35 Burst results for "Princeton"

Surviving Wokeness on College Campuses

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:52 min | 6 hrs ago

Surviving Wokeness on College Campuses

"So I'm reading to you a piece by Joshua Katz, Professor of classics until last year at Princeton highly regarded in his field by his colleagues at Princeton, but he wrote a piece about wokeness. And that ended his career. Listen to this. Let's give you an idea of the moral quality of the cowardice that is a scenic one on college teaching. If you're not a coward, it's very hard to rise in academia. Let alone be a president or a dean. Cowardice is essential in your resume. Exactly one of my 16, none retired former colleagues in the department of classics at Princeton University. Has been in touch touch since I was fired last May. I'll continue with that in a moment. I want you to understand non retired. See, the retired, they don't fear being fired. They don't fear, but you won't be fired if you're in touch with Joshua Katz and you teach at the classics department at Princeton. It's that you don't want to be on the outs with your colleagues. To be to actually be a human being and contact your former colleague one of my 16 non retired former colleagues in the department of classics at Princeton University. Has been in touch since I was fired last May.

Joshua Katz Princeton Department Of Classics Academia Princeton University
Why Professors Are Destructive Fools

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:13 min | 6 hrs ago

Why Professors Are Destructive Fools

"Now do you know why it is in no way an exaggeration to say if I hear that I am about to meet or just hear that somebody is a professor in the humanities, the liberal arts called it what you want, I assume the person is a fool. I know that some professors aren't. We have probably about 40 professors who give PragerU courses. There are, of course, exceptions. People who love learning who love educating. However, the overwhelming majority of professors are destructive fools. The Princeton, I want you to understand what is happening. This is Princeton, which is just become a wasteland with the rapidity of a supersonic airliner. You don't have to take a semester of Latin or Greek to get a degree. In the classics, how about this? At UCLA, you can get a degree in English and never have once taken a course on Shakespeare or read a Shakespeare play.

Princeton Ucla
No. 9 Tennessee routs Vanderbilt 56-0 in rain for 10th win

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 4 d ago

No. 9 Tennessee routs Vanderbilt 56-0 in rain for 10th win

"Navals went for the jugular early and never looked back. They won the coin toss, elected to receive and immediately ran four plays resulting in a touchdown the entire drive took just 55 seconds. Tennessee head coach Josh says the game plan was to come out fast tempo so they could get ahead of the impending elements. The weather pattern we knew it was going to get rougher during the course of the ball game and the wind would probably pick up too and felt like we wanted to take the football first and then try to create some big plays. From there, senior Princeton fan, junior's D Williams and jamari small, as well as sophomores Jalen Wright and walker Merrill all found the end zone to put this one away for the falls. Jeremy take over Nashville

Navals Tennessee Josh Jamari Jalen Wright Walker Merrill Football Princeton Williams Jeremy Nashville
David Berlinski Describes His Early Years

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:16 min | Last week

David Berlinski Describes His Early Years

"David, you know, I think I want to ask you a little bit about yourself and your life, I can't help myself. I do this instinctively. People think it's some interviewers hat that I wear, but I did this long before I ever had any kind of show or something. I just want to know what are people come from? Where do they get? So you grew up in New York. Oh, I grew up. I was born in New York in 1942, February 1942, just a couple of months after my parents arrived in the United States. And I don't think I went to kindergarten. I don't think the work in the gardens when I was growing up. But I went to elementary school and then I went to Bronx science and then I went to Columbia and then I went to Princeton entirely in New York experience. First time in my life, I left New York. It was to go to Stanford in California as an assistant professor. Okay, so you were in college in the early 60s. Late 50s or early 60s. Late 50s, early 60s. When did you know and I don't know if you can answer this question, but I'll ask it. When did you know that you were intellectually remarkable? Was this something that you knew already in grade school or that your parents knew to go to Broncos? No, I was a terrible student. That was lazy. I was indifferent. I was completely occupied with anything but the curriculum. And that went through Bronx science and once most of Columbia. So only when I got to graduate school that I said, you know, there's something interesting here. It was a very you don't get into Colombia by being a dunderhead. You clearly cared enough to go to college and to go to an Ivy League school. That was expected. What was your major as an undergraduate? It was history. History, especially medieval history. Did you have or I should say, did you ever did you have a sense at that very young age of what you might want to do with yourself? I mean, if somebody said to you at age 18 or 19, what do you want to do when you grow up? Well, you have to remember how different the academic environment was in the late 50s and early part of the 60s. And academic career seemed just terrific to me. You could do very interesting work, you were protected, you were an academic environment. You had interesting colleagues. And you could teach. That just seemed to me like a very good deal.

New York Bronx Columbia Princeton David Stanford Broncos United States California Ivy League Colombia
40 states settle Google location-tracking charges for $392M

AP News Radio

00:59 sec | 2 weeks ago

40 states settle Google location-tracking charges for $392M

"Even though Google's reached a nearly $400 million settlement with 40 states over location tracking legal experts are still warning users to check their devices Legal experts are calling this the largest multi state settlement in U.S. history surrounding privacy issues Google agreeing to pay out some $391 million After an AP investigation confirmed by Princeton researchers found that Google's services continue to store users data location Even when they opted out Connecticut's attorney general William Tong says consumers need to go even deeper He says do a personal inventory of your online settings and shut off those you don't want While understanding that you're being tracked every minute of every day Location tracking can help tech companies sell digital ads to marketers looking to connect with customers in their area I'm Jackie Quinn

Google William Tong Princeton AP U.S. Connecticut Jackie Quinn
Fant's big game powers No. 3 Tennessee past UT Martin 65-24

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Fant's big game powers No. 3 Tennessee past UT Martin 65-24

"Tight end Princeton fan to counter for three touchdowns and third ranked Tennessee racked up a 52 7 half time lead before coasting to a 65 24 route of UT Martin Ran for two touchdowns and threw a 66 yard TD pass to Jalen Hyatt to cap the first half scoring And in hooker was 18 of 24 passing for 276 yards and three touchdowns before taking a seat late in the second quarter Hyatt had 7 receptions for 174 yards and two scores as the vols moved to 7 or O UT Martin quarterback dresser went through for 301 yards and two scores I'm Dave fairy

Jalen Hyatt Princeton Tennessee Hooker Martin Hyatt Martin Quarterback Dresser Vols Dave Fairy
Princeton student Misrach Ewunetie found dead, officials say

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Princeton student Misrach Ewunetie found dead, officials say

"A Princeton University student from Ohio missing for nearly a week has been found dead on campus I Norman hall Mercer county New Jersey authorities say the body of 20 year old miss rock a wounde was found by an employee behind tennis courts on the campus facilities grounds There were no obvious signs of injury in her death according to an official does not appear suspicious or criminal in nature a medical examiner's review will determine the official cause of death a one a was last seen heading into our dorm room at the Ivy League school in the early morning hours of October 14th She was a junior pursuing a sociology degree I Norman hall

Norman Hall Princeton University Mercer County Ohio New Jersey Tennis Ivy League School
David Rubenstein on How to Invest

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

David Rubenstein on How to Invest

"How to invest because it's all about financial literacy. If I can begin on page 63 with John W Rogers. First of all, would you tell people who John W Rogers is? It's a fascinating interview you did with him. But he's also got an amazing backstory. Sean W Rogers is an African American who went to Princeton, captain of the basketball team, two years after graduating from Princeton, started the first African or the what is now the largest African American investment company in the United States, Ariel capital. It's now co CEO by him and melody hobson.

