. Peak national observatory. Nra ohs video large array at eight point The nationalist cups away to the of japan subaru telescope and with the hubble space telescope. belka med. Happy to be sure. So i i want to start with one of your earlier papers. And it's entitled basic analysis of the astro biological implications of life's early emergence on earth. Invite you say life arose on earth sometime in the first few hundred million years after the young planet had cooled the point that it would It could support what water-based sounds on its surface. The early emergence of life on earth has been taken as evidence that the probability of biogenesis is high. If starting from young like conditions now justice had the context So the solar system about five billion years old the earth itself about four point five billion years old and and i guess we have some evidence that life originated around three point eight billion years ago. Some something along those lines. Yes that's low. Those numbers are all roughly correct. They're they're not absolutely certain. But the The general consensus view. Is that as you said. The are formed about four point. Five billion years old but a a rain of of so-called heavy impacts meaning objects meteors and asteroids and small objects in the early solar system. Not every much a much greater abundance of these objects still crashing into the planets and helping them form Probably heated and perhaps reheated the earth's surface these were huge impacts Deposit energy that was you know. Millions of times like the energy of all the nuclear weapons people have ever built an vaporize the ocean and probably sterilize the earth if if life had gotten started by that point all of those statements are you can look slightly different scenarios. The evidence for them is not. I would say incontrovertible that that looks like the best we know so about three point nine or three point eight billion years ago said call it three point nine billion years ago and the early evidence earliest evidence of life that we have is. Your site goes back to about three point eight billion years ago. It's fairly uncertain might have. There's i think uncontroversial evidence at about three point five billion years ago so we don't know exactly when life got started but of course it got started earlier than evidence in another words the very first life must have appeared in a long before while not long before but before You know there was something that left a record of the fossil or chemical signature. Yes that we can identify so we don't know how early it started but it was certainly within say a couple of hundred million years possibly much less than great so a few years give or take But but the but that's really really quick so the puzzle That human scabs struggling with is one of the the flu be paradox..

princeton university princeton Peak national observatory professor flu Nra subaru mount japan
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is Mike Straws. Who is the chair of the Department of Fast Physical Sciences at Princeton University he uses large scale imaging and spectroscopy surveys of the sky to map the universe but the particular focus on studying the large scale distribution of galaxies to address questions in cosmology and galaxy properties in evolution. He's also particularly interested in quasars powered by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies. Welcome Michael. I'm very happy to be here. Thank you so much. Thanks for doing this so I want to start with. One of one of the papers a little bit older papers talking about costs logical parameters from SDS W map. So, you say the measure cost logical parameters using the three dimensional power spectrum from over two hundred, thousand galaxy in the slow in digital sky survey SDS says in combination with Wilkinson Microwave and isotope. He prob- W map and other data. So esky says is something from the ground and w map is something from from a I against that is correct. That is correct. And both of these. Have Produce Lot of data SPF started sometime in two thousand, two, thousand trend. Had A long tenure, twenty years with multiple upgrades to it. Ended W map sort of overlap with it between two thousand and two, thousand ten or so before Branca's satellite, kick them right after that. So we have. Two sets of data and and really kind of combining these two data. Looking at. Some of the. That are being more accepted nowadays. So talk a bit about the type of data that we got and. You know what hypotheses we could create some that. Okay. So perhaps, I can just say in general terms what the what the scientific program there is and what are. Just to try to explain how W MAPPING SDSS connected. So what s Tsn let's start with SDSS. So what SDSS? Was designed to do and did was to measure the distances and therefore well to measure what are called Red Shifts. which is a shift in the spectrum of a of a galaxy caused by the expansion of the universe. By measuring these shifts, which is straightforward. If you can measure the spectrum of of the galaxy, you can determine how far away that galaxy is and so one needs to remember that in when one looks at an astronomical image or looks at the sky in general, you're seeing everything as a as it appears in two dimensions. It's all in projection in you. Okay and if you see a star or galaxy or anything asteroid, you don't know. At first glance, which is relatively nearby, which is far away..

