35 Burst results for "Princeton"

Ohio governor signs new congressional district map into law

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last week

Ohio governor signs new congressional district map into law

"Republican Ohio governor Mike DeWine signed into law a new map of congressional districts that will be in effect for the next four years the wind said in a statement the Senate legislation he signed makes the most progress to produce a fair compact and competitive map the measure cleared the state legislature along party lines after breakneck sprint through both chambers this week under this year's U. S. census results Ohio lost one seat in Congress starting next year the new law creates at most three safe democratic districts out of fifteen U. S. house seats in a state where voters are split roughly fifty four percent Republican and forty six percent democratic the counties that are home to Cleveland and Cincinnati were divided three ways each one district that includes the western Cleveland suburbs now stretches to the Indiana border three hours away the Princeton gerrymandering project gave the map an F. grade Jan Miller with the league of women voters in Ohio said leaders had trampled the state's constitution rather than purely represent a highlands I'm Jennifer king

Mike Dewine Ohio U. S. House Senate Legislature Cleveland Congress Jan Miller Cincinnati Princeton Indiana League Of Women Voters Jennifer King
US climate pledge faces test in Senate with global impact

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last week

US climate pledge faces test in Senate with global impact

"The United States international climate pledges facing a test in the Senate that will have global influence after United Nations climate talks in Scotland the buy did ministration faces the test of a filling promises to invest for a new era of clean energy the house passed a roughly one point eight five trillion dollars social policy climate bill Friday including five hundred fifty five billion for cleaner energy but the bill must quiz through the Senate by the narrowest of margins to get past climate scientist an energy analyst Zeke house father says that modeling by researchers at Princeton University and elsewhere fine said of Biden's package passes the U. S. will still miss the target of cutting fossil fuel emissions in half by the end of this decade by about five percent if the bill fails entirely that falls to twenty percent house mother says market forces making renewable energy ever cheaper will help carry that it states a lot of the way but it will be harder for the US to convince other countries like China and India to follow through on their climate commitments if we're unable to follow through on our own promises Jennifer king Washington

Senate Zeke House United Nations Scotland Princeton University United States Biden China India Jennifer King Washington
Why Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, Doesn't Care What You Think

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Why Dr. Larry Arnn, President of Hillsdale College, Doesn't Care What You Think

"So doctor Arne, you say this in some of your interviews where some freshman or sophomore students will say, well, doctor Arne, I feel or I think a certain way. And you'll say, well, I don't really care about how you think. Can you talk about that? Because that's an interesting way to put it. Maybe I miss categorizing it. But it's a different way than most colleges would do it, which is to say, well, the students know best, we gotta listen to them first and foremost. Well, so, you know, I'll illustrate with the story. Many years ago now, 15 years ago or something, I had a young man stand up and to crowd a big big crowd of people, four or 5 or 600 of them. And he said, if I come to health, will you respect my opinion? And I said, yeah, we don't give a crap about that. And everybody laughs. And I said, are you 18 years old? 17 years old? What can your opinion be worth? And I said, shouldn't you be about the business of improving your opinions until they approximate the truth? By the way, you also will not be encouraged to respect my opinion. You will be encouraged to respect the forming of opinion into truth. And that's a lifelong effort, but first, by the way, you have to learn a bunch of stuff. In order to go about it, I think I asked the young man at one point, you know, that young man's a graduate will start college now. He asked me, he said, should I go to healthcare or should I go to Princeton? And I said, you should go to Princeton. And he said, why do you say that? I said, did you name him? Because it's very prestigious. And he said, well, he is. I said good. If that's what you want, you should go there. But if you want to hold to your opinion and be prestigious, go to Princeton. What if you want to know the truth? That takes some finding out. And it's no good, me just telling it to you. You know, I know some things that are true and can argue for them. But why are they true? How do they fit into all the other things that are true? That's a quest you have to

Arne Princeton
Why It's Worth Exploring 'The Big Bang'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | Last month

Why It's Worth Exploring 'The Big Bang'

"It's kind of funny, Steve. And I think we've talked about this privately, but in my book as atheism dead roughly have the same three things. And this was before I knew that you were putting it in this way. And the third one I put it differently, I kind of, you know, it's more about James tour and abiogenesis, but it's the same concept. And it's funny, though, that we're both logical or try to be. And these are three just astonishing arguments for God. There's just no way around it. And it's funny, I mean, I guess I'm glad to hear that you use these three because they struck me viscerally as the three arguments that I wanted to talk about. The Big Bang in some ways is a curious choice because I think a lot of people think, well, that's old hat. I don't think it is, at least, that's why I revisit it and I talk about it a little bit in that chapter. But why do you say the big why is it worth dealing with the Big Bang, something that presumably we've known about for a long time? Well, science and philosophy do intersect. And scientific discoveries can raise larger philosophical or worldview questions. In every world you have to answer the question, what is the thing or the entity or the process from which everything else came? And the default way of thinking about that from the late 19th century was that the universe is eternal and self existent that matter and energy play the role in a materialistic worldview that God plays in the theistic worldview. In other words, it's the thing from which everything else comes. And it's always been here, and therefore doesn't need an explanation. But one Princeton physicist Robert Dickey put it an infinitely old universe would relieve us of the need of explaining the origin of matter at any finite time in the past. But if the universe is finite, which is what all the evidence now points to. Then that raises a big question that materialism can't answer, which is where did the matter and the energy come from in the first place? At that beginning point. And this troubled Einstein, this troubled Arthur eddington, this troubled Fred hoyle, the great astrophysicist and physicist at the early part of the 20th century who were confronted with this evidence, all recognized that it posed a huge challenge to scientific materialism or scientific atheism or scientific naturalism, whatever you want to call it, the idea that matter and energy or the primary reality, not

Robert Dickey Steve James Arthur Eddington Princeton Fred Hoyle Einstein
What 9/11 Did to One Family

The Experiment

02:29 min | 2 months ago

What 9/11 Did to One Family

"Is one the thousands of people who lost someone. They love on september eleventh. Two thousand one twenty years ago now. Big brother bobby. Mcilvaine died that day in new york city at the age of twenty six. He was like reaching out insane. I want to show you my office and was specifically onto the because it was the last time i saw. He told this story to atlantic staff writer jennifer senior. Who wrote about the mcilveen for the atlantic magazine. How did this story come into your life. Well i mean the most obvious way it came into my life is that i knew bobby mcilvaine. He was my brother's roommate in college. He was my brother's roommate in new york city. When they were young then starting out. I would visit my brother at princeton. Bobby would be there and he would. Just be ridiculously precocious charming. He wanted to be a writer. But one of the things that bob learned early in his life in publishing is that a lot of people in publishing came from upper middle class families. They had cushions of money beneath their toes. And bobby's family didn't have that kind of money and bobby knew. He wanted to make a living and so he went into corporate. Pr after two years of being in book publishing. And that's how bobby ended up working for merrill lynch and going to work conference on one of the top floors of the north building of the world trade center on the morning of september eleventh. I went down had coffee and was going over my work like many americans on that morning. Bobby's mom. Helen was starting workday as a teacher and they had the tv set on in every classroom. And i my knees buckled and light. I had to be helped. Bobby's dad bob senior. Also a teacher at the time was also at work. It was on tv. I call home. Of course i try to bobby. We get colon now. The phone was ringing. No one could reach bobby. His parents is friends his girlfriend or his brother. Jeff

Mcilvaine Bobby Jennifer Senior Atlantic Magazine Bobby Mcilvaine New York City Atlantic Princeton BOB Merrill Lynch World Trade Center Helen Jeff
Supreme Court Ends Biden’s Eviction Moratorium

The Takeaway

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Supreme Court Ends Biden’s Eviction Moratorium

