36 Burst results for "President Lincoln"

"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:02 min | Last month

"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Capitol police chief Thomas Manger, the Senate majority leader, Chuck Schumer, telling reporters after today's security briefing. They seemed very, very well prepared. Much better prepared than before January six. I think they're right. Wait for whatever might happen. CNN reporting that U. S Capitol Police say they arrested a California man who had multiple knives in his truck, which had a swastika and other white supremacists symbols painted on it near the Democratic National Committee headquarters early Monday morning. The knives included a bayonet and machete, which are legal in the District of Columbia. Go. God bless her AmeriCorps members of the U. S. Army band Pershing's own part of today's ceremony on the East Front steps of the U. S Capitol building marking the 20th anniversary of the September 11th terror attacks is from roll call. Explaining that that song has become an unofficial part of the capital's observance of 9 11 and dates back to the evening of 9 11 itself in 2000, and one when members and leadership gathered on the East front just hours after the attacks. Before bipartisan leaders of the House and Senate speaking today, here is Speaker Nancy Pelosi. President Lincoln cautioned against the silent artillery of time. That's harsh artillery of time eroding our memory today and all I did always with the new Carvel. Time shall not dimmed the memory of our fallen heroes. We pray that the years might ease the pain of the bereaved but never the luster of the deeds of the fallen When we does it the memories of September 11th we check on sacred ground as we all know, 20 years ago On that clear Tuesday morning, America was forever changed by an act of terrorism. In a moment, nearly 3000 lives were taken. And the innocence of a generation was lost. Yet at our darkest moment, America showed the world our greatness and the heroism of the first responders who rushed into danger in the strength of strangers bounded by the laws and the courage of the nation. That sound unity in our agony As Americans across the country mark this solemn day over the weekend, we recommit to our sacred promise. To never Forget both what we lost at the unity and strength that we found. Hey, God bless the families of those who lost their loved ones. Those who helped those families and they God bless America. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, also with some remarks about the remembrance. House Minority leader Kevin McCarthy. 20 years ago We saw true evil and evil that tried to destroy us, but good people. Become heroes in hard times, and that's how the American people responded heroically. We rallied around the principles of freedom that came under attack. We comforted families, friends and neighbors. Churches flung open their doors and we flocked in calling out to God for help and hope we had the sense to know there was something more important. In politics. We stood together United proud to be Americans. We flew the American flag and homes across the country to honor the first responders who lost their lives and to celebrate the undying American values that a cowardly act of terrorism could not extinguish. That is a record of how a dark hour Of American history became one of our finest hours. The cowards who wanted to destroy our way of life tried to break our spirit. Instead, they revealed that those who live in freedom have a rare reservoir. Of strength that nobody else has two decades later. We continue to mourn the victims and honor our heroes. We cannot mourn without honoring and we cannot honor without resolving to do everything we can to prevent another terrorist attack on American soil. Together, We can continue to honor the memories of the fallen by making never forget a 365 days a commitment. It is up to us, everyone to make this pledge meaningful House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Today's ceremony on the steps of the U. S. Capitol also included a moment of silence. Grey News writes the event capsule weekend of solemn remembrances Saturday on the anniversary of the terror attacks that killed 3000. President Joe Biden visited the sites in New York, Pennsylvania and outside Washington, where the four hijacked planes crashed. Biden stood next to former presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton at the National September 11th Memorial in Manhattan. At the former site of the World Trade Center is the names of the dead were read aloud by their loved ones. Former President George W. Bush delivering the key No address at the flight 93 National Memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Decried the current acrimony in the nation and compared to Mystic terrorists. Those who attacked on 9 11 today, former President Donald Trump put out a statement that reads so interesting to watch for President Bush, who is responsible for getting us into the quicksand of the Middle East and then not winning as he lectures us. The terrorists on the right are a bigger problem than those from foreign countries that hate America and that are pouring into our country right now. He shouldn't be lecturing. Us about. Anything..

Bill Clinton Chuck Schumer District of Columbia CNN Biden Washington 2000 Saturday U. S Capitol Police President Middle East 365 days Kevin McCarthy AmeriCorps Nancy Pelosi Tuesday morning Today World Trade Center 3000 Thomas Manger
Fresh update on "president lincoln" discussed on Live Local and Progressive

Live Local and Progressive

00:35 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "president lincoln" discussed on Live Local and Progressive

"Was made up of enslavement forced to join One of these men was Robert smalls Smalls was a deckhand at like a federal supply ship known as the planter During his time smalls earned as much as he could about navigating the ship So he and others could escape and on May 13th of 1862 while officers were sleeping smalls along with 16 others took the planter out of the Charleston harbor navigating through all 5 checkpoints while heading to open waters looking for the union blockade Smalls raised a white flag of surrender letting union soldiers or the ship giving them guns ammo and documents about planned confederate attacks Being a wealth of information small was given the role of the union navy captain Stories like smalls are one of the many factories convincing president Lincoln to allow free African Americans to serve in the Union Army This has been a W CPT veteran minute Joan esposito live local and progressive on willow springs is powered by combat lower your energy bills and reduce your carbon footprint with a comment energy efficiency program From New York this is democracy now When you look at the video it hard is back to you Yes the years Things we thought we had overcome in America I mean it looks like it's a little chasing young black man and when they kill him there's no accountability They go home and sleep in their beds at night Jury selection is continuing in Georgia in the trial of three white men accused of murdering ahmaud Arbery An unarmed 25 year old black man who was chased down and shot to death while out for a Sunday jog We'll speak to Arbery's ant in one of the family's lawyers Then as President Biden campaigns for his build back better agenda we'll take a close look at how democratic senators Joe mansion of West Virginia and Kirsten sinema of Arizona are fighting Biden on everything from taxing the rich to expanding dental care But here's the thing Visit mister Manson is opposed to that As is I think senator sentiment Then to Pfizer's power Public citizens revealed how Pfizer's bullying governments and COVID-19 vaccine negotiations as part of a push to increase their profits during the pandemic Monopoly on a lifesaving vaccine to extract concessions from desperate governments The contracts consistently placed Pfizer's interests before public health imperatives All that and more coming up Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot.

Smalls Robert Smalls Smalls Union Navy Joan Esposito Charleston Harbor Ahmaud Arbery President Lincoln Union Army Willow Springs Arbery President Biden Joe Mansion Kirsten Sinema Mister Manson Pfizer New York Georgia Covid America
Who Was Ida B. Wells?

Made of Mettle

02:32 min | Last month

Who Was Ida B. Wells?

"In today's episode we will be covering the impassioned the influential the inspiring ida b wells ida. B wells was born ida bell wells on july sixteenth eighteen sixty two in holly springs mississippi. Ida was the eldest. Born to james and lizzie wells. Who had seven other children. All were born in slaved as they lived on a plantation in mississippi whom or members of the confederacy during the civil war in the previous episode. We talked a bit about president. Lincoln's revolutionary decision to issue the emancipation proclamation on january. First eighteen sixty three during the civil war ida in her family were officially freed from slavery as they resided in a confederate state before either was one year old immediately following. The war was the pivotal reconstruction period with a divided territories of the union in the confederacy. Determine how they would begin to come back together as a single nation. Ida's parents were dutiful in diligence supporters of african american rights in particular the right to an education. Ida's father james was directly involved in starting in serving on the board of trustees for school for freed african americans that school rushed. College is still a notable inactive university. Today falling under the umbrella of historically black colleges and universities ida would begin her educational career at this school attending in her early teens. Sadly heartbreaking circumstances would find ida early on in life in eighteen seventy eight while visiting her grandmother. I learned harling news. Ida's mother father in her youngest sibling. Just an infant had passed away from yellow fever. Her parents sudden-death turn ida from a teenager with no children into a parent of six suffering from the grief and loss of one's parents. It would be understandable for a child to shy away in resist taking on a role with such incredible responsibility but did ida shy away from her obligation torture family. Absolutely not

IDA Ida Bell Wells Lizzie Wells Mississippi Holly Springs Board Of Trustees For School F James Wells Lincoln Yellow Fever
"president lincoln" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 3 months ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You can't And Douglas tells us that he said, Well, tell President Lincoln and Frederick Douglass is out here. Two minutes later, the Police came back out and said Yeah. Come on in. And in the East Room and a big reception. They spy each other. Lincoln comes over to Douglas. And according to Douglas's recollection, Lincoln asked Douglas what he thought of the speech. This is the great second inaugural. Every drop of blood shed by the last shall be paid with blood shed by the sword and so And Douglas tells us that he told the president. No, sir, It doesn't matter what I think it tend to all of your guests and Lincoln said Douglas. No, no, no, no, no. I want to know what you think. And Douglas tells us, he said, Mr President, that was a sacred effort. That's a very good description of that speech. Very biblical speech. It's very Old Testament speech. And then, of course, Lincoln was assassinated one month later. We talk about Andrew Johnson for just a moment. Douglas set of Johnson. Whatever. Andrew Johnson. Maybe he is no friend of our race. It's incredibly vivid in your book. Very public. An argument. I don't know. What should we call that a very public back and forth between the two men. What came of this fight. Well, it was a terrible exchange wasn't at this end February, 18 66 is in the midst of the struggle in Congress to try to come up with the reconstruction plan. Douglas gets up a delegation of 12 black men. Including his oldest son, Louis. They got an appointment at the White House to meet with the president, Andrew Johnson, But they never even got to speak. Really. Johnson held forth and preached at them, in effect, for about 45 minutes. He told them if it weren't for your people, this war wouldn't even exist. This can never be a country that's truly biracial. Uh, he even said things like, you know. Once old I once owned some slaves, but you know, I freed them. But even when I own slaves, I was more of their slaves than they were of mine. And it got worse from there. Here was a president of the United States spewing this racism at a delegation of 12 black men who come to talk to him about their futures. And as they were leaving the room, Douglas got the delegation to stand up. There just realized this is going anywhere. It's over. We're about to leave the room. And they all overheard Johnson say this because the member of the press, and by the way, the press was there, recording this Johnson was overheard to say that Douglas He's just like every other and word it sooner. Cut your throat, then nut. Now I have always had this imagination. I don't know exactly what Douglas was thinking. But Douglas must have turned around. And I'd have given anything to see his eyes. Meet Johnson. At that point. What we do know is they went back to a hotel. They wrote up a manifesto that was published the next day in Washington, D C newspaper, and then Douglas went to his desk and he did what he always did. He wrote a new speech. He took it on the road for the next six months. The title of that speech was the perils of our republic. And he developed Not just a critique of Andrew Johnson. He skewered Andrew Johnson as the great danger to the future of American democracy. And in that speech. He laid out a whole scheme. It of measures that he believes should be done to thwart and stop Andrew Johnson. Uh, but that was their only, uh, significant encounter. There's no question Andrew Johnson was the worst possible thing that ever happened to the potential of the future of black rights. He was, above all a virulent white supremacist. My guess is David Blight. The name of the book is Frederick Douglass. Profit of freedom. As we mentioned the Douglases lived in Rochester, there was a terrible fire loss of the home. Douglas had no doubt it was the work of the clan. He leaves he moves to D. C. He has various appointments under different presidents under Hes, he's appointed U. S marshal for the District of Columbia. How did living in D C and being a part of all this being the insider? How did it change him? If it did? Well when Douglas and his entire extended family moved to Washington in 18 72. He was Coming to the center of power. Douglas becomes a fixture of Washington, D C. Political life. As an African American. Now. This is during the grand administrations. The to Grant Administration. Grant indeed had even appointed him as a secretary, not as a full member of the commission but of secretary to the center Domingo Commission. Then later, when Hayes is elected, he is made Marshall of the District of Columbia. He frequently did events at the Capitol at the White House. He was sort of inside of Circles of power now, and he began to make very close relationships with some Republican Congress people. But mostly, Douglas was still an orator. Still traveling the circuit talking about every issue that came before the country, and especially any issue that had to do with race. The rights of the Friedman the future of the Friedman One of the most fascinating things about this year of Douglas's life, and I've it actually, in some ways, took over the book for me. All these relationships he makes, and some of them are relationships with other black leaders, and he develops these bitter rivalries. Several other black leaders, especially the next generation. You're listening to my conversation with David Blight about his biography, Frederick Douglass. Profit of Freedom part of our full bio series up Next, we conclude with Douglas's later years, including his time as U..