John W Rogers Sean W Rogers Princeton Basketball Ariel Capital United States Hobson
What's NOT Shown in Ken Burn's Documentary on the Holocaust

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:04 min | 2 months ago

What's NOT Shown in Ken Burn's Documentary on the Holocaust

"I want to talk a little bit about Ken burns new documentary on the Holocaust, not so much for what's in it, but for what's out of it or what he doesn't cover. Now he has every right, of course, to pick his topic and his topic here is the his the American response to the Holocaust. And Ken burns begins, of course, by conceding that we today are kind of commemorate, or at least remember the Holocaust. Of course, it's famous, the famous phrase associated with the holy ghost, which is never again, there's a Holocaust museum right off the national mall in Washington, D.C., kind of remarkable in and of itself. I mean, think about it. The Holocaust did not occur in America. It happened thousands of miles away in Europe, and yet here we are when the museum of natural history, the museum of American history, you've got all this Americana in Washington D.C. and a series of museums that talk about the Wright brothers and now I talk about Albert Einstein at Princeton and talk about all this stuff. American history replicas of American presidents, the. Cutlery and the dresses of American for his ladies, and then somewhat anomaly, the Holocaust museum now, it looks like what Ken burns is trying to do here is say that the American response to the Holocaust was inadequate. And in that he's right. Americans didn't, first of all, no fully what was going on. Second of all, there was kind of an isolationist sentiment that was happening in Europe is none of our business. And it's a European war. I mean, today we call it World War II, but you have to think about it all of the world was not equally involved in this war. To some degree World War I and two were Europeans civil wars.

Ken Burns Holocaust Museum Museum Of American History Washington D.C. National Mall Museum Of Natural History D.C. Albert Einstein Europe Washington Princeton Cutlery Wright America
If You Want an Education, Get the Vaccine?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:22 min | 2 months ago

If You Want an Education, Get the Vaccine?

"Your college Harvard was the first to shut down. Do you know that in the country? I didn't know that. I thought it was Princeton. Is that true that it's well, they're racing for the bottom, but I believe it was Harvard. At least that's what I recall. And they continue. By the way, in order to go to Harvard now, do you still have to be vaccinated? Yes, you do. You do. Yes. Isn't that absurd? You can't get into, you can't attend classes if you're not vaccinated? No. You can't. It's not even a matter if you have to wear a mask. Well, I think a lot of students still wear masks. A lot of them do? Yes. That's actually something that we should talk about. It has become a social fad. I've noticed among people my age to wear masks. Fascinating. I have a relative who's young and she wears an N95. Everywhere she goes. When she's outside walking down the street, she wears it when she's inside, she wears it, when she's at her house, she wears it, and she's at a cafe she wears it. And where does she live? In Los Angeles. And I just think for her and again, I've noticed this among other young people. It's a way. It's an accessory now. It's like wearing sunglasses or a baseball cap or a scarf. An accessory that indicates I care.

Harvard Princeton Los Angeles Baseball
Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:55 min | 2 months ago

Google, IBM Backtrack on Race-Conscious Fellowships

"I'm continuing my discussion of the misdoings and malfeasance of various social media platforms. And now I want to talk about Google. Now what I'm saying about Google to some degree also applies to IBM. Apparently, Google and IBM and I talked about this on the podcast, think about a week or so week or two ago. Established race based scholarship programs. And established them in coordination with many elite universities. The Google program alone was called the Google fellowship. And Google was carrying out this program with Harvard, Princeton, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, duke, NYU, UNC Chapel Hill, Johns Hopkins, I'm Carnegie Mellon. So this is a Google fellowship, and basically under the Google fellowship, if the selection process produced more than two nominees for this for this fellowship, Google required that the next two nominees quote self identify as a woman black African descent, you know, the whole, the whole gamut, trans, LatinX, or person with a disability. But it was essentially a kind of mandatory quota. You have to do this. So these colleges entered into contracts with Google as a requirement. Now, this as it turns out, flatly violates not only the well, gladly vibrate violates a civil rights law that goes all the way back to 1866, which completely bans racial discrimination and contracting. And let's notice that these are contracts between Google and these universities. And then there's also title 6 of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bans racial discrimination at federally funded schools, and all these schools, some of them, of course, private, some of them, public, but nevertheless, they all have massive contracts with the federal government and so they fall under the federally funded clause. Now, the free Beacon, the Washington free Beacon, publicized, did an article, which I talked about here on the podcast about this policy on the part of Google. And they also mentioned that IBM has a similar policy IBM had a fellowship program, and it required a mandated that half the nominees of this PhD fellowship program B quote diversity candidates. Now, Google talked, I'm sorry, the Washington free Beacon talked to a bunch of civil rights lawyers when they go, well, these programs are illegal.

Google IBM Unc Chapel Hill Carnegie Mellon NYU University Of Pennsylvania Johns Hopkins MIT Princeton Harvard Duke Federal Government Washington
The Real History of The Democrat Party

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 2 months ago

The Real History of The Democrat Party

"I want to tell you a little bit about Woodrow Wilson Their bridges with his name on it their buildings with his name on it Princeton he was governor of New Jersey who was president of Princeton at one point But I'm mentioning this because of all the things that had been eliminated torn down scratched off as a result of ties to slavery And the Civil War and racism the Democrat party has not The Democrat party was the party of the confederacy Jefferson Davis and his generals were Democrats They were Democrats Democrat party fought For slavery the Democrat party fought to divide the union Democrat party even after the Civil War Fought in the courts with Democrat judges To maintain segregation The Democrat party refused to ban Lynching with a federal law For the longest period of time Fact Franklin Roosevelt despite the pressure from his wife Eleanor Refused to support one of the bills He said it might hurt his support in the south for his reelection In 1936

Democrat Party Princeton Woodrow Wilson Democrats Democrat Party Union Democrat Party Jefferson Davis New Jersey Franklin Roosevelt Eleanor
The Original Election Denier: Hillary Clinton

The Trish Regan Show

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

The Original Election Denier: Hillary Clinton

"Paul krugman, oh yeah, that noted economist, can I even call him that? Economists from Princeton, he's got a job at Princeton's got a job at The New York Times. Anyway, he penned the column this week saying and I quote heal be the first. He's referring to Biden modern U.S. president trying to govern in the face of an opposition that refuses to accept his legitimacy. This is mister krugman there. He goes on and says, and no, Democrats never said that Donald Trump was illegitimate, just that he was incompetent and dangerous. This seems to be a new talking point over the weekend of all Patrick, who's the former democratic governor of Massachusetts, said something quite similar. I quote, he said, I don't think there was a new Democrat calling the election itself illegitimate because the outcome was surprising or disappointing to Democrats. Wow. Do I need to remind them? Do we need to remind them exactly what Hillary Clinton was saying? In the days and years following her defeat, we're going to get to that in

