21 Burst results for "Primary School Teacher"

"primary school teacher" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

07:43 min | Last month

"primary school teacher" Discussed on BrainStuff

"What if you were a gigantic snack food maker who needs to satisfy cravings from Tokyo to Toledo? So you partner with IBM consulting to manage your supply chain with real-time data driven precision. Let's create supply chains that have an appetite for performance. IBM. Let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com. You wanted to see me miss swinton? Have you been hearing about the new government modernization efforts? AI, RPA's data science, things are changing at this agency, and people will need new skills. I'd like you to get some training. Look at this management concept catalog. Wow. Over 275 courses. That's right. In local classrooms or instructor led online classes. We still have budget in this fiscal year, so sign up online. Advance your career with courses for management concepts, get a catalog at management concepts dot com or call 8 three three 5 7 8 84 66. I show people all around D.C. and to keep my guests engaged. I like to sprinkle in a fun factor too. Next stop. DuPont circle. Also, here's a lifestyle tip for you. Try Apple Pay. You can now just tap with your phone or watch to get on the bus or train all over the D.C. area. Add your smart trip to the Apple wallet than just tap to ride. Apple Pay on iPhone. Now arriving on metro. Welcome to brain stuff, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, brain stuff Lauren bogo bomb here. Sometimes you've had enough and you just need to go for a walk. It's understandable, a walk can clear the mind, and it's possible the extent to which your mind needs to be cleared should determine the length of the walk. This isn't necessarily scientific, but the story of Emma gatewood provides anecdotal evidence that it might be true. Emma gatewood, called grandma gatewood by her family, and later the world, was one of the early through hikers of the Appalachian trail, the longest walking only foot path in the world. When she left Ohio in 1955, she told her family that she was going for a walk in the Woods. So it was surprising to her 11 children and 23 grandchildren that these 67 year old matriarch of their family had undertaken this hype. It stretches some 2190 miles. That's 3530 kilometers from Georgia to Maine. Her family only found out when one of them stumbled across a newspaper feature about their mother's track. Gatewood was not the first person, or even the first woman, to hike the trail. In 1948, 29 year old Earl schaefer was the first person to hike the entire trail by himself. In 1952, Mildred Norman Ryder, in her mid 40s at the time, completed the entire trail with a companion. Gatewood's hike was notable because of her age, and because she was the first woman ever to complete the trail in a single season. For the article, this episode is based on, how stuff works spoke with Larry Luxembourg, president of the Appalachian trail museum in Pennsylvania. He said, when grandma gatewood did her first through hike in 1955, there were few hikers, and it was hard to follow the trail. There were also many fewer resources for hikers, fewer stores near the trail, and much less information about the trail. She saw very few hikers along the Appalachian trail. But still, gatewood hiked it alone, wearing canvas sneakers. She walked through 7 pairs of them that summer. Carrying the denim duffel bag over one shoulder. She brought a change of clothes, a blanket, a plastic shower curtain for shelter at night, a Swiss Army knife, a canteen, a flashlight, a length of rope, and a few other essentials. She ate a lot of Vienna sausages, trail mix, and bullion from cubes. Sometimes she ran out of food and ate berries, she recognized in the forest. By the time gatewood became a famous hiker, she had lived the kind of life it would take a few thousand miles to walk off. Born in Ohio in 1887, gatewood's father had lost his leg in the Civil War, and her mother single handedly raised 15 children in a small log cabin, sleeping four kids to a bed. A gatewood completed school only through the 8th grade, but she loved reading and writing poetry and walking in the Woods. In 1907, at the age of 19, she married a primary school teacher and later tobacco farmer by the name of PC gatewood. For the next 30 years, she would endure frequent assault from her husband, while also doing strenuous farm work and raising their 11 children. She tried to escape a few times, but it's hard to disappear with multiple children in tow in 1939 after being nearly beaten to death by her husband, gatewood was arrested for throwing a sack of flour at him. She spent the night in jail before the mayor of the town saw her craft teeth, bruised face and broken ribs, and took her into his own home. As she stayed there until she healed, at which point she filed for divorce, a difficult thing to obtain at the time. But her divorce was granted in 1941, and she was given custody of the three children who still remained at home. In 1951, after all of her children were out in the world, gatewood found a back issue of National Geographic, which included photos and a story about the Appalachian trail. Gatewood was intrigued and decided she wanted to be the first woman to hike it alone. Gatewood's first attempt at hiking the entire trail was unsuccessful. In 1954, she started out from Maine, but broke her glasses, lost her way, and was rescued by rangers. The next year she tried again and successfully hiked an average of 14 miles, that's 22 kilometers a day from Georgia to Maine. She didn't necessarily enjoy everything about the experience. After her 1955 hike, gatewood was interviewed by Sports Illustrated, and she had this to say about the trail. I thought it would be a nice lark. It wasn't. There were terrible blowdowns, burnt over areas that were never remarked, gravel and sand wash outs, weeds, and brushed your neck, and most of the shelters were blown down, burned down or so filthy I had to sleep out of doors. This is no trail. This is a nightmare. I would never have started this trip if I had known how tough it was, but I couldn't, and I wouldn't quit. All things considered, the only thing more improbable that Emma gatewood's completing the trail from Georgia to Maine in a single summer under these conditions at the age of 67 is that she did it again. Twice. Once in 1957 and again, in 1964, at the age of 76, though that time in sections. Also, in 1959, at the age of 71, gatewood walked some 2000 miles, or 3200 kilometers of the Oregon Trail, inspired by the pioneer women who walked from Missouri to Oregon, a hundred years before her. And by then, newspapers had dubbed gatewood, America's most celebrated pedestrian. And she's been inspiring other hikers ever since. Today's episode is based on the article grandma gatewood hiked into Appalachian trail history at age 67 on how stuff works dot com, written by Jocelyn shields. Brain stuff is production by heart radio in partnership with how stuff works dot com and was produced by Tyler clang. Four more podcasts, my heart radio, visit the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hear that. That's the sound.

Emma gatewood gatewood Gatewood IBM Lauren bogo Apple D.C. Earl schaefer Mildred Norman Ryder Larry Luxembourg Appalachian trail museum RPA swinton DuPont circle Maine Toledo Appalachian trail Ohio
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

07:52 min | 3 months ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"Hello, part two of Homer sapiens with Nicola Adams boxer superstar Olympic star and Ella baig her other half body positivity activist and model and many other things. If you haven't heard part one, that's on the feed, listen to that first, simply press play on this here part two if you've heard one or already. What about for you nikla? What was your journey in that regard? Well, mine was completely different to Ella. I mean, I've been pretty much getting my whole life. I can't really think of a time when I wasn't. I literally from like two years old type thing. Yeah, very much. Do you remember who your first crush was? Yeah, it was on my primary school teacher. Difficult. Did they know? No. That's why I'm not mentioning any names. Miss blah blah. Can you help me with my own work? Yeah, it's funny that isn't it, 'cause it's very, so my first crush was and I'm not bisexual, but I was in love with Elisabeth Shue and Tom Cruise in the film cocktail. That's fine. Because everyone was like, oh, you know, the boys were into Elizabeth's shoe and the girls went to Tom Cruise. That's right. And I was like, I kind of love them both. What do I do there? And actually, I was really in love with them as an idea. But I knew I don't think they were I didn't have the interior language for bisexuality. That's for sure. Age, whatever it was. But that was my first crush, and then after that, I don't know, maybe Patrick Swayze and dirty dancing. But when it comes to both of you and kind of being, I suppose I wonder if you feel that you are a visibly queer couple. And is it something you like to be or is it something you have plans to play down or something that you want to sort of take and do something with, where are you at with it all? Yeah, I think that is such a big thing. I know especially among feminine lesbians that we don't look gay. So we get a lot more comments when people find out when people assume very quickly that we're straight whereas you don't have that problem as much. Because your masculine, I mean, the older generation tend to assume everybody's straight. But again, it used to sisters were like looking at each other like really? They don't say that, do they? We've had that with my friends. And then we said we're together and he assumed we were both married, separately. Oh, yeah. Honestly, sometimes you just give up. You're just like, yeah, we're Friends. We're Friends. For the purposes of this conversation, we're Friends. Yeah, it's funny that it's not I'd forgotten that where was I with my husband? And whoever we were with, I feel like it was in a state agent. I'm struggling to remember the detail, but it was very much like there must be otherwise. There must be both of your wives elsewhere and I'm trying to work out where they are and when they're coming. Do you know what I mean? No, this is it. We're here. But I hadn't thought about that, and that's actually really interesting because I am sort of obsessed by the feminine presenting the masculine presenting in all LGBTQ+, you know, and it's like how different versions get different versions of attention. Do you follow that queer black woman, I think she identifies as a woman, Alison Graham, she does him on Instagram. I feel like I recognize the name. She is my obsession because she just breaks down masculine presenting. Lesbians. I'm pretty certain that's what she is an apologies if I'm getting that bit wrong. She says one of these things which is like just because I'm masculine presenting doesn't mean you're going to get other bits of masculinity out of me like hiding my feelings. And I suppose navigating that as a couple, people coming with so many assumptions must be quite tricky or is it? Yeah, definitely. I mean, people are very quick to assume gender roles in general. Right. Interesting. I mean, everyone always goes to immediately talk to you. Like they would the man of the relationship because she's more masculine, whereas I tend to be the one that everyone should be talking to. They're in charge of everything. Nicola would you like to respond to this dragging you're getting? It's true. It's true. It is true. I thought I would. And how do you, how do you divide? And I don't mean in a gendered sense. I just mean, I'm interested in it as a couple. Because I'm like, in my couple, William, if he was listening, would strangle me right now. My husband. But I'm a bit more like the big idea, like we're going in this direction, but William will be like, okay, well, let's think about the detail how are we going to do that? What's the machinations of that? If you want to move, where are we going to move to? How does it break down with you two? Yeah, I think I do the details. Interesting. Ella has the I'm more the expansion. Nikki likes says what she wants. And we'll get all the technical details. And I'm more fill in the gaps. So I'm getting a sense that you've got incredible Wi-Fi in your home then. Oh yeah. Yeah. Really? Are you in it? Nicola, I love it. So you do all that kind of stuff. Who cooks? Oh, so yeah. I haven't been cooking a lot because I actually was really affecting my nausea. Oh, I bet, yeah. The smile of cooking for some reason. I remember Christmas Day. I took the food out and I was just had to go be straight away. It really ruined my dinner. But if cooking needs to be done, Nikki likes to do the prep. And then I would do the cooking, but if you enjoy it a bit more. If you're feeling not well, would Nikola would you then reach for deliveroo or would you still make something even though it's not your neck of the Woods? If there's something easy that I can do, then I'll cook it, if not, yeah, deliver straight away. So I moved to the countryside and I can actually hear Scotty who we interviewed the other day, saying, Chris, it's really boring, stop talking about moving to the countryside. But I'm telling you anyway. And you can't do delivery. You can't do it, and it's really interesting. It forces you to cook. It's like, you eat quite a lot of things on repeat, but yeah, it's really interesting to have that not in your life. Do you know what's so funny? Where we actually have a house in the open hill last year. We didn't have deliveroo and honestly when we went back to the house and I clicked on deliveroo. And it said, it came up with things and I was like, surely it's the wrong address..