Andrew Johnson David Blight Rochester Frederick Douglass Washington Douglas Hayes Johnson D C Congress Douglases 18 72 two men Grant D. C. Republican one month later Louis Washington, D February, 18 66
Juneteenth Becomes a National Holiday

News, Traffic and Weather

01:50 min | 4 months ago

Juneteenth Becomes a National Holiday

"June 19th is now officially of federal holiday. You're gonna see me dancing in the street. I tell you, I'm so happy. I don't know what to do. That's 94 year old Opal Lee affectionately referred to as the grandmother of Juneteenth. She's pushed for the day to become a national holiday for years, and now it is at a White House signing ceremony, Li described a momentous day of June 19th. 18 65 General Gordon Granger, um, made his way. To Galveston, with some 7000 colored troops they were from Illinois was in New York, and he had and Red General Order number three. That said that all the slaves were free for slaves in Texas. The news that they were free came 2.5 years after President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation and two months after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered at a town called Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia in signing the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, President Biden said the importance of this day must never be forgotten by making Juneteenth a federal holiday. All Americans can feel the power of this day and learn from our history. Celebrate progress and grapple. The distance. We come With additions we have to travel because, says the president, this is not just a day of remembrance and reckoning. It's a time to repair racial divisions. This is his day profound in my view, profound weight and profound power. Day in which remember The moral stain the terrible toll. Slavery took on the country. And continues to take its also a day, says House Speaker Nancy Pelosi for

Opal Lee General Gordon Granger Appomattox Courthouse President Biden Galveston LI President Lincoln White House Robert E. Lee Illinois New York Texas Virginia House Speaker Nancy Pelosi
14 House Republicans Voted Against Juneteenth Holiday

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:57 min | 4 months ago

14 House Republicans Voted Against Juneteenth Holiday

"The are four hundred and fifteen and the nays are fourteen. The bill is fast texas congresswoman sheila jackson-lee announcing the passage tonight in the house of legislation to make juneteenth a federal holiday congresswoman sheila jackson-lee sponsored the legislation to make juneteenth a federal holiday. She also sponsored legislation to create what they call a national emancipation trail to trace. The news of the emancipation proclamation. The news of the freeing of the slaves to galveston texas. It took more than two years after the emancipation. Proclamation was signed by president lincoln for the news to reach galveston on june nineteenth eighteen. Sixty five once. President biden signs. This bill that has now passed the senate and the house. June nineteenth every year will be celebrated as the juneteenth federal holiday honoring the end of slavery in the united states and like i said it was unanimous. Vote in the senate. It was an overwhelming vote in the house but not a unanimous one there were fourteen republicans who voted against it Fourteen conservative republican white. Guys all voted that we should not commemorate the end of slavery in the united states. Which is kind of vote that will stick to their shoe forever and smell up any room. They ever walk into for the rest of their lives. Forgive me for saying so. But it's worth it's worth noting that they were a rump minority. Yes there were. Fourteen republican men who voted no but there were a hundred and ninety five republican men and women who voted yes for the holiday along with every single democrat in the united states house and every single united states senator from both parties

Sheila Jackson House Of Legislation Galveston LEE President Biden Nays Texas President Lincoln Senate United States House
David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

This American President

06:47 min | 8 months ago

David S. Reynolds on Abraham Lincoln

"Our guest. Today is dr david. S reynolds historian who has written extensively on the civil war era. He's won numerous awards including the bancroft prize. And the ambassador book award just to name a few. And he is the author of the book. Abe abraham lincoln in his times professor reynolds. Thank you for being on our show. Great to be here richard. Thank you great. So much is made about president. Lincoln's lack of experience and his many supposed- professional failures prior to winning the presidency. But you seem to push back against this narrative. So what's the real story here. yeah One of the best books on him david. Donald to lincoln one of the better known books actually says very frankly that no president has ever entered the highest office being the least prepare less prepared than than lincoln that is the least prepared ball and on the surface kind of looks that way because he had less than one year of education just primary school education and Thou that was it and He didn't go through any formal formal of self education. Either but what i found is that he had something far more important. A insatiably curious. If he were on the law circuit around illinois he would go to a farmer and say. How does that machine work. And what brand of cow is that and and the pig over there. What can you describe that to me. Very very curious about the world around him And also he loved to read poetry in particular newspaper small so poetry and poetry kind of organized his thoughts and he memorized shakespeare by the page. She didn't do it to impress people but Suddenly suddenly would come out with a shakespearean soliloquy though is on his hard disk his brain and Or burns poem or something like that. So he was a really exposed to different levels of culture so much so that his contemporary emerson said There's one hero who stands out from the rest as somebody who bridges the entire range of experience from the very highest shakespeare of the opera. And all of that to the lowest. He like body humor and grotesque Frontier humor and emerson said he went down as far so the the very dogs believed in him so In a way who's very very open to experience and is that lincoln that i'm really interested in the songs he loved the poems he loved and what really made him a what what was going on inside of him right and you talk about. Lincoln's ran as an era of sensationalism. Violence susannah humor surreal the surreal in the bizarre which i think for anyone that follows politics now is a bit comforting to know that it's it's been like this for a while. So can you expand on just what you meant by that. Well i think there's been interesting sensationalism for a long time in many cultures but the difference was that because of changes in print printing techniques and also distribution techniques. Suddenly this was available to the masses and so the newspapers they used to be used to six hundred suddenly were once the penny papers and they were filled with sensational stories about murders and suicides and oh adultery and all all all this stuff and so yeah. I mean Linking grew up in this kind of culture. Also in popular humor lincoln said it was characterized by grotesque nece and it was a very violent kind of humor of gouging and and scrapping and scraping and a often feature these kind of frontier types. That were just wild men and people get a lotta thrills out of these kind of very very wild escapades in the crockett manuscripts the davy crockett manuscripts almond accents. Helper and p.t barnum. Who was a sensation. He was founded show business and wasn't in the circus business back then but he was in the museum business and he put on sensational displays like a fiji mermaid. Who is this beautiful blonde. Half naked woman had presented that way in in the posters. But actually it was just a a monkey's torso tied to a salmon's tail assistant in some water. And anyway the biggest. The smallest the fattest put things on display so in a way Lincoln had to serve accommodate culture as well because he was sold as as abe. That's book is called the kind of rough frontiers men with his sleeves rolled up and he's wielding an axe in these splitting the rails and by the time that It was advertised that way. It had been many years since. He's splitting rails because he was a respectable lawyer by the time war. Good suits and all of that and it was making a good income but he allowed himself to be sold as a even though he hated the name but he said without names like old. Abe uncle abe Honesty i wouldn't have been elected. I would not have been elected. So he was sort of put on display almost in a barnum barnum like way in eighteen sixty.

Dr David Ambassador Book Award Abe Abraham Lincoln Reynolds Lincoln Emerson Donald Trump Richard Illinois David Fiji Barnum Barnum
"president lincoln" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

05:44 min | 9 months ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I'm Joey Hudson. In the really factor dot com studios. Glad to have you in as well. You know. Today is February the 12th Abraham Lincoln's birthday. It comes at a time when President Lincoln and other American icons are literally under attack. Over the last several months statues of Lincoln Washington Jefferson, many others have been destroyed by both the angry protesters and by local state federal officials. Recently, the San Francisco school board. Who can't seem to get their teachers in the classroom, but they had time to strip the names of dozens of historical figures. Off of their buildings. One of those being Abraham Lincoln, I want to spend a few minutes this morning with John Crib, author of the historical novel Old Ape is a great book. I've read it. On. I want to talk about the importance of teaching our kids and adults for that, for that matter to honor heroes like Abe Lincoln, especially on his birthday, honor our guest line this morning. Friend John Crib. Thanks for having me. I really appreciate it. Happy birthday, Abe Lincoln. Happy birthday. Indeed. First boy. Great book. You were kind enough to get me a copy of while back through a mutual friend of ours. Mike Sabara. On a while back. Uh, I had a chance to talk with you. And, uh and and read the book. In fact, I started reading it again. Especially for Mr Lincoln's birthday. There literally been thousands and thousands of books. Written about Abe Lincoln. I've read a few of those, not all of them, but a few of them and I have to say, John, your book brings Lincoln toe life. It tells a story in such an interesting away and you wrote it as a novel. Why is that? Yes. Well, thank you, Jerry. Thanks for reading it and for saying that I really, really appreciate it. I wrote. It is a novel precisely to try to bring him to life. I wanted to try to make him a you know, kind of walking, talking, breathing fellow. Not just that stiff image we see on the penny or the $5 bill for the for the reader and also wanted to Help remind the reader of just extraordinary service that Lincoln performed for this nation that he really was that giant hero in the epic struggle to save our country when it was falling apart and defend our founding principles and, of course, help. Three millions have enslaved Americans. And if you can walk through those those years of his presidency with him at his side in the form of a story in a historical novel, I think it helps the reader appreciate all them or exactly that heroic, extraordinary service that he performed. Yeah, my longtime colleague Bill Bennett, who used to do mornings on this very network, The Salem radio Network said. Your novel turns Lincoln into a walking, talking, breathing fellow. That's quite the compliment from one of the smartest men I know. Yes, well, Bill Bill's an old friend and colleague for me to, uh, worked with him at the part of education that on several books since then, and so he was very kind TomTom forward for all day and didn't really really wonderful job with us A while. I appreciate Bill doing that, But yeah, that's exactly right. That's exactly what I wanna do. Bring Lincoln alive for the reader. Yeah. All right. What a Tom. We're living in John, this cancel culture, you say? The wrong thing. You can literally lose your job. They try to destroy you. What do you think Abe Lincoln would think of his statue of being removed in public places about his name being taken off of high school, for example. Well, I mean, I think nobody would like their their name taken off the high school, right? But I think I think Lincoln would really look at all this, uh, unfavorably and I tell you A couple of years before the Civil War on 18 58. He gave a speech in Chicago that right around the fourth of July, and he talked about that founding generation Washington and Jefferson. And others of that great heroic generation. He called them iron men, that generation that thought so hard for the freedoms and liberties that we enjoy today. And Lincoln said, he said, You know, a few of us are actually descended by blood by family from those iron men, especially recent immigrants. But he said, we're all airs on in the sense that when you look at the declaration of independence, he said, You see that is the father of all moral principle. Innocent America as Americans. And the Iron Man who established those principles and freedoms and won them for us are in a sense all of our forebearers. That's why you know, we used to call in the founding fathers, right? And Lincoln said that even if we're not related by blood, he said, is it is as if we are the blood of the blood and the flesh of the flesh of those iron men. So you know, we're all heirs. To know what it was, you know, bequeathed to us by those great heroes. And so Lincoln knew that and I think that he would take great offense at the makers of those names being taken off schools. Although my gallery show guest line this morning, John Crib is author of of a great novel, Old Abe and it truly on this as we celebrate. Abraham Lincoln's birthday today, February the 12th. It truly brings his his story to life. Do you think Twitter would ban hold a big John? I don't.

