20 Episode results for "President George Bush"

No Spin News, July 8, 2020

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

12:35 min | 5 months ago

No Spin News, July 8, 2020

"Hey Bill O'Reilly here. Welcome to the no spin news for Wednesday July two thousand twenty. Stand up for your country. All of you who are participating in our campaign. We are mailing out the stand for your country stickers. Today should add them soon. We'll tell you more about that. At the end of the program very important program that we have launched here and we hope you'll. You'll participate now. One of the reasons that we all need to stand up for our countries because we're such a divided nation, and it really hurts me as an American who loves my country I love to see us all on the same I hate to use the cliche page, but I really like to see a lot of common ground among all Americans. It's not happening. So think back twenty years ago September eleventh. And what happened well? We got blown up actually nineteen years ago. By Al Qaeda and that brought most Americans together. To right that wrong and we got behind the new President George Bush. The younger and we did accomplish our goal. We did knock out the Jihad. We did it. All right with the help of other nations, but it was us. But that. Unification that fell apart once the Iraq war went south so in the beginning. Was Alright The USA and the coalition invaded Iraq to remove Saddam Hussein was not cooperating with UN weapons inspectors, and we thought had weapons of mass destruction that he might use. So once the Iraq campaign went south then the country fractured again against conservative Liberal, Republican Democrat, and on and on and on and on okay, so President Bush younger got reelected. Because John Kerry was a pretty bad candidate. Nobody trusted him, and then Barack Obama came in defeated John, McCain all the while. The country is divided. We did not unite behind Barack Obama. He said he would unite. The Buddy didn't. Although he was reelected as Bush, the younger was. He bit beat Mitt Romney another week. Candidate Romney could not articulate why he would be better for the country, and he could have easily because the economy was still terrible. But anyway. Divide divide divide Divi- divide, and now we're at the breaking point. That's how bad it is here. So you see the forces. It's obvious what is happening, but with the killing of George Floyd. That ripped off any kind of civility. So now it's destroy America. We destroy this country. and. You'll have the media. Academia colleges all of that on the destroy America side. And then you have traditional conserve Ericans. Wait a minute. We believe the country's noble, and we believe that this nation offers more opportunity than any other nation on earth which is. That is true. So. Why do we want to blow it up because of slavery or some historical injustice? Doesn't make any sense. Now sense is not what's what's employees here though. So I was talking with a very intelligent liberal woman a few days ago and I don't do this often. OFF Media so I'll obviously interview anybody on TV, but in my private life. I don't do this much. But there was an occasion where I was in her proximity, and she was giving me the. America's a white supremacist nation content lie which I looked at her. I said well I don't believe that most Americans don't believe that. All right, so you may believe it, and under our Constitution of a writer. Believe it, but it isn't a fact. And to present it, as a fact is fallacious, always using big words because she was very smart. So. She said well. You're just discounting slavery and Jim Crow and I said. I'm not discounting anything Madam. I submit to you. Every single nation in the world. has a historical injustice and more than a few. So by your calculation if America has to be remade because of slavery, which is what The New York Times of saying. Then Germany the Soviet Union China. Every other country would have to be remade. And reparations wouldn't just have to be paid to African Americans but every minority including me. Now her eyes get wide I said my ancestors lost their land in County Cavan, Ireland. It was seized by the British crown. And when the British crown sees the two acres that my poor ancestors farm, the father had a heart attack, and the mother was left with two sixteen year old boys who she couldn't feed. So she put them on a coffin ship with a worked their way across the Atlantic, throwing bodies into the Atlantic Ocean. And landed in Brooklyn. That's how my side. The Riley side started, so I'm entitled to reparations from the British government. Am I not. You are listening to a free excerpt from Bill O'Reilly dot. dotcoms no spin news broadcasts where you can actually see me. We'll be right back after this message. So, you may know. Tammy Duckworth she's being considered as VP candidate under JOE by. Our. She's a senator from Illinois. Fifty two years old. Former. I think she's in the army all right? She was deployed to Iraq as a Black Hawk helicopter pilot for the Illinois Army National Guard. On November Twelfth Two Thousand Four Helicopters Hill by ground surface to air missile. She lost her legs and partial. You use of her right arm. So Ms Duckworth Patriot. Okay and she went to Iraq for country. She's a Thai American Raisin, why? And she got severely injured. Though. That's truth. And you gotta respect that. The problem is that now that she's a senator from Illinois. She's gone way far left. Will take. George Washington I don't think anybody would call him a traitor and there are moves by some to remove statues of him. Is that a good idea? I think we should listen to everybody I think we should listen to. The argument there, but remember that the president at Mount Rushmore with standing on ground that was stolen from native Americans. Who had actually been given that land during a treaty? Well, what does that have to do with George Washington and that's true by the way when you read my book killing crazy horse out in September, you'll see. What happened to the sue? And, the US and how they dealt with each other. Spell it out for you, but nothing to do with. George Washington instead of sticking up for the father, our country a man. So, heroic I it's. You can't even describe it, and if you don't believe me, re killing England. Because I. Describe it there, but it takes you know seventy eighty pages you such a hero. Yes, his wife, own sleeps. Yes, and he benefited from that, but that doesn't override the fact that we wouldn't have our freedoms. If, not for George Washington. Okay. So instead of saying. No we shouldn't tear down statues of George Washington as any responsible senator would do. She does. She diverts it into Mount. Rushmore is a bad thing. So. Tucker Carlson. Criticises Duckworth, all right, and I'm going to get into it, but. Tammy Duckworth has a right to her point of view and sodas cost. So. He calls her names and he shouldn't do that. But. His criticism was pretty much what my criticism is if you're a sitting senator and can't stand up for George Washington. You're wrong. You're wrong. In the course of his analysis, Mr Carlson says. We wanted Senator Duckworth program and debated, but she would not. She's a coward. Shouldn't have said that, because then the media immediately I mean immediately said I'll look at this. Tammy Duckworth lost both legs fighting for her country, and this guy calls her a coward. That's not what he did. It's totally out of context, but you can forget about context and the United. States of America's media. That's never going to happen. Okay, so as I, said we're shipping the stand up for you. Countries stickers today. We want you to get your packs I kept the price as low as I can keep it all right, give them out to everybody, and if somebody will take, tells you a lot. Doesn't it? So display where you want. Be Proud of your country, it is a noble nation. Stand up for your country. We do not Neil. Kay campaigns very successful got a couple hundred thousand out WANNA get two million. Out of quick break back with a final thought on. Fun Stuff to do this summer to mitigate all the terrible stuff. Okay, final photo, the. Summer's going fast. whizzes by. and. This is a very tough time I. don't even remember a tougher time this thing. is devastating people and economically physically it's awful, and now we have the far left. Assaulting are the traditions of America's. It's not a good time so I want you guys have some fun and take your mind all that so number one you got to plan. Nature activities nature all right, so you're the beat. Beaches are really good. Stay six feet away that kind of thing. If you can't boat. You don't have to worry about the cove it on a boat. Little fishing little jumping off the ball of jet skiing whatever it is water. Hiking Great. Just, make sure you know hiking with people who are hacking, no hiking with hacking, okay? Golfing? I'm not a golfer. I'm terrible at it i. like the Miniature Golf. I can handle that I. Am the big off. I'm bad, but golfing. You're out there. You know you can do it, and then you distancing and it's a good diversion. SAGAAF is good plan. What you're GonNa Watch on TV, so there's so many good movies so many of them right down a movies that you want to see again and then. You can get everything out and then like planet out. What I'm GonNa, do and finally read a book read five books re ten bucks. I'm going back and reading the classics I'm reading. Cannery row by John Steinbeck. I'm going to read a hemingway book. All right. You know you got time now. Read read read read. Read read read regular books. Fill your leisure time with fun activities very very important this summer in particular.

George Washington America Tammy Duckworth Iraq senator President George Bush Bill O'Reilly Tucker Carlson USA British crown Illinois Barack Obama Mitt Romney Senator Duckworth George Floyd Golfing Hiking Ms Duckworth John Kerry
Fed Considers Rate Cut as Political Pressure Mounts

WSJ What's News

11:23 min | 1 year ago

Fed Considers Rate Cut as Political Pressure Mounts

"Whatever you and your employees are working for ADP, designing better ways to help you achieve it from HR talent, and time management to benefits and payroll. That's ADP always designing for people. President Trump wants more criticizes the Federal Reserve. We have people on the fed really warrant, they're not my people, plus technology. Stocks just had their best five days stretch, and seven and a half years. The tech sector is really the one that benefits from the sort of the economic and political good news and the murdered hot brother of North Korean dictator. Kim Jong UN is a CIA informant. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Kim Gittleson? Let's get started. Now, before we got in term main story this morning, just how President Trump's repeated hectoring of the fed has complicated interest rate decisions. Here's what you missed were reporting this morning that North Korean leader. Kim Jong UN's murdered half-brother Kim Jong nam was an informant for the CIA Mr Kim met on several occasions with agency operatives, according to a person knowledgable about the matter. He was killed at an airport in Malaysia in February twenty seventeen when two women smeared his face with the nerve agent via axe the US and South Korea blamed the attack on North Korea. But that's something the country denies it's great until it's time to find gifts. Then I discovered shutter fly their photo. Books are the perfect way to give some and chances are if you've ever found yourself trying to turn a digital photo into a physical on. You've stumbled upon companies like shutter fi or its rival snap fish today. We're reporting that the private equity firm, Apollo global management has made an offer. To by both firms for roughly two billion dollars. The deal terms have not been disclosed. It comes at a difficult time for the industry as online photo sharing services have become ubiquitous. Meanwhile in Los Angeles, the biggest event in the video games industry. The three expo is currently underway. Art technology reporter Sara needle men has been speaking with JR Whalen from the conference about the latest offerings from the likes of Microsoft, and Google, so Sarah Microsoft took the spotlight even before the expo. Got started Xbox One owners are excited, I would imagine because they'll soon be able to stream games onto their mobile devices Microsoft normally holds an event just ahead of the expo. And during that event, the company announced more than sixty games coming to the XBox and indeed it did say it will start publicly testing game streaming from its expert phone console to mobile devices in October. No Microsoft certainly isn't the. I company to announce this Google announced its own game streaming service earlier this month Gokul is doing is, they're streaming games from almost any internet connected device. So it could be TV a laptop a desktop or mobile phone, although right now, it's just the pixel three phones that they put out and service will launch in November. And it's a ten dollars monthly or you can buy games Alicarte end. They're gonna watch with about thirty games though. Most of them are older games that have been out for a while. And they're not any of the big, big blockbusters that gamers are most familiar with, but there are some a couple of big names out there. And at least a two, new ones launching on the service that was there, a needle men speaking with JR Whalen, about the e-3 expo. Now, our main story this morning, just how President Trump's repeated hectoring of the Federal Reserve has complicated interest rate decisions. Here's what the president had to say to CNBC yesterday in response to a question about whether he thought the fed had listened to him. Listen to me, and get a we have people, it's more than just Jay Powell. We have people on the fed really weren't, you know, they're not might people. So how has this changed the environment in which the fed must determine whether economic conditions warrant a rate cut are fed reporter, Nick Tim Roche has been speaking to Charlie Turner from Washington. Well, let's be up front about this Nick has any fed chief ever faced such pressure before, from a president actually, yes, you could probably say that this is something fed cheers in the postwar period, have faced, what's different about President Trump? Is that his criticism has been much more public of the fed? So just to. Go back in time in the nineteen sixties, the fed chairman by the name of William mcchesney Morgan was very unpopular with president Johnson recall Johnson was trying to boost domestic spending while fighting the Vietnam war, and he did not like the fact that the fed was raising borrowing costs to limit inflation. And so he was very critical privately of Martin. There's a story about how he pushed him up against the wall said my boys are dying in Vietnam. And you won't give me the money I need. So there is a history of presidents putting pressure usually in private on the fed chair. What's different about this president is that he does it pretty often in public via Twitter via interviews or off the cuff statements to reporters on his way to Marine One helicopter. And so it creates a perception problem for the fed because the fed doesn't want to be seen by the markets is responding to anything but the economic and financial. Data that they analyze that could change the way investors. Think about inflation, and bond yields, and so forth. You described three challenges fed chair pal is navigating at this point. What are they so the fed has to set the right interest rate of the right time? The fed has to explain clearly, what they're doing and why they're doing it, and those are two challenges that every fed leader faces, but the third one is unique as we've talked about. And that is he has to deal with this public pressure, campaign, very loud, criticism from the president something that we haven't seen since the early nineteen nineties President George Bush senior was the last president who even said publicly what he thought the fed should be doing President Clinton and his two successors Bush, and Obama maintained this rule where they were not going to comment on the fed, and Clinton's advisers convinced him. This was a good policy for them because they had seen how President Bush. This is a first President Bush had called on Greenspan to lower rates. And Greenspan didn't go along with it. And so Clinton's advisers told him, look, you really don't have anything to gain by pressuring the fed. They're going to do what they think they need to do. And you putting pressure on them isn't gonna make their life any easier. They may feel like they have to do the opposite to to, you know, to look independent so Clinton and then Bush forty three and Obama never said anything about the fed, and that was a tradition that continued up until about a year and a half into Donald Trump's presidency doesn't fed chairman pal. Face pressure to cut rates for the rest of the year, including at the June meeting. So the Fed's next meeting is in less than two weeks on June. Eighteenth and nineteenth and it seems likely that even if they don't cut rates at that meeting, there will be a debate about whether they should. And so now you're getting into a situation where even if didn't look like the fed was going to need to cut rates when President Trump started calling for the fed to cut rates. The president has taken some actions that could worry, the fed enough that they now think they have to cut interest rates. The markets are expecting the fed will cut rates by their July meeting. And so it looks much more likely now than it did just a month ago that the fed is going to have a very serious conversation about whether and when they need to cut their benchmark interest rate, you can find next article on WSJ dot com. Capital. One knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created, you know the Capital One assistant that catches things that might look wrong with your credit card you no catches over tipping, duplicate charges, or potential fraud. And then sends an alert sheer phone helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching after your money when we're not Capital One. What's in your wallet? See Capital, One dot com for details. On two markets. The S and P five hundred information technology sector rose nearly nine percent in the past five sessions. That's its best performance since October twenty eleven according to the Dow Jones market data. So what's causing renewed optimism in the sector are markets? Reporter, Mike Byrd has more. I think the biggest reason that the US tech is doing so well moment is really down to the US, Federal Reserve, which is signaled that it's not only done hiking interest rates, but it may be looking to interest rates, and the Texas has really the to the lead US equity market for a number of years during the economic recovery after the financial crisis that is really coming back again, solo spurred on by those lower interest rates is also a news on trade inches of reaching a sort of punitive deal between the US and Mexico. And the tech sector is really the one that benefits from the sort of. The economic and political good news on these fronts, as it has done in the last ten years. In now this guide. Here's what to look forward to later today. President Trump heads to Iowa for rally. It's his first visit this year to the perennial battleground state. Unlike the Democrats focused on the February caucuses hilby looking ahead to the general election. He's also visiting the state amid unrest over tariffs. Many of which have been placed on farm exports and Canada has said it will been single use plastic as early as twenty twenty one here prime minister Justin Trudeau announcing the move the magic of your phone dismembers. Maybe you're camping or cottage in canoeing, or fishing. No imagine those memories, punctuated by dead birds or fish. Or maybe a pile of copy Cup lipped lids and shopping bags covering the ground or floating all around, you. That's the reality for our kids. If we don't act know finally, some good news. If you're planning a summer vacation, the average price for a gallon of regular gas has hit its lowest level in more than two. Two months in some parts of the country gallon has fallen below two dollars. That's according to figures from price tracking firm gasp, buddy. It comes after the market for US. Crude oil briefly fell into bear market territory last week. That's what's news from the Wall Street Journal. Thanks for listening.

President Trump Federal Reserve president President George Bush President Clinton Kim Jong UN reporter US Wall Street Journal CIA ADP Kim Gittleson JR Whalen Capital One Nick Tim Roche Capital One Microsoft Apollo global management
Deaf President Now protest ended - March 13, 1988

This Day in History Class

08:07 min | 1 year ago

Deaf President Now protest ended - March 13, 1988

"Hey, Mario Lopez here. And I really hope you can check out my new podcast. Listen tomorrow. LTM definitely side of me that you've never seen before. So please, listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. What's up everyone? Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day today is March thirteen twenty nineteen. The day was March thirteenth nineteen eighty eight. Deaf. President now a student protests at gala debt university in Washington DC came to a close as a result. Doctor I king Jordan was named the eighth, but I death president of the university. Just a week earlier another hearing person had been chosen as the seventh president of the university. Gala debt is a university for people who are deaf in hard of hearing. So this decision was a disappointment to many people on campus in the death community. There were plenty of deaf. People who were qualified for the position people have been asking for a deaf person to be named president for a while and two of the three finalists for the presidency for death. But the board of trustees had decided to appoint Elizabeth as denser, the only hearing candidate to the position this sparked outrage in marked the start of a week-long protests that would catalyze change at the university and an American deaf culture in law. Jolla debt university was founded in eighteen sixty four but in all those years leading up to the protests in nineteen eighty eight. The university had never had a deaf president considering is university specifically for the deaf in hard of hearing that may seem pretty ridiculous, but there were still prejudices against deaf and hard of hearing people and there was conflict within the community of educators of deaf. People some educators dubbed manual lists. Support it using sign language to teach deaf students the other camp. The oral lists believe deaf people sit learn to read lips and speak so educators at Galleria in other schools for the death were mainly people who could hear some schools didn't hire any deaf. Teachers and in the beginning at gala did there weren't many deaf candidates who are qualified to be president of university because education for the death in the United States was sore. Really lacking. All of this is why by nineteen Eighty-eight gala debt had only had male presidents who could here, but between nineteen eighty three and nineteen eighty seven the school had trouble keeping presidents. It went through three of them in that short time when the seventh president Jerry Lee step down in nineteen eighty seven the board of trustees began the search for someone who could take his fight. A consultant was hired to make sure the school found the best candidates by mid January. The pool was narrowed down to three deaf people and three hearing people and on February twenty eighth. The three finalists were announced Dr Harvey Corson, doctor, I king Jordan. And Dr Elizabeth Zinser course in Jordan were both death men, while Zinser was a hearing woman. By this point. There was no valid reason for a deaf person not to be president of the university throughout the search for a new president deaf, advocacy, groups faculty and alumni have been lobbying for a deaf. President President George Bush in civil rights leader Jesse Jackson had even made known their support for a deaf president of the university. But it was the action of the university students that really kicked the momentum into high gear on March first more than one thousand students. Faculty advocates in the deaf community and other supporters of the movement participated in a rally to demand a deaf president over the next several days, the student body government, president asked then sir to withdraw students camped out in tents ended TV crew came out to the campus. So when the board of trustees interviewed each candidate on the fifth and the fix it seemed like there was a good chance. The next. Resident would be death. Instead at six thirty pm the board handed out press releases saying they pick Zinser the only hearing candidate and people were upset. Some of the protesters met with the board after interrupting a press conference the chair of the board in one of the deaf. Trustees held but not much progress was made. So students began boycotts, sit ins and marches in protest of the board's decision by March seventh protest leaders have formalized their demands they were that one. Elizabeth Zinser must resign. And a deaf person we selected president to Janesville men must step down as chairperson of the board of trustees three deaf. People must constitute a fifty one percent majority on the board and four there will be no reprisals against any student or employee involved in the protest, but the board did it. But so the protesters formed the deaf president now council an assembly of students faculty staff alumni, interpreters fundraisers and legally as on the protests gave more media attention and on March tenth Zinser announced her resignation. On Sunday, March thirteenth the board met and announced that they would honor the other conditions doctor. I king Jordan was named president Jordan went on to play a role in supporting the Americans with Disabilities Act of nineteen ninety and he remained president until two thousand and six. I'm Steph coat, and hopefully, you know, a little more about history today than you did yesterday if you'd like to learn more about the deaf president now protests, listen to the episode of stuff you missed in history. Class called deaf. President now. You can find us on Twitter Instagram and Facebook at T D, I h fee podcast before you here in the same place tomorrow. Hey, guys. I wanna talk to you about a podcast family secrets when Danny Sapiro husband axed her if she wanted to submit her DNA for genealogy test. She said sure why not she didn't think she learned anything new after all she came from a well documented family with deep roots? But when the results came back, she was shocked the story she had been told about who she was and where she came from was completely different than the DNA results. Staring. Her in the face family credits is a new podcast from the New York Times bestselling author Dany Shapiro in a world with DNA tests in the internet revealing information at every corner a staggering amount of family secrets are surfacing. And in this podcast. Danny Shapiro talks. With her guests about their family secrets about how everyone has. One and how they experience isn't just painful, but also liberating an ultimately attached for us all to fully become the people. We were meant to be episodes are released on Thursdays. Listen and subscribe to family secrets on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

President president president Jordan Elizabeth Zinser President President George Bus iheartradio Apple Jolla debt university Mario Lopez Dr Elizabeth Zinser New York Times Dr Harvey Corson Zinser Danny Shapiro United States Washington Dany Shapiro Danny Sapiro Jesse Jackson consultant
Episode #17 - Alabama Space Mafia

The Future Calendar

22:25 min | 2 years ago

Episode #17 - Alabama Space Mafia

"The year is two thousand ten Haiti just been rocked by a seven point O magnitude earthquake BP would go on to spill over two hundred sixty million gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico, WikiLeaks had just burst onto the scene. With first trove of top secret documents. There's also the year that catches tick tock went to the top of the charts. But did you know that it was also the year that the moon was cancelled? Hello and welcome to the future calendar. I'm your host nicb annoy today's episode we're gonna be talking all about NASA, and the Alabama space, mafia and most importantly, their space launch system or SOS their next generation rocket, which they plan to take astronauts into deep space to Mars and to destinations even beyond that we're going to compare that to an upcoming program from space x which its name keeps changing, but was formerly known as the far or their next big giant rocket program, and we're gonna talk about how the military industrial complex plays into all of this, and introduce new phrase this Alabama space mafi, explain exactly what that means and what it means for Nasr's budget moving forward. So thank you, and all that more. And if you stick around the NFL to give something, a lot of people have talked about that they like the cool gadget, I've seen today so sick around for that, all that more ramp to us. So in two thousand ten then President Barack Obama effectively canceled the Bush era program known as the constellation moon program. It was basically a program that was gonna bring human spaceflight in humans back to the moon had been under development for a few years led by before him. President George Bush, and it was. You know, people looked into it, and it was massively underfunded. Right. So it's going to require many more taxpayer dollars, NASA budget, you know, percentage and capacity for further development. So President Obama canceled it and two months later, he made one of his only space base speeches, NASA related speeches, and it kind of the big takeaway. Unfortunately, kind of his one of his legacies in space this one being negative, another one. I'll get to later being positive in this speech. He had famous phrase when referring to the moon as been there done that. And unfortunately, that really resonate really well. A lot of people NASA for kind of obvious reasons and became kind of how, you know how he's going to set space policy in, in his year. So what that did was that kicked off a search for the next rocket. What's the next big moon program, where space program that NASA was investor dollars in and what that turned out to be with something called the S L S or the space launch system. So this is going to be one of the most powerful rockets of all time, actions have the greatest thrust of any rocket of all time, and eventually, get kind of walked up in developed, so that we have the biggest payload of any rocket ever built ever right gonna cost tens of billions of dollars to develop over, you know, ten fifteen years, and this, this development funding started in two thousand eleven so that's kind of where the, the death of one program led to the birth of another. Once again, this is kind of early in, in Brock Obama's presidency. So this goes on in twenty eleven they received NASA received one point five billion in funding for LS another one point five. In two thousand twelve one point four and twenty thirteen one point six in twenty fourteen basically a billion and a half until two thousand sixteen. They received almost two billion and then in twenty seventeen and twenty eight teen for over two billion dollars for a grand total from twenty seven to twenty teen for fourteen billion dollars and has yet to fly. So this is one of those rockets and one of these programs that has been pointed out by many in the community that's been targeted for, you know, pork for overspending, basically being the whole space military industrial complex, right? The space launch system creates a lot of jobs, rather, really no way around this. These are aerospace jobs is high paying jobs. They keep contractors busy all around the country. They're spaceflight centers in states all around the nation, but one thing and why this episode is titled the way it is you might not have heard about is that all aerospace roads lead to a very particular place that you might not assume right? Like, where would you think that the Aeros? Space employment capital of the United States, which you think, you know, Los Angeles, would you think, you know, New York or maybe Chicago, or one of these big cities or you know, maybe up in Michigan, something like that. No. The single greatest employment of aerospace, new United States is Huntsville, Alabama with nearly four thousand aerospace, engineers, employed, and then nearly five thousand in the greater state of Alabama. And so what that means is that they control a disproportionate amount of NASA funding NASA development work, contractors influence, and this extends to politics to their senators per in particular Richard Shelby from Alabama all roads in space and NASA tend to lead through Huntsville and therefore through ala Bama. It may seem shocking, but it's one of those weird quirks of wear centers in NASA history, going back to the sixties started. There's in Huntsville Alabama, there's a big one of the big. Nasa centers called Marshall space Flight Center and basically wear these facilities are located. How these jobs have set up there just to politically important so programs likes the space launch system at billions of dollars a year need to continue to fulfil and prop up and keep these people employed, keep these space center's space flight center's active. So this is all fine rights tip. There's plenty of these projects, right? You can point to the f thirty five program fighter jet program, which, you know, they're gonna say the last jets can cause over four hundred billion dollars, and has to be the last jet actually flown by person. And you know, it's went through years and years of delays. There's projects like these, you can point to across the military across space. It's kind of businesses, usual, and really this wouldn't be much of a story if it weren't for Yuan. Musk's SpaceX, basically, people are pointing 'cause essentially without any benchmark, when they say they need fourteen billion dollars over seven years, the last seven years to get this. As launch system up and running, and that it's going to cost somewhere between half a billion and a billion dollars per vehicle. Right. We're not talking about a reusable rocket this is going to be a classic expendable throw it all away, but build another one type rocket people. Just take it take a face value. You know, it's unprecedented, something never done before, you know, massive engineering undertaking. That's the price tag. There's no there's no precedent. There's no you can't walk down the store and order it from Russia, or you can't order from this company or that company. One of kind never been done before. So the cost the cost, right? There's it's hard for critics who are looking at the budget to complain about money. That's going space, the space launch system that could be going toward probes or earth signs or climate change research, or any other number of things that NASA could spend their budget on or quite frankly, other parts of the military. So along comes inconveniently Ulan musket SpaceX and I'm gonna get to other part of Brock Obama's presidency, which is much better in space under his under. His NASA administration that was the start of e-commercial croup are commercial cargo project and commercial crew later on basically with that said of took it began a public private partnership between NASA and space x and another company called orbital sciences, which lose later, acquired by north of grummin and basically, what they would do is instead of having the government shuttle cargo from earth up to the international space station, they would subcontract they contacted out to space x and to this company orbital sciences. And what that did was lowered the cost dramatically, it actually gave SpaceX early funding. It needed to survive as a company and it really was a win win for people who wanted space private to earth. You know, bring down budgets and cost give the private enterprise, private enterprise, NASA, spend more of their budget on basic science, which companies aren't going to do you know there's no business model behind studying atmosphere of titan, or trying to sample an asteroid or you know, sending pick. After, you know, getting fly by pictures of Pluto. Right. These are just things these are in the realm of government research, and where more the dollar should go to. So this is a fishing. This is a legacy that, you know, Barack Obama housing space and it's much more favorable than cancelling necessarily the constellation moon program, so that's all well and good for cargo and kind of stores playing on in parallel. Right. So the first flight for space x to the international space station was in twenty twelve now, this is in the early years of the of LS development and at the time space, x is rockets were nowhere near as capable as the space launch system was proposed to be once again, this is we're talking about literally v. Most powerful rocket of all time that are bigger than the Saturn five the Apollo rocket anything. Right. And so what happens is SpaceX is progressing at a much more rapid rate. This other project is, is just as lumbering sleepy giant that is used to the way government military contracting works. Right. It's. It's essentially this pork project to employ these aerospace, engineers, both in, in Alabama Huntsville. And in NASA centers around the country, you know, contractors etcetera etcetera. And meanwhile, SpaceX is innovating. They're developing other accrue, dragon vehicle to do the commercial crew program to ferry astronauts, that's gonna start happening this year. Listen to other podcasts, and they're working on, and they've got bigger ambitions. Right. So SpaceX his end goal was is to, you know, have a column on Mars have a population of a million people. And so their goal to is to build a massive rocket much bigger rocket, and this wasn't really public knowledge really will the mission with public knowledge, but the plan to do. So is not public knowledge in two thousand eleven two thousand twelve when they're doing these cargo runs to the space station with a much, much smaller falcon nine at the time that wasn't reusable. And so the two company, you know, SpaceX in ECE lesser kind of plotting along over the years. And then in two thousand sixteen SpaceX has their first reused they had the first landing of rocket, which was later reused and then that became routine. And so this innovation aerospace this pace just picking picking up picking up picking up more people are taking them seriously. Meanwhile, SOS potting along testing slowly in the way that bloated government contracts work, and then, you know, SpaceX, his landing more rockets and reusing rockets, and they start to end Alon for the first time unveils the architecture for what he thinks this Mars rockets, going to look, like and would you look at that six years into development of S L, S Ulan must unveils a rocket on? That's almost as big it's on the scale of the space launch system, and it's going to be fully reusable, which means it's going to be really cheap. You know, we're talking about under ten million dollars because he wants to fully use. All of the hardware, he doesn't wanna throw away any into the ocean. Remember the space launch system. There's no reusability. This is the old school, nineteen sixties way of looking rockets, and they were happy to do. So they're gonna throw away half a billion to a billion dollars of hardware, every flight for the space launch system. Meanwhile, over here, once again, conveniently kind of nowhere you on musk unveils a plan for a rocket. That's fully reusable. They're not gonna throw away anything. So the cost that vehicle becomes the propellant is just the fuel to load it up. And he estimates that's going to be less than ten million dollars. Who okay? So now that we're talking about something, that's you know, on the order of fifty times cheaper than the space launch system. And once again, it's still on paper, so not much has not much has been seen yet. At this point of, of the be afar, SpaceX, big rocket, but kinda starts some whispers of like. What does this mean for timing? So, you know, the space launch system was as most things aren't aerospace, delayed. And, you know, the costs have gone up like these things tend to do, and they're looking at maybe their first flight of the space launch system. Rocket in twenty twenty and then, you know, start launching more significantly kind of in the twenty twenties will meanwhile once again, this these, these timelines starting to converge quicker and quicker because SpaceX moving faster and faster. And you know, this NASA this kind of bloated rocket development programs moving it typical aerospace, military industrial complex speeds. Okay. Well, SpaceX is looking at maybe having their actually started building hardware is at the end of twenty eighteen just a few months ago, and they've started building a mockup with brand new rocket engines, the final version of these in the rocket, and they've actually built a test version that they're gonna hop of the spaceship that they're finally going to develop and they built it in. South texas. And they're gonna hop it up to five kilometers and practice their landings just like they did without nine. And so once again, now, there's actually starting to be real. There's real hardware. They have real engines, this isn't just a paper rocket anymore. These timelines to get more and more awkward for NAFTA. Explain and so what's going to happen soon in why, why? It's coming up on the future calendars. You're gonna see you're gonna see news stories in in. You're gonna have justifications for why this program is allowed to continue. I mean, there's billions of dollars a year spent on a rocket that's essentially gonna come out at the same time space X's for literally fifty times the cost to operate and at the start of the program. Now going all the way back to dozen eleven. You could never foreseen that there'd be ten years of basically, the most most innovation, we'd seen rockets in fifty years. Right with what's base. Xs, don. But here we are right inconveniently for them in twenty nineteen with brand new rocket technology fully reusable or upcoming fully reusable rocket technology, and I. I really I honestly don't know how you're going to explain that. It be similar people make this comparison all the time it would be like if you had to companies, right? Like you had NASA developing planes for the first time, and the this plane's amazing the cost billions of dollars develop, but you're gonna be able to fly from New York to London, but, you know, it's gonna cost fifty million dollars. We're gonna throw away the plane in the ocean. You're gonna have to jump out in parachute down to the ground in London and ten years ago that might have been like, wow. That's so cool no ever flown across the ocean like that with that many people amazing stuff go for it. But then along the way and other company comes along and is like, well, we can develop those, and it's going to cost, you know, five hundred thousand dollars, and we're just gonna land the plane, and then you can fly back when you're when you're ready to go back to New York, and we can bring just as many people. And so the cost is, you know, one fiftieth rice was gonna look pretty silly over those over that much time if you even let the other program continue, so. So basically, what this comes down to why, why this group is known as the Alabama space, mafia is even as this time looks more and more ridiculous, and preposterous as SpaceX and program, kind of converge here, and isn't happened quite yet. I mean, you know, SpaceX needs real hardware. I think as soon as people were very visual visual animals issues. We see SpaceX memorial refined version of its hardware on the pad and maybe even doesn't I kind of test flight. I it'll be funny to watch. I mean, this is once again, I try and build kind of the narrative give you the background of, of the story because it makes it more impactful when you see it play out watch this space, because over the next kind of year or two, it's gonna be it's gonna come to a head is like, do, even bother finishing this rocket this thing, that's bloated way over expensive, basically, just to satisfy your Alabama voters and aerospace industry in Alabama of all places. That's the question, right? Like I don't even know what happens. It's just kind of interesting to watch. I'm just sharing this because this is a narrative a story, I followed. And I know that most people are not following this yet, and, you know, when the space launches was ready to launch, I think, a lot of you will see it because once again, what we, let's talk about this, this programmer are the events, the kind of slow things down. And everyone kind of stops and collectively watches, and that will be one of them, because once again, it's gonna people respond to precedents and superlatives it's going to be the most powerful rocket ever launched ever. Right. So people will stop and watch that guaranteed. But the but the question will be will basic says something kinda just as good for a fraction, like actual fraction pennies on the dollar compared to the space launch system, which developed by NASA. So, yeah, it's kinda hard to say this is billions of dollars that could go to once again all kinds of other good science. They could, you know, NASA. It could just fund some of those dollars and help SpaceX jointly develop it. There's really a million other ways you could do this right in a more cost effective manner, and there NASA and the senators from Alabama and all these people are kind of willfully ignoring that SpaceX is getting this close and has something this probable. You know, I happen to be a believer in space x and musk and everything they've done, but the store really encapsulates a lot of things. Right. So it touches on the military industrial complex development aerospace, really cool rockets really hits a lot with hits lot things on the head. So that's kinda history. Going back decade in both space launch system. And what was formerly known as far now known as starship super heavy from SpaceX. So unless a lot of facts and figures, but basically Jeff the biggest takeaway is that you had the LS, which was set up almost ten years ago, as you know, kinda the next great space military. Israel complex project in, they all it was gonna be business as usual, and then kind of out of nowhere, even though they said they were trying to do SpaceX actually showed in execute improve they could innovate and now, kind of awkwardly approaching the same capabilities as what they think Iraq, it can do so you have these converging timelines it's all gonna come to a head here, maybe next year maybe two but I think, really in the next year it's going to heat up. So watch watch all kinds of news for both mentions of space launch system, s and the latest outta SpaceX. They're building their stuff out of south Texas. So you're gonna see that heat up a lot more, and that's actually become a launch site, which hasn't in the past because they can launch over the Gulf of Mexico and yeah, that's, that's kind of the latest and in the big story on on the space launch system. So thank you for following that. Hope you enjoyed that, that narrative and kind of caught up on the background and. Yeah, love to hear everyone's thoughts on that if they're interested at all. So, yeah. Thank you. All right. So at the top of the program, I promised one gadget. I like the coolest thing I saw recently is something that a lot of you'd be interested in, but I think the price point might be a little too high for the functionality. So what I'm talking about is something called the ember wave. So that's E. M B R space wave. And what this does it's a personal thermostat. So it's a wearable. It looks of like an apple watch started on Kickstarter. They've been in development of for five years, and what it's based on. Is that? Let me explain. What does I basically it's a personal thermostat in that it can cool or heat, your temperature, so it doesn't actually control? You know, your entire internal body temperature but it's based on the idea that there's areas in your body, that disproportionately make you change your perception of how you feel hot or cold rights, endless battle in the office of who controls thermostat and how you feel. So what this is once again, imagine this kind of apple watch thing on your wrist, and these researchers needs people started to this product found that, while the head is the number one place that influences how you feel of whether something's hot or cold. But the next best place is actually the inside of your wrist, so you can wear the device on the inside or the outside of your wrists. Whichever's more comfortable has a few settings both in the kind of cooling and heating directions. And what they found a bunch of studies that they ran that people actually perceived changes in temperature based on the settings on this device a from around four or five degrees in either direction whether they. Wanted to feel cooler or hotter. So seems to work from early kind of reviews indications is now broadly available. Once again, it was a Kickstarter project kind of the one downside, if you're someone who this would really benefit is running at three hundred dollars right now. I n ration- product I'm sure it takes off. You know, they'll either be acquired or have come out with a more friendly price, but pretty cool technology. I mean, I've never even heard anything like that before. And, you know, I know a lot of people who always seem to be perpetually cold, or maybe this device could be for you. So check it out. It's the ember wave EM be our space wave. Yeah. Check it out. Well, thank you for listening. Hope you enjoyed this background on the Alabama space, mafia and space launch system and check out amber, amber. Wave not a sponsor once again, we're we're not big enough for that. So thank you. And so next time.

SpaceX NASA Alabama President Barack Obama Marshall space Flight Center Mexico President George Bush apple NASA Musk Haiti New York NFL Huntsville Aeros Alabama Huntsville United States WikiLeaks
'What Unites Us' As Americans? Dan Rather Has An Answer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:30 min | 1 year ago