Nicola Adams Ella baig Tom Cruise Elisabeth Shue Ella Alison Graham Patrick Swayze Homer Olympic Elizabeth Nicola Nikki likes Instagram William nausea Nikola Nikki Scotty Chris
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Uncommon

Uncommon

08:22 min | 11 months ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Uncommon

"Best for my job. I lived new stuff every single day. If with a up shore be very similar to being a journalist as you can say. It's a lot easier to say. Would you come on my podcasts. As opposed to hey to grab a coffee or do you want to have zoom coal. It's very easy to do stuff like that. There's been instances of paper where i wanted to learn from them because they're in a field similar to me and i want to really just learn about what they do and i say let's podcast. Surprisingly they've gone on like being in front of the camera because the nitro will i do. Can we get a coffee. Which is funny but yeah it gives you an excuse to interview anyone and everyone which are called like what is your parents do. Grow up so a a primary school teacher. My dad would basically a warehouse full the which is a uk from so he would like pack and paik the stuff that the gap for the big trucks and put into other trucks. That would then go to schultz which is really interesting. Because it's like with focusing lightly account class right and so i'm always very up front about the fact that i went to a private school like a fee paying school but this this huge dialogue going on the uk at the minute around every single person that went to private school must automatically be like upper class talk radio. Richard's like my licks. They just had this compensation and the other day. Yeah exactly and it's like it's like my mom was like a primary school teacher. My dad literary works in the white house like even like a manager of like like he just moves stuff they down. He became a postman when he got redundancy that like at one point between becoming the warehouse to open becoming a postman. He not working sandwich factory. Doing twelve hour shifts overnight like just filling sandwiches like iran interesting. So what's the conversation guy on the uk the minute because there was something similar here in the of friends we were chatting about it and i just said i really odd that because i went to school and obviously lucky. My brother go to scholarship. And i got a partial scholarship because of that body was still expensive to go to that. School is a private school. And i was lucky. Like hearing ustralia runs says it was to do with an issue that happened like some fool. My student at the school had raped. Someone and i brand had done a pr campaign about it and always when you have about the timing privileged school blah blah blah privilege shoot globe on. I'm just sitting there and i go. It's just not like that. Everyone most people that i went to school with their parents self made in not not sitting there from old money so i guess i'm curious what's this conversation that's happening in the uk. I think i think it's more around kind of very very exclusive southern schools like any and things like that and there was this idea that they should essentially be they. They currently have charitable status in eugene. They should have not charles day just taken away from them because they are exclusion. Which i agree with. They are exclusionary In many many ways lake thursday different standard of education rightly or wrongly and in more than i think about it the more. I think it's wrong but and what was really interesting in in that particular discussion is not. It's each side's is right in their own way because they very rarely cross over like people who go to private school a lot of them all of this approach of well if he didn't manage get in your parents can be folded and it's probably because if they didn't work enough like my parents did which i think is incorrect or they think that they called conceptualize the idea that actually some people do struggle so much to food on the table that the idea of being able to try and put aside money by sacrificing. Other things is inconceivable to them. And i think that's like that's really damaging because we discount the very valid concerns of people for him. Private education is never going to be an opportunity but then by the same token the people for whom private education has never been opportunity because they have narrowed live situation and because they way see the other people saying not being able to conceptualize all the idea that they have not issue. They think that everybody there is super rich. And they call the seems to be this middle ground. Always like you re the super rachel. Uc papu. as-yet will continue for the idea that some people aren't all super-rich super rich people can't conceive the idea that those people also in obviously they are like narrow people in the middle depending on the site sitting on. Say the you're very good or you very bad. There's nothing nothing in between. Yeah that's that's funny. I speaking of studies in creole of you did your high school at newcastle grammar school. Royal gramma grandma. Royal school program school done which school it okay michael batra at newcastle uni graduated probably around the same time as myself onerous that at each point doubly doubling in the school newspaper the university publication of sorts straight at the guy. You're into pay our focus on the northeast region. You've held various jobs in the marketing spices. A freelance copywriter radio. Tunnels all press focused before you go into the writing component of your career that deep running component of your career. What seems like the golden principles from that period. I was just. I'm i'm always interested in communicating lie. I think thoughts was interesting. One of the things that people often ask like. I teach chinese journalism at nicosia on very much home. Like home based homebody person. In the i haven't really i travel far from my work but i always come back and like i. I've never really left knee console. But i have you know as i enjoy. I can travel around. The journalists doff. By teaching the university which is hilarious wearing in my english literature stuff matisse journalism students and i often satan your job really is a journalist is to translate you take what often very complicated concepts from leading experts in the field. You know everything about tenuous job is to try and to understand enough of lot who blog it and explain it in a really comprehensible way to ordinary people. Some of you will have a passing knowledge of it. Some people have known eligible van and what we do as journalists is translated. So i think everything that i've done is not kind of translation thing whether it was the initial stuff. You mentioned that. I was like a research onless. An energy consultancy sounded like I worked at a company straight out. University like trade and north sea gas oil. Which is interesting may because here in the uk and also elsewhere around the world while everywhere. Shipment is this kind of energy price spike and the resulting crises. From it. As what i was doing that i was learning all about marketing. Market research understanding trade flows and liquefied natural gas and things like that and trying to translate not to coins in a way that they can understand teammate at a business decisions so the entrusting start. Journalism was doing as he said. It's like a university school little bit than in office job. My boss at a time like ride. Some of my report was like you right. Like you should for the economist. So i took is a challenge and tried writing for the economist. Kind of how. It will start it. It sounds like you'd love telling people how something is once you've consumed at a men digested it so to speak. That's that's your thing you'd like helping.

uk schultz newcastle grammar school Royal school program school michael batra white house iran Richard eugene charles rachel newcastle nicosia north sea
Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

Science Friction

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Lucy's Story, the Chimp, the Poet

"Today. It's lucy story though. Lucy isn't here. And if she was she would have spoken to you. In screeches squeaks and grunts and pant hoots. Now if you don't know what a parenthood is let me just say it goes a little bit like you all get one thought. I bled shimon radio. Look lucy the deed. Learn to use rudiments of american sign language. Isil as you'll hear she might have gestured to you. In simple single words or occasionally she put them into pairs and triplets like like luck kind of poetry and writing poetry. Since i was a kid. I think i write when we first poems in e three and had a primary school teacher who told me that it was okay and i thought oh the lead to write poetry. So i did. What was the pace of poetry about in grade three. It's not it was about walking through the bush and listening to kookaburras. And i rhymed the word bush with short i said walking through the bush listening to the store and i thought it was very profound. Doesn't hold up today. That you gotta start somewhere. Benjamin dodds powered by not primary schoolteacher by day and science. Fan boy big time. His latest book of verse is called airplane back banana blanket and it's inspired by one of the most curious social experiments of the twentieth century. On the tesha mitchell. And this is the story of a team called lucy. It's one from our archive one. That listeners really loved and warning. There are some sexual references in this program with starting in non sixty four when little. Lucy is just two days old cradling in her mob

Shimon Bush Lucy Benjamin Dodds Tesha Mitchell
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

"God my who's come home you inheritance over again and that's not a big party and everything and the brother. The older brother is spitting venomous blood of out right on the porch. She doesn't go to the potty sits on his own goes what the actual fuck. Oh my god. Wow and i remember hearing that story at school and begin. Yeah i'm totally on the side of the older brother. What a dodger. Wanka clearly does not how i wow and of course when you hear that story you will project any family issues you have with daddy issues mummy. She's onto that story on. You'll see it in a different way. When i was a kid. Failing that my dad didn't the date me enough. i mean. My dad was a teacher eating college. Right and i was unwell. I also willing students a great student and he wanted to connect with me through education and the education was all about trauma and tara. Because i had a primary school teacher who used to deny me toilet access when i was four just as she could fuck with my head until i was a very dysfunctional little six year old. Two years people should make on a very regular basis and my parents can protect it from that because they were in the early thirties and trying to juggle a massive and what she was doing it was child. Abuse would be allowed now. One thousand nine hundred four. So it was like was not very cool. My sons always coming home with either shit. His pants pissing his pants or traumatized in some other way by evil woman. By the time. I was six. I was terrified of breaking rules of getting things wrong of not being loved of not nine. I was doing everyone else seem to. And i had this incredible daydream welter escape into so i wouldn't have to be scandal the time which is where my My creativity comes from from that place so again as we look at all these terrible things that happened to children. The most amazing things can come from them. If we choose to accept what's happened to us and step into gratitude for exactly where we're standing now. Then we start to see the goods only then and we can let go and the ourselves for the first time maybe ever in this world. Who would you be if you always worrying about what other people thought you hot. The people on this planet have a clue because what other people think of them is essential to that livelihood wellbeing. Yeah for sure a people think of me. I love it when people love me. I love it when people think tank because usually they know very nice and they go away quite quickly bus themselves out of my reality completely and forever array. I win both ways. I think i had cad. If someone thinks. I'm presumptious or arrogant or the. I claims the secret. I lost a friend. And one of these comments was and we've been since you would like twelve. We haven't really been friends for about twenty years. But i didn't realize that until quite recently and i challenged him in our friendship and he's like we haven't been friends for ages. I just can't be friends with you. Many reasons one the addiction thing and he was just like a hurts to what she and yourself. I did lose a few friends over that period in my life. People who just couldn't see me coming into a goblin just caught me off. They don't wanna come back. That's okay. that's fine that they're making a choice. And i'm glad they're making the choice. That feels best for them and his posse comment. Was it pisses me off. When there are certain people around this question. Lots of them these days. I think he was talking about trump loving queued having conspiracy theorists in inverted commas because conspiracy. Theories was actually a phrase invented by the cia assassination in order to shutdown alternative via lock in the streets. Genius welcome them bosses again. I did take my hat off to ideas to these. I am very impressed with the intricacy of that. Five tastic horrible plan. Well dumb and also you have failed because when they locked us in our houses though people sentenced illness and discovered that the heart is a doorway to zero point groups. That's what kick start the ascension process globally but Do everything they do. Try takes over every single thing. That i do is gonna backfire. The already on the essential timeline and they know it this is just circumstances playing themselves out into the eventuality when love expands and expands Teaching from the institute of high consciousness until the darkness is so visceral and so hideous but also tiny as the love reaches out and tries to cover it. the hatred goes down. They wanna be cuddled. It'll kill the. And i love you and the dog just keeps up and falls into the light. Neutralizing it because this is still not true light. It's the bowl slight. It's the flip side of that coin of duality. Dog was on one side. You know these evil evil people simply the g. Realistic reflection at the spiritual people who produce around going well seriously like until everyone's of the world totally up a creek without a paddle. god cobley. I still eat meat. God you know the dot force's it just a reflection of that at the crystal relationship between the sexes and the mystics joins when a sexy dies. It's correspondent corresponding mystic dies. Because they are part of the same coin to bodies experiencing two sides of.