Bill Bennett Mike Sabara Abe Lincoln Jerry John Crib $5 Joey Hudson Lincoln Twitter Chicago Abraham Lincoln Bill Civil War thousands Bill Bill Three millions John Jefferson Washington President Lincoln
America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:54 min | 9 months ago

America Is in a Dark, Deeply Divided Place: Inauguration Day 2021

"In july eighteen. Sixty four some fourteen thousand confederate troops to just six miles within sight of the us capitol dome for president lincoln. It was a rude shock after all. This was a year after the union. Victory at the battle of gettysburg and the confederacy seen near defeat. Just the nicotine. Seventeen thousand union troops dispatched by ulysses s grant arrived and pushed the confederates back. Well today joe biden. Sworn in as the forty six president of the united states twenty thousand national guardsmen will defend the same capital this time from enraged citizens. It's impossible to understand how we've reached this point unless we look beyond the last few weeks even beyond the election to pre existing conditions such as our decades-long thinning out of civil society. The most recent lawlessness at the capitol reflects an escalating lawlessness that spans political parties religious affiliations age brackets social classes. And so we're faced with. The question will a militarized america. Be the new normal. Will the armed troops protecting the citadel of democracy today be patrolling the streets of writing cities tomorrow will the blatant failures of our institutions and our leaders continued to fester to this explosive level of distrust chuck. Colson often said that unless people are governed by their conscience they will be governed by the constable when people were unable to govern themselves. They then face a choice. Between order or continued chaos. Most often people will choose order which inevitably means the loss of freedoms the freedom to peaceably. Assemble is impossible to maintain when assemblies frequently turned into riots. looting or sedition. The freedom of speech seems particularly vulnerable today when big tech world so much power and decides like twitter facebook and instagram. Already have to crack down on political speech they deem offensive or dangerous and just last week representative alexandria. Ocasio cortez spoke openly about forming a committee to rein in our media environment. That's something that should anyone who has ever read any dystopia novel ever and our second amendment freedoms are most vulnerable. When used as cover by mass shooters are insurrectionist. Perhaps the most consistent refrain from america's founders is that our national experiment would ultimately prove unsustainable unless there was a virtuous citizenry. our constitution simply cannot ever knows who refused to govern themselves. John adams our second president said it most clearly quote. Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It's wholly inadequate to the government of any other and yet americans are becoming increasingly. Immoral and irreligious are shocking. Lack of conscience on display in rising numbers of both deaths from despair by that. I mean addiction self harm and suicide and acts of desperation meaning violent acts riots and even self mutilation pursuit of identity or sexual pleasure. Look we pump poison ideas into our hearts and minds and then call it entertainment. We pump lies into our children and then call it education. The result is that america finds itself in such a dark deeply divided. Play place that alexander solzhenitsyn accurately described in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight speech at harvard. We have he said quote very little defense against the abyss of human decadence such as the misuse of liberty for moral violence against young people such as motion pictures full of pornography crime and horror even the strict. This laws sits alternates in might add even twenty thousand national guard. Troops will ultimately be powerless. Defend people against such moral corrosion but the situation is dire. But it's not without hope as chuck. Colson often said despair as a sin. Christ is risen from the dead and god and his gracious goodness has revealed to us what is true and what is good. He's given us his word and through prayer. He makes himself available to

Ulysses S Grant America President Lincoln National Guardsmen Ocasio Cortez Gettysburg Joe Biden Colson Chuck Instagram Alexandria John Adams Twitter Facebook Alexander Solzhenitsyn Harvard
"president lincoln" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:34 min | 10 months ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on KCRW

"Up from the 10, the North bound side of Valley Boulevard. There's a crash there on that. Z backed up as well in that area, and also six or five North Peck crashing the two left lanes as well from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelly. And I'm Elsa Chang Unity and healing two words that have been thrown around a lot lately. President elect bite and built his campaign around those words. Now it's time to turn the page as you've done throughout our history. To unite to hell. And this week as lawmakers debated whether to impeach President Trump for inciting a violent insurrection at the U. S. Capitol, many Republicans used those same words to argue against impeachment. Here's Republican House member Ronny Jackson. It is clear now, more than ever that our country needs to come together and Congress this Congress needs to lead by example, and begin the process of healing. The deep division that exist among us is Americans. The articles before us today will not accomplish that. In speeches on the House floor, many members of Congress quoted Abraham Lincoln here's Republican whip, Steve Scalise, citing Lincoln's second inaugural address with malice toward none. With charity for all Let us strive on to finish the work. We are in To bind up the nation's wounds. The ideas of national unity and accountability have often been in conflict with one another throughout American history. And to talk about that tension. We're joined now. By Eric Phoner. He's a professor of history at Columbia University. Welcome. Yes. Nice to talk to you. So you know, it wasn't just Republicans. This week, We heard members of both parties quoting Abraham Lincoln enjoys. What does that tell you about how politicians view this moment? We're living in right now. Well, primarily, it tells me that you really can't go wrong by quoting Abraham Lincoln, however, before Lincoln spoke about healing up the nation's wounds, malice toward none charity toward all. He also said. That this war the Civil War was God's punishment on the nation for the evil of slavery, and that if it was necessary to have every drop of blood drawn by the lash repaid by one drawn by the sword, that's Lincoln's words. That would still be justice. In other words, what Lincoln is saying is reconciliation needs justice to come with it. Reconciliation needs accountability. You can't just wash your hands and say, Let's forget about the past. And move forward with healing. Let's talk about that reconciliation requires justice and just sort of when we think about where we are right now and insurrection at the U. S. Capitol. This bitterly divided electorate, literally, members of the National Guard hunker down inside the Capitol. Does the Civil war feel like an apt reference point to you? You know, after this speech about reconciliation that President Lincoln was assassinated a month later by a strong Confederate sympathizer. In other words, reconciliation requires two to tango. Unfortunately, in the civil war, and particularly in the aftermath of the ward of the reconstruction era, large numbers of white Southerners were not willing to accept the freed slaves as fellow citizens. They launched a campaign of violence, the Ku Klux Klan and terrorist groups like that. Just as we saw the other day willing to use violence to try to overturn democratically elected by racial governments. So do you feel that the reconstruction era was an example of Failure of both reconciliation and justice. Well, reconciliation came eventually. But there was a high cost to that The cost was a ignoring what the civil war was about that slavery was sort of erased from the memory of the war, and secondly, black people were not part of this reconciliation. It meant accepting. The southern racial system that was put in place that we call Jim Crow. So in other words, it was a white reconciliation. Ah, lot of Republicans were saying this week that Impeachment would only interfere with national healing with reconciliation. Do you believe that time has told us that accountability? And unity. Mutually exclusive. Well, I mean, you know you have a political party that has been the emphasizing law and order a lot during this presidential campaign. You know, Lauren order seems to require that if people commit crimes of one kind or another, they ought to be punished. Impeachment is the way you punish a president. The division is here. The question is How do you deal with people who violated the law and further exacerbated the division? Well, let me ask you. I mean, what do people even mean? When they talk about unity? I mean, people in this country will always disagree. Right? So what is unity? Ultimately? Well, unity. It does not mean that everybody thinks the same or has exactly the same political outlook. Unity here would mean that people are committed to the democratic process. So you know, those who call for unity in this case seemed to be those who just want to forget about the past and I don't think that's really the past to unity. Eric Phoner is a professor of history at Columbia University. Thank you so much for this conversation today. Pleasure to talk to you. Thank you. Miami is mourning the death of a legal pioneer Osvaldo Soto. He helped Cuban Americans gain equal representation and government and fought for the repeal of an English only law in Miami Dade County. NPR's Greg Allen has this remembrance Osvaldo Soto knew Fidel Castro. They were law students together in Havana in the late 19 forties, and he supported the revolution. But like so many other Cubans, Soto became disillusioned with the Castro regime and left for the U. S. He took part in the Bay of Pigs invasion attempting to oust Castro. When that failed, he took a serious of jobs at US universities teaching Spanish His daughter, Burr, Teela, Soto says he wrote five books on Spanish grammar and literature. He could recite the life of wholesome, etc. In English, Spanish and French. He loved it. After teaching stints in Wyoming, Virginia and Iowa, so to return to Miami in the mid seventies and got his law license, he soon became involved with Spanish American League against discrimination along with longtime friend Eduardo Padrone. Drone, the president emeritus of Miami Dade College, says when he first arrived in Miami, Cubans weren't welcomed by all I remember coming to a boss to go to school and having to sit in the back, and I saw a lot off a lot of signs that not Cubans. No dogs in 1980. The Mario Boat lift stoked anti Cuban sentiment in South Florida, the U. S. Coast Guard reports. At least 40 more votes are in route to key West 125,000. Cubans arrived in Florida over a six month period. Voters passed an ordinance making English the county's official language prohibiting any funds from being used to translate government documents in the Spanish as president of a civil rights group, Osvaldo Soto became an activist, forcing Miami Beach, a city with a large Cuban American population to begin hiring Hispanics. His daughter, Burr Teela. Soto worked with him as a teenager and later as a lawyer, So yes, I was there when he flew the plane over Miami Beach, where it said Miami Beach equal discrimination. I was there at the county chambers. When English only was we won the fight to get it removed the legislation repealed that came after years of work in 1993. But drone says Soto fought for better representation, not just for Cuban Americans, but for all people of color. And believed that was the key to making Miami a world class city. Proculus Soto says her father saw the law as a way to fight for change. I think that came from his experiencing came his experience in Cuba. He wasn't gonna stay quiet. He wasn't gonna let injustice happen on his watch. So those most visible legacy maybe his former receptionist and law clerk, his daughter, Burr, Teela. Today. She's the chief judge of Florida's 11th Circuit, the fourth largest trial court in the nation. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami This'll.