"So now the by administration has been extending a federal eviction moratorium to protect tents struggling to pay their rent during the pandemic but now the moratorium is over really truly over. That's because the supreme court ruled last week. That the cbc has overstepped its at and that the moratorium to continue congress. We'd need to authorize it but that's unlikely to happen as house. press secretary. jen psaki told reporters on friday. What we're trying to do here is prevent people from being evicted from their homes. If there were enough votes to pass an eviction moratorium in congress it would have happened. It hasn't happened and while the white house says it's working with states on solutions. hundreds of thousands potentially millions of tenants across the country are now at risk of losing their homes including tenants in the state of new york. We're more than eight hundred. Thirty thousand households are behind on their rent. We're joined today by sia weaver campaign coordinator of housing justice for all in new york. Sia welcome to the takeaway. Extre having me also with us. Peter hepburn assistant professor of sociology at rutgers university newark and part of the eviction lab at princeton university. Peter welcome back to the shell on sia from your perch. What's the significance of this supreme court ruling. Well that's really just devastating as you said eight hundred thirty thousand households are more really are behind on rent in new york and seventy seven percent of them are people of color. The thing that's most painful about all of this as our state also has two point seven billion dollars in rental assistance. Money meant to solve this problem and we've been unable to spend it so this is a a real wave of addiction. That should be preventable. But for some reason has not been prevented.

Peter Hepburn Peter Congress Last Week New York Friday Hundreds Of Thousands SIA Seventy Seven Percent Jen Psaki CBC Seven Billion Dollars White House More Than Eight Hundred Today Eight Hundred Thirty Thousand Rutgers University Thirty Thousand Households Sia Weaver Millions Of Tenants
Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Alan Dershowitz on How Colleges Have Become Propaganda Mills for the Hard Left

"I mean though a is simply that the people that are animated whether on the left or on the right or any of these issues there at least paying attention even if they're on the wrong side but but it strikes me that the moneyed classes don't seem to think that this affects them in other words. The reason we are where we are is because those people typically have stepped back. They think that everything's fine. There isn't a battle for fundamental freedoms in america. They're wrong because their children are going to college and college. Today has become a propaganda mill for the hard left. And today you cannot your mind in a class or if you're a faculty member many american universities if you express views that are not politically correct. You are threatened. You won't be promoted. You won't be giving classes to teach. You won't be hired by other universities. I've written a new book called the case against new sensors five censorship by big corporations universities each and there are small never people in universities who want speech want to have a very very. Don't think speech codes. Who want to make sure that professors and students can't express users Their views and the administrators aren't doing very much about it. They talk about free speech but when it comes down to it they don't do very much to protect it on many college campuses so the rich and the elite who was sending their kids to princeton and yale and harvard in chicago and then they really do have something to worry about because they're sending them into place where they're not getting educated. They're getting propaganda is they're not being too how to think that being told what the

America Princeton Yale Harvard Chicago
Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:12 min | 3 months ago

Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

"The un said that it is unequivocal that humans have warmed the earth in that the scale of the changes is unprecedented and the predictions are dire more drought or fires heatwaves. If we don't change our ways and is not the first time we've heard it. Though the evidence linking human behavior to climate change is now stronger so that got us wondering how does such overwhelming news effect us in our desire to do something about it. We're joined now by dr elke weber professor of psychology at princeton university and she also contributed to the un's latest climate report. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. Increasingly people are dealing directly with the results of climate change. Right record heat across the country. How do people respond when they're confronted with the sort of bigness of the issue of climate. Change what kinds of emotions can that out. It can be incredibly overwhelming especially among younger people. And so there's no question that climate anxiety has gone drastically up i- contemplation about sort of what kind of world full of and and what kind of world we we might leave to our children and grandchildren so it's very debilitating symptoms that oftentimes have to be treated with medication or psychotherapy from psychologists point of view. How can the threat of climate change be communicated in a way that reaches people that also convinces them to act so we have a study in the field for the last year and a half. We've been following five thousand americans across the political spectrum on issues related to covert but then also in parallel on climate change and as you know both covert and climate. Change are highly politicized in this country. But what we find. Is that when you see. People who have personally experienced is a covert symptoms or extreme weather events. They are equally concerned about the issue and equally willing to take action regardless of the politics for better or worse effect that we're seeing climate change hitting all now hopefully as a way of bridging the current gulf to political ideology because people want to protect their loved ones and when they see dangerous in the front step to actually much more to do something about it.

Dr Elke Weber UN Princeton University
How Ethical Food Choices Shape Our Options

The Future of X

02:10 min | 4 months ago

How Ethical Food Choices Shape Our Options

"Animal rights activism heated up in the nineteen sixties and. It remains a hot topic when it comes to food ethics but questions about how livestock are treated and slaughtered have been around since the beginning of time. So do we ever have the right to take an animal's life. I actually cringe every time. I hear someone says. What's the protein choice for today. You mean what animal are. We going to kill an today. That's nasr dory executive director of the national family farm coalition. Our food system has led us down this really ugly dark alley where we don't care if the pigs are terrified entering Slaughterhouse and treated in such ways when they're alive that we wouldn't want any living being to be treated niyada's far from alone scholars like andrew signal. Tackle the issue in the classroom. He's a professor of philosophy and religion at princeton. an editor of the book. Philosophy comes to dinner arguments about the ethics of eating andrew identifies as a flexible vegan. It was the ethical treatment of animals that led him to believe he could be happy eating meat on occasion. I tend to be mostly vegan or plant forward. As i said but i've even encountered farms up in new jersey where the animals are treated better than i have ever seen. No the bulls do have the summer of love followed by a one very bad day at the slaughterhouse. But you know we all have won at least one very bad day facing us at the end of our lives so i can't we all eat. Animals that are treated humanely simply put. It is expensive. Happy cows and pigs cost more than factory farm meat. Not everyone can afford to consider ethics when it comes to filling their shopping carts or their plates. This has ethical implications if we are having some limitations based on where we live our zip code. Color of our skin are income level. Our class right there were hitting at the heart of what is unethical

National Family Farm Coalition Niyada Andrew Signal Princeton Andrew Bulls New Jersey
Tim Wallace on How His Grandad Introduced Him to Photograpy

Photography Daily

01:35 min | 4 months ago

Tim Wallace on How His Grandad Introduced Him to Photograpy

"Let's talk about voters i know. What was grandad the introduces deep fascination. Kambas yeah when. I was younger younger than charlie is not. I used to spend a lotta time. Like i'm pants Godfather was quite On i guess he was the one that saw a But my initial passion actually came from when i was a secondary school in djibril because of false thing in the family i run into a camera trip that adjoined jibril said i run into a guy that what's the athol hayes. Joe basically was when night. Put the surveillance planes of needs to fly around the strikes that you both. He used to load allowed. The bulk film. That used to shave the russian subs when they surface compensated strikes but he was. He couldn't actually print very well. It wasn't very good at princeton and it was one of the things that he wanted to learn today mall in the air force. Were ready doing anything like that with those guys in the photography section. Here's a tiny section. And i think princeton fifty years that Today fest which to develop prints and he said to me if you teach me out to print if you spend hours with me every way can help make this a sergeant nfl. And i'm not some kid I'll give you a device. Faith on which was the bulk. Tends that used to get that and thinking you can't add so. He used to give me a bolt setbacks. Faith five next to sit in his wardrobe with adult closed and everything that have been bugging me parasitism. It solid side unwillingness allowed. Fem stock could shape. He's probably one of the unique things with made. My journey was development. Princeton

Kambas Djibril Jibril Athol Hayes Godfather Princeton Charlie JOE Air Force NFL
Branson, Bezos, Musk: The Billionaire Space Race