Wanka primary school teacher cia institute of high
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

07:50 min | 1 year ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Out of control and that she's reacting to that off, you know in as as Sarah green and I think that is terribly effective and it's doubly so because they're because she has about her this Persona off. So here's here's the thing. She's she's like my blue Peter presenter in the she's like the primary school teacher you love She's someone who you want to be your dog. Your big sister or whatever. She's she's kind of beautiful and she is reassuring and you see that in the relationship that she develops with the kids in the house. And what's so great about that or possibly so terrifying for the you know bite back audience is that they can then use that bath subvert it because here is someone who will make everything. All right. It's like don't you know don't know what I'll put you to bed. I'll hold your hand. She is the ultimate in and this is going to sound slightly critical but I I think it's clear that I love Sarah Green. So but it what what you're talking about is kind of glib somewhat banal TV presentation style and then you and then at the end you get the situation where it's not all right, it won't be all right because Sarah Green has has been dead. Pipes had got shut down the glory Hall. She's feelings exactly exactly so and and I think I think that is one of the things that that is really effective wage making this properly terrifying and I'm not going to put this in anywhere near the same context and I I will say I am I am seriously impressed with the BBC at getting their first. Okay, and and and maybe maybe there used to be I mean, we have a ton of this phone call it crap now, but you go back to this period of time if you go over to Asia Japan Taiwan, they used to have a lot of these panels shows where they would send a couple of people in to a house with thermal cameras and and then they'd have a group of people talking about it and watching what was happening and and and that was an early form of this month. That then crept over here and over there and I I wonder if there's a little inspiration in that but in 1998 and I was in nineteen ninety. I was much older than you were in 1992. I believe it was Fox television in the United States ran a program called alien abduction incident at Lake County and I happened to be watching that with a group of friends on a Friday or Saturday night. And I remember when it was but I had a group of friends over at my house and we watched this program and it was also a fake I shouldn't have to say that but I'm going to was also a made-up program. Apparently what had happened was that these filmmakers had made this sort of found footage story about alien abduction and whatever happened it was somebody liked it. Well enough money. That they remade the same footage perhaps with changes. I don't know with professional actors and then the producers took that program and framed it off with experts talking about it as if they had recovered this film so they had they had people who were paid to take, you know cut in and out of this footage so they weren't trying to make it look anything like that. They were saying this is what we got. And here's what we got and they were talking to and I'm see the air quotes real experts. They had people like Stanton Friedman who was a month relatively famous. UFO researcher are quotes who who were providing commentary on this program. Now what they had done with these experts think they had it some I think they had some names Skeptics if I recall as well. They didn't know what they're they were commenting on they were doing a generic interview where so they would be dead. You know Friedman movie talking about cattle mutilations and they would insert that after you'd sequence seen the sequence where there'd been some funny business with the cows and it made this seems so much more real that and there were absolutely no credits at the beginning. It just went right into this program. And you know, I had a group of friends some of them to believe this kind of nonsense and and fair number of us who do not and you still watching the program and it's like this is I mean, they didn't say this was fake. So I mean just can't possibly be real but that that's that little doubt in your mind that there's nothing that there has to be something that's nice and and it wasn't until you're watching the end wearing very very small type at the at the end, you know, not even in the first prominent place, but took We're down in the credits where they quickly listed the actors by you know actors and you're like, oh well, we're off the hook here, but it felt like a betrayal of Television. I agree you're watching this going boy. They did not they didn't give you any warning that this was a fake and by including real people I said Stan Friedman for four months for one. I'm sure of was part of it. Even though he's a crackpot just kind of cuz he wouldn't think that a crackpot would be involved that a True Believer would be involved in a box right? I mean not the last person that they'd want to be participating in something that's pulling the wool over people's eyes about the reality of or non reality of UFOs and so long. I I was I fully was expecting ghostwatch to be years after incident at Lake County, but it is not true. It's the reverse so long Kudos to the British for getting their first the BBC once again pioneering television. But yeah, so I mean I can almost almost peeling off before the kind of found footage phenomenon that yeah, which kicked off. Yeah. I think I think the producers of Blair Witch actually have said it goes porch was an influence on on them, which would not be surprising. I read somewhere that that was common but that the that the the producer said no, no, we hadn't actually we weren't off by it. So I don't know which is true. But definitely both stories are running around out there that they were they weren't but yeah, it's nice. I'm going to catch a couple things here that we're also tip-offs and and also during the course of the the program the during a bite back one song. The production people were talking about, you know, we gave you we gave you Clues during the course of the show. We we had things in there where you know, Michael Parkinson, like if this is bothering of this distressing, you know, if your kids are watching this right now turn the TV off and put them to bed, you know and things like that. They were supposed to I don't.

Stanton Friedman Sarah green producer Lake County BBC Peter primary school teacher Michael Parkinson Asia Japan Taiwan United States glory Hall Pipes researcher Fox Blair Witch
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

"So, you know what Kate had to say and just about the kind of the sense of promise and growth that these young people will have been through over the summer and obviously in the current climate thrown knocked down. It's really important that we create a forum for those voices to come through. Yes. We've got a curriculum to live to deliver but you know, the magic happens in the classroom that ephemeral stuff happens wage when we allow a bit of a tangent and we allow our people to kind of bring a bit of themselves to to whatever it is that we're learning about. Anyway, that was a big long tangent, but it's hard with him. So maybe you went with it or maybe went and grabbed another cutter the time for tangents, isn't it? I was just thinking about the mess and surfing I really don't miss being called it was cuz I thought Most of the time it was probably said less out of respect and more. I have not been able to be bothered to remember what my actual name was. I quite liked Miss. I quite liked it. I tell ya yeah, some people love it. Some people hate it don't know it's an interesting historical hangover actually isn't in the Miss Thing. I hadn't really fully thought about them until I I had a conversation with somebody about it that yeah you would you would not have carried on in teaching once you're a mrs. Would you back in the day? That's a very good point. Yeah, so you'd always been a mess. I would always have been a mess. It's funny actually how those those habits die hard because I've got several, you know among students who I'm still in touch with not just from a chi capacity from when I was back in secondary school. In fact one contacted me last Friday, which was my birthday. She contacted me back to me happy birthday and to let me know that she is now a teacher primary school teacher and and her opening was happy birthday Miss and then I'm seeing bracket in Brackets cheaper down..

primary school teacher Kate
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Regrets, I've Had a Few

Regrets, I've Had a Few

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Regrets, I've Had a Few

"They used to have these or County made competitions. And so my parents need to teach their would put us in for these, you know, you just perform in public. It's just a chance to perform in public and there's a little panel and they would write a certificate just about you. You know, it's just chance to perform wage matter what it was, you know, it would just have been very simple pieces and they even had I remember they had to sort of category for sight reading. Can you imagine sight-reading in age five? You know those things I don't think they kind of exist anymore on that level. It was an amazing time. I think I was that area was really good. Yeah, exactly exactly as you say the opportunities. Well, that kind of leads me to my next question cuz I've been asking this to various people. I had a teacher when I was about fourteen who was very inspirational English teacher and kind of provoked me a little bit off to the idea that possibly acting could be something that you could actually do. Do you do you have any teacher equivalent of that in your kind of younger years who inspired you or provoke? Well my primary school teacher. Mrs. Hawkins, I've still got through. Yeah, I mean again in primary schools, but she was amazing. She played piano she did so much music with us. We did end of your shows all the you know loads of different things and she had recorded classes taught classes. So, you know, it just means it was just a natural part of my everyday job. At school and at home, you know, so leading on from there. I mean it was just that's just what you did and she encouraged it and currently in us and my siblings and then Thursday when I was eleven, I went to the black Junior Royal Academy. So, you know like teachers up to that point and then from there. Yeah my teacher at the Academy again who are still in touch with Susan and nineties now and so a gig recently a couple of gigs recently was amazing cuz I have so many decades, you know, and then she just appeared. Yeah. She said, you know, I didn't pursue the classical side of things. I don't know my older sister sort of did all that actually went to the menu in school and but I went down near the Jazz route. Basically, I like making my own stuff up. I would like to get it learning someone else is Paces. Those are the people that in kind of like encouraged me because your parents weren't musical. Am I right musicians? My mom was a doctor. My dad was a teacher in fact a theater that page De venise of other education College he he was a big into Shakespeare and poetry and listen to a lot of music but they weren't musicians. So in terms of fact, he encouraged me again, like there was lots of we open churches here in West Sussex and you know any opportunity to go and listen to music so at the festival theater, although she just a festivities used to be a festival every year lots and lots of different artists would come through and the any performance we could go and see you know, they take on you know, theater music anything and what about when you were young or teenage years were you in bands? Did you play in a group of school or my brother and I not at school my brother and I used to play he had it he was in a band at school and we used to listen to em, like have you Hancock and you know Miles Davis all kinds of play Horace silver that album stand for my father, you know? Oh, yes. Yes..

primary school teacher Mrs. Hawkins black Junior Royal Academy Miles Davis Susan West Sussex Horace
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"His gig. Yeah, see this? Yeah. Film why he lost his gig because a parent complained about him like you know, the not molesting or something? God forbid, it's anything like that. Well, because our boy Sylvain scared their child. He was three years old and kindergarten there, okay, only scaring the kids. He has his body face and tongue covered in tattoos. And had the whites of his eyes surgically turned black. Now. Ah! That would scare me. Yeah, that's scary, that that's just fine with tattoos and all that, But that was okay. Clinical condition. That guy has Well, that's what I wanted to find that quote where he said Bob I'm a primary school teacher. I love my job, but said he said he started getting tattoos at the age of 27 when, while teaching at a private school in London, he had quote an existentialist crisis. It's hopeful the remedy was to tattoo your entire body and get your eyes turned. Ah, that's that's only like seven years ago. He is completely I'm sure you've seen pictures of me. I've seen that guy, the other ones that have it. But again, that's a clinical condition. Like when you like When you look in the mirror and you see You don't like the person you see. So you got to that body modification sort of thing. I don't know what it was didn't scream like a This guy's buttoned up and he's got his stuff together, and he's focused on teaching my well That's what I was going to say. I mean, when you say you had an existential crisis, and you've got your whole body tattooed and your eyes dyed black I don't necessarily know if I want you around my kid. Aye. He's dedicated to what he's doing. I lay like you said. I love my job. And he was saying, Why did they leave me alone? Let me do my thing. Quote. Maybe when they're adults, they'll be less racist unless homophobe HQ and more open minded. What does that have to do? The racist and homophobic is because he has tattoos, I guess accepting of people who look different. Getting tattoos is my passion. Sorry. Just that just doesn't match up with teaching kindergarten, well, planning other professions. I'm sure that would look as soon as the guy said he had a crisis, and it caused him to go off the rails. I think that disqualifies you right there. Correct from teaching little kids. Yes, it's not even watched the tattoos it is. There's something else going on there, right? Something else. That's inside the mind of that guy That isn't conducive to teaching. Why's it again? Kindergarten kids? Good lord, your noble mother for 56 years old tops. And they see a guy like that that is going to sit against ahead scare me exactly. Coming.

Sylvain primary school teacher London Bob I
Harrier 809: Britain's Legendary Jump Jet

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Harrier 809: Britain's Legendary Jump Jet

"Week's addition comes from the central London and we have a slightly different podcast to a usual technology and industry focus. I'm absolutely delighted to be joined by aviation author and historian. I think that's fair rolling white. Who's GonNa talk a little bit about his new book? Harrier eight hundred nine which comes out in. May End of April which looks back at the role of the partic- Harry in the Falklands War and sort of looks a little bit ahead as well. Rhode Island welcomes check six. Thanks very much understand you a bit of a Fan I am. I've been I've been listening to check six at home for as long as I've been listening to. Podcasts is one of the first I discovered and so Thrilled to be on it. That's great before we get to the nitty gritty of the book. I wonder if we could just ask how you go into this. I mean you navient engage. I'm absolutely aviation Geek and have been for as long as I can remember a as a kid. I remember flying into Wattisham. My Granny's house in Suffolk Going to ashes at Lake in. He's Mildenhall Duxford grew up in Cambridge. had a primary school teacher whose husband was working on the British Aerospace on the on the Tornado. And so I'd get sort of the tornado calendar and those things. Just you know made made by Hartley. So I've been an aviation geek as long as I can remember earned On the opportunity to kind of explore some of those things that captured imaginations a kid more latterly has been an absolute privilege and pleasure. Epic gave us a premise of the book focuses. Your Second Falcons will. Yes I sort of circled back to the Falklands war from Nazran space shuttle. Each book seems to be reaction to the one before. So Hey we're back on Rissoli British territory Obviously the Harriet to any British aviation fan is an iconic machine. And the folklore opposites. Its finest