President Lincoln Proculus Soto Miami President U. S. Capitol NPR Burr Teela Eric Phoner Greg Allen President Trump Florida Mary Louise Kelly Congress Miami Beach professor of history Miami Dade County Teela Elsa Chang Miami Dade College
"president lincoln" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:52 min | 10 months ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And this week as lawmakers debated whether to impeach President Trump for inciting a violent insurrection at the U. S. Capitol, many Republicans used those same words to argue against impeachment. Here's Republican House member Ronny Jackson. It is clear now, more than ever that our country needs to come together and Congress this Congress needs to lead by example, and begin the process of healing. The deep division that exists among us is Americans. The articles before us today will not accomplish that. In speeches on the House floor, many members of Congress quoted Abraham Lincoln here's Republican whip, Steve Scalise, citing Lincoln's second inaugural address with malice toward none. With charity for all Let us strive on to finish the work. We are in To bind up the nation's wounds. The ideas of national unity and accountability have often been in conflict with one another throughout American history. And to talk about that tension. We're joined now. By Eric Phoner. He's a professor of history at Columbia University. Welcome. Yes. Nice to talk to you. So you know, it wasn't just Republicans. This week, We heard members of both parties quoting Abraham Lincoln enjoys. What does that tell you about how politicians view this moment? We're living in right now. Well, primarily, it tells me that you really can't go wrong by quoting Abraham Lincoln, however, before Lincoln spoke about healing up the nation's wounds, malice toward none charity total. He also said. At this war. The Civil War was God's punishment on the nation for the evil of slavery, and that if it was necessary to have every drop of blood drawn by the lash, repaid by one drawn by the sword, that's Lincoln's words. That would still be justice. In other words, what liquid of saying is reconciliation needs justice to come with it. Reconciliation needs accountability. You can't just wash your hands and say, Let's forget about the past. And move forward with healing. Let's talk about that reconciliation requires justice and just sort of when we think about where we are right now and insurrection at the U. S. Capitol. This bitterly divided electorate, literally, members of the National Guard hunker down inside the Capitol. Does the Civil war feel like an apt reference point to you? You know, after this speech about reconciliation that President Lincoln was assassinated a month later by a strong Confederate sympathizer, in other words, Reconciliation requires two to tango, and unfortunately in the civil war, and particularly in the aftermath of the war in the reconstruction era, large numbers of white Southerners were not willing to accept the freed slaves as fellow citizens. They launched a campaign of violence, the Ku Klux Klan and terrorist groups like that. Just as we saw the other day willing to use violence to try to overturn democratically elected by racial governments. So do you feel that the reconstruction era was an example of Failure of both reconciliation and justice. Well, reconciliation came eventually. But there was a high cost to that The cost was a ignoring what the civil war was about that slavery was sort of erased from the memory of the war, and secondly, black people were not part of this reconciliation. It meant accepting. The southern racial system that was put in place that we call Jim Crow. So in other words, it was a white reconciliation. Ah, lot of Republicans were saying this week that Impeachment would only interfere with national healing with reconciliation. Do you believe that time has told us that accountability? And unity. Mutually exclusive. Well, I mean, you know you have a political party that has been the emphasizing law and order a lot during this presidential campaign. You know, Lauren order seems to require that if people commit crimes of one kind or another, they ought to be punished. Impeachment is the way you punish a president. The division is here. The question is How do you deal with people who violated the law and further exacerbated the division? Well, let me ask you. I mean, what do people even mean? When they talk about unity? I mean, people in this country will always disagree. Right? So what is unity? Ultimately? Well, unity. It does not mean that everybody thinks the same or has exactly the same political outlook. Unity here would mean that people are committed to the democratic process. So you know, those who call for unity in this case seems to be those who just want to forget about the past and I don't think that's really the past to unity. Eric Phoner is a professor of history at Columbia University. Thank you so much for this conversation today. Pleasure to talk to you. Thank you. Miami is mourning the death of a legal pioneer Osvaldo Soto. He helped Cuban Americans gain equal representation in government and fought for the repeal of an English only law in Miami Dade County. NPR's Greg Allen has this remembrance Osvaldo Soto knew Fidel Castro. They were law students together in Havana in the late 19 forties, and he supported the revolution. But like so many other Cubans, Soto became disillusioned with the Castro regime and left for the U. S. He took part in the Bay of Pigs invasion attempting to oust Castro. When that failed, he took a serious of jobs at US universities teaching Spanish His daughter, Burr, Teela, Soto says he wrote five books on Spanish grammar and literature. He could recite the life of wholesome, etc. In English, Spanish and French. He loved it. After teaching stints in Wyoming, Virginia and Iowa, so to return to Miami in the mid seventies and got his law license, he soon became involved with Spanish American League against discrimination along with longtime friend Eduardo Padrone. Drone, the president emeritus of Miami Dade College, says when he first arrived in Miami, Cubans weren't welcomed by all remember coming to a boss to go to school and having to sit in the back, and I saw a lot off a lot of signs that not Cubans. No dogs in 1980. The Mario Boat lift stoked anti Cuban sentiment in South Florida, The U. S Coast Guard reports at least 40 more votes are in route to key West 125,000. Cubans arrived in Florida over a six month period. Voters passed an ordinance making English the county's official language prohibiting any funds from being used to translate government documents. In the Spanish As president of a civil rights group, Osvaldo Soto became an activist, forcing Miami Beach, a city with a large Cuban American population to begin hiring Hispanics. His daughter, Burr, Teela, Soto, worked with him as a teenager and later as a lawyer, So yes, I was there when he flew the plane over Miami Beach. Word said. Miami Beach. Equal discrimination. I was there at the county. Chambers. When English only was we won the fight to get it removed the legislation repeal that came after years of work in 1993. But drone says Soto fought for better representation not just for Cuban Americans, but for all people of color and believed that was the key to making Miami a world class city. Proculus Soto says her father saw the law as a way to fight for change. I think that came from his experience in Cuba. He wasn't gonna stay quiet. He wasn't gonna let injustice happen on his watch. So does most visible legacy. Maybe his former receptionist and law clerk, his daughter, Burr, Teela, today she's the chief judge of Florida's 11th Circuit, the fourth.

President Lincoln Proculus Soto Miami U. S. Capitol Eric Phoner Congress Impeachment Miami Beach Burr President Trump president Florida Teela professor of history Miami Dade County Republican House Ku Klux Klan Miami Dade College
"president lincoln" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:32 min | 10 months ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"This is talk radio 6 80 wcbm boy Inside baseball. Not here. Totally inside baseball guy are our guy who does these things Because it was Victor while and he turns this stuff around on a dime. I mean, that is audio in in that little promotional announcement That's audio from hours ago me hours ago, and he already had his pat has a package and we have in our air. I mean, that's just phenomenal to me. Pick three. A lot of other way 763 pick 45206. Plus, He's clever and funny is a good guy. By the way, great email in from George, he says. I've never heard somebody real friends is that President Lincoln from Democrats as yesterday? Aren't the Democrats and once they're having the statues of Lincoln taken down by calling him racist. And they also quarter the Constitution on voting. No. Yeah, well, hypocrisy knows very few bounds. Let's grab Rick in Miller's Oh, he's up next. Good morning, Rick. Thanks for hanging on. Good morning, Bruce. I'm gonna make if you allow me a couple quick points in an opinion what? I was down there at the Capitol on the steps. I didn't go all the way up because I felt the tension anyway. I saw that guy want to cower with the horns one. He was just stoking the fire. I did seem t solve people around with helmets on on guy. I do believe that Antifa was inserted in there. Um and I saw people helmets all over and I believe that they were Boston, possibly and tea for two..

President Lincoln baseball Boston Victor Bruce Rick George Antifa Miller
Boston removes controversial Lincoln statue

Democracy Now! Audio

00:43 sec | 10 months ago

Boston removes controversial Lincoln statue

"In boston. A statue depicting a formerly enslaved men kneeling before president. Lincoln has been removed after the boston. Art commission voted unanimously. To take it down during the summer at the height of the anti-racist nationwide uprising the vote came after a campaign spearheaded by boston. Artist tori bullock. Who responded tuesday to the removal. This is a great day for the city of boston. In case you didn't know this has been up for one hundred and forty one years for boston to be the first place to come up with any kind of legitimate process to decommission these controversial statues in a respectful manner. It warms my heart and makes me proud is a proud day for me and for my city

Boston Art Commission Tori Bullock Lincoln
Vandals Try to Pull Down Chicago Park's McKinley Statue

NBC Nightly News

01:20 min | 11 months ago

Vandals Try to Pull Down Chicago Park's McKinley Statue

"Now to the mystery after a nationwide spree of destruction aimed at statues of historical figures like george washington and abraham lincoln tonight. Who might have done it. And why lane alexander reports in spokane washington. It was a statue of president. Lincoln splashed with red paint in portland. A cemetery dedicated to veterans of america's nineteenth century wars tagged with graffiti toppled george washington statue in minneapolis and chicago. This statue at mckinley park historic monuments and during the thanksgiving weekend all targeted by vandals on many a similar message anti-colonialism graffiti no more genocide and the words land back an apparent reference to a campaign focused on returning american land to indigenous peoples so far in portland three arrests for facing grocery store all of it reminiscent of similar backlash against confederate statues. In recent years message that people are trying to deliver that they want to see a change. A change in the system of white supremacy that is characterized by these public events and memorials that speed to a very painful pass across the country. Police are still searching for those responsible.

Lane Alexander George Washington Abraham Lincoln Mckinley Park Portland Spokane Lincoln Minneapolis Washington Chicago America
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 1 year ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
National Nonprofit Day with Hannah Hethmon

Podcast Gumbo

03:40 min | 1 year ago

National Nonprofit Day with Hannah Hethmon

"Hey Paul this is Hannah Hessman August. Seventeenth is national nonprofit day. My favorite kind of nonprofits are museums. Of course, all our favourite museums are locked down right now struggling to get through this virus like the rest of us. So I thought we'd celebrate them a little and I challenge you on that note to find a great podcast created by a museum. Go. Well Hannah under most other circumstances, this would have been a minor challenge. But as it turns out, we have a mutual friend that has a podcast about museums and that same friend was my eighth guest on this show. For my first recommendation, I'm going with museum archipelago. When the host Ian Elsner was my guest I mentioned an old episode about the Apollo Eleven landing site. But I'm not going to take the easy way out and I'm going to suggest to newer and very relevant topic statues. In this episode and talks about the relationship statues and museums, he goes into the tearing down toward causton statue and one of his guests talks about the slippery slope. So to celebrate this National Nonprofit Day learn about a nonprofit consider donating time or money to one that you believe in and let us know using the National Nonprofit Day Hashtag. Today's guest is Hannah Hetman. Hannah's the writer and producer of the Vagina Museum podcast. Yes. You heard that correctly. In New York there is a sex museum which I've been to. In Iceland, there is a Pinas Museum which I haven't been to. And now there is a Johnny Museum which opened in London in two thousand and nineteen. The podcast. Liked the museum is all about smashing shame and stigma around the vagina through awareness education and route puns. The first and recommended episode is entitled. See you next Tuesday as in the letter C. and the letter, you would you like me to wait for you to figure it out. As most people know there are many terms for the vagina, but there is one that stands out as the most offensive if you still haven't figured it out, it starts with the letter C and ends would Tuesday? This episode answers a lot of questions about that specific word. For last recommendation Hannah recommends if people saw that slavery was getting started why didn't they stop it by Q. and Abe? She says and I quote. This podcast is produced totally in house by President Lincoln's cottage in DC. They take questions from their guests. They can't answer at the moment and die super deep into them with the help of historians to address big ideas in American history loosely connected to Abraham. Lincoln. Of course, but it's so much more than a podcast about Lincoln Unquote. For. Today's episode hot sauce. I'm going to relay on link that Hannah gave me. If I got stuck trying to find an episode related to this day. Hanna is the owner of better lemon creative audio that produces podcast for museums, history organizations, and cultural nonprofits. So check out the director she created that anyone can add to. Come back on August, twenty fifth where I'll be talking about close a topic I have no business talking about.