'What Unites Us' As Americans? Dan Rather Has An Answer

"Support for on point out the following message come from. MIT system design and management jointly offered by Mit School of Engineering and the MIT's Sloan School School of management earn a Master's in engineering and management join a virtual info session on Thursday December fifth from four to five PM S. D. M. I'm dot. Mit Dot Edu from NPR and Wvu. Are Boston I made Mitch Opera Birdie and this is on non-point in one thousand nine sixty eight. Dan Rather was a floor reporter covering the Chicago Democratic National Convention for CBS News outside on the streets of Chicago riots involving police tens of thousands of protesters rallying against the Vietnam War the battle carried on inside the convention and rather was right in the middle of it. Here he is speaking with then. CBS Anchor Walter Cronkite as security guards blocked rather access to a Georgia. Delegate who is being removed from from the hall take your hands off. A man came to arrest me. Don't don't push me please. Off Three hundred hundred. No you want but don't push me take your hands off or maybe nothing less me. Wait a minute in a minute what are you can say. I don't know what's going on but this is our security people. Apparently I believe around. Dan obviously getting roughed up well in his forty plus years as a newsman. Rather has seen America cleaved and healed again again and again so how to. America's current divides compare. And how can we come together. This hour on point a conversation with Dan Rather and you can join us. What are your questions for Dan? Rather about America about today's political polarization. What are your questions about his career in the news including about how that ended and I want to know what your questions are four four Dan Rather about journalism today? Join US anytime at on point radio or on twitter and facebook at on point radio. Will Dan Rather joins us today from in New York. And as I mentioned he was a reporter and anchor at CBS News for forty four years. His two thousand seventeen book. What Unites US reflections on? Patriotism MM is currently out in paperback with new afterward. Dan Rather welcome to on point. Thank you very much. I'm honored to be here. I appreciate your having been a good day. Are you good day to you as well. Mr Rather wanted to acknowledge that I had a household that When I grew up that were devotees of the nightly news and and it was always a competition in my household between you and Peter Jennings and I am sorry to say that Peter edged you out every now and then where I grew up? But it's still a real delight to to talk with you here now. Listen I I wanted to start by with your reflections on that. Nine hundred sixty eight convention In Chicago because obviously I mean the people were literally at each other's throats in America. Then how would you compare what you saw in sixty eight to American politics now. Well there is What I call a bloodline running between one thousand? Nine hundred sixty eight and the tumultuousness that had engulfed the nation for much of the nineteen sixties. It's worth remembering the nineteen sixties. Not only were we. Deeply divided nation nation over the war. But we were deeply divided over raise. Wade had the assassinations of Dr Martin Luther King Robert Kennedy. We had regime is industry. We we were troubled nation during the decade of the nineteen sixties which came to a climax sort in nineteen sixty eight at the Democratic Democrat convention but while there are similarities to nine hundred sixty eight. This is a different time. A different era In the ongoing history of our country some other divisions for example division over race which is always been deep and dangerous? Divide in the country. are similar to what we were going through in nineteen sixty eight but I do come around to it. It's a different time. Different era a different generation With a different government so while there are comparisons to the nineteen sixties and particularly As they say the climatic period Around the summer of nineteen sixty eight it would be a mistake to overemphasize. I think the similarities the one thing that we as a people went through nineteen sixty eight that we're going through again now is basically the question. Can we hold it together. Can we hold the country together. Can we stand united can. Can we agree on enough core principles ensembles and core values of the country To hold ourselves together and it wasn't open question in in nineteen sixty eight eight and it's an open question today. Which is one reason that I originally did two hardcover book What unites is in one reason I wanted to put this paperback edition Out To talk about you know the book is not meant to provide answers but it the hope is that we can start a conversation about our core values you know core values just to name to the rule of law and the right to vote but there's dissent and free press inclusion empathy a belief in in science and Knowledge Public Education. All these are bad news that I think the overwhelming majority of Americans agree on. But we're in a period he had as we were for some time in the nineteen sixties where we have national leadership that seeks to exploit our differences put the concentration on our differences inches rather than what unites us. So that's the reason I wrote what unites us an Wi. Come out with a paperback edition. But now well the miss rather if I can ask you mean you said it was an an open question in the nineteen sixties about You know whether the nation could come together and then it's an open question now. was that question resolved in the nineteen the sixty s to to anyone's satisfaction. I mean what lessons can we learn even with your point about. We shouldn't overemphasize similarities or differences. I think there are a lot of people today who didn't leave through that time. Who are very hungry to learn the lessons from previous Times when the country did feel starkly divided. What a very good question? And I'm glad you ask it. The what happened in the wake of the nineteen sixties having said again that he sort of climax that summer of nineteen sixty eight with the two nominating donating presidential conventions. After that to a large degree we Americans began to listen to one in another as you may know from your own reading and background in history. Late was always emphasizing. How important it is to listen to one another even when we disagree so to some degree the country in the wake of the nineteen sixties began to listen to one another a good example would be on civil rights and other example would be on the need for environmental protection as you know the Environmental Protection Agency was put put into place in the early nineteen seventies as a direct result of the conflict over in in the nineteen sixties? So the answer. Sure is that what happened. Is we listen to one another. And we went through a period where the the start divisions of that had come. Come to the front. In the in the nineteen sixties didn't fade from view but the country began to emphasize what unites is now with the AH onslaught of Watergate which is the shorthand word we use for a widespread criminal conspiracy which was led by the president of the United States. Himself That things took a turn for the worse in the mid nineteen seventies but the answer your question. Roughly from the end of the nineteen sixties to uh-huh fairly early now in the twenty first century. The country did a pretty good job by no means perfect but a pretty good job of listening to one another and and adjusting to our differences in finding some common ground again. I wouldn't want to overstate that but I'm trying to answer question. What did we learn from the nineteen sixties? The basic lesson we've moved in the nineteen sixties is listened to one another and try to find common ground. An attitude goes along these lands. Listen and you and I may disagree over one hundred things about policy and a political leanings but can we find one or two things on which we agree and common ground and work on that a simple example might be that you may live in a small town And and some people are trump supporters. Some people that trump haters some people shorter in between and so the big differences just in even in the small town but if somebody says listen the Little League Baseball Park with a needs to be redone and remodeled. Can we agree on that and you agree on something simplest that everybody gets together and starts to repair the Little League Baseball Park. The next thing you know they're talking to one another laughing one another. It seems simple but though Oh small steps can be enormous in our effort now and I think it's a desperate effort now to hold ourselves together and agree on what unites us. What about this though? I mean I have heard display pretty frequently from callers calling into this show that they they feel America in two thousand nineteen is actually a markedly different place than it was in the seventies sixties the forties and and that they're not sure common ground exists anymore that it's not a matter of politics. The fear is that people have actually quite divided values and so finding common ground when your core values are very different might actually be virtually impossible. I mean that's the the sense I get from a lot. A lot of people talking and talking with them day in and day out I understand because I have been a number of people who contact me in various ways including programs such as this who expressed that point of view and I simply I smile and take a deep breath and say I respectfully disagree. I do think that we are dealing In in a different eras I said before we are in many ways a different country in two thousand nineteen then were let's say in nineteen sixty eight That demographically the country begin changing drastically with the passage of the immigration reform. Warm Activ- nineteen sixty five. Which did away with biases against certain people emigrating the country? From the time that passed as a result it was in the wake Geico the civil rights movement of the nineteen sixties. We've passed the immigration reform from that time forward. We begin changing really drastically. Ah continually demographically at the country. One of the main raise ways. It is different here in two thousand nineteen and it was during the nineteen sixties sixties is that we are a richer mix of of religion race ethnicity and that has caused wash away. The fear in people There any number of people who say look it. It's not the it's not the America of my grandfather and grandmother Not even the same was my parents. Time is caused fear. And I think this is a very important point that this fear is being exploited by any number of political leaders including. I'm sorry to say. And there's no joint saying the president of the United States this fear of well not only has country change in so many ways. The whole culture's changed. They're trying to exploit that fear they talk about. Ah The the divisions. They emphasize what divides us. And they've been successful in playing upon that fair fear exploiting that fear for their political and ideological advantages At the disadvantage of the country. We are talking with Dan. Rather this hour we'll be right back. This is on point support for on point and the following message come from. MIT system design and management jointly offered by Mit School of Engineering and the MIT's Sloan School of management earn a Master's in engineering and Management Sdn Educates mid career professionals. Nationals to lead effectively and creatively by using systems thinking to solve large scale complex challenges and product design development and innovation using MIT's most advanced information and communication technologies. Join a virtual info session on Thursday December fifth from four to five. PM S. D. M. DOT MIT DOT Edu. Think peers life. Kid is that friend who always has great advice about everything from how to invest to how how to get a great workout. We tools to help you get it together. New episodes every Tuesday and Thursday. Listen and subscribe to life kid. This is on point. I'm Meghna Chocolate Birdie. We're talking this hour with Dan Rather as you know he spent more than forty years at. CBS News he has a book out. It's called what unites US reflections on patriotism. I published a couple of years ago. It's out now in paperback with a new afterwards words and we're afterward I should say now. Dan Rather in that forty plus year career. How covered so many aspects of some of the most contentious moments of recent American history for example Here is a moment from June nineteen sixty three. This is when Governor George Wallace of Alabama one of the nation's then staunchest supporters of segregation stood in the doorway of the University of Alabama in an effort to block to African American students from attending class. And here's Dan rathers report on how that standoff unfolded governor. Wallace is now walking away from the door. Apparently capitulating being now in his battle against the United States government to prevent to Negro students from entering the previously all White University of Alabama. It's Dan rather in nineteen sixty three. Now MR rather in the book. There's there's so many great stories that you have of Amir experiences that sort of help you think through this moment of divide that we see in the country. I'm wondering if you could actually tell us the story of how and when you first met Medgar Evers and you saw him you know go to a polling station and ask for his right to vote. I mean the such. It's such an incredible story. Can you tell me about that. Well the time is I think nineteen sixty two may have been early. Sixty six games. Nineteen sixty two MEDGAR. Evers who was a a very decent very friendly person. Very calm person under pressure. He was trying. It's almost almost hard to imagine now but he was trying to get People have African American heritage to the polling places They were very fearful about about going to the polling places and with good reason and I personally bore witness to Medgar evers saying to some of these African American neighbors who were reluctant to go to the polling place. You know come with me. He took them the polling place he shows up at polling place And officials there including local law enforcement. I want to clean up the language basically said you know. There's no way that you or any of these people in revolt today. Medgar Evers pointed out that they had their poll tax ahead registration everything And they just met a stone wall of resistant it was A. It was a a revelation to me. I grew up in a segregated alleged society with institutional racism in Texas. But it was it was bad it was terrible but I had never seen anything like this but medgar evers courage. Hurry in walking up and in very calm with a look on his face was not one of anger. A facing that kind of resistance is and by the way most if not all of those people did not get the vote that day because they were white people in positions of power. Who Just said? I don't care what the law says. You're not going to vote here today. And as long as I'm alive you're not GonNa vote here any day but ma- medgar evers did that kind of thing day in and day out it took tremendous resolve tremendous courage and as you know he was later assassinated. We shot down on his his own front porch by a coward assassin. Who is hiding into grass street? Here's what was then. It is now in American hero. So here's why I ask that question because I I. I read this portion of your book over and over again because I think it's worth I'm going to read a little bit of it now to folks because I think it's really worth hearing some of this language. Ah I mean you talk about how Medgar evers you know went to a polling place with with With other people this what you witnessed that the voting officials said what you doing here boy and Evers politely responded that he had come to vote with these fine people and then the official says. You aren't voting today. You aren't voting any day. And then he goes on to say. Well I'm telling you the ain't GonNa vote now just hearing that that that sort of blatant denial of a basic American right is is disturbing enough. But what really got me Mr Rathers later on when you were talking with a member of your crew and you're saying that you didn't really expect that to happen. And he said well that's how it is in a lot of places so that's why I wanted to ask you about is like how do you deal. How did you? How did you deal with the revelation of these really entrenched beliefs? That were just a part of life in place in places that you were reporting on well how I deal with it and keep in mind that was obviously a much younger reporter. That time I was not inexperienced but I've never gone through anything like this. My job was to cover over Dr Martin Luther King in the Civil Rights Movement Pretty much all over the south and it turned out that what that crew member told me At that time. which did you quoted from the book? which was I had only recently started? CBS News but over succeeding months and years It was true in in place after place all over the south. How I dealt with it is to remind myself and try to carry out? What was my job? My job was to re to bear a witness to report and too much of it as possibly could on television screen. Well I'm curious about how you think I think the media today is doing that very job right because there. There's a lot of people are asking whether the the ideal of journalistic objectivity to just simply bear witness and report is a false side ideal to begin with. What do you think about that? Well Aw I was raised on on the on the belief and the Credo that one should be as objective as possible as a reporter. A you know your job realizing that nobody can do it perfectly but insofar as is humanly possible what you need to do is set aside your own biases Deal view with facts. However I fully understand that here in this near the end of the Second Decade of the twenty first century that this is what I call Core Credo of American journalism is co called into great question and I've called into question myself but again I think the basic in the what what? What is the journalist trying to do on our best days keeping in mind that nobody does it on our best days? What we're trying to do it is get to the truth or as close to the truth as is humanly possible and tell it and show it now in doing that? For example if when the president lives not if a it's still kinda catches my throat to say the president lies but our president Jason has consistently relentlessly and without remorse has lied repeatedly so on the one hand. The old standard of objectivity would be not number one. Don't call ally ally call it something else. has difficulty with the truth trying to address it up I it is not enough. If you're if you see your job is trying to get to. The truth is closer to the truth. If if even if a president lies it should be called a lie. Hi an American journalism has moved somewhat in that direction and it makes a Lotta people uncomfortable Integra truth sometimes. I'm uncomfortable with it myself. But having said that the job is to bear witness and report then when the president consistently deals in in lies. Thousands implies isn't it it needs to be said. I don't think personally that that's in conflict with being an objective reporter but I fully understand that a lot of people do and by the way the president himself tries to use this as to undermine the press. Is You know he's indicted the whole press not just individual reporters and in journalism and institutions. He's called a American news. Reporters as a whole quote enemies of the People Unquote which has a very negative residents in history that every dictator up and down. The line is always said one version of this so an answer to your question and that if you're going to be reporter of integrity then I think you have to have the guts to to say what is and and and then take the criticism at will by pointing out these truths your being biased. You're you're being unfair. You have to stand up face. Furnishing take the heat. Well let me let me give you a specific example because perhaps when it comes to not perhaps definitely it comes to matters of fact act and when the President says things that are in opposition or any politician says things that are in opposition to fact that seems to be more straightforward to me. But you know your the whole book A lot of what. You're thinking over. The past. Several years has been about is about deeper things they've values right. And what as your book says what Unites Us and I want to know what your response is to how journalists or modern journalism should cover issues. It really are about those values. And here's my specific example. It actually happens to come from my own career four years ago when I was covering this was a longtime ago actually now here in Massachusetts covering the legalization of same sex marriage in Massachusetts and it was a very contentious issue Then in the in the state and I had a young very bright producer who kept putting the words marriage equality in the scripts for me and I kept taking them out saying we gotTA use free his same sex marriage and we. We had a pretty heated battle about this because at the time marriage equality was the language used by those in favor of same sex marriage. So I mean it seems like a minor issue now but we had a very very heated battle about this. And here's the thing that stays with me is that young producer looked me in the eye and challenged me and I welcome the challenge. He challenged me and said this. This is a moral issue. If you covering the civil rights movement back in the nineteen sixties would you use politically neutral language when talking about the clan plan. Would you use politically neutral language when covering the atrocities that were that were felled upon Freedom Writers A and I just I don't actually have an answer. I did not have an answer for him. Then what's your answer to that question. Well I'm not sure I understand what the question is. If he wanted me to take. Aside through the language we were using essentially right. He said quote we. We should be using the phrase marriage equality polity because it's the right thing to do. Well a honest. Decent intending people can differ and in the end and AH had answered your question. I try to listen to my conscience and whatever my conscience tells me is the right thing to you That I try to do the right thing. You know part of my prayer every night and it's not that I carry it out as you know Lord. Please help me to do the right thing and in that circumstance. I think what I would like to think I would have done if say to myself. What's the right thing? Not not the politically correct thing to do. Not The thing is going to get employed. It's or don't be fearful of criticism but what's the right thing this time after time and I can say hey. This is going back to my own experience covering Dr King in the Civil Rights movement time after time you I'd ask yourself you know what is what is the right thing to do and the the the the answer is not always clear but an answer your question I think for each individual reporters say to yourself. What is the right thing to do and then do it? You're not always going to be right. You understand magnetic has any experienced journalists. Does that you know the practice of journalism is not an exact science. It's very crude art. And even the best is GonNa make mistakes and let me tell you people let me know when they think I've maple people were let you know. Well look let's let some of the people in this conversation. We are talking this hour with Dan Rather Lori. Worry is calling from Davie Florida Laurie. You're on the air. Hi thanks for taking my call. Mr Rather thank you so much for everything you've done and CBS. It was their loss I wanted to address The issue that was put out at the beginning which is whether this country. Whether are there. I believe this country can heal and you just made the statement that honest people can differ on certain things but at this point we have have thirty five percent of the country or thirty four percent of the country who support is racist bigoted homophobic president. And I I personally cannot heal enough to reconcile myself with these people. I don't want to be friends with them. I've lost friends. You know beginning under President President Obama when I was receiving racist emails And then trump got in office and he is. Now the one tweeting emails tweeting tweeting these tweets and I personally think these are social issues Vietnam while there were social issues was a political issue as well. I think these issues issues are so social and so personal. I don't think we can heal. They're they're so offensive to me. I don't WanNa be friends with anyone who supports this man Laurie before I let to Mr Rather respond to you. I mean if you don't think the nation can heal that we can heal. I mean what kind of future does that portend it is is it is I hope it go ahead. Well I'd rather hear from you. I hope he can heal. My personal opinion is there's and I hope as a nation it can heal you. Know it goes all the way up to Washington where that the Republicans won't even allow President Obama to Put in his his supreme court nominee. So do I think we can get back to normal on a personal level. No I hope so. So I don't i. I don't see where what will happen. Because it's so bleak like you say well. Laurie I'M GONNA save. Thank you for that call and Dan Rather this is exactly what we were talking about before that. There's a lot of people. There's no bridge to you madam. That so I fully understand what you're saying number one I say gently take a deep breath. Whisper at least mentally yourself steady Not only can we heal but we have to heal and I take your point. You say you don't want to be friends with these people talking about what you described as thirty three thirty. Five percent may be slightly more than the people that you don't want anything to do with. Please understand that say this gently an an humbly not a word generally associated with President or former television. I think people people humility but I said humbly. I'm not asking you to be friends with these people. I am saying that part of the healing process process which we can have. It must have the key is to listen you. You may despise them and I understand that you spies what everything they stand for. But it's still important to listen and to try to find common ground. Even the smallest things things it even tiny thing like getting up in the morning saying listen. I I can't send quote these people can't stand this president but I love my country entry. I WanNa do something then flew in the morning. Say How can I find somebody I can help. And if it somebody of a different color different religion different different political persuasion. All the better. He appoints you. Don't you don't think we can heal. I do think we can. We'll just have to take a quick break here. So that's why I jumped in there. My apologies for that but I also want to just say before we take that break that maybe we ought to reassess the language that we I mean the quote unquote these people. We're all L. Fellow Americans. We're all neighbors with each other. So that's a quick though. I'm GONNA leave you with to take this quick break. We are talking with Dan Rather today. He his twenty seventeen book. What Unites US reflections on? Patriotism is out now with a new afterward in paperback. We'll be right back. This is on point this is on point. I'm magnet shocker. Bardy we're talking this hour with Dan Rather he was a reporter and of course anchor for the CBS Evening News for some forty four years he worked worked for CBS News. Since then he's had a quite a renaissance in his career largely through social media. Actually facebook and twitter. He writes about what he believes Unites Nights this nation even in these divided times. His book is what Unites US reflections on patriotism and it first came out a couple of years ago. It's out now in paperback with a new afterward. and Mr Rather. I know that you want to talk about healing before. We had to take a quick break here but I actually want to just ask you a question. That's come to us over social media on twitter from Daniel Hamilton. He says I'd like to hear from Mr Rather water. Some of the values he believes are commonly held by folks on the far light far right and far left left and the vast middle ground talking with friends who don't share political values seems virtually impossible. So what are those common values well among the common values news and this is basically what what unites is. The book is about a mentioned to before a common value Is the rule of law overwhelmingly whether one considered himself on the right left or conservative liberal Mug womp independent. Whatever there's white agreement that we should be and we're always driving to be better as a nation of law so the rule of law is one the right devote one person one vote? Well there are people who oppose this for their own partisan political ideological advantages overwhelming. This is something that people in the right and left both agree on the right to vote the right to dissent the right to dissent even even when you disagree with someone that they have a right to express their dissent sent a free press a free press as the red beating heart of the soul of democracy there are certainly people who attacked the president unfortunately now the president himself itself but you we're talking about common values that overwhelmingly Americans support the idea and the idea of a free press That other badgers and you know I could go on the rest of the program at won't because I'm trying to keep my answers short but such such things as inclusion empathy a belief in science and knowledge in public education environmental protection and many others that these are core values and they are common values. I used to repeat for emphasis that the majority of Americans agree on they may disagree about individual policies but as core values. There's a lot of common ground there. What would you say for folks who tell you? That's a very pollyannish view of common ground in America that when you say empathy and inclusion as core values Allie of those means different things to different people. Of course it can and I do want to emphasize that you know. The book what unites is is not meant to provide answers but to start a conversation in the kind of conversation that you just started that I certainly a word like inclusion gene for example. It's some people say well tolerant of other people's points of view will tolerance is the is the minimum requirement for a decent person but conclusion to something else and I quite agree. Even on the definition of the word people can disagree but I would come back to because I do feel strongly about it. That the both the idea. Hi Dea and the idea of of something such as inclusion or empathy most people overwhelmingly left right or centre politically. Want want to believe that they are. They are Im- have empathy that they include and so these are things we need to have a conversation about. But if we don't talk to one another everybody don't air our differences and and even when we especially when reduce agree then there's no chance it will be able to hold this country together. Okay so I promise the callers I'll get to you get in just a second. But there's something I have to ask you about your call empathy and talking to each other Mr because I mean you found this renaissance in your career and reach on social media and I think a lot of people look at social media these days as potential strengths to it. But it's it's you. It's the definition of not talking to each other because you can get in your little social media bubble happily and never leave it or when people do talk to each other. They're just pummeling each other with toxicity. City I mean that that is different. That is a very big difference between the Times. We're living in now versus the Times of these other divides that we've been discussing. Well it is. It's something we have to struggle with and again I don't professed have all the answers but I do think we should be discussing it in having the questions about it. Look I know part of what made this book. What unites is What made it possible was the? There's no other word for it. Incredible response we've seen on social media particularly on my facebook page but with the books extension of that spirit of talking to one another however your point is well taken. There's another side to the Internet and to social media. Part of it is that you can Attack people you can ruin people's reputation with a AH with a non anonymously it. Nobody ever find out who did cowards. Take advantage of that but look as we moved into the social media era. There are a lot of questions that again. We have to find some common ground about when while social media has tremendous advantages. It does have a some kamajors disadvantages and in fact some dangerous well. Let's go to sue WHO's calling from Wakefield Massachusetts Sue. You're on the air. Hi Matt. How are you gal doing well? What's your thought today to Hi Dan I'm so excited. To Talk to you you spoke at my commencement at Syracuse University in Nineteen eighty-four and been a huge fan ever since So my comment is kind of a rebuttal to the woman who spoke earlier about not wanting to talk to friends who are trump supporters. I have a very dear friend who was a fervent trump supporter and I've been told by people that I shouldn't be friends runs with her. And I disagree because we had many discussions on our differences and we try and keep them. centered on the issues Like immigration or women's rights or gay rights or gun control as opposed to getting into the politics about about what I generally like to call the print president And I think it's been very fruitful for us for our friendship to to be able to disagree but agree on like more global principle. Man I think that if more people to do that and heavy rational discussion about issues and not scream at each other that we would all be in a better place and you know to Mr Rather spoke which I read cover to cover. Definitely we need to unite and not divide. We'll soon I'm going to take it back from you and thank you so much for your call. Mr Rather I'm going to get a couple more in here because I really have been neglecting people who have been waiting patiently on the line. So let's go to Marie who's calling from Hominy Oklahoma career on the air. Hi I am calling from a small rural community. I have two comments. One is people. Little dog seem to understand that a lot of people can't even watch the presidential debates if you don't have cable TV and Internet that then you're screwed you know you have to find out days later and if you're small town library doesn't have an Internet. You can't even go find out there. You have to travel an hour away or something and people are I think mainstream media and journalists. I have let us down because you're not even talking about the issues that are affecting us which primarily stem from economic doc. Id Issues Wall. Street and Main Street are not the same thing and main street is having a hard time even being on its. He's the Mayor Marie hold on. I just WanNa give Dan rather chance to talk with you. Mr Rather go ahead. Well first of all I appreciate the call and keep in mind that I was born born and raised her degree in his small rural community in Texas. And so is my wife. Jean I understand Madam and Frankly I smile when you said you know. I think the court was if you don't have cable TV and the Internet you're screwed. I would say not entirely humor. I would say in some ways if you don't have cable TV and the Internet you're blessed but I wanted to what you point. That Wall Street is is is not main street. There is a great divide between the the the power some of the power centers of the country protected economically between Washington and Wall Street and places just like Roll Oklahoma. I take your point but I come back to Don't give up. Don't give up on us. Let's emphasize what what we can undo. I I do agree that the press overwhelmingly under reports what happens in the less popular populated sections the country as opposed to the more populated sections. And that's that's a legitimate criticism of the press including myself but thank you for the call and thank you for your spirit. Well well Marie thank you so much and I mean when we talk about the press I mean. The sort of natural focus is on the national media. But I've we've got a great comment here that's come in through through facebook from Garrett Woodward and Garett says as a journalist in the mountains of western North Carolina. I've seen the shift to where local journalism now gets grouped in with mass media As the enemy the hate mail and threats continue towards hard working on the ground journalists. How do we regain the trust of the people in our own backyard when our politicians continually say we are the problem when truth where actually the frontline of justice in our society? What do you think well First of all I really appreciate the question and again. I'm going to remind people that I started as a small town reporter. And what he describes is often expressed to me by people. Live live in places like the mountains of Donald Carolina and the answer the question. How do we regain trust? When we lumped in with the mainstream media the best council I can give a try not to give advice his this? Do Your job every day. Just do the job do the best job you can do every day. And that's the best way for you personally. Earn Trust as a reporter which is where it starts and then for the whatever institution and local paper you work for to gain trust that it with mainstream media and media in rural and remote areas. My my answer is the same one when as what we can do what we can do is just do the job. Do the Damn job if we do the job and do it anywhere reason. We'll then we'll get trust It's very difficult to right. Now where you have the most powerful person in the country attacking impress unreal unrelenting relentlessly but if we do our job and do our job to the best of our ability and every day try gotta do a little bit better. Then you'll have the trust you'll have the trust personally and for whoever you working eventually being crushed Trust it isn't easy and it requires a lot of resolve. And so to you. I would just say very respectfully in with the hand salute stay stalwart. WELL WANNA fit in one more call all here. Let's go to Tom. WHO's calling from Fort Valley? Virginia Tom you're on the air. Hi Facts I'll be briefed at a question regarding Eh George Bush's service record back when he was in Texas Air National Guard. And we all remember about the letter that was found Alan Dershowitz filed. The letter turned out to be fake. And I just the logical person in me wonders. Why would there be a computer generated letter Decades before desktop printers even became popular So could have been planted all right now apple. Yes a Tom. I don't mean to cut you off. I'm just looking at the clock and I want to do a little explaining here for Tom's question in Mr Rather of course let you answer this. But he's referring to the the story that you did for sixty minutes to about President George W Bush's National Guard record. That was was extent intensely criticized decide Some of the document's authenticity of those documents were called into question. And that's what led to your ouster from CBS. Just for folks who don't actually know that. But what's the answer this question. I appreciate the question and we could spend the rest of the day talking about this book. We won't because I'll try to be brief. Let me say first of all nobody. Nobody has ever proven that the documents of which we're so fiercely attacked when we did that story. Nobody's ever proven that they were false. Now you can argue argued that we didn't do enough to prove that they real but here's the main point our story what our story was number one. Our story was that George W Bush had gotten into the champagne unit protective unit of the National Guard to keep them Golden Vietnam through the influences father. That's a fact number two once. He got in the Air National Guard after serving at least reasonably well for a while he disappeared. He walked away for a year and and never paid any price to it. So those two things. That's what our stories about those including then President George Bush needed to attack the a story. They've never denied those two things so without going on and on about it our story was basically true. We did have difficulties with one document document and again they've never denied what was into document. But it's a long story and it's true that You know I paid a price for putting this story on the air but I always come back to two two points are basic story was true and secondly That neither President Bush nor anybody in the Bush family music tonight also want to note that that report came all just hot on the heels of your outstanding award winning reporting about the atrocities at Abu Ghraib prison and I still. I remember seeing that for a seared in my memory. How powerful that reporting was about Abu Ghraib but but mister we've only have a minute and a half left here? I want to constrict gears slightly. Have a little bit of fun. This has been a heavy our important our but a little bit of fun so here let me just play a little something for you here it is motto up. There's buying by and in the sweet by and buys it turns out for Gore that if the kids haven't gone to sleep get them in the room but George Bush's sweeping through The south like a big wheel through Delta Delta cotton field. It won't mean a thing they don't get those swing states. There's got it back to the wall. He's short tails on fire. And the bill collectors. At the door cracking like a hickory fire for at least the last hour and a half years lead is thin as turnip soup. Give an aspirin a headache. President trump has been jumping around like a frog in a hot skillet. It will be ugly enough to choke a question before we get through with it. There's some of your greatest rather `Isms we have about thirty seconds left to go Dan. Rather where'd you get your way with language. Where do I get them wage? I grew up with people who talk this way you know. I started working in the oilfields on his fourteen. Eighteen years old and many of them have come from of my memories of working. The oilfields is an early kid. And then go through life. I'm always looking for a way later us more colorful language and you know. Sometimes they work sometimes they don't but You know that's the way people talk that that grew up with and so when something along election night in an effort to say things a little differently. Use Them coiling login. Yes have a little bit of fun than I try to drop on in from time to time sometimes something just pop in my head Sometimes they fall flat but I had forgotten by the way that he has lied is thinner than turn the great one. Dan Rather flat out of time. The book is what Unites US reflections on patriotism out in paperback. Now thank you so much for being with US magnet. Thank you very much. I make Party this is on point.

Dan Rather Times president US Dan reporter America CBS News CBS facebook Medgar Evers President Dr Martin Luther King President George Bush MIT Mit School of Engineering twitter
8-10-20 - NOW Wauwatosa wants to protect Officer Mensha?

The Mark Belling Show

2:23:05 hr | 3 months ago

8-10-20 - NOW Wauwatosa wants to protect Officer Mensha?