Princeton Mister Krugman Paul Krugman The New York Times Biden Donald Trump U.S. Patrick Massachusetts Hillary Clinton
"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

03:20 min | 3 months ago

"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

"Each school is a little bit different, but they do a really good job, you know, Princeton and Ivy League is non merit based, meaning they want anyone that's capable to be at Princeton to be able to come to Princeton, right? So they make it affordable. There's each different brackets. They change each year. They actually take specific circumstances in. We really don't have any say in that. We submit. We don't even submit the family submits their financial profile. They go through all these different paperwork, for instance, specific paperwork. And they get a financial aid read about how much aid that they're given. But it's become more affordable each year for each family. That's amazing. That's really interesting. Again, I don't think that the ivys do a really good job, but I agree with you. I'm not sure people understood how much better the talent is or how much more affordable it is than it's ever been, even it makes sense because the product to anybody who's watching has been far better than the last decade that was pretty sad. That's not those teams weren't good. But there wasn't the depth of talent link that there is for sure. For sure. I mean, there's some really good players in our league. You got pro players, NBA player, like you have really talented players that are coming into our league because the opportunity to both at a really high level. And at the end of the day, no matter they play an MBA, they probably overseas, Princeton, Ivy League degree, is going to put you in a lot of circles that you wouldn't have opportunities to be in, right? And that's the beauty of it. I'm watching our guys, what did I play beyond college or not? Like the success that they're having is really cool to watch. Well, it was awesome because I learned a ton from you personally. Obviously, just like the guys, I feel like Friends for life. No, I want to do this again after Spain. I want to hear about what approaching in Spain is like, definitely. That's pretty galore. I'm feeling I already know. Right. You just show my video be following on the floor. You don't act like this idiot. Yeah. Well, it's funny was, that was like the last time I yelled at the refs. It's just not even worth it. Yeah,

Princeton Ivy League NBA Spain
"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

04:51 min | 3 months ago

"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

"2021 that had invited the 2021 2020. They had invited the student body back for the second semester at Princeton. So the first semester, no one was on campus. The second semester named by everyone back to campus. So before you get to that, so that first semester. And there's no season. Yeah. Right? But the lockdown stuff had gone relatively well at least West Coast had. How often were you allowed to go into work at all? Yes, but it was only if you need to, right? Like our guys weren't around that first semester. So we weren't going in. Did you ever go to Princeton when nobody I just wonder what that was like with this historic institution that's always vibrant with people? It was ghosts. Nobody's there. Yeah, it was weird. I am legend.

Princeton West Coast
"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

08:26 min | 4 months ago

"princeton" Discussed on All Ball with Doug Gottlieb

"Scotty was a tremendous player and he's a tremendous coach. And so he was supposed to take over his assistant in American, but because he was changing jobs. This off season, I end up getting the call. A guy, look, I'm nothing but honest with you guys. And it's fun. It's a thrill. It was a little challenging because it was not a team that I had selected. So as much as the practices were about getting better, a good portion of the practices were about me trying to figure out who to use them, how to use them, who to play how to play. And that's kind of what we did. Skyler and Skye and was my assistant. And he was the defensive coordinator. And he took what they do and how they do at Princeton and he's a full-time assistant and put in a play. And I found him to be an outstanding coach. Players like him. He teaches in a way in which is easily consumable. He's demanding, but not in an overbearing way. For me to work with him, I thought we had a great symbiotic working relationship. I did the offense. He did the defense. And then I did the get on their ass about playing hard sort of thing. He did the scouts and the minutia, if you will. It was really good. And part of the trip is that the head coach, we actually roomed together for three and a half weeks. So we did training camp in New Jersey for three days. We did a training camp in Israel for four more days. Then we do touring where we train in the morning and tour in the afternoon. We played friendlies against the 1800 team and the Israel 20 U team. And then we played 6 games. We won all 8 games, two friendlies, and 6. And we were always better in the second half than we were first half. And I think a good portion of it was his help with adjustments. My demand for the type of energy every day at practice, not just enthusiasm energy, so that we were in great shape. But I got to know Skylar on a sky on a level that's above that of just being a coaching colleague. On that of being a really good friend. And when I heard his story, I thought, you know, I really wanted to tell his story on this pod. So sky Edinson assistant coach at Princeton, this interview is a snapshot of what it's like to recruit to the Ivy League. How to get to where he's gotten at just 30 years old. And what he wants for his own future. I thought you'd enjoy it. Here's my pod with Princeton assistant. All right, so obviously we have now like this crazy month and a half of like friendship go from like, don't know each other to living together for a month. That I want to get to, which is fun. But I purposely didn't ask you a bunch of this stuff because sometimes it's better like learn about a person as you go and then dial back because you bring in the baggage of then whenever there's like a low in conversation, like I don't know, the interviewer brain and me goes like, oh hey, tell me more about this. So let's start at the beginning. You were born grew up where? Princeton New Jersey. So born and Brett. Yeah, man. Crazy. Parents educators, like why were you in Princeton? Both my parents, psychologists. How did you feel about that? Exactly. That was growing up for sure. They both had private practices, little outside of Princeton, about 20 minutes away. So they settled in Princeton, and been here ever since. What kind of psychologists were they? Both clinical psychologists, my mom deals with trauma, my dad used to do group therapy. So yeah, all the conversations you can imagine, we had. That was a life. Why'd you love basketball? What was it? What was it, when was it? Tell me how that relationship. Really, for my dad, you know, he was a huge fan. He played in high school. He actually played at cranford high school, and at the time the head coach was hubie Brown. So we played for hubie, which was cool. He has a bunch of a bunch of really cool stories. Some nice, I'm not so nice as you can imagine. I believe it's funny, you know, we went to that movie in cranford. Minions movie in cranford. But my dad replaced hubie at farallon high school. We started thinking he was a fair long before cranford. Wow. Right? So that's how small the world is. That's amazing. That's amazing. So yeah, it really came from him. You know, I started playing at a really young age. You know, four or 5. And just the love developed from there. You know, just by going outside and playing at the park with him and you just kind of you fall in love with this thing and you keep doing it and you want to chase some things in the game. So when you grew up in Princeton, New Jersey in the 90s. Yes. Everything the prince and offense, like from the very youngest age, you do the you know the 45%. And yeah, you know, I grew up going to the camps, right? You had first John Thompson. When I really started to go, which was early 2000s, and then Joe Scott and so you kind of grow up with learning, thinking, you know how to play a little bit and I grew up going to games and so definitely the prints and offense was always at the forefront of things. For sure. What was the park or the rec center where you kind of like were first hooping it? Yeah, so there's this park community park, which is a local elementary school. I didn't go to community park. There's four elementary schools and Princeton, but community park had this league and it still does. And it goes from younger kids to middle age kids to adult league at night. So I used to go playing the kids league, and then I would stay and watch the adult league and at that time, it was division one sanction. So a lot of the Princeton players who were around in the summer would play, and it was really good competition, some really good players passed through there. So that's really where I truly developed my love for basketball, just watching the men's league games. It was a really cool atmosphere. People will come. It's outside, under the lights. Really cool experience, the leak's been gone for almost 30 years. It's pretty cool. What high school Jada? I went to Princeton high school, the public high school in Princeton. So are they the tigers as well as everything? The little tigers dug the little tigers, you know, couldn't be the normal tigers, they had to be able to. The prince in little tigers? Yes, sir. Did you guys run elbow and chin as well? No, no. We didn't run as much of that. But yeah, there's obviously a big pull from the university in a lot of ways. Who's your high school coach? This guy, Jason Carter. He went to Princeton high school, was a really good soccer player, actually played in college and he coached me as a freshman on the freshman team, and then my sophomore year, I got moved to varsity and he became the varsity coach. So I had them all four years, and he actually was one of my college assistants at one point. So I spent a lot of time with coach Carter. Good guy. What were you like as a player? I was an undersized forward. I was 6 four, forward wing, I didn't shoot. I actually kind of turned myself into a shooter in college. But in high school, I didn't shoot many threes and kind of just finished around the rim and was crafty and but undersized