Sky News Daily

02:40 min | 4 months ago

Branson, Bezos, Musk: The Billionaire Space Race

"Richard branson's being outed longer than the others. Seventeen years or so since richard branson. I announced his ambitions. Two thousand four. When virgin galactic was started. I think back then the intention walls within three or four years. They be doing what they've only just done now of of taking passengers into space but for him dates back and he. He talks about this a lot. Doesn't it back to nineteen sixty nine and watching the moon landing a teenager. We choose to go to the moon and and do the other thing not because they are easy being taken outside by his dad and the pointing up at the moon and realizing there were two men up there east folks at one of those men buzz aldrin in the nineties and and talked about the idea of using plane rather than a traditional rocket as so. The idea is been fermenting for a long time lot of setbacks on the way of course. I think a lot of us wonder whether this would ever happen. He's proved he can do it. And i think that for him is why this is so emotionally significant but also practically significant in a business sense as well. Let's go through the others then we go elon. Musk of tesla. Fame with space. X.'s dragon capsule and he's the best known for his space ambitions around the world. Think just because of his global profile that he has and has had a lot of success with the commercial side of this deals with nasa of taking things up into orbital space which of course is much further than branson or some of the tourism operations are going and has talked in perhaps much greater ambition. About what could be done. He's talked about colonizing mars. Easy said he wants to go to mars. he's also said people might die. Going to mars but ambitions seemed to be much bigger and grander than just space tourism. And someone who through his life has solve the big problems as he's seen them around the world and this is one he sees that needs to be solved by the private sector. Then making up the triumvirate. Jeff bezos of amazon fame. What of his ambitions. what's his rocket. Program is interesting isn't because he there's far less publicity with with. Jeff bezos a blue origin. The company that will take him into space has been around for twenty years so longer than branson's virgin galactic but his plans all rooted much further back than that he he talks of colonizing space of building these holds where trillions of people can live something. It's thought he took from a professor. He had at princeton physicist. Who came up with his idea in the seventies so he has these grand ambitions that pass. He doesn't talk about as much as richard branson alone. Musk but which are very rooted in in history and clearly having left amazon this is now his focus on taking humans where they where they've not come

Richard Branson Musk Of Tesla Virgin Galactic Aldrin Elon Branson Jeff Bezos Nasa Amazon Princeton Musk
Driving Diversity in Economics With Fanta Traore

After The Fact

01:45 min | 5 months ago

Driving Diversity in Economics With Fanta Traore

"I am originally from new york city one of the most diverse cities in the world arguably but also one of the most segregated and so growing up in that environment. That brought up a lot of questions for me related to opportunity and resource distribution. And in hindsight. I know that these are all questions. That are central to economics. And just to give you an example of the kind of questions. I was thinking about growing up. I was wondering about. When i cross crossover from manhattan into harlem why the neighborhoods was so different. Why the harlem side wasn't as clean as say the manhattan side for instance in the way. I rationalized this as a young person. Was that this had to do it. Politics and to some degree it does so. That's what led me to go into howard university setting political science and also having a focus on african politics because of my mauleon heritage as well but what was really a turning point for me in my economics. Career was when i did a summer program at princeton where a policymaker introduced the concept of economic research to work that she did to us and basically what she shared with that she use economic research to end a food desert in harlem. And when i learned about that i was completely mind blown and so excited to learn more. So i went back to howard and declared a second major and that was economics and emit a mad dash of taking nearly ten classes so that i could now have this economics major but it was one of the best decisions that i've made

Manhattan New York City Howard University Princeton Harlem Howard
Prof. Peter Singer, Professor of BioEthics at Princeton University

Scientific Sense

02:37 min | 5 months ago

Prof. Peter Singer, Professor of BioEthics at Princeton University

"My guest today is perfect. Peter singer whose professor by riddick's at princeton university. He was mostly in practical ethics and is best known for animal liberation and poets fighting goat politics but competing. Thank you thank you. It's good to be starting to you. Thanks for doing this early in the morning and belvin So i wanted to start in possibly slightly different of point and we want to talk about different things. Done all your career But you have collated text of don's to it knows on butane or something. I guess coming out you save is coming up next month. Ease ability elder discounting out. Now it's coming out in july dissolved in july. I'm not quite sure. What date in july but northern wanted to bring it out in july so that could still be used for courses beginning in north america in september. Okay okay so and you know. It's a common theme in media. I that have done So because the help you define you the tuna some in in in common terms pito for the audience utilitarianism is the view that the right action to choose of any actions open to you is the action that as far as you can tell. We'll have the best consequences or put more technically the action that has the highest expected utility. Because obviously the probability is of any particular consequences will vary so you to discount. The ad comes by the chances that you will achieve it. The other thing that should be said is when utilitarian stalker by best consequences they main best consequences in terms of the wellbeing of all of those affected by the action. So no classical utilitarian is talked about happiness in the prevention of suffering. Oh misery pleasure kind yet you can think of wellbeing indifferent wise but if we say wellbeing a good general term for what utilitarian talking about and they do mean all beings affected so that includes of course old humans living now but it will also include future humans insofar as we can predict tara our actions affect them and very importantly it includes other sentient beings who are affected by our actions so any being who can experience pleasure pint of their places in pines can't in the calculation as well.

Belvin Peter Singer Riddick Princeton University DON North America Tara
Water Strategy and Future Thinking

Future Cities Africa

01:16 min | 5 months ago

Water Strategy and Future Thinking

"Michael waste is executive director for water and waste at the city of cape town will be discussing. The city's water strategy. They thinking and future plans but before we get into that mike. Welcome give us a briefing action to your role and background. Thanks a lot dan. it's great to be with you when free said he's africa. This is the topic. I care a lot about something. That i've with unprofessionally for most of my career i'm currently executive director and water and waste for city of town and i've had that johnson's December the twenty one thousand nine hundred prior to that. I was director warren sanitation. This makes me accountable. The which and sanitation department is whether the southern waste department in the city. It's a big department. We've got four million customers of cape capetown. Twenty thousand kilometers of pipeline of the four thousand stores seven ran budget a prior to this position. I worked for the world bank for sixteen years in Eastern europe saab asia. Africa have twenty five years experience in the sector But originally a civil engineer from uc team with a postgraduate qualifications from left brand the uk and princeton university. And the us.

Michael Waste Cape Town Cape Capetown Mike Africa Johnson Eastern Europe Asia UC Princeton University UK United States
The Second Kind of Impossible

Science Friction

02:06 min | 5 months ago

The Second Kind of Impossible

"Heard the beginnings of a saga and we met the maverick mind behind it. Paul steinhardt theoretical physicist and albert einstein professor of science at princeton university. Great job title. Well today he gets another title indiana jones. You know irish Sort of learning science type is here and as theoretical physicist. I never had to go out on an expedition before except to sign a piece of chop. Hell you'd never lights up a pair of hiking boots little build a campfire. No but you were the mission later. Did people think you're mad. Well anyone who had volunteered for this trip. I guess accepted that we were going to go on this mad trip with very little likelihood of success because they hunting for the equivalent of a needle in a haystack. A tiny speck of crystal with a very big story. It's invisible to the human eye. But had his mission crew will have to cross miles of remote wilderness in far east russia in search of it but the whole story is a series of long long long shots. And so by this time long past the point where you would hesitate. Poll is no hesitate. And if you missed it you definitely want to start with the podcast of last week's episode or catch it over on the science fiction website right now. Paul is about to become an unlikely expedition later. In search of a forbidden idea. One that violates would have been the accepted laws of nature where you just knew it was history in the making so we heard that thirty years of detective work had thai. Can paul from a wacky idea to a box with a mysterious labeling contents in florence museum to chasing down a suspected kgb. associate in israel. A romanian mineral smuggle like cold team a dutch widow with not one but two secret diaries and then finally to an incredible discovery. Something that we had thought was first of all is

Paul Steinhardt Albert Einstein Princeton University Indiana Jones Russia Florence Museum Paul Israel
Advancing NLP With Project Debater With Noam Slonim

The TWIML AI Podcast

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Advancing NLP With Project Debater With Noam Slonim