"Pro Pay Taxi. Plug in that tank, we deliver propane straight to you extend your aunties went through. That's pro pain Taxi Pentax Dot Com let's cook in this weekend. If rilling is your plan, then make it easy on yourself. Go to propane taxi dot com enter Promo Code bbq Ten for ten dollars I barbecue tank exchange delivered to your door. It's that easy with propane taxi so you can focus on family friends and fun. Good afternoon Milwaukee versus the mark belling late after do Shell on news talk eleven thirty W my ass at. This is one of those shows in which. You kind of know where you have to start, but you're not sure where where you're supposed to start with what you're supposed to start with. So. Rather than third eighty where I'm just gonNA give you the first of our four words that we have at the sizzling summer cash contest a member we have one of these each hour of the program three, four, five, and six for a little bit after the word for the three o'clock hour is home h o m e home is in home played home text that into two, hundred, two, hundred anytime between now and four pm you can instantly win a thousand dollars to get a text confirming entry plus iheartradio Info Standard Data and message rates apply. In this nationwide contracts. There's the real big picture. There's the big picture and then there's the story. I'm GonNa give you the real big picture that I'm GonNa get to the story and. The actual big picture will probably be the third thing that you're the real big picture is if you take a look around the United States right now and you say things going to hell. You are looking at a community that is being run entirely by. Democrats. Just, true. Find a part of the United States that appears to be going completely to hell. It's entirely by Democrats by the place that might be screwed up, but it salvageable probably split. and find something that seems to be just fired A. You're not going to see Eddie Democratic power in site thereby exceptions out there but I'm telling you this really holds. I counted on the show. A couple of weeks ago. That wa Wa Tosa was headed to being worse than Madison and it was headed toward being Portland. In terms of. The civil insurrection that was going out of the community. At some point the residents and the city leadership woke up and realized that when you turn over your city to insurrectionists, you're GONNA get insurrection. Now. Whenever I say these things despite the fact that they've this is not exactly a tremendous revelation by what I just mentioned holds up almost every single time. Once you came in the caving never stops in once you start caving and you don't appease your critics they see you as soft and they push for more. While Tosa has a despicable member of the common council. She hates cops she's got a bug upper. But for police said authority, her name is heather cool. But. She's one member. Common Council. She's one radical. WHO's on a common council a community that is skewing left. Ended of itself, she can only do so much harm. But once she suggested that Wa Tosa cave-in. To insurrectionist and fire or police officer who has acted heroically and it's done nothing wrong. The rest of the city council immediately jumped on this, and this is what has led us to the point that we are at right now. We're in a Wa Tosa neighborhood last. Saturday. We're in a while we're Tosa neighborhood, Saturday night. Sixty people can show up at a private residence in rather quiet subdivision. With. No evidence of police department in place. Can Scream and taunt the residents. Then, throw rocks through their windows and eventually fire a shotgun at least one shot. Close to a person's head. All the while children inside the house. As I've been telling people at Tosa. It will continue to get worse. Until you start demanding sub leadership from your community in that means telling people that you are going to start enforcing the law. And resume living in a civil society where you don't get to go into people's neighborhoods and scream and rant and rave at the top of the line chant all sorts of unbelievably vile threats say you're going to kill somewhat. I can't just go do that in front of somebody's house in Hartford. Dave michaels. Paul. Today I don't think he can. Falls get three or four of his goofball France had just decide to go outside somebody's house and scream at the top of the legs for an hour and a half. Hey, we're gonNA, kill Ya. But. Why would Tosa has tolerated this tolerated this tolerated tolerated in tolerated this because they've clip the wings of their police department of that wing clipping started. When they fired a police officer for trying to stop a band who had a loaded stolen gun. With, thirty six rounds of ammunition and it extended magazine from heading into Mayfair ball perhaps intent to commit mass murder at only after the individual fired a shot at the officer. For potentially saving all those lives that officer was fired, which is given tremendous. Strength. To the people who are causing insurrection at Tosa. So they figured we're going to keep pushing the envelope pushing the envelope, pushing the envelope, pushing the envelope pushing the envelope. Right up to the point at which they will start killing people if this doesn't stop. They won't go that far OH. You won't go that far and Portland wasn't going to go that far at Seattle. Was it good to go that far in Minneapolis was a good to go that far nothing's ever going to go that far until of course, it did. Now let's move away from the story and get to a little bit of the bigger picture. I don't know what was more Kelly. The Awol Status of the wobble Tosa Police Department during this. Or the fact that the mainstream media did everything in its, it could to avoid reporting this story for hours. Now I don't work on weekends and have halfway out of commission in terms of what's going on. And I didn't I become aware of this until after Joseph men that put it out a social media post early in the morning. On Sunday. And when I got up, Sunday morning. I. Had A number of people notify me that Mensa had posted this, and this is what had happened while Matosas around six thirty or so in the morning on Sunday? was lying after that that. Meant his girlfriend who? I'm struggling with how much to identify her. It's not a secret who she is and everybody who knows the two of them. Knows her job and her role, but there are children involved here and The residents that they share is in her name. Suffice to say she's in the same crosshairs that he is based on ocupation. Put out a social media post describing what had happened. There are parts of this story though that I think and I realized that I'm doing this show after number of other talk show hosts have already commented, and there has now been some degree of news coverage on the story. I offer all the by comments independent of what anyone else has to say unless I'm citing something that was reported elsewhere. I can tell you. That wa Wa Tulsa police and the Mayor were aware of what was going to happen. At men's I don't mean the shooting but that there was going to be a protest at house edit mayfair over the weekend. There were residents who in fact had emailed the mayor because there were ominous indications that these protesters we're going to up the ante. And the mayor said we're aware of it. Will if there are where there was absolutely no precautions in place at all. Always asked what would you have done? I've been clear from the beginning of this. I would have any situations in which individuals have been threatened officer Mensa has been threatened repeatedly. I would have SWAT team officers riot gear in place we thought that there was going to be a disturbance that doesn't mean they do anything I'd have them in place in case there needed. I would not be part of this crap of Oh you're only going to stir up people even more we have seen were that weakness gets The. Only huge size said he. Word the only major said he of size in the upper midwest that has not seen. Real violent protests other than for the one night was Milwaukee because we had a show of force. We had police officers in riot gear ID we had the national guarded riot gear guarding police district stations, and after the first situation on the Friday night follow of the George flight protests there was looting on. mlk there has virtually nothing in terms of mass destruction. It is for that reason that is one of the reasons at least the police chief Afonso Morales was fired. Because, we actually showed enough force. The people who are hell bent on causing destruction realized they wouldn't get away with it. The places where the police have been ordered to stay back Minneapolis certainly Madison at Wolpe Tosa. We have seen things get worse and worse and worse. So. Again, my commentary has not been new in this regard, but I can tell you as I said and I as. This all goes back to leadership within a community. And maybe Dennis McBride's bad luck that he was elected mayor in. April right before all hell broke loose in this country, but he was elected. And he has shown grotesque weakness here. In part because a good segment of the people who live in Wa wa Tosa are themselves week and have behaved themselves shamefully I say all said a good segment of. The People who live while Matosa have lived in a largely safe community. I said Lars lead entirely. Which? Is Such an interesting community in terms of of its diversity in terms of the different neighborhoods, dense downtown main drags. Usual City boundary-line that zigzags between Milwaukee and while we're Tosa, not just east west, but then as jangle span of north south. You could drive around while we're tossing. Go you see them walkie side the what does decide the Milwaukee side all of this creates for an interesting community. Then, major shopping centers and huge commercial strip on the west side, but also quiet subdivisions. Middle Class, the upper middle class community. And changing in nature in part because of the inflexible walkie residents, perhaps because of the dropping of the residency rule that moved into the community. But during all of this, they have lived in a largely safe community. With a largely high quality of life. Almost. Entirely because they have had a police department that is managed to handle. All of this spectacularly well. Yet there are many residents of that community who turned on their police department with a vengeance. Just. So they could pose politically correct holy pictures. With an entirely different situation occurred an entirely different state Minneapolis. And all of this as I say has led to this point who which we shot saw incredible weakness even though I'm telling you. I'm not sitting here to any Monday morning quarterbacking because I have been telling you all along that. This was going to get worse than I said on this show repeatedly that when they made the decision to recommend the firing Mensa, it was going to get worse and that they wouldn't stop with this. They would next go after the police chief and after that, they would try to get the. Police out of mayfair altogether, and after that, they would try to shut down Mayfair. You'll recall I said all of these things would happen and I stand by all of them and to Warwick. Tosa. Determines get some backbone and realizes that this will not stop at its own that it will only stop when they stopped people who continue to break the law and disturb the peace and threaten people. And that includes people are running through the mall screaming and yelling busted windows shove people over instead of running away from that it means patrolling that wall and making arrests when they occur. In the same fashion that you can't let people go into neighborhoods. And make these kinds of threats that people will where are they? Would you have them printed out? Yeah. Well Hey We have weather advisories that I need to interrupt myself. To pass along to you here. We have a severe thunderstorm warning in effect for portions of Kenosha Racine and Walworth counties. Until four PM, again, we've had a severe thunderstorm watch for much of the listening area in effect throughout the afternoon we now have a warning that's in place for. And I'm looking at our radar here yet and as you probably know been storms moving through the entire region, there's a really strong line I would say if you kind of look toward. City of Waukesha and Brookefield on south toward the state line, and that's where the strongest sellers is that it's a big long cat of north South Pencil like line that's moving. Toward. The East right now through Walworth then of. Proceeding Kosheh counties, we used to call that thing tornado alley because of the number of tornadoes that were kind of come to should even so odd this was kind of shuping across the state. It's sort of moved the beloit area now through Lake Geneva and he's headed to these. That's the line that we're. Concerned right now. So that's the only warning in place. We have watches out there as well severe thunderstorm warning for Kenosha and Walworth counties until four PM. And there may be additional warnings that come up and we'll keep you on top of that. Getting back to the point that I was making. Lost the train of thought a little bit. But I think what I was saying was that I have been. Consistently predicting that things while we're toasted, we're going to get worse. So long as the community was going to continue to show weakness. It isn't just liberals who think this way often conservatives had the same stupid response. When people agitated agitated agitated agitate there's this tendency will just give them what they want and they'll go away. I'm going to tell the story of. Albert. I'm not talking about the what was was the cat that That w the word Allen had to in the weather with him was that Alpert also. Is. Different Albert Sameera. Was it. Albert. Albert. I tell this story even though it's stupid story because. If you reading in the Bible Jesus always talked in parables and the reason he talked in parables is the same reason. I use analogies. It's a way makes the story more memorable if I just tell you the story, you will remember your remember the story about the stupid cat named Albert. And this story? This is not about that. Albert. This is about by Albert. When I went to school a Lacrosse I lived in a dorm for one year. Got The hell out of the dorm as soon as I could. I. Didn't like limited a door. That was when dorms read actually dorms where did you go to college? You go to college anywhere G. BYWATER water couldn't get into a good school I say that about every school there is I told the same stupid joke. It always works for whatever. If if you're in radio, it's never harvard. It's never even Marquette it's we're John. Wyatt is the logger course with us. He's not dead. He just quit. You know he was Platfo Paul was Oshkosh across where Donald go he might have gone to someplace like he went to see Right right. I. He went to Marquette. But I'm guessing graduated like. best-case middle of the class, right? Yeah. I mean we ever went to. Madison. I mean that's generally you're to get radio. I thought Vicky. went to. I she might have gone to a both I don't know. I tell the story about Albert because it's my way. Of making an important political point that I'm going to use to get into a more serious discussion about what happened in the toes said, what needs to happen at Walmart Tosa and the fact that the media has chosen not to cover to essentially play and I think initially attempt to cover this story up. I got of the door miss. Students. I possibly quoted as I was say because back in the urine which I lived in a dorm dorms were actually dorms. Two guys living on top I can't even imagine what the square few. I bet it was less than a hundred square feet. That's probably low had be a little bigger than that. Not much to beds right next to one another you could barely walk between the two of them and two little desk behind them and then tiny little closet. That's it. Every floor had a big bathroom and it was whether shared showers or there's like twelve standard x the twelve other guys there's not stalls or anything. The bathrooms were just filthy as is loud. This is this is the seventies. Everybody's planned rocket roll into four o'clock in the board brooks are being done like crazy everybody's drinking I made was a little overwhelming for me. So I decided to move into a private residence role of these things that happen to you just would not have as many people at one place or another sell it at a different place every year. Okay. I have lived uncast read across it was a sophomore. Enforced Street when I was a junior. I was in no rush to get out of here. There were two places in my senior year and one of them was on. Badger Story. And the House that me and? Three other guys live did. Weirdly, it was like two and sort of a third other guy. I didn't really know Eddie of them. I knew what are the guys that I didn't know the other two and that's just how he always do it back in that day it had we found this house that was not right in the college neighborhood meaning. It was less of a dump than students would normally say it was near downtown, but it was in an actual neighborhood, but it wasn't to route a student area that was mostly a rental house. A guy had rented out but was around US still lot of owner occupied it's occupied single family homes. And moved in. And one day this cat. Scratch it. And you can just see from this cat, this cat. This cat literally had lived nine lives. This was a street cat. In fact, he came from around the alley. He was literally at Alley cat that's it was. K.. And I'm looking at him and pick it. Should I open the door open the door he didn't come in. Okay I'm not that stupid he wants the Melker water so I put some milk owed. then. The next day I put out a little bit of food. As, it turns out what I learned from all the neighbors within three or four days that cat's name was Albert and that cat came with whoever lived in the house. So even though people would move in and out every year, it was generally used for student Housing Albert? Just knew this who would feed him but he never wanted to come inside I mean, once in a blue moon, we get inside the house said he'd walk around but he wanted to stay outside of the St Albert was like this people who live in San Francisco. He was essentially homeless, but he knew where to go in order to get fat. If I had not fed or my roommates not fat Albert. That first couple of days he would have gone elsewhere and look for something else that feed he kept coming back to our because he kept knowing knowing that we were going to feed him. This is true from alley cats too liberal agitators. Once they realize you're stupid enough in our case it wasn't stupid. I like Albert actually he's the perfect cat he didn't come in. Come over and like demand a little bit of this and then you know you'd see him stand at around nine. You don't have to do anything I. Pat Him already you didn't want any of that. This is what? Liberals understand if someone gives them something that they want. especially if it's somebody, they don't much like. They're gonNA come back again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again and again, and again, this is what drives them crazy about trump. He never gives them what they want and he goes and takes shots right back at them. They are not used to this. With totally different style. The same was true of Scott Walker the other Republican in recent times that they just reviled and despised. Walker never backed out. Can he was GonNa do you know right to war whatever the thanks for if Scott Walker decided he was going to do something he decided he wasn't GonNa Cave in just because the media and the left Eastwood widing complain about it. What Walker. Understood. What I think Sheriff Clarke understands what trump understands is something that hardly anybody else understood ads It's not just that liberals aren't reasonable. They're not reasonable, but that's not the motivation here. It's simple. Common Sense. To move away from the alley, cat. If you're a beggar WHO's working on the corner and there's a corner, make a lot of money that's going to be the corner you keep going to. So, once while Tosa started a cave after the protesters acted obnoxiously to them, they realize this is how we give away. Want we act obnoxiously. They wedded wobble toes say even though most not even live in the city they went started going into city council meetings, government meetings, and screaming and yelling they've got you know there's a normal process for in this virtual meetings through to make it even weirder. But. They're showing up in person. There's normally a time for citizen comment and they would just scream during the meetings and scream and scream and scream and scream and screaming screaming and instead of doing what ought to have been done what would have been done to me or you or any other person who's disrupting a meeting instead of calling the police and hauling them out for at arresting them for being disorderly in a public dating, and Outta love for character buzzes Ho. Now they're responding canoeing this that and the other thing. Then, they said ghetto the fire of the city council has no authority over the police department is the fire and police commission. But to get the author back, the City Council takes this symbolic vote to fire officer. MENSA. The fire and police commission does the same thing the next night. No I. Get I always. Put myself at the other guy shoes you all should. I have never been married, but maybe I if I was married this would be however to figure out mayor of the bliss. Put myself at the other person's shoes rather than always thinking about your own shoes. I know the people who are really good at. Strategic Sporting events that you know that's what they do. Got A billy crafty basketball player vehicle. Jordan. Talk about this all the time how he tried to get into the head of the other guy figure out what he was thinking. In terms of his moods, moves and so on. Put yourself at the other guy's shoes. If. You're an agitator who wants to stir up crap in a suburb. And you stir up crap by screaming and yelling and you get exactly what you want. Are you going to run away go to another suburb really like they tell you to go screw yourself or you're gonNA stay in that same one up the ante with more crap mark rapid more crap and more crap. Evidently Wa Tosa could not figure this out. They sacrifice offer officer. MENSA bay literally sacrifice them. They sacrificed him at the altar altar of political correctness. It started with other cool and then it got to the mayor. It's just not head of for him to continue as employment as a police officer here. It was just not tenable for Joan of arc to continue her life as a young woman we have to burn her at the stake because there are people who didn't like her. Just not tenable. Everything that America is premise the pod. We have all sorts of rights in order to stop mob rule. For thrown by the wayside. This decision while Tosa was made by an entirely white common council and that the victim of this attack was a young african-american. Makes this all the more profound. Clarence Thomas made reference to what they attempted to do for him due to him when he was nominated by the first President George Bush to the United. States Supreme Court what she called it a high tech. Lynching. In they use TV to bring up an amplified, the bogus Anita Hill allegations against him. Well there was a high tech about what happened in while the Tosa with regard to officer. MENSA. And the term lynching can be used rather casually. But. Wa Tosa felt that the criticism that they were getting over officer Mensa was too much trouble for them. So they decided to ruin his life these white liberals who couldn't handle a little bit of criticism decided to. So the black guy into the fire and dispose of him. Not Understanding. That once you threw him into the fire, they realize we could get a real bonfire going. Why quit now? So. There he is recommended for firing suspended, etc.. And the protesters up the ending other start showing up at the guy's house. This was not the first time they showed up at his house. This has happened before. Say the Police Department in the city officials knew it. Now. I know it's always easy after something happens to say, well, why did you think what's going to happen? Which is why I'm glad. That, what I do this program, we have podcast recordings, and so on. Because I told you, it's just going to keep getting worse while Tosa. Again, put yourself in the other guy's shoes. Imagine. Your kids you know neighborhood kids Easter up trouble. Much lower level than this. Remember when I was a kid like I lived in a subdivision where they're always building houses. You're the always a new house go up. And you weren't supposed to go onto that construction site and climb into the basement of the House and so loud that is going up but you know kids would do that sort of harmless other than I suppose we could break our next but this is in the era in which parents didn't seem to care of kids broke. Their next is literally wasn't. I remember that the like three or four days that have rolled his you know usually like some neighbor chase you off and then we'd be mortified right away there is and we kept going in there and we kept going to add noble we're doing this look at it the plywood or something and other or maybe somebody tried to shoot down into the basement it was etc.. And nobody was telling us to go away. I don't know who did what but somebody then decided to break something. I am real vague who I know it was at bay. At then that of course, scared us because. We might actually get in trouble. The reason that we broke something was we had to keep upping the ante that we're we're getting any kind of a reaction here. So when they keep showing up, they're not going to stop showing up at all, they're going to up the ante. And what happened Saturday night when they were screaming and yelling at the top of their lugs at officer Mensa lives with his. Girlfriend story has been described as his residents, girlfriends, residents I believe she owns the house. But. If resides there means. Often. Is there overnight he? He lives there. And It's a neighborhood of. small-sized houses that are close together. I'm not GonNa, give you the address it's been reported in the media, but I'm not going to give you the address. You can find it easy. Lay Off. I'll just say that it's Around two, hundred, th street in that general area. Anyway With. Them screaming at the top of their lungs right in his front yard. Opposite Mensa wet out to like a man talk to them. Hitting power away. He walked out unarmed. Remember even though he's a suspended police officer still in American citizen, he has a right to carry a weapon. And I know why did because I know exactly what I? What? I, know exactly what's happening here? Even though nobody else wants to tell you what's happening here I know what's happening I'm not stupid I know what's happening here he went out to talk to him like a man. who was very reasonable Well like that. Think about this, a mixed race group of agitators confronting a young. African, American. Who's got people in the houses coming out here, wondering why they keep yelling and screaming outside his house. It was at this point according to various witnesses that the object started getting hurled. There was at least one window that was busted out. This. is as Mensa was going back into the house in which he realized he was getting nowhere. According to officer Mensa. Shotgun. Either Shell or pellet. Move very close to his ear. His girl had reported that there were multiple gunshots while would host the police said, there was one shot. As Best I can tell a number of firecrackers were shot off and then shot went off lake, which might be the confusion as to how many shots are being fired. But if somebody who lives in Milwaukee and his heard these protests, all the time, the shooting off fireworks constantly, and one of the reasons protesters shoot off fireworks is because it sounds like gunshots, freaks people off. I know exactly what was happening here? They were hoping that meant would pull out a gun and shoot himself not not shoot himself shoot shoot someone himself. They WANNA get men said it kills somebody else or shoot at somebody else and there are people there that were armed ready to shoot back. They were trying to provoke him. That's what this was. Why also they shooting off all all the firecrackers all at once tried to get him. On my God, they're shooting at me Pelotas Gut. But. He didn't have a gun with him. He was smart enough to know that he's not right now being denied the rights rights if an American. Citizen and being able to defend himself because for defending himself earlier situations professionally, they're trying to destroy his life. And it was after this that there was a police response and the crowd dispersed. There was essentially no police presence so far as I can tell. During the time that any of this was going on because if there was. The police would have separated officer Mensa from these individuals that were agitating. One has a right to protest on sidewalks but one does not have a right to disturb the peace furthermore in almost every community in the United States. If you're going to have it organized protests, you're supposed to get a permit in advance. They didn't have any of these things. There was dead the grass everything under the sun and the next thing you know objects are being hurled and as I say a gun was fired. I don't know if they were trying to hit him or not. As I, say it sounds to me like they were trying to do some provoking. But maybe they worked tried to hit him. Don't know. Things can happen. I don't think I'll name the guy but there's a guy who's had various issues. I got a name why not? Yet. Over the years I've been a lot of problems with frank. Jewett and frank has had some issues I think. Coping with life. And aside long after the incident in which he was beaten up at the police party in Milwaukee and so on and lying after he blew through the money from settlement and so on. There were a couple of weird disturbances that would occur at the House that frank live with with his girlfriend. There was an odd thing at Selfridge Ridgewood franken making allegations there but odd standoffs at the police et Cetera et Cetera et Cetera I mean some people just The not wired right and there could be issues. There was a standoff recently in the area where the person was domestic situation and for hours the police waited him outside. That can happen anywhere where an isolated case somebody's having a bad day. They get on hinged they make threats this can happen in any neighborhood anywhere. This was not that this is the building and building and building and building, and building and building and building. You have people that are out there. Who Don't much like America don't much like police adjust love be able to act up and behave and carry odd knowing they could get away with it who have used this officer at wildwood. Tosa. As their own personal whipping post just so that they can take shots and carry on and they have been doing it because Wa Tosa has been too wimpy to do anything about it. Could have been menominee falls. Had there not at least been some response after they went out to the gas station and took whistles on the side of the building and so what the police did show up they make clear that they weren't going to tolerate that any longer but wallet Tosa has been rolling over to this from the beginning just as they have rolled over all along efforts since the Mayfair protest started. Back years. If you people at Walmart Tosa WanNa have peace you've got to be willing to have confrontation I. This is true of anything in life. The person whose behavior has impressed me boast action there's two people. Officer men's a young officer men say and his girlfriend have been so professional. And so wonderful through all of this. I am hopeful that officer men Sisu, was the can off the people of Wall Tosa, and you people that while the Tosa overtax yourself like crazy to build all these schools that you're putting up that you're not even going to use because you've decided that. Not Safe to let your kids go to school, but it is safe to allow a bunch of people who are threatening to kill police officers show up at his house and shoot at him. Could pay settlement here for. The wrongful termination of the career of a police and trashing of police officers reputation who has nothing wrong other than to try to stop mass murder from going out at the mall. To be committed by a seventeen year old who had a lengthy juvenile record was running around with a stolen gut? And posed on social media. Pictures of himself with his God's. Yet through all of this officer men say has responded has behaved respect. He has not shot off his mouth angrily. He's not condemned the community of Walmart. Oh. So he's not condemned the mayor. He has barely spoke in Kabwe about himself and his family members have done the same. He has roots in the community has gone to church in the community grew up in the community, and as I say, his girlfriend is a servant in that community as well. We have a tornado warning right now until four fifteen for Kenosha county. Again, if you're just tuning in, this is the same line of storms that we've been talking about since the beginning of the program that has been moving the get a quick look at my rate right now. There's a big area of rain really on the southern half of the state of Wisconsin but the strongest lines of actual thunderstorm for those of you see the radar, the red part. This is now a kind of the eastern portion of Walworth county moving into racine and Kenosha County, and one of them is strong enough that there's either better tornado citing or conditions exist that lead them to think that there might be a tornado. This is in Kenosha County, and as I say, the front end of the storm is right now just pushing toward the lake and the guts. Is over central Canola County is this thing moves through so tornado warning until four fifteen in Kenosha county and I can't do any narrative because apparently. The actual there's been a sighting just over the state what? I'd location in the sky with two old Tornado has been spotted in the Sky I, guess, it's still the funnel clouds spotted in the sky near Antiach a little I, which is just over the lied in other words if you at North Mannequin be in West Central Kenosha, county I and so on his so I'm a swimming there's weather. Advisories south of the border as well but are reporting your courses only offer the state of Wisconsin. So again, the very very strong thunderstorms now moving through racine and Kenosha county kind of exiting Walworth, and so on. In this potential of a tornado with funnel clouds spotted in the sky on your Antioch Illinois Very Very Close Kansin line and keep on top. Pay. Stop logging that tank. We deliver propane straight to extend your aunties went through. That's. Pain taxi, Pentax Dot Com let's cooking. This weekend really is your plan then make it easy on yourself. Go to propane taxi dot com enter Promo Code bbq ten for ten dollars I. Barbecue tank exchanged delivered to your door. It's that easy with propane taxi so you can focus on family friends and fun at Tropical smoothie cafe they want you to get away every day unwind with their watermelon Mo- Hito. And new, Guava Margarita smoothies pair one with their delicious new barbecue case idea for a mini summer vaca- this summer tropical smoothie cafe is bursting with flavor made to order with fresh quality rock ingredients with sixty Washington DC area locations. It's never been easier to ride the summer wave of flavor order ahead online for carry out curbside pickup or delivery at participating locations Tropical smoothie cafe you're on tropic time now. Eleven thirty Wsmr grabbing late afternoon showy horse required to bring your tornado warnings that and that's why you heard that emergency advisory US. So four fifteen. Four Kenosha with that storm that's moving through the east right. Now, a severe thunderstorm moving through that could produce a tornado. We have been discussing the situation in Tulsa which is escalating and. I would say right now is out of control when you have a shotgun being fired. Either at or near someone. After. Windows were smashed out of their house and a protest that has been occurring. More than once. And the leadership of the community apparently deciding to do nothing about it. Until now they've got a meeting today there's a meeting today mayor, but decided I'm mayor after all called together police chief, wherever, well, what are we going to do to protect? This police officer notice he didn't say what are we going to do to stop the criminal behavior that is going on in our community? He has not said that. And that's not going to occur until they are willing to take back control the Mayfair Mall, they're willing to take back control of North Avenue in the streets that are constantly obstructed and they're willing to take back the neighborhoods in which out of control loud. Raucous UNCIVIL and upon occasion, illegal behavior occurs in individual neighborhoods of people that are trying to threaten family members. As I mentioned. The two people who through this and it's hard to single out a lot of heroes and Jose because they're Ben. They certainly none in city government there are. Members of the only one member of the city council voted not to get rid of officer. MENSA quite a few phonies on there including a handful of Dink's from the west side who've passed themselves off in the past as conservative and shown their true colors here by the way they turned on their community and turned on. This young man I'm going to read. Officer Meneses Original Social Media Post. Interestingly, his girlfriend's post has not been reported to my knowledge in the media other may be on some talk shows. This was their first hand discuss description this with an hours of the incident occurred in which they described. What happened and there is say some conflicts here and my explanation is believed that some of the firecrackers were. Misconstrued has gunshots shots, but I. This is what officer so posted. Any posted this in the middle of the night Sunday morning the incentive occurred. Late Saturday night last night protesters came to my girlfriend's house while I was there and tried to kill Kilby. I was unarmed and tried to defend my property and the property of girlfriend. We were both assaulted punched and ultimately shot at several times a shotgun round missed me by inches not once that I ever swing back or reciprocate any of the hate that was being directed at me. I am all for peaceful protests even against me, but this was anything but peaceful faith through toilet paper, inner trees, broker windows, and again shot at both of us as they were trying to kill me. There are children that live there and they knew that. The irony in all of this is that they chanted black lives matter the entire time but had zero respect for any of the black children that live there or me. A black bed. Also posted on social media. Joseph and I were shot at today. Shot by cowards who were inches away from us but missed they shot into my home. One gun was a shotgun. They physically attacked Joseph and I. They broke the windows to my house. They shot into my house causing damage to the brick. You prove nothing today. Now I have to come up with the funds to repair your damages that prove nothing. You completely forgot with this movement is about. There is a high volume of children on that block that you could have harmed. I will still be returning to work to protect the community that I love. And she posts photos. Of some of the bruises and scrapes and scratches. That she sustained and. Side of her neck, her arms leg, and so on. She scratched and kind of gouged up it. Looked like there was a little bit of bruising. That was developing. That response was very restraint. Imagine your being on the receiving end of something like this. Imagine if. Bunch of white thugs from Milwaukee or west Alice or anywhere. Franklin. decided to show up at the home of an African American protesters house and do this, and then rough up the people there and fire a gunshot. Can you imagine? Jackson and Sharpton and the whole bunch they'd be here everybody's screaming and yelling Oh my goodness. Gracious. Officer men say and his girlfriend are being discriminated against because of their profession that they chose. Almost undeniable. They aren't George. Floyd. Excuse me. They aren't officer shod. And none of the victims of officer. MENSA are George. Floyd. And everyone ought to know that. What they were looking for in Wisconsin was somebody to make a symbol of and they decided to settle on this young officer from wobble Tosa because they don't have any George Floyd type shootings here. And while would Tosa decided to respond to this? By turning their backs on this officer, turning their backs on their police department, selling out their local police chief and instead appeasing a mayor who still trying to sell sell copies of his thirty year old book on racism in Wa. Tosa I'm sorry for having to make it personal but that's clearly what's going on here. Now would Tosa cad? Justice Madison, eventually, sort of woke up and realized my goodness. Gracious. They're trying to firebomb the jail. The city county building has dozens, maybe hundreds of inmates that are in it. They're all sorts of other people that are working there plus it's the second biggest government building that we have here not counting the university. We can't just let him firebomb it. They tried to beat up and maybe kill a democratic member of the. State. Senate state Senate and they tore down to statues that I liberal icons of the state that finally was enough for Madison. May. Maybe this is finally enough for while we're Tosa, that they're going to decide to retake control of their city but that means you've got to start enforcing the law again even against protestors even if some of those protesters are African American and you need to make clear that people do not get to be threatened while Tosa law abiding citizens of the community do not get to be threatened and have this kind of thing occur to them, and when people show up at a disturbing the peace you respond by having police presence and you have those. Sufficiently armed and protected to be able to be ready for anything. This is what would be done almost Eddie normal community. It, in fact, was what was not in Milwaukee When we had the confrontation on McKinley Avenue where police used tear gas now I grant you. Police Chief Morales that's one of the reasons they fired him because he kept the peace in the city by showing moderate nonlethal force. There've been a number of reactions from public officials that the thing that occurred Waubosa over the weekend and this mistreatment issued by the mayor. There has been to my knowledge. No statement issued an apology at all by other cool who started this no statement from Jason Cofer already of the other Alderman who decided to assassinate this young man's career and ruin his family's life. They've been some statements from individuals who are running for public office others conspicuous by their silence. Thunderstorms it'll be third. Line say. Mkhwanazi go to Chicago I. That's where the line is in it sort of pushing to the north and the East angling up But. At the southeastern corner of the state here again, we have a tornado warning for a few more minutes and Kenosha County. We might get an update more advisers don't know right. I'm GonNa give you the sizzling summer cash context word for the four o'clock hour. Again, you'll have until five pm text in the following word to two, hundred, two, hundred maybe you can win a thousand dollars. The word is family F. A.. M.. I. L. Y. Family you'll get a text confirming entry plus iheartradio Info. Standard Data and message rates apply in this. They should wide contest to my knowledge Tony vs had nothing to say. About the disgraceful incident that occurred Matosa over the weekend in which. A. Police officer and Girlfriend and children had their home shot at after the house was attacked. In the latest round of protests that have been occurring outside. Of the home owned by the girlfriend in Walmart Tosa It doesn't surprise me the twenty percents go to say anything because Tony You Persson the Democrats had made very clear. That they're on the side of the protesters and out of the side of the police. That may sound harsh but I don't know any other way. You can take this. If we are dividing this into a police or anti police argument in the United States police are getting no support in many communities. In some communities they're being attacked their budgets are being funded in Milwaukee. The police chief was fired in Warwick hosts other trying to fire a police officer for doing his job. And there are even the tacit comments of support. Well, we support our first responders. You can't even get that out of some liberal mouth in the meantime former governor Scott Walker over the weekend labeled the incident in Wa Tosa as domestic terrorism I applaud Governor Walker, for not mincing words. They are tempting to terrify a family because. Of the career choice of an individual and they have been in bold and by the fact that that individual was sold out by Mayor McBride and the Waubosa Counsil when they decided in an attempt to stop the protestors from bugging us. We're going to target this officer and Put. This slurring his name bad cop for the remainder of his life. This has emboldened the protesters to go after him even farther. Update you right now we have a tornado warning in effect for Racine County until four, forty, five, I mentioned the storm is moving to the kind of in the northeast and it was logical as I said that we'd have an update this. As, are warning in Kenosha County is expiring in a couple of moments tornado warning receive county till four, forty five, and right now, the crosshairs of the storm would be the union girl of York Phil Redmond area, which is in West Central. Versi County So again, I applaud Governor Walker for using that language at domestic terrorism. This is terrorizing activity. And it is being done for a political purpose. Other statements some less laudatory, some decent enough put out. Some had nothing to say now I'm not sure if this particular residents is actually in the fifth congressional district, I know a good chunk. Kubotausa is in Congressman Sensenbrenner district. That's the one. That's the subject of the election tomorrow WHO's a Democrat running on the ballot pulsa wits in two Republicans Cliff Temple and Scott Fitzgerald. At least to me not one of them is bothered even put out. A word on this. Maybe they none of the three of them. They're too busy banging on doors. They couldn't be bothered by the fact that terrorism is occurring in their district. Jillian. Bradley who has a state Senate candidate running in Jason District back it's just the right. Now that has a lot of the storm activity going through it in southeastern Wisconsin put out a strong statement condemning the actions that have been going on in the community Jason Jillian Bradley Statement. Radical. Behavior destroying our communities must ed. I won't read the entire thing body and lea running for the state assembly in the very area where the attack occurred. She's in a three way. Republican. Primary running against the Rhino at a nobody. But Ryan was Linda Boucher Bonny Lee State Assembly candidate and conservative put on a strong statement statement of attack on attack of officer mentioned Saturday officer mench Saturday evening a large group Kerry carried out a truly heinous act in our community violent protesters broke in. And attacked officer Joseph Mensah and threatened not only his own, not only his own life. But that his girlfriend and the children in their home officer Mensa attempted to talk to the angry protests outside the residence but was met with physical violence as he retreated armed protesters fired to the back door attempting to shoot officer Mensa and others inside the home. That's the statement from Bonnie Lee candidate for the state assembly as I say, we haven't gotten anything into. State Senator Dale Koya egg represents that district the mob attack. In fact, an assassination attempt an officer is a Paula. newstalk eleven said Mark belling late afternoon show. Again, we get these alerts him the emergency notification system that we have to air these only when there were tornado warnings and they come up automated like that and without any warning to me, and that's why I was interrupted in mid sentence. So again, that Tornado warnings for Central, Racine County, until four forty five, it is the only weather warning that is currently in effect at this moment. Again, this very strong line of storms moving through a kind of heading from the southwest toward the northeast, the southeastern quarter of the W I S. Mentioned the statement state Senator Dale Conga who commented on the terrible incident that occurred while but Tosa Saturday night a story that. Really was blacked out by the media wasn't any of the local TV stations Sunday morning barely showed up on their websites despite the fact that. Horrifying and frightening event. Sugar coated in today's newspaper. They don't even mention on page one, the gun shot that was fired any way senator claiming ironically the original and warranted peaceful protests began in response to the equally appalling injustice administered in the George Floyd incident, which I am also nauseated by in both cases whether it's a mob or. In individual recognize that Americans are innocent until proven guilty and there is no such thing is three justice. We cannot have people taking justice into their own hands. However, this is what appears to be happening in Wildwood toss with the harassment of officer Mensa we've also since we're we're also seeing closed door secret meetings in Milwaukee an attempt to discredit and marginalized chief Morales who has done a masterful job of respecting the. Right to protest while also protecting private citizens and private property officer Mensa, Chief Morales, and the police departments in the fifth Senate district, which is why would hosted Milwaukee Must Alice. Brookefield growled have my full support is they fight as they fight for law and order in our communities? Again, those are fairly strong statements and a credit to those who at least put them out. Now, what does the Mayor Rob Hutton who represents? A portion of Senator Kwang district I believe he's a little bit to the west of a wobbly Tosa mostly in Brookvale Rob Hutton statement Saturday night group of rioters followed through weeks, threats and attacked a wobble Tosa police officer at his home though the protests of the last few weeks have been largely described as fees peaceful. A brief lots social media reveals multiple threats to find to find officers and their families and their homes. Now, the that Rob Hutton mix is very good. Many people have had their addresses plastic out there on social media and there've been calls to go after these police officers at their homes. Interestingly, the media's choosing not to report this just as much of the coverage deletes some of the vulgar vile statements that are being hurled as reporters who have an agenda try to sanitize their coverage. As I said, the Mayor of Alba Tosa Denis McBride put out a statement as well McBride Waking. Up Now to the fact that he's presiding over a city that is falling apart and going to hell as he sits back and fiddles Allah Niro. You do at least hope. That perhaps. This is an indication Tim McBride in some of the others at the mollycoddling that they have done. Is simply fueling these people who want to burn while we're Tosa doubt. And until. This horrible behavior which has not been peaceful for weeks is stopped when the law is being violated, and until there, it's a commitment to protect all people in the Tosa including protesters. This will get worse anyway here's the statement that was issued by McBride who met later earlier today with the police chief last night approximately fifth, this is issued yesterday last night approximately fifty people assembled at the private residence of although police officer Joseph, and again for those of you again, there's a little bit of lack of clarity here the home zone by his girlfriend. There couple he's there a lot. I. Don't know if he's there full time. been described it as his residence if he's residing there a good chunk of the time but. You know there are a couple that not yet married but. But. Home is actually owned. By the girlfriend, but there are a couple together and that's Whether, it's been this back and forth as to WHO's house. It is anyway engaged in a protest began to vandalize his home officer Mensa tried to engage in a dialogue with them, but was physically assaulted as he retreated into his home. Armed protesters approached the rear door and one fired a shotgun round into his back door. The WATTO's police department received assistance in dispersing the crowd from numerous neighboring agencies. The WP's investigation into this incident is ongoing in recent with us. Again, the mayor in recent weeks, various groups have protested in Wildwood Tosa. Demanding that officer met Mensa he fired the city of Tosa has always supported and protected the right to peaceful protests. Last night's event was not a peaceful protest. It was criminal behavior. If the perpetrators of this crime criminal behavior are identified, they will be prosecuted to the fullest extent allowed by law no one including me believes that while what does not have a history of following through and prosecuting people who engage in this kind of behavior like the numerous slaps on the wrist that have occurred after behavior at Mayfair back to McBride stated. Tomorrow morning that turned out to be this morning I will be meeting with the police chief, the city administrator, the city attorney, and other city officials to determine which steps could be taken to ensure that officer men say is fully protected and the criminal behavior of this kind will not happen. Again, I would interject and ask why we had to have gunshots in order for that to occur back to the statement on July fourteenth the Common Council and I issued a statement asking the police chief and city administrator to facilitate the transition of officer Mensa from WPRO. That's interesting. Rated his skype firing nevertheless, every common council member and I support our police department. That's a non sequitur. You don't fire innocent people when if you support them every common council member and I support officer men's right to due process under the US Wisconsin Constitution and is a police officer to the additional due process protections found in the Wisconsin statutes under Wisconsin Law, the decision as to whether he. will be fired as demanded. A citizen complaint belongs solely to the WTO police and fire commission, and that commission must be given a full opportunity to carry out its deliberations. During this difficult time, I ask all members of the community to reflect on their personal responsibility to engage in responsible and civil behavior. That is an obnoxious statement from that mayor who has been behaving irresponsibly while Tosa other than these protesters. He's calling on the people of Alberto said it grow up? People the Volvo. Tosa. Most of them had behavior this just five. Now, more than ever, it is essential that we all work together to heal a divided community on other words. The other side can yell and scream and curse out and fired gunshots but every else's supposed to keep their lips zipped while you the mayor hide under your desk and refuse to protect your community. This will require patience and understanding that though changes must occur they can only occur during the functioning of a democratic processes processes and not through violence that was the statement issued. By, the mayor of all Tosa Denis McBride so anyway, that's where we stand on all of this. Again, I will update you on our weather situation. We have a tornado warning in effect Racine County until four, forty, five, very strong storm moving through the year. It's part of a larger track of storms that many of your network right now in the southeastern corner of the state. In this thing's been Kenneth shoving up from the southwest toward the northeast and his right now over racine. Plug in that tank, we deliver propane straight to extend your aunties through. That's pro pain taxi paying taxes DOT COM. Let's cook in this weekend. If grilling is your plan, they make it easy on yourself. Go to propane taxi dot com enter Promo Code bbq Ten for ten dollars I barbecue tank exchange delivered to your door. It's that easy with propane taxation so you can focus on family friends and fun at Tropical smoothie cafe they want you to get away every day unwind with their watermelon Mahyco and new Guava Margarita smoothies pair one with their delicious new barbecue pork. For A, mini-summit Vaca- this summer tropical smoothie cafe is bursting with flavor made to order with fresh quality rocket ingredients with sixty Washington DC area locations. It's never been easier to ride the wave of flavor order ahead online for carry out curbside pickup or delivery at participating locations. Tropical smoothie cafe your entropy time now. Standing up for gay this is the mark belling late afternoon show on news talk eleven thirty. San. Drove observational skills will notice that much variance pouring rain right down pretty much the farther south you are. The likely are that you're getting storms have a tornado warning in effect for about fourteen more minutes for Racine county a part of this strong line of storms. It's mostly in the southern half of the urea kind of shoving right now over toward Lake Michigan part of a big glop of rain. That's over the entire region. We spent the first portion of today's program discussing. The situation in Waubosa said, which has been. Under siege is community even before the George Floyd situation occurred, there's been trouble at Mayfair off and on forever. The been situations in which the police in Waldo toys have been criticized because they've tried to keep order. Following the George Floyd. Situation. Shooting that occurred at Mayfair months ago that was not thought to be controversial at the time in fact. You Go back to win that initial incident occurred at me in which. A gang. Charged for the mall and was being disruptive police responded somebody fired a shot at a cop and the police officer shot back and killed the suspect. There was no criticism at the time. It was only after the George Floyd situation when some black lives matter protesters were looking for some cops somewhere in the state of Wisconsin to make an issue of. That decided to stumble an officer Mensa. Given the fact that he had to earlier police shootings during his career. And they've been raising a stink in Waubosa ever since and. Walmart Tulsa, is. A diverse community, but predominantly white with a lot of people over there that are liberal very much in some respects like madison liberals who pose for their politically correct holy pictures and they have been bending over backwards to people who don't follow any of the rules that people in Walmart Tulsa. Are compelled follow. While Matosa like most liberal could be entities is very anal with the way they run their public. You've got to citizen comments restricted to a certain period of time, and you can link talk for a couple of minutes and so on. Well, they would never allow a resident of Abu to get away with having twenty five people yelling and screaming right during the middle of the meeting and break it all of the roads, but they allowed these demonstrators to do this. They have taken a hands off approach as demonstrators have black traffic and some of the busiest three to the state of Wisconsin. They have been targeted and demanded that officer Joseph Mensah. For that incident that occurred at Mayfair even though as they say, no authority anywhere has ruled that it was a wrongful shooting. As I explained at the time once they rolled over caved in and did this, they merely guaranteed that the pressure would increase. The next thing that would be demanded would be that officer to be thrown in jail the police chief Gerry Weber who's a very good chief. would be fired. They'd next would demand that police be taken out of mayfair altogether, and after that was done, they would try to shut down the entire mall that was my prediction and so far every one of those dominoes has started to fall. It is hopeful that while Tosa will finally start growing. So backboard and try to restore order and community and understand that these are not peaceful protesters but they're insurrectionist who want to destroy community that many of them do not live it. Will Save. Anyway I mentioned chief Weber. Absent. Here in any kind of commentary over the last several days, it's been any comment from the police chief. Now. I. Know Berry Weber the police chief. He's very outspoken. And he's very responsive. The fact that he has not talking means he has been told by Mayor McBride that he can't talk. I believe they're going to try to get Weber to reside again, they're doing everything in their power to appease these protesters in the same way the black lives matter and other liberals wanted chief Morales fired in Milwaukee and got their way they weber out and wobble Tosa. This message is not being lost on the protesters when they keep getting everything that they want, and after that, there's GonNa be a demand that. While what the police have no presence at Mayfair Mall at all and I suspect that they will cave into that as well until Mayfair realizes excuse me while Tosa realizes that the pressure here is coming for people for whom this will never be enough. They don't like police they don't like authority they don't like law and order. And, that's what they're hanging up. He has and that's what's been driving all of this. The fact that they have infiltrated the common council with some insurrectionist type Alderman like heather. Cool. Makes matters worse but it's not an excuse for the rest of the Common Council or the mayor who ought to know better. So anyway I think it's interesting that we haven't heard from chief Webber and I know that's not by chief Weber's choice. It's got to be because the mayor is told chief Weber that he can't talk. So Mayor McBride wants to take charge of the entire police department. Then this is all on him. There's another part of the story that WanNa comment on before I move forward. I mentioned in my commentary earlier, my criticism of the that while all of this was going on there was no police presence, the only tops at the scene. Of the home of officer Mensa and his girlfriend when they were under siege officer Mensa and his girlfriend. There was no. So Police Department there at all. I would love to ask the chief whether or not. They have been ordered to stand down by the mayor and city administrator I suspect. Yes. But they weren't there. When you have a terrifying situation like this that you don't have to I, think police should have been there in riot gear. Just. As a deterrent in case they saw something like a gunshot being fired, they could be ready to respond. But it said there was no one there which of course emboldened the protesters. People always well, that's just going to inflame them know what inflames them as knowing they can get away with this kind of behavior. which generally stops them is when they think that they might get arrested when they're caught breaking the law. I chose in my discussion earlier. Debacles hero use him as my Guinea pig. Do. You know. Anything about officer Mrs, his girlfriend who is the homeowner here Do you know where Well I am not going to name her even though these names social media and so on. Are All over the place because she doesn't need any more crap herself, but she did sort of identify herself and. I've mentioned a couple of times in the past. What she does for a living she's a police officer in Milwaukee. I am told that it was Milwaukee police that responded to the situation in Wildwood Tosa I. Because of lack of confidence that while the Tosa police we're going to show up at all. That's how hands off the police department has been forced to be by the leftist leadership evolved Tosa. Now, I believe that in Milwaukee despite the fact that the fire and police commission got rid of chief, Morales his trying its best determine Milwaukee's police department into a bunch of flowers children. The police officers in Milwaukee will respond when they believe that there is a chance that one of their own is being killed. And there was a very good chance that that's what this thing was going to shake up to be. Once you saw that at least one gunshot was fired into the home. So the statement the camera while the police that multiple jurisdictions responded Milwaukee police responded I believe because they were asked to respond by people in the home who are isolated. So for those of you who live in Oiseaux, on your hands doing nothing for the last number of weeks understand you have a terrible city council understand that your city could fall apart. Unless you grow up and realize that an orderly society we must maintain order and I'm not talking about bringing in this. Gestapo for crying out loud Milwaukee. Kept a lid on things that while the saints kept a lid on things even Madison is demonstrated once decides to keep a lid on things that it is capable of doing. So but it starts with empowering Your Police Department to enforce the law on its starts with understanding that many. Not all but many of these agitators including those that are throwing rocks through the windows of people's homes are not peaceful protesters but our insurrectionist hell bent on breaking the law in the same way that number of the people who continue to cause mayhem inside of Mayfair are not people protesting there people that are out there trying to simply break the law because they realize that Matosa has become a community that allows them to do so. We will move out. I got another interesting story for you in a weird way. It's related in the way it's not. We have been commenting on over just the last several months the absolute silencing of any number of people who have a dissenting point of view really at any of these social issues that we have. I'm going to share with you a story about how coach he's not even a teacher. got fired. From a local school district. Because he has dared to express political beliefs which have been critical of the black lives matter movement. I'm going going to kill you yet which community it is because I'm GonNa, make you stick around. But I will tell you that it is not the city of the walkie. It's a community whose. Letter starts from the first half of the alphabet what data guess. Got To, tell you what he said. Talk Eleven thirty W I S and mark late afternoon show as we. and. Mentioning we have. Strong lot of storms that are moving to a big chunk of really severe weather's moving out of the lake but there's still a lot of rain activity. In fact, it's pretty much raining from west at Madison all the way over to Lake Michigan and the southern half of the stayed the strongest portions of those storms are to the east and all of the severe weather advisories. That we have in effect are now out, we still have a thunderstorm watch until seven o'clock tonight but no more warnings in effect at least as of the moment thunderstorms ending tonight. Then clearing skies with a low of sixty five beautiful weather for the rest of the week tomorrow partly sunny high seventy, nine Wednesday sunny high eighty one, Thursday partly sunny high eighty, two, Friday partly sunny. With, a high of eighty two Friday hammers chance more. Storms coming into the area. In the United States right now if you have political viewpoints that are right of center and you express them on social media, you can lose your career. That's just reality. My advice would be not post diplomatically viewpoints on social media if you don't WanNa, lose your career. But I also understand in saying that that you are allowing social media to simply be a forum for only one side of the discussion as were essentially conceding that. Americans do not have a right to their political opinions. Any more During all of the other crackdowns that have occurred the tearing down of statues and everything else that have occurred over the last several months of liberals. Destroying everything that was once America. The right people have diverse points of view has also been shot from the individual perspective. You could take the path of least resistance and not at least post things on social media where the entire world can see them re post and raise a stink. Or? You can stick to the gun your guns, and hope that somebody's going to have your back. When they come after you. The following the story of it apparently opinionated person who's out there in the community. He's the coach at Germantown High School. Germantown is one of the most conservative communities, all of southeastern Wisconsin there. You are not safe from the politically correct school administration. The Superintendent Germantown reside they've got a new one. And he apparently is somebody who is making it clear that if you have political viewpoints that somebody objects to you and the right of center that your career in Germantown is over. Now. In preparation for this segment, I common contacted the Germantown Principal Athletic Director and. School Superintendent and none of them have chosen to respond assume that that means that they don't want to responded. They couldn't care less if the folks Germantown realized that. Somebody says something in Germantown, the black lives matter does it like German towns going to fire that? I'm not going to defend the comments that were made by the individual teacher than to say that you can say things like this from the left and not have to worry at all. There's almost no limit as to how you can be an out and out Marxist. You. Didn't damn police officers. You can get down white people you could talk about white privilege. If you say something though that offends someone on the left, they're going to claim that simply the offensiveness of that speech is enough that your done. Though the person who contacted me as the individual who has fired, he has not a teacher. In High Schools in Wisconsin, most of the coaches well, let's not right. Public High Schools Teachers have the first crack at a coaching job but. When there aren't enough teachers to fill a spurt certain kind of thing. Some non teachers will come as often. For example, you'll see private schools can hair they want but Santa Public School. The. Guy Coaches the defensive backs might be a non teacher or somebody who's an assistant gymnastics coach might have experience in that sport or they might not be a teacher. So but most of the head coach is still teachers not all not all their you know German too. There's a famous police officer who's a basketball coach around the area anyway WanNa make it clear. This guy did not get fired from a teaching position he's not a teacher he was an assistant swimming coach. His name is Tim D'Amico. I'm going to share with you what he told me. He also sent this to numerous other talk show hosts and others, and the story has been covered elsewhere as well. I've been an assistant coach with the Germantown Girls Swimming and diving team for the last three years. The upcoming season was going to be my fourth I grew up in Germantown and graduated from there myself and twenty eleven for the last five years I had been coaching club for two different private club organizations in my time as a coach have worked with kids and. Never once had a personal a professional complaint against me on Thursday July ninth. I shared a post to my facebook page comparing the KKK to the organization not the statement black lives matter because of course, I agree with that statement. But with the political organization is not something that I am a concert that is a conservative can or will ever support and let me interject. I am of the opinion that a lot of people do not know that black lives matter is not only a slogan is also a group the group black lives matter is a Marxist organization that has radical points of view. I believe many people who say the term black lives matter do not realize they are affiliated with a radical group. Many people are bothered for example that the NBA puts black black lives matter around the court. The NBA has said they're not endorsing any particular rueful. That is the name of a group. Nonetheless, it can create confusion. This guy is saying, look my criticism here is of the organization by criticism is not of the statement black lives matter back to his comments to me around eleven thirty that day I got a voice mail from the athletic director. Her name is Sarah. At Germantown High School I should point on I contacted Sarah. You know she has not responded to be. So if she doesn't like the spin that's being offered here, it's because she has chosen not to come out and defend. Wyatt is that she sought their sanctioning people for their political points of view I was that by Fulltime Day job and unable to count to call her until later in the afternoon when I did connect with her she told me there was a post for me on. Social media going around that concern to them. She explained the post to me and I explained my stance on the post. She made it sound like there was some sort of outrage in the community about me and the post that I shared little that I know the post was sent to each school board member and the principal Joel Farren from a single person that doesn't even live in Germantown. They live in west bed. Now let me interject this of course, is the danger in social media. Somebody could be a teacher and you know Massachusetts and somebody could read it in Anchorage Alaska, and the next thing you know they're going to contact everybody in Massachusetts and the rest of the world the social media of course knows no geographic limits. So one person saw this in West bend in Lake said at everybody in Germantown and tried to create a you know a big thing about it and apparently succeeded back to the evil. When I was talking with Sarah Again, she's the athletic director. She mentioned other people they saw on facebook that I had shared or posted myself that concerned the district, some of the post robot, the recent rioting and looting most having firearm references as I am an Abbott and open Second Amendment Supporter, and concealed carrier I might mention. So as about half of Germantown, I always will advocate for responsible and legal ownership of firearms I of course explained. To her that I have never had my firearm with me while on school property or at school related events, regardless sheet nor the human resources representative that was also on the call seem to really care. She told me that she did want to let me know that they will need to look into this further and they will get back to me as soon as they can let me interject I wonder how often somebody's made a lefty comment up. There in the Germantown School district that they have gotten this kind of treatment at again Germantown, say very conservative community. But as again when you have school officials who are essentially leftist hacks, they're out there laying for anybody who might be right of center, and if some people say something that might be deemed offensive, they're going to use that as their opportunity to sanitize purge the district's from one more conservative thought. This it problem is endemic across public. Education as we have hacks like the individuals who were up there, Germantown who will look for reasons to get rid of people perhaps in some cases rightly. But it simply is never applied the other way. There is nobody out there trolling around facebook to see if we can't find somebody who says something bad about the military are bad about the police are bad about some other group that can serve it as my life back to the guys email. A week later on July sixteenth. Sarah called me back again. This is Sarah. You know she's the athletic director the you're stuck with up there in Germantown who has chosen not to respond to me to put out her version of events. She did inform me that they will not be renewing my contract and I will no longer be a coach at Germantown high school if I'm going to be honest I was. Rushed but not surprised given the world that we live in today I asked her to answer a question for me. I asked her if she had ever had any complaints from athletes, parents or the Head Coach Laurie About My coaching Sarah told me that you have always been. You've always had great reviews and positive feedback but we as a district need to be sure we are on the right side of history. Now again, this is the guy statement to me. He's putting words in Sarah Units. I don't know if she said that or not if she did. What side of history as Germantown high school trying to be on the leftist side of history. The shutting people up side of history. Again. However, it's the site of history that the school boards and communities like this tolerate when they allow goon squads to run around to get rid of people because of their points of view. Back to the email, I, came to the conclusion that I am being fired not for my inability to be a great coach but because my political stance doesn't fit with the prevailing narrative I'm a conservative gun over. WHO supports president trump and I will never stop supporting what I believe in justice saved my job. Sarah asked me what story would you like told when people ask why you won't be coaching anymore? I was a bit confused and ask that clarify what she meant. See see what's happening here. What line is Germantown going to put out because Sarah Nodal doesn't have the guts or personal integrity to say we got rid of the guy because we don't like his political point of view back to the email. She said that sometimes coaches would like to tell people they are leaving to focus more on there fulltime work. It'll be with their families. They said, no anyone asks you about why I am not coaching anymore. I expect you as an educator at a school district employees to tell them the truth you tell them that you fired me because of my political views. This is why I'm no longer coaching. You decided this not me she seemed a little surprised by that and the conversation was basically over at that point she probably did not. Imagine that the guy would end up telling me the story and people would know that Joel and the principal and Sarah Sarajevo the athletic director and the brand new superintendent up there in Germantown are running around firing people by their political point of view. But I'm looking for cover story. So they don't hack off people in a conservative community like Germantown and again, for those of you who live in the community, you're the only ones who in the end have any control over this you're either going to tolerate this crap or you're not. We clearly see that liberals are out to get anybody right of center and they're very emboldened right now. And, I keep getting people asking me, what can I do? What can I do? What can I do? Well, we can stop taking it. And when you see people like Sarah Universal and Joel Farren dishing. Out You have a right to demand to know why in the world they're doing this and you have a right to go after them. Because leftist bullies can dish it out but they cannot take it. They've never shown an ability to take it just as those school officials were being asked to come back into the classroom considered themselves martyrs even though nobody shooting inside their houses such as occurring with the Wa. So police officer back to the. Email. I asked Sarah about three times before she finally sent me the copies of the emails that I requested from looking at the emails I should point out that he has supplied to me. The emails, he received an an open records request discussing his case, and indeed this thing was bad at around around the highest levels of the Germantown School Administration in which they all express concern when they saw the commentary in which he compared the attitude of k a racist organization with the attitudes of Alum Organization that he believes also has racist views. That is the man's political viewpoint back to his piece. It sickens me that there are people into that. These are the people that are in charge of our kids education from all different angles. They are telling kids that you must believe this way or you will lose your job if you don't believe in what we believe that you are a racist. Given the world that we live in today I am not at all surprised that I lost a job with a school district considering that I am such a strong conservative and open about that publicly. But I did feel like I needed to make this known that the cancel culture is attacking more than just conservative TV or talk show hosts. This culture is coming after anyone with opposing view and we need to stop this. and. Again, it comes from Tim to make who all he was as an assistant swimming coach up in Germantown High School and they got him. This is how deeply this is reaching into society and people think, wow, this is only milwaukee. It's only Madison, this happened in Germantown. And it's GONNA stand to Germantown unless the school board in Germantown decides that it doesn't want people who are running around like this. Trying to got people's careers because they don't like their political views to get away with it. Unless as I suspect the Germantown School Board was involved it because many of the school board members even in conservative communities rather liberal and when they get an opportunity to impress their liberal friends, they will do. So we have across our society right now which hunting going on. The only thing most of us can do is a make sure we're all aware of it and be when you live in the community what occurs you can speak up and make it clear the not agree with it I do understand that many people are now fearful of speaking up even in Germantown. For being on the wrong side of political bigots like Sarajevo here just tell Alexa Google home or Siri, home pot to play eleven thirty. N. on Iheartradio then sit back and enjoy the experts. His. Thirty wins at mark. belling late afternoon show. Back let's do a right now I'm going to give them the summer cash contests text in word for the five o'clock hour. Again, we at the moment, do not have any weather advisories in effect other than a severe thunderstorm watch for the whole region until seven o'clock at night. Drawing storms have been moving through the area and it looks like the severe component of it is moved out over the lake. Again, the word for this hour is bills B.. I L. S. bills you have between now and six o'clock to texting bills the two, hundred, hundred, you get a text confirming entry plus iheartradio Info Standard Data message rates apply in the station contests since we interrupted a commercial break and. I'm not sure if that. Goes to the disaster to the of the online feed or not. Anyway. So we think everybody heard it but because it came in the middle adjust quickly stressed this might be I mean obviously it's something there was a shooting. But. It might have nothing to do with security of the president but. It did happen right outside the White House where law enforcement shot a suspect. Outside the White House fence I think I initiated early that it was inside the perimeter was outside the perimeter of the White House but in that area where they maintain security kind of this buffer area that's in there and the only reason I got noticed because president trump was delivering his daily briefing and the Secret Service took him out the room. When this incident occurred wanted to make sure we don't have some big huge thing coming on and so on and once they realized that it was simply involving the one person the president resumed his briefing. So we don't know much more than that. But nobody was ever close to the president or inside the White House or anything of that nature and. We'll find later probably more about in the president said law enforcement will be doing a briefing a little bit later later on I spent a good chunk of this hour talking about how somebody and I think the whole point of the story is that he didn't have a big job. He's just an assistant swimming coach, not even a teacher. But for posting, this is out criticism of black lives matter and he says he's one of those people that goes on social media and he's trying his political points of view is a conservative big supporter of Second Amendment Open Carry, etc.. Somebody did like the fact that he compared black lives matter the movement he stresses not just somebody who believes that statement the group black lives matter to the KKK both as being racist. Organizations. Now whether you agree with that or not, it's a political point of view. There was time. In, which just about every teacher that was out there had politic. No teachers were in the middle I I school in College I had a teacher who said he was a communist. But he sat it. It wasn't like it was hidden or he was sneaking he was it economics professor in college. He made clear that he was a comment is in terms of is economic viewpoints even back. Then there are a lot of lefties around. There are also some people that were right wingers Ed. At the time. The whole point of going to college even high school was you would attempt to encourage aggressive and vigorous dialogue. There was no idea. Considered too extreme. Angela Davis fresh out of prison spoke to my college when she was there. OUT NOW MARXIST STAND Think we had think we had a guy from the John Birch Society of about on campus. Etiquette. A political viewpoint that you could imagine and you wanted to expose kids to this as well. Give them every idea that they could let them hear all of this stuff. And decide for yourself what you think about things to hear something ghetto like question and criticize it now. The only allowed political viewpoint is from the left and really from the fire left, they can say anything they want to go to any extremes they want and break any laws they want. Anyone who dared speak out from the right is shutdown silenced and often fired. This, has clearly been going on this self sanctioning within public schools for many years over the years I've shared with you Eddie, number of stories from people who tell me Mark, a teacher I've conservative but nobody and none of the other teachers know what I can't let them know what I think just the ostracism. How you just outed. is so terrible. We now realize given some of the thoughts of so many young people in their twenties and how incapable they are of critical thinking it started to show up when you saw that they felt that they were threatened by speech that made them uncomfortable literally. So incapable of arguing ideas that they felt threatened by hearing an idea, they didn't like rather than Marshall up all of their resources to. Argue against it. This is what happens when they'd been in an ideological bubble where they've been presented a lot of crap by unprofessional leftist hacks, which unfortunately is most people who work within the public schools and we now see how bad it's gotten well now it's getting any given even worse and not even a teach not even anybody who ever expresses political points of view in terms of dealing with the kids guy expresses a common b. m.. N., Germantown may be the most conservative humidity. We avid southeastern Wisconsin. They can still fire him and the school board up there is okay with that. That's chilling. A guy was running around wearing a sheet or anything for Heaven Sakes. No again by individual. Comment he has nothing good comes posted on social media as. One of the few talk show host in America who virtually never uses it I just say how many people? We can put things down in writing any kind of nuance if you're trying to say something clever doesn't come out and. I could at least explain I have to be careful with everything that I say allowed. But at least I have the ability to explain whereas in a one or two sentence post their facebook thing you can't lay out all of the reasoning for your thing. I. Would say nothing good. Come some posting on social media if you're right of center but. That doesn't make this right. Where the silencing is going at, you can shut up a swimming couch in Germantown just for criticizing Blm a movement. that. Spent until they changed their website pretty open about its ideology. It's a NEO Marxist organization. And again, he's smart enough that he separating people who simply agree that black lives matter which he is one of. From the agenda of the organization if you can't criticize an organization where we are New York state is trying to disband the National Rifle Association a state government trying to make a political organization shutdown. But in Germantown Wisconsin, you can't even criticize another political organization without losing your southern coach job. Again. There isn't much that somebody and find a lack or Seattle Washington can do about that. But if you live in, Germantown you don't have to take it. And you don't have to tolerate a school board. That is empowering people to behave and there is no word that is better than this ideological goons. If there's some. I I have criticized the incredibly overwhelming leftist agenda teachers. I don't have a problem with an individual teacher. Happy that agenda if the head swimming coaches some radical lefty. Keeps his or viewpoints out of the swimming coaching. That's fine. Again, if the guy was out there as a swimming coach shooting off his mouth about the political, this data that ninety seven times saying, okay fine. If you're a liberal I'm not gonNA. Let you do the diaper what that that's their Fred. We're losing control of our, country our society at our freedoms. And when it gets all the way to Germantown. And School Board members are okay with this. And athletic directors are worried about being on the right side of history deciding for example, just exactly what side of history she's GonNa put the swimming team. That's not a free country. Anymore. It is happening everywhere. And it is going to be most easily defeated at the grassroots at the bottom at an individual local level. Now, I'm not expressing any confidence in anybody in Germantown is going to do anything about this. The school superintendents school board I asked that all of them given a copy of the email questions that I put it. I heard from none of them meeting none of them even bothered to want to defend what it is that they're doing out there. But we can at least know. That Germantown. High School is not a safe space. For individuals who have viewpoints other than those sufficiently liberal that they pass muster of the new superintendent principal in. Atlantic director out there trolling around the Internet to Ferret out anybody that they might be a closet racist. Germantown. I mean this isn't sure with Germantown. Do these shows and you just wonder how these things settle out there I. I can tell you in the comments that I get from. And by continuing belief that trump is going to win reelection that he's under polling because so many people know they can't say aloud with their political viewpoints are that many people are furious about this? But the fact that people are afraid to speak aloud about it also means that many people are afraid to speak up an object to it. Imagine if Sarah Nota was on the receiving end of some of the gloom like behavior that she dished out. And if the principal up, there was on the receiving end of getting a little bit of crap from people who didn't like. The ideological censoring that he is doing from somebody who would dare to criticize an organization that as I said, is outmoded embraced Marxism. Add as made clear, its hatred of officers, all of the. Come. From Theory Specialists Memory McFarland. San Up for Milwaukee this is the mark belling late afternoon show. On News Talk Eleven thirty WS. In the last segment, we discussed the situation in Germantown and covets. Swimming teacher swimming coach was fired from his job there. We're going to be posting that umbrella dot com when I received, but don't look for a now. We'll have it up sometime after the show is over tonight for those to. Check it out looks like College football is done for twenty twenty, the big ten and five other conferences are moving toward. I love this trying to move the football season to the spray. But everybody's like doing. What we can't do it now, we'll try to shove into the future so you end up with. The NBA season winding down now in the playoffs starting in a few days Major League baseball trying to somehow work through this short and season. So they can get to the playoffs the NFL saying, well, we won't have a preseason, but we're going to try to have regular season and I'll college football, which if you understand maybe I should give a little bit of background here for those of you not aware. College football carries the athletic budgets of almost all major universities, most universities at least the public ones are set up the way Wisconsin. Wisconsin. The University Sports Program does not get tax support other than. The buildings had facilities themselves. Are publicly owned the bonding issued by the public, but the actual budgets paying the coaches, etc. Paying for the travel most of these university sports departments are self sustaining. In other words, all the money they make off of the revenue producing sports carries zillions of non revenue producing sports. For example, track produces very little revenue. Cross country produces very little revenue. At UW, Madison. Men Slip, ball produces the bulk of the revenue followed by men's basketball men's hockey is slightly positive cash flow. I, believe women's volleyball is slightly this several years ago women's volleyball I think slightly above water women's basketball was kind of a push to under and the others of course all. cost the buddy. In other words they make all the money off of men's football and a couple of the other sports but men's football is by far the biggest REPUTA- generator because the TV rights of the greatest add. Wisconsin, they sell eighty thousand tickets. So, if they don't have a football season, it is a backbreaker. On, the other hand, almost all of these universities are in liberal college towns at the universities themselves very very liberal added as liberals who have been quick to cancel things because of the corona virus. Best the NFL sees it is still on. But College football's about to pull the plug out talking about holding the thing. In the spray. They keep believing that there's a silver bullet on the calendar here. And the position that I have been taking is. There isn't now the one thing I say on all my discussions I'd Corona virus is I could be wrong. I share which fell she, and some of the lefties would say that before they issue these broad statements because it is a new virus. To other Kuroda viruses in very similar to. Some diseases that we've had in the past, but because it is new, we don't know how it will play itself out. We also don't know if there's a vaccine how effective it will be. We also don't know is this a virus that we developed? What hundred percent resistance to after getting at wants maybe eighty percent or not? Is it like the common cold or you just keep get the damn thing over and over and over again or? Is it like many other viruses that once you get you develop such strong immunity that it is very rare that you don't know. We also don't really know how many people have actually been infected by it. Most believe it is way higher than the numbers that are given because until recently, we hardly tested anybody only tested people when they were sick. And Corona virus does not make most people sec. especially if you're young usually you don't know you have it. So there's a lot of things we don't know. On the other hand were now in the United States about five months into the real crush of it. Probably eight months into how long it's been here. But five, you know it was march things went crazy. Sir About five months. And what seems to me to be happening is this. We add that initial wave and April at mart late March into April literally. And after that, the thing calmed. At his bed at a relatively steady level ever since. The media often miss reports because it's tries to middle mislead people as to what's going on right now in the united. States. We do not have a spike. But number as Laura Ingram is struggling to point out. She's pounded the table of this. The number of hospitalizations right now are at the same level that they were the beginning of June. We had a somewhat increase in hospitalizations over the last several weeks, but it was relatively modest as the virus move from the northeast the other parts of the United. States but the hospitalization rate remained relatively low across the country just as it has. Wisconsin, where we're generally in the range of the two hundred, three hundred per day and have been for buds. What we have seen an increase is the number of positive tests. The media keeps calling that cases, which of course, is misleading given that some people can test positive seven times in a row that's not seven different cases and. If someone test positive on the first day they do the follow up tests and they'd has negative. They still count them as a case. C., N. With this inflated number but the biggest reason that they're the increase in the number of. Positive test is because we're doing way more tests. Still. It's to me almost that arguable and some people on my side on the right WanNa argue at the ones who want to see the corona virus as it exists. It seems to be arguable that corona virus is not going away. I don't believe it's going away. I think it's possible. It will never go away. I didn't say that's likely I don't know. I have tried. Unlike. All of these people on the left and the media to have a little bit of humility here in dealing with science that we do not yet know they always follow the science follow the. Yet they themselves don't follow any sites. They make wild statements about the future based on nothing. But I think it is very possible that this virus is going to be like many many other viruses that are out there. That exists in the human population that simply never go away. That it just becomes one of the many types of things, human conditions that we have to deal with. Bdo has never gone away. To deal with it. AIDS and HIV is still out there. You have to deal with it. Maizels rebel chickenpox. Those things are all still out there. Polio. In fact, it is out there. The common cold is out there. And then things that are a whole lot more serious cancer diabetes. Alzheimer's numerous. Other conditions generally aren't thought to be contagious they're out there as well. But certainly a far greater threat and far more. Deadly, in terms of their mortality. So my belief is that. There's a good chance that again, I didn't say like because I don't know that this thing going to be with us for the long haul I would say like. For decades it's also possible. That we're going to develop strong immunity as people get it that the experience that we saw in Sweden where they didn't do anything. So their numbers initially were much higher at initially and now later on are much lower that people in Sweden who got don't seem to be getting it again or if they are, it's only a tiny minority of them if indeed. Once you get. You develop an immunity, it would be reason to be positive. About, the long term prognosis of this and It would be reason to think that we should end all of these lockdowns and just let whoever is going to get a get it. So we could be done with the damn thing rather than have people be Dying for the next twenty years and cancelling things for twenty years but. While we don't know I think. There's very little reason to believe that the virus isn't going to be around in December at least as big bigger problem as it is now and I don't think it'll be any less of a problem in March or April. Next year when they WANNA start up college football again. That it is now. Now. Maybe it will fade away. Some people say what if there's a accede? I've been throwing cold water on the vaccine talk, for Buds. Most vaccines. Are Between, thirty and seventy percent effective. That's not a bad number. I mean if you can lessen your chances of getting any particular thing by fifty percent, get all do it. I mean, they talked about red meat because it might give you a nine percent better chance of avoiding heart disease for Heaven's sakes fifty percents not a bad number. But that does mean that fifty percent of the people get the vaccine are still GonNa get it. and. I can't think of a vaccine out there other than the ones a kids are being given because they don't have any say in it. That more than half the population gets half the population doesn't get the flu shot. And the flu's more commonly this. So I my point is. I. Don't think everybody's GonNa get it and I don't even think half the people are GonNa get. So. If it's fifty percent effective and only half the people get it, it means that we've reduced the numbers twenty, five percent. Now, that's good. One in four people not getting it that really eliminate lessons the spread because you know you're likelier to get this. If you're around somebody who has it in the fewer people who have it the less likely it is to be spread. It's not like nothing but to think that this is the silver bullet that solves everything. I just don't think it is. Sober College football says while we're GONNA put you to sprague. At some point and I keep asking this question and I never get it from anybody who for any of these shutdowns what becomes the point at which you just throw up your hands and say. We're going to press on with life even though the viruses there. Dave michaels thinks the election of ever. I don't agree with that I. think that a Joe Biden get himself elected president the left is going to be so empowered to shut down things forever. Now say if Biden wins he has to have a decent enough economy and then He'll at all of this stuff ed and many people point out that when we had the swine flu two, thousand, nine, Obama was the president and we did nothing then Fauci of the same job that he then that he has now we didn't do anything and that by every level infected way more people than Kuroda virus seems to have infected. But we've cultural is inside people this terror in this fear? I, did. The mask wearing is the other thing. I mean. There are some people who believe that the summer months actually have slowed the spread of the virus that it's going to get worse in the cold. Have you it around wearing these masks everywhere as it is now? From the perspective though of College Sports. If they don't have college football they can't of anything else because college football produces all the revenue, the schools that don't have football like save marquette they have to get even more out of basketball and they make a bigger deal basketball and saw him because they don't have football to carry the freight and some of the smaller schools football doesn't even produce Eddie revenue because of your small schools that on TV and so on, and they have to get tax support and student fee support in order to keep these things going but for these. Colleague universities that have these massive infrastructures built on. Remember. They get thousands of students, scholarships, and all these sports I. Mean Track Scholarships in this scholars, every spout tennis, the all of these scholarships at the money all comes from college football. If you're not going to resume any of these things, you've interrupted the money flow to pay for all these scholarships to pay for the salaries and to pay the rent and all these facilities that they have and so on and. Use an example at horse racing, I mean the Kentucky Derby the was supposed to be held the first Saturday in May. They shoved it to the first Saturday in September Labor Day weekend. We'll do it. And as I said at the time, what do you think you're doing by informants? WHO's well, you're probably be go out enforement base that what what if people keep thinking three or four months something's going to be better. They. Said from the beginning, it's probably a year for a vaccine that's assuming vaccine knocks it out which nobody thinks it's GonNa. Happen why would any what in April or may have thought in September anything would be any better. So now, the Kentucky Derby well, we're GONNA have fifty thousand fads. You Watch the end up with no fans or maybe two or three thousand in there. They may as well have held the thing in. May. With nobody there because that's what they're gonNA end up with until you finally get to the point where people do what Elkhart Lake get over the weekend with an screw it we're gonNA hold the event and people want to come they wanna come and people are afraid of getting sick they don't have to come But we don't appear to be close to that. The less government is involved and the less liberal, the area, the more willing you see people to resume their regular lives. For example, Sturgis went on the could still go at isn't it? When does it break up Wednesday? Yeah they say the numbers it's impossible to get. It's not like you have attendants where they go through turnstiles. They're guessing there's about two hundred, fifty thousand people there which is about half. As normal, but you know these people camp outed. It's hard to figure out exactly how many people are there, but the numbers are down, but it's still massive. We'll sturgis. I can't believe sturgis allowed it to Kurds. How do you stop there are people who come here on a motorcycle it's not like it's not like we're going to have people at the Minnesota state lying shooting you if you try to cross the border. So that's something that's outside the control of regular old people they want to go on their border cycles and they wanna go to sturgis. Likewise the farther away you get from Milwaukee and shorewood the more people that are out there and companies that have just ignoring the mass requirement bars restaurants nobody has a mind stores. Nobody has a mind. It's only the chain stores that have a national policy that required them. You get into the city of Milwaukee and everybody's wearing masks everywhere because it's enforced. So where people are given the opportunity to choose their choosing. The schools are the crosshairs most parents want their kids to go back to school. But the schools themselves run liberals and the Liberals though water run the schools because the teachers are too lazy to go into work. Some of the teachers say they're afraid the same teachers who show no concern at all about a officer who's home is shot into. The last time that happened with a schoolteacher. So I just think that you're gonNA see the same issue come up with college basketball, which is gonNA have to start in a few months they're going to have to decide. Are we going to play you kiss this, pushing it back, pushing it back, pushing it back as for the professional sports they've tried to find this compromise of holding the events but not allowing fads. Nobody knows if they'll be able to do that. But again, it's not financially long-term. Sustainable. I predicted there will be no milwaukee box. Home Games this year. I mean they may play at home, but there will be no fans for the entire season. Now, I might be wrong and Dave michaels things after the election people will just throw their hands up on this. May Be. The only answer is this is going to stop doing bailouts and so on but the bailouts don't really help these giant sports leagues are in the billions of dollars of. Revenue, in so odd. We've allowed the fear of the virus to overcome every other. Decision to be made because of some sort of belief that this thing had an end date of say may fifteenth or June first that it was going to go away and. I'll grant you I many people on the right thought it was going to go away I. Think, it's not going to go away until everybody gets it. And it might be one of those things like the cold. Or even if you get it, you're going to get it again. Some people get colds five times a year. But I admit I don't know. If I'm looking for a positive on this. It's that most people who get this virus now don't even get sick and all. So many people who have tested positive I added. And that there have not been many cases that we know of where people have gotten more than once. But that doesn't mean you can't get a tour three years from now. where it would come back on you. Those are positives but it hasn't changed this response of. The businesses stoke offices are still closed can have college sports can have this can of that can the other thing? I always try to look at anything and ask myself where does this end and? I don't see anything that ends this. Including people who have a lot of money to lose. These universities, they was a fortune, not avocado football. Fortune. So the save liberals that want to shut everything down there. Also shutting down infrastructures that bankroll their universities. You'RE GONNA end up with numerous non revenue producing women's sports that have to be cancelled. Because no money to pay for it and these university. These are in universities that are saying declining enrollment anyway and I believe. A cultural change that's going to result in far fewer of the current teenagers wanted to go to college. After seeing a that, you can have your life run for expressing the wrong point of view and be the amount of debt that were piled up by the generation older than them that end up. Under employed I want to share with you. It's related to corona virus this back and forth between. President. Trump and the congress. On what kind of stimulus to be dot to be done and the President essentially tried to resolve the whole thing by issuing an executive order over the weekend? What goes through June. August sixteenth. sturgis goes through August sixteenth. I thought only when's okay. So that Saturday Saturday right? Yeah, Sunday. Yeah. Yeah. At it's from what I can tell I do people that go for three days then they come back and it's like it's it's not even like Harley fest where there's like, okay this day there's this every motorcyclists they go out there when they feel like it and then some going right three hundred and fifty miles away and camp out in the Black Hills for four days before they come back. I know I know people have been to surge the one thing they all say there's nothing to do with. You go there. You only go there to see all these other bikers and then you just kind of scatter around that. Do the stuff that you do I mean they go there and then they ride and they're they're all over the places where they are. It is a lot of just camp. How did you? Know. Or ride two hundred and fifty miles any ticket fire roadside motel inch check in there or just pull the backpack outed. Such and such I don't how did they come up with Sturgis? How did this did originally? Was it just some group decided to have something at it. Became unto itself don't look out. Don't look I. Hate Look things up with the PD because every time they say half the time you say Kapiti it turns out to be and then somebody calls up and says, Iran, we don't really care if you don't know look it up. That's the other thing that your generation feel this need to look all of these things up. Rhetorical. Questions are often best left unanswered. The thing that Google ruined the bargain guys can't argue about sports in bars somebody just looks at up and okay. That's the end of that. Now, what are we supposed? It just makes you more drunk because you just talk more rather than argue things out. Like I'll do my babe ruth hit more home runs one year than. Most teams hit combined. Some has gotta look that look what whether it's true or not whether it's true or not does doesn't mean that it's not a good thing to discuss before you know the stupid answer to it anyway. President trump challenge they do his plan a combination of the suspension of the payroll tax and four hundred a week for the unemployed. The Democrats wanted to do eight hundred for the unemployed and ignore the payroll tax this aside from the fact that trump is taking matters into his own hand just saying screw it. You'RE NOT GONNA cut a deal with the I'm GonNA issue you order. There is important policy distinction to be made here. I admit everybody's just looking at the grotesque amount money that both parties are willing to throw around. But there is a distinction in here. That is very important to think about. So. We're going to dive into that above five fifty, three news talk seven, thirty W I. It's time for. Pay. Tax. Plug in that tank, we deliver propane straight to extend your aunties went through. That's pro pain taxing pro Pentax dot com cooking this weekend if. Your plan then make it easy on yourself. Go to propane taxi dot com enter Promo Code. Ten for ten dollars I barbecue tank exchange delivered to your door. It's that easy with propane taxi. So you can focus on family friends and fun at. Tropical. smoothie cafe, they want you to get away every day unwind with their watermelon mosquito and new guava Margarita smoothies pair one with their delicious new barbecue pork. For a mini summer vacation, this summer tropical smoothie cafe is bursting with flavor made to order with fresh quality rocket ingredients with sixty Washington C. area locations. It's never been easier to ride the summer wave of flavor order ahead online for carry out curbside pickup or delivery at participating locations Tropical smoothie cafe you're on tropic time now. Hello News Talk Eleven thirty Y S N. Mark belling. Late afternoon Shell interesting story out there Janice Dean may have seen on Fox. She's done a bunch of things including the weather on their I. Her inlaws died of covert and she said that she was essentially sanctioned by Andrew Cuomo the governor they're not allowed to talk about her experience including thoughts on medications available in so on. Keep an eye on that story I don't have time. To dive into it on my program today, I want to get into the debate back and forth between President trump aside from the fact that the Democrats wanted to spend three point, four, trillion dollars, which is it. That's twenty percent of GDP just on this round of stimulus in other words come up with a number. So over the top ridiculous, the trump can't say, yes to it. The second argument was if you where does the money go? Now, the first round of stimulus that I did. I defended. On the grounds that the alternative would have been in America economy that would have literally seized up. To go all of a sudden to twenty percent unemployment. They would have been no social service safety debt. And most American businesses would have gone under You would have literally seen a dust bowl of this country. If. That meant that in the short term, we had to artificially just give people a bunch of money to stop chaos. I could support it. The problem is doing it again and again and again, and again and again. To subsidize some of these businesses and individuals who are chosen to keep their lives on hold forever because of the virus. It's clearly inflationary and as you know, I, have been pounding the table for bud side the buying of gold and silver and I believe. That, we are going to see bad inflation in the United States by destroying the American value of the dollar and the dollar has been plummeting for weeks as you might know. But. If you are going to do another round here. Whether. It's the last letter not. Should. You again give people these huge unemployment check subsidies or should you go another route? The Democrats have thrown around the number of eight a week. President trump. Came up with a different proposal that he issued via executive order. Now, there's no way of knowing whether or not the executive order is league or not the Democrats would have to challenge and it takes a long time to get to the supreme. Court. But it is a way for the president to have acted arguing, look, the Democrats were not serious and their talks at me. What the president dead is that half of it and unemployment and the other half in suspending the payroll tax. This is important policy distinction. The Democrats didn't want to spend the payroll tax prompt dead. WHAT'S THE PAYROLL TAX? At somebody emailed me saying mark what is the payroll tax here that turbo all the time the payroll tax is not the income tax, the payroll taxes, the money that's tax for you. It goes to Social Security and Medicare. The payroll taxes paid half by you at half by your employer. This is not to be confused with your federal income tax. We call it the payroll tax that you'll often see on your paycheck. Fayka. Than Medicare. What is it all s? There's letters after it is what whatever it is but that's the payroll tax. The president wants to suspend the payroll tax to come up with half the stimulus. The other half would be an unemployment. Why is this a better approach? When. You gave out all these two reasons when you give out all of this money. In unemployment you have many workers who don't want to return to work. They have we saw the first route. So many many this did not affect people in Wisconsin because he's to lagging getting the unemployment checks out but many people are receiving more money not working than they ever made while working. In the meantime these companies therefore are hoping and praying their businesses stay closed because they'd rather be out unemployment. By providing that relief half in the form of eliminating the payroll tax. Remember issue a key point Obama to go who pays the payroll tax who did I say paid it paid half by the employer half by the employees. In words you take a look at your social security tax the about to help your check, your employer pays the other half. So whatever your amount withheld say it's two hundred, twenty six dollars to grab a number by. The employer kicks in two, hundred, twenty, six also. The employers not having to pay the payroll tax to the end of the year. This creates an incentive for them to reopen and bring people back. You've just lowered costs not only for the employees that gets the muddy. You've eliminated a huge chunk, a big tax that employers pay. This is like the employers bringing their pay employees back but not having to pay them as much money even though they're getting as much money, you're not sending that money to the government. If becomes an inducement for companies that were real close to bring a lot of people back to do it. To have it economic recovery it can't be permanently based at coming up with these funny bunny checks to pay people who are working. So if you're going to do a stimulus, it needs to be premised try to get the employers to hire and bring back. Rather than to permanently subsidize the unemployed. I is still think all the numbers are too high. At some point we've got to suck it up. And try to reopen our country and say look if you're afraid to operate your business because of the virus tough luck guide you. But since we're not near that and there is going to be a stimulus that's done the way trump has done. This is far more beneficial to the academy. Because it gives businesses and incentive. To bring employees back to work and put it that put them on the books books and. Understand. Also that if the business calls the employees back and they refused to come. They will lose their unemployment eligibility. Policy wise that trump approach is better. Politically. The very fact that trump rolled up his sleeves in San luck these people are being ridiculous they won't work. I'm just going to do it again indicates that he has a president of action willing to try to solve something on his own when the Democrats are clearly obstructing because. I. Think the goal of the Democrats all along in. This is bad. They don't want trump to craig take credit for getting any extra stimulus out they wanna make demands that are so ridiculously high that he can't do it, and then say look trump doesn't care about you. So, trump I. think it's taken this away from them on both sides a show decisiveness be a limited their ability to have to have them run around and say trump doesn't care about you trying to block the stimulus and if they wanna take as bait and Suam, trump can say look I'm trying to give you the stimulus out there but the Democrats are suing me they don't want you to have it six zero six. Six. Oh six we come back after this break I'm going to give the season summer cash contest texted word for the six o'clock hour. newstalk eleven thirty. It's time for rapid traffic. News Talk, eleven thirty wins Ad Mark belling late afternoon show. One last canceled today show two thousand dollars out there sizzling summer cash contest number. There's never any rush. So don't text the drive especially rose a little slip after. You got all the rain. Anytime between now and seven text in simple word. Remember when w I N. win text that into two, hundred, two, hundred when a thousand bucks you get a text confirming entry plus iheartradio Info Standard Data and message rates apply. In this nationwide contest I always encourage people to try to figure out why things are happening. Very interesting development in New York City New York, spend the king of the lockdowns I first to shut everything dilated. Lot of New York is still shutout. have. You noticed that the Mayor Bill De Blasio and the Governor Andrew Cuomo both say they want the schools to open This is not what we're hearing from Democrats anywhere. There's only one possible interpretation of this and that is that it's starting to on the Democrats they are on the run side of this politically. The one thing we've seen in these surveys at yet I was critical when the school districts, these goofy surveys of the parents did you want to open the schools I? Think they thought most parents would be all freaked out of the kids going back to school they'll say, no, no, no, no, no don't reopen the schools don't reopen the schools. That's my guess whether that was the motivation not the one thing that we learned his across the nation the support is overwhelming for parents wanted the kids to be back at school. Of the options, in? School. A combination of virtual and in school or just virtual it goes in that order in school wins virtual is second combination. His second had just virtual is the third, the more liberal, the area, the more support for not reopening the schools. But across the board, the numbers are very, very strong. Parents want their kids back in school. and. We all know what the reasons are. It's dawning a lot of people that kids don't get sick from this thing. It's also dawning on a lot of people that their kids are suffering emotionally they locked up in their houses forever. They need the back to school as the whole just common sense thing about how far behind you want your children to Bay When you start to see Democrats shift their positions on things. There's always a reason for it. Now. We don't know if this is going to translate across the country. For example, will you know many people have asked me are you surprised that Tony vs not issued an order shutting down the school statewide that he's allowing the do it on a case by case basis my guess is and it's just a guess trying to read the mind of the Democrats that run the State of Wisconsin is the support for reopened the schools if so overwhelming once you get away from Milwaukee and Madison? that. If they're going to keep schools closed Iverson, probably think of let Barrett in Milwaukee, take the blame let Madison take the blame. Why should I take the blame if these liberal areas want to shutdown especially given that there's such strong support. For reopening the schools. Everywhere else. All right. So I watched the PGA Championship. I don't even know when that's supposed to be anymore I think it was supposed to be used to be always the last major but then it was supposed to be like in March or May or something then they moved it because such and such it's out there in San Francisco. I was I swear I thought that there'd be a homeless person laying around the golf course but there wasn't any anything there. Anyway the Guy That wanted his Colin Morikawa I have no idea how many people watch this usually the majors ghetto big big TV attendance but nobody knows when anything is anymore. He does Tie Tiger Woods record for being the youngest player ever to win a major. Did you watch it? Dave Michael did you even remember that it was on? At, did on late. because. It's San Francisco and actually end like around seven thirty with four holes to go there was a six way tie for the lead. They're all like at eleven hundred and nine hundred whatever it was Mukalla then had this big eagle and took off anyway. There have been several major tournaments that we'd have over the last ten years where a guy would win it and everybody came on and anointed him as the next Jack Nicklaus the next tiger woods. I think the first that fit that category is Roy mcelroy one whichever one he went unopposed, the British or whatever. He's the next superstar. He's going to be the next guy to dominate Gulf and then Jordan speak what maybe I have. It reversed then Jordan speed camera he's unbelievable. He's the next superstar is dominate Gulf. Then it was Brooks Koepka who keeps winning all these managers. He's the next superstar he's going to dominate. Gulf well colored Merkava looks like the next superstar and he looks like he's going to dominate Gulf he looked so unbelievably good. So unflappable he so relatively small yet such incredibly powerful swaying I think the aunt what the one thing we've learned with all of these guys who come out at a young dominate a major is they all turn out to be really good I can't think of any of them that were flukes but none of them becomes the next tiger that so much better than everybody else that might be because there's such level of parody of so many young superstars there are at it might simply bathed that. Players like Jack Nicklaus Tiger Woods only come around once every forty or fifty years but. This guy is very good. The thing that struck me about him and. EVERY GENERATION IS DIFFERENT I don't know that I've ever seen a gopher so less excited part of it is there's no crowd you know on the dolphins pumped up by the crowd you make a big you know when he gets hit as he got his eagle on, I, get mixed up here I think it was sixteen, but it might have been fifteen when he got his eagle, the crowd would've roared whether a crowd so he'd be swinging his fists and all that. So it's GotTa be weird with his the only people that were out during the course for caddies and the you know the course, what's the volunteers? So there was nobody to really yeller screen, but I mean, he wins the major at he cut. Okay. Shakes his caddy's hand and that's the twenty three and you WanNa Major. The guy apparently was spectacular as an amateur in fact, played in a lot of what's the big championship they have for an amador's wanamaker or something. Yeah he won that and he in fact, it's played in a lot of pro tournaments while he was still an amateur. So he's been he's kind of tiger and that he was known to be a fee. Nom since he was in his teenage years. Anyway, there was that and for those of you wondering, yes, the bucks are playing tonight. In fact, they're playing right now I've had some people ask me what is all of the seeding me? There is no homecourt advantage because the games are in the bubble. So the only thing the bucks needed to do in the remainder of the regular season was the eastern conference number one seed in the only advantage that is the one seed plays the eight seed in the first round, and then you move forward but since there is the court advantage. The big thing that you know you play for and seating as they have most most of the games including game seven on the home court. So there's very little of that and it means nothing in terms of whoever the western conference team is. All the seating really did is determined who it is that you will play during the rounds in the eastern, conference and the one seed will end up playing whoever the the eight is. So jaanus is in play tonight and so on. The bucks have no reason to win any of I think they would have three regular season games left and then the playoffs start Think at the end of the week or early next or whatever in the meantime baseball keeps plug into law and end remember baseball half the teams make the playoffs. So I guess that would mean a five hundred record probably puts you right about there. So that's the standard we need to keep the. Brewers above on the other hand to Saint Louis Ever GonNa play again. I mean Saint, Louis Two and three. They have I mean they got it. If they don't make up all of those games are the just going to go on percentage with them or? In the me in the meantime, the Pittsburgh Pirates apparently like three and ninety seven or something I mean they're just terrible they can't win at all anyway the breweries I've direct hold they the brewers are at Miller Park you can't tell but they're at Miller Park and they have one series each year with the Inter League they play the American league central when the not play the national league central. So the Minnesota twins are in town. Those are always wild games. So they're always great environments of the Ballpark, but tonight is what? what it is in the meantime Christian Yelich still hitting on the one forty nine is he a weird season that I? I know I have friends who are white sox fans that inside the park home run that he had. To write it out I. still go to why he was running it out. I thought when the ball hit it was a bomb maybe decided as a fall, but it lands twenty feet short of the fence, but it's inferior territory jogging the first the white sox leftfielder comes after the ball and the next thing you know he falls into the stands in somehow seems to be tangled up in a seat and Yelich gets a home run. And then he responds. Up The middle of the scoreboard at Miller Park. So What I've noticed is his swing has been very tentative he and that's always a side of you're not seeing the ball. Yelich usually he sees ican figure out what the pitches the incident it comes off the finger he's already swinging by the top before the ball is halfway to the play any it's been more of a half swaying nervous tichy kind of thing he started drawing all those walks them, which is usually a sign. They see the ball because he's laying off pitches that they were having him chase, and then he went off the middle of the scoreboard yesterday. So maybe he's got himself back but anyway, I think the brewers are better than fifty fifty to make the playoffs I just think. The fact that they're five hundred. So many of their power hitters aren't hitting it. All is a pretty good sign for where they are six, twenty, one news talk seven, thirty W I it's time for red looking for a new career but don't want to spend four years in college then checkout Septa University through are year round accelerated programs you can earn a bachelor's degree in just two point five years and associates in one point five or earn your masters in as little as fifteen months whether it's technology healthcare business criminal justice or the culinary arts are hands on programs can help you reach your professional goals. So what are you waiting for visit e CPI DOT EDU to learn more