Duxford Falcons British Aerospace Nazran London Rhode Island Wattisham Harry Hartley Primary School Teacher Suffolk Cambridge.
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"You Ain't it you're using and all these different parts of your bright and in the process you'll become very emotionally involved with all your senses as we something Nice Really Nice Spicer cancel the time we do papa name for drink. Yeah so I guess touching can. Hopefully this is inspired a few people listening and go. It sounds lovely. I particularly like the idea unconscious always rushing around places. We touched on earlier meditation. I've always tried really hard with the kids to try. I WanNa get them to just be a bit more present park that we walked through on the way to school every day and driving bonkers by getting excited about the different times of the year and the leaves and the flowers and we live by the see as well so the series looks different every day and try to be present but this is a way of of really doing now I suppose to another level so people swear to start suppose is it is it literally is certain times of the year that a better and is there a good place. You mentioned some of the species but I'm thinking this particular park I walk through. Is it pretty likely that there's always always something there. The is edible. Because it doesn't always feel so that it doesn't it shouldn't just be because it's edible that we slow down and look at it but I guess it's a good motivate us. Yeah Oh you do need a good thing and guest is definitely always going to be something that is edible power talking about where as and it's worth considering that the majority of our parks and open green spaces although there public access they all dissolved enough Property and therefore this is a big gray area here and byles often waved around dual all spoken about the way I view the lure. Is that if you you have access to apply. If you're allowed to be there you are allowed to forage there. Now that is reasonably debatable. Could coast is such a lot of conjecture on this topic but uh somebody like mushrooms for example. They're exempt from the theft act. I'd say so. You can't steal shrooms. By picking them theft the highways and countryside's three or four different acts and foraging tends to fall slightly between them. In airing this law you are allowed to forage impersonal years for fruit and fungi and flowers and anything above ground. Basically dig out the permission of the landowner. I've never been told to stop what I'm doing. I'm no blatant about. It doesn't mean I'm sneaking to the pot with my head toward show. It just means if I were to pick alighted stinging ants was OPEC alleged. I would pick a whole bloody failed of them or invite twenty I guess the shore and Cherries Power Cherries out parks folks. I actually pay cherry blossom because it is more plentiful and I think it's a lot more usable Lots and lots of chimpanzees who people foraging in oven on and not an environment. I think he got to exercise a bit common sense. You go to not be greedy. You've you have regard for what else is going on around you and and the ways other people might use a poke you go do a little bit of research into potential toxicity or pollutants ingesting forged foods or any new. Food is a good idea for anybody who might be Oma have other health concerns with a little bit of common sense is a really rewarding thing to do and it's totally safe with an absence Of those fit potentially deadly. But it's always crossing. The road is net perjury. So okay so if we've inspired some people to to at least make a start. Where should they start is a case of in Google is buying your book just just to get some basic knowledge so imagine in people are spread out around the country yet? The best thing I could do is go to the Association of forages website so about five. I'm six five years ago. I helped form a association of foraging teachers with a half dozen other people the anew around the country and we've now got about a hundred hundred and twenty national international members Nice Aspects of my heroes joint. That's Oh my God that's lovely so this people aren't Rodger Philips is written kind of UK Mushroom Bible and things that WHO's joined this eminent French Joined things it's been really really good. That is a good starting point for finding somebody who's running events that that would be good to join you. Could I mean there's a lot of books now they're all probably more foraging books with UK they were ever going the need but but things progress You could look at a website of somebody in your area. I'm in my Website is is a bit of a misnomer really because he's nets snapped before Beyond but nobody's GonNa Sach Coach and build. But I live in Dorset by Ron Events and also share and I slightly reluctantly guy back to London. Talks People lapatin nature which is not the reason I moved to the countryside But you know if you if you can think of people teaching foraging Fritzy. See much all around the U. K.. So it shouldn't be hard to find. Somebody says that's a really good way to the rudy. If you've got somebody who noses up and they say five is cow parsley not hemlock than the Benintendi why it's care policy no hemlock and they're gonNA explain certain some things that you can't get out of a book smells there you know it's really important. I think it's actually doing a scratch. And Sniff foraging go. But I don't know about Miami. I think anything that was scratch and sniff the smell of lemonade or strawberries. That's left things you'll be fine okay. What the Association Jason? You mentioned their website for that yes cool sociation of forages. Okay what are they okay. I'll put some links to your website. Yeah that'd be great as well so people can find. It will be a good good so humans of Hospitality Code at UK. You'll find the links on there. Thank you so much fascinating I just. Yeah Yeah it's mind-blowing feel simple. My Wife's a primary school teacher can't help but failed that somehow we should get this onto the curriculum and get kids. Doing it feels like unnatural way of bringing it back into the human race but at least you're doing it with the with the grownups and hopefully that will trigger down as well so yeah sometimes kids come. Come come on walks. Yeah Yeah I mean that Britain as far as pop anything close.

theft OPEC Association of forages Google UK primary school teacher Rodger Philips perjury Britain London Miami Jason Dorset Ron Events
20 Minutes With Brian Keane

20 Minute Fitness

07:12 min | 2 years ago

20 Minutes With Brian Keane

"So high Brian. Welcome to the show. Thank you very much for taking the time to speak to me today. How you doing? I'm doing amazing. Thank you so much for having. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. No aures thank you again brought. If you could start off just giving us an introduction to yourself yeah so my name is Brian ranking ranking fitness online. And I'm a former primary. School teacher turned fitness entrepreneur effectively. So to cut a long story short. I was a primary school teacher in London for four years and for two of those years I worked as a personal trainer nighttime walking in a gym with people looking to lose weight get fit or get stronger etc and then it's thousand fourteen. I moved back home him to the west of Ireland where I currently live and set up a one to one personal training business and then over the space of eighteen months two years of living full time at home in order to kind of match the supply and demand because of the amount of people that were coming to me for personal training. I moved my business online and over the last name. Since two thousand fifteen I've been primarily online with the exception of a couple of books books that I rise in the appearances that ideal person in terms of speaking everything else in the fitness ramble. My business is on line. Two programs one a sport specific the other is pure fitness Pacific. Civic and now I just spend my days talking to people like you and working with my online client doing some talks around the world that to kind of communicate with some awesome people. Yeah I've got a pretty awesome lifestyle per minute so long. No definitely greats ahead obviously as well with your podcast. That's another great resource for anyone that wants to find out more about what Bryant Definitely Chatham. We'll talk more about that throughout the podcast. First thing on the touchdown Brian McKnight's obviously you saw your other fitness industry as you said is a PT and did some fitness modeling now use of transitions since doing ultra endurance events. As well what's changed in your own way. You approach your fitness to not to want to make a massive lead so one of the things that I generally always advise people with fitness whether your couch to five K.. An absolute beginner. You've never step foot in the gym or ever done a workout or somebody. That's a near professional athlete or professional professional athletes and their life. If is training you always need to have a goal that you're setting in working towards and I'm the exact same with fitness and in two thousand and end fourteen. I started competing in fitness modeling. Embody I believe so stepping onstage and the end of two thousand fourteen I won a pro card fitness. Molly was basically just means that you can compete for more money and in two thousand and fifteen. I was preparing for the World Championships in Las Vegas and a few months prior to that my daughter was born and I remember having this moment where I was getting ready for a show. I couldn't form sentences in my head. Hey I'm so pleased and just hired all the time I remember thinking I'm going to be terrible dad if I keep doing this man. I made that decision there and then that I would do that show in Las Vegas and I did quite well that I came to the world's in Las Vegas and I decided I was stepping away. I needed to set a new fitness goal. This wasn't going to be my life anymore. It was too all consuming for me and and to be honest Charlie for the next eighteen months. I didn't really do anything in the fitness realm. I kind of trained a few days on and off. I always did something in the gym. High intensity interval training bodyweight workout aesthetics. You don't just Kinda messing around with it. But I didn't really have any serious fitness goals. Now I wrote my first book my first book. The fitness mindset which did really well that was sixteen weeks of the bestseller list on Amazon is an eighth consecutive weeks and wrote that in released in two thousand seventeen and after that point when I came off the back of the success of that book I was starting to get that little bit of a hollow auto feeling again Ronn like mine. I haven't set a goal for myself in ages. I haven't had any fitness school. Because I've been so focused on my business so focused on my family so focused on the book at the time and then I was at this event in Tony Robbins business mastery in Amsterdam and I met a friend who I've met a guy who sits become a close and personal friend totten's name and he ran what he told me about was ultra marathons and I had been from a world of played sports all my life football rugby soccer and I'd never heard of an ultra marathon marathons I like really ignorant the ass of the what an ultra marathon committee and he was like an over her marathon distance and he told me about this race in the Sahara called Maratha Saab which is marathon in the sand. It's six back to back marathons self sufficient through the Sahara desert in the north of Morocco and itself supported to carry all your food on your back to give you water checkpoints but evidence self sufficient. We need to have a venom pump within arms reach at all times so that your in case you get bitten by a snake armor. I'm telling you about this event. He did and I was like that sounds insane and planted the seat and I was like a couple of months later signed up for his having never random marathon having never ran and running when it's unfamiliar with the way I look. I'm fair from built like an marathon runner like I'm short and stock Yemeni harsh really built for Durance and I signed up in August two thousand seventeen and then decided that look. I need to start training for the marathon to solve in April of Twenty eight eighteen so I signed up to my first ever marathon there Dubai marathon in January two thousand eighteen Iran with a backpack in thirty five degrees and Dubai. By and from there on I just kept training in April around those six back to back marathons through the Sahara Avenue kind of got hooked and ultra endurance in February of this year around June thirty kilometers through the Arctic circle which was gold old. And now a minute. I'm currently trading for one hundred mile to marathon in Nevada in February. And so that's kind of a long story you've got a medium not long story. Short story brought to a kind of a medium to where I am. Now in the transition from bodybuilding fitness model into running ultra endurance events. Going to challenge my body in a different way then to be honest charity it. It all comes down just needed a goal to work towards because I train hired otherwise 'em and I recommend that to everybody. Listen it's relative like you don't have to run to the The Arctic for some people. It's just going to the gym twice going for a walk around the block after work. When you know you'll be tired or decided body weight program Monday Wednesday and Friday for the next three months? You know it's completely relative. What for me working towards a goal and not wanting Halloween into combat because? I'm not working any specific fitness goal. modest the distance is your Rhode Island oversee pre yourself in his positions blanket. Imagine it was just incredible when you actually accomplish them. Oh it's different. Especially to be honest. There was a huge difference between the first two between Maryland Assab because when Iran six back to back marathons in the Sahara. I'd never done anything like that before I ever marathon which was on the road in a few months earlier and I wasn't sure sure Charlie until I got to the finish line of the six back to back marathons if I was going to be able to finish like there's so many things that could have gone wrong. I was like I just didn't know the article slightly different. I knew I was going to finish that race. And it's probably a different story for different day but I tore my kidneys. Eighty six kilometers from the end of that race and the High A.. Different completely different relationship with pain. In 'cause I powered through for the eighty kilometers off three months after put I powered through honors. And what you get out of these events for me anyway like you just get this massive of net benefit your confidence grows. You feel like you can attack any obstacle comes your way you get really good at separating like real problems from perceived problems so like even in my everyday life in my business with my daughter with my family like I get very good between separating right. This isn't a rea- problem. This is an inconvenience. This can be fixed verses this is this is a real problem I e. There's something wrong with my daughter. There's something wrong with my mom. There's something wrong with the family. Member and ultra endurance gives me that. Because you're just doing that. On a micro basis. Yeah as I said you don't have to to do ultramarathons crazy events to get that people get it from different areas. But it's definitely something I've got. I've got a massive net benefit as a result of

Sahara Desert Las Vegas Brian Mcknight Charlie Dubai Primary School Teacher School Teacher Ireland Rhode Island Molly Bryant Morocco Iran Durance London Chatham Amazon Maryland Nevada
"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