Mike Straws SDS Department of Fast Physical Sc Wilkinson Microwave Princeton University Michael Branca esky
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 7 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guess today's purposes Danny. Green who's a professor of physics at Princeton University. Could broad research interests include measurements of black masses the connection between supermassive black holes in galaxies stellar and gas kind of matic's Golf Galaxy Nuclei and diffused light in galaxy clusters. she also serves leadership comedy of the prison, teaching initiative at Princeton University. Jamie. Thank you. I. Won't. Start with. Something that topical and that's the Nobel Prize for physics this year. that shared by Roger Penrose, Ryan, Clark Gentle Antea guests. and. They have all worked in this idea of black holes and that is that is You are associated wall I wondered if you could briefly talk about their contributions to this idea. I think I can I can focus mostly on the work of of Andrea Gezim, Reinhard Gonzo. Their groups and they have really been zooming. Into the very center of our own galaxy at the Milky Way. And painstakingly over decades taking pictures of stars right at the center of our galaxy and then piecing together the orbits of those stars. And finding that they move much faster. Than they possibly could if there was not a dark mass sitting right very much exactly at the center of our galaxy. And so these measurements taken over a long period of time and I could at least bit of what anti had talked about this and she has taken this measurements from Hawaii understand lanes, right the cats telescope. Okay. Okay. So over what time period is. An anti like ten fifteen years. I, think, right. I think it's more than that more than that, and so this is basically looking at an area that we be sort. Of thing there is a supermassive.

Princeton University Andrea Gezim professor of physics Nobel Prize Clark Gentle Antea Danny Roger Penrose Reinhard Gonzo Green Jamie Hawaii Ryan
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 7 months ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 8 months ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
"princeton university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:28 min | 8 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"A cz. You know if you've been following the news for the last four months, we had these braying mob's out on the street, creating all sorts of problems. And what it's done is it's gotten companies universities, organizations of all kind to release. Letters of support for the braying mobs. Even though there may be no truth to anything that is in the letter that they release. They do it to keep the braying mob from their front door. They think that as long as we pretend like we support these people, and we absolutely understand their point, and my goodness, I can't imagine why anybody wouldn't be rioting and looting. That's certainly absolutely they're justified to do that. Politicians as well. So we go to the head of Princeton University. Guy's name is Christopher Eyes. Gruber. I guess this guy could be the villain from die hard. What was that guy's name? Hans Gruber was alright Hans Guri essence. Okay. I didn't see that movie in years. President of Princeton University, Christopher Eyes Gruber, Hans, his brother. Issued Omega Coppola and a letter in which he argued that Princeton still events racism, He wrote that racism and the damage it does to people of color. Nevertheless persist at Princeton is in our society. Racist assumptions from the past also remain embedded in the structures of this university. Now. First of all, it's a stupid thing to write, because you're in charge. If there's racism, there it comes and stops at your desk. It's your fault. Why haven't you fixed it? I guess it's just that white privilege that you've been depending on to save you, right. You've seen letters like this from? I don't know how many places things along this line there. They criticize their own organizations where we pick up change. And we flagellating beat our own backs. Raul with all the Oh, we're so sorry about what has shut up all of you. Let me tell you, we're just briefly. The organization you're supporting. Had people outside a hospital where two deputies had been shot and those people were yelling. I hope they die. I don't support that. And yet if I want to watch an MBA game, I have to see that miserable organisation's name printed on the court. Not interested anymore. I don't need the MBA that much. All right. So this guy writes this letter. He's just self flagellating. All this university is just the worst place ever. My God, We're just We're horrible, horrible people. Well. On Wednesday, the Department of Education run by Betsy DeVos fired off a letter to Princeton University, declaring that the university would be investigated now, saying it's concerned that Princeton's nondiscrimination an equal opportunity assurances and its program participation agreements. From 2013 to the president may have been false, in other words, to get the tens of millions of dollars in federal money. The university has to fill out program participation agreements They have to, in essence say that we have fulfilled all requirements of title six of the Civil Rights Act that declares that no person in the United States shall be on the ground of race. Color or national origin be excluded from participation in benign be denied the benefits over subjected to discrimination of any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. I'm Betsy DeVos looked at this letter probably laughed out loud because it's clearly one of these things that Theo guys just trying to keep the mob away from the front door. She said. Oh, okay, So you're saying racism persists? All right. Well, if it's systemic, as you say, then clearly that is on you, and that is on the university. And you're going to probably have to refund the tens of millions of dollars because you lied. On your government applications here. You said there was no racism. You said that you'd met all the requirements. And yet here you're saying something different? I got to be a honest with you. Don't know much about Betsy DeVos. But I said I'd marry that woman right now. I love the fact that they did this. I wish they would start doing this to every organization and send out and investigate them. And if they insist on following the idea that they're systemically racist, take all the money back to the feds. That's billions of dollars we could certainly use in the Treasury right now. I think this is Brilliant, but her parts don't ever let anybody tell you she's not great at her job. All right. So once again, it's just it's I don't believe the guy even believes is. I don't believe these organizations that write these kind of letters or say these kind of thing. I don't believe any of them believe that we're all now living in a pretend world were now pretending we're faking it. We're acting as if but nobody really believes it. And the reason they don't believe that organizations are systemically racist is because the system isn't racist Individuals can act that way. I have no doubt that there are plenty of people who have racist actions that they've taken in their lives. I don't doubt any of that. But systemically sorry, nobody..