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CBS11 AM NEWS UPDATE AUG 7_WFOR - PCM WAVE

CBS11 News Dallas/Fort Worth

01:58 min | 4 months ago

CBS11 AM NEWS UPDATE AUG 7_WFOR - PCM WAVE

"Good Morning. I'm Karen Boorda it's Friday August seventh and here your headlines from CBS Eleven News, you'll want to avoid thirty in Arlington this weekend or risk getting stuck in major backups text audits demolishing the southbound three sixty bridge forcing the closure of all lanes of thirty between Collins and the President George Bush turnpike starting at seven tonight even though a detour will be in place text dot is advising drivers to just avoid the area altogether. County counties holding its back to school roundup today because of the pandemic, it'll be a drive through only event this year, and even though it scaled back, it's been a challenge just getting school supplies because the pandemic is force several large sponsors to cut back on their donations that means only those who pre registered we'll be able to receive supplies. Well. We have done your back to school shopping yet you may want to tackle it this weekend starting today school supplies, clothes, shoes, and backpacks could be purchased tax free as long as the item is less than a hundred dollars tax free weekend runs through Sunday items can be purchased in stores or from Texas Businesses Online. Now. Here's meteorologist Danielle East parks with a quick check of your weather. Happy. Friday and we're Texas we're gearing up for what looks to be one of our hottest weekends so far this summer temperatures today already starting off the day in the eighties and that's just a quick jump start to the upper nineties. This afternoon bills like temperatures topping one hundred up to one. Oh, three, four today or going to see a repeat tomorrow mostly sunny it will at least be breezy through the weekend southeast winds up to fifteen miles per hour. Sunday looks to take the cake ninety nine feels like temperature's up to one zero four. and. That's the latest from CBS eleven the ones protects.

Texas CBS George Bush Karen Boorda Arlington President Collins hundred dollars
Episode 57: Neil deGrasse Tyson

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

09:02 min | 1 year ago

Episode 57: Neil deGrasse Tyson

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and life want only tried and tested guides it from people who have truly made an impact. You have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan. Chevelle New York Times bestselling author Dan Shop Bell distills the most actionable and tangible advice. From a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs ignores authors Olympians Follow Titians Billionaires Nobel Prize winners Ted speakers celebrities astronauts and more inspirational guidance. Practical advice and concrete solutions our power chat sal. Welcome to the fifty seventh episode of five questions with Dan. Shaw Bell as your host goes to create the best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is astrophysicist. I author and head of the Hayden. Planetarium Neil degrasse Tyson born in New York City to a gerontologist father and sociologist mother. He grew up in the Bronx in high school. He was the captain of the wrestling team. In the editor in Chief of the Physical Science Journal Neil first became interested in astronomy falling visit to the Hayden planetarium where he enrolled in various courses purses there he started gaining notoriety as a fifteen year old lecturing in his community he went on to earn his B A in physics from Harvard and his PhD in Astrophysics from Columbia. In in two thousand and one President George Bush appointed him to serve on a commission studying the future of the US aerospace industry and in two thousand four he was reappointed to focus on the implementation nation of the US space exploration policy in two thousand six. He was appointed to serve on the NASA Advisory Council and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Currently Louis Neil as the head of the Hayden Planetarium. A research associate of the Department of astrophysicists at the American Museum of Natural History and the host of the star. Talk PODCAST I. He has written sixteen books including his latest letters from an astrophysicist. That we discussed in this podcast you've written countless letters over the past. Thirty years in documented rented them in this book writing letters lost art form in the age of email texting and social media. How has reviewing and publishing these letters impacted how you live your life? I am reminded by these letters that thoughtful communication using the written word. It is something that perhaps should be rejuvenated in our culture. And we've come far from it would now communicating with emojis. I just think about that from a handwritten letter and in the old days you would have penmanship. That would express some of the mood of as a letter as well. Another dimension of communication who has provided by the writer. Not only that you might illuminate the first letter of the page. As the monks did in manuscripts that were written. So I'd like to see more thoughtful. COMMUNICATION COME FORWARD I. I wonder whether the anger that exists in social media is because we forgot how to communicate the nuances of what we you mean and what we think. They end up. Being Blunt statements that people use as reason to argue rather than as supporting words to pursue a conversation you have blended science and pop culture in an entertaining way that has gotten people who don't like our understand science interested it. How did you learn to be such an effective communicator? All I did was pay attention to people's reactions one on one when I would describe bribe science or any part of the universe to them. Do there eyebrows go up there. Did they look attentive. Did they look away. There's body language that you can do on that informs that it's feedback on whether you are communicating successfully. If You keep mental or written inventory on what works and what does not you can use that to shape future encounters. You might have with the public. And that's what I've been doing my entire life so I don't presume what I have to say is what someone will want to listen to. Instead I draw from my repository of knowledge of the universe and say to myself how can I shape ape this information and deliver it in a way that I already know can trigger enthusiastic reaction to that information. And that's what I do and I do that all all the time and when I did that with the press came back for more with documentarian they came back for more. When I did it on twitter? They came back for more. So I'm a servant of this Appetite and I'm delighted to operate in that capacity but I'm I don't forget that I'm a servant of that appetite not someone who's creating it you say that yeah. People tend to look outside of themselves especially people who are religious to find meaning in their lives. Why do you suggest people instead look inside themselves and how how has that benefit year? People look outside of themselves for meaning I in principle. There's nothing wrong with that. But if you spending your life looking for meaning and not finding it maybe it's time to look inside. That's really how I should have ever presented that point of view. If you're looking for me not finding it look inside yourself and see if you can create create the meaning. You've been searching for your entire life. And that usually means using your mind body soul your energy resources to improve either in your own life or the lives of others. It's not hard to derive meaning in those contexts meaning and purpose and value in civilization for having done so it could be small acts of kindness. You know the proverbial helping the lady old lady across the street. Is it volunteering. Charity where people are benefiting from your invested energies that can create and sustain meaning in one's life. And that's what I do in my own way. This year I worked on a global study focus on artificial intelligence with Oracle we found that people are now embracing ai and overall a positive relationship with it despite privacy and security concerns how can a improve our lives instead instead of causes harm. It's already improved our lives. Think of the things that computers are now doing that. You're not even questioning where you know. Thirty years ago. It would have been seen as sorcery. You have a thing that fits in your shirt pocket that tells you how to get to grandma's house and when and where the traffic is getting heavy and it will suggest roots for you to avoid the traffic vic and at no time is an actual human being involved in that process. That's a are you have cars. That are actively stabilizing the the axles. Because it knows what outcome you want and don't want that's why I was in the airport lounge. There's a big machine there you can get DECAF you can get expresso. You can get nine kinds of coffee plus hot chocolate pushing a button on the same machine that say I know there's another kind of a general I where it's not just a tasked machine. It is something that learns on its own and can make decisions on its own and can do different things. I don't see US heading heading that way anytime soon. Because that's not why we need something smart. We're GONNA have smart car drivers around. They will not get into accidents. That will never be drunk. They will not get distracted that will have all protections in that. We don't have for ourselves. That's a I but it's localized to a car. It can navigate from one side of the city to the other without a human intervening whatsoever. So Hey I is already upon us and I don't see some future future arrival of. Ai Is being fundamentally different. From what we've already experienced in terms of the practical workplace and what is your best piece of career advice. Do the hardest things at all times times. You will ascend a pyramid with powers of solutions that others don't have and then force people to beat a path to your door because you took harder classes then everyone else. Did you take easy classes. And everyone is equally as talented as you. And there's no way to distinguish you from anyone else in the workplace. Thank you so much for sharing your wisdom Neil to follow all his journey can read his book. Letters from an astrophysicist listened to star Talk Radio and find him on twitter instagram and facebook where he shares his travels life reflections pictures she from space and time and celebrity conversations. We hope you enjoyed today. So and the amazing advice our guest provided remember that you can only benefit if it from advice if you packed on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in the form of a review. You can leave a review on Itunes stitcher report. podcast your of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan. Shot fell dot com slash review now.

Dan Shop Bell Louis Neil twitter Hayden planetarium Nobel Prize Neil degrasse Tyson US NASA Advisory Council New York Times Shaw Bell wrestling Bronx New York City American Museum of Natural His George Bush editor in Chief Harvard writer research associate
Ep 297 - Ces, Passarinheiro, Tentilho e Velho manco esquivo

Túnel de vento

20:22 min | Last month

Ep 297 - Ces, Passarinheiro, Tentilho e Velho manco esquivo

"Gosh them and my Roku December versus podcast musician. And when was this network box for users into open podcast inventing that strong academic conversation podcast comes first. For a good boudica's am creative interests as a linear has you seeing you then? You could change the def tumko mere rashke Starvin in to cast the spell to curtail. Do you spell cement patch you over to eat in freaking course kind of students case same key since this moment me log. Of you carry, put me in my would push they're scared to not any Imago musicals you Shuffle Ambush cash. A quiz views pants a chemical numeric number where cement he selected passed for him all he'll medic few hours milk. Let's see Phyllis Meszaros open 6 or 10:30 would be fully we do Pura Ville you in the Lincoln Memorial fragile happy the castle meant to travel you can see a single divorce case. Wednesdays really was into screams Saddam use the key won't introduce herself. Khrushchev self-image was an image apart in principle intelligent average gas gauge a very fluid very exclusive home. Jewish values groups Jewish he got a group. So yes illegal ports and win different the water or proximate bottom prokash, you know made me run a speed stable in English the language of the lingua Italiana. He's our President George Bush rather uniform different Bulldog, Kissimmee 7000 Savage Grace. You see numerous that quad has the quizzes. Do you spell everybody's are who seems intelligent or sages through this is litigious gangs as musical as our guest in Boise. Can you still see the mint sauce? Stop and water gets in Austin Sam's Club what this text us by any user cannot receive a mint pashtun teach em did not save a machine off switch same thing this observing wires into his values capes beams. Can we contact you know, you'll notice it off break. I wish creation these vitamins new podcast and didn't compete. Are you all self-taught a dog? Just say it was a student of either Aversa Busca Bill. If we see. Okay. For Thursday is my zone means simply gents don't what is their absolute the mentally challenged, you know important as matters no food poisoning guy, you know, so you should be receiving the sewage frequent meant Envision masum Ahmad posted swallow you skedaddle via system has changed positions Source intermittent main conclusions Emergency Management Personnel department and was supposed to get them by extremists freakiest North North schemes of the Sierra Club. Sainik, if we see that here give Yellen this for Arkansas travel. Rapidly Belgium North m. M Grand career Grand Journal Paso MPC pregnant seems interesting color quiz is proven to the Parkinson's which seems Odd Squad the most severe a bush kind of options near Olympus on this page it me I'll go sums of receipt of your request fragile in this post office. I was not showing a song you hate Israel or shaft went dead. But as a machinist El Gaucho the Wind & Irish peanut, he prevails consent Sir Duke University versus University front page lists out to the scene was staged in Britain CPU alguma York University, imagine a selfish to their home, but have some quizzes process neutral Forum. Even Ferrara Kismet Inn empty seat were more, Panthers will see ish the movie that. That she has some parallels as well as programs at the circumstances. There's no videos can be spent white with red cars when you could use UPS mikele vosges. What is viability? Let's do finish off. I believe you should see my ability of the shift is out there in the pendant pendant. Very independent rep scheme spots. It means facing the same car wash events delivery of the vehicle. There's no readers Nordstrom Phyllis some specific include a slippery cement then that same philosophy and then even promote and push. Okay boo terms of inventors your normal and what signal goes over to campus may be may have or Gump which are there on the spot or the person or a pencil gets psaki. It was a table. SEC West the guys who 5-0 win, please enter a queue princesses the Disney a technical vs. He's on board controllers. The public meetings in palabra leche the most woke up said if I ask who's dead but as soon as the system is the rule of Lisa. I am in English. My so many moons home a Buddha Le Yaca was meant for kids exams so fast, you meant Bula you would learn to do it too long as you're free keys approximate nage nourishment prevent there who's Daniel seemed like it was a Shopkins person can't log. Hello in person yet. What's the full each month without pillars menu for something Jewish home from the person rather swarthy Torres or super tickets and templates for our new Snips applies in and see with our team will reach the Milky of your colors have in for planners Patrick's Day for parties group page the passage in for Polish ambassador. Mesh anthems permeate and we'd official. Yes already told the pastor if he used physical touch his followers and pass it for the blob that you'll freak Los Bravos, foreign think you said north slash Charmed. Where is Manish Kumar stems you to amend some Winters universes some scriptural spinach subscribed to this can't touch can tabs on us officials joke anthems on our salary for the month of bottom and boutique. You want me to receive 10 p.m. Thursday. Ucbrocer GM or he might as well awesome awesome and Norwich Devil's nose Muir almost more south Asia message. As soon as I get out of humor loading washing the Box some Oregon are mass produced and sit down with multiple choice. They can't smoke. You can't power sweet decision second as a linguist charging port is Ferris jabr. The Mishka 7 to 10. Maisel season, season. No, Salman Pak use their premiums various decisions. And even imagine McGuire's War Mission a noble birth can't actually get some call Garrick were more than a million movies, but he says he says he boss, further, but the new below person didn't tell you, do the test drive, okay. Shuffle cage the employees Xavier starve, you know who Steve in his life, you know now he's the boss lives here. He worked fast food or a consumer. Never me Mera Lund Bazar took the view the bills on the mort bills Steven video on the mere pass aaja easier quizzes in perspective who catches their birth. Let me start with this new it my reverse payment immediately to proceed with My Love Shack hours without warming your sub Spanish too much start off trashed wallpapers. No cost to open a new Scout when the mirror Vault Old North Pole on your stuff as opposed to push the on the person used to be, you know special events or not. Allow me to log. Pause news. Cinders range Noel new part or prevent starvation Bay, No self-worth is Vince Gill doing camera lenta. And yes, and don't forget his friends can do in Cumberland. That's the passage AC the Pasadena a Mini Cooper say, you ain't even that beginning because Jo's egg water Eileen's value chemically to the, this is Yvette in value off. Find any new friends. How in these are Crush orange juice website who had caught in a loop. You got a fish when Bush or Off the Grid salt because you seen you swear kasib. So small that most has absorbed their squaws start moving to the beginning Simon Legree new plan this regard order one. Same thoughts at least have already introduced absolutely normal new car or pre-owned. Beta Mostafa bisque Insider do impossible to paste. I got a bank where in the past security Now based off as foolish by his Law Office reveals pain. Gets me so long to get that they give you the Dealers Choice. You see the episode. Where is my vision perspective on life gives birth. Addition usual more this month old scared, but you can bring your bills snow Moon Valley Bank at Mid provavelmente now a boyy is the Mount, North steps currency more the effect you School of it easier with more obvious South were more south bills are more connected with this song. Of deals a Traverse this page now, so I assume you can depend on beige one system current home. Shuffle Amanda, Eric Keck space agency was more gentle you made $1,000 more English-speaking. There's no obligation in cement new cameras is. Not in the mirror as your home will that payment from your old Mexican music off of them down and search fumes into this into the brush cleaner and the approximate?

George Bush Phyllis Meszaros Imago Saddam Lincoln Memorial Pura Ville Nordstrom Belgium lingua Italiana Law Office Salman Pak Khrushchev Sir Duke University versus Uni Grand Journal Paso Ferrara Kismet Inn Boise Panthers Sierra Club masum Ahmad
The O'Reilly Update, June 4, 2019

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

13:00 min | 1 year ago

The O'Reilly Update, June 4, 2019

"Bill O'Reilly here. It is Tuesday, June fourth two thousand nineteen you are listening to the Riley update and here's his happening today in America. President Trump seems to have hit it off with Queen Elizabeth during his first state. Visit to the UK the number of Americans working into their seventies skyrockets, Joe Biden unveiling his own plan to combat climate change Chicago sees another weekend of record-breaking violence, the city of Los Angeles. Now, the rat capital of America. Also coming up. I message of the day about the growing problem with homeless Americans. But first President Trump seems to be getting along with Queen, Elizabeth, and Prince Charles during his first state, visit to the United Kingdom today, politics is in play as far left demonstrators in London protests, Mr. Trump tomorrow. D day expositions began the number of Americans working into their seventies is way up. Researchers at the university of Maryland. Say senior citizens to remain in the workforce rose from ten percent to fifteen percent pass twenty years, major factor behind that trend is a growing population of older people with little or nothing save for retirement to the campaign trail, where Democratic Front runner. Joe Biden unveiled his plan to combat climate change. The former vice president is introduced the clean energy revolution, and environmental Justice program, quite a mouthful. Economists say Biden's proposal will cost about five trillion dollars over the next ten years, that is far less than the ninety three trillion price tag associated with the proposed green new deal city, Chicago continues. Struggle with vicious gang violence, more than fifty two people were shot over the weekend. Ten died, the violence on display despite some of the strictest gun control laws in the nation. The underlying problem in Chicago is certain communities will not cooperate with police officials in Los Angeles to crack crackdown on rat infestation now that the nasty critters are invading city hall, according to witnesses the roads are moving into the building from homeless camps circling the public property last week. At least two LAPD officers were diagnosed with typhus a medieval disease, spread by fleas found on rats will have more on this in the message of the day, coming next. But first. We have all been reading about the exodus of some Americans from the heavily taxed areas, our country to states, that embrace, personal, freedom, small, government and lower taxes. Now, if you are thinking of voting with your feet, you need to check out real estate agents. I trust dot com. At real estate agents. I trust I'd com. They have a great agent where you currently live, who will help you sell your home quickly and for top dollar. The also have the best agents where you wanna move, so they'll work on your behalf to find you a great home and be your advocate, so you can buy without the stress worry and travel. A buying remotely all the agents have been heavily vetted for the past performance, an are like you fans of this program. They also are waiting to welcome you into their communities and help you find your dream home. So get moving with real estate agents. I trust dot com. That's real estate agents I trust dot com. Time now for the Riley update message of the day, three west coast cities are under siege by legions of homeless people. Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. Although cities, have one thing in common ultra liberal leadership and staggering wealth, right, alongside the homeless. Let's take LA. I there are estimates that fifty five thousand homeless roam the downtown area in Los Angeles. Now, if you know anything about the city downtown is away. It is east of the affluent communities, like Beverly Hills, Brentwood and Santa Monica, therefore, a lot of Angelenos never even see the encampments of homeless that ring the downtown area but the situation is, so intense as we just reported that rats run wild in LA. Not only that disease is spreading all over the place. It is just a matter of time before the bubonic plague carried by rats. Develops in downtown Los Angeles. No, most of the homeless are substance abuse. Offers studies prove that the police have been ordered not to do anything about the encampments so legions of people have come together putting up. Makeshift shelters. Sharing narcotics and alcohol and generally behaving themselves. Anyway, they want this, of course, is a public safety hazard, you can imagine if you lived in downtown LA, and had children walking them to school pass all this. Now, there are laws in the book against consuming hard narcotics and being intoxicated in public and vagrancy and blocking public therapies, but in LA those laws are not enforced. Same thing in San Francisco, where there is an epidemic of people going to the bathroom in the streets that has been well publicized. There are fewer homeless people in San Francisco. Oh, estimates are about fifteen thousand but they are panhandling. They are ruining properties and public parks, and they are again, like LA doing whatever they wanna do Seattle, same situation. They're estimated ten thousand homeless in Seattle. Now, the solution to this is to stop the flow of narcotics without the dope. These people will go elsewhere. That is what drives homelessness in America, narcotic, addiction substance abuse, people who cannot or will not work for a living because they wanna be high all the time. If you stop the flow of narcotics, which, again, are illegal around these homeless communities, if you will the people will leave. They want the drugs. They wanna get high certainly the police can do that. That is a solution, but the liberal governance in LA's, San Francisco, and Seattle will not do it. And that is the message of the day. For more commentary, please go to Bill o'riley dot com, where we analyze the news every night, and you can see me next something, you might not know. Imagine sailing the Mediterranean on a ship full of passengers. You share your thirst for history and love of country or may Italian food. Great nightlife, and relaxing pool side on the deck sound enticing, right? Well, you don't have to dream it. You can live it. I'm excited to announce Glenn Beck's. I ever cruise through history taking place next spring. He'll take us back in time to the foundations of our faith our freedom and human progress. I'm gonna join as well as we sail. The incredible coastal Luminoso out of Croatia. There are four different options for you, but in a nutshell the crews will begin in Venice and sale on the eastern Mediterranean, visiting Croatia Greece, and Israel here, you will walk where Jesus and the prophets wall in the holy land guided every step of the way and on the sea, we'll be with you myself, David. Barton rabbi Lapine, Stu, and of course Beck we would love to share this experience. As we cruise through history together. Please visit come sell away dot com to learn more. That's come sail away dot com for all of the details. Now the Orion update brings you something, you might not know today, March the thirtieth anniversary of the massacre in TNN square China, April nineteen Eighty-nine thousands of pro democracy demonstrators gathered in central Beijing following the death of a prominent politician, who called for liberal reforms within the communist government later that month the country's official newspaper labeled the demonstrations anti-socialists, and condemned the activists saying they sought to overthrow the regime Chinese government declared martial law, but were blocked by Chinese civilians, who refused to leave TNN square the crisis escalated until the early hours of June fourth when Chinese troops had. Hacked the square from multiple directions soldiers given the green light to open fire on civilians, armored tanks, mashed into protesters who refused to leave following day alone, man publicly defied, a tank, an image that was captured and went around the world that signifies a brutal massacre of innocence villains by their own government. China has never released the official tally of those hurt or killed during the square protests in response. Then President George Bush the elder suspended high level talks with China, but did little else, but here's something you might not, not on June fifth. Nineteen Eighty-nine one day after the massacre, the British ambassador to Beijing sent a secret cable to his government in London. That message was released to the public. Listen, two years ago, the cable stated that you K intelligence agents, believed the death toll in the square could be as high as ten. Ten thousand people thirty years later, China, views, a protest is taboo subject. You will not find it mention in Chinese school, libraries or history books, US secretary state bike Pompeii or release a statement at twelve a one AM today to coincide with the anniversary of TNN square urging everyone to remember the horrible abuses of human rights with everything going on in the world today to port and to remember what real tyranny and oppression actually looks like and it's still happening in China. We'll be right back. If you are age seventy five or older, and if you own a hundred thousand dollar life insurance policy or larger, please get a pen and write this information down. Many Americans are making the decision to convert their life policy into cold hard cash giving them. Some extra money to pay off credit cards, medical bills, any number of things. Look the economy's always been dicey. Some people need cash. There's nothing wrong with that. You may find the cash you need in your life policy. If you are over seventy five you have a one hundred thousand dollar policy or larger please write this number down now, eight four four. We buy seventy five totally free to call you'd rid of those insurance premium stopped, paying them, consider turning the policy, you have into cash, the number again, eight four four, we buy seventy. Five, call eight four four w e b u y seventy five eight four four we buy seventy five call now. Brought to you by our sponsor life guide partners. And that is the Orion update. Again. Please check out Bill O'Reilly dot com for more commentary, and please consider my book killing the SS makes great Father's Day gift.

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The O'Reilly Update, June 13, 2019

Bill O'Reilly's Free Podcast

13:00 min | 1 year ago

The O'Reilly Update, June 13, 2019

"Bill O'Reilly here. Thursday June thirteenth two thousand nineteen. You are listening to the O'Reilly update. And here's what's happening today in America, the fatal shooting of a suspected criminals, sparks major clashes between police and residents in Memphis Tennessee federal spending sets a new record at three trillion dollars, so far, this year, Mexico, deploying troops to the border to avoid Trump's tariffs, governor of Illinois, declaring abortion, a fundamental, right? Los Angeles International airport officially declared the worst airport in the world. Also, coming up my message of the day on the US women's soccer team. But I the fatal shooting of a suspected criminal by US marshals in Memphis, Tennessee, sparked violence last night, that injured more than two dozen police officers. The unidentified man crashed his vehicle into approaching. Authorities. Then exited the car carrying a weapon when the marshalls opened. Fire police fired tear gas to disperse the growing crowd, which apparently does not want civil protections for the first time in history of the USA federal spending top three trillion dollars in the first eight months of the current fiscal year, one hundred and eighty one billion dollars more than the previous record set during the great recession of two thousand nine the three biggest factors in the massive budget. Our health and human services, social security, and defense spending. Some economists believe the federal spending is now a dangerous situation. Mexican officials are deploying thousands of soldiers to the southern border with Wata Malla, the foreign minister saying the government will crack down on illegal immigration from Central America in order to avoid President Trump's five percent tariff on virtually all Mexican goods flowing into the USA. The abortion debate between liberal and conservative states, continued Wednesday. When Illinois Governor Jay Pritzker officially designated abortion, a fundamental, right? That declaration removes many restrictions on the procedure including spousal consent. Waiting periods and previous bans on partial birth abortions during late term, pregnancies city of Los Angeles taking the top spot, and a new global survey, but not for a very good thing. Los Angeles International airport better known as LAX is now officially the worst airport in the world, popular travel guidebook, fold ORs compared the airports nine terminals to Dante's nine rings of hell coming up. The message of the day about America's women's soccer team Bill O'Reilly here, and I'll lay is at the title and mortgage to your home, just hit the hands of identity thieves one of the largest real estate title companies in the world leaked. Hundreds of millions of homeowner files. And I'm betting documents about your home, including loans, mortgages, and Bank accounts are up for sale illegally internationally. And once these have them, they'll Ford your home's title, so it appears you sold your home. Then they'll borrow thousands from online lenders and stick you with the payments. I've seen this firsthand and no identity theft program or insurance covers you the first thirty days are crucial. So I got you thirty days of free title and mortgage protection from home title. Lock home title. Lock puts a virtual barrier around your homes online, titled to help block identity thieves registered dress now to verify. You're not already victim and get thirty days of free protection, no obligation, do it all online. Go to home, title, LOC dot com. Home, title LOC dot com. Home, title LOC dot com. You listening. The rally update and here is the message of the day as you may know USA defeated Thailand, thirteen to nothing at the World Cup in France on Tuesday, the women's soccer team publicly celebrated every goal with the tied players left in tears. This is wrong. America is the most powerful country on the earth. Thailand is a little place and obviously the women there. Do not play soccer very well. USA star. Alex Morgan scored five goals. Why once a soccer score becomes six nothing. Seven one eight two. There should be a pullback soccer does not score at that rate, everyone knew the USA would slaughter Thailand. So why did this embarrassment happen? Well coach Jill. Ellis justified it and then wondered if the US men's soccer team would have been criticized implying that there is sex ISM, if you object to the women, defeating Thailand, thirteen to nothing surely, coach Ellis could have removed her stars and put in substitutes and also shot from long range, if you know anything about soccer when the score becomes lopsided the winning team can shoot. So it doesn't embarrass the other team, what was accomplished here. Now, the US women's soccer team has already controversial because of a player named Megan Rappeneau, who, basically refuses to stand during the US national anthem overseas, and says, f you to the president. All right. Ms Rappeneau, I guess, is entitled to her opinion, but it certainly not reflecting. Well. In america. Now back to the game cures to Jila brand. Senator from New York said on Twitter, here's an idea if you win thirteen and nothing the most goals for single game in World Cup history. You should be paid at least equally to the men's team Senator Charles Schumer from New York performance aside, and the women have been excellent often dominant, should, we reward them for doing the same work as men, so immediately left wing politicians politicize instead of criticize thirteen to nothing victory over Thailand. Well, here's the deal in the NBA, men, basketball players are paid more than women desk, ball players, because the crowds are ten times the size if the women's crowds were bigger they be paid more that is called capitalism, and it's ridiculous to politicize sports. That is wrong. So. This thing is a the bottle now. Why is it happening virtue signaling? That's why left wing politicians jumping on the bandwagon to make a point that women should be paid the same as men. Well for equal work and equal circumstances. Yes, they should. But perspective is everything going forward. I hope the US soccer team wins the World Cup. I hope they do not bully other teams. I hope they're celebrations are muted, fair minded people. I believe. No would winning. Gracefully is all about more news and commentary. Please check out Bill O'Reilly dot com where we have the no spin news every night, you can see me on that beginning at seven eastern time. We'll be right back. Everyone is heard of AARP you may even be a member. What many do not realize is that AARP has become a liberal lobbying group that spend your hard earned? Dollars lobbying against things. You may believe it and stand for thankfully, there is now a conservative alternative organization that believes in the sanctity of the constitution and stands up for the values that make America great. It's called, amac AMA. See amac founded by air force veteran, Dan Weber for less than twenty dollars a year, and amac membership gives you members only pricing on car insurance roadside assistance discounts on hotels travel cellphone plans, and much more your amac membership dollars support the ideals that you may believe in, like protecting our borders with immigration reform getting rid of ObamaCare and fixing social security. So please join more than one million fellow Americans right now at amaCus, and yes, I am a member, please visit amaCus. That's AMA C dot US. Now the Ereli update. Brings you something you might not know executive privilege has been in the news. President Trump is hurting his privilege twice in recent weeks. First time when the White House moved to block the full release of Robert Muller's Russia report, the second time a census question and how it came to be while executive privilege has become politicized by the media meant to conjure up images of secret, backroom meetings or implications of wrongdoing. The origins of the privilege, actually go back to the first president of the United States, George Washington in seventeen ninety six Washington refused to obey requests, from the house of representatives that demanded documents concerning. His trade negotiation with Great Britain after the revolutionary war. Washington said, no arguing only the Senate could request material related to international treaties Washington was correct. Executive privilege was used. Again, by president, Thomas Jefferson who refused to hand over his personal letters with Aaron Burr during Burr's trial for treason in eighteen zero nine Jefferson arguing the release of his private correspondence, could quote imperil public safety in eighteen thirty three president, Andrew Jackson, very rough guy cited executive privilege, when Senator Henry clay demanded documents detailing private meetings between Jackson and his cabinet. President Jackson famously told congress he had yet to learn under what constitutional authority clay had the right to his personal conversations. The political tool was used repeatedly during the Cold War to protect state secrets from the communists. President is an hour would assert executive privilege, at least forty four times between nineteen fifty five and nineteen sixty the presidential power would face its biggest challenge during the Watergate scandal, the supreme court forced president Nixon to hand over his. Personal tape recordings made inside the Oval Office, rejecting his claim of executive privilege. Nixon would resign short time later. President George Bush, the elder Bill Clinton Bush, the younger, Barack Obama would all go on to assert the rule multiple times during their administrations. President Trump exercises constitutional right this week. The courts will likely back him up, presidents do have privileges kind of like some credit card holders back in a minute. Millions of Americans have been diagnosed with cancer or a serious illness. If you are one of them and money is a problem. You're not alone. It's simple. If you own a life insurance policy of one hundred thousand dollars or more, then life guide partners can evaluate your coverage for free to see if you qualify for cash. Now when you need it, the most be ready to take down the summer. If you own a life insurance policy of one hundred thousand. Thousand dollars or more. And you are living with a serious illness, then life-guide partners can evaluate your coverage free to see if you qualify for cash now. So, right. There's number down one eight eight eight guide fifty totally free to call get rid of those insurance premiums. Stop paying them consider turning that life policy into cash. The number again, one eight eight eight guide fifty one eight eight eight four eight four three three five zero one eight eight eight guide fifty call now. Thank you for listening to the Iraqi up date. I am Bill O'Reilly, those spin just facts and always looking out for you.

