18 Burst results for "Prevention Institute"

"prevention institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:55 min | 2 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Will participate and an intensive program before entering the classroom this fall. The months long program is the product of a partnership between teach for America, DFW And kept taxes. Public schools to train more than 350 new educators T F A D FW's Jessica Guthrie says it will also focus on providing teachers with the tools to make sure students are caught up on grade level coursework and to ensure higher star test results next year set them up with not only the foundations but to give them the skills necessary to continue growing and adapting. To adjust to whatever is going to come their way. Meanwhile, a federal grant will fund new curriculum for human trafficking prevention and Fort Worth School. The three year program will provide up to $600,000 annually to fund for or thighs, these curriculum aimed to teach students trafficking protective measures, warning signs how to report abuse and more. It's always been very important that especially now because of social media and way more connections, Tricia Tamayo with the District says, although it's tough to have these conversations Important for kids to understand the dangerous reality and are prepared CAT bones iron W B A P News. Longtime state Senator Jane Nelson has announced he will not seek re election next year. One of Nelson's legislative accomplishments in her almost 30 year career was when she was involved in a successful push for voters support for $3 billion of state bonds to create the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas. In 2019 voters approved the renewal of the institute and was given another $3 billion. Nelson is also a former teacher, and will be remembered for working for the return of physical education to public schools. Access business. Real time numbers on Wall Street, the Dow was down 348 points, NASDAQ Down seven points and the S and P. 500 down 25 points from the W B A P News desk. I'm Nicolo say you're an ex update is at 11 24 7 coverage at W b.

Tricia Tamayo Jessica Guthrie $3 billion 2019 25 points 348 points Nelson Fort Worth School Nicolo more than 350 new educators seven points NASDAQ W B A P News Cancer Research and Prevention next year DFW Senator Jane Nelson Wall Street One
"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:15 min | 2 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Fort Worth 74 in Dallas and 72 in Arlington. Okay. Now, as you remember, the governor said, I'm going to make you go back to work because the Democrats walked out. On the, uh, the regular session, but he didn't really say what's going to be coming up in the session that starts on Friday or Thursday. Well, but we all assumed it's going to be. You know the election? Well, yeah, that's why he That's why he's called in the special session that another things, but, uh, The the Democrats walked out on, uh, vote on the election bills, According to the Dallas Morning News. Democrats have set a list of discussion topics to House Speaker Dade Fallon. It also includes a request do not move any bills through the house until legislative branch funding is restored. Excuse me. Funding was vetoed by the governor and reaction of the Democratic walk out on the last day of the session, so we'll see almost three decades of service in the state Senate Republican Jane Nelson has announced he won't seek reelection next year. She was successful in a push for voters support of a $3 billion worth of state bonds to create the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas 2019 voters approved the renewal of that institute. She's a former teacher, and she worked hard to get the return of physical education back to public schools. Dallas police say they still don't have any suspects identified in the fourth of July shooting that left three people dead and two others injured. This was Sunday night around 11 o'clock during a holiday block party in the Hamilton Park neighborhood east of Central Expressway in south of 6 35. When police arrived, they found a vehicle riddled with bullet holes and shell casings littering the street. The Dallas Police Department says over 5000 disturbance calls for a gun shots, fireworks and loud music came in over the long holiday weekend. Debris from various types of fireworks were left at several city parks and business lots. Some residents said the loud noise was a problem Saturday and Sunday, and the noise didn't stop in some neighborhoods until five a.m. Monday morning. Tomorrow is July 7th. That is the fifth anniversary of the ambush that killed five Dallas police officers. And injured seven as well as two civilians. Dallas Councilwoman Carolyn King Arnold. Says the only way to move forward is to move as one Dallas. Not only is this a season of reflection as it relates to the challenges that we face, we also keep in mind. Officers who lost their lives during this period of time, and I want to make sure we never forget to honor the fallen officers. The Thanksgiving Square in downtown Dallas will feature a small display tomorrow in their memory. We will have a special edition of K L i. F Morning news. Tomorrow. It will bring you some of the sounds of that terrible day five years ago. We'll also talk with some of the people who were involved there one way or the other, either, you know, connected with the police department or reporters, or what have you? It was Scott Sittwe. Our producers first day on the job. That's right. Yeah, so he'll be joining us as well for Worth man has died after his car dropped into a ravine, the man's car filth. The man's car fell 30 ft before it hit the bottom Sunday. It happened around that evening on 2 87. Car rolling over and falling off the ramp and dropping then down the ravine. The man was pronounced dead at the scene. No word yet on what exactly caused the incident. Jay Dixon K l i. F news. Fort Worth, I s D is one of eight districts nationwide to receive a federal grant for curriculum aimed at preventing human trafficking for students. Grades four through 12. Tricia Tamayo, with the districts of the three year program will provide up to $600,000 a year teaching kids about trusted adults and what a trusted adult would really look like which huge older grades and kids to really pay attention to social media. And we also work with teachers and campus based mental health professionals teaching about the indicator. Haters project kicks off this summer with the citywide prevention campaign called Don't Get Tricked, which is displayed on public transportation and benches. Long holiday weekend is over Markets reopened today. Let's get the latest business update now from Net Worth Radio Spencer my gallon Investors.

Tricia Tamayo $3 billion Hamilton Park Thursday Friday Scott Sittwe Carolyn King Arnold five Arlington 30 ft Sunday Saturday five a.m. Monday morning Tomorrow Fort Worth Democrats Dallas three people tomorrow two civilians
"prevention institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:07 min | 2 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Com w b A P first traffic and weather on the ones 6 35 on the westbound sign around Skillman. Aw, Delia, that problem starting to keep things heavy. Looks like back toward about Garland Road. So do keep that in mind the one International Parkway north south, their field drive. Looks like it may have cleared up. Things are definitely moving better through that stretch. We do have a new rec reported. Now, this could be south side of Arlington is moving to Fort Worth 20 westbound right around Green notes. It looks like there's a wreck. That one is starting to stack things up just a little bit back towards Kelly Elliott. With W B A P first traffic on the ones I'm Monte Cook Classic Chevrolet. Relax, Enjoy the difference. Classic Chevrolet and Grapevine knows you like buying to be easy. That's why they created the classic pass online Buying to visit classic Chevrolet Com to get started find new roads enjoy. Meteorologist Brad Barton. In the W B A P Weather center. We're gonna have some a fairly routine weather for this time of year. Couple of degrees below normal as far as afternoon highs because of humidity and some cloud, but not much in the way of rain 91 for the high Today 75 for the low Tonight 92 to 93 tomorrow Thursday Friday and even Saturday highs will be in the lower nineties. We could see some isolated showers and storms any afternoon today through Friday, mostly a dry day on Friday and then better chance of rain by Sunday. Right now, W B A P 75 degrees news brought to you by Texas home improvements and new spray, a longtime Texas senator will not run for re election of Nelson's legislative accomplishments was the successful push for voter support of $3 billion in state bonds create the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas in 2000 and seven in Conjunction with cyclist and cancer survivor Lance Armstrong. In 2019. Voters supported the renewal of the institute, and it was given another three billion. The former teacher also worked for the return of physical education to public schools. Kim Lampkin is W B A P NEWS Texas House Democrats are calling for a public hearing on some controversial GOP backed election bills.