"Coasting they don't say well to pet I studies fort. We found tiny tiny little element which we gave to describe two different in terms of predicting great complex potentially one point three percent of the difference but we found no difference when it comes to students actually being an tasting progressing at university. We can important thing to look I in terms of office and the policy Situation Refund ourselves saying so. What are we GONNA do? How much should we analyze how to make sure that we understand what we're doing with a piece of practice? Some politicians positions fun uncomfortable. This week the Wellcome Trust released a report on research culture in the UK based on a survey of four thousand researchers around the country. They find that two-thirds respondents had witnessed it's bullying and harassment with only a third feeding able to report such instance Jenny. Can you need us through this research. Yes I can reports not an easy one to read actually because it paints this. This picture of researchers actually highly dedicated professionals who very passionate about what they do but working in a culture that many of them believe is becoming Ming. Unsustainable is certainly plenty of evidence that it's causing harm so many of them as well and and actually it's very culture that threatens the thing that they value the most which which is their own research so I think understandably. It's been that that human cost that has been reported on the most but there's plenty in there as well abouts. What's you know is is this the way to continue? Is this actually going to harm the the research culture of UK universities time. Because there's there's evidence there as swell poor research practices on ethical practice actually being driven by this culture and Jimmy and the kind of the pressure that comes on researchers leading to the leading to discuss these problems. Yes it's partly that so there's quite a lot as well Further down the reporter about Just the way in which the funding seems to set up power imbalances and this can be mitigated by by good management and leadership but but isn't always done so so you'll you get researchers who are good producers. They get published in high impact journals and and they get the ground so they can become untouchable And so there's this an idea that they can get away with poor practice. They can get away with even actual misconduct but but can't be challenged. There's a culture in which they can't be challenged because they're the stars and then of course those researchers he will not being published or or getting the grants as much then become kind of lower status within within the institutions. So as quite a lot there about how this creates a toxic culture if not well managed seems to be choosing choosing academic research career. It's a tremendously hard path. I mean there's there's junior rung and can a weapon away up is so difficult so precarious and then you look at this this report and it basically says that the culture is completely broken on this on human level as well wonder why on earth anyone we'll get into in the first place it's true and at the very least it's just poor talent management so if you've got a workforce where I'm trying to find the statistics here at the very very few at the junior level and even the the mid career level feel that it's a long term viable profession to be in those this high levels and security tapie say you put that together with the level of stress. I think it was seventy percent feel stressed by work on a daily basis. It's just pulled talent management. It's hard to see how that could be sustainable. Long one I agree. I think it's a really important report this has been such. A spotlight shone on the very important issue. Things like undergraduate mental health which is another very important issue but the mental health research is equally important. And we haven't talked about it very much and I think we're so lucky to have the wellcome trust because they have two things they have good sense on this issue and a lot of money. They are themselves of funder so they come in themselves as they say in the report actually we lead from the front and encourage a change a change of behavior which I think is is fantastic and as I read the report I just kept on thinking. We like to think in higher education that our values is an art practices better than in other sectors but sometimes you know microcosm of wider society have exactly the same challenges and problems. But what I like most about the report was a has a really constructive set of proposals at the end. The things to do better. I mean there's lots of them but yeah. I think like more diversity on funding panels giving advice to the leaders of teams on how to manage diverse team having anonymous appraisals allowing allowing that to be impartial spaces where people can raise concerns. And that's the sort of practical suggestions that we need to hear and implement. I completely agree with that. I thought the recommendations were great and it was. It was very clear reading the report. How a lot of this stuff stems from Either stems from or can be influenced by management practice in an although so researchers seem to be quite positive about their immediate management. You drill into the data a little bit more and it's clear that those manages aren't doing just the basic things that make for good leaders says I mean good. Leadership is not being charismatic as A. It's being diligent about doing the right things. Having performance conversations giving feedback asking for feedback and and actually that seems to be something that can be that can be fixed whereas some of these wider issues about the way in which research is funded. I think an actually says in a report can lead to a sense of hopelessness. Ns about well this. This problem can't be fixed because it's just beyond me and it's beyond everyone so I thought they ended on a very positive note. Certainly it is always great when the police report has some tangible tangible and and kind of meaty recommendations that are also quite achievable. And I think it's totally right that you know. Just the kind of quality of of of work from welcome is is really outstanding and also welcome to make a more general points on that. which is you won't face the same challenge we do? I'm sometimes ask that why we are happy. Publish more papers. Written by Academics Higher Education Body were involved in the higher education policy debate and one of the frustrations I have in my role is is we sometimes some fantastic whiting from academics. Which are a brilliant ripping Paul to all of a problem but you know as a policy we need to know a positive alternative solution and sometimes in our own sector that is lacking and as you say the Wellcome Trust? I clearly very conscious of because I have a very effective list recommendations that back. I think we should always when we criticized government policy or criticize things going on in the sector. ACTA have a better alternative in our back pocket to the when someone else someone says what would you do instead. We can say this is what we would do instead now monkeys at. It's a ovarian ovarian. Debbie mcvitie. Exactly is a new shadow universities in science minister. We heard last week that Emma Hardy. MP Kingston upon Hull West and Hessel has been appointed as Labour's shadow minister for further and higher education. Replacing Gordon Marston. MP who lost his black pills plus seat in the one thousand nine hundred general election. We don't know whether hardy will retain the rule for more than a few months. You'd expect a new liberal leader to appoint a new shadow team but even before the new Labour leader is a nonstop April. Were expecting a few big policy. The events in higher education the response of the government to the HR see report on racial harassment. The Independent Review of the teaching excellence framework are not least the budget which were expecting acting at least some progress on the government's response to last year's order review potentially some new money for research as well and of course there's brexit there's always brexit. The party has a degree in politics from the University of repeal and a PG see from the University of Leeds before entering parliament in two thousand seventeen she worked as a primary school teacher undesired organizer for the National Union teachers since her election. Harvey's been a member of the House of Commons education committee where she's campaigned on. Special Education needs and disabilities. She's also a parliamentary. Private Secretary. To Labour leader countered at cure starmer Champion of gender equality. Her website promises that she'll use the rule to campaign in for increased funding for further.

Wellcome Trust harassment UK Emma Hardy Jenny House of Commons education com Jimmy reporter Independent Review University of Leeds Secretary Harvey University of repeal Debbie mcvitie Gordon Marston Kingston Paul primary school teacher National Union Hessel
"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

"Coasting they don't say well to pet I studies fort. We found tiny tiny little element which we gave to describe two different in terms of predicting great complex potentially one point three percent of the difference but we found no difference when it comes to students actually being an tasting progressing at university. We can important thing to look I in terms of office and the policy Situation Refund ourselves saying so. What are we GONNA do? How much should we analyze how to make sure that we understand what we're doing with a piece of practice? Some politicians positions fun uncomfortable. This week the Wellcome Trust released a report on research culture in the UK based on a survey of four thousand researchers around the country. They find that two-thirds respondents had witnessed it's bullying and harassment with only a third feeding able to report such instance Jenny. Can you need us through this research. Yes I can reports not an easy one to read actually because it paints this. This picture of researchers actually highly dedicated professionals who very passionate about what they do but working in a culture that many of them believe is becoming Ming. Unsustainable is certainly plenty of evidence that it's causing harm so many of them as well and and actually it's very culture that threatens the thing that they value the most which which is their own research so I think understandably. It's been that that human cost that has been reported on the most but there's plenty in there as well abouts. What's you know is is this the way to continue? Is this actually going to harm the the research culture of UK universities time. Because there's there's evidence there as swell poor research practices on ethical practice actually being driven by this culture and Jimmy and the kind of the pressure that comes on researchers leading to the leading to discuss these problems. Yes it's partly that so there's quite a lot as well Further down the reporter about Just the way in which the funding seems to set up power imbalances and this can be mitigated by by good management and leadership but but isn't always done so so you'll you get researchers who are good producers. They get published in high impact journals and and they get the ground so they can become untouchable And so there's this an idea that they can get away with poor practice. They can get away with even actual misconduct but but can't be challenged. There's a culture in which they can't be challenged because they're the stars and then of course those researchers he will not being published or or getting the grants as much then become kind of lower status within within the institutions. So as quite a lot there about how this creates a toxic culture if not well managed seems to be choosing choosing academic research career. It's a tremendously hard path. I mean there's there's junior rung and can a weapon away up is so difficult so precarious and then you look at this this report and it basically says that the culture is completely broken on this on human level as well wonder why on earth anyone we'll get into in the first place it's true and at the very least it's just poor talent management so if you've got a workforce where I'm trying to find the statistics here at the very very few at the junior level and even the the mid career level feel that it's a long term viable profession to be in those this high levels and security tapie say you put that together with the level of stress. I think it was seventy percent feel stressed by work on a daily basis. It's just pulled talent management. It's hard to see how that could be sustainable. Long one I agree. I think it's a really important report this has been such. A spotlight shone on the very important issue. Things like undergraduate mental health which is another very important issue but the mental health research is equally important. And we haven't talked about it very much and I think we're so lucky to have the wellcome trust because they have two things they have good sense on this issue and a lot of money. They are themselves of funder so they come in themselves as they say in the report actually we lead from the front and encourage a change a change of behavior which I think is is fantastic and as I read the report I just kept on thinking. We like to think in higher education that our values is an art practices better than in other sectors but sometimes you know microcosm of wider society have exactly the same challenges and problems. But what I like most about the report was a has a really constructive set of proposals at the end. The things to do better. I mean there's lots of them but yeah. I think like more diversity on funding panels giving advice to the leaders of teams on how to manage diverse team having anonymous appraisals allowing allowing that to be impartial spaces where people can raise concerns. And that's the sort of practical suggestions that we need to hear and implement. I completely agree with that. I thought the recommendations were great and it was. It was very clear reading the report. How a lot of this stuff stems from Either stems from or can be influenced by management practice in an although so researchers seem to be quite positive about their immediate management. You drill into the data a little bit more and it's clear that those manages aren't doing just the basic things that make for good leaders says I mean good. Leadership is not being charismatic as A. It's being diligent about doing the right things. Having performance conversations giving feedback asking for feedback and and actually that seems to be something that can be that can be fixed whereas some of these wider issues about the way in which research is funded. I think an actually says in a report can lead to a sense of hopelessness. Ns about well this. This problem can't be fixed because it's just beyond me and it's beyond everyone so I thought they ended on a very positive note. Certainly it is always great when the police report has some tangible tangible and and kind of meaty recommendations that are also quite achievable. And I think it's totally right that you know. Just the kind of quality of of of work from welcome is is really outstanding and also welcome to make a more general points on that. which is you won't face the same challenge we do? I'm sometimes ask that why we are happy. Publish more papers. Written by Academics Higher Education Body were involved in the higher education policy debate and one of the frustrations I have in my role is is we sometimes some fantastic whiting from academics. Which are a brilliant ripping Paul to all of a problem but you know as a policy we need to know a positive alternative solution and sometimes in our own sector that is lacking and as you say the Wellcome Trust? I clearly very conscious of because I have a very effective list recommendations that back. I think we should always when we criticized government policy or criticize things going on in the sector. ACTA have a better alternative in our back pocket to the when someone else someone says what would you do instead. We can say this is what we would do instead now monkeys at. It's a ovarian ovarian. Debbie mcvitie. Exactly is a new shadow universities in science minister. We heard last week that Emma Hardy. MP Kingston upon Hull West and Hessel has been appointed as Labour's shadow minister for further and higher education. Replacing Gordon Marston. MP who lost his black pills plus seat in the one thousand nine hundred general election. We don't know whether hardy will retain the rule for more than a few months. You'd expect a new liberal leader to appoint a new shadow team but even before the new Labour leader is a nonstop April. Were expecting a few big policy. The events in higher education the response of the government to the HR see report on racial harassment. The Independent Review of the teaching excellence framework are not least the budget which were expecting acting at least some progress on the government's response to last year's order review potentially some new money for research as well and of course there's brexit there's always brexit. The party has a degree in politics from the University of repeal and a PG see from the University of Leeds before entering parliament in two thousand seventeen she worked as a primary school teacher undesired organizer for the National Union teachers since her election. Harvey's been a member of the House of Commons education committee where she's campaigned on. Special Education needs and disabilities. She's also a parliamentary. Private Secretary. To Labour leader countered at cure starmer Champion of gender equality. Her website promises that she'll use the rule to campaign in for increased funding for further.