Princeton hubie cranford New Jersey Skyler Israel Scotty cranford high school hubie Brown Skye farallon high school Skylar Ivy League Joe Scott Princeton high school Brett basketball trauma John Thompson
Helicopter Parenting Does Not Raise Children to Be Adults

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Helicopter Parenting Does Not Raise Children to Be Adults

"A massive outbreak of narcissism with among young people. It's not an attack on young people. It's a description. If anything, it's an attack on. So sorry, there was a technical clit for a second. So I have to restart here. Most families have been one or two children, and as a result, parents have devoted massive amounts of time to their to their child or children. Well, in either case to their child. You know, the term helicopter parent, it's hard to imagine aside from actual abuse, a more destructive idea than the helicopter parent. The task of a parent is to raise an adult and very few parents have thought about that, they thought their task is to shower their child with attention and love. And that's not how you make an adult, an adult meaning an independent human being. Once again, the Bible is so much wiser than Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, Berkeley, University of Michigan university of Wisconsin. Emory, duke, all put together and therefore managed to leave his mother and father, though father and mother. Yeah. And clinging to his wife and they shall be as one flesh. You have to leave your parents. To be able to love properly. To become an adult, and that's not what has been prepared.

University Of Michigan Univers Yale Princeton Harvard Stanford Emory Berkeley Duke
Alger Hiss and 'Gods of Deception' With David Adams Cleveland

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:37 min | 5 months ago

Alger Hiss and 'Gods of Deception' With David Adams Cleveland

"To you about the book gods of deception. So what's the general plot of this novel gods of deception with this background we've been discussing? Well, one of the things that fascinated me was how his managed to assemble a defense team. Most of them were Harvard Law School guys. They were, they were people that knew his pretty well. But I mean, when the evidence started coming through, I just couldn't believe how could these guys really believe their client was innocent? As the evidence, they had papers. It's top secret State Department papers with his handwriting on them. They had documents that have been typed on the Hiss typewriter, it was quite clear that Hiss was guilty. So how was it that his defense team could have stood by him through all of this? So the way I worked the fictional arc of the book was having one of the main characters be one of his defense lawyers who had actually defended him in the trial. And come 50 years later, the now the Edward demick is known as the judge in the book, is writing his memoirs. And he enlists his grandson. Who is a Princeton astrophysicist to help him to write these memoirs. And it's actually the grandson's exploration of what's in the memoirs and talking to his grandfather to try to figure out what had really happened in the algebra his case. And

Harvard Law School State Department Edward Demick Hiss Princeton
What Is the Sovietization of American Life?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:23 min | 6 months ago

What Is the Sovietization of American Life?

"Victor Davis Hanson has a very powerful piece, unfortunately. In American greatness, it's called the sovietization of American life the amazing thing is I would say at least half of America would not understand the title of his article and certainly virtually no young person. I wonder if you said to the average not forget the word average. Wonder if you said to most juniors at Princeton University. What is the sovietization of American life mean? The I think that the most of them would not know. The ignorance of history, I lament all the time, the lack of the teaching of wisdom, it's my column today, I hope you'll see it. Dennis prager dot com. And it's at town hall dot com later in the week. It goes elsewhere as well. Many other sites. And I lament the lack of teaching of wisdom. With the reliance on feelings, I I have good intentions is now the only thing that matters.

Victor Davis Hanson Princeton University America Dennis Prager
Wallbuilders President Tim Barton Tells Us About John Witherspoon

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:56 min | 6 months ago

Wallbuilders President Tim Barton Tells Us About John Witherspoon

"Folks, welcome back. I'm talking to Timothy Barton, president of wall builders dot com. You should check it out. Wall builders dot com. It is just a treasure of resources. But Tim, you're just giving us really important rare information. I've not heard most of this before, but you're talking about how the founders specifically John Witherspoon of New Jersey dealt with the issue of abortion. As you said, we tend to think of it as something fairly recent. Of course, it is no more recent than life or birth or death or recent. These are things that have existed since we have existed. So talk about Witherspoon because we cut you off in the last segment. Yeah, and let me actually add a little more context to John and Witherspoon, because John and Witherspoon as the president of Princeton, he personally trained more founding fathers than any other single individual and Princeton trained more founding fathers in any other university. So John Witherspoon had a direct influence on dozens and dozens and dozens of individuals that we would consider founding fathers. And this is important to know because he's imparting his philosophy into them and certainly you actually see a lot of his ideas coming out and things they did. But one of the lectures he gave while he was at Princeton dealt with the issue of parents over their children and specifically of the unborn child and parents. And one of the things he explained was, for example, this was in the era of the French Revolution, which the French revolutions, there were many of them, they lasted for a couple decades, but there was a lot of bloody deaths, a lot of conquering a lot of messiness in the French Revolution, but in the French Revolution, there was also a lot of secularization. We're under the French church. The French people had been oppressed and abused in many ways. And in America Christianity was very different than in many of these European nations because of the freedom that we gave and how in America Christianity was not the same level of coercive. It was over in Europe. And so John Witherspoon goes through and he explains that, for example, over in France, they're rejecting a lot of these basic biblical Christian notions. He says in France, they believe that parents own the children and actually he says really kind of Europe and the world, but he's specifically talking about France and then goes a little bigger, but what he says is there's people around the world that believe that they own their children. And they can sell them to somebody else's slave. They can sell them off to be indentured. They can give them in marriage, or if they don't want their children, they even can kill their children. And this is before they're born or at birth or even later, that parents are the property of the excuse me, children on the property of the parents. He then says, but in America, we believe it's very different. We believe there's a different role for parents and one of the things he explains is that in America we've denied the power of life and death over the child, we've denied that power to the parents, where the parents role is not to determine if the child lives or dies, but to raise them up and instruct them and nurture them and strengthen