Kim Lampkin Lance Armstrong 2019 $3 billion Sunday Brad Barton 2000 Arlington three billion Friday Garland Road Skillman GOP Saturday Texas 93 Chevrolet Com Couple of degrees Kelly Elliott Nelson
"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:01 min | 2 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Of public service in the state, Senate, Republican Jane Nelson has announced he will not seek re election next year. One of now, since legislative accomplishments was When she was involved in 2007 with cyclist and cancer survivor Lance Armstrong in building, the Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas in 2019 voters approved the renewal of the institute. Nelson is a former teacher will be remembered for working for the return of his add to public schools. The controversial Republican led election security bill in Texas is expected to be reintroduced. During a special legislative session that will be in Thursday. Republican consultant Matt Mackowiak said that the issue has pressed Texas into the national spotlight. You're going to have massive protests are going to have celebrities coming in, you're gonna have all kinds of things. Pressure campaigns, probably some threats. That's that's how high the stakes are. I think Democrats see this bill as affecting future elections. I don't think Republicans see it that way. I really don't comments on W F A is inside Texas politics. Catalytic converter thefts becoming more frequent as thieves target the car part for the metal inside medals inside these catalytic converters. Are expensive. Right now they're high value. That's Dallas Police Department Detective Kevin Dancey, who told w F A. A. There have been 300 catalytic converter thefts in the past two months. Governor Greg Abbott recently signed a new law requiring a person to sell the part to a scrap yard to provide proof of where the middle came from. The bill goes into effect September 1st Dallas Police Department says more than 5000 disturbance calls came in over the holiday weekend. The calls were for gunshots, fireworks and loud music. Debris from various types of fireworks were left at several city parks and business parking lots. Some residents said the loud noise was a problem on Friday, Saturday and Sunday. The noise didn't stop in some places until five a.m. Monday morning, according to reports. Mickey Briggs, Calif. News Well, tomorrow the city of Dallas will honor and remember the five Dallas police officers who were ambushed by a gunman during a protest Five years ago. Dallas Councilwoman Carolyn King Arnold paid tribute to four D P D officers and one dart officer who lost their lives in line of duty that day, and I want to make sure We never forget Officer. Errands Officer Cro Officer Smith Officer Zamarripa, an officer, Brent Thompson. She says. In order for Dallas to move forward, the city must come together and unite as one federal grant will fund new curriculum for human trafficking prevention in Fort Worth School. The three year program will provide up to $600,000 annually to fund for, or thighs, his curriculum aimed to teach students trafficking protective measures, warning signs how to report abuse and more. It's always been very important, but especially now because of social media and way more connections. Tricia Tamayo with Strict says Although it's tough to have these conversations, it's important for kids to understand the dangerous reality and are prepared CAT bonds. Iron CALIF News Coming up at 6 17. Lieutenant colonel and the former chairman of the Texas Republican Party and former congressman Allen West that decided to run For governor of Texas. My understanding is that Mr West only problem with with Governor Abbott is that he's not conservative enough. And the governor is getting some heat from from Republicans who are saying Well, now he's now he's coming out and acting acting. Uh yeah, but during the pandemic, he really shut things down more than they would have like we'll talk with, uh we'll talk with Colonel West about that. Coming up in about seven minutes. 6 10 right now at K L. I f five years ago, Devastating news out of downtown Dallas, where 11 police officers have been shot. Entire city of Dallas is grieving, remembering and honoring those brave officers that war and continue.

Tricia Tamayo Matt Mackowiak Lance Armstrong 2007 Thursday 2019 Brent Thompson Texas Sunday tomorrow five a.m. Monday morning five Friday 11 police officers Carolyn King Arnold Kevin Dancey Nelson Democrats Senate Allen West
"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:17 min | 2 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Cancer Research and Prevention Institute of Texas in 2019 voters approved the renewal of the institute and it was given another $3 billion. She's a former teacher and will be remembered for working for the return of fizz add to public schools. Well ahead of the state legislative special sessions that starts Thursday in Austin, Texas. House Democrats have asked for public hearings on election bids, according to the Dallas Morning News. Democrats sent a list of discussion topics to House Speaker Dade Phallic failing but also includes a request do not move any bills through the house until legislative branch funding is restored. That funding was vetoed by Governor Abbott in reaction to the Democratic walk out on the last day of the session in opposition opposition of election security legislation. Dallas police say they don't have any suspects identified yet in the fourth of July shooting that left three dead and two others injured. Happened Sunday night around 11 during a holiday block party in the Hamilton Park neighborhood east of Central Expressway and south of 6 35 kind of near the high five. When police arrived, they found a vehicle riddled with bullet holes and shell casings littered the street. Dallas police say more than 5000 disturbance calls for gunshots, Fireworks and loud music came in over the holiday weekend debris from various types of fireworks or left it city parks and business parking lots. Some residents said the loud noise was a problem on Friday, Saturday and Sunday Noise didn't stop in some neighborhoods until five o'clock Monday morning. Well tomorrow. July 7th marks the fifth year anniversary of the tragic ambush that killed five Dallas police officers and injured seven as well as two civilians. Dallas Councilwoman Carolyn King Arnold says the only way to move forward is to move as one Dallas. Not only is this a season of reflection As it relates to the challenges that we face. We also keep in mind the officers who lost their lives during this period of time, and I want to make sure we never forget. To honor the fallen officers. The Thanksgiving Square in downtown Dallas will feature a small display tomorrow in the officers memories and we have a special show that we set up for you tomorrow with a number of guests. To commemorate the fifth year anniversary Dart police will honor officer Brent Thompson, who became the first dart officer to die in the line of duty. This is our acting dark chief Ed Addison. The pain is still there. It's just time gives you basically the tools to deal with it a lot easier. And what we're trying to do. In this five year anniversary is just remember the lives that were lost, he said. The ceremony will be private. Thompson was killed along with Fort Dallas police officers five years ago. Tomorrow, coming up on K L. I, F and R Cliff notes will continue tracking Elsa, which is getting closer and closer to the Florida Keys as we speak. The search and rescue efforts in South Florida have grown even more urgent right now, and we'll update you on that, and there's been a huge chicken recall that you need to know about. You may have some of it in your freezer. And more coming up in our cliff. Notes. Kelly of News time is 5 10 Dallas Fort.

Ed Addison South Florida Brent Thompson 2019 $3 billion Florida Keys Thursday Thompson Friday July 7th Carolyn King Arnold two civilians Tomorrow Democrats Saturday Sunday fifth year tomorrow seven five years ago
"prevention institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:23 min | 9 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Scott Simon is off today. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer. We're learning more about the Christmas Day explosion in Nashville and we'll have the latest in a few minutes. Also the new strain of the Corona virus and the continuing vaccine roll out first. Though more chaos from a chaotic president, President Trump is throwing into doubt badly needed pandemic aid, and he's flirting with a government shutdown. He's also raining clemency down on his associates, whether they're remorseful or not. For more on that. Let's turn to Ron Elving, NPR senior Washington editor and correspondent. Morning, Ron. Good to be with you, Sasha Ron. Let's start with that curveball that the president through into the code relief package. We know why. He said. He has done it. Do you think there are additional motivations? It's called a combination of political impulses and personal grievances. The president seems especially obsessed with those personal grievances in his last weeks in office, he probably does want the bill to give people more money upfront. He's eager to be associated with that payout. Remember when the first stimulus was passed last spring, and he got his name on every check that went out. But on top of that, there's his bitter resentment that more Republicans, they're not joining his campaign to overturn the election results. He's going after his party's leaders almost every day on Twitter, and he sees the whole situation is disrespectful of him as leader of the party and the things that some things he says he's upset within this bill Money for believes for the Kennedy Center for the Smithsonian, they mainly involved budget request from his own administration. But do you think Ron that his main argument, which is that Americans need more aid than Congress is providing Actually resonates with the general public. And if it does, why does Congress seemingly going so small? You make a good point about those side issues the lesser budget items, some of them are actually smaller amounts than his own budget, had asked for back last February and March. But on the $2000, of course, people would rather have 2000 and 600. And for some Americans, the difference is critical. Millions of Americans are seeing their unemployment benefits expire today. December 26th in the midst of this pandemic winner. So you saw the Democrats in Congress. Glad to embrace that $2000 number Last week, They held an immediate vote in the House. But that boat was blocked by Republicans. And it's no secret that many Republicans in both house and Senate don't think we need another relief bill at all. Or at least that we don't need any stimulus checks to individuals. So the $600 was a compromise. Sasha, it was go small or no checks it all wrong on the clemency that Donald Trump is giving out. There's no question he has the power to grant pardons to people convicted of federal crimes or to commute sentences, but give us a sense of whether Trump's clemency decisions stand out. They stand out because so many other people benefiting have personal or political ties directly to the president. There. Typically people who got in trouble working for Trump either as president or as a candidate in 2016. And then more broadly, Ron, What do your thoughts on whether presidents should have this kind of clemency power? This has been called the single most absolute power that the framers of the Constitution permitted the president, they were adopting what was seen as a benevolent aspect of the king's power in the English monarchy. Means for the king to show mercy or solve disputes or less intentions in the country, and not as a deck of get out of free get out of jail free cards for the president's palace. It seems out of date in our time. Precisely because it violates the idea of checks and balances. It's just an absolute power. And that is just an invitation for abuse. That's NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Ron. Thank you. Thank you so much. Starting Monday. People flying to the United States from the United Kingdom will have to prove they are not infected with the coronavirus before they can board their flight. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention instituted this requirement because a new and potentially more infectious strain of the virus is now circulating widely in the UK. CDC hopes this move will keep the strain out of the U. S. Joining us now to talk about this development is NPR's science correspondent Joe Parka. And Joe Would you tell us whether screening airline passengers is likely to keep the new virus strain out of the U. S? Well, I mean, that's the hope it's a way of stopping the virus from coming into the country of But there is a chance it's already here, in which case this is closing the barn door after the horse has left, so it's a step they can take its. There's not a lot of other steps that are available, Angela. Very basic science question. Remind us why new strains of the virus show up. Well, viruses are changing all the time. I mean, every time a virus replicates inside of you, it has to pass on his genetic material. And every time it does that errors crop up and most of the time these errors don't make any difference in the way the virus acts when it gets inside you, But sometimes there are changes in peace of the virus that could actually make a difference. And that seems to be what happened here. There's a change in a part of the virus that codes for the spike protein, which is the protein that allows the virus toe enter cells. And so that's why it's concerning The scientists know yet how big of a problem this new strain is likely to pose. No, I mean, it appears to be more infectious. It doesn't appear to be more dangerous in the sense that doesn't seem to be making people sicker. But if this parent infectiousness holds up, it's going to reinforce the message of mask wearing hand washing and keeping distance because those are the only things we have in. In addition to the Vaccine that will prevent people from getting it. But meanwhile, the covert 19 vaccine is being administered. People are getting shots. So will the vaccines being rolled out now? Protect people from this new strain? Well again. It's unclear. I've seen people from by on techs say yes, it'll protect, but they also say In order to say for sure We're going to need to do some testing, so I think it's ah fingers crossed at the moment. I mean, the good news is that vaccines like the one Moderna and Fizer have made are relatively easy to Week, and so if it turns out to be necessary, they could actually change the vaccine, so it works better against the new strain. In terms of where we are on the vaccine landscape, which ones are further so long in development, and when might they become available that the ones that are still being researched and working on it lives?.