Johnny Museum Hannah Hannah Hessman Vagina Museum Hannah Hetman Pinas Museum Ian Elsner President Lincoln Hanna Lincoln Unquote Apollo Eleven Paul Iceland Causton New York Director ABE London DC Writer
"president lincoln" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Decades status. First Social Services secretary in the office hasn't gone to your office for approval to the council. We tasked with keeping an open mind wants you not even like metal health checks. Spring or just your bare body in the hospital recovering from possible affection. He was discharged on Jon Jon talking little today and a mild out Stanley Now to everything except your old was appointed by President Lincoln in 1998 was the only source of problems on Saturday night is near Dillon Road brought to us by and we'll have to billet people a little confident and others differently, even scraping. That must have been a lot of tail reports and not just that. Probably about a lady. What have you been talking A lot of transition in our killer. Get farm split chicken. Just give it to me for only one thing. That avenues probably 3.1 92 96. 59. 6391 25 Whatever neurologist about 95 193 reasons. I everything to you when I was 19 kfbk, everyone fucking news driving another three days, okay? Someone wanted to come here by fun as much as I do chairs the long days and delighted to see that new set of challenges in terms of millions and millions of nastiness. They're wonderful. John trusted until very pleased with the way we're out of business and that knowledge into their field. There sounds a little bit of compassion for the service. They're just really did find a principle that makes him great. Challenges socially without you. Your family just happen to be smart. They're absolutely committed. Three healthy. 152 800 or just.

Jon Jon John President Lincoln secretary
Washington DC’s congressional delegate wants ‘problematic’ Lincoln statue removed from Lincoln Park

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Washington DC’s congressional delegate wants ‘problematic’ Lincoln statue removed from Lincoln Park

"The movement against statues deemed offensive has an ally on Capitol Hill it's DC delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton who is introducing a bill to take down a Lincoln Park statue depicting president Lincoln and a slave Lincoln is standing the slave is kneeling Norton says the statue fails to note in anyway how enslaved African Americans pushed for their own emancipation former slave started the effort to build the Lincoln monument after he freed them but when it was first unveiled abolitionist Frederick Douglas said he didn't

Eleanor Holmes Norton Lincoln Lincoln Monument Frederick Douglas DC Lincoln Park President Trump
"president lincoln" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"End of slavery in the U. S. two years after president Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation thousands making their way over the Brooklyn Bridge others marching near the gateway arch in St Louis they prayed in Atlanta and in the nation's capital they paused for a moment of silence at the Martin Luther king junior Memorial with president trump headed to Oklahoma for a rally tomorrow Juneteenth is taking on special significance in Tulsa trucks a music stage and dozens of hand sanitizing stations greeted Michelle Davis and her eleven year old son as they arrived at this event commemorating the emancipation of their ancestors I asked my son while ago if you know anything about Juneteenth and he told me he didn't if you don't even know I can't believe I haven't even told them about it now she has told her son in hopes of landing a new chapter to his life story Jim Ryan ABC news Tulsa and the Oklahoma Supreme Court has rejected a request to require all who attend the rally tomorrow to wear a face covering and a socially distance inside the arena COPD cases are rising in cities like Houston mayor Sylvester Turner supporting in order that was signed by Harris County judge Lina Hidalgo to require face coverings for everyone over the age of ten fully support the ater that has been signed I believe that as you indicated and no shirt no shoes no mass no service on the Phoenix city council making masks mandatory to hospitalizations are on the rise in seventeen states Arizona and Florida have set records for daily code cases for the third time this week the chief of naval operations as captain Brett crozier will not be reinstated to his command of the USS Theodore Roosevelt admiral Mike Gilday had I known then what I know today I'd be really I would relieve them back then that time the acting secretary David macpherson felt that the investigation should be broader increase in scope stocks closed lower today you're listening to ABC news there is no news.

David macpherson ABC secretary Theodore Roosevelt Brett crozier chief of naval operations Florida Harris County Houston COPD Jim Ryan president Brooklyn Bridge president Lincoln St Louis Mike Gilday Arizona Phoenix city council Lina Hidalgo Sylvester Turner
Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

Squawk Pod

03:00 min | 1 year ago

Juneteenth: People are hungry for change

"We observe June team alongside millions of other Americans. It's a one hundred fifty five year old holiday commemorating the day enslaved African Americans learned of their freedom on this day June nineteenth in eighteen sixty five major. General Gordon Granger of the Union army arrived in Galveston Texas and informed the enslaved black population that the civil war had ended, and slavery had been abolished eighteen, sixty five. That's over two years after president. Lincoln's emancipation proclamation took effect. Texas on the other confederate states ignored the proclamation, and in doing so submitted enslaved African Americans to thirty extra months of uncompensated labor and inhumane treatment this. This day the day honoring the reinstatement of freedom that should have never been taken away the day that freedom was lawful, and yet still withheld represents many Americans, the difference between the ideals of the American dream and the reality for black people in this country, the June team holiday has largely been observed by the US black population wall, and efforts to make June Tiv a national holiday have fallen short in Congress as twenty twenty, though forty seven states and the District of Columbia have all passed legislation recognizing June Tepe as either a state holiday or a day of observance this year. Corporate America is also making president. Several large companies are honoring the day as a paid holiday for employees, Google. Uber General Motors Ford J. P. Morgan Nike and others are observing team today CNBC reporter Gene Wells reported today from once center of Commerce. That's also marking this special day. All the dockworkers at all twenty nine West Coast ports, including here at the largest largest port complex in the country are taking an eight hour work stoppage today for June teeth and up at the port of Oakland, where the local is seventy five percent black. They are going to have a a march and a caravan as local President Trent. Willis says there is systemic racism at times still even within the Union we've had incidents of hanging nooses. That we sense addressed. And just just here and there we've had some some evidence of systemic racism. Showing its ugly head. Here, where we work every day, Corporate America is all in on this saying that June teeth will be paid permanent holiday including target, which will pay working employees, today, time and a half. Other companies are still open, but canceling meetings like Amazon, which will offer workers, a variety of opportunities online to reflect on the day and GM where in many plants the work will continue, they will stop for eight minutes and forty six seconds in recognition of the death of George. Floyd one note about the ports guys in this union dockworkers are allowed one work stoppage a month. They are all happening to take it together today

President Trump United States Galveston Texas Corporate America Union Army Gordon Granger Uber General Motors Google Amazon Lincoln Floyd District Of Columbia Oakland Congress J. P. Morgan Nike Willis Cnbc
Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

Randy Baumann and the DVE Morning Show

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Companies and state governments celebrate Juneteenth, giving workers the day off

"Today is June eighteenth a June. Nineteenth commemorates the ending of slavery. In the US the origin of the holiday comes from June nineteen, eighteen, sixty, five, when General Gordon Granger of the Union army, arrived with soldiers in Galveston Texas and told enslaved African Americans their the civil war had ended, and they were free more than two years after President Lincoln had signed the emancipation proclamation. June teeth is now celebrated in black communities across the US, and some have called for it to become a national holiday. Nearly all states recognize June teeth with some limited special status in this year. The NFL Nike and twitter have all recognized. June eighteenth as a company holiday. Governor Tom Wolfe is marking June. Teeth is a special holiday closure for employees under his during. For the first time is office as the more than seventy three thousand workers will get either the day off or a compensatory day to use it another time. If they are often, office remains open. The Governor says today is a moment to honor African, American history, and to reflect on how everyone can promote equality, liberty and justice for all people.

Governor Tom Wolfe United States General Gordon Granger President Lincoln Twitter Union Army NFL Texas
"president lincoln" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:30 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Of freedom and opportunity thanks to president Lincoln about president trump as we pray for healing and unity she said during this present time of unrest let each of us also dedicate ourselves to doing our part to create a more perfect union and let June change services source of inspiration of what we can achieve when we appeal to the better angels of our nature and unite in the fight for freedom justice and opportunities for every American I like that statement very much we definitely need to pray for healing and I think healing is aways away Juneteenth will now be unofficial holiday in New York City starting next year the the mayor said it's going to be a New York City schools holiday an official holiday in the city he said it's a celebration of the liberation that never really came the fact is it's also a day of reckoning four hundred years of American history tell us one simple thing for four hundred years one group of Americans has been treated profoundly unequal many states incidently have made Juneteenth unofficial holiday would it not be something that president trump announced tomorrow at the rally in Tulsa that he would urge Juneteenth to become a federal holiday what would they do with that I mean they didn't do much with the news that he moved the scheduled rally for tonight to tomorrow because of respect for this day what what what what his critics do if he made that amounts I've no it's really no knowledge information believe me I'm not I'm just saying wouldn't hypothetically wouldn't that be something she was Nancy Pelosi is marching around ordering portraits being taken down from the halls of the U. S. capitol trump could actually do something pretty monumental and I don't think people of good faith would object this is the day that slavery finally ended up at the door the day that we commemorate the end of slavery in America make it a national holiday would be a pretty big deal but we've got portraits coming to absolutely little pop quiz what do you think the political party is of the former house speakers who were who served in the confederacy that pelo see ordered removed what political party do you think they belong to just just out of curiosity because if they were Republicans I know that's how the media would report the removal of the portraits but they didn't seem to mention I didn't hear much about their political party all I heard was they were you know they served in the confederacy so that's got to come down it's got to come down the Israeli I I saw a fascinating article by Kira Davis over RedState dot com saying that when the trump era is over whether he loses in November or whether he serves another term the trump era will come to an end although his his haters think he's never leaving but I think he's going to become a squatter at sixteen hundred Pennsylvania Avenue but she writes that senator Tim Scott would be a terrific presidential candidate she says I've been watching Scott for years as a passionate advocate for school choice I'm always moved by the politicians who take a stand for equality in education and against the current government monopoly it's a big reason I've come to enjoy trump's presidency he's the first president I can remember speaking boldly about education disparity and how your zip code should not determine your educational opportunities she says for those of us in black America who know what it's like to be trapped in a failing district without the financial comfort to buy a private education it's a big deal senator Tim Scott she says has been pushing for school choice since the day he landed in the capital he also has the a pension for finding the emotional center of an intelligent political argument while avoiding the temptation to pander it's a skill all too lacking in today's politics there are few more stunning examples of this then senator Scott's speech this week on the Senate floor the South Carolina senator calmly carefully dismantled every single Democrat talking points against the police reform bill and even against his very presence is the only black American senator in the chamber may we never forget Dick Durbin using the word token in explaining his opposition to senator Tim Scott's police reform efforts she says I don't know if Tim's got has any intentions of running potus is the worst job in the world there's a reason men age so quickly in the role although I don't see trump Beijing do you think you know what I I mean I've seen pictures of Obama three for six years into his presidency Clinton all of them George W. bush I don't even if you start even recognize him now is there is gonna be real grave real balding hairs stand out the job ages you I don't feel like the job is age Donald J. trump she says I'm on board with a Tim Scott presidency he's the future of the Republican Party I'd love to see him leave the nation into a new era of growth and politics she says what his speech on the Senate floor tell me I'm wrong what we got Democrats saying that by going to win in a landslide wonder what tomorrow night a look like in Tulsa Oklahoma incidently for people who are going to Tulsa you'll be met with early temperature bury me for monitors those those touchless thermometers are gonna take your temperature they're going to give you face masks you're not going to be required to use it judge where the facemask but you'll be offered one don't kill me don't yell at me if you are vulnerable I urge you to wear one heck I urge you to where one period but go ahead go ahead don't call me drag me through of barbed wire now that I said you should wear a mask tomorrow night at the trump rally because that's a bit like it or not if you're in California you're now been ordered by the emperor of floor of California to wear a facemask the emperor of Tampa Florida wants you to wear a facemask at five o'clock today you live in Tampa you go outside you leave your house apparently have to wear a facemask I don't know what they're going to do if you don't no idea what's going to happen to you they're going to take you to jail give you a fine but gold Gavin Newsom issued a statewide order mandating the use of face masks in public this is the really weird thing about Florida where I live is that cases are spiking no question about it new confirmed infections are rising three thousand a day thirty one hundred today twenty nine hundred today but Ashley were hospitalizations and deaths are that number keeps declining I spoke to a neighbor of mine yesterday real great guy I love this guy hit his wife for such a wonderful couple and she's fighting and beating cancer and he is a loving supportive husband and it works I think there's something to do I don't know exactly what to do with the with.