"All right everyone. I'm here with no i'm slonim. Noam is principal. investigator of project. debater at ibm. No i'm welcome the podcast. Hey hello sam. Thank you for having me. I'm really looking forward to digging. Into our conversation. We're going to focus of course on product debater. And what's new everything about that project. But before we dive in deep there. I'd love to have you share a little bit about your background and how you came to work in a so I did my university in angels lhermitte and machine learning lab. This was laid to nineties. More or less. I graduated in two thousand and two and i walked mainly on Information to take methods cluster analysis and related goten and the main data that was considering back then was the textra later and in two thousand thousand and two i moved to princeton new jersey to do my can mean two thousand and seven i joined. Ibm search and i walked on value. Spacek and in two thousand eleven. I suggested to work on project the battle and this is what. I'm doing enough stan. Years also nice. Nice end was debater in existing project at that time. How far along was it. So he has an interesting history because You know we have this tradition in. Ibm lee search of fat grandchild In artificial intelligence so back in the nineties ibm introduced the deep blue that was able to feed the galley kasparov in chess. In two thousand eleven ibm introduced watson that defeated the all time winners of the tv glacier game jeopardy and just a few days after this event and eamon was sent to all the thousands of philly soldiers so ibm across the globe. Asking us what should be the next grand challenge for. ibm

IBM Noam SAM Spacek Princeton New Jersey Stan LEE Chess Watson Eamon
The UFOs the Government Couldn't Explain

Supernatural with Ashley Flowers

02:25 min | 5 months ago

The UFOs the Government Couldn't Explain

"Most ufo stories are typically difficult or impossible to verify at the center of today's story. Though we have eyewitnesses. Who aren't your average. Joe shmoe off the street. They're trained pilots and technicians with years of experience. Working for the us military and the events all happened not long ago. It's the fall of two thousand. Four and two ships are parked about a hundred miles south west of san diego the cruiser uss princeton and the aircraft carrier u. s. s. Nimitz besides the ships crews they're loaded with navy pilots running routine flight drills keeping their skills sharp as they wait for deployment as the pilots hit the skies. Radar technicians back on the ships. Track their flights. It's all pretty standard stuff but sometime around the end of october. A few technicians notice unusual blips registering on their equipment as many as five to ten objects. Keep flying within ten miles or so of where they're running these drills they're all cruising at about twenty eight thousand feet which is too high for them to be birds but they're moving too slowly to be planes. The texts broadcast radio transmissions asking who these aircrafts are. They don't receive any replies. The even recalibrate their equipment thinking the blips could be some bugs in their software. But they're not they're screens keep showing these unidentified flying objects now thanks to pop culture a lot of people here unidentified flying object think alien spaceship despite its very literal meaning. I mean a balloon can be considered a ufo until someone confirms. It's just a balloon in this case the ufo's could be anything. A spy plane a missile or even a drone smuggling drugs into the country so on november fourteenth. Two thousand four the navy. Dispatches squadron commander david favor to intercept the objects whatever. They are but a half hour into david's flight. Radar technicians spot one of the blips. They give him some coordinates and he has out in that direction mentally preparing for what he'll do if the ufo is actually hostile near the ordinance. His plane infrared camera picks up on something and it's directly below him.

Joe Shmoe Nimitz Navy San Diego United States David
The Biography of Anne Frank

This Day in History Class

02:35 min | 6 months ago

The Biography of Anne Frank

"The day was june twelfth. Nineteen twenty nine jewish girl named analysts. Murray frank better known as an frank was born in frankfurt on mine. Germany to eat in otto frank and frank is well known for her story of persecution. During the holocaust and in her family went into hiding in nineteen forty two during the german occupation of the netherlands in world war two. The family was soon discovered in sent to cuss in training camps. An's father auto was the only one in the family to survive the holocaust but an frank had kept a diary during her time in hiding which otto worked hard to get published. The diary has now been translated into many languages sold. Millions of copies and has been adapted for other mediums and frank was born into a family of modest wealth and prominence auto was a well to do businessman but after the nazis came to power in germany and parents decided to move to amsterdam away from so much anti semitism and a suffering economy amsterdam auto company that dealt impacted which is a substance used as a setting agent in jams and jellies and father mother and older sister marcotte immigration i and an joint them in amsterdam february of nineteen thirty four but beginning in may of nineteen forty nazi germany occupied amsterdam. After and her family had settled into life in amsterdam. Living in the netherlands became dangerous as the nazis began to persecute jewish. People an was forced to transfer from a public school to a jewish school in september of nineteen forty one in nineteen forty two on her thirteenth birthday and got a plaid diary. But as nazis began to send jewish people to concentration camps and marcotte got a letter saying she needed to report for work at a labor camp. The frank family went into hiding on july six. They began living in an attic of autos office at princeton god to sixty three in her diary and called their hiding spot. The secret annex the entrance to the hiding spot was behind a movable bookcase some of those friends and colleagues including me. he's smuggled food clothes supplies and information to the franks

Frank Amsterdam Murray Frank Germany Otto Frank The Netherlands Frankfurt Marcotte Otto Princeton
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"So you now have tools to potentially start your own business. If you'd like to do that, you've gone through the motions, you've things that you need to worry about. And then the other thing, which we say kind of jokingly is, you can retire because you made so much money and everything's been so successful. Which, you know, I think at the end of the day is, is a component and a benefit of potentially joining a startup Yeah, so Greg touched upon this and actually, I think this prepared me very well, two weeks ago, I had a mini quarter life crisis. So I collected 50 data points across money to wage Industries. And from people in all stages of their career and essentially, these were the exit options that they said, hey look like you South still have in front of you, of course joining another startup even pivoting and I think that going back to grad school or getting your MBA is also a very good way to Pivot your career from going back in joining an established company wage and as Greg said Consulting and really the bottom line because we already have this foundational, Princeton education. I think that I mean we are all smart people reach and think on our feet and really apply ourselves and all options are still on the table. So, the main three takeaways, I know we've thrown a lot of information that you would be one. When you get the offer, if you can negotiate everything, the worst they can do is known to you need to consider your own risk, appetite and long-term goals, I think by keeping your end goal in mind. Even if what you end up doing right out of college is not off your end goal. You can still work towards building skills that will get you closer to your end goal. Also remember if you first start up isn't successful you can still leverage the experience to do anything you do in the future. And also I think that this is really important to be able to articulate and create a narrative and whether it's successful or not successful being able to have that narrative in mind and keeping that in mind as you're picking projects. And yeah, essentially just figuring out where you want to spend your time and also just as a reassurance, you have many viable at the table. And I just want to reiterate, like, yes, we can give you a lot of guidelines, but at the end of the day, really going with your gut is probably going to serve you the best authors. Do we don't have time for this but we did include an additional resources that will be sent out. I'll just fly through the slide really quickly just to give you the overview of what would be in them but happy to discuss anything afterwards, so this is kind of a framework for how I've helped other others. Evaluate one friend had had offers from Microsoft Bessemer and wage a self Health Care startup and we were able to negotiate all three so that was an interesting..

Princeton education Greg Microsoft
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"A dog..