John Witherspoon Witherspoon Timothy Barton Princeton French Church John TIM New Jersey France America Europe
How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | 7 months ago

How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

"Hey, welcome back folks. We're talking about American education, battle for the American mind, is the book uprooting a century of miseducation, David Goodwin has written it with Pete hegseth in that David. You're the head of the association of classical Christian schools. So you're like a brainy guy. Pete is just like a talking hit on Fox and Friends. We know he has nothing to say if it's not on a teleprompter. Pete, how did you get involved in this? I've always learned to join forces with people smarter than me. That's the key. Andy's humble, which makes me hate him even more. You went to Princeton, you went to the Harvard Kennedy school of government. What did you major in at Princeton? Politics. You did. I did. Political philosophy. As sort of a degree of that. But I'll tell you what I've learned in this project, how much I didn't learn. I didn't learn any of this stuff. My kids are in classical Christian schools and all I say every day is, why can't I go back to school and learn these things? Okay, you're singing my song. I have said this over and over in the last couple of decades. I learned something. I wrote a book called if you can keep it Franklin's famous line. And because of Oz Guinness, whose book I had read, I understood things, and all I could think of is how did I not get this? I didn't get any of this. So you obviously going through this elite schools, which like, Yale, they don't teach you this stuff. They teach you John Dewey on steroids, I guess. And they teach you now the latest manifestations of the Frankfurt school and critical theory, which is now we now see as critical race theory, and we talk about every day. But it was just the water in which we swam. I took social studies. We all took social studies who invented social studies. Yeah, why is it not history? Why is it social studies? We can't get into that. We can't get into that, don't talk about it. I didn't know where that all came from. David had done the research and then I was able to lay it upon the environment in which we live right now and realize we all got a progressive education. Yeah. Almost everyone watching guaranteed. Right. Got a progressive education that was started by atheist advanced by marxists who had their own agenda and it all happened subtly, and a lot of us think we aren't infected, but we are. And so you have to dig under the ruins of what used to exist. And that's what David did in this project. This is the way education our founders were educated, how free people and republics actually perpetuate themselves. Why don't we do

David Goodwin Pete Hegseth Association Of Classical Chris Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Pete Princeton Oz Guinness David FOX Andy John Dewey Franklin Frankfurt
"princeton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:29 min | 10 months ago

"princeton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Right Yes After visiting Beau a Princeton alum named Richard mesner called me every single day after I got into Princeton and told me why Princeton was the better school for me And he ultimately invited me to a lunch with Bill Bradley in between the two of them and John Rogers the founder of Ariel I was triple teamed and ultimately I said any school where people would be this fanatical about the school and having someone go there must be a really great place And so against my mother's wishes I chose Princeton I assume you could have had a lot of jobs in New York or east coast but you went back to your hometown and joined a then relatively small firm Ariel Is that right It was tiny I got $1.6 billion in assets Maybe 1 billion at the time I did interview on Wall Street but one day after making lots of trips into New York on the train to do the interviews one day I just called John Rogers then he had the title of president And I said I want to come to Ariel because I could see what I could learn from working with him up close versus the layers down that I would be in some of the other firms I think he was surprised by the call He told me I didn't open invitation to join the firm after I was an intern And I eagerly went there I knew from the first day and I know it's going to sound crazy then I would work there my whole life I knew it You have worked at Ariel your whole life In fact I think you're the only person in your class or prince who has the same telephone number that you had when you graduate Is that right That's right out of 1100 people So you can tell that loyalty means a lot to me as well as consistency and stability which is the opposite of what my childhood experience was So your firm specializes in what's called value stocks which means cheap stocks You're not in the high technology high flyers but the high flyers have done so well Crushed it In recent years so I've made you think maybe you should get into that business as well As a contrarian I think just the opposite Whatever worked in the past won't work in the future Most people fight last year's war That's not how we think about things You want to look and see what hasn't been successful And that's where you want to be So when we look at this past decade where large caps and growth have dominated in a way that we've never seen before selling it valuations that we've never seen before relative to value or cheaper stocks we see a tremendous opportunity Coming up on a special edition of Bloomberg best more of David Rubenstein's conversation with melody hobson On.

Princeton Ariel John Rogers Richard mesner Bill Bradley Beau New York east coast David Rubenstein Bloomberg melody hobson
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"To you that audience to the students who are learning and so on and so forth so just think about on your calling. You're leading a discussion and calling upon people. Think about that. You know who you're calling. And i can have huge impact on the discussion on the the big discussion. So these are really simple things. But they are very well documented their studies on things like that and so on and so forth when he give you a final example. I do a lot of editorial work for my sealed as a service and I was offered a few years ago. The position of editor in chief which is nice because in neuro science not many journals led by a woman and i said to the general manager. I'd take this position that only if we have an edge joint that is expected gender-balanced which is unheard of actually in the field of science. Because for some reason women don't do a lot of editorial work but i've changed that so in my journal lots and lots of women and it's just a name discovered something for them. I have to talk them into doing this of me. Basically in the beginning but they haven't joined a great deal and they just have discovered a skill that they didn't even know about so for me. It is really encouragement encouragement encouragement. I do this signs fear once a year. I mean we couldn't do a joint last couple of years. Because of cohen was young women. High school students here at princeton. Young women's you know science fair and it's just being there talking to these young women who wanna get into signs but sometimes they don't know how or what really interests them but to provide this kind of mentorship and encouragement is just so important and even though it doesn't change the world now again it. Is this little kind of block. You change to can't change in few lives you can make a little change and if a lot of people are doing that we can make an impact that You know that that effects people want and will bring positive change. It is not taking care of the structural changes that will need but they could grow from there. You're just talk some bear As you say initial condition smack lavar east Discussion it a conference map allowed And so i think those things that quite important so i went to Sort of finish up with are bringing kids into the scientific review process paper. You save funky. Young minds. put skips in charge of scientific publications by cabinet. The controlled the review process. I couldn't understand it. So how do you do this..

cohen princeton lavar High school cabinet
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Not be like okay. I'll just go to work as normal like what's happening or there's a hurricane warning. Okay where do we right so so again. That's a way that we can benefit from social away of social learning basically. I'm thinking Yale yesterday sorta define communities mood like you say early on. There could be you know. Hundred fifty people clients. There's declines mood was important so the plan leader perhaps plan leader who has a higher probability of being in a good mood Averaging over time might be considered a good leader race eleven. Bbs similar sorts of things going on in modern context People are optimistic. Generally optimistic than to be better leaders and so on so what they are in some sense affecting. The communities mood are the company's more organizations mood that has a net benefit right. You leaders pessimistic all the time. You know you destroyed fancy discipline you can see your person who is in bad mood defects you credible making me think about again that other side. That leaders who invoke fear control. He pulled a lot more so what. What's considered a good leader. The leader that we want or the leader that action he leads us all could be off a cliff but literally we follow that person And we've seen around us a lot in the last few years and it's not new it's always been the case that her is a way to control people and so sewing fear you know goes together. It's like selling fear saying. I'm your savior so follow me because all those things are so scary. Turn up all your fight. Flight responses amendola as i say Which is kind of cynical manipulation of people's tendency to be more affected by negative moods and i mankind to move but actually just to be to have much less free choice when they're afraid so we'd lose We you're talking before about what we think about consciously what we plan and make decisions to halt. We kind of respond automatically under fear. Responses are mostly automatic and to putting people in that state. And then saying here's your automatic response. Is the only thing that you can do than people just do that..

amendola
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is purposive. Bushman with assistant professor of psychology neuroscience at princeton university. He's wizard james to understand. How breen accomplishes intelligent rational behavior by guiding or actions towards a goal. Welcome thank you. Thanks for having meets. It's great to be here. Thanks for being a so. So i was speaking at all your papers team. You appear to be really productive beauty. Depending on many many papers coming out clinically. One to start with the of view. Peoper balancing flexibility get into firms in working memory working memory. Send a commission flexibly holding the right. Your cars needed for complex behavior yet despite its importance. Lucky.