president Lincoln president
Chicago - Pritzker orders flags to be at half-staff for Juneteenth

Wintrust Business Lunch with Steve Bertrand

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Chicago - Pritzker orders flags to be at half-staff for Juneteenth

"Governor Pritzker has ordered flags flown at half staff on Friday to mark Juneteenth to commemorate the end of slavery state representative leshan forded been calling for a formal recognition president Lincoln signed an executive order to cancel me in America I'm asking governor Pritzker to sign an executive order for rapid relief for black people in New York governor Andrew Cuomo signed an order today making Juneteenth the state holiday in

Governor Pritzker America Andrew Cuomo State Representative Leshan Forded President Lincoln Executive New York
Sojourner Truth

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Sojourner Truth

"Today's warrior was an evangelist to became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights. Let's Talk About Journal Truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabela. Balm free. She was born into slavery in Ulster. County New York in seventeen ninety seven. In eighteen o six at the age of nine years old, so joyner sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars. Join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands, so joyner was sold once again. This time to a man named John Dumont. Interestingly, because to journal grew up in New York, state originally settled by the Dutch she actually only spoke Dutch were living with Dumont. She learned to speak English At that time support for emancipation in new. York was growing. Dumont promise that he'd set so join our free before it became the law to do so. But eventually, so joyner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing. Sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen, twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in new. York, She was forced to leave her other three children behind. When she later reflected on the escape, sojourner said I did not run off for I thought that wicked, but I walked off believing that to be alright. During her journey to freedom. Journal! into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon. After learning about her predicament, they took so Jordan around her baby. In until the states Samantha patient of slaves took effect. The van wagons treated with kindness and compassion, so join our leader said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher. During her stay with the couple, she became a devout Christian. Around that time, sojourner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth. because. She felt it represented her mission of fighting for justice. joiners famous words, truth is powerful, and it prevails. Echo that sentiment. After, moving to New, York City, joyner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church joining the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. So are also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being illiterate, so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement, she spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance, civil and women's rights. In eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron. Joyner gave her most famous speech called Ain't dia woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted aecom an argument that women should have equal rights. Because Jesus was a man. In her speech, she asked. Did Joe cry, come from. He came from God and a woman manding have nothing to do with it. When the civil war broke out, so joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army. For her efforts in the war and the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet President Lincoln in eighteen, sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen, eighty, three at

Joyner New York Sojourner John Dumont Isabela Joe Cry Ulster Aecom York City President Lincoln African Methodist Episcopal De Isaac Union Army Samantha Methodist Church Ohio Jordan Akron
"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Yells back about this time a germ of Oklahoma research German from Massachusetts is recognized I thank you Mr speaker Mr speaker I have been inserting various articles into the record does showing other states and other parliaments and congresses across the world doing operating remotely to prove a point that it can be done and I don't know whether my Republican friends are just intimidated by technology I mean listening to some of them I think they think bifocals or radical idea but the bottom line is we can do this the United States Senate had a remote hearing and it worked out just fine the bottom line is that we're in the middle of a health care crisis a health crisis a pandemic and we need to make sure that we can continue to do our work in a safe and orderly way I mean if I'm if I was cynical I would think the reason why my Republican friends are against this is to make sure we don't do anything and I get it you may not like the fact that we're trying to address the needs and the concerns of the American people but we are going to do this and I would urge I hope I hope we get a a bipartisan vote on this with that I like the one minute to a distinguished Majority Leader Mr horror German from Ellen's recognize Mr horror I thank the gentleman for yielding which Baker I want to remind us today of president Lincoln's words to Congress he said this the dog was of the quiet past are inadequate for the stormy presents the occasion he continued is piled high with difficulty and we must rise to the occasion as our case is new so we must think anew.

Massachusetts United States Senate Ellen Baker Congress Oklahoma president Lincoln
Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:40 min | 1 year ago

Sojourner Truth: The life and legacy of pioneering anti-slavery and women's rights activist

"Today's warrior was an evangelist. Who became an outspoken advocate for abolition temperance and women's rights? Let's talk about joyner truth. Sojourner truth's name at birth was Isabel Balm free she was born into slavery and Ulster County New York in Seventeen Ninety seven in eighteen o. Six at the age of nine years old sojourner was sold at an auction along with a flock of sheep for a hundred dollars so join our later described. The slave owner is cruel. She endured repeated beatings at his hands. Sojourner was sold once again this time to a man named John Dumont interestingly because Turner grew up in New York state originally settled by the Dutch. She actually only spoke Dutch while living with Dumont she finally learned to speak English at that time. Support for emancipation in New York was growing. Dumont promised that he set so joyner free before it became the law to do. So but eventually sojourner came to realize that he had no intention of freeing sojourner fled with her infant daughter in eighteen twenty six one year before the abolition of slavery in New York. She was forced to leave her other three children behind when she later reflected on the escape sojourner said I did not run off for. I thought that wicked but I walked off believing that to be all right. During her journey to freedom sojourner made her way into the home of a quaker couple Isaac and Maria van wagon after learning about her predicament. They took so joyner and her baby. In until the states emancipation of slaves took effect the van wagon and treated joyner kindness and compassion sojourner later said that their benevolence inspired her to become a preacher during her. Stay with the couple. She became a devout Christian around that time so joyner officially changed her name from Isabella. Balm free to join her truth because she felt to represented her mission of fighting for Justice. So joiners famous words. Truth is powerful and it prevails echo that sentiment. After moving to New York City sojourner worked as a domestic servant. She became active in the Methodist Church. Joining the African Methodist Episcopal Denomination sojourner also used her experience to help others volunteering as a social worker for former slaves. Despite being literate so joyner became a popular speaker and the abolitionist movement. She spoke in front of hundreds promoting religious tolerance civil and women's rights in eighteen fifty four at the Ohio. Women's rights convention in Akron Sojourner gave her most famous speech in called anti a woman. She spoke about racial and gender equality and refuted a common argument. That women shouldn't have equal rights because Jesus was a man in her speech she asked. Where did Joe Cry? Come from he came from God and a woman mandate have nothing to do with it when the civil war broke out Joyner helped recruit black troops for the Union army for her efforts in the war. And the abolitionist movement sojourner was invited to meet. President Lincoln in eighteen sixty four. She continued to teach and lecture about social justice until her death in eighteen. Eighty three at the age of eighty six.

Sojourner Joyner Akron Sojourner African Methodist Episcopal De John Dumont Ulster County New York Isabel Balm New York City New York President Lincoln Joe Cry Union Army Ohio Isaac Methodist Church Isabella Maria Van Turner
"president lincoln" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Ago I signed a bill promoting Charles McGee to brigadier general earlier today in the stars of the shoulders in the oval office Carol McGee our nation I salute you thank you Sir rooms to the founders from the soldiers of Valley Forge to the marchers at Selma and from president Lincoln's to the Reverend Martin Luther king Americans have always rejected limits on our children's future hi members of Congress we must never forget that the only victories that matter in Washington four victories that deliver for the American people the people of the heart of our country their dreams are the soul of our country and their love is what powers and sustains our country hi we must always remember that our job is to put America first the.

Charles McGee Carol McGee Valley Forge Selma president Lincoln Congress Washington America Martin Luther
"president lincoln" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on KTRH

"Mostly right your election is in the public interest kind of a president does which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest that cannot be the kind of quid pro quo that results in impeachment I quoted president Lincoln when president Lincoln told general Sherman to let the troops go to Indiana so that they can vote for the Republican Party let's assume the president was running at that point and it was in his electoral interest to have the soldiers put at risk the lives of many many of the soldiers would be left without their company wouldn't that be unlawful quid pro quo no because the president Hey believed it was in the national interest but be he believes that his own election was a central to victory in the civil war every president believes that that's why it's so dangerous to try to cycle analyze the president to try to get into the in into proceeds of the human mind everybody has mixed motives and for there to be a constitutional impeachment based on mixed motives would permit almost any president to be impeached and we may depend on more this we have a divisional wonderful clips from today most of us working can't watch this all day but we're gonna move briefly I maybe not so briefly into this peace deal that the president has put forward with Benjamin Netanyahu the prime minister of Israel it is a fantastic and brilliant the steel although The Washington compost and CNN and others have a post this there's numerous Arab states they have welcomed this numerous Arab states that support this but you wouldn't know that the kingdom of Saudi Arabia Egypt Qatar now called gather Michael Bahrain and there are others I just can't remember them who support this effort who are behind this effort the I mean it's really quite shocking it's really quite remarkable and the ambassadors to the UAE Bahrain and Oman three Arab Muslim countries in the Middle East I attended I attended the ceremony yesterday I was there I tend to the sermon with the president and the prime minister of Israel have you heard this anywhere today so while the left in America The Washington compost editorial page thanks lance at the constipated news never get others reject this the left in America Bernie Sanders.

Michael Bahrain Middle East UAE Saudi Arabia Washington Republican Party Bernie Sanders America Oman Bahrain president Qatar CNN Israel prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu Indiana Sherman president Lincoln
"president lincoln" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Streets alone Gastone drunk I presume order so tell you well it's hardly surprising I am this. Mister vice president. a prisoner in my own hotel room were only following orders. sit down and shut up was at a party or orders. no Sir when I told him I was leaving and if they didn't like it they can kiss my lily white **** I was physically restrained I am distressed Mister secretary deeply distressed how did you get past the guards. bathroom window. should be down a drainpipe in spirit often dark alley like son used up lady of the night as they were only trying to keep you safe Sir as I instructed them to do please for your own safety return to your hotel. not just someone tells me what in the hell is going on around here there was an attempt made tonight on the president's secretary Seward and as we have recently learned so you need I have reason to believe we're under attack. yes Sir as such it's imperative we keep you safe you must allow my men to escort you back to your hotel this already Robert E. Lee has surrendered general Johnston the ranking Confederate commander refuses to accept unconditional surrender he has more troops under his command the leader of the rest of the southern generals combined Johnson is taking the fight to general Sherman as we speak we are still at war Sir president Lincoln had a difficult time understanding that concept which is why he is grasping for life just on the other side of that wall do not be a fool. your back up at me Stanton I don't know if I'd be in call of fooled by you or any other man walks. maybe our Christian how long ago Christ he could be halfway to Virginia bye now send everybody we have an on him down. the actor he's involved in this manner yes Sir he shot president Lincoln. can't be right booth is he was he's what Sir..