president Sasha Ron President Trump NPR Ron Elving Congress Washington Sasha Pfeiffer Scott Simon editor CDC Senate Twitter Nashville Sasha Joe Parka United States Fizer
"prevention institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:19 min | 9 months ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Christmas Day explosion in Nashville and we'll have the latest in a few minutes. Also the new strain of the Corona virus and the continuing vaccine roll out first, though more chaos from a chaotic president. President Trump is throwing into doubt badly needed pandemic aid, and he's flirting with a government shutdown. He's also raining clemency down on his associates, whether they're remorseful or not, For more on that. Let's turn to Ron Elving, NPR senior Washington editor and correspondent. Morning, Ron Good to be with you, Sasha. Ron. Let's start with that curveball that the president through into the covert relief package. We know why. He said he has done it. Do you think there are additional motivations? It's called a combination of political impulses and personal grievances. The president seems especially obsessed with those personal grievances in his last weeks in office, he probably does want the bill to give people more money upfront. He's eager to be associated with that payout. Remember when the first stimulus was passed last spring, and he got his name on every check that went out. But on top of that, there's his bitter resentment that more Republicans, they're not joining his campaign to overturn the election results. He's going after his party's leaders almost every day on Twitter, and he sees the whole situation is disrespectful of him as leader of the party and the things that some things he says he's upset within this bill Money for believes for the Kennedy Center for the Smithsonian, they mainly involved budget request from his own administration. But do you think Ron that his main argument, which is that Americans need more aid than Congress is providing Actually resonates with the general public. And if it does, why does Congress seemingly going so small? You make a good point about those side issues the lesser budget items, some of them are actually smaller amounts than his own budget, had asked for back last February and March, but on the $2000 Of course, people would rather have 2000 and 600. For some Americans, the difference is critical. Millions of Americans are seeing their unemployment benefits expire today. December 26th in the midst of this pandemic winner. So you saw the Democrats in Congress. Glad to embrace that $2000 number Last week, They held an immediate vote in the House. But that boat was blocked by Republicans. And it's no secret that many Republicans in both house and Senate don't think we need another relief bill at all. Or at least that we don't need any stimulus checks to individuals. So the $600 was a compromise. Sasha, it was go small or no checks it all wrong on the clemency that Donald Trump is giving out. There's no question he has the power to grant pardons to people convicted of federal crimes or to commute sentences, but give us a sense of whether Trump's clemency decisions stand out. They stand out because so many of the people benefiting have personal or political ties directly to the president. There. Typically people who got in trouble working for Trump either as president or as a candidate in 2016. And then more broadly wrong. What do your thoughts on whether presidents should have this kind of clemency power? This has been called the single most absolute power that the framers of the Constitution permitted the president, they were adopting what was seen as a benevolent aspect of the king's power in the English monarchy. Means for the kingdom show mercy or solve disputes or less intentions in the country, and not as a deck of get out of free get out of jail free cards for the president's palace. It seems out of date in our time. Precisely because it violates the idea of checks and balances. It's just an absolute power. And that is just an invitation for abuse. That's NPR's senior Washington editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Ron. Thank you. Thank you Suction. Starting Monday. People flying to the United States from the United Kingdom will have to prove they are not infected with the coronavirus before they can board their flight. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention instituted this requirement because a new and potentially more infectious strain of the virus is now circulating widely in the UK. The CDC hopes this move will keep the strain out of the U. S. Joining us now to talk about this development is NPR's science correspondent Joe Parka. And Joe Would you tell us whether screening airline passengers is likely to keep the new virus strain out of the U. S. Well, I mean, that's the hope. It's a way of stopping the virus from coming into the country of but there is a chance it's already here, in which case this is closing the barn door after the horses left, so it's a step they can take its. There's not a lot of other steps that are available. Angela. Very basic science question. Remind us why new strains of the virus show up. Well, viruses are changing all the time. I mean, every time a virus replicates inside of you, it has to pass on his genetic material, and every time it does that errors crop up. And most of the time. These errors don't make any difference in the way the virus acts when it gets inside you, But sometimes there are changes in peace of the virus that could actually make a difference. And that seems to be what happened here. There's a change in a part of the virus that codes for the spike protein, which is the protein that allows the virus toe enter cells. And so that's why it's concerning The scientists know yet how big of a problem this new strain is likely to pose. No, I mean, it appears to be more infectious. It doesn't appear to be more dangerous in the sense that doesn't seem to be making people sicker. But if this apparent infectiousness holds up, it's going to reinforce the message of mask wearing hand washing and keeping distance because those are the only things we have in. In addition to the Vaccine that will prevent people from getting it. But meanwhile, the covert 19 vaccine is being administered. People are getting shots. So will the vaccines being rolled out now? Protect people from this new strain? Well again. It's unclear. I've seen people from by on techs say yes, it'll protect, but they also say In order to say for sure we're going to need to do some testing, so I think it's ah Fingers crossed that the moment I mean, the good news is that vaccines like the one Moderna and Fizer have made are relatively easy to Week. And so if it turns out to be necessary, they could actually change the vaccine. So it works better against the new strain in terms of where we are on the vaccine landscape, which ones are further so long in development, And when might they become available that the ones that are still being researched and working on it loves?.

president President Trump Ron NPR Ron Elving Congress Sasha Ron Good Washington CDC editor Senate Twitter Nashville Joe Parka United States Fizer United Kingdom
"prevention institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"School in central Massachusetts for students from pre kindergarten to great swell register for their virtual open house on October 29th visit. Bancroft school dot org's slashed Open Customers have been known to get a bit rowdy during the holiday shopping season. But this year, store owners say there is a different level of concern. CBS's Lisa Matteo explains. Retail workers are trained to know how to deescalate shopper disputes. But during the pandemic, there are a few more aspects to consider. The National Retail Federation says it has teamed up with the Crisis Prevention Institute to help employees learn how to deal with customers who refused to wear a mask, practice social distancing and understand store capacity limits. Oh, Graham includes topics such as verbal and nonverbal communication and how to present the shopper with options to make them still feel in control least. MATTEO CBS News For many, the pandemic has taken a hit on the social scene, but a couple of college kids are trying to change that by putting their knowledge to good use. CBS NEWS. Debra Rodriguez has the story after Jordan gold swag in Sam Brickman were sent home from Cornell at the start of the pandemic. They used their computer science smarts to come up with quarantine buddy. Jordan says people fell out their personal information on the website and exactly what they're looking for. Then you're going this matching algorithm that matches them together based on their similarities, and then we introduced them to each other so that they could get to know each other and continued elderly since New York Governor Cuomo mentioned it in a daily briefing in April. Quarantine Buddy has helped 50,000 people in all 50 states and more than 100 countries happen on a video chat. And just having some basic human connection really doesn't friends Deborah Rodrigue yet CBS News A big guest host for next week's episode of Saturday night Life singer Adele is the host for the October 24th line up. The show made that announcement on Twitter. She will be joined by her is a musical guest. The episode will likely draw concept from the 2020 presidential debate. The last one, which comes just two days before the show airs Right now it is 5 57 coming up at six o'clock. We've got our top stories, including Two dueling rallies in downtown Boston this afternoon. And then it is food for thought. Facebook knows that voting this year is.