Bushman princeton university breen james
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest is. Janet corey was economics and public affairs at princeton university and director of princeton's center She also directs the On families and children at the national beautifully economic again. Thank you thanks for being so you had a testimony to the house. Select committee on economic and centers. In goat. I speak not photographic nancy by the way. Could you summarize your moss to the committee. So my remarks focused on the effects of inequality on children. And i was trying to make too broad points so the first point was that poverty is very damaging to children and that may seem obvious. But there's always the argument potentially that you know. Well maybe it's not poverty per se. Maybe it's something else. That's related to poverty family background or something but i think there's a lot of evidence which was summarized actually in a national academy report recently that yes there's a causal effect of poverty on children and conversely if you give core families money adept that helps so that was kind of the first point and then the second point was said a lot of the social programs that have been implemented in the past twenty thirty even forty years have had tremendous effects so we always hear about how basically everything is getting worse or in poverty doesn't change overtime but in fact in the us it's changed a lot So some of the things that i would point to and i did point to in my testimony are the effects of public health insurance for children which people think immediately about the affordable care act in two thousand ten. But i'm talking about things that happened thirty years before that covered pregnant women amd awkward children. And that's just had a tremendous impact not only on saving lives but preventing disability and making people into more productive adults similarly early childhood. Education has really spread so we have the federal program had start but we have lots of state and local programs as well which really make an impact on poor children. And then the third thing i would point to his nutrition programs like Snap which used to be constant stamps or the supplemental feeding program for women infants and children or school lunch..

Janet corey princeton's center Select committee on economic a princeton university us
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Permanent powers with a veto derives from the victims of the second world war And i think that does nate china. There have been various proposals for reforming that So i think there are specific thing recharge but we still need the united nations. In fact i'd like to see a stronger. United nations yeah. I know that you're working on a couple of more. I guess Editing books so writing books I can't quite remember so it was working on right now. I'm revising animal liberation which we talked about earlier which was published in nineteen seventy five There's a complete revision in nineteen ninety and some lighter additions with minor changes since bata. It really needs a fulop died. So i'm hoping that sometime. In two thousand twenty two perhaps completely new fully revised edition of animal liberation will appear and the golden asked. This is that out already masses add. Yes that's available published by norton. The united states and in the united kingdom Text publishing here in australia and some other translations of my edition will be coming out as well but yes People will look at that. I enjoy it. I think it's the most entertaining book might be the latest in a sense that i've produced and it's a good rate people. Get up maybe give it to somebody as a president. I think it's it's beautifully illustrated. By the way i got some russian illustrators insistence to provide illustrations for So it's a. It's a nice little package teaching this quarter or not. This will be teaching again in september of planning. Go back for the fall semester to princeton. Excellent this data. thanks so much. Time has been between good to talk to you. Revenge pretty widely. But that's always been interesting. Good topics thank you bye. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. If you do sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com..

united nations china norton united kingdom australia united states princeton
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You know people people seize on them and suddenly they beat them up into something much larger and more significant but my And that is a factor in terms of racism in the community I see this. You were talking about evolution and what it's given rise to I think it has given rise to a certain kind of of xenophobia. That is to the idea that people who look like me looked like my my parents I'm more likely to think positively of than people who look different from me and that can be combated socially of carlson that should be And when we used to diverse societies with people a lot of people look different and we much less likely to have those sorts of attitudes but the problem is that unscrupulous politicians can appeal to them. And they're still there and sunlight and foam and we've seen that so often. I mean obviously. Hitler came to power by appealing to this xenophobic reaction against the people who were part of the german community had been for hundreds of years the jewish people but he was still able to appeal to that and stirred up in in germany and donald trump was able to study this against Immigrants against a mexican food. He said rural ripest and so on the that seemed to get some residents mike. Some of the american electorate incredible as that my same so said that's the problem. I think that That this is not that. There's nothing there it. There is something there and it's affected by the society and we need to have a positive environment to minimize it and come as close as possible to eliminating it but it's it's therefore People to stir up. I see an advantage duration. So i mostly what scientific basis feeder so A race as we see it is fairly tactical thing grade. So my understanding is that that opens. Cps lend to a bottleneck we had at some point or fifteen thousand samba's left on earth And so we wind time bag sufficiently long from a scientific perspective that it's no difference but he eats the difficult for people to internalize because the surface features that the assigned so much importance to all highly tactical. But that is what we see out but that is what actually prescribes policies. We help two hundred different countries. I would ask this on on on you. I think the slightly different opinion on this. I consider myself to be a universalist. I will say. There are no needs for countries Companies that really is sort of a segmentation scheme that is no reason for religions that some of the segment he invented the segmentation schemes assault of segment solves into into something that has had no real meaning or relevance i was. He gives an opinion on this. Well i'm look. I i agree that It would be much better if we could have. I've been borders and Not have countries. So have. Not as i said i write this book. One world which really is advocating global governance. I thought it was premature to say a world government but more institutions of global governance like Strengthening the united nations like the international criminal court alike your ways of making reaching agreements and enforcing agreements on climate change..

carlson donald trump Hitler germany samba mike international criminal court united nations
"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is perfect. Peter singer whose professor by riddick's at princeton university. He was mostly in practical ethics and is best known for animal liberation and poets fighting goat politics but competing. Thank you thank you. It's good to be starting to you. Thanks for doing this early in the morning and belvin So i wanted to start in possibly slightly different of point and we want to talk about different things. Done all your career But you have collated text of don's to it knows on butane or something. I guess coming out you save is coming up next month. Ease ability elder discounting out. Now it's coming out in july dissolved in july. I'm not quite sure. What date in july but northern wanted to bring it out in july so that could still be used for courses beginning in north america in september. Okay okay so and you know. It's a common theme in media. I that have done So because the help you define you the tuna some in in in common terms pito for the audience utilitarianism is the view that the right action to choose of any actions open to you is the action that as far as you can tell. We'll have the best consequences or put more technically the action that has the highest expected utility. Because obviously the probability is of any particular consequences will vary so you to discount. The ad comes by the chances that you will achieve it. The other thing that should be said is when utilitarian stalker by best consequences they main best consequences in terms of the wellbeing of all of those affected by the action. So no classical utilitarian is talked about happiness in the prevention of suffering. Oh misery pleasure kind yet you can think of wellbeing indifferent wise but if we say wellbeing a good general term for what utilitarian talking about and they do mean all beings affected so that includes of course old humans living now but it will also include future humans insofar as we can predict tara our actions affect them and very importantly it includes other sentient beings who are affected by our actions so any being who can experience pleasure pint of their places in pines can't in the calculation as well.