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George H.W. Bush and his baggie of crack

The Uncertain Hour

46:07 min | 1 year ago

George H.W. Bush and his baggie of crack

"If you happen to be watching TV on the evening of September fifth nineteen Eighty-nine flipping through the channels. You might have seen the image of the White House flashing across your screen law from the Oval Office President George Bush addresses the nation, the image cuts to president George H W Bush the first President Bush. He's sitting at his desk. Blue suit red tie, white handkerchief peeking out of his left pocket. There's an awkward millisecond where he'd just stares at the camera. Like, he's not sure the broadcast has begun. Then he speaks. Good evening. This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important so threatening that it wanted talking directly with you the American people it was Bush's very first televised address from the Oval Office since being elected president to nine hundred ninety eight. So a big deal. And there was one issue. He wanted to talk about drugs all of us agreed that the gravest domestic threat facing our nation. Today is drugs mostly one drug cocaine, and in particular, crack, crack Bush says is America's most serious problem. It's sapping our strength as a nation as he talks. His hands are folded on his desk. He's looking straight into the camera and then seventy seven seconds in Bush. Does this thing he turns to his left reaches under his desk and pulls out this clear. Plastic bag full of white Chaki chunks. This. This. This is crack cocaine sees the few days ago by drug enforcement agents in a park just across the street from the White House. There's a close up of the baggy you can just make out the word evidence printed on the top. And then he underlines the point of this baggy. He's holding up and the fact that it came from just across the street from the White House drugs or real and terribly dangerous threat to our neighborhoods, our friends, and our families no-one amongst is out of harm's way. But the president said he was going to protect us from this threat with ambitious plans to transform the war on drugs. Take two new unprecedented heights. He described the machinery he wanted to unleash in that effort, and it was all wrapped up in this one, dramatic prop. In fact, if you talk to people who happened to see the speech that night. That's the thing. They usually remember most us who never bag of crack in saying somebody who. Correct across street and ally house in e held up a bag of crack big bag to I have to say with this sort of white rocks powdery substance in it, and he said this was purchase just the other day in the park across the street from the White House. I remember the president halting up this little baggie of crack and saying they bought that across the street from the White House, Tracy. Thompson was watching the speech at a beach house in South Carolina with a couple of friends and their collective reaction was what across the country in California. A guy named Craig Reiner men remembers calling a friend. Did you see that? You know, we were both pretty astonished but for Don shots, he was a teenager at the time and lived in one of the poorest parts of Washington D C where crack felt like it really was everywhere for dawn, the idea that someone had sold it in the park across the street from the White House something about that. Just didn't sound right. You know, nothing is impossible when it comes to droves. When when you break it down. Really think about it. No by sales crack funding, the White House, not everything is in not the White House and that new way downtime where they bind, you know. So it was art and Don should know because back then across town. He was also selling crack. Welcome to the uncertain. Our where the things we fight the most about are the things we know the least about I'm Chrissie clerk senior correspondent from marketplace's wealth and poverty desk. And this is a show that dives into the deep uncertainties of our time to make some sense of making it in America each season. We pick one issue that surrounded by a lot of soundbites and talking points, but not a lot of basic understanding, and we go down the rabbit holes of history looking for clarity this season. The issue. Tackling is drugs drug epidemics, and how they ever end the drug epidemic. People think most about today and fight most about today is of course, not crack but opioids and we're going to talk a lot more about opioids later in this series. But decades before the opioid epidemic. Crack was the big drug crisis on everybody's lips. It seemed to have no end in sight and yet thirty years later. You don't hear so much about crack anymore? It's not on everybody's lips. So why like what actually happened to crack? And what does that tell us about how our current drug epidemic might end for the next few episodes? That's what we're going to look at through the story of this one baggy of crack that president George H W Bush held up one September night in nineteen eighty nine for all the nation to see and the stories of some of the people who remember that moment whose lives were touched by it in some way, because that little baggie of crack, it contains multitudes, it wasn't just a dramatic prop for a speech. It was part of this seminal moment in the esscalation of the war on drugs. The story of this bag of crack starts in the White House back in nineteen Eighty-nine. But in all these different ways it reverberates today. So let's get into it. And I should say there is a swear word or two in this episode. So that park in front of the White House where the baggy of crack that Bush held up in his speech came from it's called Lafayette Park. And here we are. I went there recently. It's lovely a big green square. Lots of benches fountains some statues of men on horses. Actually, just one man is on a horse, my producer since pointed out to me the rest of the statues are standing, but regardless this park is not at all the place that seems conducive to crack dealing for one thing. There's a lot of tourists taking pictures holding cameras. It's v place people go to take that Connick shot of the White House. And if all the tourists with potential surveillance tools hanging from their next weren't enough to make this an inconvenient place to do a drug by. There's also the issue of the guys in uniforms and badges donning landscape. Here is a secret service agent who is getting his picture taken by tourists. Can we take picture with you? Needless to say, there's a police presence. Because of where the park is Michael Isikoff walked through Lafayette Park. All the time back in nineteen eighty nine. He worked a few blocks away at the Washington Post. He was a reporter there, he covered the president's speech about the baggy of crack. I was watching it on TV and reporting on it because I was the drug reporter Mike remembers watching the president hold up the baggie of crack that night and his first thought was it was a great prop great way to get attention to try to show. This was a universal problem. This is something that's affecting all of us. It's even happening across the street from the White House. But then that list of reporter questions starts nagging on him. The who what when where how and why is for Mike knowing what he knew about Lafayette Park, the constant police presence the tourists. He. He kept coming back to this question. How did that crack come to be there? The president says it had been seized in a park across the street from the White House. That's not a natural place where you would expect to see drug dealing, well, that's odd. And I wanted to know a lot more than the president was telling us that night. Mike started digging one of the first calls he made was to the US park. Police who patrolled Lafayette Park. He asked him. Have you have a lot of crack dealing in Lafayette Park. And the answer. I got was no. We don't consider that a problem area. There's too much activity going on there for drug dealers. There's always a uniform police presence there. In fact, the commander of criminal investigations told Mike there hadn't been any crack arrests in Lafayette Park, ever until this one. That led to the crack that was in the president's speech, and that and that got my attention. At this point, Mike asking himself, if park officials only knew of one crack deal ever happening there. What were the odds? It would happen. Just a few days before a highly anticipated speech where the president just happened to be unveiling his anti-drug strategy, and that DA agents would just happen to be there. So Mike starts calling his sources DA he talks to William McMullan, the assistant special agent in charge of the Washington DC field office told me this remarkable story, and the story McMullan told him was this a few days before the president's speech McMullen had gotten a call from the assistant to the head of the DA with a question. Do you have anything going on around the White House was the quote that was related to me? And the the DA guy McMullan gets the calls. Boulders and really a lot of crack dealing around the White House McMullen explained there were plenty of other parts of DC where there was a lot of crack dealing going on the drugs seemed to be flooding. The city's poorest neighborhoods at the time and the DA was setting up some undercover buys several blocks away. And what he got was any possibility of you moving down to the White House. Quote, the president wants to show it could be bought anywhere. Mcmullen says the head of the DA's assistant told him, according to Mike is cops reporting that the White House speechwriters had ridden this line in to the president's speech and came up with the idea of using a bag of crack as a prop and could d oblige by doing a drug bust around the White House. They just assumed that oh DA must make these bus all the time. There must be crack dealing all over the place. Certainly, that's the way the story seemed to be playing at the time in the media. And you know, they came the small problem of how are we going to get the crack it was left up to the sort of underlings that DA the figure that out what is going through your mind as you are curing these these pieces of the story. Wow. So this was all a setup is what I'm thinking. And in fact, it was. The details of the setup that Mike is a cough proceeded to dig up the intricate choreography involved. They was pretty bunkers an undercover DA agent reached out to an informant he'd been working with saying he was trying to set up a crack deal with someone in Lafayette Park. The informant suggested an acquaintance of his this kid teenager who lived in another part of Washington northeast, Washington miles away from the White House in a poor neighborhood where there actually was a lot of crack dealing going on the kid got a call was told someone wanted to buy some crack from him and wanted to make the by and Lafayette Park. But according to Mike Isakov sources the kid had never heard of Lafayette Park. It's across the street from the White House. He was told and the kid was like where the fuck is the White House. He had no idea where they wanted this drug by to be he had no idea of even how to get to laugh yet park. Make a cough says William McMullen the DA agent. He spoke to sounded kind of proud of the links they'd gone to to get the kid to the White House. Quote. We had to manipulate him to get him down there. It wasn't easy. We tried to get in touch with various people at the DA who were involved with the story. We couldn't reach some of them. We did reach the guy who was the head of the DA at the time. But he said he couldn't remember the circumstances of how the Lafayette Park deal went down. But I did talk to this guy. I had the idea of the president holding a bag of crack cocaine taken from inventory isn't close to the White House as you could find it. Mark Davis was the White House speechwriter assigned to write the national drug address that Bush gave Mark says there was a lot riding. On it. It was Bush's first time directly speaking to the nation as president. He was still trying to climb out of Ronald Reagan's technicolor shadow still trying to define his presidency. So I stood back and looked at this and thought well, this needs something very dramatic and needs something to really pull it out. Mark thought having the president hold up, this eye-catching prop, this baggy of crack would be the perfect touch. And it would be nice if they could find a bag that was seized somewhere close to the White House. Be a nice rhetorical. I and why why was that part important? The closeness to the White House. We felt that it would bring it home to every American has been a tourist walk by the White House to think that this is happening right here in your nation's capital if it can happen there can happen anywhere. It was late September a couple of weeks after the president had delivered his speech that the Washington Post ran Mike is cuffs article exposing the back story of the baggy of crack it was on the front page headline drug by setup for Bush speech DA lured seller to Lafayette Park from there. The media was all over this story of president cut manufacturing reality to the strange story of bag of crack, Mr Bush held up during his at drug speech to the nation. Earlier this month, the crack he said had been seized and drug deal right near the white and his speech. The president implied that drugs were easily available even in Lafayette Park. But in fact agents had to lure a suspect from the other side of Washington in order to make the by the sale was real. But the location was a fake Mr Bush's staff wanted to buy some practice near the White House to make it for Matic point on TV. But no dealer could be found the day. The story came out President Bush was doing. Press up at a family tree farm in Kennebunkport. Maine. He seemed to be blissfully unaware of the media blowback he was about to get. A farmer was handing him this little wooden man attached to some kind of pinwheel a souvenir. And then a reporter from the press pool. But then. About the drug buses, the engineer for your profits. Without a beat President Bush answers. I think it was great because it sent a message to the United States and even across from the White House or sell. They can sell drugs. Reporters jumped. The park. Police say there's usually no drug activity there. No problem with those. Where'd you manipulate the American people into thinking there was a serious problem in front of the White House? Did you ask for the bag of crack for the speech? And Bush owns it. I said I'd like to have something from that vicinity to show that it can happen anywhere. Absolutely. And that's what happened. That's what they told me. The tree farmers interrogation. Short. Schroeder? Now, a lot time someone handed the president his wurley gig. But there was more drubbing to come for his drug speech and the baggy of cracking held up drug problem bigger than ever a week after the story broke about the choreographed crack by in front of the White House. Comedian Dana Carvey was on the stage of Saturday Night Live with a parody of it which didn't take much just like the president. He reached under his desk and pulled out a clear plastic bag, not even that much bigger than the one Bush pulled out full of white Chucky chunks. This is cocaine crack tell you some this crack was bought right here in the White House. Three feet from this desk. Problem worse than we ever thought marijuana being grown in the rose guard. Nilly the Bush dog bringing in crack pike from the south long. And the Purity's the press scrutiny it all did start to worry, folks. In the Bush administration to sail was. Oh upset. Would have been an understatement. That's David demerist. The White House communications director underbush David says, the White House plan was never supposed to be. Let's ask the DA to set up a special drug by near the White House. Just for the speech, Mark Davis. The speechwriter who had the idea for the prop in the first place makes the same claim don't do anything special force. I said this. I know Davidson this do not do anything on our behalf. Take this out of inventory. Of course, that's not what happened. They did. Not just take the crack from some inventory of drug busts, they'd already done whether it was a misguided request from the White House or a game of telephone or some overeager person at the DA in the end. There was a special drug by setup just for the speech and David demerist. White House communications director says when that fact came out publicly he was not happy not just because the whole story became a punchline on Saturday Night Live. Frankly, the real reason I was upset was it was a big distraction from the message that we're trying to get across. And I want to spend a little time talking about that message. They were trying to get across I want you to understand the full weight of it. Which means you need to understand. How America was thinking about drugs in September of nineteen eighty nine when President Bush gave that speech it's very different from where we are today. So it needs some background by September nineteen thousand nine it had been almost two decades since Richard Nixon, I declared a quote war on drugs. Public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse. And yet despite Nixon's hawkish rhetoric the seventies were overall actually a pretty dovish time for federal drug policy. In fact, Nixon put more money into drug treatment than arresting drug dealers at the same time congress lowered federal penalties for drug trafficking and Jimmy Carter talked about decriminalizing marijuana by the early. Nineteen eighties though, the pendulum was swinging the other way the mood toward drugs is changing in this country. And the momentum is with us President Reagan relaunched the war on drugs while he was in office. We've taken down the surrender flag and run up. The battle flag, and we're going to win the war on drugs. He was mostly focused on international cocaine cartels. Of course, there was Nancy Reagan and just say. By the late eighties. The public perception was that America's drug problem was only getting worse. And there was a new clear culprit crack. This is the typical tiny bottle for the new illegal drug of choice in America, crack, crack wasn't even mentioned in the national media until nineteen eighty-five but by the late eighties. The news was full of stories like the running Americans crack cast crystallized the national perceptions of a growing drug abuse epidemic is a new drug crack, it's more than five minutes. A baby is born in the United. Expose to crack a place free of the crime and violence of the big city until the arrival of crack police say drug laws are too lenient. Most dealers back on the street soon after they're arrested, eight hours on crack street. It could be anybody straight. It was a scary time in the national poll that periodically asks Americans what they see as the most important problem facing the country by the spring of nineteen Eighty-nine the top response was not dropped economy. Not the issue of Warren piece but abuse here's the nation's leading overall concern right now. So when George H W Bush sad it is desk in the Oval Office in September of nineteen Eighty-nine to make his first live address to the nation. Drug seemed like an issue worth sticking claim building a reputation on. And so the point of his speech the big message. He was trying to convey to the country was that under his leadership the war on drugs, especially on crack. I was going to get even tougher than it had ever been tough on drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law penalty up law enforcement and sentenced to build new prisons space differ bail for the drug kingpins the death penalty. It's sort of jarring to hear these words today. Sure. Some people say things like this. But a lot of politicians on both sides of the aisle. Now agree we have too many people behind bars, and that's partly because of these tougher drug policies that Bush champion in the late eighties. Since nineteen eighty our federal prison population has grown by six hundred thirty nine percent today nearly half those inmates are in for drug offenses. So. Yeah. Mass incarceration from the war on drugs has become a bipartisan concern today. But back in nineteen eighty nine. It was all about making incarceration, more massive and the policies Bush launched with his baggy of crack speech or crucial to that. Push. Listen to what he was calling for that night. We need more prisons more jails more courts more prosecutors. So tonight, I'm requesting altogether and almost billion and a half dollar increase in drug related federal spending on law enforcement. One newspaper called his speech, a Rambo style. Call to arms, I know George H W Bush, not necessarily the first drug warrior that comes to mind. But it's true. He was one of history's toughest though. I should point out. It wasn't just Republicans like Bush who were gung ho on the war on drugs back then by this moment in the eighties. Republicans and Democrats were in the middle of a kind of arms race in the war on drugs. Each party wanted to be the toughest party. And this may surprise you. But when Bush came into office in nineteen eighty nine it was not Republicans who seem to be winning the competition. A few years before in the run up to the midterm elections of nineteen eighty six. It was Democrats in congress white and black ones who spearheaded sweeping anti-drug legislation laws that established new mandatory minimum penalties for drugs. Major funding for prisons the democratic. Trolled house of representatives put together a comprehensive anti-drug package in a matter of weeks. So the Democrats could campaign as the anti-drug fighters and take this into the November election, Eric sterling a democratic staffer for the US house of representatives at the time. He was involved in writing key parts of the anti drug abuse act of nineteen eighty six it timidly. It came out of my word processor room to seven in the cannon house office building. Eric says one of the things that prompted Democrats to draft the anti-drug law that summer of nineteen Eighty-six with the death of a basketball star named Len bias all Len bias wasn't all American basketball star the university of Maryland's leading score. He had speed. His grace was acrobatic. He was drafted this week by the champion, Boston Celtics headed all until this morning when his heart gave out and he done his death. Was the pivotal event? He was known as a clean cut guy. He was a gifted athlete. Extremely well. Known to members of congress. How such a young man with dice? Oh, suddenly, of course, immediately lead to suspicion. Rumors and toxicology reports being leaked there are reports that traces of cocaine found advice assist. A grand jury will begin hearing testimony about the circumstances surrounding the death of Len bias debt caused by cocaine and toxication soon news stories came out saying it wasn't just cocaine crack cocaine that had killed Len bias it turned out. Those new stories were wrong. It was later determined that bias used powder cocaine not crack, but Eric sterling says the crack rumors took hold and at all helped fuel the fear around drugs in general, and crack in particular, I'm so in the subcommittee on crime where I was assigned the Republicans got. A couple of Democrats to agree that there should be mandatory minimum sentences that we should really be cracking down on important drug dealers, and that legislation developed very very hastily without any real background in the nine years. I worked for the congress. I'd never been involved in such a hasty half baked legislative process when congress started writing anti-drug legislation Eric sterling's main job was to figure out what amounts of what drowns would trigger different mandatory minimum penalties. This is win. The notorious sentencing disparity between powder and crack cocaine got written into law and the racial disparities that came along with it since people convicted of crack cocaine offenses were mostly black while people who are busted for powder cocaine were mostly white. And if you got caught with five grams of crack a little more than a teaspoons. Worth. It would autumn get you the same sentence as getting caught with one hundred times that amount of powder cocaine in both cases the sentence would be five years in prison. Eric says the push to get a tough sounding Bill at the door was so rushed that in retrospect, he's actually embarrassed by the numbers and measurements. He helped congress come up with members of congress on lake Nydia are not particularly fluid in the metric system, if it says five grams, you know, let's see Graham is that is a kilogram bigger than a milligram. Or you know, how many milligrams know like doesn't matter. No sense. What is just what are these quantities? This was like what yet? Okay. When Ben done. Don't bother details on running free election. Let's just get something. That sounds tough out the door. Ereck says that was the prevailing attitude back then on both sides of the aisle who could push for the longest MandA. Tori, minimum sentences the most prison spending it felt like a bidding war. No. If there's going to be one hundred million dollars for more prison construction and the other side say Mr. champion and moved to strike hundred million in two hundred million, you know, and then the other side, so you Mr. China's move men that strike four hundred million by the time the legislation passed Eric says the process had left him with a growing sense of disgust pretty soon afterward. He left government started an organization focused on undoing the harsh war on drugs policies, he helped make but that was a lonely effort at first someone else I talked to describe it like this conversation's around drugs in the mid to late eighties where the sound of one hand clapping. There was essentially no opposition party almost everyone was pushing in the same direction, tougher stiffer harsher, which brings us back to the baggy of crack speech that Bush gave. In September of nineteen eighty nine a few months after he'd become president. It was now his turn to up the ante. And he presented his opening bid his policy goals in that speech. This was a zero tolerance policy. That's Mark Davis. Again, the speech writer who drafted the drug address mostly based on talking points from the White House drug czar office, everyone from the user to the seller to the drug kingpin to the country's behind this. There would be absolutely no slack. And now give it was going to be very harsh bright line was being laid down for drugs like crack cocaine, and it was from that policy decision that I crafted words that were star clear uncompromising. The president did propose some funding increases for treatment and drug prevention in his speech, but his message was that the real money should go toward arresting and jailing. The people supplying the drugs. When you add it all up the big plan that Bush proposed in the September, nineteen Eighty-nine drug speech involved almost eight billion dollars to fight drugs that coming year at the time Bush called it the largest increase in history. He wanted the lion's share seventy percent of it focused on law enforcement. So the deeper message of Bush's baggy of crack speech was to show how much tougher and more resource intensive his war on drugs was going to be the calculus of the time was that you could earn serious political points by reassuring the average American voter that you were protecting them from the terrifying threat of crack, and that's where the prop baggy of crack came in to reinforce this point as President Bush told reporters himself at the tree farm in. Maine. He held up that baggy of crack and said it was purchased right in front of the White House for one reason happen anywhere. Absolutely. It was visual proof, but crack was affecting neighborhoods across the country. No-one amongst is out of harm's way. But there was a problem with the bigger point Bush was trying to make here because by the time he gave his speech in September of nineteen thousand nine it was becoming clear that the crack problem was not that widespread, and it was not grow. Knowing and the Bush administration, his speechwriters drugs are they had access to plenty of data demonstrating that in fact, I found that data in their own archives. That's coming up after a break making a series like the uncertain. Our really is a labor of love one that takes a lot of time and money to produce. If you believe that this kind of reporting is important, please donate today to support independent journalism you value trust any donation. Larger small makes us stronger and better give online at uncertain our dot com. And thanks back in nineteen Eighty-nine as George W Bush was holding up that baggy of crack as he was announcing that it came from across the street from the White House as he was warning that no one was out of harm's way. Craig Reiner men was listening to that speech and thinking the idea that that it's a plague sweeping all sectors of society. This was never true Craig's professor emeritus of sociology and legal studies at the university of California Santa Cruz, and one of the editors of the book crack in America, he told me in the eighties. There was very little evidence to. Suggest crack addiction was spreading to every corner of America. In fact, when a lot of news reports, I started making that claim there were basically, no national statistics on crack use at all. The National Institute on drug abuse. The main body that compiles data on drug use mostly through surveys. They didn't even start publishing data about crack use until nineteen eighty six. If you look at the charts from before then it just says, an hey for the column on crack, no statistics. Though that absence of hard data didn't stop the media from quoting health experts and government officials who said crack was everywhere still by nineteen eighty nine the year Bush held up that baggy of crack, the government was actually collecting statistics. And the numbers told a different story from the recent anecdotes in newspaper headlines in the few years that crack use had been tracked. Nationally data showed that crack use had already peaked and was on the decline by nineteen Eighty-nine that August. The percentage of household survey respondents who reported using crack in the past year was just half of one percent for context in two thousand sixteen the percentage who reported abusing opioids in the past year was almost ten times that rate for point four percent Craig says compared to that half of one percent reporting. They used crack that's tiny very small vanishingly small percentage of the bup Yele. Shen, and you know, the myths that were spread about being instantly in an evidently addicting. And even at the time they knew that eighty plus percent closer to ninety percent of people who'd ever tried. It hadn't continued to use it. There were some alarming statistics about the people who had continued to use crack stats that people at the White House might have seen the data showed that a growing number of crack users were using it more frequently their use was getting more intense. But those people weren't really everywhere in parks near the White House or suburban neighborhoods crack was concentrated among a small group of people didn't spread in the same way. That was being claimed in Ron numbers. There were more white than black Americans using crack, which makes sense because there are way more whites in America. But in terms of the hardest hit demographics in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight the per capita rate of black Americans who reported smoking crack in the past year in the household survey was almost three times higher than. The rate for whites crack use was also more prevalent among unemployed people in less educated people. So that's who crack was hurting the most. Not to share that. There couldn't be some random kid from picket fence family gets code up. And all that that happens, certainly, but it didn't spread to Westchester county as the New York Times confidently predicted it was doing it just didn't happen. If it it's a drug and a high that appeals to those who have virtually nothing left to lose and not too many other people if you look at the aggregate statistics overwhelmingly, it's the most impoverished invulnerable parts of the population. And I'll say this again all this information was available by the time. Bush gave his baggy of crack speech. In fact, I looked through the Bush archives, and I found many of these statistics on crack us, and how it was overall on the decline in the briefing memos that the National Institute on drug abuse gave the White House as Mark Davis and David demerist were working on the speech. But that is not what the White House chose to. Emphasize, and if you look at the evolution of the speech, which I did because I got obsessed if you look at the drafts you can see how the good news about drug use overall in America that it's on the decline that it's not widespread. This news gets buried as the speech drafts progress in early drafts. The speech starts with the good news. There's a sentence about how according to a recent federal survey the number of Americans using any illegal drug has declined by thirty seven percent. But by the final draft that information has almost disappeared. The numbers are fuzzier and their several paragraphs in after Bush has held up the baggie of crack and the good news is followed by a sentence about how the bad news about crack. Overshadows the good, but as much comfort as we can draw from these dramatic reductions here is also bad news, very badness in the final speech Bush breezes past. The data on how cocaine uses actually down in America in spite of the fact that overall cocaine use is down frequent use has almost doubled in the last few years. And that's why habit you'll cocaine users. Especially crack users are the most pressing immediate drug problem. You can almost hear the actual evidence flickering away under a gust of projections and assumptions. What all this amounts to is that Bush's speech did not paint. The crack problem is something that was seemingly getting better. Even though it was speech did not paint. The crack problem as something that was doing particular harm to certain Wilmer communities, even though it was instead it lead with the baggy of crack found in front of the White House and all the misconceptions packed into it. If you just think of it as feeder, it was masterful. If you think about it as a basis for public, opinion and public policy. It was a disaster. That's sociologist Craig Reiner men again, you get this sort of fun house mirror snowball effect, where the problem gets magnified and harsh for Konia solutions get justified Craig says, it's a classic political feedback loop a president using his pulpit to stoke public fear in something exaggerating or distorting the problem that he could then appear to be saving us from. By holding up the baggie of crack telling us, no one was out of harm's way. Bush could whip up more fear in the public fear that he could then get credit for addressing not surprisingly high level officials in the Bush White House do not describe their thinking like that David demerist bushes communications director says regardless of where the harms of crack were most concentrated he believed then and believes now that at its height crack should have been seen as a universal problem. I know there were plenty of anecdotes at the time that this was everywhere that, you know, there were the suburban housewife that was, you know, doing crack or the, you know, the assembly line worker doing crack, you know, how much hard data was there the time. I don't recall David says it's possible the Bush White House painted, the crack problem with too broad a brush, and that it really was mostly affecting certain neighborhood pockets. But even so even if it is. Zim pockets, and some of those pockets might have been large pockets that affects the society as a whole if the inner city is being ravaged by something like a crack epidemic that should be a concern to the entire country. It doesn't mean that you falsify the narrative and make it. Well in every household, there's a crack problem, but I think because they're probably anecdotes that this kind of us was more BIC witness than that, you know, the narrative of this could happen in your community to is valid one. And in the end that narrative stuck despite what David demerist and others in the White House had feared sure they worried the expose about the White House baggy of crack setup could pull the rug out from underneath their larger message about why America needed to get even tougher on the war on drugs, and frankly, looking back now, you can imagine an alternate reality where this could have been a moment of reckoning. Where the law enforcement tough on crime approach to drugs that was being cemented thirty years ago could have gone another way the American public. The media could have responded to this whole in the White House's narrative by questioning whether maybe we were misunderstanding the nature of the crack epidemic altogether. We could've taken a hard look at the data thought hard about who crack was hurting most and how we should try to help. It could have been a moment. Like that a warning was yell. But nobody listened and thirty years later, we're still dealing with the consequences. In fact, Bush got even more stepped up funding, then he'd asked for for the law enforcement side of the war on drugs. I Bush tonight accepted changes in funding and emphasis of his version of a plan to fight the drug abuse play. The endorsement is a Senate compromise plan that would among other things provide almost a billion dollars more resources than Mr Bush originally asked and cut a wide range of other federal programs to pay for the plan was to move money from things like public housing, an immigrant medical services to pay for it. And by late September in the weeks after Bush had made the baggy of crack address. There was another round of that polling that asked Americans. What was the biggest threat facing the nation? Drugs was still the top concern earlier that spring a quarter of respondents gave that answer after Bush's drug speech it jumped to almost two-thirds and by the end of Bush's time in office. His administration had spent a whopping forty five billion dollars on anti-drug efforts more than Nixon Ford Carter and Reagan spent during their administrations combined more than two thirds of the money. Bush spent went to law enforcement in other words, the even tougher war on drugs strategy that Bush laid out and justified in his baggy of crack speech. It came to pass. One guy. I talked to who worked on the speech. But it to me this way, this was Edward McNally. A White House speech writer federal prosecutor who specialized in drug cases at the time. He says the back story of the baggy of crack. It's certainly didn't derail or change the direction of or diminish the true progress or success of the so-called war on drugs. Really that the whole thing was an in retrospect, it's a footnote at least a footnote for the White House and our collective memories. But there were plenty of people that this was not a footnote for including the teenager who got charged with selling that baggy of crack in front of the White House. I could see my teammates huddled around and conversing about something. And I was I was up up. They was like you heard about Keith Keith Jackson. What happened to that teenager? And a lot of other people like him. That's coming up on the next episode. That's it for this episode of the uncertain. Our thanks so much for listening. We'll be back next time with more stories about the things we fight a lot about. But usually no just a little about you won't have to wait for the next part of this story. We'll be back in your feed tomorrow, March twenty second with another new episode after that we'll have new episodes for you. Every Thursday this episode of the uncertain. Our was reported by me, Chrissy Clark beyond uncertain hours produced by me and Caitlyn ash along with the socio producer Peter Valentine Rosen. Production assistant, any Reese and digital producer, Tony Wagner mixing and sound design by Jake Gorski, additional production help from Lyra Smith our podcast is edited by the incredible Catherine winter Sitara Nevis is the executive director of on demand at marketplace. Deborah Clark is the senior vice president and general manager especial. Thanks to Nancy for golly. Who helped bring this podcast into the world. Thanks to the George H W Bush presidential library center. And the vendor built tell. Division news archive for providing some of the archival footage. You heard him episode for more events or our or if you wanna let us know what you think find us on Instagram and Facebook were marketplace APM on uncertain our dot org. You can find photos of a lot of the people. You heard from this episode drafts of bushes baggy of prac- speech and pictures of the park across the street from the White House where undercover agents that crack. in certain our supported by the Annie Casey foundation, dedicated to creating a brighter future for the nations. Children more at eighty c f dot org.

White House George H W Bush White House crack cocaine president America cocaine Bush Lafayette Park Mark Davis DA Mike Isakov President Reagan United States reporter Bush White House Craig Reiner
Americas Drug War, Revealed (rebroadcast)

Reveal

53:41 min | 1 year ago

Americas Drug War, Revealed (rebroadcast)