Princeton University Betsy DeVos Hans Gruber Princeton Guy President Christopher Eyes Gruber Omega Coppola Raul Christopher Eyes Treasury United States Theo Department of Education
Buckle Up

In The Thick

05:48 min | 9 months ago

Buckle Up

"Hey. What's up? Welcome to in the big this is a podcast about politics race and culture. From a POC perspective I'm mighty at Sam and I'm Julia Galleria joining us today. All of us important team separate going crazy. We'd have to return all stars from Princeton. New Jersey is Dr Eddie Claude Junior James. S Mcdonnell Distinguished University professor at Princeton University Hey Eddie welcome back rose more pleasure. excited. We are so happy to have you so happy and joining us from Boston Massachusetts County. Crossley. She's host of W. H is under the radar you're on the radar for here Kelly. Welcome back. I'm so glad to be back and we're happy to have you back so. It has been a minute since the both of you have been on the show it's the first time that you're on the show in two thousand twenty, which is honestly like, wow, I know and a lot has happened since you were on this show, the coronavirus pandemic I became a survivor of the corona virus myself the movement now to defend black lives this extraordinary reckoning that's happening all across the country young people really turning up, and now the twenty twenty presidential election officially heating up amidst all of this it's been intense so Kelly start us off just what's your temperature check? How are you doing like for reals? I'm exhausted I'm exhausted physically and emotionally, and as I wrote about recently I have outraged fatigue and I'm trying to fight it Eddie. How're you doing? I'm holding on I'm just barely holding on actually it's just exhausted like Kelly. Trying to hold on tired of looking at this damn computer screen and really just trying to figure out a way to step away from this moment. You know because I'm drowning in it it's been pretty intense. It's crazy Julia for two people who feel exhausted and kind of drowning in it, I. Mean. We turn to Kelly and two Edita to help us to give context but I appreciate and this show who that we do we do let it all hang out as we used to say back in the nineteen seventies. But the point being about exhaustion I think it's important to recognize that and. Unfortunately, I feel like this level of exhaustion is going to continue because here we go twenty twenty election. And there is now a zoo meeting called the Democratic National Convention DNC which starts this week we. The. People. We the people call the forty eighth quadrennial Democratic National Convention to order. And it goes through Thursday, all our listeners. We're recording this conversation on a Monday afternoon so that you know, but you know the DNC I actually saw this video i. don't know if you saw it on twitter from Nineteen ninety-six, the DNC is starting in everyone's doing the Macarena. Acquit. On. Putting You this big Joyce Event and I remember that actually so it's going viral on twitter. Clinton's yeah yeah claims and ninety six. Oh I saw that. So anyway so they're doing them I got and I was like I remember these conventions and it's supposed to take place in Milwaukee. Obviously because pandemic, it's turned into this entirely virtual format talking about computer screens, Eddie? I'm like, oh So. What we do know is that on Thursday Joe Biden is scheduled to officially accept the nomination from his home state in Delaware on Thursday. On Monday night, the virtual convention featured speakers from former first, lady, Michelle Obama let me be as honest and clear as I possibly can. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is to Senator Bernie Sanders at its most basic this election is about preserving our democracy. During, this president's term, the unthinkable has become normal. He has tried to prevent people from voting undermined the US Postal Service deployed military and federal agents against peaceful protesters threatened to delay the election and suggested that he will not leave office if he loses. Is Not normal and we must never treat it like it is but you all know and we have people here who are critical of the Democratic Party like we are of the Republican Party. You've already heard the critique right that a number of the speakers like including Sanders and club HR, and Buddha judge and cory booker, all of them former candidates. So we've heard a lot from these people and one twenty twenty candidate was clearly not invited guests that was Oh let's see Mexican, who represents the largest non white voting block potential voters yes. That would be Latinos and Latinas and yes, they did not invite Julia Castro. Who is the only Latino candidate in the primaries so I mean look there are literally only a handful of Latino or Latina speakers. There are no Muslim speakers scheduled.