"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

First of All

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

"Was. It was like this is what I WANNA do this. Would you know what to do and? Yet at the rest is history. That's. I mean. I'm very I've just having a moment just reflecting on How are passing cross? You know in in these ways enlightening, bring Larry and stuff, and like all the craziness of life in Prevention Institute essentially couple years older than you by essentially babies like really working on a on a very big trajectory that we had no idea what was about to happen, but it's I feel really I don't mean it patronizing me just so proud of you. That's audible and. It's not a small undertaking I mean like. Any any endeavor, especially dream because there's a lot of layers to that because I think be these big visions that we can have, I can feel very like. Larger than life, but like you actually went out and did it so i. just really proud of you. That's amazing and I. Think for me. I feel a certain level of. Enlightenment, just having been around like my brother right learning about the legal system learning about literally just learning how things work right and part of the reason why unite connected because we're in this really crazy time with the black lives matter movement with with you know our our shared passion for Social Justice in general, which is what brought us to cross paths in. All those years ago, but I think you know. This is not to disparage anybody or to talk down. It's just like I'm just as a grown woman. I'm learning more and more every day. How much I don't know about. What I don't know you know there's. So many systems. That operate in this in these different universes that I have not enough knowledge about right, and it only becomes relevant at certain times, and then you're just like oh my. God, I had no idea. It works this way I say that about lots of different things that are now hopefully going to be put into work that I can write make films and write stories about, but right now. Just this Mona reflection. I think there's a lot of awakening happening to. Social Justice, is a mole. The systems the broken system. What if that's you know? Someone's perspective is my perspective. the the groundwork was laid to build system how they were unlike. Is Ju- I just feel like I'm learning something every frigging day. It's a bit overwhelming, but what brought us together to like? Talk about this was to see. A lot of the universe that were currently living in where there's a lot of feelings in a lot of like you just mentioned at the top of the episode Trauma but to see it through your lens into understand. The complexities like honestly let's just like Star I. WanNa Learn. I mean right now I want to keep that mode forever I. WanNa learn and understand, and I feel like what better way than to understand from the source from the person that's in the courtroom. That's dealing with you know defendants right like. How can you just okay just treat me like I'm a five year old? Because I think that's the best have to go about this conversation. Well I Exist. Who Am I quiet? So, You know the the constitution. guarantees all. Access to counsel you know, and it's A. It started I forget. The year was longtime ago. Like fifty I should know this people are going to be ashamed of me. Nineteen, fifty four or something getting wainwright established a right to counsel in all criminal cases, and I. Mean You just briefly tell you about the case? Basically, this Guy Gideon uneducated He got accused of you. Know burglarizing this this bar and they. They arrested him. They charge them he you know. He represented self. and he lost A case eventually went to court It was found on appeal..

Guy Gideon Prevention Institute Larry wainwright Mona
"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

First of All

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

"Can you elaborate on this dream job thing I like. How and when did you dream of becoming a public defender? Like what does the story behind? I I mean. First of all I. It wasn't my dream job so much when we worked together prevention student comedy night. I I knew I wanted to do something social justice related <hes>. At Ti we? We worked on one of the things that work. There was violence prevention, and that actually got me started on like looking at <hes> took one of the classes that. Are exactly record started their violence prevention as a public health issue, and so I just. Looking at looking at that and thinking I wanted to do something within the community <hes> I grew up in a poor underserved community <hes> community caller. You know a refugee we. We came over America on a refugee resettlement <hes>. You know <hes> plan and <hes> I grew up in A. Poor, community stalled pitfalls of crime and <hes>. I mean pitfalls, poverty and homelessness in lack of social services, and what does the? How that intertwined with you know criminal justice. Actually <hes> I haven't really shared this a with a lot of people, but in college. I don't know if you remember, but <hes> about. About like a a couple of weeks before the end of my second year I think that was your senior year. <hes> one of my <hes> fraternity mates got killed outside of our house I think it's like it was huge news at Berkeley right like profits class in nuclear engineering. Really I don't remember I apologize. There's there's a lot from my past. That's a blurb, but yeah. Yeah, yeah, so he was. He was stabbed outside Sigma Pi. And I was I was like there. I had seen him like minutes before that. So the trial unravelled a over the next couple of years and. It slowly some. If some of my about this podcast is GONNA be like! Wow, we didn't even know this, but you know when I was sitting in the through a case and going through that case <hes>. I felt this. Kid You know when I learned more about it turns out like he was. <hes>. Small was unemployed. She works for nonprofit. Is that I? Think was like construction work, but you either way. They came from a working class. Family went to public schools he went to. Berkeley High School nearby. And <hes> I sitting in that courtroom I kind of felt more. I felt like I empathize with him. You know 'cause he he. He reminded me of you know the people kids grew up with <hes>. You Know An. Myself came through the environment and I know that I'm very fortunate to be where I'm at <hes>. You know I you make your own luck, but a lot of it is you catch outbreaks along the way and I kind of was keenly aware of how close I was from not being at Berkeley, not being where I was. You know and so. I I couldn't help feel empathy for him, and so it kind of made me like. You know I wanted justice for my. My friend, who was killed tragically, but I I also felt like his kids GonNa. <unk> he kills one drunken site. Right and so I was like it gets convicted. He goes to prison. Justice just felt elusive, really lucid to me and I think that was experience was very transformative <hes> for me especially with my background everything that was going on knowing. Justice and so. You know I got to law school and I actually <hes> was recruited to <hes> help. Run A campaign for my one of my mentors. Ru Training is a form of public <unk>. County new has private practice now. was running for DA and so if. I. Don't know people pay attention, but the recent election Cisco <hes>. They elected a yes boden <hes> from the San Francisco, public office, but he wasn't I poetry a run for DA <hes>. And so he ran. He ran for da I manage his campaign. <hes>. Obviously lost George, GASCON Wanda year and <hes>, but just being with him. Just he was like you know. I was working at A. A firm that summer I was out wasn't happy on civil, a civil work and I just wasn't happy. And like you got for public office <HES>, and so I did. And I the next semester. A you know got got internship at Contra Costa Public Office and I fell over the work it just was. It was like this is what I WANNA do this. Would you know what to do and? Yet at the rest is history. That's. I mean. I'm very I've just <hes> having a moment just reflecting on <unk>? How are passing cross? You know in in these ways enlightening, bring Larry and stuff, and like all the craziness of life in Prevention Institute <unk> essentially <unk> couple years older than you by essentially babies like really working on a on a very big trajectory that we had no idea what was about to happen, but it's I feel really I don't mean it patronizing me just so proud of you. That's audible and. It's not a small undertaking I mean like. Any any endeavor, especially dream because there's a lot of layers to that because I think be these big visions that we can have, I can feel very like. Larger than life, but like you actually went out and did it so i. just really proud of you. That's amazing

Kwok UK Oakland Coo California Sacramento Toe Berkeley Trans Community
Striving For Justice with Quoc To

First of All

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Striving For Justice with Quoc To

"Can you elaborate on this dream job thing I like. How and when did you dream of becoming a public defender? Like what does the story behind? I I mean. First of all I. It wasn't my dream job so much when we worked together prevention student comedy night. I I knew I wanted to do something social justice related At Ti we? We worked on one of the things that work. There was violence prevention, and that actually got me started on like looking at took one of the classes that. Are exactly record started their violence prevention as a public health issue, and so I just. Looking at looking at that and thinking I wanted to do something within the community I grew up in a poor underserved community community caller. You know a refugee we. We came over America on a refugee resettlement You know plan and I grew up in A. Poor, community stalled pitfalls of crime and I mean pitfalls, poverty and homelessness in lack of social services, and what does the? How that intertwined with you know criminal justice. Actually I haven't really shared this a with a lot of people, but in college. I don't know if you remember, but about. About like a a couple of weeks before the end of my second year I think that was your senior year. one of my fraternity mates got killed outside of our house I think it's like it was huge news at Berkeley right like profits class in nuclear engineering. Really I don't remember I apologize. There's there's a lot from my past. That's a blurb, but yeah. Yeah, yeah, so he was. He was stabbed outside Sigma Pi. And I was I was like there. I had seen him like minutes before that. So the trial unravelled a over the next couple of years and. It slowly some. If some of my about this podcast is GONNA be like! Wow, we didn't even know this, but you know when I was sitting in the through a case and going through that case I felt this. Kid You know when I learned more about it turns out like he was. Small was unemployed. She works for nonprofit. Is that I? Think was like construction work, but you either way. They came from a working class. Family went to public schools he went to. Berkeley High School nearby. And I sitting in that courtroom I kind of felt more. I felt like I empathize with him. You know 'cause he he. He reminded me of you know the people kids grew up with You Know An. Myself came through the environment and I know that I'm very fortunate to be where I'm at You know I you make your own luck, but a lot of it is you catch outbreaks along the way and I kind of was keenly aware of how close I was from not being at Berkeley, not being where I was. You know and so. I I couldn't help feel empathy for him, and so it kind of made me like. You know I wanted justice for my. My friend, who was killed tragically, but I I also felt like his kids GonNa. he kills one drunken site. Right and so I was like it gets convicted. He goes to prison. Justice just felt elusive, really lucid to me and I think that was experience was very transformative for me especially with my background everything that was going on knowing. Justice and so. You know I got to law school and I actually was recruited to help. Run A campaign for my one of my mentors. Ru Training is a form of public County new has private practice now. was running for DA and so if. I. Don't know people pay attention, but the recent election Cisco They elected a yes boden from the San Francisco, public office, but he wasn't I poetry a run for DA And so he ran. He ran for da I manage his campaign. Obviously lost George, GASCON Wanda year and but just being with him. Just he was like you know. I was working at A. A firm that summer I was out wasn't happy on civil, a civil work and I just wasn't happy. And like you got for public office and so I did. And I the next semester. A you know got got internship at Contra Costa Public Office and I fell over the work it just was. It was like this is what I WANNA do this. Would you know what to do and? Yet at the rest is history. That's. I mean. I'm very I've just having a moment just reflecting on How are passing cross? You know in in these ways enlightening, bring Larry and stuff, and like all the craziness of life in Prevention Institute essentially couple years older than you by essentially babies like really working on a on a very big trajectory that we had no idea what was about to happen, but it's I feel really I don't mean it patronizing me just so proud of you. That's audible and. It's not a small undertaking I mean like. Any any endeavor, especially dream because there's a lot of layers to that because I think be these big visions that we can have, I can feel very like. Larger than life, but like you actually went out and did it so i. just really proud of you. That's amazing