Sir president Lincoln president Mister secretary Gastone Lincoln. Sherman Johnston Robert E. Lee vice president. Seward Virginia commander Johnson
"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:34 min | 2 years ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Programming from tried WCS beer from Washington you have an ongoing our history grants I think in general or eleven in eighteen sixty three he points to the Jews as a people are selling cotton. two are buying cotton from contraband south in in bands choose from a whole his whole area of of the of the war in Tennessee area now the president president Lincoln says no. father Abraham comes to the the as he said it father Abraham comes to the the aid of the Jews we have a course and we've had it throughout American history to in World War two if you look at polling Gallipoli two or two and you ask people who are the greatest threats to America and then you asked in nineteen forty four who is the greatest threat to America are the Germans no. are the Japanese no. third Jews. nineteen forty four already we know Jews are being met killed in the millions in Europe. and it's the Jews within the the disloyal people in in America you know we go in more kind of less crude ways with people like Walton Scheimer. you know that the kind of the implication is well you know do they have kind of dual loyalties here no no it's okay to lobby on foreign policy. you know do we have. you know other people who have attacked the D. Israel lobby. sometimes use the same type of thing so the idea of disloyalty is just resonates through the years now the president on that we saw the second day the first day he didn't mention disloyalty to who. now again I can't get into the present head I'm guessing it he also felt and disloyalty he does all the things for Israel from his perspective. and the Jews are thankful what is this no loyalty. now again this is making an anti semite you know I think these are these are questions that are we are not particularly useful in this in this thing if we if president trump is a problem and they're certainly things that he has done that I think do not help the cause in anyway another time he talks about how much use against anti semitism that's great more does it the better. right when he says this loyal. it does we have the Benjamins with the congressman Omar these will get over it let's stick on trucks and I ask that this is a real good to them I I think we're we're a lighting some issues but we're we're gonna get to those and also Daniel when you heard the remark did you think it was a new Katori just another weird thing that he says the district accord with you. I wish I could say that I still listened in a critical fashion to Donald Trump I added provided hear him say that this is the first time I've actually seen the the video I saw it on on Twitter remember was followed by those extra remotely weird tweets about being the king of the Jews and blah blah blah I can't remember the other day I was just awful as I I would. I hesitate to impute anything to Donald Trump other than statements in this instance I there is a history is a long history as as I rightly laid out of of of loyalty and disloyalty trips which she rightly noted we heard we heard and in the reference to the Benjamins I don't think that that's what he was talking about any more than I think that that's what he was talking about when he's and graze the slogan American America first which also was by the way anti semitic you know. these always devolve into conversations in which people who are not psychiatrists engaging pop psychology and and pop psychiatry I have no idea what Donald Trump is thinking I am persuaded after several years of immersion in trump world here in Washington that he does not think about these things the way that any normal person dies he is not informed by history he doesn't think about father Coughlin or or Charles Lindbergh and even after being told he thinks to himself I will redefine miss right okay not that I can't possibly have any hint of of America first ism in my in my history. you will now associate this with me and of course I'm also so that's great now again that's pop psychology I don't know whether it's true but I think this is the the same case that is not to to negate that is not to to diminish the meaning of words even when they are stupid because I think they they were stupid but at at at their base unfortunately I think they are much more rooted in how you say ignorance rand and anything else alright so we've lane okay is a senior vice president at American enterprise institute to tomorrow's response in a moment there some cards on your church if you have any questions you'd like to direct towards us our students will come by and pick them up and now we come to you yeah so I just want him or her IRA IRA it gave you a sense of the legacy of this loyalty disloyalty issues through the history of Jews particularly in western societies and and the and and the enlightenment and that's important but there is something different about the United States and there's something different about the liberal democracy that was established in the United States that's a different for Jews and that's what I think. field may be threatened in this moment and statements like this it makes them feel concerned that it may be threatened and I want to explain why because when Napoleon said that the emancipation that was conditional citizenship okay that would even be a Jew at home and a man in the street a Frenchman in the street you can you don't get to be Jewish in the street you don't get to bring your Jewish identity into the public square okay the United States is the first place in modern Jewish history. where Jews were able to have been able to create a vibrant communal life for themselves and be full participants in society and politics not just as individuals but as Jews. and. that is. this. I'm not not because of something special about American Jews that's something special about America. about the nature of this pluralistic liberal democracy so in that context and in context is particularly concerning when we hear charges of two loyalty no matter where they come from and it's why. and yes so I think we need to think about this not just in terms of. Jewish livelihood but in terms of the health of our liberal democracy because that's what's at stake yes we have. tomorrow I agree with you United States is different in many ways in terms of into it but Primerica button namely were mostly different. this last half the twentieth century yeah I mean if we had a long effort yeah it is it is in our and we have Washington sacking about Jews as to the terminal synagogue in that Jews are then we have no we have we give no loyalty to bigotry it's after so we have a long history we also have a history of Jews during remembering their history and hearing the anti Semites I just read this great piece by a letter from the secretary Hey in the rose on inspiration and he had been working as private secretary and the Jews were complain complain complain they were they were worried about their fellow Jews in Russia being killed in pogroms and they wanted to push the administration come out and Hey was fairly sympathetic he actually was not as much of an anti semite as most people here and he wrote about the for Jews the poor dear Jews they think we're all bully boys. and this we did not have that sense of. we have a sense of with with inteiro sounds great smells great friend the Jews. there were Jewish Americans you came to America and you have your part a melting pot you're melted and you're just Americans you were Jewish Americans now when it came to politics he knew we had to go into Jewish war is simply districts and talk about Jewish issues but this stop you know into the thirties we had great anti seven it is qualitatively different than Europe ever was and today is different in Europe. but we should always remember this is part of our historical memory not a memory of just fear. your memory of just everything's been great. that things could change not just on anti semitism but as you said tomorrow are very liberal democracy and I think we are very tied as the Jewish community to this point realistic limit liberal democracy if we lose it. the goal Medina we're gonna lose well very quickly you know because we have another major actually get to before we wrap up the whole another major issue another reason I'm gonna be as succinct as I possibly can I think that one I I respect what you say Tammy and I and I understand and I understand that it is troubling to hear the president say things even when they come from a place of stupidity rather than a place of hate none the less I do feel being in the political sort of muscle every day that a lot of the expressions of hysteria about the plight of the Jews as well as the plight of women as well as the plight of pretty much every other group are at risk because of Donald Trump is wrapped up in the hyper partisan. fill the politicization of everything this is there are I don't want to dismiss. no matter where it comes from right is it seven I agree I understand and I know and I know that you're actually getting shock a good segue into our next I hope what I hope will be our next segment but it is important to remember that a lot of the hysteria that really the hyper mental as it incidentally shin comes from an antipathy towards this president some of which he's earned not entirely all of it so I'm just going to put on the table that the three of you have have made it very very passionate arguments against the politicization. Washington DC folks are one of these village. the three of you on this a little bit and I think this next question is I don't see how we get outside of politicization in this town president. this way our president trump's remarks about loyalty and disloyalty were made in the context of his ongoing feud with a group of four democratic Congress woman known perhaps misleadingly as as tomorrow point out as the squad of two members of this group refused to leave and a lot Omar or harsh critics of Israel and the vehemence of their activism has sparked accusations of anti semitism of the left so let's talk about that for a moment since we're interested in politicization my question for the three of you is a hard one and the concerned whether you think these charges of leftist anti semitism in this country are justified and whether the easy word and equivalence can and should be drawn with forms of anti semitism associated with the right for example do BDS initiatives and attempts to delegitimize the state of Israel which we do see coming from the left to present any quarrel lesser or greater dangers to American Jews who would like to have the first crack as well I'm gonna take the first crack at it Jack and I'm gonna start by saying I don't I don't think it will last for or greater is the issue here I think the three of us have been describing an environment that is too great..

Donald Trump president America Israel Washington Omar president Lincoln Twitter Abraham father Abraham D. Israel Tennessee Walton Scheimer. congressman Europe. Daniel DC
Slave trade remembrance concerns all humanity