belvin Peter singer riddick princeton university don north america tara
"princeton" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"Princeton is joining other universities and trading in the classics for diversity and inclusion for the colson center. I'm john stonestreet. This as breakpoint. Imagine a software engineering class. That didn't make students learn computer code. That's kind of an idea of just how ridiculous it is. That princeton university is no longer requiring classics majors to learn greek or latin. I'm not talking about biology students or even english majors classic students. You know the folks who study. Greek and latin culture are not being forced to learn the languages of greek or latin. Now why this departure. From centuries of academic standards the head of undergraduate studies in princeton's classic department explains that the change would bring quote new perspectives and make for a more vibrant intellectual community. Not every student or scholar of language agrees writing over at the atlantic columbia university linguistics. Professor john mccall argued that buzzwords new perspectives and vibrant community are becoming code words for forced racial diversity as a black academic dr mccarter values diversity in higher education but as he argues. The study of classics is under assault from a twisted and a condescending view of diversity one which sees minority students as incapable of learning and reading ancient languages. One that requires colleges to dumb down their curriculum in order to achieve this goal of diversity. He's right he might even be understating. The problem it's not just greek and latin languages itself. It's the study of the classics as a whole that's under attack in is atlantic piece. Professor mcchord quotes one of princeton's classics faculty who said in two thousand and nineteen that the whole discipline of classics is quote explicitly aimed at disavowing the legitimate status of scholars of color far from being extrinsic to study of greco roman antiquity. The professor claim the production of whiteness resides in the berry marrows of classics unquote. In other words requiring students who want to study the greeks and roman culture to learn their language is itself racist and fact setting. The classics at all is racist. This isn't quite as absurd as the recent washington post editorial that argued the names of north american birds are racists but it's close writing in the new york magazine. Rachel poser observed that some classicists have come around to the idea that they're disciplined forms part of the scaffold of white supremacy at america's universities and schools. This kind of claim is increasingly common. Staunchest homer or virgil in the crosshairs either. Last month the wall street journal reported on proposed revisions to the framework for california's mathematics curriculum. One that would make quote dismantling racism and mathematics instruction the top priority among the suggestions is to stop correcting students. Mistakes and they direct way. Apparently that also is a way of expressing white supremacy. The point here is less about greek. Or latin or algebra. It's really about the way that modern ideologies gobble up everything else including everything else. That's worth learning at. The heart of the feeding frenzy is an attitude that owen barfield dubbed chronological snobbery. So notion that somehow we are smarter. We're better and we don't have the same blind spots that our ancestors did simply because we're modern institute. Austin men noticed the same attitude. He argued that abandoning classical languages is to quote. Cut ourselves off on the past and the wisdom that it has to offer us. This shelter thinking stunts our minds. We come to believe that our modern concerns are the only real problems in the world and our own insular discourse is the only hope of rescue. That's why one of the duties of christians and a culture like ours is to be the kind of people who understand the moment in light of the story not trapped in the moment but understanding that the moment itself as part of a larger story of redemptive history. First and foremost of course we need to know the scriptures in order to live this way we need to be fluent in age old wisdom in the books the ideas the art that stood the test of time understanding that these things themselves are expressions of the image of god that is part of our shared humanity. It's not grounded in this culture or that culture explicitly. It's grounded in what it means to be human and it transcends cultures reading the classics is worth doing it for its own sake as cs. Lewis points out in his essay on the reading of old books. Ancient ideas can be powerful antidotes the modern errors like the obsessions currently consuming higher education. Only by keeping as he put it the clean seabreeze of the centuries blowing through our minds and our cultures he argues. Will we learn.

Princeton john mccall Last month america english Rachel poser cs. Lewis greeks latin two thousand mcchord princeton greek greco First princeton university john stonestreet Greek nineteen california
"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Those troops treated people around princeton much better than any of the other armies that had been through either american or british as they said. Our fight is not with you. Our is with continental congress in our government. The problem was resolved at trenton but they had camped at princeton for a while some people in princeton benefited from the army camping out there because they supplied firewood in plunder young Collected it and sold it to the military sending with some food and that sort of thing so there are records of people getting actually paid for helping out to supply this army rather than the army plundering or the value of the money to take a united. You say it was questionable but it wasn't your calendar by any means so that turned out to be not such a bad thing. Although the people were terrified that this rubel mutineers was coming to their town so it was a lot of relief when they actually got there and they found they weren't gonna terrible car another time that the situation that you're talking about was important was at the end of the war in seventeen. Eighty three in june of seventeen eighty three pennsylvania. Soldiers were again not happy. The army was breaking up at this point or at least being furloughed. Yeah going off active duty and the men were not getting paid well. There were a lot of grievances they had. So some of the men actually did get the philadelphia and threatened the continental congress as well as your state government to the point where the continental congress decided leave town. They felt that badly threatened or they found a friend in princeton kind of of friends in princeton princeton. Literally invited with the idea that we not only would like you to come here but we promised to defend you. Three militia regiments kernels of three militia. Regiments the two counties that the line split between for example. Both middlesex somerset. County as well as hundred and county which was right next to princeton. Those three colonels sent a note saying are men will defend you against those pennsylvanians or anybody else that threatens you so the continental congress decided to come to princeton and were there for several months. They meet in nassau hall. They did a lot of meetings in nassau. they also met some other places to that committee. Meetings navarine is in different places like that and they were quartered throughout the town but they did a lot of their meetings at nassau. Yes one would ask you why the heck would turn stones invite the continental congress to come to princeton. Put a strain on princeton. They didn't have enough buildings to quarter all these men. They're going to have to rent rooms. You know and people's houses and things like that and they actually got people princeton to write up a list of what they were willing to donate in terms of space desks. Whatever might be for the congress. Delegates to.

princeton nassau trenton three colonels pennsylvania Both nassau hall two counties seventeen three militia navarine british princeton princeton united Three militia continental congress june of seventeen eighty pennsylvanians american Eighty three
"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