Wellcome Trust harassment UK Emma Hardy Jenny House of Commons education com Jimmy reporter Independent Review University of Leeds Secretary Harvey University of repeal Debbie mcvitie Gordon Marston Kingston Paul primary school teacher National Union Hessel
"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

08:24 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

"Coasting they don't say well to pet I studies fort. We found tiny tiny little element which we gave to describe two different in terms of predicting great complex potentially one point three percent of the difference but we found no difference when it comes to students actually being an tasting progressing at university. We can important thing to look I in terms of office and the policy Situation Refund ourselves saying so. What are we GONNA do? How much should we analyze how to make sure that we understand what we're doing with a piece of practice? Some politicians positions fun uncomfortable. This week the Wellcome Trust released a report on research culture in the UK based on a survey of four thousand researchers around the country. They find that two-thirds respondents had witnessed it's bullying and harassment with only a third feeding able to report such instance Jenny. Can you need us through this research. Yes I can reports not an easy one to read actually because it paints this. This picture of researchers actually highly dedicated professionals who very passionate about what they do but working in a culture that many of them believe is becoming Ming. Unsustainable is certainly plenty of evidence that it's causing harm so many of them as well and and actually it's very culture that threatens the thing that they value the most which which is their own research so I think understandably. It's been that that human cost that has been reported on the most but there's plenty in there as well abouts. What's you know is is this the way to continue? Is this actually going to harm the the research culture of UK universities time. Because there's there's evidence there as swell poor research practices on ethical practice actually being driven by this culture and Jimmy and the kind of the pressure that comes on researchers leading to the leading to discuss these problems. Yes it's partly that so there's quite a lot as well Further down the reporter about Just the way in which the funding seems to set up power imbalances and this can be mitigated by by good management and leadership but but isn't always done so so you'll you get researchers who are good producers. They get published in high impact journals and and they get the ground so they can become untouchable And so there's this an idea that they can get away with poor practice. They can get away with even actual misconduct but but can't be challenged. There's a culture in which they can't be challenged because they're the stars and then of course those researchers he will not being published or or getting the grants as much then become kind of lower status within within the institutions. So as quite a lot there about how this creates a toxic culture if not well managed seems to be choosing choosing academic research career. It's a tremendously hard path. I mean there's there's junior rung and can a weapon away up is so difficult so precarious and then you look at this this report and it basically says that the culture is completely broken on this on human level as well wonder why on earth anyone we'll get into in the first place it's true and at the very least it's just poor talent management so if you've got a workforce where I'm trying to find the statistics here at the very very few at the junior level and even the the mid career level feel that it's a long term viable profession to be in those this high levels and security tapie say you put that together with the level of stress. I think it was seventy percent feel stressed by work on a daily basis. It's just pulled talent management. It's hard to see how that could be sustainable. Long one I agree. I think it's a really important report this has been such. A spotlight shone on the very important issue. Things like undergraduate mental health which is another very important issue but the mental health research is equally important. And we haven't talked about it very much and I think we're so lucky to have the wellcome trust because they have two things they have good sense on this issue and a lot of money. They are themselves of funder so they come in themselves as they say in the report actually we lead from the front and encourage a change a change of behavior which I think is is fantastic and as I read the report I just kept on thinking. We like to think in higher education that our values is an art practices better than in other sectors but sometimes you know microcosm of wider society have exactly the same challenges and problems. But what I like most about the report was a has a really constructive set of proposals at the end. The things to do better. I mean there's lots of them but yeah. I think like more diversity on funding panels giving advice to the leaders of teams on how to manage diverse team having anonymous appraisals allowing allowing that to be impartial spaces where people can raise concerns. And that's the sort of practical suggestions that we need to hear and implement. I completely agree with that. I thought the recommendations were great and it was. It was very clear reading the report. How a lot of this stuff stems from Either stems from or can be influenced by management practice in an although so researchers seem to be quite positive about their immediate management. You drill into the data a little bit more and it's clear that those manages aren't doing just the basic things that make for good leaders says I mean good. Leadership is not being charismatic as A. It's being diligent about doing the right things. Having performance conversations giving feedback asking for feedback and and actually that seems to be something that can be that can be fixed whereas some of these wider issues about the way in which research is funded. I think an actually says in a report can lead to a sense of hopelessness. Ns about well this. This problem can't be fixed because it's just beyond me and it's beyond everyone so I thought they ended on a very positive note. Certainly it is always great when the police report has some tangible tangible and and kind of meaty recommendations that are also quite achievable. And I think it's totally right that you know. Just the kind of quality of of of work from welcome is is really outstanding and also welcome to make a more general points on that. which is you won't face the same challenge we do? I'm sometimes ask that why we are happy. Publish more papers. Written by Academics Higher Education Body were involved in the higher education policy debate and one of the frustrations I have in my role is is we sometimes some fantastic whiting from academics. Which are a brilliant ripping Paul to all of a problem but you know as a policy we need to know a positive alternative solution and sometimes in our own sector that is lacking and as you say the Wellcome Trust? I clearly very conscious of because I have a very effective list recommendations that back. I think we should always when we criticized government policy or criticize things going on in the sector. ACTA have a better alternative in our back pocket to the when someone else someone says what would you do instead. We can say this is what we would do instead now monkeys at. It's a ovarian ovarian. Debbie mcvitie. Exactly is a new shadow universities in science minister. We heard last week that Emma Hardy. MP Kingston upon Hull West and Hessel has been appointed as Labour's shadow minister for further and higher education. Replacing Gordon Marston. MP who lost his black pills plus seat in the one thousand nine hundred general election. We don't know whether hardy will retain the rule for more than a few months. You'd expect a new liberal leader to appoint a new shadow team but even before the new Labour leader is a nonstop April. Were expecting a few big policy. The events in higher education the response of the government to the HR see report on racial harassment. The Independent Review of the teaching excellence framework are not least the budget which were expecting acting at least some progress on the government's response to last year's order review potentially some new money for research as well and of course there's brexit there's always brexit. The party has a degree in politics from the University of repeal and a PG see from the University of Leeds before entering parliament in two thousand seventeen she worked as a primary school teacher undesired organizer for the National Union teachers since her election. Harvey's been a member of the House of Commons education committee where she's campaigned on. Special Education needs and disabilities. She's also a parliamentary. Private Secretary. To Labour leader countered at cure starmer Champion of gender equality. Her website promises that she'll use the rule to campaign in for increased funding for further.

Wellcome Trust harassment UK Emma Hardy Jenny House of Commons education com Jimmy reporter Independent Review University of Leeds Secretary Harvey University of repeal Debbie mcvitie Gordon Marston Kingston Paul primary school teacher National Union Hessel
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

Burn the Haystack

12:54 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Burn the Haystack

"Doc so good what would you say in your church. Then what are some of the whole marks. I guess that you say like here's some things that we've done directly because of the community around today mall for them rather than US say yeah I guess to to stop kick that off way. Not I'm doing it perfectly but what we're aiming to Aiming to make sure that that's what we can see that in everything Shed where really a work in progress in that lie and we're honest about that. We cited the people who are coming along saying. We haven't got this to get out yet. But this is what we're aiming to do so we're really keen on your feedback Because we're willing to change if it's not doing the right thing site and what I mean by doing the right thing is being genuinely genuinely meeting the community. That's cool even just not in itself is amazing that you're willing to accept feedback and change everything doing everything. Yeah so PAYPAL'S PEOPLE'S clarity. Maybe just for my clarity on. We probably already touched on this. But can you just describe to US exactly exactly what sort of what's your church environment that you work in. Now what's your Lard. What are you working with just so that people can get into the heads? This is what actually looks like instead. Scientists at the beginning of this transplant process flaws. I had two churches and also looking at fifty percent Churches one of them is Elizabeth. And that's is the mother church for this new church plot and as we've been working And trying to get things off the ground basically I had to sort of Trial lies lies without church at Elizabeth and invest in this church plot to then have the conference site high. What you're doing is good? I believe in that. Let's investment so I just this year I've given me a forty percent lighting to work in the plot and I've got a fifty cent lighting in the mother. Church these cool groups that are working to plot this new in like but they still connected with another chips the Minden mm-hmm and end site in essence. What we've done is we've FAKEST for about three years on connecting with the community building connections with them through different on through vandalism through Civis projects and things like that and and so what we just now. I think communities in the target area and in that community center Web Partnering With Adra Adr and we're having a community pantry or food pantry in there and was also a cafe and cafe on main cafe locker. Aw Legitimate cafe. Yeah I think that's important tonight because a lot of people when they think of church especially adventist Church cafe fight. I think of Milo in a Styrofoam Cup with a slice so it may be a bit controversial for some some papers boundaries but basically that's one of the is the spices that the community I really genuinely engage with. And so we've got both aspects signed community center We're also running lack of fishing club out of the And we're going to be running kids in the kitchen club. One of the needs identified in the community. But we haven't started the program is. I'm having like a homework club. The kids might maybe one or two afternoons a week because a lot of the kids are in very unstructured environments and I struggled to highway and site just creating a spice with I can uncommon. They can have support and people who invest in them. Help with if I let me tell you my. My wife is a primary school teacher and she could hear a year right now she would be like. Please bring this to pommy live. Make this one of the biggest struggles that she goes through as a teacher teaching years three and four is that her kids. She'll send homework time and the parents won't touch it. The parents don't care. The parents for the mice are really a lot of them are quite hands off when it comes to their kids education and you see that in the classroom time and time again. So I'm saying just hats off to you for that that's awesome so again like I said that's where can progress but that's identified laden with working towards that And I guess the other part out of that is for the last year we've been running What we call pop churches so we basically wanted to have a church service that connected with the community and made sense to the particular community wherein which is the Lowest Economic Community and site? We thought about it like we've got young young families we've got Louis Economic Community and waste Have some contacts and friends that often to the Gospel. That are a part of that. We sort of picked their brains a little bit about what I think about church. And what works for them and so we started good with that and the pop-up churches are research and development in essence with doing it and we signed with trying this and we go to save. I fall off the service. We invite our community friends to come along side with wanting to start a pitch for people who are the and also a place where you you would feel comfortable bringing your friends. So they not fully invested in his whole thing yet they kinda interested but they're not just thinking. This is a place for me but this is a place where I can bring my friends. This starting to think from Michigan Mindset themselves And you you tend to get more honest honest feedback then because when you thinking about what's important to you that can be a hard question to answer but when you're thinking about a place or a service that that would suit you're bringing your friend to it changes the dynamic of how you think about Then you start thinking about on a different level or what does that. What's that person like? And what would make sense to what wouldn't make sense to them that's been released. A path will end. We've run six of them the last year and basically had said lifeforms afterwards and sort of a little rundown on the structure that we've developed a couple of things is that young families We believe in having inter generational worship but sinologist tightly separating kids out from the families but often financial services away too long we have white too much crammed in the mice stuff. We do for us A- and things like that site. We met a commitment that our church services we go for fifty minutes. The other thing that we've done is we've put the same in the talk. We just talk at the very beginning. Because People's attention is is more fresh thin and kids work on our. I've got kids man and the longer it goes on the tide I get hungry. Get they get the more fair will get and say well. What wait founded trip? What we've found is that we could have them by friendly bling? Welcome is we could have the greatest worship program relevant And Great Food and everything goes super well well but we have a single mum bring kids and her kids are noisy and disruptive than it doesn't matter how well you did everything else else she's GonNa walk away from their thinking. I'm never coming back again. Not because I didn't enjoy it not because you went friendly but because I didn't feel comfortable with my kids and site if we can make that a minimize that as much as possible and create an environment where she's GonNa feel comfortable with kids for example who could be single dad. Then then it's Kinda hit everyone else will so there a couple of things and then we have a breakoff worship service. We have kids club named for the adults we sort of developed from sitting and rise to sitting round tables. What we ended up doing? Is We sit around. Tables have table discussion based based on the the salmon but it's all about minimizing barriers. So we have facilitators there but often when you see in a group like it's funny because we found with the people that we know in the community coming along and hearing speaker is less daunting and coming in sitting in an around title and having to chat that's hugely intimidating tables site. They're actually more often to coming in just just sitting in a service in hearing a speaker than they are coming like we think are everyone wants community. Everyone wants to sit around and chat. But it's daunting the time. So it's about minimizing those barriers and So one thing is that the fissile tide is not the expert the the questions that they ask. We make sure that they just read the question as on the PICA. Yeah the not an expert facilitator. That's all they're doing. We work really hot on the questions. Banks questions anyone can answer especially we want them to relate to lock but look at the topic But related back to real life that anyone could not to that question in share something. Everyone gets a sheet of paper as well so everyone has the questions. Because then you can read breakthrough in sort of prepare yourself rather than going. What could I know what's coming next if this bobble vases that the Bob this is recent down on the pace of pipe? Because there's a lot of people don't even have a Bob find that night until about side just minimizing a lot of those barriers paypal and we've had really positive feedback Discussion time has gone. SI- well That it's really hard to kind of get. Get them to stop. Yeah and people have really left the navy. Patients who come from the community office would be intimidating and we have good food and we have a drink since stuff that like a casual and relaxed inside. The whole thing is set up roundtables Sort of like a casual relaxed environment and one piece of feedback that we actually had that we didn't expect was We try to make the music as accessible in other worship. Music is accessible to people's possible. But wait we had a lot of They've from the community people is community. Said I never saying. And it's weird for me standing as we'd singing. I don't thank get that aspect will I don't even lock it and we were just totally surprised and blonde going. They thought about that before. Like what do we do that So what we what we do now. We just we've we moved more towards awards format where we can't make it more like a special awesome We run exactly the same so the people stand up the front and I did the song. We'll put words on the screen but we kinda cool at a special item but we say hi if unite the song and you WanNa sing along. You're welcome to people. Sit back and that way. It means that if you don't WanNA sing we it's not your sort of thing you title. They comfortable to back. And you probably going to get more out of uh-huh 'cause you're gonNA listen to the you can listen to it from a different aspect you're gonna read the words on the screen and maybe it will impact you rather than you thinking the whole Tom. This is really awkward. One standing and I don't sing like these other people's united side. That's fascinating I would think like for me. That's that's probably when I would start getting a bit precious like no but that's what we do. You know what I mean like. And that's the tradition in May coming out already but it looks like taking away something I love and the like obviously like I get a lot of meaning out of that it would be difficult. Oh I think like running a church where obviously it's no longer about you. It's.