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"You that payoff, and that's how fan of equity works. But wait, there's a twist. One thing basically party if you got this already, but I'm surprised by the number of people I speak to who don't have this one down. Let's say they say to you, whatever, this is Phantom Equity options. Whatever this represents currently a half, a percent of the company. For me, or or let's say, you're coming in really early and it's like, well, it's 5% of the stock you're going to be a 5% owner, okay. Obviously you're only at 5% owner or right choice than 5% if it's one of these other forms today when they sell more stock as they want to to raise more money when the next round of financing comes along when the, the venture-capital guys come along and they want rightly. So a pretty good chunk your half a percent, becomes the quarter of a percent or becomes 10,000 or less, right? Numbers are percentages. And I'm still surprised at the number of people come to me, even who are forming companies who are entrepreneurs and they have to kind of explain to their friends. Hate the number is the, the percentage that number is now is not the percentage that number will necessarily be later. I'm giving you a number of shares, not a percentage of wage Years. That gives it sounds like a dilution Clauses and so forth. We don't need to go there for these purposes. The point is just be aware of what you're getting. Be aware of what you're getting. When we come back from a short break, we'll get it to. What else you need to know about this. Magical job, offer letter. If you're going to be in New York City on March 25th, join us for Tiger talks, in the city, tiger dogs is Princeton entrepreneurship council's, signature panel discussion series on entrepreneurial topics who has a great panel of black, Princeton alumni, talking Pathways entrepreneurship transition from corporate to entrepreneur for you folks. Interested in mid-career changes Not have a big slab of cities for Tiger talks in the road. Coming up, including April 2nd in Washington DC, April 23rd in Nashville. May 6th in Boston. Back to New York City, per tiger talks in the city on May 7th, and then out to San Francisco on May 14th in Los Angeles on June, eleventh could all that ticket information, these events and more, and entrepreneurs, that Princeton. Edu / tiger stalks off. Welcome back to the Princeton Sparks, you have a job offer from a start-up. Now what here's Jason Meyer again now for all those forms of equity their various various off the come with them things like the price pricing on options, you have the strike price for the exercise price. That is what can I buy that sheriff for the typical structure would be your. You have the right? You have an option to buy a thousand ships for Iraq. What's the stock worth today on the day? You're hired by it's worth $10 a year. Okay. Well you have the right to buy 1000 shares for $10. A share. So that's going to be worth it. When you help with the company growing value, you make the stock worth more money down the road, you'll want to buy those shares for ten bucks because our shares will actually work be worth 2550. Okay? That's one condition, which is Price. And as I said before, if the price goes up and then the price goes down by the time you were able to exercise those options, those options may not be worth anything. So that's always a risk on stock options. Will the price be there when they needed to be there? So that goes and you don't count your money before. It your strike price comes to, which is what I always say. They don't count your strike price chickens until they're hatched granted invested What's granting investing? A grant is when your rights to that start. So it would be things like will give you options to buy 10,000 shares a year, granted on the first day of the year for five years, So it's two thousand shares a year, okay? At the beginning of the year, maybe you get 20% of that the next year 20% but glancing you've got no rights to that stuff before the grand date then you get Vestige investing is the period of time over which you can actually exercise those rights that things sort of write them. So typical structure would be our grant, you 20% of them every year and it will vest monthly over the course of a year. Just basically means is, I'm sure you piece of paper that says you get this, but unless you're around for five years or three years, or ten years, you don't get all of it. Unless you're around for some minimum, your period of time you get none of it and the question you should ask him that letter is how long am I prepared to wait? And let me think about that time frame and what happens within that time frame to evaluate whether this Grand does me any good There's a lot more to the job offer letter than what we have presented here like conditions on granting investing and how you could potentially lose all these rights. Nothing like pausing on a cliffhanger, we will return with part. Two of you have a job offer from a start-up. Now what in two weeks what's more will also make the entire panel available as a separate download wage part 2 comes out. So stay tuned. What will you here in the full audio of the entire panel, you'll hear answers to questions. Like what kind of worker are you? What is your relationship to that company off? And we'll talk about who owns what which is, not quite as simple, an issue, as you might think, and then talk to them about your, your freedom of movement. What else can I do while I work for these people? What will I be able to do when I'm no longer working for these people this evening, that day comes with that? Well, and part one, if you have a job offer from a start-up. Now what The princess bark is a production of the Princeton entrepreneurship Council and produced by me, right. Senior has engineered by neelma twin on location at the same thing for career development at Princeton and Dan Kern's is the Princeton broadcast Center. I designed the sound and music for this episode. Our theme music is by the treadmill special. Thanks to Neil. The twin Laurinburg Scott Cohen Jason Meyer, Tom Vander schaaf Rachel, ye Greg Brooks and the staff at the center for career development. Comments and suggestions Box is always open, then, an email to spark POD at Princeton. There's a topic on entrepreneurship or a person you'd like to hear from please. Let us know. Follow us on Facebook, or Instagram and Facebook at Princeton spark, you'll find some extra content there and put some faces to the names and voices, you hear on this episode and more also have a newsletter, so you don't miss out on anything Princeton spark. You can subscribe at Princeton spark.com the views expressed by our guests in the shower. There's and do not necessarily reflect the views of Prince and operatorship Council pressing University if you rate and review. It's the I could install. It really does help the show. I know every podcaster says this but it's the actual truth. If you haven't subscribed to the show yet, please do so wherever.

Phantom Equity Jason Meyer Princeton entrepreneurship cou Princeton alumni Princeton Sparks New York City Princeton Washington DC Nashville San Francisco Boston Los Angeles Iraq Princeton entrepreneurship Cou neelma Dan Kern Princeton broadcast Center
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Recommend, kindly that's end podcast along, recommend kindly and send the Princeton spark to a friend. Now back to the show, Welcome back to the Princeton spark production of the Princeton entrepreneurship Council. We've been on an odyssey of mentorship first from the mentee side of the table. Now let's walk around to the mentor sidewalk as Linda clarizio for her Insight on being an effective Mentor. Do I think it's super important that if you're a mentor first that you have the time to do it and you're interested in doing it home. When I usually try to do as a mentor is try to find out how I can really help the person that are mentoring and, you know, look at it in three buckets, First Capital, you know, is is this is the person looking for Capital. The second thing that you bring as a mentor, is really your advice and expertise. So I'm personally an expert in the areas of marketing media in Commerce. But, you know, that's something that's very, very valuable to a mentee. So what sort of advice can you bring? Can you provide advice on fundraising? Can you provide advice on recruiting if something I'd be looking for a c m o r c t o r a c r o. Can you provide advice on marketing? The third thing that you really bring as a mentor is your connections and your networking. And it's an asset that you might not even realize that you have, you know, but as you've proceeded in advance in your career, one of the biggest assets that you've built is all of the people that, you know, all of the relationships that you have wage and often when you're talking to someone, that's starting a business or it's looking for mentorship, they don't have that. So, a lot of what I do with my mentoring relationships is, I'll say to the person I'm mentoring off. Hey, I know exactly the person that you should talk to, can I make that introduction for you? Can I help you do that and you know it sounds like a trivial thing to do but it's often really real important and makes all the difference. So it's those three things, Capital advice, and networking and connections. So that's mentorship from both sides of the table before we sign off on Thursday. Season 2 premiere episode, I should mention that the office hours platform is available for Princeton students faculty and alumni for free. You can find it at entrepreneurs. Princeton. Edu. / office hours from here is Lawrence talking about a great way. If you're Princeton Alum, a great way of engaging with people who want to provide income tax and provide and share their Insight, right? And in doing so in a very thoughtful intentional way and in a way that is designed to be transactional, but notwithstanding what I said at the very beginning, this is actually a vehicle that's designed to be transactional, right? I would encourage people particularly if they're at the earliest stages of trying to figure stuff out, this is a way to have some low-cost conversations wage that are designed to be transaction. I may develop into something but it's not specifically designed to develop into a long-term relationship. Trying to answer a very specific question.