Family Berkeley Contra Costa Public Office George Prevention Institute Public County Berkeley High School America A. Poor A. A Larry San Francisco Private Practice
"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

First of All

12:08 min | 1 year ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on First of All

"Definitely have to say it took a very very long time for me to get to the point of making this career change albeit like it seems like it's been a very short time because I've only been working for like a year and a half to two years at this point but I think if you count up even like internships that I had while I was in school and getting exposure to the tech industry as well. I if you add that all it's sort of like five years of experience at that point and I think I started off just really not knowing like I wanted to college as a Pre Med as many of us do actually and I took a chemistry class at school and was horrendous and I was like okay maybe this is not exactly what I should be doing. Or what is best for me and the default was on my desk suggested that I consider computer science and Luckily Stanford has a great introductory computer science I got hooked into it from the beginning because I saw all the wonderful applications of it and so it was honestly kind of a practical solution to my confusion of. I don't know what to do in my life because this career path Lease allows me to go in without much more schooling outside of college and it's still a financial and so I went in. But then as I was continuously exploring the nebulous area of computer science computer graphics design artificial intelligence. I just really wasn't quite finding my niche in and relief finding myself drawn to like I think of it as passion is something you spend your outside time on as well. Not just things that you do in your job so I noticed and this is also along with the rise of life seeing. Allow you to asian-american youtubers and seeing a lot more media presence of Americans. I realized that that was really something I was really getting excited about. Getting to talk like warmth or inviting food to campus and having them show their movie everything before us or whether it was being involved in the Asian American community at school and being an activist and getting them excited about seeing stories that day. Resonate with on screen. And honestly the. I've just grew up. Not really seeing filmmaking as a potential career twist just because I had no idea it was even a possibility in the first place like it was never something my parents ever talked about even though they are favorite pastimes to watch Korean dramas together for example Ten when I ended up discovering filmmaking through a class in realize I actually enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I remember bringing up the topic at first my parents. They're kind of like. Why would you waste your money and your energy on this? This should just be like a fun. Little thing you do on the side. That shouldn't take up a ton of expenses to take up a ton of time and it was funny because they had always been very hard on me on my studies as I was going up and all of a sudden like once. I started working there like you need to go. Hang out with your friends more. Why are you working on these videos? So I think what I ended up having to do was because I had the resolve of okay filmmaking. Something I'm really passionate about. I have to hold my. I'm the only person who can hold myself accountable to grow into crap. And so while I was working my first year I went out of my way to try to meet as many people as I could in New York City which was where I was at the moment and I just try to keep making videos and like one opportunity led to another. I ended up doing the jubilees still in fellowship this past summer which allowed me to work with a lot of people who had been set on so making as their career paths for a long time and that was just the most inspirational thing and so. I was like okay. I need to act by the end of the fellowship. I decided that okay. This is the time for me to make the change in like just bite the bullet and apply to schools because school will at least give me that opportunity and that familiar space again to learn and experiment and make mistakes and honestly. I remember having some hesitation because I had heard other people talk about how. Oh you should wait until you're like in your late twenties because that's when most people go to film school and I remember talking to the director of the fellowship and voicing these concerns issues like but if you know you want to do it why wait like there's no reason to wait like oh my gosh. You're completely right and so. I was like you know what my biggest regrets are always things that I don't go after it's always me missing opportunities and so if I have the time and if I have the effort if I can put in the effort why not and so I just applied lily. Didn't think much about like okay. I've done everything I could. I've left it up to Into the hands of the admissions committee and very very lucky to finally hear back in that I got accepted and I was like you know what this is a sign. I'm just going to go even though people might look at my decision to say that you didn't spend enough time in the workforce. Maybe you should have gotten more work experience. I definitely have learned so much in the last two years and also for my internships that I think that they will continue to be applicable in a think. Being in school doesn't mean my learning stops all of a sudden the complete opposite I could see. I'm going to school so that I can learn even more and invest more and more at my energy into something that I really want to improve in growing so that was kind of my thought process as all of this was happening there is a part of me with this pandemic that has kind of made me reflect a little bit more and had some second thoughts about. Oh this is the right time but I think that just kinda shows that. There's never the right time to be doing things and you just have to sometimes bite the bullet. Just do it in the first place so yeah wall. Kudos I mean it it is. It is a big decision you made and so I mean I feel like you also made such a big decision like I remember listening to your episode about how you studied was in molecular biology in college and you ended up deciding to not go into that outside like right out of graduating. You actually chose to go work at collaboration which I would imagine. If I were in that position I would have had a very hard time talking to my family or maybe even my loved ones about that like having that Miss Connection between my studies and the first job that I get right. I don't know if you felt that way at all. When you were in that position will it actually? Was it my first job because I went for molecular cell biology into public health. I felt when I found social sciences. Or it found me if you will It was like another great awakening. I was like Oh my God. This is this is what's been missing from my life. It was sociology all along. But I I'm just really curious about people. I'm very fascinated by how the human brain works. Why we make the choices that we do. Why we're so emotional. And what influences us to do X Y and Z? So that was a hard switch from like the hard hard science. The hardened soft out like whatever you WANNA call it but you know the social sciences so I actually Did work in public health for a few years after college because during my super senior year I spent a semester abroad and then After I spent a semester abroad have my last semester at Berkeley and I did a student out sees how old I don't remember the name. It was a student work study program so I was like getting paid Through a nonprofit that did public health work and I ended up getting hired by them so actually worked fulltime for Public Health nonprofit in Oakland called Prevention Institute shouts surprenant. They still tight with my old boss to this day and she was my boss. Amazing when I was your age. You know like She hires me do public speaking training with her. She's the Executive Director of a different nonprofit down in San Diego and she hires me every January to come. Teach her like amazing teenage. They're like sophomores. Juniors in San Diego and I teach public speaking. So that's a really cool but it's like again. Yeah the the the relationships you make at any point they have so many different ways of coming back into your life and like yeah definitely being no matter how different the spheres are the industries are like. I've been thinking a lot about how I'm very grateful for my current manager because he has really been an example of someone who really uplift diversity and inclusion and he does whatever he can to make sure his reports. You'll psychologically safe in the spaces that were working and I feel like that's just something I'm taking away to now like future workplaces to kind of see like what are the qualities of a manager that I am looking for in a future job before working ahead knowing you not even look for in a manager so for surely there's always lessons to be learned absolutely and those relationships become super super vital and they teach you a lot because this is what my parents acknowledged to me. At least. My Dad acknowledged me when I was pretty young he was. He acknowledged that he's not my only teacher. He's my parents but he's like the world is your teacher and he that's also also how he justified being really really strict enderle sometimes because he was just like. I can't control what you learn out there but I can control what happens in this household and so part of me actually really respects that because they think there is the pendulum swings and I'm not a parent but I definitely know of parenting. That's a little lax in there's consequences to that but anyway Going back to your original question of like how decided to make those switches or Addressed that with my loved ones. It was actually very gradual situation and I feel like you know in hindsight it can feel like Oh this was like a really significant milestone. This was the day that I switched and this is the day that I knew for me. Everything kind of blends of it. I mean I can distinguish this was the period of time in which I went through this significant growth. But what I can say is none of these realizations warlike life altering and defining in that moment there were moments that added up and over time gave me a very financial financial a foundational understanding that. I was like. Oh this means a lot to me. Ooh This is something. I cannot stop thinking about yeah. It's like patterns that you recognize and are able to pinpoint for yourself that right when it all clicks for you right and eventually there's no sometimes. I'm not saying at least for me. It was not like a one a hot moment but there were a series of Aha moments that led me to make that leap and if I look in hindsight like leaving. Collaboration was super gradual. Because I started volunteering for that while I was working Fulltime after college and I was working in nonprofit job it was completely extracurricular activity. And even at that my parents my dad was very vocally annoyed at that. He's like why are you spending all your time doing that? Like who cares. But I was essentially becoming a producer in two thousand nine which wasn't even the beginning because I've been producing since high school because at Amador. I was doing homecoming and Prom and navy so I essentially equate that with being a producer. So it's just a longtime coming you know and I had the job to run. Collaboration offered to me in two thousand twelve and I didn't take it until two thousand thirteen and there's a lot of different things that I juggled in my mind and had to really. Yeah before I can make that decision and then I totally made it without telling my parents..