US Elizabeth Bob Lowest Economic Community Louis Economic Community adventist Church vandalism primary school teacher Adra Adr Milo Michigan
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

Humans of Hospitality

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Humans of Hospitality

"I'm not knocking it at all because I think it's brilliant and I think that's such a step in the right direction but I feel even more strongly than that. I believe that that has to come from the government. I I think we do too much these days of doing things from the bottom up with enthusiastic people. The has got to be a government commitment. And it's urgent agent. It's as urgent as climate change. Nothing they go hand in hand in many ways and they've actually got to do something and I think the go-to prevailed on them now. I think you're right. I think just just lecturing and telling people to change their habits is isn't going to work you've gotta show them you gotTa make them believe you're gonNA make it real. Give them the experience experience. Yeah I'm Governor Primary School and my wife's a primary school teacher and you're right. Some people have a teaching gift. My Fiona can walk into a classroom and the kids kind of cup and respect. I walk into a classroom and agency human climbing frame and they run absolute riot so yeah even though my knowledge and passion is there for food. Yeah you need. You need good teachers good curriculum so I think what you could do. You could really write a great curriculum with your knowledge and the fact that you've managed to come up with a six week course. This is just ask you. One thing is what the teacher's voice. She got a certain Airports Authority. She's got aura. She's one of these teachers. She's one of these new teachers I would say or maybe maybe it's old school but she can walk into a car. She doesn't need to voice she can walk into a class and she can put up her hand and in a certain way she can even close her eyes and just go silent and kids will look over and they'll see her somehow standing at the front of the class with their eyes closed and a hand ended up and and this hush will appear in the class and then she will speak very softly and calmly to them and they were they censored you blows my mind how she does skill of being a teacher conference. I think if I'm in a room and I wonder tension people say sh- click the hands or history to know something and you say no need. Just leave it because it's a Chinese whispers if you stand silently for long enough now stock nudging each other and pointing eating at you and being quiet not I think. That's one of the skills that were saying of being a teacher is just knowing how to can this work people. It's incredible even an assembly to be a walk out in front of five hundred kids and they go quiet and listen to you. I think phenomenal. So yes we should celebrate teaching more and teachers and we should definitely get get kids cooking more and they want to find out more about your cookery school..

primary school teacher Fiona Governor Primary School Airports Authority six week
"primary school teacher" Discussed on Closure Optional

Closure Optional

09:10 min | 3 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on Closure Optional

"Fighters. So, you know, you just something special, and then we've kind of gone started pouring, sir, took it slowly high level of communication a lot of people in the room. And yeah, just kind of it was hilarious and funny and ridiculously. Like. To me. It looked hotter than it would actually. But at that point of time, you've kind of beat out all the nose and things like that. And you just riding the high. Wow. And then they were able to pull it out. And now you have a mold of the inside of your vagina. Yes. Which I loving lead aided to the owners of thirty three because we've videos of the removal of the molds, and you can literally hear the onus screaming. Oh my God. Oh my God. God sorry. I'm like, they they could a lot out of that. Phase. That's what you do something. Like that tonight. We get to maybe not wax tonight. I am doing two scenes. I'm topping with rope. And sensation. And I'm bottoming for I think wax, still halfway through the negotiation process on that. But will just be like basic kind of it's almost meditative for wax. Like, that's that's the easiest thing to get into. When you first start. It's just it's a lovely experience to connect with that person. And for them to take you on the kind of journey. Okay. And so a lot of this stuff that consent is arranged beforehand. So like, you said you said that tonight like almost like you were booked to do something. Yeah. That's interesting. See this is already how long out did you preplanned? Sorry. It depends on the individual if we've played together before or not. I- impetus usually play of two to three days out just kiss. If you bringing a quick -ment check in head space and everything that you do is kind of. With the caveat of if we're both good to go on sorry. It's the safety net. Just to kind of make sure that you feel safe and comfortable. Wow. This place is just absolutely my. Well, I'm gonna let you get back into the party lease go. Enjoy the party. Imagine that imagine getting your giant a-hole filled up with whacks like I've got a picture of it. So if you have a look at my website, and probably on the post to this thing, you fucking internet stuff social media stuff. You'll get to see the photo that I took of it. But it's your do you call it a caliber I can't remember what it's called. But when you go into get like your annual exam. They put this thing inside your Jonah that holds the whole open. So that the doctor can go in there and poke around and stuff and make sure that you don't have any diseases, and this so this mold that they did they stuck that thing in their opener whole right up, and then filled it up with wax and stuck a set of teeth in their little skull on top of it was a little skull candle. And then they lit the candle and fires I saw the photos of it because I met the girl that actually filled up this girl's Jonah with wax. I met her later on in the evening. It was exciting to say. The least exciting is maybe not quite the word. Just like I was getting a bit overwhelmed by just the pure imagery this, and then I went out into the hallway and saw the inside of this wax. It doesn't look particularly impressive. When you don't understand what it is. But then when you hear the story of how they came to be it's pretty fucking crazy. So let's get back to the party. I went back upstairs after I finish these interviews, and I could tell it was probably time to stop to in the interviews because I could just feel the general sense that the party was starting to kick off. It was definitely a lot more people around. There was people in every room milling about walking around. And when I went back upstairs at music was going. Everybody was starting to really kick off enjoy themselves. They were you walk up into the stairs region. There were people getting whipped in the general shackles area. It was a person bent over on one of the leather chairs ask just rife with red Mark. So they were getting whipped couple of girls making out on the floor in that general area. Look like they were kind of just finishing the scene that they just on with each other. And then the next room over there. Couple people being tied not on the stage just in a little private room. All of these rooms are open, though. So you can see into everything you walking past couple people getting tied and hung by ropes. And then the next. Room. Over was my worst nightmare was the old latex vac bed. Where people are getting sucked into this latex vacuum-sealed into it. My friend did tell me later that he was happy to vacuum. Seal me into the bed. If I wanted to later, but I. I didn't quite have the cart. It was way too. Over stimulated for me perhaps later on. If I go back to one of these things and have another conversation with these people to get more footage. I like how I throw that in there like, oh just to get more. If I go back, maybe I'll end up inside that bed. Maybe not who knows. Then we went around. I we me my self went around the corner to the last room upstairs, and this what they call the medical room. So this is where the needle stuff goes on. So as I was walking in their priestess came up to me. And she said, hey, if you're interested in looking at some medical stuff today. We've got some hard medical players here tonight. And they're about to do a scene if you'd like to have a look, and if when priest has tells me that somebody's about to do hard medical play. I know that it's she's not fucking around because she's the person that told me about so and people's Dicks together and stuff. So I know that she's about to get real in this room. I went in and met the ladies that were involved. And luckily, I had enough time to chat with them. But while they were getting set up, and they were happy for me to film, the things. So I will actually be able to show you what this look like for real with visual context. Holy shit. It took them about a half an hour to set up. So I was in there just chatting away with them. They were sterilizing the whole place laying down drop sheets for any blood sterilizing the girl's body that was about to get needles. Stuck into her? And then when they're finally ready. They got started and the top was like a middle aged lady. And she like like. Like a primary school teacher. You could imagine like that kind of person. She was really sweet she started putting needles through the girls cheek the girl had like a similar concept to the vagina calipers. But like a thing that locked onto her job that kept her mouth open, and she put twenty five eighteen gauge needles into this girl's cheeks from the outside in on either side of cheeks and then straight up through her bottom lip by the. This girl was so fucking tough. I I I've seen people cry because they got kicked in the leg. Like imagine having twenty-five needles push through your face, and this as she couldn't say anything because the thing was holding her mouth open. But they had prearranged signals that like this is. Okay. That's not. Okay, whatever and she had a phone in front of her that she could text into if she was needed to communicate anything, and it was pretty amazing to watch. I felt like I was watching. I felt similar to the way I feel like at a fight show. But just an a totally different dynamic like you have this person the top putting needles through someone's face. But she was kind of in the capacity of the way, our trainers are like you to the two of you together have committed to doing this really intense thing, and it's the trainer's job to get you through it. No matter what. And when you get in there, whatever's going on you feel like quitting. You feel like it's not a good idea. Whatever that trainer is has to have so much wear with all to assess where you're at and make sure that this is something that you should be continuing on with or to pull the pin and get the fuck outta their pull the pin. I don't know if that's the right term pull the plug. I don't know. So the trainer has to be watching her every movement. And so this top sitting there watching it. She's asking are every single time. The needle goes in are you? Okay. Is that? All right. How are we doing? She's watching her. She's telling her to breathe she's getting to slow down. Relax, her body because his girl has asked for this thing. To be done to her. And she knows this is the person that's going to give her what she wants. It was so intense.