Princeton Princeton entrepreneurship Cou Linda clarizio First Capital Princeton Alum Lawrence
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Hi. I'm Marilyn Manson and I'm Pilar Castro kills. And we're here to talk a little bit about arts and Entrepreneurship day on February 15th, the inaugural arts and Entrepreneurship, dad, that's right. Off parts and Entrepreneurship day is the first-ever Gathering on Princeton University's campus to address how arts and Entrepreneurship share more than you think. I think it's really important to be there on the 15th because this is a change to share best practices with colleagues with the future colleagues that are gonna coming into the field and with people who've been doing it for a long time. It's important for alumni to come to the Arts and Entrepreneurship day because sometimes we don't give ourselves the time to stop and ask the question. Are we solving problems in the most efficient way? Is there? Someway knew that we could be addressing some of the obstacles that we're facing parts and Entrepreneurship? You may think I'm an artist not an entrepreneur. Oh, contraire my prayers. Aaron and I are going to run a workshop, opening your mind to how as an artist you are also an entrepreneur and it was a conference is free. I did page. Be great if people registered in advance true on the Princeton entrepreneurship council's, website. Thanks Pilar. We'll see you on the 15th. See you on the 15th. Thanks, Aaron. Welcome back to the Princeton spark. We've been exploring mentorship Belinda, clarizio Lawrence, Latimer, couple more office hours mentors, FPC, we've established that mentoring is a relationship should be countered into it with an understanding. So now that we have that, what should have been T do next. Here's Lawrence. Be very intentional with every conversation and try to break it down, to be as discreet as possible, so don't get on the phone and say, oh, I just have an idea. I just want to like, talk something through. Yeah, even if that's the case you say, hey, here's the thing that I want to engage on with you and that is why I want to engage with you and here's what a good outcome would be. For me, just applying that structure, you may just totally throw it out once you actually get on the call, but it breaks it down into something manageable both for the mentee to say, you know, like forced that person to be thoughtful about what they really need to get. But for the mentor, it just they know what they're getting into on any particular. Conversation and they can prep themselves mentally. Maybe there's, there's no research they want to go and kind of something they want to reference. It just makes it easier. For for Franco, thanks for being thoughtful about what are the effects of the topic? What's the outcome? You'd like to see if it's I need to make a decision or I need your Insight on X Y and Z or you know would be great if if there's somebody else to recommend that I can talk for whatever the right outcome that you think is yeah. To start there and then have that, you know, two or three, four key questions that you want to make sure you get answered as you worked, or wage desired outcome. Here, is Linda again. So, first know what you want out of the relationship and second, you know, make sure that what you asked out of a mentor, you know, is sort of a reasonable, a relative to the skills of the mentor and also relative to the, you know, the the type of relationship that you want. So let me give you a few examples of things that that don't work. I've had some wage Mentees, reach out to me with excessive asks, like they will call and say, will you write my marketing plan? Will you, you know, help me, write my business plan, you know, I thought that that is an overreaching asks to ask a mentor in a more appropriate, ask would be, hey, I'm working on my marketing plan and you're an expert in B2B marketing and I'm struggling over this one assumption. You know what your feedback on that and that's an example of a more focused, ask you can't ask a mentor to do all your work for you but what you can do is Leverage The expertise of that Mentor but you know again I see time and time again mentees come to me basically saying do my work for me so I'm not I'm not trying to school them but just to say, you know, the relationship can be incredibly valuable if you're very focused and what you want mentoring is a relationship checked, the intention Specific in your ask check. Of course, don't ask the mentor to do your work for you. Check. What else of the what else has to be mindful of your mentors time? Their time every 168 hours of the week is valuable didn't get to be successful and worthy of your attention. If they didn't feed their own time with great value and respect and Mentor, invest that half hour or hour, whatever it is on you, the mentee feedback loop on that investment is follow-up. So, even if it's almost any conversation is going to be some kind of follow up, but even if the same week a month later, whatever it is, hey we talked about X. I was looking for this kind of outcome or this kind of feedback or this going to think here is power views that are here is what came with that. Here's the outcome that actually decided it may not even be something that's actionable but it just closes the loop and it shows that the time that was spent their provided some kind of real actionable value. It's a good way of sprinkling off. Operating urself it demonstrates, a level of integrity. That's frankly rare these days, but it also cements your place in the mind of the of the person. You spoke to ride of the mentors. It's important to think about what you have to offer. I'm not just talking right now to mentors. Hello young person, hello, early career person. You really do have something to offer. Yeah. When I was in college even at first year or two, and my job, it was very hard for me to think about the things that I had to offer people who might have been ten years, fifteen, twenty years thirty years, in their career, that seemed to know, everything, know, everybody and, you know, we're so, just wise. And the reality is, I've now contributed to Across the Threshold through second half of my career, my ability to understand what's happening with the Next Generation younger than me or two generations. Younger than me, is so limited. Yes, and so my conversations when I talked to a college student wage, Sometimes even high school students of people early in their career, it's fascinating for me to learn how people think to learn what other key trends to learn. You know, just the dynamic of life being an early in your career, whether it's technology or related or industry-related or Geographic, geography related. So you have as a young person so much more to offer than you realize, but it's important that you think about what do I have to offer this person for them to invest in me. So we've heard from two successful mentors. Now, let's meet someone on the men thought of a table. This is the Shanti, Shanti must I graduated from the class of nineteen ninety-five in chemical engineering. Possibly, the second piece is in creative writing, poetry, Jake, Paul Muldoon, which we have part of the amazing Princeton experience that I had. I am currently the CEO of historical pocket, naloxone Corporation dead Naloxone is the magical antidote. That is administered to somebody who has an opioid overdose and is unconscious and not able to revive them. And, uh, sustain them to be able to be taken to an emergency room to be taken care of, as you may have read the news, a hundred and thirty, Americans are dying every day from opioid overdoses. And last January, the FDA put out an unprecedented call for it, over the counter, Alex on product and profits Alex and cooperation in to answer that call and we'll be in the process of developing and they're going through the entire process with our current.

Pilar Castro Princeton entrepreneurship cou clarizio Lawrence Aaron Marilyn Manson Princeton University Pilar Latimer Belinda Princeton Franco Lawrence Linda Paul Muldoon historical pocket naloxone Corporation Jake Alex FDA
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"And so how do you develop a good productive relationship with a mentor? What kinds of questions should you be asking? What should you not do? I'm looking into all of these questions and we'll explore both sides of the table. NPC, we always start up advising platform called office hours entrepreneurial alumni specific skills and knowledge can share with princetonian looking for advice on their startup Journey, that I spoke to two of our office hours. Mentors to explore what it takes to have a productive mentoring relationship. The first one here is Lawrence, Latimer whom you heard at the top of the show, The, my name is Lawrence. I am a graduate, alumnus of Princeton University. I was at the Woodrow Wilson school and graduate in two thousand. And one, my current job, I serve, as head of Ventures for a company that I X and I access a technology company. We launched about seven years ago in the first product that we launched was called, the investors exchange that competes very directly with the New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ. And we trade, you know, us equities here. So if you want to buy a hundred shares of Netflix or apple, where one of now fourteen venues dead. I seem to be more where you can place that order on it. National Security exchange. The second one is Linda clarizio. I caught up with her during our Ultra successful. New York City tiger entrepreneurs conference in November 2019. So, you may notice the boisterous crowd in the background. Hi, I'm Linda clarizio. I'm Princeton class of 1982 and I've done a lot of things in my career life been a lawyer. I've been a CEO and a president of several companies. Right now, I sit on several public company boards and private company boards. I do advising to startups and along with joy Marcus whose class of 83 at Princeton I run an investment group called brilliant friends, which invests in women-led businesses, I asked them the same question. What should mentees do to have a good productive relationship with a mentor? There's a few things that I would suggest mean it won the let me just start with. There's no right answer. I mean it's such a dog Personal relationship. And and I think is really driven by it's really driven by Justice of the personalities of the folks involved in addition to the experiences and everybody's bring to the table, but it's not such a personal thing. I always want to start there cuz there's no one, right answer. Linda echoed. The relationship aspect of mentoring to the best mentor-mentee. Relationships are not just a 15-minute meeting a 30-minute coffee. It's something that's really continuing. I'm entering is something that I take very seriously by the way, and that's been really important to, me, as I've Advanced, what's in my career of minty and also, now, at the stage in my life, where I spend a lot of time, mentoring, younger people. But to go to your question about the mentee, I think. First, it's really important that when you approach your mentors or that you have a sense as to, you know, what you want out of the relationship because it should be, if it's going to be successful, A continuing relationship, will pick back up on this point about what you want to get out of mentoring wage. But let's continue on the relationship aspect. Thinking about that, it it starts with being trust-based relationship and I think that is just so important to really come back to and just reflect on as it kind of core. Meaning of the word, green soul from. If I'm a young person and taking that into into context, the first thing that I would say, for everybody is don't force the issue any number of times and as I'm getting older in my own career you get younger people that come and say, Hey, I want you to be my mentor. It's very difficult to engage like that, right mentoring and being a mentor and and being a mentee. It's such a personal relationship, it's and it starts with relationship starts with trust, and you don't just build that with one conversation, you don't build that even with two conversations, it happens over time. And it happens, very organically wage which is an unrewarding answer for some of these looking for, for information now. And what do I do? And how do I get there? But for real long-term relationships and real job, You added relationships, it's just that it's a relationship. It's not a transaction. And so I encourage younger folks to treat it like a relationship, treat it like dating, if anything else, right? Right. Old school dating not long enough, you know, speed dating. But really, I need to get to know this person. Yes. To know whether I actually even trust what they're telling me, right. I need to get to know this person to just understand how they have the kinds of experiences and insight that I'm looking for right now or in the future. And so I'm spending a lot of time on that cuz I think it's so important. It's not a transaction, it's not a job description, it's really a relationship. Next, we'll hear from Lawrence and Linda about what to ask and what not to do and young people. Early career people, you hang something valuable to offer that you may not have realized that you had all along. That's after the break..