"Hey Hey before we get started today. I WanNa tell you about a great new podcast from marketplace. It's called this is as uncomfortable. The emphasis there is is mind cause every time I hear it. That's what I think. It's a weekly show out on Thursdays about life and how money just messes this. Is it up for all EU adult out there. I know you know they're being an adult is hard it. It's actually impossible and then you add money into the equation and it gets even harder. This is uncomfortable. Listen things I what happens when one person relationship has way more money than the other what happens when work is a thing. That's making us cry at work. The show is funny. Little tents and enjoy ably uncomfortable subscribe to this is uncomfortable. Wherever you get your podcasts now you can can get enhanced security for your home wifi network with Xfinity X. Fi if it's connected it's protected now that simple easy awesome go to xfinity ready dot com call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store today to learn more restrictions apply from the Center for Investigative Reporting Apr X? This is reveal. I'm Alison. I was born in Plainfield New Jersey in the early seventies and all my memories of where I lived as kind of utopia keep in mind. This is in the eyes of a kid but it was just perfect a middle-class black neighborhood where I do all of our neighbors. I got to play until the street lights came on and every weekend. A bunch of kids came over and hung out in the basement because my dad had the only. VHS Is play around the house. We lived in it was a fixer upper. My parents poured all their money sweat and love into that home and by the time we moved to Florida in the eighties. My Dad was so proud of that house it heard to leave. I didn't get back to Jersey for visit till about four years later. In the middle of the crack epidemic and my little neighborhood was hit hard streets I used to play on. They just look different. A lot of my friends had left and those who stayed told us that our old house had turned turned into a crack house boarded up diminished and dark. I will never forget the look in my dad's is like like like he law something. He'd never get back that day. This season the podcast the uncertain our for marketplace is looking back at that time at the crack epidemic and seeing how it connects to the OPIOID crisis America is dealing with today. The podcast begins by zeroing in on this one seminal final moment when the war on drugs hit the streets of American cities with new fierceness left our laws our prisons and our neighborhoods changed in ways. We're we're still dealing with right now today on reveal we're revisiting stories from the uncertain our which we first brought you back in April. Here's the show's host Chrissy Clark If you happen to be watching TV on the evening of September Fifth Nineteen eighty-nine flipping through the channels you might have seen the image of the White House flashing across your screen live from the Oval Office President George Bush addresses the nation the image cuts to President George H W Bush rush the first President Bush. He's sitting at his desk blue suit red tie white handkerchief peeking out of his left pocket good evening. This is the first first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important so threatening warranted talking directly with you the American people it was Bush's his very first televised address from the Oval Office since being elected president in nineteen eighty eight and there was one issue he wanted to talk about all of us agree that the gravest domestic threat facing our nation today is drugs mostly one drug cocaine and in particular crap crack Bush who says is America's most serious problem. It's sapping our strength as a nation and then seventy seven seconds in he turns to his left WBT reaches under his desk and pulls out this clear plastic bag full of white chucky chunks this this is crack cocaine seized a few days ago by Drug Enforcement Agents in the park just across the street from the White House. There's a close up of the baggy you can just make out the word evidence printed on top drugs or real and terribly dangerous threat to our neighborhoods neighborhoods our friends and our families no one among us is out of harm's way but the president said he was going to protect us from this threat with ambitious Russia's plans to transform the war on drugs. Take it to new unprecedented heights and it was all wrapped up in this one dramatic prop in fact if you talk to people who happened to see the speech that night that's the thing they usually remember most us who number bag a crack in southern crack across the street from the White House for Don shots something about that just didn't sound right. You know nothing is impossible. When it comes to drugs when you break it down you really think about it and they'll buy sales crack front the White House and Don should know because back then across town he was also selling crack? Nod everything is in the White House and that new way downtown where they bind you know so it was odd so that park in front of the White House where the baggy of crack that Bush held up in his speech came from it's called Lafayette Park and here we are. I went there recently. It's lovely a big Green Square lots of benches fountains. This park is not at all a place that seems conducive to crack dealing for one thing. There's a lot of tourists taking pictures holding cameras. It's the place people go to take that ICONEX shot of the White House. Here is a secret service agent who is getting his picture taken by tourists. Can we take our picture with you. Needless to say there's a police presence because of where the park is Michael. isikoff walked the fruit Lafayette Park all the time nineteen eighty-nine. He worked a few blocks away at the Washington Post he was a reporter there and he covered the president's speech about the baggy of crack doc I was watching it on TV and reporting on it because I was the drug reporter for Mike Knowing what he knew about Lafayette Park the constant a police presence the tourists he kept coming back to this question. How did that crack come to be there? That's not a natural natural place where you would expect to see drug-dealing Mike started digging one of the first calls he made was to the US Park Police Elise Hu patrolled Lafayette Park he asked him have you had a lot of crack dealing in Lafayette Park and the answer I got was no. We don't consider later that a problem area. There's too much activity going on there for drug dealers. There's always a uniform police presence there in fact the commander of criminal investigations since told Mike there hadn't been any crack arrests in Lafayette Park ever until this one that led to the crack that was in the president's president speech and that m that got my attention so mike starts calling his sources at Da he talks to William mcmullen the assistant special agent in charge of the Washington DC field office who told me this remarkable story and the story mcmullan told him was this in a few days before the president speech mcmullan had gotten a call from the executive assistant to the head of the Da who told him that the White House speechwriters speechwriters had written this line into the president's speech and came up with the idea of using a bag of crack crack as a prop and could de oblige by doing a drug bust around the White House and mcmullen says Walder's really a lot of crack dealing around the White House mcmullan explained there were plenty of other parts of DC where there it was a lot of crack dealing going on the drugs seemed to be flooding the city's poorest neighborhoods at the time and the DA was setting up some undercover buys several blocks away and and what he got was any possibility of you moving down to the White House what is going through your mind as you. You are hearing these these pieces of the story wow so this was all a setup is what I'm thinking taking and in fact it was the details of the setup that make us a cough proceeded to dig up the intricate choreography involved. It was pretty bonkers an undercover. Da Agent reached out to an informant he'd been working with saying he was trying to set up a crack deal with someone in Lafayette Park. The informants suggested an acquaintance of his this kid a teenager who lived in another part the Washington northeast Washington miles away from the White House. The kid got a call was told someone wanted to buy some crack from him and wanted to make the the buy in Lafayette Park across from the White House and the kid was like we're the faulk at the White House make a cough says William mcmullen The DA agent he spoke to sounded kind of proud of the links. They'd gone to to get the kid to the White House quote. We had to manipulate him to get him down there. It wasn't and easy. It was late September a couple of weeks. After the president had delivered a speech that the Washington Post Ran Mike Isakov's article exposing the back story of the baggy of crack. It was on the front page headline drug by setup for Bush speech. Da Lured Seller Salafi at park from there the media was all over this story of a president caught manufacturing reality to the strange story of that bag of crack. Mr Bush held up during his anti-drug speech to the nation earlier this month. The sale was real but the location was a fake Mr Bush's staff wanted to buy some in the Davis story came out president. Bush was doing a press up at a family tree farm in Kennebunkport Maine. He seemed to be blissfully unaware of the media blowback he he was about to get president. What do you have to say about the drug busts of the engineer for your providence drugs me without a beat President Bush answers? I think it was great eight because it sent a message to the United States and even across from the White House they can sell drugs and Gaggle of reporters jumps accent but the park police say there's usually no drug activity. There has no problem with those drugs. Did you manipulate the American people into thinking there was a serious problem problem in front of the White House. Did you ask for the bag of crack for the speech and Busch owns it. I said I'd like to have something from that vicinity to show that it can happen anywhere absolutely and that's what that's what they told me what a week after after the story broke about the choreographed crack by in front of the White House Comedian Dana Carvey was on the stage of Saturday night live with a parody of it and Dan the drug problem bigger than ever this is. This is cocaine crack. I'll tell you something. This crash crack was bought right here in the White House three feet from this desk. This definitely was not the way it was supposed to go. You might wonder who came up with the idea of the president using a baggy of crack as a prop in the first place well it was a speech writer named Mark Davis. We felt that it would bring it home to every American has been a I walked by the White House to think that this is happening right here in your nation's capital. If it can happen there it can happen anywhere but he says the plan was never to have the. Da set up a special drug by near the White House just for the speech. He says the White House told the DA don't do anything special for us. Do not do anything on our behalf. Take this out of inventory of course that's not what happened and when the story became public White House officials from that time I am told me they were afraid it would undermine the whole message they were trying to get across and I want to spend a little time talking about that message. I want you to understand the full full weight of it which means you need to understand. How America was thinking about drugs? When President Bush gave that speech? It's very different from where we are today. By September nineteen eighty-nine it had been almost two decades since Richard Nixon. I declared a war on drugs public enemy number one in the united each stage is drug abuse and yet despite Nixon's hawkish rhetoric the seventies were overall actually pretty dovish time for federal drug policy in fact Nixon put more money into drug treatment than arresting drug dealers at the same time congress lowered federal penalties for drug trafficking and Jimmy Carter harder talked about decriminalizing marijuana by the early nineteen eighties though the pendulum was swinging the other way the mood toward drugs is changing in in this country and the momentum is with US President Reagan relaunched the war on drugs while he was in office. We've taken down the surrender flag and run up the battle flag and we're going to win the war on drugs. He was mostly focused on international cocaine. Cartels crack wasn't even mentioned in the national media until nineteen eighty-five five but by the late eighties the news was full of stories like these a new drug called crackup. It's more than coke. Every five minute. Put a baby is born in the united exposed to crack a forty eight hours on crutch street. It could be anybody straight. It was a scary time in the national poll that periodically asks Americans what they see as the most important problem facing the country by the spring of Nineteen eighty-nine the top response was was not dropped not the economy not the issue of war and peace but drug abuse. Here's the nation's leading overall concern right now so when George H W Bush sat at his desk in the Oval Office in September of nineteen eighty nine to make his first live address to the nation drug seemed like an issue worth staking a claim building Alina reputation on and so the point of his speech the big message he was trying to convey to the country was that under his leadership the war on drugs especially especially on crack was gonna get even tougher than it had ever been tough on drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law upper penalty relief up law enforcement health and sentenced to build new prisons space differ bail for the drug kingpins the death penalty I should point out it wasn't just Republicans like Bush who were Gung Ho on the war on drugs back then by this moment in the Eighties Republicans and Democrats. We're in the middle of a kind of arms race in the war on drugs. Each party wanted to be the toughest party a few years before in the run up to the midterm elections of nineteen eighteen eighty six it was democrats in Congress white and black ones who spearheaded sweeping anti-drug legislation laws that established new mandatory Tori minimum penalties for drugs major funding for prisons Eric Sterling was a democratic staffer for the US House of Representatives at the time he was involved in in writing key parts of the Anti-drug Abuse Act of Nineteen eighty-six intimately it came out of my word processor room to oh seven in the Cannon House Office Building Eric says one of the things that prompted Democrats to draft the anti-drunk law with the death of a basketball star named Len bias had it all he had speed His grace was acrobatic. He was drafted this week by the champion Boston Celtics he had it all until this morning when his heart gave out and he died there are reports that traces of cocaine were found in viruses system. Soon news stories came out saying it wasn't just cocaine Cain but crack cocaine that had killed Len bias it turned out those new stories were wrong by as had used powder cocaine not crack but Eric Sterling says the crack rumors took hold and all helped fuel the fear around drugs in general and crack in particular in the nine years. I worked for the Congress. I'd never been involved in such a hasty half baked legislative process. This is when the notorious sentencing disparity between powder and crack cocain got written into law and the racial disparities that came along with it since people convicted of crack cocaine offenses were mostly black while people who are busted for powder cocaine cocaine were mostly white and got caught with five grams of crack a little more than a teaspoons worth it would automatically get you the same sentence as getting caught with one hundred times that amount of powder cocaine in both cases the sentence would be five years in prison. Eric says the push to get tough sounding funding bill at the door was so rushed that in retrospect he's actually embarrassed by the numbers and measurements he helped Congress. Come up with members of Congress Lake many of us are not particularly fluent in the metric system if it says five grams is a gram is that is a kilogram bigger than in a milligram or how many milligrams like it doesn't matter no sense what is just what are these quantities. This was like what yeah okay when Ben Dunn don't bother us with the details on running free election by the time the legislation passed Eric says the process had left him uh-huh with a growing sense of disgust pretty soon afterward he left government started an organization focused on undoing the harsh war on drugs policies he he helped make but that was only effort at first almost everyone was pushing in the same direction tougher stiffer harsher harsher the calculus of the time was that you could earn serious political points by reassuring the average American voter that you were protecting them. I'm from terrifying threat of crack by holding up that baggy of crack President Bush could whip up more fear in the public fear that he could then get credit for addressing no-one among is out of harm's way but there was a problem with the bigger point Bush was trying to make here because by the time he gave his speech in September of nineteen thousand nine it was becoming clear that the crack problem was not that widespread and it was not growing the idea that that it's a plagued league this sweeping all sectors of society. This was never true. Craig Reiner men is a professor emeritus of sociology and Legal Studies at the University of California Santa Cruise and one of the editors of the book crack in America. He told me in the eighties there was very little evidence to suggest crack addiction was spreading to every corner corner of America by nineteen eighty nine crack US had already peaked and was on the decline the percentage of households survey respondents who reported using crack in the past year. I was just half of one percent for context in two thousand sixteen. The percentage who reported abusing opioids in the past year was almost ten times that rate four point four percent Craig says compared to that half of one percent reporting they used crack that was tiny very small the vanishingly small percentage of the population and you know the myths that were spread about it being instantly in inevitably addicting even at the time they knew that eighty plus percent closer to ninety percent of people who'd ever tried it hadn't continued to use it and the people using crack weren't really everywhere people who smoked crack were more likely to be poor unemployed less educated. The rate of crack use among black Americans was three times the rate among whites. That's who crack was hurting the most not to say that there couldn't be some random kid from picket fence valley to get caught up in all this that that happens certainly but it didn't spread to to Westchester County as the New York Times confidently predicted it was doing it just didn't happen it it. It's a drug and a high that appeals to those those who have virtually nothing left to lose and not too many other people if you look at the aggregate statistics overwhelmingly it's the most impoverished and vulnerable parts of the population all this information was available by the time Bush gave his bag of crack speech in fact I looked through the Bush archives and I found many of these statistics on crack use and how it was overall on the decline in the briefing memos that the National Institute on Drug Abuse gave the White House so the White House had those memos as the president's speech writers were working on the speech where the president held up a Baggie full of drugs and told Americans that crack was a growing wean menace and a danger to everyone in the end Congress gave President Bush what he wanted and then some his administration went on to spend more on anti-drug efforts the Nixon Ford Carter and Reagan combined over two thirds words of that money went to law enforcement whatever happened to that teenager who sold crack across the street from the White House I could see my teammates huddled around and conversing about something and I was like what's up. It's up you heard about Keith Keith Jackson next on reveal from the Center for Investigative Eight of reporting. MPR EX support for reveal comes from vistaprint for small business owners being prepared haired. When opportunity comes up is crucial vistaprint wants you to be able to own the now in any situation which is why our listeners will get free shipping on all business cards any any style any quantity just go to vistaprint dot com and enter Promo code reveal for free shipping on all business cards any style any quantity limited time offer own the now at vistaprint dot Com Promo Code reveal? You support our show when you support our sponsors from the Center for Investigative Reporting P. R. X. This is reveal. I'M L. Let's Today we're bringing you stories from the podcast the uncertain our from our colleagues over at marketplace this season they're looking at the war on drugs and how we got to where we org today in America drug laws have historically been about race the very first one past was aimed at Chinese opium smokers and cocaine it was legal until the early twentieth century records historian Donna Merch said that changed when it started to be associated with black men you have this wild circulations of rumors about African African American cocaine consumption that made black men more violence s for marijuana it was legal until the Great Depression when it was tied to Mexican immigrants burning weed when it's ruled in Hell in the nineteen seventies freebasing was popular among white people. That's another way to smoke who who came but when black people started smoking crack cocaine politicians led by President George H W Bush went on the offensive tough on drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law penalty up law enforcement often sentenced to build new prisons space for twenty four thousand in Chrissy Clark the host of the uncertain our tells us how that crackdown played out. We gotta take it right up. You want it on the ground fresh no cameras the group of old friends is leaning at arm's intertwined posing for a picture off audio unofficial mini high school reunion little backyard cookout honor. A handful of people are here former students and teachers from Spin Garn high school a public school in the northeast North East part of Washington. DC It's been closed for a few years now but it was a tight knit school. When most of the people at this mini reunion pass through its halls in the late eighties and early nineties endorsed live most of them were at Spring Garden right around the time that a student a senior an eighteen year old named Keith Jackson just didn't show up for class one day David mcgruder was a junior getting ready for basketball practice when he hurts something that happened I could see on my teammates huddled around and conversing about something and what's up. What's up? They you heard about Keith Keith Jackson. David was close to Keith's brother. He'd always liked cave so his ears perked up immediately thought the worst unfortunate where speeds his his demise yeah yeah yeah so somewhat a pessimist but his teammates were like no no no. He's not he's not dead. He was caught over Lafayette. Yeah part the president. Did this drug sale. Yeah that drugs sale by all accounts bounce Keith was a quiet guy people. I talked to remember him as a fiddler of pencils a lover of basketball usually wearing a sweatsuit. His mom worked two jobs jobs for office cleaning companies. His Dad was out of the picture he lived mostly with his grandparents. He was known to be sweet. UNASSUMING low key and then one day on September twenty six thousand nine hundred nine Keith Jackson disappeared from school and he never came back the government class. Everyone was like Keith got arrested. He so drugs the White White House Kerry bridges was in the same grade as Kief. It's been guard they'd been in school together since junior high. She says when she and her classmates heard the news about Kief why why would he do not why would he sell drugs. Curious says that was actually pretty common at their school but the bigger question for Kerry and a lot of kids at the time was why would he sell drugs in front of the White House in downtown Washington DC fancy and for the most part white. DC Miles Al's away from where any of them lived that was the location and we were like you idiot like calm one dude like and why because because that's not where normal transactions would take place like an and I wasn't a drug dealer by any stretch of the imagination but I'm like. I don't think I knew anyone who would do that in that location. The spin gardens student body was almost entirely black. Most kids lived in neighborhoods where the poverty rate was double or triple the national average these were places unlike the blocks around around the White House where crack really did seem to leave no one out of harm's way in one way or another mother at the time was on drugs which is why carry lived with her grandmother. One of Carey's uncles struggled with drugs to one of my favorite uncles he had from when I was told smoked so much crack he passed away behind the wheel of the car were surrounded by just the usage the spelling fouling you saw it pretty consistently. Here's David mcgruder Keith's friend who played on the Spin Garn basketball team you would see someone wanting to do crazy intense labor for miniscule payment and you knew what it was. They just WanNa hit you know and some very salacious. Things would take place that were a mind boggling to us as kids very very R. Rated Hardcore R. rated stuff but I mean you saw sexual things you you heard word of sexual propositions at the time. A lot of people believe crack was causing decay in neighborhoods like the one David and Keith lived in the Bush administration released policy brief the same day he gave his speech that said quote crack is responsible for the fact that vast patches of the American urban been landscape are rapidly deteriorating but historian Don emerge says the drugs were getting the blame for economic problems that were already there. The nineteen nineteen eighties is a period when you have serious recessions that are suffered in the cities. social welfare programs are being cut and you simultaneously had the loss of manufacturing jobs Bob's. It was just a really really devastating time. It was in that setting that crack came on the scene in neighborhoods like Keith Jackson's essentially a a cocaine marketing innovation prepackaged in a cheap easy to use form with a quicker and more powerful hi. It's an a smokable form versus starting of powder cocaine smoking was something that was familiar to people so it becomes an easier drug to consume initially these rocks were or twenty five dollars and then they drop to fifteen and ten and even five so it was a way to market a product to a lower income population and lower income people have a much higher risk of drug abuse and addiction and wealthier people research shows that recreational drug use cuts across all classes but if you look at frequent hard core drug use it's more likely among people who live in places with high unemployment rates lower wages more deindustrialization or income inequality. That's true now with the opioid epidemic and it was true back in the nineteen eighty s with crack so people are suffering real economic displacement and divestment and that that in turn creates the conditions for drug use when you talk to former students at Keith Jackson's highschool spin garn students who went there around the time he did and the ladies the shadow of crack is never far away and their stories not just the using but the selling in the mini high school reunion went to everyone. I talked to who grew up alongside Keith Jackson told me about people they knew who sold crack Don shots went to Spin Garden in the late eighties time Kief he explained that the demand for crack was high in their neighborhoods economic opportunities were scarce and so the appeal l. of selling was hard to resist drugs. You know soldiers myself you know. Some you know a fad Sunday do making money fast money clothes and caused. It wasn't nothing to get involved with drugs when he's around you all day I talked to another guy who sold crack in the eighties as a kid Reginald Murray. He's from the other side of the country in Los Angeles when Reginald was a teenager an older guy from the neighborhood said he'd pay him up to five hundred dollars a week to stand on a corner and sell crack to customers reginald did the math and it was exhilarating. His mom was getting seven hundred dollars a month to raise as a family of four five hundred dollars a week just for me I could pay we can get back on clean up my wardrobe so it just this seems like a blessing but Reginald says from there the calculations would get blurry know what you're doing is bad and the kind of bothers you but when you look at you know what's being generated from it in cal- on bills with groceries in an abundance of groceries now you know it's not when you get close in the month frigerator on bear status so all these things are changing and you know there's so much wrong when it but the which you're looking at is so you know right and crack cocaine mate audible but when people got caught selling crack the criminal justice system would drop drop a hammer on them to war on drugs was never really the war on trucks it will still war on acts that part of the story next on reveal reveal from the Center for investigative reporting. NPR Ex the center for investigative reporting in PR vis reveal outlets today. We're bringing you stories from the war on crack from the podcast the uncertain our at marketplace the teenager who sold the crap in front of the White House Keith Jackson went on trial in December of one thousand nine hundred eighty nine. I've never forgotten it. Tracy Thompson was a reporter for the Washington Post who covered covered the trial that was almost thirty years ago but she says she still thinks about Keith. I wonder what happened to him. I think about what a farce that trial was and how unfair that whole situation was the host of the uncertain. Our Christy Clark picks up the story from here in the end Keith Jackson did not get convicted for the crack sale in front of the White House of the jury did convict Keith of Selling Crack Act three other times to undercover agents in the months leading up to the White House deal. Two of the charges were for selling at least five grams of crack a little more than a teaspoons Hoon's worth the third was for selling at least fifty grams of crack about three and a half tablespoons Keith had no prior criminal record Tracy says watching Keith eighth during the trial. He looked like a scared kid. He looked like a scared kid but the judge didn't have much choice when it came came time to sentence kief the federal mandatory minimum sentencing laws that Republicans and Democrats in Congress had passed a few years before in Nineteen eighty-six they set up strict formulas for how much time kief would get based on the amount of crack he sold his sentence came out to ten years in prison When the judge handed down the sentence he told Keith he seemed like a nice young man who'd been out of control for a period of time he also also told Keith he thought a ten year sentence was too harsh? He apologized to him and he told him I don't have any discretion here. This is what the law says I have to do. The judge actually suggested that Keith make a personal appeal to President Bush he used you in the sense of making a big drug speech the judge touch said but he's a decent man. Maybe he can find a way to reduce at least some of that sentence. There's no record anything came of the judges suggestion the only public comment comment Bush ever made about the teenager the DA lured to the park in front of the White House to crack for his speech was back at that tree farm in Maine right after he'd given speech in he said this man was busted in front of the White House and I cannot feel sorry for him. I'm sorry they ought not to be penalties. Insidious drugs at ruined the children in this country and I don't care where it is. I'm glad that the DA and everybody else's going after him with a renewed when Bush was pressed further he said I don't understand. Does someone have some advocates here for this drug Guy Tracey Thompson says says the day Keith was sentenced later on. I heard that when they put him back in the holding cell that he just completely lost it and he was crying and hysterical and threw himself on the floor of the cell and they were worried he was going to hurt himself and they eventually had to come in and put him in a straitjacket Keith's arrest his trial his sentencing. They got national media attention because of the crazy circumstances is that happen to surround Keith's case the bizarre story behind Bushes Baggy of crack speech the setup but what might be more important about Keith Jackson story are the ordinary parts. A young man of color for a poor neighborhood was convicted of a nonviolent low level drug offence. He was put in prison for a long time he was put there because of things like mandatory minimums and zero tolerance policy towards drugs that focused on law enforcement. Here's some numbers to consider since nineteen eighty six when Congress established mandatory minimum sentences for drugs. The number of people in federal prison has almost quadrupled. I should point out that federal prison is just a small slice of the overall. US prison population but when it comes to federal prison nearly half of all inmates are in for drug crimes and about seventy five percent of them are black or Hispanic. The most common drug charges in federal prison amused as our for low level sales and a report from a few years ago by the US Department of Justice found that in twenty twelve the majority of people who were in federal prison for crack crack like Keith Jackson got at least ten years in prison. Tracy Thompson says covering the federal courts thirty years ago during Keith Chief Jackson's trial when these even tougher on drugs policies had only recently been put in place. You could just start to see the shape of things to come at that time. I'm they were just funneling a million of these things through the federal courts. You weren't hearing about these cases in terms of here's somebody who got caught with a little bitty bag of crack. You know something the size of your left molar they went to prison for ten years ears and if we keep this up we're GONNA put a generation of young black men in prison. Keith Jackson was released from prison in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight. I spent months trying to reach him to see what's happened. Since I tried old numbers I sent him letters. Eventually I did talk to some of his family found out. He has a job in an office but that was about it and then Keith called me one night to say he didn't want to be interviewed. He wants to move on with his life understandable but there are so many Keith Jackson's out there or I should say in there so many young men of color charged charged with low level drug sales and put behind bars for a very long time guys just by this of course it's a merciful Lord. Thank you for this day for the scattering for this mini reunion of Spin Gone Family and friends Lord. Now we ask that you bless his food. At the mini reunion of students students and teachers of Spin Garn high school where keep Jackson went people bowed their heads and said grace before they dug into the potluck everyone I talked to over the Turkey. Burgers careers and deviled eggs had a story about how zero tolerance drug policies and mandatory minimum sentences had affected them one form it takes is then the people that are missing from their reunions and many reunions keep Jackson and lots of others. It was typical to see someone in our neighborhood and then the next week you're like hey what happened to such inside. That's David mcgruder again. Keep Jackson's classmate on the basketball team. He says when someone disappeared odds were good. They've gone to prison. A study of police records in DC from the late. Eighties showed that about twenty percent of young black men in the district ages eighteen to twenty two had been charged with drug crime. Kerry bridges remembers that suddenly people were getting serious prison time for those crimes. Where is this coming from? Carey says when she found out her classmate Keith Jackson had gotten ten years in prison. She felt like he was a scapegoat in the the war on drugs. You still kid and you pretty much want his life. Was it worth it worth. It in the war on drugs was never really the war on drugs. It was the war on us. That's Leroy Lewis. He taught government in journalism. When Keep Jackson was a student at Spin Garden High School? That's how many people felt a doing the Bush speech and doing his little hug trauma trauma with the bag of crack and even with the arrest of keeps Jackson it was just a betrayal and it was just a a signal lockout locale coming after you coming in your communities and we're going to show US death debate you. The first time I talk to Leroy. I mentioned that I was also going to be talking to some of the men who'd worked in the Bush administration who'd worked on the baggy of crack speech that Keith Jackson indirectly got caught up and in fact I was going to be talking to one of them later that day just wondering is there anything. You'd like me to ask him on you on your behalf. Maybe you should ask ask how fair did he think that that situation was to keep Jackson and to all of them other young people that were directly recluse affected negatively by the consequences of what the president did and said I put that question to Bush speechwriter Mark Mark Davis. He's the guy who came up with the idea of using the baggy of crack as a prop. I was talking to a former teacher of Keith Jackson's. He was was angry with with you with the speech writers who sort of began all of this and he said you know you guys were part of the problem and he wanted talk to ask you. How do you think that situation was to someone like Keith Jackson while I don't think it was fair at all and it wasn't the situation that the speech writers I envisioned but I do agree we? We've do have to quit doing what we're doing. We've done it for three decades now. Now it's not working but other people from the Bush administration see differently Edward McNally worked on the bag of crack speech to he says yes mandatory Dettori minimums lead to unfair sentences for some people but he made this analogy between the war on drugs and other kinds of wars. I don't think there's been a war yet where we've been able to avoid any Americans dying from friendly fire so it's a really tragic unacceptable an unwelcome reality. I don't think collateral damage is acceptable but maybe unavoidable sounds like you're saying that may be a reality as well but if Keith Jackson and potentially hundreds of thousands of others became as ED mcnally called it collateral damage caught by friendly fire and the war on on drugs and also wanted to make sure to point out in his mind. It wasn't all in vain he reminded me of how bad things were when crack was at its height it destroyed whole communities it was block after block and whole neighborhoods taken over by corrupt crack gangs a lot of those realities have changed at told me and he credits the kinds of tough on drug crimes policies that came out of the Bush administration he worked for there are many key elements of the so-called war on drugs that were successful in bringing about that result things have gotten better when it comes to crack Jack and the violence that surrounded it but the real question right is whether the war on drugs the steep sentences the tougher punishments whether that it was what made things better turns out. There is no good evidence showing that it did that there's no evidence. It's a real takeaway good. There's no evidence Peter Reuter is an economist and a professor of criminology at the University of Maryland Orland and he explained to me law enforcement has basically two main goals when it comes to drugs one is about morality punishing people for doing doing things that we as a society see bad but the other goal of law enforcement Peter says is much more practical and economic and it all comes back to thinking about markets looking for drugs like any other kind of market that is ruled by the forces of supply and demand law enforcement. Peter says is an effort to constrict supply constrict the supply of drugs to make drug prices go up because more expensive drugs should presumably reduce reduce demand. If the probability of getting arrested in going to prison goes up then in the standard economic model. They'll be some people who will will decide not to sell drugs at the current price because the compensation they get is not worth that additional risk that may I lead to an increase in price and in its simplest form. This model seems to work just outlying any given drug does likely reduce its supply apply and increase its price but Peter says as much as he loves the supply-and-demand theories that drive this model. There's just not evidence to show that in in the real world stiffer and stiffer law enforcement or sentencing makes much more of a dent in reducing the drug supply or increasing the price. I I have used this model over a very long career at I would very much like it. If there was some evidence that it was correct in fact what is striking is how little evidence there is for it and in fact there are some very striking evidence against this model the drug policy researchers have been banging their heads against for the last few years namely if you look at the eighties and nineties when the war on drugs was ramping up and dealers were more likely to get locked up the price of crack was falling more intense law enforcement did not seem to deter people from selling selene or using drugs heater has a lot of theories about why that might be for one drug sellers a very poorly informed of senses they face or as Don shots the Spin Garn Grad who used to sell drugs. Put it to me. You know they're doing crime. You don't look at I might we get a lot of times. I sell rocks. He wasn't looking at you know 'cause. There's always like everybody thinks they ain't gonNA get caught. Nobody studied the law and say okay okay okay. I'M GONNA look up these crimes curry's if I if I do this nobody does that you know so if tougher and tougher laws don't work what does ause I asked Peter Reuter that question well going to sound as pedestrian as a public health person but I believe that we can by expanding and improving treatment substantially reduce the demand for the drugs that causes the most problem heroin cocaine methamphetamine treatment even not very good treatment which is the treatment is generally available makes a difference and and we can manage this problem which is all we ever do with social problems. We can manage this problem better by focusing on the demand side it occurred to me. This is pretty much. What Kerry bridget's keep Jackson's classmate whose family struggled with crack has been thinking all their life about how the handle drug epidemics? My focus was never to be on the people that are selling drugs. It was the focus should have been on the people that were using because because if there's no demand is no needs to supply so it was always more we need to do whatever we need to do to get people off off of drugs and carry says for people like her mom and her uncle there weren't many options there wasn't any we're GONNA sing you away to Rehab and and you can go to California and stay at this luxury place with teach you how to meditate in no they didn't have that she compares that to the way she hears people talk about the opioid crisis now they're addictive in his disease and we need to get them smelled okay but we didn't need to get them any hope years ago okay so as a black woman these states like what were you doing twenty thirty years ago when it was when it was a problem then but it wasn't a problem because they couldn't identify it wasn't until it stretched over different demographics and different socioeconomic class and then it became a problem but it's it's always been a problem so like right now. We're like Oh. That's been a problem like you're you're new to this. We're not helping drug users users rather than locking up small-time dealers. These are lessons about how to deal with the drug epidemic that someone like Kerry bridges has come to know in her bones. After she watched so many of her peers her friends and family turn into the collateral damage of the war on drugs their conclusions that drug researchers like Peter Reuter have come to to after studying the data for over thirty years but it's still worth asking whether we as a country have really learned anything from the war on crack what's changed and what hasn't as we deal with a new drug epidemic the biggest one we've ever faced thanks to Chrissy Clarkin the whole team aim at the uncertain our for marketplace for bringing us today show be sure to subscribe to the podcast here how they tackle the opioid epidemic. We also want to tell you about a new podcast casts for marketplace called this is uncomfortable they dive into life and how money messes with it you can subscribe to this is uncomfortable. Wherever you get your podcasts check it out today? Show is produced by Chris Clark and Caitlyn Esch along with associate producer Sir Peter Ballantine Rosen with help from Lyra Smith production assistant any reese and digital producer Tony Wagner Catherine winter edited the show especially thanks to marketplace's Nancy for Golly Tatar Neves and Deborah Clark our production managers and the G Bombini mixing sound design from Jake Gorski with an assist from reveal sound design team Jay Breezy Miss Jim Briggs and Fernando my men. You'll Rueda are. CEO's Christie Schaumburg Matt Thompson is our editor and chief our executive producer is Kevin and Sullivan our theme music is Colorado Light Support for reveals provided by the Raven David Logan Foundation the John D and Catherine T. MacArthur foundation the Jonathan Jonathan Logan Family Foundation the Ford Foundation the Housing Simon's foundation the Democracy Fund and the Ethics and excellence in Journalism Foundation reveal is a CO production of the center afford investigative reporting and P. R. X. Amount listen and remember there is always more to the story

Keith Keith Jackson White House crack cocaine President George H W Bush cocaine president David mcgruder Keith United States White House congress basketball America Bush Washington Post Don emerge epidemic reporter Lafayette Park
Bonus: The Uncertain Hour season 3 premiere

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

46:07 min | 1 year ago

Bonus: The Uncertain Hour season 3 premiere

"If you happen to be watching TV on the evening of September fifth nineteen Eighty-nine flipping through the channels. You might have seen the image of the White House flashing across your screen law from the Oval Office President George Bush addresses the nation, the image cuts to president George H W Bush the first President Bush. He's sitting at his desk. Blue suit red tie, white handkerchief peeking out of his left pocket. There's an awkward millisecond where he'd just stares at the camera. Like, he's not sure the broadcast has begun. Then he speaks. Good evening. This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important so threat that it wanted talking directly with you the American people it was Bush's very first televised address from the Oval Office since being elected president to nine hundred ninety eight. So a big deal. And there was one issue. He wanted to talk about drugs all of us agreed that the gravest domestic threat facing our nation. Today is drugs mostly one drug cocaine, and in particular, crack, crack Bush says is America's most serious problem. It's sapping our strength as a nation as he talks. His hands are folded on his desk. He's looking straight into the camera and then seventy seven seconds in Bush. Does this thing he turns to his left reaches under his desk and pulls out this clear. Plastic bag full of white Chaki chunks. This. This. This is crack cocaine sees the few days ago by drug enforcement agents in a park just across the street from the White House. There's a close up of the baggy you can just make out the word evidence printed on the top. And then he underlines the point of this baggy. He's holding up and the fact that it came from just across the street from the White House drugs or real and terribly dangerous threat to our neighborhoods, our friends, and our families no-one amongst is out of harm's way. But the president said he was going to protect us from this threat with ambitious plans to transform the war on drugs. Take it to new unprecedented heights. He described the machinery he wanted to unleash in that effort, and it was all wrapped up in this one, dramatic prop. In fact, if you talk to people who happened to see the speech that night. That's the thing. They usually remember most us who never bag of crack in science. Southern crack across street and ally house in e held up a bag of crack, a big bag to I have to say with this sort of white rocks powdery substance in it, and he said this was purchase just the other day in the park across the street from the White House. I remember the president hunting up this little baggie of crack and saying they bought that across the street from the White House, Tracy. Thompson was watching the speech at a beach house in South Carolina with a couple of friends and their collective reaction was what across the country in California. A guy named Craig Reiner men remembers calling a friend. Did you see that? You know, we were both pretty astonished but for Don shots, he was a teenager at the time and lived in one of the poorest parts of Washington DC, where crack felt like it really was everywhere for dawn, the idea that someone had sold it in the park across the street from the White House something about that. Just didn't sound right. You know, nothing is impossible when it come to drove when when you break it down. You really think about it? No by sales crack funding, the White House, not everything is in not the White House and that new way downtime where they bind, you know. So it was off and Don should know. Because back then across town. He was also selling crack. Welcome to the uncertain. Our where the things we fight the most about are the things we know the least about I'm Chrissie clerk senior correspondent from marketplace's wealth and poverty desk. And this is a show that dives into the deep uncertainties of our time to make some sense of making it in America each season. We pick one issue that surrounded by a lot of sound soundbites and talking points, but not a lot of basic understanding, and we go down the rabbit holes of history looking for clarity this season. The issue. Tackling is drugs drug epidemics, and how they ever end the drug epidemic. People think most about today and fight most about today is of course, not crack but opioids and we're going to talk a lot more about opioids later in this series. But decades before the opioid epidemic. Crack was the big drug crisis on everybody's lips. It seemed to have no end in sight and yet thirty years later. You don't hear so much about crack anymore? It's not on everybody's lips. So why like what actually happened to crack? And what does that tell us about how our current drug epidemic might end for the next few episodes? That's what we're going to look at through the story of this one baggy of crack that president George H W Bush held up one September night in nineteen eighty nine for all the nation to see and the stories of some of the people who remember that moment whose lives were touched by it in some way, because that little baggie of crack, it contains multitudes, it wasn't just a dramatic prop for a speech. It was part of this seminal moment in the esscalation of the war on drugs. The story of this bag of crack starts in the White House back in nineteen Eighty-nine. But in all these different ways it reverberates today. So let's get into it. And I should say there is a swear word or two in this episode. So that park in front of the White House where the baggy of crack that Bush held up in his speech came from it's called Lafayette Park. And here we are. I went there recently. It's lovely a big green square. Lots of benches fountains some statues of men on horses. Actually, just one man is on a horse, my producer since pointed out to me the rest of the statues are standing, but regardless this park is not at all the place that seems conducive to crack dealing for one thing. There's a lot of tourists taking pictures holding cameras. It's the place people go to take that Connick shot of the White House. And if all the tourists with potential surveillance tools hanging from their next weren't enough to make this an inconvenient place to do a drug by. There's also the issue of the guys in uniforms and badges donning landscape. Here is a secret service agent who is getting his picture taken by tourists. Can we take picture with you? Needless to say, there's a police presence. Because of where the park is Michael Isikoff walked through Lafayette Park. All the time back in nineteen eighty nine. He worked a few blocks away at the Washington Post. He was a reporter there, he covered the president's speech about the bag of crack. I was watching it on TV and reporting on it because I was the drug reporter Mike remembers watching the president hold up the baggie of crack that night and his first thought was it was a great prop great way to get attention to try to show. This was a universal problem. This is something that's affecting all of us. It's even happening across the street from the White House. But then that list of reporter questions starts nagging on him. The who what when where how in wise for Mike knowing what he knew about Lafayette Park, the constant police presence the tourists. He. He kept coming back to this question. How did that crack come to be there? The president says it had been seized in a park across the street from the White House. That's not a natural place where you would expect to see drug dealing, well, that's odd. And I wanted to know a lot more than the president was telling us that night. Mike started digging one of the first calls he made was to the US park. Police who patrolled Lafayette Park. He asked him. Have you have a lot of crack, dealing and Lafayette Park and the answer. I got was no we don't consider that a problem area. There's too much activity going on there for drug dealers. There's always a uniform police presence there. In fact, the commander of criminal investigations told Mike there hadn't been any crack arrests in Lafayette Park, ever until this one that led to the crack that was in the president's speech, and that that got my attention. At this point, Mike asking himself, if park officials only knew of one crack deal ever happening there. What were the odds? It would happen. Just a few days before a highly anticipated speech where the president just happened to be unveiling his anti-drug strategy, and that DA agents would just happen to be there. So Mike starts calling his sources DA he talks to William McMullen, the assistant special agent in charge of the Washington DC field office told me this remarkable story, and the story McMullan told him was this a few days before the president's speech McMullan had gotten a call from the assistant to the head of the DA with a question. Do you have anything going on around the White House was the quote that was related to me? And the the DA guy McMullan gets the calls as boulders really a lot of crack dealing around the White House. Mcmullen explained. There were plenty of other parts of DC where there was a lot of crack dealing going on the drugs seemed to be flooding. The city's poorest neighborhoods at the time and the DA was setting up some undercover buys several blocks away. And what he got was any possibility of you moving down to the White House. Quote, the president wants to show it could be bought anywhere. Mcmullen says the head of the DA's assistant told him, according to Mike is cops reporting that the White House speechwriters had ridden this line in to the president's speech and came up with the idea of using a bag of crack as a prop and could d oblige by doing a drug bust around the White House. They just assumed that oh DA must make these us all the time. There must be crack dealing all over the place. Certainly, that's the way the story seemed to be playing at the time in the media. And you know, they came the small problem of how are we going to get the crack it was left up to the sort of underlings that DA the figure that out. What is going through your mind as you are curing these these pieces of the story. Wow. So this was all a setup is what I'm thinking. And in fact, it was. The details of the setup that makes a cough proceeded to dig up the intricate choreography involved. They was pretty bombers an undercover DA agent reached out to an informant he'd been working with saying he was trying to set up a crack deal with someone in Lafayette Park. The informant suggested an acquaintance of his this kid a teenager who lived in another part of Washington northeast, Washington miles away from the White House in a poor neighborhood where there actually was a lot of crack dealing going on the kid got a call was told someone wanted to buy some crack from him and wanted to make the by and Lafayette Park. But according to Mike Isakov sources the kid had never heard of Lafayette Park. It's across the street from the White House. He was told and the kid was like where the fuck is the White House. He had no idea where they wanted this drug by to be he had no idea of even how to get to Lafayette Park. Make a cough says William McMullen the DA agent. He spoke to sounded kind of proud of the links they'd gone to to get the kid to the White House. Quote. We had to manipulate him to get him down there. It wasn't easy. We tried to get in touch with various people at the DA who were involved with the story. We couldn't reach some of them. We did reach the guy who was the head of the DA at the time. But he said he couldn't remember the circumstances of how the Lafayette Park deal went down. But I did talk to this guy. I had the idea of the president holding up a bag of crack cocaine taken from inventory isn't close to the White House as you could find it. Mark Davis was the White House speechwriter assigned to write the national drug address that Bush gave Mark says there was a lot writing. On it. It was Bush's first time directly speak into the nation as president. He was still trying to climb out of Ronald Reagan's technicolor shadow still trying to define his presidency. So I stood back and looked at this and thought well, this needs something very dramatic. And there's something to really pull it out. Mark thought having the president hold up, this eye-catching prop, this baggy of crack would be the perfect touch. And it would be nice if they could find a bag that was seized somewhere close to the White House. Be a nice rhetorical. I and why why was that part important? The closeness to the White House. We felt that it would bring it home to every American has been a tourist walk by the White House to think that this is happening right here in your nation's capital if it can happen there can happen anywhere. It was late September a couple of weeks after the president had delivered his speech that the Washington Post ran Mike is a cuffs article exposing the back story of the baggy of crack it was on the front page headline drug by setup for Bush speech DA lured seller to Lafayette Park from there. The media was all over this story of a president cut manufacturing reality to the strange story of bag of crack, Mr Bush held up during his at drug speech to the nation. Earlier this month, the crack he said had been seized drug Beal right near the white and his speech. The president implied that drugs were easily available even in Lafayette Park. But in fact agents had to lure a suspect from the other side of Washington in order to make the by the sale was real. But the location was a fate. Mr Bush's staff wanted to buy some pract near the White House to make it for Matic point on TV. But no dealer could be found the day. The story came out President Bush was doing. Press up at a family tree farm in Kennebunkport. Maine. He seemed to be blissfully unaware of the media blowback he was about to get. A firmer was handing him this little wooden man attached to some kind of pinwheel a souvenir. And then a reporter from the press pool. But then. About the drug bust. The engineer for your profits. Without a beat President Bush answers. I think it was great because it sent a message to the United States and even across from the White House or sell they can sell drugs and Gandel of reporters jumps in the park. Police say there's usually no drug activity there. No problem with those. Where'd you manipulate the American people into thinking there was a serious problem in front of the White House? Did you ask for the bag of crack for the speech? And Bush owns it. I said I'd like to have something from that vicinity to show that it can happen anywhere. Absolutely. And that's what happened. That's what they told me. The tree farmers interrogation. Short. A lot of time someone handed the president his wurley gig. But there was more drubbing to come for his drug speech and the baggy of cracking held up drug problem bigger than ever a week. After the story broke about the choreographed crack by in front of the White House. Comedian Dana Carvey was on the stage of Saturday Night Live with a parody of it which didn't take much just like the president. He reached under his desk and pulled out a clear plastic bag, not even that much bigger than the one Bush had pulled out full of white Chucky chunks. This is cocaine crack tell you some this crack was bought right here in the White House. Three feet from this desk. Drug problem worse than we ever thought marijuana being grown in the rose guard. Millie the Bush dog bringing in crack pike from the south long. In the Purity's the press scrutiny. It all did start to worry, folks. In the Bush administration to say, I was. Oh upset. Would have been an understatement. That's David demerist. The White House communications director underbush David says, the White House plan was never supposed to be. Let's ask the DA to set up a special drug by near the White House. Just for the speech, Mark Davis. The speechwriter who had the idea for the crop in the first place makes the same claim don't do anything special force. I said this. And I know Davidson this do not do anything on our behalf. Take this out of inventory. Of course, that's not what happened. They did. Not just take the crack from some inventory of drug busts, they'd already done whether it was a misguided request from the White House or a game of telephone or some overeager person at the DA in the end. There was a special drug by setup just for the speech and David demerist. White House communications director says when that fact came out publicly he was not happy not just because the whole story became a punchline on Saturday Night Live. Frankly, the real reason I was upset was it was a big distraction from the message that we're trying to get across. And I want to spend a little time talking about that message. They were trying to get across I want you to understand the full weight of it. Which means you need to understand. How America was thinking about drugs in September of nineteen eighty nine when President Bush gave that speech it's very different from where we are today. So it needs some background by September nineteen thousand nine it had been almost two decades since Richard Nixon, I declared a quote war on drugs. Public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse. And yet despite Nixon's hawkish rhetoric the seventies were overall actually a pretty dovish time for federal drug policy. In fact, Nixon put more money into drug treatment than arresting drug dealers at the same time congress lowered federal penalties for drug trafficking and Jimmy Carter talked about decriminalizing marijuana by the early. Nineteen eighties though, the pendulum swinging the other way the mood toward drugs is changing in this country. And the momentum is with us President Reagan relaunched the war on drugs while he was in office. We've taken down the surrender flag and run up. The battle flag, and we're going to win the war on drugs. He was mostly focused on international cocaine cartels. Of course, there was Nancy Reagan and just say. And by the late eighties. The public perception was that America's drug problem was only getting worse. And there was a new clear culprit crack. This is the typical tiny bottle for the new illegal drug of choice in America, crack, crack wasn't even mentioned in the national media until nineteen eighty five but by the late eighties. The news was full of stories like the running Americans crack cash crystallized the national perceptions of a growing drug abuse epidemic is drug crack it's more than every five minutes of babies born in the United. Expose to crack a place free of the crime and violence, the big city until the arrival of crack police say drug laws or too lenient. Most dealers back on the street soon after they're arrested, eight hours on crack street. It could be anybody straight. It was a scary time in the national poll that periodically asks Americans what they see as the most important problem facing the country by the spring of nineteen Eighty-nine. The top response was not dropped the economy. Not the issue of war and peace but throws abuse. Here's the nation's leading overall concern right now. So when George H W Bush said it is desk in the Oval Office in September of nineteen Eighty-nine to make his first live address to the nation drug seemed like an issue worth sticking claim building a reputation on. And so the point of his speech the big message. He was trying to convey to the country was that under his leadership the war on drugs, especially on crack. I was going to get even tougher than it had ever been tough on drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law penalty up law enforcement and sentenced to build new prisons space differ bail for the drug kingpins the death penalty. It's sort of jarring to hear these words today. Sure. Some people say things like this. But a lot of politicians on both sides of the aisle. Now agree we have too many people behind bars, and that's partly because of these tougher drug policies that Bush champion in the late eighties. Since nineteen eighty are federal prison population has grown by six hundred thirty nine percent today nearly half those inmates are in for drug offenses. So. Yeah. Mass incarceration from the war on drugs has become a bipartisan concern today. But back in nineteen eighty nine. It was all about making incarceration, more massive and the policies Bush launched with his baggy of crack speech or crucial to that. Push. Listen to what he was calling for that night. We need more prisons more jails more courts more prosecutors. So tonight, I'm requesting altogether and almost billion and a half dollar increase in drug related federal spending on law enforcement. One newspaper called his speech, a Rambo style. Call to arms, I know George H W Bush, not necessarily the first drug warrior that comes to mind. But it's true. He was one of history's toughest though. I should point out. It wasn't just Republicans like Bush who were gung ho on the war on drugs back then by this moment in the eighties. Republicans and Democrats were in the middle of kind of arms race in the war on drugs. Each party wanted to be the toughest party. And this may surprise you. But when Bush came into office in nineteen eighty nine it was not Republicans who seem to be winning the competition. A few years before in the run up to the midterm elections of nineteen Eighty-six. It was Democrats in congress white and black ones who spearheaded sweeping anti-drug legislation laws that established new mandatory minimum penalties for drugs. Major funding for prisons the democratic. Trolled house of representatives put together a comprehensive anti-drug package in a matter of weeks. So the Democrats could campaign as the anti-drug fighters and take this into the November election. Eric sterling is a democratic staffer for the US house of representatives at the time. He was involved in writing key parts of the anti-drug abuse act of nineteen eighty six it timidly. It came out of my word processor room to seven in the cannon house office building. Eric says one of the things that prompted Democrats to draft the anti-drug LA that summer of nineteen Eighty-six with the death of a basketball star named Len bias. Len bias wasn't all American basketball star the university of Maryland's leading score. He had speed. His grace was acrobatic. He was drafted at this week by the champion, Boston, Celtics. He headed all until this morning when his heart gave out and he done his death was the pivotal event. He was known as a clean cut guy. He was a gifted athlete. Extremely well. Known to members of congress. How such a young man with dice? Oh, suddenly, of course, immediately lead to suspicion. Rumors and toxicology reports being leaked there are reports that traces of cocaine were found advice assist. A grand jury will begin hearing testimony about the circumstances surrounding the death of Len bias debt caused by cocaine intoxication soon news stories came out saying it wasn't just cocaine, but crack cocaine that had killed Len bias it turned out. Those new stories were wrong. It was later determined that bias used powder cocaine not crack, but Eric sterling says the crack rumors took hold and at all helped fuel the fear around drugs in general, and crack in particular, I'm so in the subcommittee on crime where I was assigned. The Republicans got a couple of Democrats to agree that there should be mandatory minimum sentences. We should really be cracking down on important drug dealers, and that legislation developed very very hastily without any real background in the nine years. I worked for the congress. I'd never been involved in such a hasty half baked legislative process when congress started writing anti-drug legislation Eric sterling's main job was to figure out what amounts of what drowns would trigger different mandatory minimum penalties. This. When the notorious sentencing disparity between powder and crack cocaine got written into law and the racial disparities that came along with it since people convicted of crack cocaine offenses were mostly black while people who are busted for powder cocaine were mostly white. And if you got caught with five grams of crack a little more than two teaspoons worth it would get you the same sentence as getting caught with one hundred times that amount of powder cocaine in both cases the sentence would be five years in prison. Eric says the push to get tough sounding Bill at the door was so rushed that in retrospect, he's actually embarrassed by the numbers and measurements. He helped congress come up with members of congress on lake meadows or not particularly fluid in the metric system, if it says five grams, you know, is a gram is that is a kilogram bigger than a milligram. Or you know, how many milligrams like doesn't matter. No sense. What is just? What are these quantities? This was like what? Yeah. Okay. Win ban done. Don't bother details on running free election. Let's just get something. That sounds tough out the door. Eric says that was the prevailing attitude back then on both sides of the aisle who could push for the longest mandatory minimum sentences, the most prison spending it felt like a bidding war if there's going to be one hundred million dollars for more prison construction and the other side say Mr. champion moved to strike hundred million two hundred million and then the other side. So you Mr. men that strike four hundred million by the time the legislation passed Eric says the process had left him with a growing sense of disgust pretty soon afterward. He left government started an organization focused on undoing the harsh war on drugs policies, he helped make but that was a lonely effort at first someone else I talked to describe it like this conversation. Around drugs in the mid to late eighties where the sound of one hand clapping. There was essentially no opposition party almost everyone was pushing in the same direction tougher stiffer harsher which brings us back to the baggy of crack speech that Bush gave in September of nineteen eighty nine a few months after he'd become president. It was now his turn to up the ante. And he presented his opening bid his policy goals in that speech. This was a zero tolerance policy. That's Mark Davis. Again, the speechwriter who drafted the drug address mostly based on talking points from the White House drug czar office, everyone from the user to the seller to the drug kingpin to the country's behind this. There would be absolutely no slack. And now give it was going to be very harsh bright line was being laid down for drugs like crack cocaine and it was from that policy. Decision that I crafted words that were star clear uncompromising. The president did propose some funding increases for treatment and drug prevention in his speech, but his message was that the real money should go toward arresting and jailing. The people supplying the drugs. When you add it all up the big plan that Bush proposed in the September, nineteen Eighty-nine drug speech involved almost eight billion dollars to fight drugs that coming year at the time Bush called it the largest increase in history. He wanted the lion's share seventy percent of it focused on law enforcement. So the deeper message of Bush's baggy of crack speech was to show how much tougher and more resource intensive his war on drugs was going to be the calculus of the time was that you could earn serious political points by reassuring the average American voter that you were protecting them from the terrifying threat of crack, and that's where the prop baggy of crack came in to reinforce this point as President Bush told reporters himself at the tree farm in. Maine. He held up that baggy of crack and said it was purchased redden front of the White House for one reason happen anywhere. Absolutely. It was visual proof, but crack was affecting neighborhoods across the country. No-one amongst is out of harm's way. But there was a problem with the bigger point Bush was trying to make here because by the time he gave his speech in September of nineteen thousand nine it was becoming clear that the crack problem was not that widespread, and it was not grow. Knowing and the Bush administration, his speechwriters drugs are they had access to plenty of data demonstrating that in fact, I found that data in their own archives. That's coming up after a break making a series like the uncertain. Our really is a labor of love one that takes a lot of time and money to produce. If you believe that this kind of reporting is important, please donate today to support independent journalism you value trust any donation. Larger small makes us stronger and better give online at uncertain our dot com. And thanks back in nineteen Eighty-nine as George H W Bush was holding up that baggy of crack as he was announcing that it came from across the street from the White House as he was warning that no one was out of harm's way. Craig Reiner men was listening to that speech and thinking the idea that that it's a plague sweeping all sectors of society. This was never true Craig's professor emeritus of sociology and legal studies at the university of California Santa Cruz, and one of the editors of the book crack in America, he told me in the eighties. There was very little evidence to. Suggest crack addiction was spreading to every corner of America. In fact, when a lot of news reports, I started making that claim there were basically, no national statistics on crack use at all. The National Institute on drug abuse. The main body that compiles data on drug use mostly through surveys. They didn't even start publishing data about crack use until nineteen eighty six. If you look at the charts from before then it just says, an hey for the column on crack, no statistics. Though that absence of hard data didn't stop the media from quoting health experts and government officials who said crack was everywhere still by nineteen eighty nine the year Bush held up that baggy of crack, the government was actually collecting statistics. And the numbers told a different story from the recent anecdotes in newspaper headlines in the few years that crack use had been tracked. Nationally data showed that crack use had already peaked and was on the decline by nineteen Eighty-nine that August. The percentage of household survey respondents reported using crack in the past year was just half of one percent for context in two thousand sixteen the percentage who reported abusing opioids in the past year was almost ten times that rate for point four percent Craig says compared to that half of one percent reporting. They used crack that's tiny very small vanishingly small percentage of the population. Shen? And you know, the myths that were spread about being instantly in inevitably addicting and even at the time they knew that eighty plus percent closer to ninety percent of people who'd ever tried. It hadn't continued to use it. There were some alarming statistics about the people who had continued to use crack stats that people at the White House might have seen the data showed that a growing number of crack users were using it more frequently their use was getting more intense. But those people weren't really everywhere in parks near the White House or suburban neighborhoods crack was concentrated among a small group of people didn't spread in the same way. That was being claimed in Ron numbers. There were more white than black Americans using crack, which makes sense because there are way more whites in America. But in terms of the hardest hit demographics in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight the per capita rate of black Americans who reported smoking crack in the past year in the household survey was almost three times higher than. The rate for whites crack use was also more prevalent among unemployed people less educated people. So that's who crack was hurting the most. Not to share that. There couldn't be some random kid from picket fence family gets caught up and all this that that happens, certainly, but it didn't spread to Westchester county as the New York Times confidently predicted it was doing it. Just didn't happen it. It's a drug and a high that appeals to those who have virtually nothing left to lose and not too many other people if you look at the aggregate statistics overwhelmingly, it's the most impoverished invulnerable parts of the population. And I'll say this again all this information was available by the time. Bush gave his baggy of crack speech. In fact, I looked through the Bush archives, and I found many of these statistics on crack us, and how it was overall on the decline in the briefing memos that the National Institute on drug abuse gave the White House as Mark Davis and David demerist or working on the speech. But that is not what the White House chose to. Emphasize, and if you look at the evolution of the speech, which I did because I got obsessed if you look at the drafts you can see how the good news about drug use overall in America that it's on the decline that it's not widespread. This news gets buried as the speech drafts progress in early drafts. The speech starts with the good news. There's a sentence about how according to a recent federal survey the number of Americans using any illegal drug has declined by thirty seven percent. But by the final draft that information has almost disappeared. The numbers are fuzzier and their several paragraphs in after Bush has held up the baggie of crack and the good news is followed by a sentence about how the bad news about crack. Overshadows the good, but as much comfort as we can draw from these dramatic reductions here is also bad news, very badness in the final speech Bush breezes past. The data on how cocaine uses actually down in America in spite of the fact that overall cocaine use is down frequent use has almost doubled in the last few years, and that's why bitchy cocaine users, especially crack users are the most pressing immediate drug problem. You can almost hear at the actual evidence flickering away under a gust of projections and assumptions. What all this amounts to is that Bush's speech did not paint. The crack problem is something that was seemingly getting better. Even though it was Bush's speech did not paint, the crack problem as something that was doing particular harm to certain Wilmer communities, even though it was instead it lead with the baggy of crack found in front of the White House and all the misconceptions packed into it. If you just think of it as feeder, it was masterful. If you think about it as a basis for public opinion and public policy disaster, that's sociologist Craig Reiner men again, you get this sort of fun house mirror snowball effect where the problem gets magnified and harsh for Coney in solutions. Get justified Craig says, it's a classic political feedback loop a president using his pulpit to stoke public fear in something exaggerating or distorting a problem that he could then appear to be saving us from. By holding up the baggie of crack telling us, no one was out of harm's way. Bush could whip up more fear in the public fear that he could then get credit for addressing not surprisingly high level officials in the Bush White House do not describe their thinking like that David demerist bushes communications director says regardless of where the harms of crack were most concentrated he believed then and believes now that at its height crack should have been seen as a universal problem. I know there were plenty of anecdotes at the time that this was everywhere that, you know, there were the suburban housewife that was, you know, doing crack or the, you know, the assembly line worker doing crack, you know, how much hard data was there at the time. I don't recall David says it's possible the Bush White House painted, the crack problem with too broad a brush, and that it really was mostly affecting certain neighborhood pockets. But even so even if it is. Zim pockets, and some of those pockets might have been large pockets that affects the society as a whole if the inner city is being ravaged by something like a crack epidemic that should be a concern to the entire country. It doesn't mean that you falsify the narrative and make it. Well in every household, there's a crack problem, but I think because they're probably anecdotes that this kind of us was more BIC witness than that, you know, the narrative of this could happen in your community to is valid one. And in the end that narrative stuck despite what David demerist and others in the White House had feared sure they worried the expose about the White House baggy of crack setup could pull the rug out from underneath their larger message about why America needed to get even tougher on the war on drugs, and frankly, looking back now, you can imagine an alternate reality where this could have been a moment of reckoning. Where the law enforcement tough on crime approach to drugs that was being cemented thirty years ago could have gone another way the American public. The media could have responded to this whole in the White House's narrative by questioning whether maybe we were misunderstanding the nature of the crack epidemic. All together, we could have taken a hard look at the data thought hard about who crack was hurting most and how we should try to help. It could have been a moment. Like that a warning was yell. But nobody listened and thirty years later, we're still dealing with the consequences. In fact, Bush got even more stepped up funding, then he'd asked for for the law enforcement side of the war on drugs. Bush tonight accepted changes in funding and emphasis of his version of a plan to fight the drug abuse play. The endorsement is a Senate compromise plan that would among other things provide almost a billion dollars more resources than Mr Bush originally asked and cut a wide range of other federal programs to pay for the plan was to move money from things like public housing, an immigrant medical services to pay for it. And by late September in the weeks after Bush had made the baggy of crack address. There was another round of that polling that asked Americans. What was the biggest threat facing the nation? Drugs was still the top concern earlier that spring a quarter of respondents gave that answer after Bush's drug speech it jumped to almost two-thirds and by the end of Bush's time in office. His administration had spent a whopping forty five billion dollars on anti-drug efforts more than Nixon Ford Carter and Reagan spent during their administrations combined more than two thirds of the money. Bush spent went to law enforcement in other words, the even tougher war on drugs strategy that Bush laid out and justified in his baggy of crack speech. It came to pass. One guy. I talked to who worked on the speech. But it to me this way, this was Edward McNally, a White House speech writer and federal prosecutor who specialized in drug cases at the time. He says the back story of the baggy of crack. It's certainly didn't derail or change the direction of or diminish the true progress or success of the so-called war on drugs. Really that the whole thing was an in retrospect, it's a footnote at least a footnote for the White House and our collective memories. But there were plenty of people that this was not a footnote for including the teenager who got charged with selling that baggy of crack in front of the White House. I could see my teammates huddled around and conversing about something. And I was I was up up. They was like you heard about Keith Keith Jackson. What happened to that teenager? And a lot of other people like him. That's coming up on the next episode. That's it for this episode of the uncertain. Our thanks so much for listening. We'll be back next time with more stories about the things we fight a lot about. But usually no just a little about you won't have to wait for the next part of this story. We'll be back in your feed tomorrow, March twenty second with another new episode after that we'll have new episodes for you. Every Thursday this episode of the uncertain. Our was reported by me, Chrissy Clark, the uncertain hours produced by me and Caitlyn ash along with the socio producer Peter Valentine Rosen. Production assistant, any Reese and digital producer, Tony Wagner mixing and sound design by Jake Gorski, additional production help from Lyra Smith our podcast is edited by the incredible Catherine winter Sitara Nevis is the executive director of on-demand marketplace. Deborah Clark is the senior vice president and general manager special. Thanks to Nancy for golly. Who helped bring this podcast into the world. Thanks to the George H W Bush presidential library center. And the vendor built tell. Division news archive for providing some of the archival footage. You heard him episode for more events or our or if you wanna let us know what you think find us on Instagram and Facebook were marketplace APM on uncertain our dot org. You can find photos of a lot of the people. You heard from this episode drafts of bushes baggy of crack speech and pictures of the park across the street from the White House where undercover agents bought that crack. in certain our supported by the Annie Casey foundation, dedicated to creating a brighter future for the nations. Children more at eighty c f dot org.