Stanford producer San Diego New York City director enderle Executive Director Prevention Institute Amador Oakland Berkeley
"prevention institute" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"Here's what you get with this episode of the Nice guys on business should good business for the bad guys in Vavuniya. I'll give you an ideal example. He throws an inverted pyramid and then across top of it. He drew a land about an eight to the wait now and he wrote in thirty five percent. You said it's thirty. Five percent of my victims never understand what happened and I get to keep all their money. Major Land could end twenty five percent. You said twenty. Five percent of my victims stopping is wrong. But they're not sure and they don't know what to do so I get to keep all their money and he drew twenty percent and he said twenty percent of them her attorney but the never go to judgement so I get to keep all their might and then he wrote in fifteen percent and he's getting down toward the tip of the of the inverted pyramid and he says fifteen percent. They harm attorneys. They get a judgment with Kate. Find grow up with the money or where it is now or what I bought with it so I get to keep all that and he said then there's five percent right down here they win. The judgment is called. Somebody like the two of you and when I found out what the amount is ironic Jack because that is my cost a business and he said I would challenge you to find a successful business. It makes millions of dollars and their cost of doing business is only five percent when you decide to be something you can be it. That's what they don't tell you in the church. When I was your age they would say we could become cops or criminals today. What I'm saying is this when you're facing the nice guys on business. What'S THE DIFFERENCE. Bill from where you are now to where you could be get expert tips to grow your business to be more productive and more efficient whether you're trying to build influence grow your community or make it rain bestselling author of. Nice guys finish first. Doug Sandler can lead the way. The Nice guys on business is produced by turnkey podcast productions. Now here's your host Doug Sandler Joe H Dickerson. Cf is a financial forensic authority. And I am excited to find out more about what that exactly means a bestselling author and is the founder and CEO of financial forensic services. Joe is a graduate of the National Crime Prevention Institute and Dickerson has more than fifty years of financial investigation and forensic research experience. He has trained hundreds of law enforcement professionals and has helped recover millions of dollars her dickerson. It's not what you win. It's what you recover. That counts and I'm excited to have him here on the Nice guys business. Welcome Joe to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm I'm happy to have you here man. I just think back to some Some judgments that I have had And I was looking at a little bit of the summary of your book and I it said something like some crazy statistic. Eighty percent of judgments never get Never get actually collected and I am one of those statistics in the eighty percent. So how did you even get started with With understanding how does the word forensic even part of anything when it comes to financial stuff will let me explain? What for intake is I think most people think about these and forensic actually mange for court purposes. So that's So we have for court purposes doing financial research for judgment enforcement. I got it so it's not just people then not dead legal time we get through with him. Some wish they were dead but they should have got into trouble. I understand that. And how did you get to be an expert in this in this field? It seems like it's such a microcosm of the overall financial world. It is but it's a significant. Financial Portion of my background is a a was a detective. Sergeant Houston Police Department and specialized in white collar crime. And during that time the district attorney and chief lease had a conversation about the Organiz crammed was trying to get started in Houston so we were transferred to his office. He took his top five. Seven of us were the founders organized crime bureau in Texas back in the seventies and Extended hospitality to gas from Chicago with some free room and board and some continuing education in the agricultural industrial. Business We taught them how to pick cotton and make license plates but my frustration. When I was in law enforcement was that we could catch the bad guys but we couldn't help the good guys that had lost. Sometimes their entire life savings their business the whatever the the situation was because once you got the bad guys in jail the bosses were always saying okay. Here's a stack of work that you didn't get done while you're working on that it out there and hit it so we never could work on recovery. It seems like that is just part of the missing link. That's involved yeah you got this guy that Whether they took money from you directly out of your bank account or or committed You know company-wide fraud or whatever. It was It seems like it's the challenging part is not putting them in jail challenging part is how do you recover the losses once you got it because what are you what happens when you sue them? They probably don't have any. They don't have any of that piece of paper saying congratulations. You won they learn titled to recover this amount and the average citizen thinks that means check will be in the mail and their attorneys often. Forget to tell them that they've done half the job and that's when the judgment now you've got a different program that you have to get into to recover in. During the time I was at least department Everybody had to work off duty so to to make additional income goes to salaries weren't great in those days and I chose instead of being a bouncer at a beer joint or working construction traffic in Houston heat. I formed a company that did security and Crime Prevention consulting in represented all of major oil companies and through them with met the manufacturers distributors. Wolfville equipment. And of course they were interested in. You know how they did. The prevention so Hor saw particularly since I'm reg of the National Crime Prevention Institute of the University of Louisville but I still couldn't take me because it would have been a conflict of of interest or a perceived conflict with the city and I never wanted to have that so I finally got to the point where I had to make a business decision. I was making four to five times as much beauty so was on duty and I still couldn't feel fulfilled. My client's needs so I chose to leave the department after eleven years full-time to my business practice. So let's say that we do have a a company. And let's say you dealt with the oil companies and then providers of services to the oil company. Who is the one? Oftentimes that you find is doing the wrong. And then how the once. It's actually once it's there actually either convicted or found guilty of something. How do you go about recovering the money that that That is not you well. That's what we specialize in now. Because when I moved from Houston to Denver my first client up here. Of course we had to start over and that was when the bottom dropped out the oil and gas business and banks started failing in savings and loan. You're probably too young to remember that but it was a major blow to our economy so I moved Colorado. Were at a vacation home. Started over in my first real client was the legal department of FDIC taking overall failed banks and they had zillions of judgments on their books and they were taking over a lot of these banks and they found that bankers bankers were in cahoots with their customers infringe on the outside and they would say. Don't you come by the bank this afternoon? Let me land you about three million dollars. And then you street by Jack's electrical CEO. Oh by the way while you're saying scrapers don't worry about paying that go on the bank fields. Fdic alternate era. And I'm going to be looking for work. So maybe you'd might Financial Officer Wink Wink. Wink view of that. What it sounds like it. I bet they did have a dim view of that. Would it sounds like Joe is it. Sounds like you followed the money trail and it's is is that each exactly. The money always leaves a trail. And that's where we start and in my practice. You know M teach people how to get get themselves into twenty percent that's collected out of the eighty percent that's not collected so we put together our forensic team. I do the case management. We've got a digital forensic expert on board with a forensic accountant on board in a question document examiner onboard so we are getting documents were i-start is finding out where the bad guys are banking. So it sounds like you've just a one person short of a really high quality highly qualified basketball team here so so let me ask this because I know that there's a number of a number of business owners in our community and you know so far we've really talked about very very large institutions that are that maybe have many layers of financial forensics that they need to go to go through in order to get there. But let's let me bring it down to a level of somebody that might be in our community that might have a business. They have sued somebody because that person hasn't paid their contract. That person is now being protected under whatever the rights that they have under their LLC or something else like that. How do we ever as business owners ever end up being able to collect the money that we are due from somebody that hasn't been paying us? Well if I'm fortunate enough to be retained in that case I have developed a process that works as opposed to what the attorneys have done for years and years and not bashing the attorneys goes. We did a survey of the law schools and we interviewed the Dean or the restaurant law schools with top fifty in the United States. And ask them what they had on their curriculum. That taught the attorneys how to collect and out of fifty deans or rich stores. In the top fifty schools. Three of them said. Oh Judgment Enforcement We talk about that for about an hour in our creditor's rights course ever semester. So there's other train so the job of the attorney is to win the judgment and of course that is that is a great beginning but like you said that. Just fifty percent of the equation. So can you explain? And I don't want you to give away any trade secrets here. Joe But can you explain maybe some of the behind the scenes. What actually happens now that we won the judgment. What what do you do? What is your organization? Do in order to help us. Actually get that collected or we. You know we've through the maze of.