Linda clarizio Lawrence joy Marcus brilliant friends Princeton Woodrow Wilson school Latimer NPC Princeton University New York Stock Exchange Netflix New York City apple Linda
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"But now princeton is moving and entrepreneurial speed from day one of pc's existence this next member of the p. c. staff has helped and the rapid growth. My name is diane di lorenzo. I was an administrative assistant to start morphed into an event coordinator position think back to the first day. Pc what was that like. Wow it it seems like time flew by starting up. This department was like putting on a wheels on sports car while it was going one hundred miles an hour. The driver leading this growth effort is another princeton. Alum my name is anne. Marie mom on. And i'm the executive director of princeton entrepreneurship council. So there so many exciting things being developed and implemented Here on campus and out with our alumni and others around the world to improve our world and our lives. We can't help ourselves really at the entrepreneurship council but In our desire to make things happen quickly because we want them to reach the world it comes back to the in the service of humanity And the service of humanity is. It's a rush to get them to be a service. Another reason that princeton entrepreneurship council is working at entrepreneurial. Speed is at princeton. Is really catching up. In this area so a lot of other schools. mit stanford all the other. Big names entrepreneurship. They've been doing it for a long time and princeton has been doing it for four or five years officially after the peac report. Of course the keller centers been working longer than that and the fa- the faculty have been entrepreneurial innovative early and the alumni or extremely entrepreneurial but the focus on entrepreneurship is relatively news. Now we've had this feeling. We need to catch up with the others. What impresses me most about the alumni community. And it's something. I knew But it's still astounds me and And warms may is the a devotion that princeton alumni have back to other alumni..

princeton entrepreneurship cou princeton diane di lorenzo Marie mom mit stanford anne fa princeton alumni
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"To be able to make fish farms more sustainable. The technology we're developing here allows fish farmers better understand how fish grow which allow for more sustainable fish farming and ultimately better food production for the world. Some of the ways in which i've engaged and give back to the prince community include being able to mentor other princeton people interested in entrepreneurship. We've hosted some princeton ships here norway as well as in san francisco now the opportunity to go back on campus to give lectures and engage with the broader princeton community although the fund is fully invested new programming to support princeton alumni entrepreneurs under the banner is in the works so stay tuned for that in the meantime the af companies are always looking to staff up. So.

princeton princeton alumni norway san francisco
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Community of young princeton alumni founders who are connected to each other and to princeton and really giving them the support of not only the university but the whole alumni network to help them succeed not only in their businesses but also in their personal careers one of these young princeton alumni founders was fighting murdy we heard from him in the first and third episodes of this podcast. So if you haven't heard those episodes. I highly recommend you listen to them but if you really wanna good story time line listen to the first episode and then come back to this one. I'm going to go have a snack and wait for you. To catch up okay was in the first cohort of af. What asked him about what. Impact the alumni entrepreneurs fund had on him and frenzy his startup. He had this to say what we're able to do with the af money and the rest of the came with it was it what kind of impacted in have specifically like the af money. It was life changing. Like it was the i would say like that is like one of the single biggest things that has like altered my life like where i wouldn't. I probably wouldn't be doing what i'm doing right now if not for that. And i'm super super grateful for that because not only was that validation in december right like from my perspective as a as a graduating senior. I'm graduating with no money to pay anybody and i'm trying to find a way to raise money. And in december of two thousand fourteen like you know princeton. Has this program where you know we can apply to get funded to like work on this and you know we eventually were. They told us that. We were selected. And i was over the moon. Because that i think it was like ninety k like ninety two and a half or something like that but that amount of money would have basically no matter what bought us a good amount of time after graduating to take a real shot at this business and if you want the dramatic conclusion to the frenzy story..

Community of young princeton a murdy princeton
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"All you're doing is having a conversation with someone that conversation may result in you increasing and growing your network. Because then they become part of your network. But it's not the act is not what you're doing networking the act of what you're doing is conversing. You're talking that's it. And i will bring it back to princeton. Perhaps to tie it in that bo. Because i feel the gift that princeton gave to me that keeps giving is the ability to have conversation. You know. sometimes when you're a student you think. Oh gosh. I say hi. To so many people we have these conversations everything superficial but there is a real value in learning how to talk to lots of different kinds of people and i think princeton teaches you that through the social interactions through class assignments. And so you get out here in the real world as an entrepreneur and you're facing that room and you're you're not afraid i mean people have said to me. Wow you can talk to anyone. And i don't understand that to be something special. But i come back for thrive and i'm like you know this is where that was born. This is where that happens because you see old friends. You see classmates. You hug them and you have a conversation and it's just so natural and so you can carry that into the business world so learn people's names people and pronounce those names correctly in our show notes for this episode at princeton spark dot com. You can find links to more information about all of our guests. If you meet them you can have a conversation and tell them you heard them on. The princeton spark the prisoners barring the production to prison entrepreneurship council. Which is an nri. Amman don sites. Lauren bender diane di lorenzo neal between and produced by main writes in yards engineered by dan kearns and danke you at the president broadcast center and me on location. At the thrive celebrating and empowering princeton's black alumni conference. I compose music for this episode. Her theme music is by the treadmills. Special thanks to alison yeras and our guest. Carl over non kareem. Maddox hank boyd in thompson. The dubose kwanza jones. The comments and suggestions box is always open. Sent an email to spark pied at princeton dot. Edu there's a topic on entrepreneurship or person that you'd like to hear from. Please let us know. Follow us on twitter. Instagram and facebook at princeton spark find some extra content there you can put some faces to the names invoices that you heard on this episode and more views expressed by our guests on this show are there's and do not necessarily reflect the views of prince nontraditional council for princeton university. If you rate and review us in the i tunes store it really does help the show. I know every podcast says this but it's really true you haven't subscribed to the show yet.