Kelly Dr Eddie Claude Junior James Donald Trump Senator Bernie Sanders DNC Twitter Democratic Party President Trump Princeton New Jersey Crossley Julia Galleria Julia Castro Princeton University Julia Boston Massachusetts County S Mcdonnell Distinguished Univ SAM
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 9 months ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
New Jersey's Princeton To Remove Woodrow Wilson Name From Public Policy School

ABC Perspective

00:16 sec | 11 months ago

New Jersey's Princeton To Remove Woodrow Wilson Name From Public Policy School

"Princeton University's removing Woodrow Wilson's name from school of public and international affairs because of what the school called his racist thinking and policies. Wilson was not only the 28th U. S president he was Princeton's president, but during his tenure there, he barred black students.

Woodrow Wilson Princeton University Princeton School Of Public
Princeton University to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from school

Dave Plier

00:26 sec | 11 months ago

Princeton University to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from school

"It Princeton University has decided it's going to remove former president Woodrow Wilson's name from its public policy school because of his segregationist views reversing a decision made only four years ago the university statement says Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate name sake for our school of public and international affairs as well as the residential

Princeton University Woodrow Wilson President Trump
Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

Frontlines of Freedom

00:39 sec | 11 months ago

Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

"Princeton University is removing the name of former president Woodrow Wilson from its public policy school the Ivy League school says it's reversing a decision made four years ago to retain the name in a letter to the university community president Chris eyes Gerber says the board of trustees concluded that Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate name sake for the public policy school he says he revisited the issue following the killing of George Floyd the move is drawing criticism from some alumni one Princeton grad wrote to fox news criticizing eyes Gruber for not standing up to a leftist mob and said Wilson is synonymous with academic freedom

Princeton University President Trump Ivy League School George Floyd Woodrow Wilson Chris Eyes Gerber Princeton FOX Gruber
Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

RMWorld Travel Connection with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

"The name of former president Woodrow Wilson being removed from Princeton university's public policy school because of his segregationist views university president Christopher Eisgruber says Princeton's board of trustees has concluded Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for Princeton school of public and international affairs and the residential college eyes Gruber notes Wilson's racism was significant and consequential even by the standards of his own time Wilson supported segregation and as U. S. president impose it on several federal agencies that had not been racially divided up to that point he also served as Princeton's president during which time he barred black students from the university and spoke approvingly of the Ku Klux

President Trump Princeton University Christopher Eisgruber Princeton Gruber Ku Klux Woodrow Wilson Princeton School Of Public U. S.
Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

All Things Considered

00:16 sec | 11 months ago

Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

"Princeton University today announced that it will remove former president Woodrow Wilson's name from its public policy school and a residential college in a statement the university's board of trustees said Wilson's quote racist thinking and policies make him an inappropriate name sake

Princeton University Woodrow Wilson President Trump
Princeton to remove Wilson name from public policy school

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

Princeton to remove Wilson name from public policy school

"Princeton University is removing the name of former president Woodrow Wilson from its public policy school because of his segregationist views university president Christopher Eisgruber says Princeton's board of trustees has concluded Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for Princeton school of public and international affairs and the residential college as Gruber notes Wilson's racism was significant and consequential even by the standards of his own time Wilson supported segregation and as U. S. president impose that on several federal agencies that had not been racially divided up to that point he also served as Princeton's president during which time he barred black students from the university and spoke approvingly of the Ku Klux Klan I'm Ben Thomas

Princeton University President Trump Christopher Eisgruber Princeton Gruber Ku Klux Klan Ben Thomas Woodrow Wilson Princeton School Of Public U. S.
Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 11 months ago

Zoom Call Eviction Hearings: 'They'll Throw Everything I Have Out On The Street'