White House George H W Bush crack cocaine White House president America cocaine Bush Bush White House Lafayette Park Mark Davis DA Mike Isakov President Reagan United States Craig Reiner reporter
60 Words

Radiolab

1:04:59 hr | 11 months ago

60 Words

"Jad So with the events of the last couple of days but I mean of course the administration's decision decision to order a drone strike that killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani at Baghdad International Airport which has unleashed a chain of events that leads we. We have no idea where with that happening. We wanted to play an episode which I think really puts this situation in a much larger context. We the first broadcast is in April of two thousand fourteen. I'M GONNA play it for you as we originally put it out and then on the back end will talk a little bit about how this All relates to the current situation. That's unfolding again. This was originally broadcast in two thousand and fourteen but it it seems to really speak speak to what's happening right now. You'RE LISTENING TO RADIO RADIO LAB radio from WNYC. Okay Ready. I'm Jaboomer I'm Robert Krulwich and this is radio today. We've got a story about the crazy power of words in particular sixty words single sentence that it is has you could say defined America for the last twelve years and yeah in the place to start is a difficult one. This just an. You're looking at obviously a very very disturbing live shot eleventh two thousand one eight forty six. Am a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center. We don't know anything more than that. We don't know if this is the day that anyone who is old enough to remember does remember you can remember where we were who we were with so you have no idea rather to one another plane and just hit another plane has just hit and of course we remember how he felt. It is the worst attack ever on American soil. Aw but if you really want to understand the world we live in. Now you've gotta jump ahead one day to September timber twelfth to a corner office in the White House where there's a lawyer sitting at a computer trying to figure out how are we going to declare war And one of the things that everybody realizes after sort of an initial discussion is yes. We'd like to declare war but we have no idea upon whom we should declare war. That is Gregory Johnson. The Michael Hastings National Security reporting fellow at Buzzfeed. Now the reason this lawyer man by the name of Timothy Flanagan And again the reason Flanagan is sitting at a computer in an office is because then president George Bush had to do something he had to act. He didn't act alone. You wanted Congressional approval level right. I mean technically in an emergency president can defend. The country is the commander in chief after all. He doesn't have to go to Congress and say hey do I have authorization to news for us not an emergency. That's been with us by the way senior fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution but President Bush needed Congress on his side. He felt it was important. That we project unity that we were all standing together as one and second if this was an act of war the power to declare war in the constitution is given to Congress Congress not to the executive when Congress declares war. Suddenly the president has a very clear and powerful mandate now the declaration Shen of war is kind of a dead instrument of international law. I mean nobody's declared war since World War Two but the modern incarnation of the declaration of war her is the authorization to use force the authorization to use force. What's called the authorization for the use of military force or as it's commonly referred to the a U. M. F. Right so our lawyer in the White House planning he's given a task go right and am FM Congress? Consent to the president. He really has no idea so he goes back to the last time that the US did this last time. Congress passed one of these things he he does a quick search on his computer. Boom finds it nineteen ninety-one Iraq the Gulf war planning and grabs a text and then he copies that into a word document meant and that becomes his template he makes some cuts he make some changes. He deletes 'em words then he hits sent our the war on terror a just and he sets in motion. This be we'll during series of events a US drone strike it linked to al-Qaeda insurance madness that is basically the world we live in fifteen members of a wedding procession killed. Why and if you're like me czar or even sadistic treatment like mean you find yourself flipping through the channels seeing the news basically ignoring it but then every so often thinking wait a second terrorism targets in Africa from Libya W now the US Air Force drone strike in southern Somalia? We how are we doing this. And all these different places are on a hunger strike and like that in protest of their indefinite detention. How how how are we detaining people for so long is it okay to do? We'll just who signed off on this you know and it turns out we all did because it was in that document. This is the legal foundation for everything that the US has done everything from Guantanamo Bay to drone strikes to secret missions to seal rates. It's all been hung off these sixty words and that's the crazy part. The body of this document the part that really matters and the reason that when I was reading in Gregory's reporting on this I was like what is it. It all goes back to one single sentence. Sixty words one sentence. Can you read it absolutely that. The president is authorized to use all necessary and appropriate force against those nations organizations nations or persons. He determines planned authorized committed or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September eleven two thousand one or harbored such organizations or persons in order to prevent any future acts of international terrorism against the United States by by such nations organizations or persons sixty words today. A collaboration with buzzfeed with reporter. Greg Johnston. We're going to try to decode those words and ask. Where do those words come from? And how did they come to mean seen what they mean. It's not what you think they know. And how did they end up leading us into what is arguably the longest war in American history included. Nobody saw it coming absolutely no. But that's the weird as well. NOBODY MINUS ONE. Let's start there there. Maybe you should introduce us to Barbara Lee Right Barbara Lee is a congresswoman from right around Berkeley California Rerun. Hello Low Low is Barbara and she is someone who has been in many ways a lifelong activist going all the way back to when she was fifteen eighteen and high school in San Fernando Valley. 'cause I wanted to be a cheerleader. But since the early sixties you had to have certain criteria like at least whether it was stated eight or nine blonde and blue is hard for you I would figure and I was really hard so I went to the ACP. She got them to pressure the school to change the the rules and are one and she became the first black cheerleader At her high school. Yeah yeah that's just by way of introduction fest for many years she becomes a congresswoman. It gets elected to a second term on that day. There is smoke pouring out of the Pentagon she was at the capital. No one knew where to go. The police officers do said run. Run run go go go. This was sort of a terrorist attack in our country so I ran out of the capital down Pennsylvania Avenue I remember looking back and saw a lot of smoke which was the Pentagon Edo clearly the country's under attack clearly people have died. Clearly we've gotta deal with whoever. Did this whatever retakes fest. For two days September thirteenth bar released back capital to meet with her democratic colleagues to review that document that Flanagan it sent over the mood in the room was very somber and very angry at the thing. We have to keep in mind when we're talking about this is all of this was done within seventy two hours after after the worst terrorist attack in United States history and very confused what would be the appropriate response. Uh so as she and her colleagues read those sixty words. There was a lot of debate going on back and forth. Oh Yes oh yes from everyone. Because this actually wasn't the first draft Flanagan get hit sent one over the night before September twelfth two thousand and one and that one was something that almost no one agreed to. According to Gregory that early draft had a few extra lines in it one on gave the president the power to preempt any future acts of aggression against the United States and Barbara Lee and her colleagues knew that look so how many things can be packed into this word aggression that if we sign onto this that if we give the president this power the president they never have to come back to Congress ever again and request authorization for military force because he can say that anything is aggression and we're also giving him the power our to preempt so they kicked it back to the White House planning and took out those words and now they had this new draft that the president is authorized to use all necessary and appropriate it force. which is what you heard it? Still in Barbara read that and saw phrases like all necessary and appropriate force. She thought what does that even mean. I said this is too broad odd. Not Definitive it's open ended and as she was speaking this is taking place in the basement of the Capitol building. She sees some of our democratic colleagues start to gnawed. Yep people were not in people were not everybody. There knew the danger of ill defined words you just had to go back fifty years to the Gulf of Tonkin Gulf of Thompkin Tonkin. Thanh with an end yes to explain as president and commander in chief in nineteen sixty four. LBJ announces it. To American ships destroyers parked in the Gulf of Tonkin off the coast of Vietnam were torpedoed by North Vietnamese knees. Boats number of hostile vessels. Many people now argue that one of these attacks never even happened nonetheless. President Johnson wants strike back so he asked Congress solution which they did giving the power to quote take all necessary measures to repel any armed attack against the forces of the United States to prevent further aggression. Making it clear. Our government is united in its determination to take all necessary measures and support a freedom and in defense of peace in Southeast Asia. Now it is the broad language of that document. Most people believe it opened the door to the worst part of the Vietnam War. The Rangers and Marines took casualty from hidden sniper the thousands and thousands of casualties not. Just keep dropping in Riddick. Atrocities charges have been made that tropes Gerald as many as five hundred sixty seven south Vietnamese civilians during a sweep in March. One thousand nine hundred sixty eight and in a television interview in nineteen sixty nine. When President Johnson was asked to justify at all he said? You can't just blame him. Garmisch gave uh authority in August. Nineteen sixty four to do. Whatever may be necessary? That's pretty far-reaching. So the lessons of Tongan Vietnam. That was very much in the air in that meeting on September thirteenth. Two thousand several key leaders hoped to avoid a repeat of the nineteen sixty four Tonkin Gulf resolution. So it's understandable that when Barbara stood up and said to her colleagues she was worried about some of this language the people were not in people were nodding so there was a lot of uncertainty about what to do but in the end those concerns were ultimately outweighed by another desire we've got to be a unified with the president. We can't show political divisions. Let's have the nation. Let's have congress. Speaking with one voice. It was a time for unity and for action and so walking out of that Democratic Caucus meeting on the evening of September Thirteenth Congressional leadership decided that these sixty words. This is the version. There's no going back to the drawing board and so that ten sixteen sixteen. Am September fourteen. Two thousand one. The Senate is gaveled into session. Clerk will call the Roll Daschle calls a vote. AKAKA MR Ballard Mr Allen. There Ninety eight senators on the floor. Mister Durban Mr Voinovich. All Ninety eight of then vote Yay. No senator voted in the negative. So is a sweep. Yep later in the day the resolution would go to the house where Barbara Lee was a representative Daschle had actually rushed the vote through the Senate because the White House has called for a national prayer meeting at the National Cathedral for the victims of nine. Eleven that's supposed to start right at noon and so right after the vote all the senators pour out of the Capitol and get onto the buses Trying to get through the drizzle. Who's actually raining that day? No at that Moment Barbara League. She hadn't decided how it what is that she was going to vote. I struggled with it for the previous two nights twelfth and thirteenth. She stayed up late calling back to advisors to friends in California. We talked every day including this guy. This is Ron Dellums. I serve four with twenty seven years in the US House of Representatives by were used to be his chief of staff and when he resigned signed she won his congressional seat. You know she would say well. What about this in? What do you think about that? And we kinda talked through the emotional state of the country that ah we are feeling pain. Anger were shocked. Both Barbara and Ron were trained as psychiatric social workers so they both knew that when a person this feeling all of those things. It's generally better to do nothing. Yeah psychology one. Oh one you don't make decisions when your morning afraid on the other hand. I believe in unity to I WANNA be unified with the president when the country's under attack I understood needn't tell me didn't say which way I should vote but I did say to her Barbara however you vote. I will always respect. You always be friend. You always be family so at that moment with the memorial memorial service about to start in a few hours till the house. Vote Barbara Lee was at the capitol. I was in the cloak room in since she wasn't sure how she was going to vote. She planned to skip the memorial service. She wanted to stay I she wanted to think. And then I don't know what it was may have been the spirit move in me. I don't know but at the very last minute. She was drinking actually can of Ginger Ale at the time. I think I'm going to go and I just ran out. I probably was the last one on the bus. I had the candidate Ginger Ale in my hand and ran down the steps and got on the bus. She got to the Cathedral. The House buses arrived about thirty minutes or so before the opening and so for for thirty minutes. It's she's in the Cathedral about halfway back listening to the Oregon thinking about the families in those who were killed there are people around onto who are sort of whispering the pain and anguish a few people who are crying. I said I got to pray over this and she's just wrestling with their vote. Her heart is saying one thing. This is too broad and her head is saying unity. How is it that you can be against the president at this point? Speaking of the president eventually President Bush takes the podium. We are here in the middle. Our of our grief just three days removed from these events. Americans do not yet have the distance of history but our responsibility to history is already clear to answer these attacks and rid the world of evil and then as soon as President Bush steps down everyone in the congregation stands hands up and they they sing the battle hymn of the republic which is a very powerful very moving piece of music. But it's not the sort of thing that is typically Sung Songa memorial service. It's A. It's a very forward and almost aggressive sounding in has the phrase terrible swift sword. Yeah Ah Oh my God. It was not quite what I expected in a memorial service but the second Speaker Reverend by the name of Nathan Baxter got got up and he gave a reading from Jeremiah. Thirty one ancient. Israel's suffered excruciating pain and tragedy Ajeti of militant aggression and destruction hearing that all over again takes me right back there and I remember voices heard in Raimo amending I think I'm better weeping Ping Rachel weeping for her children for her children when he spoke. That's when to me was the memorial Oriole. And then he he started to pray for the healing of our grief stricken hearts for the souls and sacred memory memory of those who have been lost and he said something that really struck Barbara Lee but us also pray for divine unwisdom as we as we act. We've not become the evil. We deplore that evil. We deplore when he sat became very. It was the sense of peace and calm. Came over me Barbara Lee says it was right then she knew what she do clerk report. The title astroid resolution sixty four joined resolution to authorize the use of United States. Armed later that evening the house opens up. Its debate on the speaker. I rise is supported. This resolution which authorizes the president to use all force necessary in Congress. Person Congress Mr Speaker stands up. I rise in support report. This resolution arise tonight to fully endorse and authorized the use of force one. After another speaker I rise in support of the authorization a high-rise today and supported this resolution. We will rally behind our president. Sixteen interro until Joe from California's Recognized for minute and a half we get to. I believe Mr Speaker members. Iran's today really with a very heavy heart one that is filled with sorrow for the families and the loved ones who were killed an injured this week only the most foolish and the most counts would not understand the grief that has really gripped our people and millions across worry. I have agonized over this vote but I came to grips with it today and I came to grips with with opposing this resolution during the very painful yet very beautiful memorial service as a member of the clergy Alergy so eloquently said as we can't let us not become the evil that we deplore just after the vote Barbara Lee says she was in the cloakroom again and she starts getting accosted by colleagues. All of these friends are coming up to her. And saying you've got to go back you you cannot vote this way brought changing my vote one of them actually I said to her look you've done so much. HIV You've done so much on AIDS this vote is going to take you out. Think of the bigger picture. They're saying you're dead. Yeah but that's the right vote. I'M NOT GONNA GIVE ANY President Authority to go to war and we don't know what we're doing. Only Congress can declare war helped me on this guys has the house. Vote Okay houses just now finished that. Vote in We see one no vote during the final vote for the House was four hundred twenty two one. We know it's a democrat. We don't yet know who we'll figure that out now. Now Barbara Lee was the only person in the Senate or the House to cast a no vote. That must've been very lonely. Moment it to be perfectly honest with you. I said some prayers for my friend. This was the right thing to do. And you know votes like this. You have to be ready to to pay the consequences over the next few weeks months. Her office was inundated with letters Farley. You're a traitor in a disgrace to the office. That you hold you can find all these letters archived at Mills College. You are a blade on American society the terrorist yourself so much hatred. I don't know why you decided hi to place yourself into the camp of terrorist. Attacks came and they came in the Canes Headline Death Threats off to hell with you you Benedict Arnold one means security day and night. Thanks for supporting the towpath. Hey Henry Poparelli what are you what you believe in if you go to Mills College in Oakland and we sent reporter there You will find sixty thousand letters. They're not all but most are a congressman Lee says she never faltered because right after the vote and she was in her office. My Dad called me lieutenant. Colonel Retired in the army. He said I'm really proud of you. And my dad had been in Korea and World War Two okay and he he sees that the way I see it because I really wasn't sure what he was saying. Because you know I really wasn't sure she thought all right daddy daddy proud of me now. I should note that barley is still a congresswoman. She did not pay the price for that. No vote and whatever you think of of her vote whether whether you think it was the right thing to do with the wrong thing to do what is interesting to me. Is that as we're sitting here looking back on twelve years of war. She was sitting there twelve years ago looking forward and maybe she saw something about how this would play out. But how these these words the sixty words would start to grow and expand that's next. This is Gregory. Trump by name is Benjamin with regularity supported in parts the national foundation and the Alfred P Sloan Foundation handling understanding of science and technology in the modern world more information about fund the WWW dot. Org this message. Hey I'm jaboomer. I'm Robert Krulwich. Oh which is radio lab in today. Sixty words is the collaboration with buzzfeed and reporter. Gregory Johnson story is based on a an article that Gregory wrote wrote about the sixty simple words that have really defined American counterterrorism for more than a decade. It's called the authorization for use of military forced short and do a U. M. F. was passed by Congress three days after September eleventh. And here it is again read by Senator John McCain which says the president is authorized. I use all necessary and appropriate force against those nations organizations or persons. He determines planned authorized committed or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on on September eleventh. Two thousand one or harbored such organizations or persons in order to prevent any future acts of international terrorism against the United States by as such nations or organizations all right. So why would we be looking at that. Boring assets. Seem seamless almost board at saying it yet he does. Can I just be honest with you for a second. I generally moved through with the assumption which which has been proven over and over again to be true that I don't know how the world works like miss that day at school or something. Are you coming in specific like no. I'm too general sense that somehow like ause. This is out there behind the curtain pulling levers. I'm just always going to be stuck on this side. I think it's what motivates the show for me is like I feel Kinda stupid most of the time and these shows are a way to engage the world and really examined the world right and when it comes to these matters of national security I really feel clueless and so so when I read Gregory's article I felt like I understood something crucial for the first time but the way words actually operate in the world because again this sentence this totally boring sense. This is the legal foundation for everything that the US has done everything from Guantanamo Bay to drone strikes to secret renditions to seal rates. It's all been hung off these sixty words. One lawyer who is in the Bush administration said look. This sentence is like a Christmas tree all all sorts of things have been hung off of this. But how how like 'cause you read the thing and you don't see any mention of Guantanamo Bay in those sixty words it doesn't mention detention it doesn't mention drone strikes. It doesn't mention drone strikes against American citizens needs to that guy. I was one of the first folks. We called to help us. Decode this that's That's John Bellinger. I served as the legal adviser for the National Security Council from two thousand one to two thousand five and as the legal adviser for the Department of State from two thousand five to two thousand and nine. You can't do any speed. Dating within with a quit injure like that because the date will be over it. That's my congressional testimony voice and we asked him like okay so we detention isn't anywhere in the document. So how do you read detention from the sixty words. The argument argument with which I am comfortable as a legal matter is this. He says if you go eight words into those sixty words and you get to the phrase all necessary and appropriate get force all necessary force. Yeah you gotta ask yourself what is force. What does that mean? What do we know what forces I punch you in the face? That's amusing four. That's one kind of can use force to kill people but a lesser use of force is to detain them. Detention is simply lesser included in the use so force that comes naturally in a military operation. It's like a subset of forced basically so if you're authorized to use force to kill people you are also by default authorized to use force to detain them. Essentially to knock them out of the battle in other ways and that that forces both necessary and it's appropriate and the courts courts have upheld then so that one word force that is how you justified Quintana. Mugabe controversy surrounding Guantanamo Bay continues the authorization irritation to use military force. Act Has Military Commission been the legal basis for the detention of thousands of individuals and many of them have been detained. If more than ten years. None have been charged in the words. Detention are never mentioned attention if it gets even trickier if you go. Just a few words passed all necessary. Inappropriate force you get to the mention of the enemy who the force is supposed to be used against that right and it seems to be very unlimited language. We can't shoot everybody or anybody know. Only the people who planned authorized committed or aided the terrorist attacks that occurred on September eleven two thousand and one. That sounds much more. Sounds very much tethered to nine eleven. Right yeah which is why a lot of congressmen and women voted for Joe Biden on the day of the vote Septemer Emmer fourteenth two thousand one. He says look people. Don't freak out about this language it's relates to the incident and as broad authority relating the incident it does not relate to all terrorism every place. 'cause we're just talking about al Qaeda who did this and the Taliban who have harbored them right nope not necessarily Gregory Johnson again over time. What's happened is there's been this other sort of catch all category that has has been read into the sixty words even though it appears nowhere in these sixty words and that catch-all category is associated forces associated forces horses? Yeah what we've been calling these sixty first and sixty second words Russell. It is wasn't do we define the enemy as al-Qaeda the Taliban and associated gated forces. It's a whole different ballgame. Yeah so when you read those those all those words it did not include the phrase associated forces is nowhere in the text to where where does site something. That isn't that. This is one of the enduring mysteries of of this so the earliest example that we could find of those two words is in a two thousand and four memo from Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz he finds enemy as Qaeda the Taliban and associated forces but the the truth is it may have been there from the beginning when he because according Ben Witness from the Brookings Institution there is a concept in the laws of war. Called Co belligerency. It's the idea that if you're at war with person a and person B. is on person as side in the war you're also legally at war with person. B Makes Perfect sense if you think of traditional war terms because like we're at war with Germany. Italy joins their side so by default were at war with Italy. Too Right. So just transpose. Out here if we're at war with this group called al-Qaeda and a certain set of groups that aren't them join the war on al-Qaeda side then you are legally at war with them if you don't think about that too hard is crystal clear but then the question that has arisen over time is is how broad do make that that circle because the problem obviously is that we're we're not talking about nation states anymore we're talking about groups show okay. How how close does the link to al-Qaeda and the people who carried out September eleventh have to be so if you have someone who's connected to someone who's connected to someone who's connected to someone who is connected elected to September eleventh? Is that enough or is it only three leaks or can you be an associated associate now we can exactly know how broadly the Obama and Bush administrations have defined those words. We'll talk about why in a second but you just have to look at the news and you could see that like we started with the war that was in Afghanistan fan and then spread to a lot of different places Pakistan Libya Somalia Yemen. Yeah and in Yemen. There's a lot of debate and a lot of discussion about like doc. Is this legal. Does this have anything to do with September eleventh anymore because now the group in Yemen al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula which is a group that was first formed in two two thousand nine. They have their own hierarchy in their own structure. And it's not clear how in what fashion they take orders from from either Osama bin Laden why he was still alive or now I am another one. Hurry so does this make them an associated force or does it make them part of all lied the answer at least on everyone it is Friday September thirtieth two thousand eleven market down on your calendar Denver. Thirty twenty seven seemed to be yes when the US assassinated needed to members of the group this was not confirmed yet but it could very well have been a US Predator drone strike that is a US. Government attacked presented put all this in context between green two thousand and two and two thousand fourteen. According to some estimates there have been about sixty five drone strikes in Yemen killing about four hundred people so so much hinges on how you define those words so much is in the definition. I asked the Pentagon I said WHO. What are the list of associated forces so al Qaeda yes the? US US award. That's clear what about the other groups L. Shebab al-Qaeda and Iraq al-Qaeda the Islamic Maghreb Armed Islamic group who say Shimmy as Brotherhood of this brotherhood of that who who are these groups who is the US at war with and the Pentagon emailed me back and they said that list is classified. Offer public. Release wait so we who we are at war with. He don't know I wait. So you're saying when you approach the Pentagon they say they will not tell you. The names of the people were at war or against. We'll maybe they shouldn't be that valuable well they don't you WanNa know as a citizen of America who were fighting on the other Hindu. I want to know as the as if the United States has determined that I am dangerous to it if it announces then that would give me a certain amount of a Notice which may perhaps would be disadvantageous. To the United States. It could also though act as a disincentive for you to take take action. Maybe but maybe not maybe they will just get quieter more dangerous. I mean it's true. There might be reasons for they have not wanted to provide a public book list because they this is John Injury and one. The group's move all the time and so a few say well. These are associated groups while then certain people just moved from group paid group B. and they also want to leave these different groups guessing but it still raises democratic concerns. If the American people don't really know Oh who the executive branch believes is covered by the UMF in democracy and in a representative democracy that has to be weighed out. Should the citizens dozens of the United States know who it is that the United States is targeting for death around the world who it is that the United States is technically at war with should worby a decision that the citizens of democracy of a representative democracy have a say. We're a representative democracy sets. I'm assuming that the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee knows every item on that list. I'm not so sure warning everybody. The committee meets today to receive testimony on the Law of armed conflict. One of the more interesting hosting Senate hearings took place in early two thousand and thirteen putting the status of the two thousand one authorization for the use of military force the A UMF was was the Senate Armed Services Committee Senator Carl Levin of Michigan Chairman of the Committee Senator McCain is on the committee like to welcome our witnesses and Gregory agree says the senators called a couple of Defense Department officials to answer questions members. Committee thank you for the opportunity to testify about the legal framework for the US. Military Operations Sudafed our nation because they wanted to know like now that we're twelve years into this war. How are you using? This document does need to be changed so the Department of Defense officials and there were four of Venice. Assyrian said look believed that existing authorities are adequate for this armed conflict. Don't revisit this sentence. Don't repeal it. This sentence canton is sufficient. It gives us all the power that we need against Al Qaeda and Associated Forces and as they're laying out their case they say those two words associated forces associated rated forces and associated forces over associated forces over an associated force an associated forces and associated force and their Associated Forces Societa D- forced awards associated forces instead of just nodding along a lot of the senators. Were like what gentleman. I've only been here five months but this is the most astounding and most astoundingly disturbing hearing that I've been to since I've been here. You guys have essentially rewritten the constitution here. Today that's Angus King Independent senator from Maine and you keep using the term associated gated forces. You use it thirteen times in your statement that is not in a U. M. F. and you said at one point it suits us very well. I assume it does suit you very well. Because as you're reading it to cover everything and anything but one of the most striking moments of this hearing is when the head of the Committee Senator Carl Levin Turns to one of the DOD officials and asks him. Is there a list now. Desert an existing list of groups that are affiliated with Al Qaeda senator. I'm not sure there's unlisted. I Say I am very familiar with the organizations that we do consider right now are affiliated Al Qaeda and I could provide you that list would you would you give us yes we can do do that. And when you add or subtract name from that list would you let us know we can do that as well. Mr Chairman you let me just understand what you just said at a committee hearing hearing yeah. US Senator asked specifically so who's on the list of people were allowed to kill right. That suggested that the Senate Armed Services Committee who who had oversight really had no idea she was wondering like all right if we don't have any idea who were at war with in the Senate Armed Services Committee doesn't seem to have any idea who does well one of the things that became clear to me as I was reporting on this story was that many of the people who are making these east decisions but never been elected by anyone to any position and they were the ones who are making the decision not the elected representatives. And so who are they. I guess so. Yeah so we were rooting around for a while looking for an answer to that question until we found on this guy. This is Daniel Kleinman. He's a journalist and I've covered national security and counterterrorism for many years and based on hundreds of confidential interviews that became his book killer alert capture. He was able to paint a picture for us of who makes these decisions and how he told us about these meetings. You say it's the S. T. V. S. meetings. What are they? WHO's the room? How do the events unfold these are they? They call them Civics meetings in the vernacular of the bureaucracy. It stands for secure video. Teleconference meetings described him as a sort of a massive top secret. Google hangout chat where literally hundreds of people from throughout the national security bureaucracy. Accuracy log in to decide. WHO's on the list and who isn't and who should live new should i? You should literally hundreds literally hundreds of people now many of them are backbenchers backbenchers. They're not participating in the call but they're taking notes before they get together in this meeting. Many of the folks at this meeting he says are given little packets of information on each target mark. They call them baseball cards. Because they sort of look like you got a picture and some stats like Yogi Berra on one side and then you got his batting average in his hometown on the back all the the terrorist equivalent of all of that. So who is this person. Where does he rank? And what kinds of operations has he been involved in in the past. Eventually general will come on the screen and say here's our target objective Akron for some reason. He says they always refer to the targets by the name of American Cities Objective Toledo general might say target is in Yemen. We have a drone overhead. There's an opportunity. Kill this person. Can we legally do it. And the fascinating thing. Although maybe it won't come as much of a surprise people. He's making this pitch to or not generals but lawyers or lawyers everywhere that is just a basic fact of modern warfare. Says John Bellinger you now have lawyers on the ground with artillery artillery units tank commanders lawyers in Kevlar lawyers and helicopters are lawyers really almost behind every bomb just lawyers. Here's everywhere and that's a very good thing. That's Herald Co.. He was the top lawyer at the State Department from two thousand nine to two thousand thirteen. Because it means that we're not just shooting away at people Willy Nilly or because we're angry at them right. There is considered careful decision now. Herald Co Korea. Dan Climates reporting was in in those civics meetings and he would often be the one to answer the generals questions. Can we legally kill this person so we asked him if lawyers are now the ones deciding who we we are at war with and who we aren't how do you do it. And unfortunately for us they're going to get into that on this call for multiple methods. But I'M NOT GONNA go into that. He said he couldn't comment on any of it. Because it's classified. But Harold Coe is a creative Dan Kleinman who spoke with a lot of people familiar with the process. OSSIS CO in particular had a fascinating way of determining who is and is not associated force in other words. We are aren't at war with and it seems to be less about the groups as a whole and more about individuals within the group for example Seniority that was an important issue for Co.. If you're going to target a guy. He has to be a senior senior member of group like Al Qaeda right. Yes be able to give orders. And he has to be unique within the organization. You couldn't simply under Herald coast theory. Go after say a driver or a cook who was in Al Qaeda or even split soldiers because they were fungible meaning. They could be easily replaced and other criteria was whether they were externally oriented for Co if they were just participants in civil war you couldn't target them but if they were targeting targeting Westerners or Western interests than yes. So if you take Dan Clyde men's account of Harold Coz criteria as representative and and we personally have nowhere verifying it but if you take that as the norm then maybe there is a strong vetting process in place but I interviewed numerous people who participated dissipated in these meetings and one of the things that I heard over and over again was that there was this kind of inexorable momentum toward killing and that the military people in these meetings could speak with kind of a tone of do or die urgency. In fact. Two of the people who I quote in my book used Used exactly the same metaphor to describe that sense of momentum. That was very difficult to resist. It was like standing on a train track with a train train hurtling toward them at a hundred miles an hour. Now then I guess like the question for me is like how often do they say no well. The Answer Attribute Ninety Nine Times yes one time no or fifty times yes in fifty times know. How many knows are there? Well Look I say I did not come across Many many examples but he did tell us about this one instance. This was a meeting between the top lawyer at the Defense Department. And a man named I'm Jay Johnson and the top lawyer at the State Department who was then Heraldo Herald Co and according to dance sources. Harold Cohen J. Johnson were faced with determining the fate fate of a forty year old man. Roughly forty named Shaef Move Robo. I think that's the way Name I'm not sure. He's a member of these smalley group. Al Shabaab ROB and for Context World Cup celebrations of turn to tragedy in the Central African nation of Uganda. A few months before this conversation this is in two thousand ten L.. Shebab AH bombed a rugby club. Any restaurant at the same time in Uganda. Killing seventy four people broken chairs smashed tables and the sounds of pain as rescuers you search for the living and the dead so that just happened and according to Dan Kleinman at this moment in intelligence circles there was a debate raging as to whether Al Shebab should or should not be considered an associated force at the time. Their leader had sworn allegiance to Osama bin Laden but their agenda and was primarily a local agenda. They had never struck out against the United States or against American interests in the region. So you've got the top up lawyer. The State Department and the top lawyer at the Pentagon facing off as to whether this fellow Robo from Al Shabaab should live or die and how does work does somebody just like someone pound on the table. Yes this was. This was a very heated meeting. Jay Johnson argued vehemently that Robo was covered under the maf- he was after all a founding member of Al Shabaab Herald Co vehemently disagreed Herald coast conclusion based on the evidence and the intelligence that he saw aw was that Robo was not externally focused in fact he belonged to a faction of El Shabaab. That was arguing against attacking the United States and other Western interests still according to collide men these two men went back and forth and back and forth until eventually herald co just drew a hard line and essentially said. Look if you do this you need to know that you will. We'll be doing it over the unambiguous objections of the state. Department's legal adviser the unambiguous mood. And that's very strong language coming from A lawyer and the signal that it sent to the White House was you'll be taking military action. Even though the top floor of the state's Barna said that this would be an illegal action. So what happened. Did they decide not to. They did not do it. Not Academic. It's it's Lives depend on which way the decision goes Authorize committed or a terrorist attack. AH FOR US out. We'll continue in a moment Hello this is David from Berlin. Bread lab is supported in part by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation enhancing public understanding of science and technology in the modern world. More information about Sloan. WWW dot sloan dot org kay. I'm Jaboomer Gabum Ron. I'm Robert Krulwich. This is radio lab today. We've devoted the Intel. We're continuing to devote the entire show to a single sentence. One sentence sixty words that's all. Oh it's the two thousand and one authorizations military force was signed into law on September eighteenth two thousand one and together with Buzzfeed and reported Gregory. Johnson we have we have manhandled these words. We have dissected we have bisected try and whatever other kind of selected you respected who the a U. M. F. as it's called. Yes and and you know we've looked at how the the the Senate has defined the last twelve years of counter-terrorism. Now How would define our future gentlemen. Thank you for being here today. This is a very soon when we were thinking about that. Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. We ended up calling someone who sat on the committee. Tim Kaine senator from Virginia. And who was there that day. Yeah that was a that was a very the Kind of hair-raising. Day and Senator Kaine told us that. One of the most hair-raising moments for him was when one of his fellow senators. Lindsey Graham asked one of the Department of Defense officials officials do agree with the war against radical Islam or tear. Whatever description like to provide will go on after the second term of President Obama in other words how long you think this particular war as declared him the section is going to go on then in my judgment this is going to go on for quite a while and yes beyond beyond the Turks second term of the president and beyond this term Congress? Yes Sir I think it's at least ten to twenty years. It was Celli Kosslick. This is already longest war in the history of the United States along with the Vietnam and now a DOD official saying add on ten or twenty years so I said is it the administration's position that you tell me if somebody's born after nine eleven. Let's imagine in twenty thirty. They join join a group that has just become associated with Al Qaeda in twenty thirty. Is it the administration's position at the Um F. would would cover them in those organizations and without hesitation tation the The administration witnesses said yes As long as they become an associated force under the the the legal standard that WAS WHO set out. It's not limited time not limited in geography really troubling. But you also troubled by another thing I mean you know the iconic onic It's a picture of Dj Kiss and Times Square here. We have a combination of in August fourteenth. Nineteen forty five. Th there ought to be a day where those who have served in war that you declare that the war is over and then you celebrate them odd. These people the only way I I get asked sometimes service families. Look when is this going to end. Is it ever come up. Yes yes yes. He told US something like one in three people in his State of Virginia are connected to the military so he does get that question a lot and the truth is we all WanNa vj day we need it in so seven days after that Senate Armed Services Committee hearing President Obama. It is a great honour gave a speech to return to the national all Defense University. We seem to say basically. It's time this war like all wars must end. That's what history advisors met is why I intend to engage Congress about the existing authorization to use military force or basically announces that he would like to get rid of those sixty words. And in this war. But Common Sense tells you that these are Different kinds of enemy not a state or government they just they make war in a different way senator McCain has a great line he goes look. We're in an age of warfare where the war isn't GonNa end with the signing of a peace treaty on the deck of destroy. That's not how it happens these days. There's no clear start and ending and yet the president he wants wants to end the war says Benda's every war has come to an end. He sees himself as a person who came in to a country fighting two wars hours and he brought them all to an end. I think he wants to have done that. But how how do you how do you do that. How do you end a war when the vast amount the people that you are calling the enemy has stopped fighting so what he does? America cannot in the May speech and it's extremely clever and and by the way it's really well lawyer D- is. He announces a set of rules. Going forward for drone strikes America does not take strikes to punish rush individuals. We Act Against Harris who pose a continuing an imminent threat to the American people that he's only US drone strikes. When there's an imminent throwback Iraq? It's well understood by people who understand this kind of stuff that in the constitution and also international law. The president is allowed to act unilaterally laterally in self defense when there is an imminent threat. Meaning it's urgent and you can't feasibly capture. That person. Ben Fears fears that what President Obama was doing there by stressing that word an imminent threat to the American people is that he was laying a new foundation. You saying when the AF ends and I wanted to end I do have another way of justifying all these things maybe they wouldn't change so the drone strikes rates would would continue as long as you have patience enough understanding of what the word imminent means. You might be able to continue a whole lot of this stuff. And then you don't have to go to Congress at all and you can say you've ended the war and the human rights groups will cheer cheer for you and we're going to mysteriously find that there are a whole lot of imminent threats for free. Thank do you worry much everybody. God bless you. God bless the United States and in the context of what happened to the sixty words. You do have to wonder what's going to happen to a word like imminent and all the while. According to Ben Witness and pretty much everyone we spoke with. We haven't really answered the big questions. When do we want to attack the enemy? Who is the enemy and if we're going to be fighting them even even when we're not technically at war with them? Then what's The difference between Warren Peace let's why this whole subject. Traffic is so unsettling if you don't know the common sense anymore when you're at war and when you're at peace in how do you. How are you write rules? Okay so we going to cut in here. We produce that episode in April of Twenty Fourteen and as I mentioned at the top of the episode. This the reason this came to mind for us now. The reason we decided to we released this podcast is what happened four days ago A. US drone strike killed the head of Iran's could force General Qasim money. He was at the Baghdad. International Airport the assassination. If you WANNA call it that people debate whether you should call it. That seems pretty clear to me. That's what it was that has set off a chain of events that we have no idea where it's GonNa lead but it did raise a basic question for us which is how is the United States government. Just find this is this in a UMF F. type situation or has that been phased out and are we seeing what Benjamin witness was worrying about more than five years ago that it's some kind of imminent threat type justification just raised a lot of questions for us and so the hello. How're you doing? Hey we got Benjamin witness back on the line to give us us his take. He is a senior editor at the Brookings Institution editor in chief at the blog l'affaire. He had a bit of a cold The first thing that he told us is is that even though Obama President Obama pledged to get rid of the A. O.. Math in that clip that we played in the episode. It's still very much here very much in effect it. It is still doing a lot of work. It was the basis for the Anti Isis campaign or one of the bases for the Anti Isis campaign. It it remains the basis for a variety of overseas counterterrorism operations. It remains the legal basis for a a whole lot of detention operations including Guantanamo Bay. It is also the case that we have started to confront front a variety of issues in which the even the endlessly stretchy and elastic. Ah You F- Does Not obviously get you to one of them for example is Iranian backed militias in In Iraq These are not in any sense associated forces of al Qaeda and so What the trump administration restriction has done? He says and by the way they were not the first to do this. They've taken that stretchy. A Oh math from two thousand one. And they've added things to it to make it even stretch here namely they have begun to call upon this whole collection of loose unidentified fight powers that the constitution gives a president in order to protect the United States. According to The Wall Street Journal the Pentagon was careful not ought to say imminent in its statement about the killing Sumani. What did they say if not that? Let me pull the statement because I think the statement is interesting and worth parsing statement so okay okay. So it is a three paragraph statement. The first paragraph reads at the direction of the president of the US military has taken decisive defensive action to protect US personnel abroad. Killing Qassem Soleimani the head of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps could it's force a US designated foreign terrorist organization so the key words there are decisive defensive action to protect U S personnel. SANAL abroad right. And so that is invoking The idea of preemptive self defense rate we we believe he was going to attack U S forces or personnel abroad. So we took action to neutralize. Literal is that threat. The second paragraph General Soleimani was actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region Sulamani and his coulds force were responsible for the deaths of hundreds of American and coalition service service members and the wounding thousands more. So there you have situating the current threat claim against a past asked pattern and practice of a robust series of attacks that in fact killed a lot of people then the next sentence is he. The at ORCA orchestrated attacks on coalition basis in Iraq over the last several months including the attack on December twenty seventh culminating in the death and wounding being of additional American and Iraqi Personnel General Soleimani also approved the attacks on the US embassy in Baghdad. That took place this week. So now we're talking about contemporary activity all of which sounds although it never really says it outright that there was some kind of imminent knit threat that needed to be dealt with but then the statement throws you a curve ball because the last paragraph reads. This strike was aimed at deterring future Iranian attack plans. The United States will continue to take all necessary action to protect our people and interests wherever they are in the world now deterrence is not a imminent threat issue right the And so the implication there is we're trying to send them a message and that is a very different theory and so I I don't actually know how to read the totality of that statement. It seems to say it invokes in is suggestive of imminence without saying union. It suggests that the fundamental theory is a force protection theory and then it also shifts gears and talks about deterrence deterrence which strikes me as sounding in a completely different set of values and so I found the statement pretty confusing to be honest. It sounds like a sort of the legal version of a choose your own adventure in a way. That's exactly right so it's a little bit of choose your own adventure but it's also perhaps more importantly certaintly it's we need all the adventures in order to because if you just rely on the self defense troop defense thing. Then the question becomes will water the troops troops even doing their rate. You need the UMF's to get the troops there in the first place while so what you what you were worried about back in two thousand fourteen about like this drift would happen where the am math would get stretched. But then also things would get layered onto it to where it's impossible to know the borders anymore who's our actual enemy and who isn't and what even is war in this context. Yeah that's exactly right. And this is not a trump thing it started in the Bush administration it accelerated in the Obama Administration and it continues news now on the executive hordes war powers on the other hand. Congress deserves a great deal of the blame. Here members individual members and senator. Tim Kaine deserves a real shout out. Here have tried to assert a kind of principle limits on on allowing this drift to take place but the actual posture. Institutionally of Congress is. It doesn't push back against these theories is it doesn't clarify the law and that constitutes acceptance of these statutes that are meant for very different purposes. Mrs Being Understood as authorising These activities that they're kind of Jerry rigged to support and the Sulamani case is a really good example. Ample this is kind of crazy expansion of what I had thought. The parameters of our legal fight eight against terrorism looked like and to have it done on donald trump temper tantrum without a sort of meaningful congressional involvement involvement strikes me as as democratically baffling to mm-hmm we expect things will likely change pretty rapidly. And we'll do our best to update this episode sued has as they do you and it's huge thanks this hour to buzzfeed and to their reporter Gregory Johnson Checkout Gregory's piece where we started with we will link to it from radio JIO LAB DOT Org. It's on Buzzfeed as well. It's called sixty words and he war without and the untold story of most dangerous sentence in the US history. That is title all right. They're also thanks to the Great Dylan Keefe original music and Glenn Coachee for music from his album adventure land and oh also thank you to Beth fertig and the WNYC beyond my see archives at the top of the hour this hour was produced by Kelsey paget and Matthew guilty and myself objective abroad. I'm Robert Krulwich which we'll see you next time you can play the Nessie to press two daughters message. Why it's John Bellenger? Donald quarter calling. I'm about up to read to you the text of your credit. Hi this is Dan Lightman And I'm going to read the credits As I've been asked to radio lab is produced by WNYC and distributed by NPR radio lab is produced by Jad Adam Rats are staff includes Allen Horn Soren Wheeler Tim Howard Renna feral polly webster. Melissa O'Donnell Dylan Keefe Jamie York Lynn. Levy and emails and Kelsey Patchett with help from Ariane wack Matt guilty Simon Adler and Chris nell store special. Thanks to Bruce Kane. 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The legacy of the war on drugs