attorney Doug Sandler Joe H Dickerson Houston National Crime Prevention Inst founder and CEO Jack Vavuniya Major Land Houston Police Department Kate Joe But Doug Sandler FDIC Crime Prevention consulting Cf Chicago
"prevention institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:34 min | 2 years ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In Sudan has risen sharply. A doctor's group there now says more than thirty people were killed, and hundreds wounded when the military fired on a sit in outside the defense ministry pro democracy. Protesters want a new government into Dan. They have been negotiating with the military. In a televised statement, the military said now all agreements are off an elections will happen within nine months. Joining us now is Al bog air, she's senior international correspondent with CNN. She was in Sudan, not long ago and she joins us now from London. Thanks so much for being with us this morning morning. Right, Sean, I understand you're in touch with people in Khartoum. What are you hearing? Now that this violence has happened. My parents are she's still in Khantun. We're lucky that they are among the few. He's mobile phones still work that's been a widespread outage. A just sounds incredibly scary that the season state of paralysis activist groups of cold for general. Strike, and people seem to be sticking to it roads, a closed off in what makes us particularly terrifying is, it's not even really the armed forces that people are clashing with. It's a specific parliamentary segment with was regularized as positive the food is that used to be an out of control Malaysia, in die for the ginger Wedeman issues, the rapid support forces. And, and that's what's scaring people. Is that this isn't even a regular fools, that's taken control of the town? This means the military's fracturing. I mean, we should say all this happened after protesters demanded the ouster of President Omar Al Beshir. The military is now in charge of Sudan. But what you're describing is that there is no cohesive military, either absolutely the military as a token is in charge, the head of the military council is a general, but the, the second income on head of these forces the rapid support forces everyone I've spoken to on the ground says those are the people that are on the streets all the videos that we've been sent by I witnesses from the citizens show that was rob. Support for God's that charge the sin, and it's incredibly chilling because this is a militia that was accused of war crimes that Ford into have them control the ground in the couple of Sudan is very scary for people right now. We know if the protest camp has now completely dispersed are people still there. People are still that on, and people are still very defiant. I think that's really the only way you can use so people who spent the last month fostering during Ramadan in extremes of heat. And they now say that we will not step down. We will not stand back until this military council has been deposed. Well, now the military is saying, we're gonna stall, these negotiations any agreement that we had settled is off. But we're going to hold elections within nine months is not good news for the protesters. It is that take it is good news. But the is it's not because the only infrastructure that remains intact is the infrastructure of the full Malaysia. In the former ruling policy. It's, it's difficult to see how in a situation where people fearing for their lives, you can put together a cohesive electoral campaign, even though the council says that they will allow observers in this is a miniature council that is blocking journalists that has suspended. I'll Jazirah that has suspended other journalists from doing their work. So it's there's a load of disbelief that they will allow observers to carry out that, that job. Meanwhile, they will just continue to, to sit in to protest to, to demand democratic reforms, even if they are unlikely. To resist. That's hearing that so much blood has been spilled. So many lives have been lost to turn back now is unthinkable, too. Many of those people were speaking to on the ground. Wrightson CNN's, Numa elbow gear. She is senior international. Correspondent with CNN covering, Sudan. She joined us from London on Skype. Thank you so much. Thank you. In this country. We do not know the motive of civil engineer opened fire at his workplace in Virginia Beach. We do know that, that mass shooting adds to the record of widespread workplace violence from our member station. W AMU Alana wise reports. Friday's shooting rampage at Virginia Beach city. Government building marked, one of the worst workplace killings of the last decade. Kathleen bonds it is an attorney and former HR executive who founded the nonprofit workplace violence prevention institute. She warns that at least two million Americans experience violence at work, according to the occupational safety and health administration or OSHA and as a l'armee, a statistic that is, what is even more alarming is that OSHA goes on to tell us that Betty more cases go unreported, so we don't even have a good statistic as to how many Americans are victimized by workplace violence in two thousand sixteen. There were five hundred workplace homicides. They accounted for ten percent of all fatal occupational injuries that year according to data from the bureau of labor statistics in the vast majority of them were committed with a firearm. Unlike the traditional form of workplace violence wearing is, let's say economic based, its financial in nature when it's a case of a co worker, who was lashing out on. On another co worker the amount of hostility. That's involved is very similar to almost domestic violence. The motives of the Virginia Beach shooter, have not yet been identified the nine year employees launched the deadly attack just hours after submitting his resignation, but Johnny Taylor president and CEO of the society for human resource management says that incidents like these are often preceded by reversals in a person's personal and professional lives. It's typically not one thing so professional versus personal. It's typically when there's a confluence of both. So I'm having a hard time at home, and then I have a hard time with my boss those to explode. That's when you see that occur. And then the person essentially says this is my way out. You know, the we like to think that it doesn't happen. A lot, one in seven employees say they don't feel safe at work in Virginia Beach that feeling of unease was being expressed less than a mile away from where the shooting occurred. Don Lee business manager at courthouse community United Methodist Church said that while the church and others in the area had been preparing themselves for the potential violence Friday's massacre gave new urgency to increasing building security to deal with threats from within oftentimes. It's you know, it's somebody, you know, somebody in your church enforce Friday, it was somebody. They knew so you know, you can't just say it somebody barging into your facility. It could be it could be somebody inside lease at the church is in the process of putting together a security plan that goes beyond locked doors for NPR news. I'm Alana wise. A lot of story comes to us from guns and America, which is a public media reporting project on the role of guns in American life. Later today on all things considered veterans will soon have more choices outside the VA medical system. We questioned the head of the VA listened by telling your smart speaker, to play NPR or your member station by..

Sudan workplace violence CNN Virginia Beach London NPR Al bog President Omar Al Beshir Malaysia VA OSHA Alana wise Khartoum Ford Khantun Sean
"prevention institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. The death toll in Sudan has risen sharply. Doctors group there. Now says more than thirty people were killed, and hundreds wounded when the military fired on a sit in outside the defense ministry pro democracy. Protesters one a new government in Sudan, they have been negotiating with the military. In a televised statement, the military said now all agreements are off elections will happen within nine months. Joining us now is Nina L Bogner? She's senior international correspondent with CNN. She was in Sudan, not long ago and she joins us now from London. Thanks so much for being with us this morning. Morning. I understand you're in touch with people in Khartoum. What are you hearing? Now that this violence has happened. My parents are still in content where lucky that they are among the few. He's mobile phones, still what that's been a widespread outage. A just sounds incredibly scary that the season state of paralysis. Activist groups cold for general strike, and people seem to be sticking to it roads, a closed off in what makes us particularly terrifying. It's not even really the armed forces that people are clashing with. It's a specific parliamentary segment with those regularized as positive the fools that used to be an out of control Malaysia, in Jeonju Wedeman issues, the rapid support forces. And, and that's what's scaring people. Is that this isn't even a regular fools, that's taking control of the town? This means the military's fracturing. I mean, we should say all this happened after protesters demanded the ouster of President Omar Al Beshir, the military is now in charge of Sudan. But what you're describing there is no cohesive military, either absolutely the military as a token is in charge, the head of the military council is general, but the, the second income on his head of these forces the rapid support forces in everyone. I've spoken to on the ground says those are the people that are on the streets all the videos that we've been sent. By I witnesses from the citizens show that was rapid support for God's charge the six and it's incredibly chilling because this is a militia that was accused of wool crimes that into have control the ground in the capital of Sudan is very scary for people right now. Do we know if the protest camp has now completely dispersed are people still, there, people are still that on, and people are still very defiant? I think that's really the only way you can use so people who spent the last month fussing during Ramadan in extremes of heat. And they now say that we will not step down. We will not stand back until this military council has been deposed. Well, now the military is saying, we're gonna stall, these negotiations any agreement that we had settled is is off. But we're gonna hold elections within nine months is not good news for the protesters. It is that take it as good news. But it's note because the infrastructure that remains intact is the infrastructure of the Fulmar Asia, and the former ruling posse it's, it's difficult to see how in a situation where people are faring that lives, you can put together a cohesive electoral campaign, even though the council says that they will allow observers in this is a miniature council that is blocking journalists that has suspended Jazirah that has suspended other journalists from doing that work. So it's. There's a load of disbelief that they will allow observers to carry out that, that job. Meanwhile, they will just continue to, to sit in to protest to, to demand democratic reforms, even if they are unlikely to resist. That's hearing that so much blood has been spilled, so many lives have been lost that time back now is unthinkable, too. Many of those people were speaking to on the ground right show. CNN's Nimmo el-gayer. She is senior international correspondent with CNN covering, Sudan. She joined us from London on Skype. Thank you so much. Thank you. In this country. We do not know the motive of civil engineer opened fire at his workplace in Virginia Beach. We do know that, that mass shooting adds to the record of widespread workplace violence from our member station. W AMU Alana wise reports Friday shooting rampage at Virginia Beach city. Government building marked, one of the worst workplace killings of the last decade. Kathleen bonds is an attorney and former HR executive who founded the nonprofit workplace violence prevention institute. He warns that at least two million Americans experience violence at work, according to the occupational safety and health administration or OSHA and as a l'armee, a statistic that is, what is even more alarming is that OSHA goes on to tell us that many more cases go unreported, so we don't even have a good desisted as to how many Americans are victimized by workplace violence in two thousand sixteen. There were five hundred workplace homicides bay accounted for ten percent of all fatal occupational injuries that year according to data from the bureau of labor statistics in the vast majority of them were committed with a firearm. Unlike the traditional form of workplace violence wearing is, let's say economic based, its financial in nature when it's a case of a co worker, who was lashing out on. And another coworker the amount of hostility, that's involved is very similar to almost domestic violence, the motives of the Virginia Beach shoot or have not yet been identified the nine year employees launched the deadly attack just hours after submitting his resignation, but Johnny Taylor president and CEO of the society for human resource management says that incidents like these are often preceded by reversals in a person's personal and professional lives. It's typically not one thing so professional versus personal. It's typically when there's a confluence of both. So I'm having a hard time at home, and then I have a hard time with my boss those to explode. That's when you see that occur and the person essentially says, this is my way out that we like to think that it doesn't happen. A lot, one in seven employees say they don't feel safe at work in Virginia Beach that feeling of unease was being expressed less than a mile away from where the shooting occurred. Don Lee business manager at courthouse community United Methodist Church said that while the church and others in the area had been preparing themselves for the potential violence Friday's massacre gave new urgency to increasing building security to deal with threats from within oftentimes. It's, you know, it's somebody know somebody in your church and enforce. Friday was somebody they knew so you know, you can't just say it, somebody barging into your facility. It could be it could be somebody lease at the church is in the process of putting together a security plan that goes beyond locked doors for NPR news. I'm Alana wise. A lot of story comes to us from guns and America, which is a public media reporting project on the role of guns American life. Later today. Considered veterans will soon have more choices outside the VA medical system. We question the head of the VA. Listen by telling your smart speaker, to play NPR or your member station by name. This is morning edition on K suitable you ahead on morning edition executives with carnival corporation, the world's largest cruise line or in court explaining, why continue to plastics and all water into waters in the Caribbean and Alaska and the new film framing John DeLorean, explores the life and career of the controversial automaker ahead Alec Baldwin, who stars as the automaker believe DeLorean was a tragic figure and wonders about what might have been..