Jonah primary school teacher three days
"primary school teacher" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

11:12 min | 3 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I like? Wow. These are not a cheap looking thing. They look today looked high-quality in everybody looked really good at I'm so thirty thousand of them away yesterday. That's crazy, medium and extra large. So pick. That's a old swing there. I remember they did that when they did the Star Wars the millennium falcon twins shirts last year for Star Wars night. They and people were I love when people complain about free stuff because I we we went that night, obviously because it Star Wars night, and we walk in. And this woman is just raising a holy terror over the fact that they didn't have Smalls and this poor. A teenager. It's a teenager with a box in front of them with the St. shirts. He doesn't he doesn't need this. He's probably making five dollars an hour. He's just handing out t shirts. And this woman is yelling at this team. This this twins, volunteer. Probably because they didn't have her exact size. And I'm like lady, this is free. This is this is a bonus. This isn't you're not really paying for this. This is this is an added. This is a courtesy thing. This is an added little gift and beside that point this teenager. It's not his decision. He's just handing you the t shirt. So take it take your medium, put it. And how about this lady? Take your medium, take it home. Put it in the washing machine. Then put it in the dryer, and shrink almost cost shrink the crap shrink the crap. Yeah. Then they're then boom, then you have a small how about how about them apples, shrink it though. Cheaper t shrink really easy so dry it until it looks like a prunes ask. If you want to just make it a little tapered in ticket to a Taylor seven dollars that t-shirt means that much to you tailor it take it. Take your free t shirts Taylor. The other freebie that I'm looking forward to or just seeing for the twins this year is that they're doing a series of four. Joe Mauer bobbleheads. Oh, they are isn't that cool. So there's four different games where they have Joe different parts of his career back in Crete Durham high school to a Twenty-one making his debut to being an MVP. And then his last game. So you can collect the four different bobbleheads. That's pretty tweets. All that's cool. I like that. I really liked that. I'm gonna miss Joey Joe, he was my he was my faith. He was so nice. When I threw out the first pitch a couple of years ago. I threw it to Joe. And I had no idea that that's what I was gonna. I know they never tell you. When you throw out the first pitch who you're going to be throwing it too. And I was already nervous for obvious reasons. 'cause I'm not an athlete and I don't throw right? I don't really throw baseballs on a daily basis, and I went out there. And you're standing on the field, and you're looking up, and you're like, wow, you're just kind of taken in by the domini be overly dramatic. But it really is kind of the majesty the majestic it's the the greenfield. And it was a beautiful sunny day that day. And I'm standing there thinking, okay, I'm never this is never going to happen again. So I'm gonna I'm gonna take this moment in and I'm also a little nervous because it's a big crowd. And and they're gonna put my puffy face on the Jumbotron and everyone's going to see my pitch. And then the the little assistant looks at me. And he goes, okay. I need you to go out to the mound turnaround. And then get in position. And you're going to be throwing to Joe Mauer. I thought are you kidding me? Like out of all the out of all the people that throwing to Joe, and I looked at them. I went out there. And he looked at me, and we know each other from charity events and stuff, and he he shook his head in a funny way mouth. What the hell are you doing here, and we just kinda giggled and? And then I didn't do a bad job. And he's just the nicest guy, he the sweetheart just a good just a good, man. Phil Jones wrote to us because he knows he knows everything. Now, Bethany Bethany Frankel doesn't know everything. Phil Jones knows everything. June twenty six is Star Wars night, this June twenty-sixth, if you if you would like that, which is it was really fun last year, really really fun. If you are a Star Wars fan people dress up you can't wear masks or anything, but you can wear t shirts and I wore ears. I wore my ears. So that's a Wednesday game. Okay. Cool. Is it an I o tonight. Yeah. It's a night game. Dawn has an incredible story of a woman that feels absolutely no pain. Saw this headline. I just I I saw it on the CBS evening news. What's the what's the deleo? She seventy one years old her name is Joe Cameron. And she has a rare genetic mutation that keeps her from feeling pain or anxiety. Oh, wow. The first time she notice it was when she gave birth. Everybody told her it was going to be really painful of the hours were on. Nothing. Bothered her even without an epidurals. She could feel that her body was changing. But it didn't hurt her. It's she likened it to a tickle. So she would tell other mothers that were getting a tickle tickle. She knew that things were changing. But she literally doesn't feel the pain. She said, don't worry. It's not as bad as people say it is. So that's she's telling other mothers who hadn't had yet. Oh my gosh. Then four decades later now. People now know that she has this mutation something else that happened is that she actually like ranch ran off the road and crashed her car didn't feel any pain or anxiety. That's the thing that I want. She she crashed her car and felt nothing. Yes. She didn't feel anything. She hasn't been able to experience pain her whole life. And this is a little bit dangerous because only way one time she burned her hand. I was just that was the example. I was I was going to say this is all finding good. But in a situation like I dunno like missing remember what MRs Doubtfire burner fake boobs. What if you can't feel? I was just gonna say the burn thing to know what not to do. She she knew she was being burned is he smelled her flesh. Oh boy. So she also reports that eating chill those super hot ghost peppers left. Only a pleasant glow in her mouth. Oh my gosh. She also anything going on she stinky feet. I mean, what's thing? Oh, yeah. What the hell the stinky feet? No pain you trying to give her another. Flex was. Should we really add something else? You're like really, stinky, arm pants or what? Woman has enough to bear. In some ways to live without pain. We do need pain for to recognize the good, you know, the non moments, but there is something about that. Like, a science wise. How does that work is it? I mean, it must be just the chemistry mutation or the they're studying her and trying to develop a something. Maybe that we could all once all in the future, not feel pain, especially from this woman taking her jeans figuring out what the mutation is. She even he she cannot recall ever feeling depressed or scared. She's very happy in. That's she's never anxious. She's never had any like she scores zero on ever feeling depressed scared or anxious. Wow. So she went from being a primary school teacher to working with people with severe mental disabilities because she doesn't get anxious then can calm them down. I guess I guess there would be some advantages, but is sucky as those feelings are part of the human experience, you know, emotionally is her life. What kind of conversations does she have? That's about the weather. Here's the here's whatever flaws. She's. She's prone to losing your keys and. She's never felt that adrenaline rush. That people talk about whenever she can't find something. All right. Maybe that's enough. You're right jas. He doesn't need feet or Alto says. Enough is enough to worry about that. We're really thinking about this for Nova think about I mean, you know, think about the horrible times of your life. I mean, and even not even horrible. Let's bump that up think about just bad times. Yeah. It's bad in the moment. But everything kind of teaches you something. And I I wouldn't all everything like all of those all of those circumstances shape who you are for the good usually for the good. I mean, there's there's usually something you can learn from even the worst of experiences. I wouldn't I wouldn't want to not feelings ID and feel the rush mean. Wow. That's one of the great things about being a human being. I don't know about you. Sometimes it's good. I like to feel melancholy I like to listen to a sad song. Live listen to the carpenters. There's some days I wish I didn't have to take the long road to feeling better healing or getting over something. But you're right. There is definitely value. Yeah. So I feel bad for in that way. So let's no stinky feet. Yeah. Maybe weird toenails. Feels know she has a hangnail or ingrown, it probably doesn't feel it. Then of course, not just keeps growing right through she'll be Ripley's believe it or not. Yeah. I remember that woman from that show. I love that show eight seventeen when we come back. Elizabeth Ries will be here with the dirt alert mytalk one zero seven one everything. What is it? Rings made up entertainment, Colleen and Bradley show. Did you just say there's three people here that would like to have sex. What? From a previous story when the guy was going to have an origin. At the days. We didn't know where those three people ended up. Here in the studio. Now, here's our second. Wow. Bringing you everything entertainment Colleen and Bradley on mytalk one zero seven one laugh along animal lovers. You have heard of us animal emergency and referral center of Minnesota. But do you know.

Joey Joe Joe Mauer Phil Jones Taylor Smalls t CBS Joe Cameron Colleen Bethany Bethany Frankel greenfield Crete Durham high school Elizabeth Ries Minnesota Bradley Ripley MRs Doubtfire Dawn MVP Rings
Woman feels no pain due to rare gene mutation, researchers say

Jason and Alexis

04:06 min | 3 years ago

Woman feels no pain due to rare gene mutation, researchers say

"Has an incredible story of a woman that feels absolutely no pain. I saw this headline. I just I and I saw it on the CBS evening news. What's the what's the deleo? She seventy one years old her name is Joe Cameron. And she has a rare genetic mutation that keeps her from feeling pain or anxiety. Oh, wow. The first time she notice it was when she gave birth. Everybody told her it was gonna be really painful, the hours were on nothing. Bothered her even without an EPA d'oro. She could feel that her body was changing. But it didn't hurt her. It's he likened it to a tickle. So she would tell other mothers that were getting better. Was like a tickle tickle? She knew that things were changing. But she literally doesn't feel the pain. She said, don't worry. It's not as bad as people say it is. So that's what she's telling other mothers who hadn't had. Oh my gosh. Then four decades later now people now know that she has this mutation something else that happened is that she actually like ranch ran off the road and crashed her car didn't feel any pain or anxiety. That's the thing that I want. She she crashed her car and felt nothing. Yes. She didn't feel anything. She hasn't been able to experience pain her whole life. And this is a little bit dangerous because the only way one time she burned her hand. Self. I was just that was the example. I was I was going to say this is all finding good. But in a situation like I dunno like missing remember when MRs Doubtfire burned or fake boobs. What if you can't feel I was just gonna say the burn thing? To know what not to do. She she knew she was being burned as she smelled her flesh. Oh boy. So she also reports that eating chill those super hot ghost peppers left. Only a pleasant glow in her mouth. Oh my gosh. She also. You have anything going on? Thank you feed. I mean, what's her thing? Oh you. What the hell the stinky feet? No pain trying to give her another. Flex was. Should we really add something else, you're like, really, stinky, arm pants or woman enough to bear? Some ways to live without pain. We do need paying for to recognize the good know the nonpaying moments. But there is something about that. Like, a science wise. How does that work is it? I mean, it must be just the chemistry mutation or the. They're studying her and trying to develop. Something maybe that we could all once in the future not feel pain, especially from this woman taking her jeans figuring out what the mutation is. She even she cannot recall ever feeling depressed or scared. She's very happy in. That's she's never anxious. She's never had any like she scores zero on ever feeling depressed scared or anxious. So she went from being a primary school teacher to working with people with severe mental disabilities because she doesn't get anxious and can calm them down. I I guess I guess there would be some advantages, but is sucky as those feelings are part of the human experience. You know emotionally is her life. What kind of conversations does she have? That's only about the weather. Here's one of her flaws. She's forgetful. She's prone to losing your keys, and she's never felt that adrenaline rush. That people talk about whenever she can't find

Mrs Doubtfire Joe Cameron CBS Primary School Teacher Seventy One Years Four Decades
"primary school teacher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"primary school teacher" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up these St.. The mom is called island. She's to be a primary school teacher said that she had real trouble. Finding a school place for her autistic, son. I don. Mister, Gatti's Minolta. No. We didn't know what autism was when Oprah was born sixteen years ago. Honeyball majority of the population. Still doesn't know what autism is and feel uncomfortable with their kids playing in the same environment is an autistic child chicken dating their kids might get hurt or they will copy their behavior. It's not easy. I had trouble communicating with him. He was refusing to talk, and then he would have a meltdown because of things he couldn't explain he would cry nonstop. So I'll portrayed quite a few schools, both mainstream and specialist, but none of them seem to be a good fit. Alpers better is suffer. He's h is older. And he did what he could to help. I was very involved to my brother's education. The event to some of the special therapies, and he is not interested in like there are lots of cards or or learning materials on the on the table. And he's not interested in a lot of town. At that time. I was nonverbal he has very hard time to learn some sort of cognitive skills, but then suffered notice at upper loved playing on his smartphone. I actually like very intuitive. He would like to use it. He wants to find a picture what we take like two months ago and show it to me, and I realized that if I can utilize that kind of concentration and capability that kind of life changer for him. So he gave his better A tablet and tried to find computer games for him to play. But couldn't find anything suitable. That was the moment. He decided to do something about it..

primary school teacher Minolta Oprah Mister Gatti sixteen years two months