"Moratoriums are now expiring in parts of the country and some courts are now using zoom calls to hold remote fiction hearings for people late on their rent NPR's Chris Arnold reports and a vision hearing in Collin county Texas this week was like many other zoom calls full of first timers audio problems general confusion could have trainees receive respected galaxy in Rome that's the judge who's trying to figure out who's who with a bunch of different people on the call I'm sorry I was talking can you hear me now hello wave your hand yes it would be almost kind of funny except that what's at stake here is not renters are in this soon hearing with landlords who want to evict them renters like Dino Brock's oops re reason why your rep yes Sir my company closed due to the pandemic and you have to have a letter from your employer to prove that you were affected by the corona and I was getting the run around I haven't been able to get unemployment or anything the judge said since Brooks lives within the city of Dallas he wanted to review the current rules and evictions there so her case got moved in next week her landlord declined to comment we followed up with the abrupt after the hearing she's a navy veteran and she says she has a heart condition and it she says she has no friends or family that you can move in with and I'm scared now grow everything I have outside on the street I'm gonna start crying it's a nightmare that nobody wants to go through and a lot of times people don't know what their rights are renters may have protections right now but the rules are complicated and differ from state to county the city and in this room call hearing at people who did not dial in and their landlord did it they were just out a lock I'm gonna go for this one because I don't have it here and just tell me thank you have a default judgment position background and for default judgment that basically means you didn't show up we're giving your landlord the right to evict you that happened a five people in just this one a zoom call hearing now for some people doing the zoom call might be easier than getting to the court house but some legal experts say that for other people this could deny their right to due process which includes the right to be heard what if somebody doesn't have a decent smart phone or computer or online access the elderly can have trouble connecting on video calls Emeli Benford's a professor at Columbia Law School a missed call or not being able to log into remote hearing is the equivalent of failing to appear remote hearings may not only be the loss of basic rights they could also be the difference between housing and homeless miss Deena Brooks the navy vet and Dallas is worried herself about not having a home I have nowhere to go but I feel like very depressed rest out and I did I don't know what to do so these soon call hearings are happening because it's not safe enough to gather in court but apparently it's okay for people to be put out in the street in the midst of a pandemic okay that's cool it's a cruel situation Matthew Desmond heads at Princeton university's eviction lab today is announcing a new tracking system to monitor what's happening omits the pandemic and already with some moratoriums expiring he says eviction filings are rising in Milwaukee for example the kids are out thirty eight percent last week from where they should be on a typical week in June in Milwaukee with millions of Americans still out of work due to code red at me says even actions it should not be the answer here some landlord groups agree policy now is a vice president with the national multifamily housing council we should be working to help those who have been impacted by club in nineteen through robust government assistance like she says an emergency plan from Congress for renters and landlords meanwhile the zoom eviction hearings continue but law professor Emily band for expects that legal