04:50 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"A really was looking for another victory where he outnumbered the enemy significantly. He knew he was expecting at princeton. To meet up with about fifteen hundred regulars and the other eight thousand or so hours new jersey redoubt at trenton where they had tried to attack him the day before in the the night march around them to avoid a major onslaught or he was a little outnumbered and get to a point where he was the outnumber the enemy in detail. Yeah and he had kind of looked at the british. How head split his troops up across new jersey into winter quarter. Cantona's anyone of those cantonments at the at the beginning of december washington would have outnumbered even though he had a small army. Outnumbered at trenton. Huda one here. He was gonna outnumber three or four two one at princeton. He almost looked at those cantonments across new jersey. Like a row domino's and if you can back them off in succession even get the british out of new jersey. Of course after trenton. The british demolish their own wine of domino's and put everybody in princeton washington got him out of princeton by or to find trenton. And making that look like an attractive place to finish them all but then did his running wound up at princeton he was to knock off that small encampment possibly go onto new brunswick where he knew. There were a lot of british supplies that he could get hold of and he was really planning to go to mars town and spend the winter there rather than pennsylvania. That's why he was in princeton Arrived in prison morning. January third grade of course didn't know about that they had been in on the planning and whatnot. And so the british army those fifteen hundred men about a thousand were actually princeton. The time that washington got there in order to reinforce cornwallis at look very been behind basically one regimen so when washington makes his plan to attack princeton from three sides. He starts that maneuver. But it's obsolete from the moment it starts because the british are moving down the main road towards princeton. Even though i made comment before a bad the visibility the wide range of his ability because of hills and that sort of thing they weren't in sight of each other so the british were essentially airline in the opposite direction washington's approach.

pennsylvania new brunswick trenton fifteen hundred men three mars town three sides about fifteen hundred regulars January third princeton about a thousand beginning of december cornwallis Huda washington new jersey one eight thousand or so british four
"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"By the british government. Maybe they can take over the government again of the new state of new jersey and bring back loyalty to the king. They can get back at the patriots for any problems the they cause individuals earlier in the war. They can get revenge if you will. So everybody was affected. No matter which side they were on lear. Either feeling empowered or feeling abandoned a lot of people. I think just kind of wanted to keep their head down. And whoever's in charge they're willing to say okay you're in charge. Yes continue to grow crops and get him remark and many people. Many people took advantage of that offer of amnesty that you mentioned thousands of people that the question was. Were these people now loyalists because they had pledged loyalty to the king again for amnesty or had they done it just survive until things went the other direction. Most of the people who signed those amnesty notes actually disavowed them. After the battle reprints after the british were kicked out of new jersey. Some very important people actually did bat however if they had had any political office before that it pretty much cut them out even if they would aside the loyalty to the king again. They weren't necessarily trusted a major person involved with this. I think that we don't often think about is richard stock. Richard stockton was captured by the british. When they occupied the town of princeton he wasn't captured in princeton. Gone out of town. But he hasn't been smart enough to go over to pennsylvania the again not gone far enough. He had left the state and he was captured by loyalists. Who got into them for the british in any imprisoned new york. This is all going on while. The british are occupying state and offering amnesty. And i think it's interesting to know though. Richard stockton signed the declaration of independence and very strong patriot. He also was one of those people early on who kept hoping for reconciliation. With great britain. The great britain would wake up and see what was right. So even though he signed a declaration of independence. Still a little reluctant. That wasn't the direction he had hoped things. We're going to go in so when he gets captured and was talking with how in new york. And how is talking about this. Amnesty program and how himself was more in line with helping the colonists politically not terribly politically back.

Richard stockton pennsylvania richard stock new york new jersey one thousands of people british princeton Amnesty program britain those
"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"And that becomes a focal point at people's understanding about a place but yet the story is so much bigger than that for those people especially the aftermath of battle the armies and the people are left clean right right and in this particular case in princeton also the preliminaries to the battle riche occupation. What just wasn't january third a month long experience for the people of princeton before all that at the outset of the actual war what was life like living in princeton new jersey. Princeton was probably a relatively quiet town. It wasn't too big but it was on a main road between the arkansas adelphia. Between new england southern colonies for that matter because it was almost halfway between new york and philadelphia. It was a very convenient stage coach. Stop an overnight stop in some cases and so you had a lot of people travelling through town yet several taverns to accommodate travelers and then it also had the college college attracted visitors as well as students coming and going and all of that. It was nowhere near as big a university as princeton university today but it was right in the center of town and was key point. the town. Nassau hall was but landmark of the village of princeton on a hill and was very visible from a long way away which is the other element of christmas is farm country but little village surrounded by farmland. So there's a lot of cleared land. Visibility was a lot more distant than we think of today. The people in princeton were not all of a homogeneous background. There is diversity and religion between presbyterians and quakers for example most of the people who had settled in princeton. Were of english ancestry. But there were a few french. You cannot send digestion. Germans things like that and then there's also of course in african african-american population there is slavery in princeton. Generally no more than one or two slaves per household but still slavery. Sure so. I think that is a little bit of an introduction to the town. Princeton was we would today call. Central jersey was somewhat close to the dividing line between east and west jersey. Yet talk about that a little bit. The odds right on the line between east and west jersey are there had been two colonies. He stirs in west jersey. There is somewhat of a land dispute between the proprietor proprietary colonies and there some land disputes. So several attempts were made to draw a line on the map between the two may simply to settle land disputes. So there's a province line shop rating the keith. Line is one of those very prominent one when the two colonies came together as one colony of new jersey. Princeton was right on that keith line. East jersey and west jersey had developed a little bit differently from each other older english background. There was also a major dutch influence in east jersey. Particularly up in the northeast part near new york city. West jersey was more influenced by philadelphia and quaker population. There cranston was right smack in the middle which was not bad because economically. It was a pretty good spot but it did mean that there was a fair amount of diversity in town which for many of the people like john..

princeton new york Princeton philadelphia Central jersey new england january third two arkansas adelphia two colonies Nassau hall cranston east jersey East jersey john West jersey christmas today two slaves west jersey
"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"princeton" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Kidder over remote call to discuss princeton during the revolutionary war. Larry kidder welcome to the american revolution. Podcast thank you. We're here today to talk about your book. spoke revolutionary princeton. Seventeen seventy four to seventeen eighty three. I know you've been quite busy. I think this is your seventh book in the last eight years. All of your books seem to be related to new jersey history and of them deal with the american revolution. What specifically did you hope to accomplish with this. Most recent book in many ways the same kind of things that i have been dealing with in my other books as an historian a history teacher. When i did that. I was always interested in looking at history from the point of view of the average person. The real person not just the people who made it into the history textbooks. I've always felt that studying history is a way for us to learn more about what is to be human not just about a bunch of events to memorize that kind of thing. So what i wanted to look at. Princeton was essentially similar. I tried to do for trenton in an earlier book and look at life in town in new jersey during the revolution and how the revolution affected individual lives and how those individualize contributed to the revolution for that matter. Even though those people don't make it into the history books so it's part of that overall effort that. I have to humanize a lot of history. And i make it appreciative to people who can identify with people's lives been somewhat somewhere. There's and they're living through history also being right. I think it makes it more relatable when we understand it worst out just happen in a vacuum and don't descend down from heavens and nobly joined the army's we all have to deal with things that we have no control and we have to got how we're going to deal with it. He's raising kids trying to make a buck trying to act on their way through life and all of a sudden they've got a war thrust upon them exactly exactly and also take a look at events like a battle like the battle of princeton.

today seventh book last eight years princeton new jersey Larry kidder four seventeen Seventeen seventy eighty trenton Princeton three Kidder battle of american