Sudan workplace violence CNN Virginia Beach London Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin NPR Nina L Bogner Khartoum OSHA Alana wise President Omar Al Beshir VA Malaysia carnival corporation America
"prevention institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"WBZ News Radio. Six degrees in Boston at nine o'clock. Good evening. I'm Suzanne saw Savell. Here's what's happening a vigil tonight for the twelve people shot to death in Virginia Beach yesterday. CBS's Natalie, brand has more four victims remain hospitalized and to illustrate how this tragedy has impacted the entire community. The medical group caring for the victim says that two of its own team members are among those who have lost loved ones. They're still trying to figure out the motive but police chief James survey. Ira says the focus right now is on the families of the victims who want everyone. We want the family members and the friends to know that we are behind them one hundred percent that this isn't something that's going to happen. And then suddenly, we're just going to go back to business. Kathleen Bosnich founder of the workplace violence prevention institute, says workplace violence is an epidemic homicide employees being murdered. In the workplace is the third leading cause of occupational death across the United States. President Trump has ordered flags to be flown at half-staff police now say a twelve year old girl kidnapped from park and Webster was sexually assaulted. The girl was taken from may street park at around four thirty yesterday afternoon and taken to Connecticut. All we know now is that the girl is safe Webster. Police say they'll have extra patrols near public parks. A chaotic scene at a move on forum in San Francisco while democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris was answering questions. A protester jumped on stage and pulled a microphone from Harris's hands and tried to talk to the Senator..

workplace violence Kamala Harris Webster Savell Virginia Beach CBS Boston San Francisco Ira United States Kathleen Bosnich Connecticut prevention institute Natalie James survey Senator Trump President founder
"prevention institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Fire crews in Hollywood have taken care of two house. Fires in the same block of north L central avenue. A spokesperson for the fire department says at least one of the homes was vacant. She says an arson investigator has been called in a plan has been finalized for how to spend the tax money raised for parks in L A county stakeholders have spent the last few months coming up with a blueprint for. How the tax should be spent key among the policies is to make sure that park. Poor neighborhoods are addressed LVN is with prevention institute says the measuring money present a once in a generation if not once in a lifetime opportunity county supervisor Hilda Sali's says the nearly one hundred million dollars race each year could fulfill that reversal gonna push the level playing field even farther board of supervisors has approved the recommendations, including funneling thirty percent of the money to park poor communities in LA, Chris ancarlo KFI news now bay was reinstated. A 2017 plastic sandbag ban that was suspended after November's wildfires. Cal trans LA county public works and other agencies have been told plastic sandbags may no longer be used or distributed within the Malibu city limits. City officials say burlap or jute sandbags can provide the same erosion and flooding protection as plastic sandbags. But don't have the same environmental impacts a prison guard could become the guarded. Prosecutors say the guard has been arrested on suspicion of taking cash bribes. Lives in exchange for smuggling things into the federal correctional complex in victorville. Paul Hayes was a Lieutenant assigned to investigate the bad things inmates and guards do officials say he accepted forty thousand dollars in cash from the girlfriend of an inmate so she can take illicit things into the prison. She was also arrested. Debra Mark KFI news. The FDA has approved a for severe depression a medication closely related chemically to a powerful psychedelic Johnson and Johnson's zoo. Antidepressant nasal spray is meant for people who don't fear relief with older options said to take effect almost instantly. The drug is similar to ketamine an illegal party drug popular in the nineties and wrestling star King Kong Bundy has died in New Jersey. The six foot four four hundred fifty pound wrestler was best known for losing to hoc HOGAN in a steel cage match. I've wrestlemainia to in one thousand nine hundred eighty six he also made guest appearances on the sitcom married with children. He was sixty one.

Debra Mark KFI Paul Hayes LA county KFI Hollywood arson Hilda Sali victorville fire department Johnson King Kong Bundy HOGAN investigator supervisor FDA ketamine Chris ancarlo LA New Jersey four four hundred fifty pound
"prevention institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"prevention institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"KFI twenty four hour newsroom. The body of a seven to ten year old child has been found along the trail in hacienda heights. LA county sheriff's legitimate. Scott Hoaglund says it appears the child was pushed from the road above the trail passer bys located the victim this morning about ten o'clock. Investigators say the body had been next to the trail for less than a day. The coroner's office is working on news. Brought to you by first Republic, Bank, sell companies may have a more difficult time. Expanding in LA county, supervisor Janice Han says people have been complaining about an explosion of towers in neighborhoods air concerned that there are no rules and ordinances in place to protect them from an over-concentration of these cell towers, and they have little control over where these towers are play on says the county should look into stricter regulation of where towers are built especially as five G networks. Come online Han says some people have raised health concerns related to the towers, but the county can only regulate based on structure and aesthetic. LA county's finalized a plan to spend the money raised for park. Stakeholders have spent the last few months coming up with a blueprint for how the tax should be spent key among the policies is to make sure that park poor neighborhoods are addressed LVN as with the prevention institute says the measure a money. Generation if not once in a lifetime opportunity county supervisor Hilda Sali's says the nearly one hundred million dollars race each year could fulfill that reversal to push the level playing field. Even farther board of supervisors has approved the recommendations, including funneling thirty percent of the money to park poor communities in LA. Kris Ankarlo, KFI news rap video released by army recruiters did not make some college students and Fullerton wanna sign up. This student says the video is okay. But some people might find it disrespectful. Takes it out of context. Kind of like makes it like a joke, then lake something serious. And I think joining I'm means very serious video has about one hundred thousand views five hundred likes but more than thirteen hundred dislikes. The army says the bid is just one part of a campaign to reach young people. Search crews in Alabama are trying to find at least seven people still missing following a powerful tornado. That's killed. Nearly two dozen people ages six to eighty nine. Heavy equipment coming into these particular areas that we're using to pick up a big portions of the debris to do searches under those areas to ensure that we covered everything Lee county sheriff Jay Jones says one family lost at least seven people. Got a crash on the five. On.

LA county KFI supervisor Lee county hacienda heights LA Janice Han Scott Hoaglund Hilda Sali Kris Ankarlo Jay Jones Alabama one hundred million dollars twenty four hour thirty percent ten year five G