Robust Fit to Nature

Data Skeptic

05:42 min | 11 months ago

Robust Fit to Nature

"I enjoy bringing neurologists on the show from time to time as I'm going to do today. In invariably I work in some sort of question about how different the brain is from the machine approach to intelligence. How apples to oranges? These things are in many ways that's fair, and we may eventually develop Agi in some exotic way that bear similar resemblance to our existence, just a computational process that exhibits this property called consciousness who knows but as often as I say it's apples to oranges. It's I. Don't know honey crisp to gala or Fujita red. Delicious Carl Sagan said about Apple Pie the point being that. If you frame it this way, the brain is a highly over parameter. Is the machine yet? It's still learns pretty well. We also have artificial machines that are highly over parameter. That's a complication for us there, so maybe just maybe there's a roadmap somewhere in here and things like evolution in urology can point the way forward. Along. This week on the show. I'm talking to reassign one of the authors on the paper, robust fit to nature, an evolutionary perspective on biological and artificial neural networks. Can't. My name is Alexa. I'm Apple Festival. Neil scientists. According to Department at Princeton, university, or can you tell us a little bit about your specific interest? Within neuroscience, we study out the human brain function in the real world, severely using naturalistic setups and care a lot about our people communicate the thought people, non woods and neuroscience and fields. I may be more familiar with like computer, science and machine learning. Certainly, there's some overlap and collaboration, but we're not known for collaboration per. Se yet I know for meeting some of your papers in particular the. The robust fit to nature paper. We're going to discuss. You have a strong fluency in these tools, so I want to ask you. At what point did you become interested in machine learning so relatively recently, I was saying the last five to ten years. What is unique about my? We understand other brain is operating in life, not realistic setups, so we really don't usually use a lot of the control experiment that are used in cognitive sokaia Daniel signs so most of the modeling and competition. Competition Walk in our food was not given to us because it was never applied to listrik setups excitedly sounded like a black tool in in Messina attention to have modest that sort of cognitive problems. For example you have minded cocoon is faces as good as humans. Instead they ask why these like new models are coming out of fill in computer science. Oh, by companies start to slow cognitive problems in life and second to ask out of this mother's relevant to kneel. Scientists are quality. There's. There's a lot of I. Suppose perspectives on this. Certainly the way of human learns in the way machines currently learned I guess some similarities, but they're quite different. Are we even in a place where we can have strong discussions about this, or is there something exotic Lee apples to oranges about the way machines in the human brain work? It's a good question I think. If you ask most of the people in my field, they will say well, not so, what actually really relevant to in? Kings? It was so different and if you look at the Tilles, that people use now to think about the way and psychology and cognitive functions it will also look very different. But the more we looked into this modernist related, actually that they might be to the same family of models as human brain and amusing details, family of models to say that the obviously a lot of differences between biological networks in official neural networks, but we now think that they might belong to the same family of and broadly speaking. What is that family? Can we characterize it in some mathematical way? We. Can I take what unique about? It down models. What is the time to act down model? The title understand and let me explain if you think about go back to the example of faces face net is a model tied to give the proper name, the Labor of the name of the face. We Batticaloa image. If you think about language modern, it's modern to predict the next world in sentence or complete a sentence if you think about driving a car. To drive, so if you think I'm GonNa, sit downing. It's what I to act in performance. Pacific function and they don't think down what a tight to understand the world. To Act in the world, and we stopped to think that the brain also have is like when without desire to act now brain designed to acting six and not designed to understand the situation, and this is very different perspective. Perspective of must people in our field I think actually the to understand other lengths factor so I will give you an example Devesh simple example in I. think it will help us to think let's say I. Five Thousand Points that will simple from Pablo, if a student of mine will come we ten thousand parameters to predict it's like. Like ten thousand nine points or not scientist. He didn't gain any understanding, Abud, on the next track so I really unappreciated if he understood that Pablo can be monitored by CLAMATO.

Pablo Carl Sagan Fujita Alexa Apple Festival Apple Batticaloa Neil Princeton SE Messina Tilles Scientist Daniel Abud LEE Official
Powell Says Federal Reserve Crossed Red Lines to Help Economy

Bloomberg Finance

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Powell Says Federal Reserve Crossed Red Lines to Help Economy

"Federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell defended aggressive U. S. central bank action to shield the economy as the corona virus pandemic took hold Powell spoke in an online event hosted by Princeton university's griz walled center for economic Policy Studies we crossed a lot of red lines that that had not been cross before and I'm very comfortable that this is that situation in which you you do that and then you figure it out afterward house remarks were carried live on Bloomberg radio and

Jerome Powell Princeton University Federal Reserve Chairman U. S. Griz Walled Center For Economi Bloomberg
"princeton university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"princeton university" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"At Princeton University he was Enron studying Persian history when in August twenty sixteen he was arrested Ronnie to Thor he's charged him with espionage and sentenced him to ten years in prison secretary state Mike Pompeii says those were false charges and in a statement he says quote we thank the Swiss government for facilitating the return of Mr wrong and are pleased that Tehran has been constructive in this matter we continue to call for the release of all U. S. citizens unjustly detained in Iran in Zurich the administration swap Wong from a Sud soul Amani he's in a Ronnie and Dr arrested in Chicago for violating a Ronnie and sanctions that fox is rich at St reporting another north Korean missile test the country says it carried out a very important test as long range rocket launch site the north says it will have a key affect on its strategic position not exactly what you'd expect from an Ivy League college are rap sheet a judge in new haven Connecticut ordering about fifty people to each perform five hours of community service after students from Harvard and Yale universities and others were arrested last month during an on field protest at halftime of the annual Yale Harvard football game students and alumni from both schools occupied the mid field at the Yale bowl during halftime pro testing climate change fossil fuel investments Bible schools and urging Porter Rican debt relief the I. B. league in a game day statement calling the protest regrettable Paul Stevens fox news there she is or isn't hello world in this universe twenty nineteen competition is set for this evening contestants for more than ninety countries will compete in the sixty eighth edition of the program which is being held at Tyler Perry studios in Atlanta Steve Harvey will host for a fifth year in a row and a new crown will be making its debut that's fox's Tonya J. powers I'm del Walters this.