princeton prison entrepreneurship counci Lauren bender diane di lorenzo neal bo dan kearns president broadcast center alison yeras Maddox hank boyd dubose kwanza jones Amman kareem Carl thompson Instagram prince nontraditional council twitter facebook
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Miss episode of the princeton spark. We're exploring the importance of networking as a founder. As our backdrop i recorded live at thrive celebrating and empowering princeton's black alumni conference on the princeton campus. In early october asked him. Entrepreneurial detainees at the conference there number one tips for networking but our first guest would have us berry networking in order to praise it. I like to demystify the idea of networking by first of all not even using that word. Networking my. Name's karl over non. And i'm currently the president of the natural and organic food business at general mills. So many times we get a hang up where we feel like that means it's fake or it's superficial what i like to think of it as is relationship building and community building. One by one founders. Have to stay so resilient and persistent and what i just encouraged founders is keep yourself energized. Keep your battery powered for full because you do have to knock on a lot of doors you do have to pass out a lot of business cards to find those few people who are going to give you that fifteen minute window that thirty minutes for a call or a coffee and what i would say is make sure that you help people know you really value their time and you know that their time is precious so even sometimes saying i have a couple of specific things that i'd love to ask you about even if i could just have fifteen minutes or coffee or a walk around the block. You know what everybody needs to get up and move from their desk and so walking meetings can actually be really energizing and a benefit and by expressing to people that you know that their time is precious. When you're looking for time often that creates even more empathy for them to give you some time. Play the long game and be empathetic..

princeton campus princeton general mills karl
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"He said you've been afforded the privilege. You have by going to a place like princeton for having a midway like me you better take some risks in. So i didn't see any other opportunity not to do something like it was just it was just. It was b partners is focused on millennial and gen z. Founded startups when they start as walk in the door. This is how they weigh the risk. It it's a lot of different things i think. The first thing. Is you know when i found her walks in the door. It's presentation so presentations. The first thing that everybody always notices about everybody after that the second thing of course mastery you know. Does this person know what they're talking about. Two they have a lot of knowledge in this space We you know marcus of myself and the rest of our team. We don't know every single thing about every single industry in the country and we never will but you know the people that we back should know almost every single thing about this field that there. And i think that's the second thing As far as they're going to be a lot of things that happened just the end. Of course they're fighting. This pivots are going to be required so the third thing after that. Is you look to the person in two know. The level of grit and intensity that that person has is this person relentless and barrels. And so you know things change people. Change markets change. You know company shift strategy. But we're betting on a person or group of people to adjust to those tell windsor novakovic comic actress or whatever else it may be and so it really does come down to. I think the personal day for partnership and investment opportunities sent an email to connect at t. v. partners dot com.

princeton marcus windsor novakovic
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Looking back to the princeton spark before the break to laura talked about product market fit and the status of uncertainty in the arts. It's always nice to lean on a network of mentors when faced with these uncertainties except i founded the princeton arts alumni in two thousand thirteen. Okay so what did you see out in the market that required the creation of this group. I was it was actually Late tim vasan. Who was then the director of the theatre program at princeton. I was at his new year's eve party. And i went up to him and i said tim i'm ready to talk to the arts mafia and he's what's the arts mafia and i said you know the princeton arts mafia just like princeton has this community of lawyers and bankers doctors. You can call up and find mentorship. I've written the play. I'm ready to like contact. The people and he said there's no such thing. What are you talking about or did he did he. Is he like a sworn to silence though because the mafia i know exactly. Yeah yeah. I just said it would be great. I wanna i wanna talk to people. Wanna tell them about my play. I wanna get mentorship. I wanna learn about it and and i think i went on and on and on as i sometimes can and he said that sounds great. Do want to start it. And i said what are you talking about. He said yeah. We can make this. You know that the university can give you funding for two years kind of let you launch it. Then you'll be financially independent if it works great and if it doesn't we'll tell nobody it'll be her secret and so you know. I was very grateful that when when i approached him and said i think that I think we need a community of alumni to support each other and to find mentorship and collaboration find fans and funding and whatever that is That that he and.

princeton arts alumni tim vasan princeton princeton arts mafia laura tim
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Welcome back to the princeton spark. We talked to pilar. Castro kilts an artist dancer choreographer playwright producer. Artistic director suffice. It to say. She's an entrepreneur artist and entrepreneur. One in the same weaving between the arts and culture world and a start up world. There's a bit of code switching involved but the word failure. It's the same in the arts as it is in the startup world. First deeming something a failure. I think this is something. I certainly struggle with what is a failure in what is a success and things that at the time felt like a failure when i look back on them they were just a another kind of rep in my exercise. It was you know sit ups hurt. Yes are they a failure. No right yeah. I think that as i look back the way in which today i feel like i have failed often is when i had an expectation of how something would turn out and it didn't and at the time it felt like oh i didn't achieve that thing i didn't i didn't get that grant. I didn't get that residency. I didn't you know. I'm not getting the awards that my friends are getting. My peers are my colleagues. No one's interviewing me at forbes. Whatever that whatever those benchmarks and When i when. I look back on that and what i what i try to work on is that failure is something that we define when we fall short of either our expectations or the expectations of others. If i wanna get philosophical about it. And i don't always do. I don't always succeed at doing this. Yeah well this is very and it's very it's always matter. I don't always succeed at doing this. But rather than judging something as a failure but judging something as feedback. This is if i didn't get that award if i didn't land that client if i didn't get the residency or the grant or the the accolade. Yep failures feedback. I really think. Actually you know it's not a failure it's feedback it's information of how you can improve how you can pivot how you can change or how you just need to keep on keeping on and ignore it and sometimes i think a failure is when we. We do not meet expectations and sometimes we shouldn't have had that expectation in the first place. I think sometimes it's when we when we label something a failure that it actually results in true failure because we let it get us down and we let us it define us and when you're in the mindset of i have failed especially sometimes for the princeton alumni community who are so accustomed to not failing. It's when you use language. Like i have failed that it sometimes brings about greater failure because you get negative into get down on yourself and if instead you view it as here's some more data here's some more information. What do i do with what just happened. And how do i adjust to be agile. nimble an adaptive. I think adaptive is like my new favorite word. Adapt at your professional skill. Set like stewart said. And what's next for pilar. I would say synthesis Is is the big thing right. Now of bringing together My experiences as an artist my experiences as an entrepreneur and now the added information from business school to kind of put it on the crucible and let it come together and so that's Going back to producing my art and being more active as an artist. That's building more canvas because Part of more canvases providing Part of more campuses providing income opportunities for artists away for them to have flexible work that teaches them industry skills in case they ever have to pivot down the road. And i'd like to see that

Castro kilts pilar princeton alumni stewart
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Welcome back to the princeton spark on this episode of taking risks. We go to different type of matchmaking. This is daphne. Founder of the vendor. Daphne are hoping princeton graduate two thousand ten And i am an entrepreneur. Based in new york city who founded a company called the bendery which is an online platform that is connecting brands..

daphne Daphne princeton new york city
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"Risk free way to help call students. You know branch out on. Meet the people around them and inviting got to work in december of his sophomore year. He built out a website for other princeton students to meet each other based on their interests with the same kind of double-blind matchmaking concept that tender now dominate the couple of friends. They rolled out a big marketing plan. Inviting went to bed with great anticipation for half the campus assign sign up vita woke up opened his computer and found one person signed up one but a couple of days later they'd had one hundred users and after a week thousand after some time they rolled out to other schools then came a problem. What was happening was people would try to sign up for our app and because like the server was getting hammered like every time they would try to do anything it would take like forty five seconds to get a response and that first impression is everything so like for a new user when you're launching to a new school. They download this happen. You know it's like not working. They're going to immediately think. Oh what what junk like. I'm not ever used us again. So that was the first time where i was just like. I don't know what to do but we need to do something and we try to. You know talk to as many advisors as possible and trying to get help from people who had a better understanding of how to set this up one of these advisers had them over what we ended up doing. We went over to his house. One day it was my cto another guy and myself and our goal was just to you know stay awake until we were able to get our entire infrastructure off the single machine into like the cloud so shit each part could be vertically and horizontally scalable to handle our traffic and error. He told me he was like all.

princeton
"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

Princeton Spark

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"princeton" Discussed on Princeton Spark

"From the princeton entrepreneurship.