UN News

11:16 min | 2 years ago

Slave trade remembrance concerns all humanity

"The history of the global slave trade concerns all humanity as has it impacts on modern societies according to the assistant director general for social and human sciences at the u._n. Cultural organisation unesco go now dr al-nashif was speaking to you and news ahead of the international day for the remembrance of the slave trade and its abolition celebrated needed annually on the twenty third of august twenty five years ago unesco launch the slave route project resistance liberty heritage a landmark initiative if that helped break the silence rounding the slave trade and slavery and a komo began by asking nada alma chief about the impact of the project given the origins of unesco our foundation obviously with the u._n. System on the ruins of the second world war <hes> creating peace in the minds of men and women was the ultimate <hes> core of the constitution and the fact of ignoring and obscuring major historical <hes> events with something that we wanted to redress and this was the hidden history of course that unesco wanted to have societies come to terms comes with and we believe that much of the issues actually remain today <hes> what's happened twenty five years ago. I think the most significant achievements were having decided to pursue this in a scientific way. <hes> we chose a a concept of route because of the dynamic movement that's his implicit <hes> and i would say that we have managed to foster to raise a much bigger awareness of the ethical but also of the political socio economic the cultural consequences of this entire exchange of people in civilizations <hes> we have prompted home to the development of research universities publications of books <hes> many pedagogical materials films and of course this <hes> many many debates and public engagements <hes> so and i think by giving the slave rate this universal dimension <hes> we have made sure everyone everyone understands. This is not a partial history the history that concerns the whole of humanity and we need to <hes> to discuss it. Maybe if i can just add a <hes> two things was a main accomplishment of the project was the fact that <hes> it's contributed to the recognition of the slave trade and slavery as a crime against humanity entity which is a specific category of crimes by the world conference against racism racial discrimination xenophobia in durban south africa two thousand and one <hes> and then also it allowed to advocate for the international decade for the people of african descent which is ongoing <hes> now <hes> and <hes> to which which we have many many attributes among them. I don't know if you've seen it but <hes> we contributed to the erection of a beautiful permanent memorial dedicated to the victims of the slave. They've trade inside the compound near the visitor's entrance one of these essential aspects of telling the history of slavery. It's not forget it so it's not repeated what lessons can be learned more. Specifically amongst the use wendy are exposed to the history of slavery and slave trade. Unfortunately as i said many of all of these issues are recurring and so it is very important for us at young people understand the caroline. <hes> as i said this is about freedom. It's about human rights. It's about dignity <hes> and it's about the culture of emancipation and what we want to do is make sure that young people in particular understand how we can see memory in a positive way i mean despite all the pain that is in memory and the healing that has to happen <hes> we want to turn this into a constructive pivots for young people to know what must not happen again and i think fighting thing racism in particular is a very important part of what we do so <hes> some things is for example making sure that people understand that these <hes> <hes> now. We have things that we call sites of memory. It's bringing everything to the surface and especially investing. I think for young people into understanding this as part of cultural social heritage we have now a label which was created in two thousand and thirteen cool site of memory associated with the slave roots and we have excuse of memory in africa and south america north america europe indian ocean and the caribbean we have produced resource books for example food and the handbook for new approaches in interpreting and representing slavery in museums again. There is a lot of exchange. Now and young people are participating participating from the perspective of cultural expression <hes> about how we represents this issue in these public domains all of that is very important and maybe <hes> maybe finally under this thing. There are many cultural creative activities that we enjoy today that come from the resistance of those who were enslaved slave. I wanna talk about jazz reggae hip hop kappa wera <hes> and i think these are all methods through which we reach younger the people <hes> more more intimately. I think and more profoundly what do you think it's the role of the artists specifically in with the healing the pain that comes with this period of history well. I think artists have a remarkable obviously for for for unesco cultural expression is a core commitment but it's also a corps belief <hes> in the sense that we rely not on our artists so we have a fantastic coalition of artists who've been working with us <hes> on the general history of africa including understanding slavery in fact for <hes> today marcus miller the great jazz artists recorded according to the message for us <hes> his voice is an easy amplification of the messages. You know so we have material. We have the scientific evidence. Don't we have this study but the artists in their own creativity. I think can reach a much wider audience <hes> so that's in the sense of music and art but also these new issues that we're trying for example the concepts of tourism of memory you you know the idea is to help develop a tourism <hes> which helps to sensitize visitors to various countries around the world where there's already a lot of movement and we we are trying to rely on artistic insights as to how to make those experiences more accessible to ordinary people <hes> and i think this is all a very big role was for artists who have been very very generous in extending their support to us <hes> four events or advocacy mainly as the until reaching out to many many parts of the population. Can you talk a little bit onto obstacles encountered and <hes> what our future prospects of the project the difficulties of course are the fact that it took a long time for us to <hes> billions the body of knowledge we have an international scientific committee tea and it took time of course to build these specialists that who come from very different backgrounds and regions <hes> in fact they are this scientific the committee meeting today in china and then on where we launched the original project so <hes> you know when we met for the first time the project was conceived conceived in one thousand nine hundred ninety four in bene- it was widow and we have an event today in rita to commemorate that <hes> but <hes> ah the subject matter one of the challenges of course it's subject matter is very sensitive. It is very emotive. It is <hes> deeply deeply psychological. It is traumatic. <hes> so the notion of bridging conversations of facilitating the exchange exchange is very very complicated. We were in a meeting in virginia last year where the estates monticello president lincoln and so on are very active in the issue issue of reparations now but to get to that you have to come to tom <hes> with the legacy itself first of all and another another challenge is the acceptance of the recognition so we had someone come from for example the university of wisdom which is just understanding now that many of the oldest most wealthy families bristol made their money from the slave trade so the accountability <hes> understanding <hes> <hes> how this approach needs to be sensitive but very clear <hes> because it is about human dignity she and the end is very very complicated <hes> and then i think what we'd like to do you need to link to the fight against racism and discrimination because there are many new forms of enslavement and exploitation. I mean it's it's milt true <hes> that this is something of the past i think until the mid ninety s we thought of slavery as a thing of the past but we now understand from the human rights campaigners from many ngos there are many forms of contemporary slavery that still exists and there are many governments still working on anti slavery <hes> and i think this is a little bit the the future what we'd like to do is to understand given this relevant how we can really <hes> further. I think popularize is knowledge and focus for example on initiatives that helped cities to develop philip affirmative action policies how we can work with lawmakers to repair or correct historical distortions <hes> and how we can really <hes> put together coalitions of people who are committed to making a change in the spirit of the poor commitments commitments set any of the united nations but the broader community to human rights in this day and age. We believe that the burning issues that we face in today's the world if you read the headlines just today in fact the new york times <hes> this morning <hes> has an article on what they're calling sixteen nineteen projects which examines the legacy of slavery in america just today but if you look at equity <hes> development human rights cultural pluralism dialogue reconciliation conciliation most of all prevention. I think <hes> what some people have called the black hole in history. <hes> this is what we are dedicated zip through. This is why we have this international day to remind everyone and we look forward to close cooperation across the globe to make this really a marker of never again.

Africa America Dr Al-Nashif Assistant Director Durban Unesco The New York Times South America Wendy China South Africa Milt United Nations Caroline. Marcus Miller Virginia Philip
Body African-American history museum founder discovered in trunk

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Body African-American history museum founder discovered in trunk

"Police in Louisiana are looking for who is responsible for the death of a seventy five year old woman whose body was found in the trunk of a car as NPR Shannon van Sant reports Sadie Roberts Joseph was a founder and curator of an African American history museum in baton Rouge Roberts Joseph found at the museum in two thousand one and organized an annual commemoration of the day president Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation act freeing slaves in the American south the museum features exhibits of African art minority inventors and in nineteen fifty three bus from the civil rights boycotts and a twenty sixteen newspaper interview Roberts Joseph said quote across racial lines the community can help to build a better baton Rouge a better state and a better nation her body was found Friday afternoon and investigators say they're waiting for a corner to determine the cause of

Louisiana Shannon Van Sant Sadie Roberts Joseph Founder Roberts Joseph President Trump Lincoln NPR Nineteen Fifty Three Bus Seventy Five Year
"president lincoln" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Yeah. There's something happening with Elizabeth. Warren horns popularity is gaining in the polls nationally field full of candidates. She's the one with a plan for everything I got a plan for that. Plant for that. She planned to win the places that made Donald Trump. President Lincoln twenty twenty dollar puts us in trouble live Fort Wayne in the heart of Trump country. All in twenty twenty candidate town. Running. Do you be? Say thank you, all for being with me here at saluda Brugge staff place address, you're probably enough is twenty twenty east Washington boulevard. It's a former brewery, and bottling plant back all the way back to nineteen three. It's our venue, tonight and for very special townhall event. We in the heart of the industrial midwest here in Fort Wayne, Indiana. It's a city that seems fortunes rise and fall over the past century in a state that helped power to victory and twenty sixteen amid his promises of protecting jobs and keeping factories open. Now, a lot of people talk about how the Trump basis, the Trump base and no one's ever gonna defect from down from ever. But when you go back to twenty sixteen you look at those seventy seven thousand votes, it cost three key states. When you look at the over performance, Donald Trump had states like Indiana and Ohio, and those swing states. He narrowly eked out. The question is are some of those voters for play and what would it look like if they were willing to listen or vote for another candidate? It's the reason I think that Elizabeth Warren wants to coop. Some of the central economic rhetoric of Donald Trump, Donald Trump came to places like Fort Wayne, and all through the industrial, west and said, I'm going to be your protector and fighter to keep jobs here. We'll just in the last day, swing through the industrial midwest Elizabeth Warren has unveiled yet another new plan this one geared towards what she calls, economic patriotism and attempt to kind of recast, some of the Trumpian appeals to people's material interests in many of the places the country that have seen manufacturing go away and economic stagnation set in, and with that, I'd like to introduce tonight's guest center with wars. It's good to see you the folks in this room. I say very excited to see you well, during all of them. So here's here's a question that I got from we went back and forth, people we said, where, where would you like to do at townhall? We'd like Tom with you. And you guys that we media. Yeah. Are we? We're in Fort Wayne, Indiana, because people in Indiana understand jobs. They understand how you build an economy that doesn't just work for thin slice at the top, but in a Konomi that works for everyone, but people in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Also understand that living it to a handful of giant multinational corporations to build our economy, just even working those big corporations have any loyalty to America. They're not have any loyalty to American workers..

Donald Trump Fort Wayne Elizabeth Warren Indiana Trump President Lincoln saluda Brugge America Konomi Tom Ohio Trumpian twenty twenty dollar
"president lincoln" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on 790 KABC

"And how to know if you're in trouble. John you want to comment on the national emergency. Yes, sir. Yeah. So-called this is setting. This is studying dangerous precedent. I'm not gonna argue the merits of the wall should be built or not built on the next president comes in a democratic president for that matter like say, it's president ward status elected in twenty twenty. We just had another shooting today in rural Illinois, they could say, you know, what I'm calling to curtail the second amendment because violence is. Epidemic. It's a national emergency right to your point. The other day. It's your point you could easily go. Hey, president Lincoln did it during the enduring the recent rescinding the corpus the what was it the habeas corpus? And this is just simply another version of us having to flex the constitution. And we're going to do it. And and so so what do we do with this creep in the it it? The creep in the sort of a power user patient power, the creep towards more executive power. What do do in my opinion? What congress both houses both houses and both parties and independents needs to start exercising authority giving it up slowly. But anything's political as we know, and it's like, well, you know, what this is gonna look that's my date or my constituents back home. So I'm gonna pass I'll let the president take the plane and they've been doing this. And you know, they gotta stop, you know, we're paying you guys. We voted for you guys in there. Make some hard decisions. Okay. Doing your job. Pass the buck don't pass the background. Yes, sir. Oh, yeah. But even so John, I agree with you from a leadership standpoint. But I don't know what tools they have. I guess I you need a constitutional lawyer figured out. How how do you begin to constrict executive power tart? Yeah. Well, you know the. That's above my pay grade. So but somebody will call somebody that somebody will give me that information. They appreciate bringing it up. Our number's eight hundred two two two five to two. This is weird. We are talking about the national emergency so-called, and we're going to be talking about stunt performers asking for demanding recognition by the Academy Award. There's a petition I guess they're bunch of high profile. From time. There should be a stuntman category for the Oscars. Oh, good. Totally. All right. So we'll talk to you, by the way, there's an update one. At least one person has now died in the shooting in a war terrible. Yes. Eight hundred two two two five two two. That is leeann tweeden am Dr drew and this is midday.

president president Lincoln John executive Illinois Epidemic congress Academy Award
"president lincoln" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"president lincoln" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"I saw the story the other day did you ever notice that? Sometimes I wonder what would happen if Julius random thoughts. He looks like puppet. I don't know. She said she can't plans it's just random. That's all it is. All right in in. Today is national trivia day. January fourth is the Dayton. It's a Friday for those of you who never have known what day of the week. It's spent here last week. Yeah. Exactly hiding in years. A little trivia fact that you can take to the Bank since nineteen seventy-one lake superior state university and Sault Sainte Marie Michigan has issue had has issued permits to unicorn hunters aren't they also the university. Does the words that the incoming freshman classes never heard of like they've never seen a CD your depend. They come up with words and phrases that the incoming freshman class have no idea what it means. Exactly. So you wanna go hunting the unicorn just wanna frame what that looks like you can go there also before settling on the names of the seven dwarfs. I think we've told this before Disney considered these were the names for the seven dwarfs for Snow White and the seven wars chess chesty tabby burpee Daffy Hickey, we see an awful, I think they have better. They did better who were Lincoln logs invented by president Lincoln. I think so. Bright.

Sault Sainte Marie Michigan president Lincoln Daffy Hickey Dayton Julius Disney Bank
Quoting Lincoln, Mattis signs off as secretary of defense

On Air with Doug, Jen and Victoria

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Quoting Lincoln, Mattis signs off as secretary of defense

"Defense secretary. Jim Mattis said goodbye to his employees at the Pentagon on his last day or them to stay focused on their mission. It a farewell message to defense. Implies Mattis quotes from a letter president Lincoln wrote to general Ulysses s grad during the civil wars waning days. Let nothing which is transpiring change hinder or delay, your military movements or plans Mattis resigned over President Trump's decision to pull US troops from Syria in his letter badass rights. He's confident defense department employees will remain undistracted from their sworn mission and will work alongside allies Mattis will transfer authority to deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan in a phone. Call later

Jim Mattis President Lincoln Donald Trump Patrick Shanahan Pentagon President Trump United States Syria