Tonya J. Atlanta Paul Stevens Connecticut U. S. secretary del Walters fox Steve Harvey Tyler Perry studios Princeton University Harvard Ivy League college Chicago Wong Zurich Iran Tehran
"princeton university" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Oh six. I news talk. Eight fifty F T L. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. Ken Crosswell is the author of the void next door, the new cover piece of sky and telescope magazine, which if you follow magazines about the astronomy, this is spectacular. He's the author of the alchemy of the heavens searching for meaning in the Milky Way. Ken. I follow your reporting. This is James people's Princeton University. He he he reports to you from the point of view of a cosmologists. The enigma is how few stars. There are in this. Void are there. Speculation says to why that happened. Do we have theories cap? Well, the question is are there in fact, additional galaxy envelope avoid that we don't know about the answer is we don't know the after that. But perhaps amateur astronomers may supply that answer. Let me explain the problem that the local void may be presenting. Now as I mentioned earlier as the universe expands. You do expect that the under dense wages, they're going to get more and more undergrad. And so the voids are perfectly compatible with standard, cosmology, and theory predicts that a void should have about ten percents, lean density of the universe. But in fact, when we look at the galaxies that we know of in the local void and calculate. What is their number relative to the mean in the university? It's only about one percent. So there's a factor of ten shortfall in the local void and that leads to the question where are the galaxies? Where are their stars? Is it possible that there are galaxies in the local void that we don't know about. And the answer is a definite. Maybe. And it's that.

Ken Crosswell John Batchelor Princeton University telescope magazine James one percent
"princeton university" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Saying it and doing it. Two, different things yeah man Jerod what part of you doesn't believe that. Hugs, dude I wouldn't do this extra time You just said you just said that if they said you could be the host of Jaren came in the, morning b hugs in the morning would you have to? Be with three or four. Guys you would definitely do that As it stands as far as the actions have occurred? Man cancer map yeah Yup Because he's actually done it and we only five he. Admitted, to is. Much, more Said I didn't say, this friend really tried Fritz fun Well do you have, trouble focusing I had trouble focusing even saying that He met me now But I'm going to get. The plaque on it Mike. He's, looking at me, weird hug pretty much now look I'm gay porn It's not. Your. Fault, you can't focus It's a trick your brain plays and it's something. That does every second of your life your brain tries to. Change your focus. Four times every second oh my. Gosh so it's not our. Fault now can't control that getting worse. As we continue to. Evolve with technology Well I think you, have more distractions now for sure and so the study's. Out of Princeton University and it tries to change her focus. Four times every. Second so takes a lot of. Focus to do anything then hey thanks boring at all it's like Hurts your, brain to focus that much been sitting on the couch I'm. Sure you have I do this, all, the time sitting on the couch when I'm actually able to watch TV and I have the. TV, on and I am scrolling through my phone on. Facebook and then I'll glance at the TV and realize that's boring and so then I'll have the yes. My phone and the trying to do it at the. Same, time, just to stimulate. My brain Yes. As, far as, the technology is like you know used. To back in the, day be, so happy with a. TV show came on on now like my son, Landon he's on the computer, the phones over there going off taxing TV's on and he's trying to do, homework, like yeah it's it's. Incredible and they say the researchers say this has. Been going on, for thousands of years because said our brain? This, is their thoughts had always look out for danger oh you. Know like years and thousands of years, ago and, so, you're constantly you know you're doing your. Thing maybe you're a hunter gatherer go down that path but let's say you're you're that's what you're doing and you're trying to live your life. And you're like wait. You're in the wild so you're constantly having your head on a swivel so to say we just haven't evolved is what they're saying no we got to that point and now, we're just constantly distracted so instead of fearing for our lives. We're like fearing we're gonna miss, up, fear of boredom I think has replaced actually say there are only live up there that is Enjoy it. Hope you could focus long enough to pay attention you know there's no chance Seven.

Jaren Landon Jerod Mike Facebook Princeton University cancer
"princeton university" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on KGO 810

"Just search you know thrive or thrive kloss or any after alcohol just search anything you're gonna find were quite popular on there yeah it's definitely cheaper if you buy through our website for example a thousand milligrams of this the only about forty milligrams it actually make it into your bloodstream and do something so basically we formed a partnership with princeton university my alma mater and started doing some research on it and basically found that we could make a nanoparticle form of this which means that we'll be able to get a lot more of this t h into someone's bloodstream and make it that much more effective for your liver and for this shortterm alcohol withdrawal which are the primary reasons that alcohol is for you and that alcohol doesn't make you feel the next day well thanks so much for having me.

kloss princeton university
"princeton university" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on WCTC

"And wctc a am dot com the phone lines are open so he could always call and ask us speaker coughlin a question but we'll do it again coming up march 13th speak to the speaker only and wctc ecorse began with professor laurence rosen uh who is a professor at princeton university he is a white guy he asked his students what is worse a white man punching a black man or a white man calling a black man a that word that he never supposed to say now he used the word several more times during a lecture and students were protesting his use of this word now he said using this word was it necessary and was meant to shock but ultimately after just a week of teaching this course decided to cancel it now princeton university said that it was his decision to pull the plug on the course the school the not pressure him to do so do we need a course on hate speech day to be done in in in a disorder manner i don't know i think it's something that you have to have a dialogue on and i think as time kind of moves along having platforms and forms like this where things like race relations are disgust than an openly discuss i think it's critical to go this ruehe where you're using terminology in language that is just blatantly insulting to the people who are attending the course on hate speech i think there some other ways to do it there are so many other groups here in jersey uh that that are offering groups like this there's a great cultural diversity organization its base that a downtown new brunswick they have a forum coming up that they're hosting very soon at the kits in march at keen if i'm not mistaken and it's basically just the conference on diversity where various people of the numerous backgrounds are just going to show up and have a dialogue i've got a feeling that that word that this professor chose the eu's numerous times yesterday will not even be used one time if i had a guess but again the university said that they wanted just make it clear that you know what we did not by pressure that professor into cancelling.

coughlin professor princeton university eu laurence rosen
"princeton university" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

03:15 min | 4 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Time travel well again we have reliance string theory string theory is not advanced enough to answer that question by but if time is a river as einstein said then that leaves open the possibility that the river of time good have world polls and at the river of time has world pole these are called closed timelag loops and it allows you to leave let's say you're office and come back before you left in other words you might be with a comeback yesterday now this of course is all nonsense you might say to yourself but hey these are logical conclusions of einstein's equations and perhaps may even be allowed by string theory so our next guest is dr richard god or princeton talking about time travel the now i like to introduce are very special guest today once again we have with us professor j richard got the third is a professor at princeton university and he's the author of a book called time travel in einstein's universe the physical possibilities of travel through time now just remember that we're not talking about some inventor in a laboratory in his basement creating a time machine by which you can eraser in rather embarrassing events in your history we are in fact talking about hard physics we're talking about perhaps one day a civilization much more advanced than ours our hat per perhaps maybe even our descendants thousands of years from now may have the ability to manipulate the energy of a star in which case they may be able to create a time machine capable of changing the past and so the question is it is time travel possible given the fact that there also horrible paradoxes you can get if you go backwards in time for example and shoot your parents before you're born so once again today our guest is professor j richard got the third professor at princeton university and we are talking about time is she she's and time travel the first question for you professor god is how did you i get interested in physics when i was about eight years old are belong to charter group were organized junior astronomical pro added go keren woodward robert man in school and when i became and order to break my work on after that it all very briefly and what they're anything about the romance of the stars of anything about for example looking for intelligent life and not as face are are wondering where the.

einstein princeton professor princeton university time machine dr richard god j richard eight years one day
"princeton university" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

02:00 min | 5 years ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Revisionist History

"You abroad truck the touch for details don't give up oh jews and he he seemed to accepted it with a smile that that that touched history deeply at the beginning of this story i said the balancing loyalty and conscience is just about the hardest thing to do let me give you another example is not as wrenching as gesture winger story but it gets had some of the same issues it's from princeton university one of the skulls that's been swept up in the recent wave of campus unrest the controversy is over woodrow wilson who is president of princeton from nineteen o two to nineteen ten and of course later went on to serve two terms as president of the united states princeton named one of its most prestigious graduates close after him the wilson school of public and international affairs wilson did many remarkable and important things as the head of princeton and later as president but he was a racist and not a mild one a kind of nasty one so in the fall of 2015 activists at the school stage at thirty two hour sitting in the office of the princeton president they want wilson's name off the graduate school all in the continuance of black people per we have had jacob smith what am i producers talked to one of the protesters a sophomore named will glory ten john the promise of princeton she argues is at all it's tuden's will feel at home this campuses for you.

princeton university president princeton wilson jacob smith woodrow wilson wilson school of public thirty two hour