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

27:15 min | 1 year ago

The legacy of the war on drugs

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. Ambra NYU stern are you prepared? To excel in today's data driven business world. Gained core business plus analytic savvy with the new online MS quantitative management from NYU stern this innovative online degree offers work life balance to learners everywhere. Learn more at stern dot EDU dot NYU slash business. Ready that stern dot NYU dot EDU slash business. Ready? Let's see we have global uncertainty about Brexit and the European economy. The radicalization of terrorists on social media and a raging opioid epidemic with only some and insight. I think we can all agree. What the Friday from American public media? This is marketplace. In oakland's. I'm Ali would filling in for Cairo doll. It is Friday March twenty second thanks for being here as it happens KYW is off to London to report on what's going on with Brexit's, which we should note is highly uncertain in terms of when or how it might happen. In fact, if we had a theme for today, it's uncertainty between Brexit and the global economy some flashing red lights for our economy news that President Trump personally reversed some treasury department sanctions on North Korea that were put into place yesterday. Let's see what we can do with this in the weekly wrap. Neil Richardson is an investment strategist over at Edward Jones. Genus Mialich covers the economy for Bloomberg. They're both inter New York studio. Hey there. Hi, molly. Hey, molly. Neela? We talk a lot about the politics and the process of Brexit. But I wonder are we underestimating the economic effect. Right now, we haven't seen the messy nece that is Brexit that's ongoing saga of political negotiations actually affect directly either US equities or international equities. But that uncertainty has weighed on market sentiment overall. And so what I think you'll see is this continued postpone because the the likelihood the outcome of a hard Brexit where Britain leaves the EU without a deal in place on trade or how people move around the union would actually affect economic growth directly slowing growth across the euro zone. I don't think anyone in part parliament our policy makers in the EU want that outcome. And so what I think you'll see more postpone Gina we had weak economic data from the EU on top of this Brexit uncertainty, and I did read that it's already costing the UK a billion dollars a week. And then we've got the feds caution about the US economy. This dreaded. Yield curve inversion, which will talk about an minute. But what is the big picture looking like are we close to recession? I think that's an excellent question. And it is highly dependent on what Connie you're talking about. Certainly if you look at some of the data coming out of Europe, especially if you look at places like Italy, we are seeing some some pretty nasty numbers that manufacturing print. We saw this morning that you referenced was was looking bad. It was definitely in contractionary territory. I think the question about the US economy is whether it follows the rest of the pack or whether it can hold its head above water for now, we are seeing some strong numbers some weak numbers. It's really been a mixed bag, and it's hard to get a read this early. But I think definitely a lot of reasons for caution out there. That I want to ask do, you agree with Neela that you think back to Brexit that it'll keep getting kicked down the road that they'll just be this kind of slow dribble of never actually happens. It absolutely. Looks to be that way. You know, we got this extension from the EU this week that really set up for I think an extension down the road and potentially a much longer one because they basically have the option to take the deal that's on the table, a hard Brexit or of much longer extension. It seems like that third option is going to be the most likely out of those alternatives. They could just give up and stay in the U which. On the table as well. It I feel like that is starting to be on the table. How much do you think? How how real do you think that looks? I think it'll become increasingly more likely as time whereas on, but you know, uncertainty has been part of markets, your as you alluded to we've seen it across Europe here in the United States. What's remarkable is that stocks have climbed without a lot of volatility. So this is what's abnormal about this market is not uncertainty. It's the lack volatility in the market. And we're starting to see a little bit of that pickup today. Yeah. With. Yeah. Go ahead. Sorry. What's been interesting is how much these markets are moving really on what the Federal Reserve is saying rather than on this underlying data and uncertainty that we're seeing it's going to be interesting to see if that persist. I'm so glad you brought up the fed because the other piece of news today, of course, is president. Trump nominating Stephen Moore to serve on the federal Federal Reserve Board. I'll start with you Neela. What do we think about this? You know of all the pieces of news coming from the feds this week. This one was a surprise in a different way less to do with the actual movements and signaling of the slowdown but more to do with the future of the fed itself. The future feted independence because Stephen Moore has been a critic of the fed one thing I'll just note as having spent some time as a as a graduate student at the fed of how democratic that decision making process is and how varying views are valued as inputs to ultimate decisions. So while there may be a critic that joins the fed. I don't think it starts stops this deliberate. The process making monetary policy. And then maybe about twenty seconds. She know what do you think it's going to be a really interesting thing to watch. Because even more has historically been a critic of the fed has in the past called for fast rate hikes. Now is calling for slower rate hikes seems to have gyrated with the political cycle. And as you were saying, I really think that this is going to be an important thing to watch. Because if you see any kind of politicization that's really dangerous for the central Bank. Oh, no. We didn't get to the yield curve inversion. Oh, well, thanks so much to the two of you. Thank you one hundred dollars still, I guess I do daily Richardson is an investment strategist at Edward Jones. Genus? My covers the economy for Bloomberg on Wall Street today. I mean, I already told you right? What the Friday. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. Continuing our little conversation about the fed here. This signals this week that we shouldn't see any more interest rate increases. This year are good news for spring homebuyers mortgage rates are dropping fast just in time for the spring home buying season. That does make it a buyer's market, but don't worry sellers. Good news for you to new numbers out today from the national association of realtors sales of existing homes rose nearly twelve percent last month. Marketplace's Amy Scott reports Scott Ingles v made an offer on a Tudor style. House near Kansas City just this morning, and he says interest rates were a big factor. Great gone up. We would probably be continuing to rent. But after reaching almost five percent back in November. The average rate on a thirty year fixed is back down to four point two eight actually prequalified just below four. Lower rates are one reason. Existing home sales picked up last month after months of declines Daryl Fairweather chief economist at Redfin. Says. Spring is shaping up to be a pretty good time to buy. We are seeing an art customer data. That homebuyers are having a much easier time they are getting their offers accepted more quickly. And they also are having to go on fewer home tours before actually landing that dream home. They wanted for sellers. It's a different story. Nancy Mackin, Ernie put her house in Aberdeen Maryland on the market back in December two price cuts later. She's now hoping to just break, even I'm trying to be hopeful. But we're at like ninety seven days on the market, and that hurt shut Bernie bowel mall is with the economic outlook group a consulting firm. He says there's still a lot depressing demand. Fewer people are having babies and forming new households millennials are burdened with student loans. So one month change is not a reason to uncork any champagne bottle. But you know, what is a good reason not long after we talked Scott Ingles. V in Kansas found out his offer had been accepted. Id for about sixty thousand dollars less than the original asking price. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. When a terrorist killed at least fifty Muslim worshippers in Christ's church. New Zealand last week his emailed manifesto us all the lingo of radical far, right communities on social media and social media. Researchers have warned for years that extremist content online is radicalizing young people. And that social media algorithms are making the problem worse by leading even casual browsers to increasingly offensive conspiracy theories or racist, or sexist content. Google Facebook and Twitter have all said, basically, fixing the problem is really hard and they're working on it. Beca. Lewis is a research affiliate at the nonprofit institute, data and society. She studies extremism online Becca welcome to the show. Thanks so much for having me what is this incident? And the shooter's manifesto tell us about what we should be looking for in online communities where people are being radicalized by this very same language foreign community online have for several years now been using humor specific. Typically as a recruitment tool, in fact, a really popular Neo Nazi website a couple of years ago, it style guide got leaked and the founder of that website explicitly wrote that humor is a recruitment tool because it gives the far right extremist plausible deniability about their extremist beliefs. It must make it harder for platforms right to sort of scan for this content. It's it's one thing it's very, very obvious terrorist content. But it this big foreign extremists have become really savvy at knowing exactly how to stay within the lines of phrasing things in ways that obscure the violence behind their ideology. Can you give us an example of what those sort of dodges might look like, yes. So there's a couple that were really popular during the lead up to the twenty sixteen US presidential election. One of them was the OK hand. Symbol the idea. Was they were trying to troll journalists into saying that this was a white nationalist hand symbol. And the idea was that it wasn't actually white nationalist hands, JIMBO. But it was something that allowed them to have it both ways where they had plausible deniability, but still we're drawing people into the fold through it. So I mean, what do we do we you know, how to businesses and society combat this? So I don't pretend to have all of the answers. But I think the first step is for the platforms to treat this as the theory is issue that it is. There was a time when ISIS videos, an ISIS, content and propaganda was proliferating on all of these platforms. And they actually have been quite successful tampering down on that content and making it far less accessible and far less of a problem platforms really need to prioritize and give resources to white supremacists. Content as an issue. You and how to handle with handle that and Grappo with that? Yeah. I mean, you know, you use the example of ISIS content, which seems to have been pretty effectively combated without damaging the business model of these companies, right? Like, should we buy the argument that the business model will inevitably lead to this type of content? No matter what. Well, the attention economy can be really great, you know, when you're driving content based on clicks and views, but I also don't think it's particularly conducive to messy. Longer term democratic engagement. It's really designed to get people to have an emotional reaction to a story and click on it. And so I don't know how we grapple with that. Because a lot of these puff worms. That's the business model that they're based on. And I think that it's time to have some some really tough conversations about the unintended consequences and start to think about how to temper some of the negative consequences. Becca Lewis is a research affiliate at the nonprofit institute data and society Becca, thanks so much for the time. Thanks so much for having me. On my show. Marketplace tech, we talked to two other experts this week about online radicalization how social media platform should deal with it. And what can move people from online trolling to violence in the real world. You can find that whole series at marketplace dot ORG. Coming up. I get to a point where I just can't go to the desk anymore. Sometimes doing what you don't like can lead to something you do. But first, let's do the numbers. There. They are the Dow Jones industrial average last four hundred and sixty points more than one and three quarters percent to close at twenty five thousand five hundred two the NASDAQ dropped one hundred ninety six points to and a half percent to finish at seventy six forty two and the s&p five hundred declined fifty four points one and eight tenths percent to end at twenty eight hundred four the week the Dow lost one and a third percent. The NASDAQ shed six tenths percent the S and P fill more than three quarters percent. Nevertheless, Pinterest wants in the company filed for its IPO today under the listing pins on the new York Stock Exchange bonds rose the yield on the tenure Tino dropped to two point four three percent. And you're listening to marketplace. Hello, it's Molly would here. And you have got to check out. This week's episode of make me smart. We are talking about the hot hot mess that is Brexit. There is still no deal in place for a clean separation with Europe. So if the EU and the UK can't come up with ingredient in the neck. Three weeks. What does that mean if no deal Brexit happens? It's a fundamental failure. In the way that politics is working in Europe. And if it can fail in Europe it can fail anyway. And that's a potent message for people all around the world to consume make me smart subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. This is marketplace, I'm Ali would we are in the US in the midst of the deadliest drug crisis. This country has ever seen. I'm talking about opioids the third season marketplace's podcast called the uncertain. Our helps put this crisis in context and also gives us a window into how it might end. The season starts back in time a little bit. When president George H W Bush ramped up funding that launched the war on crack. Take a listen as the uncertain hours host Chrissy Clark takes us back to September night thirty years ago to a single moment that turbocharged our country's so called war on drugs. If you happen to be watching TV on the evening of September fifth nineteen Eighty-nine flipping through the channels. You might have seen the image of the White House flashing across your screen from the Oval Office President George Bush addresses the nation, the image cuts to president George H W Bush the first President Bush. He's sitting at his desk. Blue suit red tie, white handkerchief peeking out of his left pocket. There's an awkward millisecond where he just stares at the camera. Like, he's not sure the broadcast has begun. Then he speaks. Good evening. This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important so threatening that it warranted talking directly with you. The American people it was Bush's very first televised address from the Oval Office since being elected president in one thousand nine hundred eight so a big deal. And there was one issue. He wanted to talk about drugs all of us agree that the gravest domestic threat facing our nation. Today is drugs mostly one drug cocaine, and in particular crap crack Bush says is America's most serious problem. It's sapping our strength as a nation as he talks. His hands are folded on his desk. He's looking straight into the camera and then seventy seven seconds in Bush. Does this thing he turns to his left reaches under his desk and pulls out this clear. Plastic bag full of white Chaki chunks. This. This is crack cocaine. Sees the few days ago by drug enforcement agents in a park just across the street from the White House could easily been here. So that park in front of the White House where the baggy of crack that Bush held up in his speech came from. It's called Lafayette Park. Needless to say there's a police presence because of where the park is. Michael Isikoff, walked through Lafayette Park. All the time back in nineteen eighty nine. He worked a few blocks away at the Washington Post. He was a reporter there any covered the president's speech about the baggy of crack. I was watching it on TV and reporting on it because I was drug report. Mike remembers watching the president hold up the baggie of crack that night and his first thought was that was a great prop a great way to get attention to try to show. This was a universal problem. This is something that's affecting all of us. It's even happening across the street from the White House. But then that list of reporter questions starts nagging on him. The who what when we're how in wise for Mike knowing what he knew about Lafayette Park, the constant police presence the tourists. He kept coming back to this question. How did that crack come to be there? The president says it had been. Seized in a park across the street from the White House. That's not a natural place where you would expect to see drug dealing, well, that's odd. And I wanted to know a lot more than the president was telling us that night, Mike started digging, and what he found was this a few days before the president's speech. Someone at the DA's field office in Washington DC got a call from the assistant to the head of the DA with a question. Do you have anything going on around the White House was the quote that was related to me the guy at the field office who got the call explained boulders and really a lot of crack dealing around the White House. He said there were plenty of other parts of DC where there was a lot of crack dealing going on the drug seemed to be flooding. The city's poorest neighborhoods at the time and the DA was setting up some undercover buys several blocks away. And what he got was. The possibility of you moving down to the White House. The president wants to show it could be bought anywhere. Mike Isakov says his source told him that the White House speechwriters had ridden this line into the president's speech and came up with the idea of using a bag of crack as a prop and could d oblige by doing a drug bust around the White House. They just assumed that oh DA must make these bus all the time. There must be crack dealing all over the place. Certainly, that's the way the story seemed to be playing at the time in the media. And you know, they came the small problem of how are we going to get the crack, and it was left up to the sort of underlings at DA to figure that out. What is going through your mind as you are hearing, these these pieces of the story. Wow. So this was all a setup. Is what I'm thinking? And in fact, it was. I know we're leaving your hanging. The details of that setup is a pretty wild tale. That says a lot about our country's approach to fighting drugs. And how it's still reverberates today. Take a listen to the new season of Christie's podcast the uncertain. Our subscribe wherever you listen to your podcasts. The analytics company Gallup track something called employee engagement that is the percentage of US workers who are enthusiastic about their jobs and last year that number tied a record high. Sounds like good news, right? Yeah. No. The number is thirty four percent. So that means two thirds of Americans are at best meth about work or do not like their jobs at all. And so that's a nice segue into the latest installment in our series, Maya Konami, which looks at how big picture economic ideas play out in real people's lives. Holly Butler is a writer in New York City who managed to channel her dissatisfaction with work into a creative pursuit. My name is Halima Butler written two novels, and they are both mostly about how much the narrator doesn't like working. Could you tell that there were air quotes around narrator? I graduated in two thousand eight from art school. I was very lucky not to have student loans. My mom's a professor and the college where she worked did tuition matching. So I didn't totally understand what it would feel like when I was thirty two and then thirty three and really had to think about money. My main concern was finding something that would be part time. So that I could keep writing and working on art and something that I could quit as soon as I wanted to quit it. I think I probably had about ten jobs in my twenties. I answered phones at an investment Bank. Got a job working at a video store handed out ID badges at conference Bredon shred an entire file rooms worth of HR papers. I worked at the mall downtown, Chicago and I- microwaved eggs for businessmen on their way to equinoxes. But I've never kept a job for more than a year. I get to a point where I just can't. I can't go to the desk anymore and something inside me is just like you have to go. You have to leave. This is like danger. I'm nervous that if writing novels becomes a job. I definitely going to start hating to write novels, but it is something I I like to do. I'm just not used to it. I mean, I'm I'm much more comfortable identifying as the person who microwaves eggs at the mall. Holly butlers latest novel. The new me is out now, and you can tell us about your economy at marketplace dot org. This final note before we go is a straight up unabashed chaser. Because I know it's been a day the global uncertainty. Yes. But now news that Robert Mueller has delivered his report on his inquiry into Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen election to attorney general William bar while I'm here to give you an alternative to refreshing your news tabs today. And that alternative is puppies. It's national puppy day. And if there is anything Twitter is good for its collecting, cute, doggy, pictures and stories including one about a monkey in India that adopted a homeless puppy and carries him everywhere. I'm not saying this isn't shameless. I'm just saying we need it. All right. We gotta go tough day for the markets. The Dow down four hundred and sixty points more than one in three quarters percent. The NASDAQ dropped one hundred and ninety six points and the s&p five hundred was down fifty four points or one and eight tenths percent. Aren't the music was composed by Liederman? Marketplace's executive pretty serious Nancy for golly. Our executive editor is Evelyn the Rubia. Deborah Clark is the senior vice president and general manager. And I'm only would we'll have everything you need to know about Brexit next week. So we'll see then have a good weekend. This is a PM. This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by the alliance for lifetime. Income annuities can offer a safeguard of protected monthly income for the rest of your life and provide security and peace of mind in retirement. The alliance for lifetime income is an organization dedicated to educating and raising awareness about how annuities can solve retirement income needs because income planning that includes protected monthly income solutions helps ensure you'll never outlive. Your money in retirement. Find out if making annuities a vital component of your portfolio is the right choice for you. Learn more at retire your risk dot org.

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Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

29:07 min | 5 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"This is an ABC podcast. Hi Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week. Listening to an ABC podcast discover more great ABC podcasts live radio and exclusives on the ABC listen APP.

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Americas Drug War, Revealed

Reveal

54:58 min | 1 year ago

Americas Drug War, Revealed

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So go ahead and take control of your wifi with xfinity X five. It's simple easy. Awesome. Go to xfinity dot com. Call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store to learn more xfinity internet required. Other restrictions apply. Support. For today's episode comes from Wells Fargo whose global operations are one hundred percent powered by renewable energy. They've also helped finance more than eight percent of the nation's solar and wind energy here in the nation's capital. Wells Fargo and nonprofit grid alternatives. Recently worked to install solar panels on the roofs of the park, Chester apartments. Helping nearly one hundred residents in the affordable housing complex save on energy costs. More at stories dot W, F dot com slash DC. From the center for investigative reporting in PR x this is revealed. I'm outlets. I was born in Plainfield New Jersey in the early seventies. And all my memories of where lived as this kind of utopia. Keep in mind, this is in the eyes of a kid, but it was just perfect a middle-class black neighborhood where I knew all of our neighbors. I got to play until the street lights came on and every weekend a bunch of kids came over and hung out in the basement because my dad had the only VHS player around the house. We lived in. It was a fixer upper my parents poured all their money, sweat and love into that home. And by the time, we moved to Florida in the eighties. My dad was so proud of that house. It hurts leave I didn't get back to jersey for visit till about four years later in the middle of the crack epidemic. And my little neighborhood was hit hard the streets. I used to play on they just look different. A lot of my friends had left in those who stayed told us that our old house had turned into a crack house boarded up diminished and dark. I will never forget the look in my dad's is like like he lost something. He'd never get back that day this season the podcast, the uncertain our for marketplace is looking back at that time at the crack epidemic and seeing how it connects to the opiate crisis America is dealing with today. The podcast begins by zeroing. In on this one seminal moment when the war on drugs, hit the streets of American cities with new fierceness left, our laws, our prisons and our neighborhoods change in ways. We're still dealing with right now today on reveal stories from the uncertain. Our here's the show's host, Christy Clark. If you happen to be watching TV on the evening of September fifth nineteen Eighty-nine flipping through the channels. You might have seen the image of the White House flashing across your screen live from the Oval Office President George Bush addresses the nation, the image cuts to president George H W Bush the first President Bush. He's sitting at his desk. Blue suit red tie, white handkerchief peeking out of his left pocket. Good evening. This is the first time since taking the oath of office that I felt an issue was so important so threatening it warranted. Talking directly with you. The American people. It was Bush's very first televised address from the Oval Office since being elected president in one thousand nine hundred eight and there was one issue. He wanted to talk about all of us agree that the gravest domestic threat facing our nation. Today is drugs mostly one drug cocaine, and in particular, crap crack Bush. Says is America's most serious problem. It's sapping our strength as a nation and then seventy seven seconds in. He turns to his left reaches under his desk and pulls out this clear. Plastic bag full of white chalky chunks. This this is crack cocaine. Sees the few days ago by drug enforcement agents in a park just across the street from the White House. There's a close up of the baggy you can just make out the word evidence printed on the top drugs or a real and terribly dangerous threat to our neighborhoods, our friends, and our families no-one amongst is out of harm's way. But the president said he was going to protect us from this threat with ambitious plans to transform the war on drugs. Take two new unprecedented heights. And it was all wrapped up in this one, dramatic prop. In fact, if you talk to people who happen to see the speech that night. That's the thing. They usually remember most us who never bag of crack. Crack somebody who's southern crack across the street from the White House for Don shots something about that. Just didn't sound right. You know, nothing is impossible when it comes to droves. When when you break it down, you really think about it, and they'll buy sales cracked in front of the White House and Don should know because back then across town. He was also selling crack not everything is in the White House and that new way downtown where they binds with. No, you know, so it was odd. So that park in front of the White House where the baggy of crack that Bush held up in his speech came from it's called Lafayette Park. And here we are. I went there recently. It's lovely a big green square. Lots of benches fountains. This park is not at all a place that seems conducive to crack dealing for one thing. There's a lot of tourists taking pictures holding cameras. It's be place. People go to take that Iconex shot of the White House. Here is a secret service agent who is getting his picture taken by tourists. Can we take our picture with you? The needless to say there's a police presence. Because of where the park is Michael Isikoff walked through Lafayette Park. All the time back in nineteen eighty nine. He worked a few blocks away at the Washington Post. He was a reporter there, and he covered the president's speech about the baggy of crack. I was watching it on TV and reporting on it because I was the drug reporter for Mike knowing what he knew about Lafayette Park, the constant police presence the tourists. He kept coming back to this question. How did that crack come to be there? That's not a natural place where you would expect to see drug dealing Mike started digging one of the first calls he made was to the US park. Police who patrolled Lafayette Park. He asked him. Have you had a lot of crack dealing in Lafayette Park. And the answer. I got was no. We don't consider that a problem area. There's too much activity going on there for drug dealers. There's always a uniform police presence there. In fact, the commander of criminal investigations told Mike there hadn't been any crack arrests in Lafayette Park, ever until this one that led to the crack that was in the president's speech, and that and that got my attention. So Mike starts calling his sources at DA. He talks to William McMullen, the assistant special agent in charge of the Washington DC field office who told me this remarkable story. And the story McMullan told him was this a few days before the president's speech McMullen had gotten a call from the executive assistant to the head of the DA who told him that the White House speechwriters had ridden this line into the president's speech and came up with the idea of using a bag of crack as a prop and could de oblige by doing a drug bust around the White House and McMullen says there isn't really a a lot of crack dealing around the White House McMullen explained there were plenty of other parts of DC where there was a lot of crack dealing going on the drugs seemed to be flooding. The city. Poorest neighborhoods at the time, and the DA was setting up some undercover buys several blocks away. And what he got was any possibility of you moving down to the White House. What is going through your mind as you are curious? These these pieces of the story. Wow. So this was all a setup is what I'm thinking. And in fact, it was. The details of the setup that Mike is a cough proceeded to dig up the intricate choreography involved. It was pretty bonkers an undercover DA agent reached out to an informant he'd been working with saying he was trying to set up a crack deal with someone in Lafayette Park. The informants suggested an acquaintance of his this kid a teenager who lived in another part of Washington northeast, Washington miles away from the White House. The kid got a call was told someone wanted to buy some crack from him and wanted to make the buy in Lafayette Park across from the White House. And the kid was like where the fuck is the White House. Make us a cough says William McMullen the DA agent. He spoke to sounded kind of proud of the links they'd gone to to get the kid to the White House. Quote, we had to manipulate him to get him down there. It wasn't easy. It was late September a couple of weeks after the president had delivered his speech that the Washington Post ran Mike is a coughs article exposing the back story of the baggy of crack. It was on the front page headline drug by setup for Bush speech DA lured seller to Lafayette Park from there. The media was all over this story of a president cut manufacturing reality through the strange story of a bag of crack, Mr Bush held up during his at a drug speech to the nation. Earlier this month, the sale was real, but the location was a fake Mr Bush's staff wanted to buy some. The day. The story came out President Bush was doing a press up at a family tree farm in Kennebunkport. Maine. He seemed to be blissfully unaware of the media blowback he was about to get. About the drug of the engineer for your profits. Without a beat President Bush answers. I think it was great because it sent a message to the United States it even across from the White House or sell they can sell drugs and gaggle of reporters jumps in the park. Police say there's usually no drug activity there. No problem with those folks, did you manipulate the American people into thinking there was a serious problem in front of the White House? Did you ask for the bag of crack for the speech? And Bush owns it. I said I'd like to have something from that vicinity to show that it can happen anywhere. Absolutely. And that's what that's what they told me it cost. A week after the story broke about the choreographed crack by in front of the White House. Comedian Dana Carvey was on the stage of Saturday Night Live with a parody of it. And the drug problem bigger than ever. This is cocaine crack, I'll tell you something this crack was bought right here in the White House. Three feet from this desk. This definitely was not the way it was supposed to go. You might wonder who came up with the idea of the president using a baggy of crack as a prop in the first place. Well, it was a speech writer named Mark Davis. We felt that it would bring it home to every American has been a tourist and walk by the White House to think that this is happening right here in your nation's capital. If it can happen there it can happen anywhere. But he says the plan was never to have the DA set up a special drug by near the White House. Just for the speech. He says the White House told the DA don't do anything special force. Do not do anything on our behalf. Take this out of inventory. Of course, that's not what happened. And when the story became public White House officials from that time tell me they were afraid it would undermine the whole message. They were trying to get across. And I want to spend a little time talking about that message. I want. To understand the full weight of it. Which means you need to understand. How America was thinking about drugs when President Bush gave that speech, it's very different from where we are today by September nineteen eighty nine it had been almost two decades since Richard Nixon, I declared a war on drugs. Public enemy number one in the United States is drug abuse. And yet despite Nixon's hawkish rhetoric the seventies were overall actually a pretty dovish time for federal drug policy. In fact, Nixon put more money into drug treatment than arresting drug dealers at the same time congress lowered federal penalties for drug trafficking. And Jimmy Carter talked about decriminalizing marijuana by the early nineteen eighties, though, the pendulum was swinging the other way the mood toward drugs is changing in this country. And the momentum is with us President Reagan relaunched the war on drugs while he was in office. We've taken down the surrender flag and run up. The battlefield. Leg and we're going to win the war on drugs. He was mostly focused on international cocaine cartels. Crack wasn't even mentioned in the national media until nineteen eighty-five but by the late eighties. The news was full of stories like these new drug crack, it's more than every five minutes. A baby is born in the United. Expose to crack a eight hours on street. It could be anybody's free. It was a scary time in the national poll that periodically asks Americans what they see as the most important problem facing the country by the spring of nineteen Eighty-nine. The top response was not dropped nothing economy and not the issue of fees, but drug abuse is the nation's leading overall concern right now. So when George H W Bush sat at his desk in the Oval Office in September of nineteen Eighty-nine to make his first live address to the nation. Drug seemed like an issue worth staking a claim building a reputation on. And so the point of his speech the big message. He was trying to convey to the country was that under his leadership the war on drugs, especially on crack was going to get even tougher than it had ever been co phone drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law, upper penalty up law enforcement and. Instilled new prison space differ bail for the drug kingpins the death penalty. I should point out. It wasn't just Republicans like Bush who were gung ho on the war on drugs back then by this moment in the eighties. Republicans and Democrats were in the middle of kind of arms race in the war on drugs. Each party wanted to be the toughest party a few years before in the run up to the midterm elections of nineteen eighty six. It was Democrats in congress white and black ones who spearheaded sweeping anti-drug legislation laws that established new mandatory minimum penalties for drugs. Major funding for prisons. Eric sterling was a democratic staffer for the US house of representatives at the time. He was involved in writing key parts of the anti-drug abuse act of nineteen eighty six intimately it came out of my word processor room to seven in the cannon house office building Eric says one of the things that prompted Democrats to draft the anti-drug law with the death of a basketball star name. Len bias had it all he had speed. His grace was acrobatic. It was drafted at this week by the champion, Boston, Celtics. He headed all until this morning when his heart gave out and he died. There are reports that traces of cocaine were found advisors system soon. News stories came out saying it wasn't just cocaine, but crack cocaine that had killed Len bias it turned out. Those new stories were wrong by us had used powder cocaine not crack, but Eric sterling says the crack rumors took hold and at all helped fuel the fear around drugs in general, and crack in particular in the nine years I worked for the congress. I'd never been involved in such a hasty half baked legislative process. This is when the notorious sentencing disparity between powder and crack cocaine got written into law and the racial disparities that came along with it since people convicted of crack cocaine offenses where most. Black while people who are busted for powder cocaine were mostly white. And if you've got caught with five grams of crack, a little more than a teaspoons worth it would get you the same sentence as getting caught with one hundred times that amount of powder cocaine in both cases the sentence would be five years in prison. Eric says the push to get a tough sounding Bill out the door was so rushed that in retrospect, he's actually embarrassed by the numbers and measurements. He helped congress come up with members of congress lake meadows are not particularly fluid in the metric system, if it says five grams, you know, let's as a Graham is that is a kilogram bigger than a milligram. Or you know, how many milligrams of you know, like doesn't matter. No sense. What is just what are these quantities? This was like Hong what yet? Okay. When Ben Dunn don't bother us with the details on running free election by the time the legislation pass. Past Eric says the process had left him with a growing sense of disgust pretty soon afterward. He left government started an organization focused on undoing the harsh war on drugs policies, he helped make but that was a lonely effort at first almost everyone was pushing in the same direction tougher stiffer harsher. The calculus of the time was that you could earn serious political points by reassuring the average American voter that you were protecting them from the terrifying threat of crack by holding up that baggy of crack. President Bush could whip up more fear in the public fear that he could then get credit for addressing no one among us is out of harm's way. But there was a problem with the bigger point Bush was trying to make here because by the time he gave his speech in September of nineteen nine. It was becoming clear that the crack problem was not that widespread, and it was not growing the idea that that it's a plague sweeping all sectors of society. This was never true. Craig Reiner men is a professor emeritus of sociology and legal studies at the university of California Santa Cruz, and one of the editors of the book crack in America, he told me in the eighties. There was very little evidence to suggest crack addiction was spreading to every corner of America. By nineteen thousand nine crack use had already peaked and was on the decline. The percentage of households survey respondents who reported using crack in the past year was just half of one percent for context in two thousand sixteen the percentage who reported abusing opioids in the past year was almost ten times that rate four point four percent Craig says compared to that half of one percent reporting. They used crack that was tiny very small vanishingly small percentage of the bup relation. And you know, the myths that wish read about it being instantly in an evidently addicting. They even at the time they knew that eighty plus percent closer to ninety percent of people who'd ever tried. It hadn't continued to use it and the people using crack weren't really everywhere people who smoked crack were more likely to be poor unemployed. Less educated. The rate of crack use among black Americans was three times the rate among whites. That's who crack. Was hurting the most not to say that there couldn't be some random kid from picket fence family gets caught up and all this that that happens, certainly but didn't spread to Westchester county as the New York Times confidently predicted it was doing it. Just didn't happen it it it's a drug and a high that appeals to those who have virtually nothing left to lose and not too many other people if you look at the aggregate statistics overwhelmingly, it's the most impoverished in vulnerable parts of the population. All this information was available by the time. Bush gave his baggy of crack speech. In fact, I looked through the Bush archives, and I found many of these statistics on crack use and how it was overall on the decline in the briefing memos that the National Institute on drug abuse gave the White House. So the White House had those memos as the president's speech writers were working on the speech where the president held up a baggie full of drugs and told Americans that crack was a growing menace. And a danger to everyone. In the end, congress gave President Bush what he wanted. And then some his administration went on to spend more on anti-drug efforts than Nixon Ford Carter and Reagan combined over two thirds of that money went to law enforcement. But whatever happened to that teenager who sold crack across the street from the White House. I could see my teammates huddled around and conversing about something. And I was like what's up? It's up. You heard about Keith Keith Jackson next on reveal from the center for investigative reporting. MPR ex. Today's episode of reveal is brought to you by losing earth. A recent history by Nathaniel rich a groundbreaking chronicle on climate change that Elizabeth kolbert calls an important contribution to the record of our heedless age by nineteen Seventy-nine. We knew nearly everything we understand today about climate change over the next decade. A handful of scientists politicians and strategists risked their careers in a desperate campaign to convince the world to act losing earth is their story and hours just published by m C more at Nathaniel rich dot com. Hey, hey, hey, it's time for another installment of AL's podcast picks for as long as anyone can remember criminal Justice in America has been one thing punishment. But the system is beginning to change can charged the new podcast miniseries from sleep magazine. New York Times reporter, Emily basil on traces, the lives of people who pass through gun court in Brooklyn, the court was designed to be speedy machine for harsh punishment. But along the way a new generation of activists in insiders began challenging the old system. But if you take apart America's punishment machine. What do you put in his place? Search for charged on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. From the center for investigative reporting. In r x this is reveal I'm L. Let's today we're bringing you stories from the podcast the uncertain now from our colleagues over at marketplace this season, they're looking at the war on drugs and how we got to where we are today in America drug laws have historically been about race. The very first one past was aimed at Chinese opium smokes and cocaine. It was legal until the early twentieth century records historian, Donna merch said that changed when it started to be associated with black men. You have this wild circulations of rumors about African American cocaine consumption that it made black men more violent Ezra marijuana. It was legal until the great depression when it was tied to Mexican immigrants. Earning. We'd when its roots in hell in the nineteen seventies freebasing was popular among white people. That's another way to smoke who came. But when black people started smoking crack cocaine politicians led by president George H W Bush went on the offensive tough on drug criminals much tougher than we are tougher federal law penalty up law enforcement sentenced to build new prisons space for twenty four thousand in Chrissy Clark, the host of the uncertain our tells us how that crackdown played out. We're take it. Right. You tell us what you want it on the grant fresh. No cameras news me. Group of old friends is leaning in arms intertwined posing for a picture. This is an unofficial many high school reunion, a little backyard cookout. A handful of people are here. Former students and teachers from spin garn high school a public school in the northeast part of Washington DC, it's been closed for a few years now. But it was a titan at school when most of the people at this mini reunion pass through its halls in the late eighties and early nineties. Oh, yeah. Most of them were at spin guard right around the time that a student a senior an eighteen year old named Keith Jackson just didn't show up for class one day. David mcgruder was a junior getting ready for basketball practice when he hurts. Something happened. I could see my teammates huddled around and conversing about something. And I was like what's up what's up? They say you heard about Keith Keith Jackson. David was close to Keith's, brother. He'd always liked kief. So as ears perked up immediately thought the worst unfortunate. Where speeds his demise? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So somewhat a pessimist, but his teammates were like, no, no, no. He's not. He's not did. He was caught over Lafayette Park. You know, the president did this drug sale. Yeah. That drug sale. By all accounts. Keith was a quiet guy. People. I talked to remember him as a fiddler of pencils. A lover of basketball, usually wearing a sweatsuit his mom worked two jobs for office cleaning companies his dad was out of the picture. He lived mostly with his grandparents he was known to be sweet unassuming, low key. And then one day on September twenty six nine hundred eighty nine Keith Jackson disappeared from school, and he never came back. The government class. Everyone was like Keith got arrested. He so drugs from the White House Kerry bridges was in the same grade as kief it's been guard. They'd been in school together since junior high. She says when she and her classmates heard the news about Keefe. Why would he do that? Not. Why would he sell drugs curious says that was actually pretty common at their school? But the bigger question for Kerry and a lot of kids at the time was why would he sell drugs in front of the White House in downtown Washington DC fancy and for the most part white DC miles away from where any of them live that was the location. We were like you idiot. Like come on, dude. Like. And why because that's not where normal transactions when tape plays like. And I wasn't a a drug dealer by any stretch of the imagination. But I'm like, I don't think I knew anyone who would. Do that in that location? The spin garden student body, it was almost entirely black. Most kids lived in neighborhoods where the poverty rate was double or triple the national average these were places unlike the blocks around the White House, where crack really did seem to leave. No one out of harm's way, in one way, or another my mother at the time was on drugs, which is why carry lived with her grandmother. One of Carey's uncles struggled with drugs to one of my favorite uncles. He had from when I was told smoked so much crack he passed away behind the wheel of the car. We were surrounded by just the usage the selling. You saw it pretty consistently. Here's David mcgruder, again, Keith friend who played on the spin garden basketball team. You would see someone wanting to do. Crazy intense labor for miniscule payment. And you knew what it was. They just wanna hit, you know, and some very salacious things would take place that were a mind boggling to us is kids. Very very R rated hardcore R rated stuff. But I mean, you saw sexual things you you heard of sexual propositions. At the time. A lot of people believed crack was causing decay in neighborhoods like the one David and Keith lived in the Bush administration released a policy brief the same day. He gave his speech that said, quote, crack is responsible for the fact that vast patches of the American urban landscape are rapidly deteriorating. But historian, Don emerge says the drugs were getting the blame for economic problems that were already there the nineteen eighties is a period when you have serious recessions that are suffered in the cities social welfare programs for being cut a new simultaneously had the loss of manufacturing jobs. It was just a really really devastating time. It was in that setting that crack came on the scene in neighborhoods like Keith Jackson's essentially, a cocaine marketing innovation prepackaged in a cheap easy to use form with a quicker more powerful. Hi, it's an smokable form versus snorting powder cocaine. Making was something that was familiar to people so becomes an easier drug to consume initially these rocks were twenty five dollars, and then they drop to fifteen than ten and even five so it was a way to market a product to a lower income population and lower income people have a much higher risk of drug abuse in addiction when wealthier people research shows that recreational drug use cuts across all classes. But if you look at frequent hard core drug use it's more likely among people who live in places with high unemployment rates, lower wages, more deindustrialization or income inequality. That's true now with the opioid epidemic. And it was true back in the nineteen eighties with crack so people are suffering real economic displacement and divestment and that that in turn creates the conditions for drug use. When you talk to former students at Keith Jackson's highschool, spin garn students who went there around the time. He did in the late. Eighties. The shadow of crack is never far away in their stories. Not just the using. But the selling. At the mini high school reunion. I went to everyone. I talked to who grew up alongside Keith Jackson told me about people. They knew who sold crack. Don shots went to spin garden in the late eighties at the same time as kief he explained that the demand for crack was high in their neighborhoods economic opportunities were scarce. And so the appeal of selling was hard to resist. You know, man soldier myself. You know, we have some, you know, the fad they do making money fast money by clothes and caused. It wasn't nothing to get involved with rose when he's around with you all day every day. I talked to another guy who sold crack in the eighties as a kid Reginald Murray. He's from the other side of the country in Los Angeles. When Reginald was a teenager, an older guy from the neighborhood said he'd pay him up to five hundred dollars a week to stand on a corner and sell crack to customers Reginald did the math, and it was exhilarating. His mom was getting seven hundred dollars a month to raise a family of four five hundred dollars a week. Just for me. Compare way, I could pay we can get back on clean up my wardrobe. So it just seemed like a plastic, but Reginald says from there the calculations would get blurry. Mill what you're doing is bad the kind of bothers you. But then you look at you know, what's being generated from it in kind of on Pama minds light bills with groceries in abundance groceries. Now, you know, it's not when you get close in the month frigerator like own bear status. So all these things are changing. And you know, if someone's wrong when it, but the which are looking at is. So, you know, right and crack cocaine made that possible. But when people got caught selling crack, the criminal Justice system would drop the hammer on them. The war on drugs was never really the war on drugs. It was the war on us that part of the story next on reveal from the center for investigative reporting in PR ex. From the center for investigative reporting in PR X. This is reveal I'm L. Let's today we're bringing you stories from the war on crack from the podcast, the uncertain our at marketplace, the teenager who sold the crack in front of the White House keeps Jackson went on trial in December of nineteen eighty nine. I've never forgotten tracing. Thompson was a reporter for the Washington Post who covered the trial that was almost thirty years ago. But she says she still thinks about Keefe I wonder what happened to him. I think about what a farce that trial was and how unfair that whole situation was the host of the uncertain. Our Chrissy Clark picks up the story from here. In the end Keith Jackson, did not get convicted for the crack sale in front of the White House of the jury did convict kief of selling crack three other times to undercover agents in the months leading up to the White House deal. Two of the charges were for Celine. At least five grams of crack a little more than a teaspoons worth the third was for selling. At least fifty grams of crack about three and a half tablespoons Keith had. No prior criminal record, Tracy says watching Keith during the trial. He looked like a scared kid. He looked like a scared kid. But the judge didn't have much choice when it came time to sentence kief. The federal mandatory minimum sentencing laws that Republicans and Democrats in congress had passed a few years before in nineteen Eighty-six. They set up strict formulas for how much time kief would get based on the amounts of cranky soul. His sentence came out to ten years in prison. When the judge handed down the sentence. He told Keith he seemed like a nice young man who'd been out of control for a period of time. He also told Keith he thought a ten year sentence was too harsh. He apologized to him. And he told him I don't have any discretion here. This is what the law says I have to do the judge actually suggested that Keith make a personal appeal to President Bush. He used you in the sense of making a big drug speech. The judge said, but he's a decent, man. Maybe he can find a way to reduce at least some of that sentence. There's no record anything came of the judges suggestion the only public comment Bush ever made about the teenager, the DA lured to the park in front of the White House to buy crack for his speech was back at that tree farm in Maine, right after he'd given a speech, and he said this was busted in front of the White House. And I cannot feel sorry for him. I'm sorry. They ought not to be heaven insidious drugs. Ruin the children this much. And I don't care where it is. I'm glad that that the EA and everybody else's going after him with renewed vigor. When Bush was pressed further he said, I don't understand does. Someone have some advocates here for this drug guy. Tracy. Thompson says the day Keith was sentenced later on. I heard that when they put him back in the holding cell that he just completely lost it, and he was crying and hysterical and threw himself on the floor of the cell, and they were worried he was going to hurt himself, and they eventually had to come in and put him in a straitjacket. Keeps arrest his trial his sentencing, they got national media attention because of the crazy circumstances that happen to surround Keith's case, the bizarre story behind Bush's baggy of crack speech the setup, but what might be more important about. Keith Jackson story are the ordinary parts a young man of color for a poor neighborhood was convicted of a nonviolent low level drug offence. He was put in prison for a long time. He was put there because of things like mandatory minimums and zero tolerance policy towards drugs that focused on law enforcement. Here's some numbers to consider since nineteen eighty six when congress established mandatory minimum sentences for drugs. The number of people in federal prison has almost quadrupled. I should point out that federal prison is just a small slice of the overall US prison population. But when it comes to federal. Prison nearly half of all inmates are in for drug crimes and about seventy five percent of them are black or Hispanic the most common drug charges in federal prison. These days are for low level sales and a report from a few years ago by the US department of Justice found that in two thousand twelve the majority of people who were in federal prison for crack like Keith Jackson got at least ten years in prison. Tracy Thompson says covering the federal courts thirty years ago during Keith Jackson's trial when these even tougher on drugs policies had only recently been put in place, you could just start to see the shape of things to come at that time. They were just funneling a million of these things through the federal courts, you weren't hearing about these cases in terms of. Here's somebody who got caught with a little bitty bag of crack, you know, something the size of your left molar. They went to. Prison for ten years. And if we keep this up we're gonna put a generation of young black men in prison. Keith Jackson was released from prison in nineteen ninety eight. I spent months trying to reach him to see what's happened since I tried old numbers. I sent him letters eventually did talk to some of his family found out. He has a job in an office. But that was about it. And then keep called me one night to say he didn't want to be interviewed. He wants to move on with his life understandable. But there are so many Keith Jackson's out there or I should say in there. So many young men of color charged with low level drug sales and put behind bars for a very long time. Guys, just by his. Oh crisis. Emerson poll. Lord. We thank you for the state for the scattering. This mini reunion of spin on family and friends Lord. Now, we ask that, you bless his food at the mini reunion of students and teachers of spin garn high school where keep Jackson went people bowed their heads and said grace before they dug into the potluck everyone. I talked to over the Turkey, burgers and deviled eggs had a story about how zero tolerance drug policies and mandatory minimum sentences had affected them one form. It takes is in the people that are missing from their reunions and many reunions, keep Jackson and lots of others. It was Sipa cool to see someone. In our neighborhood. And then the next week. You're like, hey, what happened such insight? That's David mcgruder again keep Jackson's classmate on the basketball team. He says when someone disappeared. Odds were good they'd gotten to prison. A study of police records in DC from the late eighties showed that about twenty percent of young black men in the district ages eighteen to twenty two had been charged with drug crime Kerry bridges remembers that suddenly people were getting serious prison time for those crimes. Like, where's this coming from? Carey says when she found out her classmate Keith Jackson had gotten ten years in prison. She felt like he was a scapegoat in the war on drugs. Poor ki-. He was still a kid, and you pretty much want his life. Was it worth it? Was it worth it? The war on drugs was never really a war on drugs. It was the war on us. That's LeRoy Lewis. He taught government in journalism when keep Jackson was a student at spin garden high school. That's how many people felt doing the push speech and touring his little trauma with the bag of crack. And even with a direct of keeps Jackson. It was just a betrayal, and it was just a signal lookout. We're coming after you coming in your communities, and we're going to just decimate you. The first time I talked to LeRoy, I mentioned that I was also going to be talking to some of the men who'd worked in the Bush administration who'd worked on the baggy of crack speech that Keith Jackson indirectly got caught up in. In fact, I was going to be talking to one of them later that day just wondering is there anything you'd like me to ask him on you on your behalf? Maybe you should ask how fair did. He think that that situation was to keep Jackson and to all of them other young people that were directly affected negatively by the consequences of what the president didn't sit. I put that question to Bush speechwriter Mark Davis. He's the guy who came up with the idea of using the baggy of crack as a prop. I was talking actually to a former teacher of Keith Jackson's. He was angry with with you with with the speech writers who sort of began all of this. And he said, you know, you guys were part of the problem. And he wanted to ask you how fair do you think that situation was to someone like Keith Jackson one? I don't think it was fair at all. And it wasn't the situation to the speech writers envisioned. But I do agree. We we've do have to quit doing what we're doing. We've done it for three decades now, and it's not working, but other people from the Bush administration see it differently. Edward McNally worked on the baggy of crack speech to he says. Yes, mandatory minimums lead to unfair sentences for some people, but he made this analogy between the war on drugs and other kinds of wars. I don't think there's been a war yet where we've been able to avoid any Americans dying from friendly fire. So it's a really tragic unacceptable and unwelcome reality. I don't think collateral damage is acceptable. But maybe unavoidable sounds like you're saying that may be a reality as well. But if Keith Jackson and potentially hundreds of thousands of others became as at McNally called it collateral damage caught by friendly fire and the war on drugs. At also wanted to make sure to point out in his mind. It wasn't all in vain. He reminded me of how bad things were when crack was at its height destroyed whole communities. It was block after block and whole neighborhoods taken over by corrupt crack gangs, a lot of those realities have changed Ed told me, and he credits the kinds of tough on drug crimes policies that came out of the Bush administration. He worked for there are many key elements of the so-called war on drugs that were successful in bringing about that result. Things have gotten better when it comes to crack and the violence that surrounded it, but the real question right is whether the war on drugs, the steep sentences the tougher punishments. Whether that was what made things better turns out. There's no good evidence showing that it did. There's no evidence to take away. Good. There's no evidence. Peter Reuter is an economist and a professor of criminology at the university of Maryland. And he explained to me law enforcement has basically two main goals when it comes to drugs. One is about morality punishing people for doing things that we as a society, see as bad, but the other goal of law enforcement, Peter says is much more practical and economic and of all comes back to thinking about markets for drugs like any other kind of market that is ruled by the forces of supply and demand law enforcement. Peter says an effort to constrict supply constrict the supply of drugs to make drug prices go up because more expensive drugs should simply reduce demand. If the probability of getting arrested going to prison goes up, then in the standard economic model. They'll be some people who will decide not to sell drugs at the current price. Because the compensation they get is not worth that additional risk that made lead to an increase in price and in its simplest form, this model seems to work just outlying any given drug does likely reduce its supply an increase its price. But Peter says as much as he loves the supply and demand theories that drive this model, there's just not evidence to show that in the real world stiffer and stiffer law enforcement or sentencing makes much more of a dent in reducing the drug supply or increasing the price. I have used this model over a very long career at I would very much like it. If there was some evidence that it was correct. In fact, what is striking is how little evidence there is for it. And in fact, there's some very striking evidence against this model the drug policy. Researchers have been banging their heads against for the last few years. Namely that if you look at the eighties and nineties when the war on drugs was ramping up and dealers were more likely to get locked up. The price of crack was falling more intense law enforcement did not seem to deter people from selling or using drugs. Heater has a lot of theories about why that might be for one drug sellers, a very poorly informed about the census they face or as Don shots. The spin garn grad who used to sell drugs put it to me, you know, they don't climb. You don't look at. I might get a lot of times. I still Iraq's. He wasn't looking at you know, 'cause there's always like everybody think they ain't nobody get caught. Ain't nobody won't study the law and say, okay, okay. I'm look up these crimes see how much it Curry's. If I if I do this. Nobody does that you know. So if tougher and tougher laws don't work. What does I asked Peter Reuter that question? Well. Going to sound as pedestrian as a public health person. I believe that we can by expanding and improving treatment substantially reduce the demand full the drugs that causes the most problem heroin, cocaine methamphetamine, young treatment, even not very good treatment, which is the treatment. This generally available makes a difference, and we can manage this problem, which is all we ever do with social problems, we can manage this problem better by focusing on the demand side. It occurred to me that this is pretty much what Kerry Bridget's Keith Jackson's classmate whose family struggled with crack has been thinking all her life about how to handle drug, epidemics. My focus was never to be on the people that are selling drugs. It was the focus should have been on the people that were using. Because if there's no demand is no needs to supply. So it was always more. We need to do whatever we need to do to get people off of drugs and carry says for people like her mom and her uncle there weren't many options. There wasn't any. We're gonna sing you away to rehab, and you can go to California and stay at this luxury place with teach you how to meditate in. No, they didn't have that. She compares that to the way she hears people talk about the opioid crisis. Now, they're addictive in his disease. We need to get them some ill. Okay. We didn't need to get them into help years ago. Okay. I was just wondering. So as a black woman, it'd be states like what were you doing twenty thirty years ago when it was it was a problem, then, but it wasn't a problem because they couldn't identify. It wasn't until it stretched over different demographics different socioeconomic class. And then it became a problem. But it's always been a problem. So like right now, we're like, oh that's been a problem. Like, you're new to this. We're not. Helping drug users rather than locking up small-time dealers. These are lessons about how to deal with the drug epidemic that someone like Carrie bridges has come to know in her bones after she watched so many of repairs her friends and family turn into the collateral damage of the war on drugs their conclusions that drug researchers like Peter Reuter have come to after studying the data for over thirty years. But it's still worth asking. Whether we as a country have really learned anything from the war on crack. What's changed? And what hasn't as we deal with a new drug epidemic. The biggest one we've ever faced. We wanna think Christy Clark and the whole team at the uncertain. Our for marketplace for bringing us today show the series goes on to tackle the question, if stiffer law enforcement doesn't work why do drug epidemics end you can hear about that. And what it means for the opioid epidemic while the uncertain our latest season just dropped. Today's show was produced by Chrissy Clark and Caitlyn s along with associate producer Peter Ballantine Rosen. We had help from Lyra Smith production assistant, any Reese and digital producer, Tony Wagner, Catherine winter edited the show, especially thanks to marketplace's Nancy for golly to target in the evas and Deborah Clark. Our production manager is the G Amini mixing and sound design from Jake Gorski with an assist from reveal sound design team. Jay, breezy, Mr. Jim, Briggs. And fernando. My men you'll Rueda are CEO's Chris Schaumburg. Matt Thompson is our editor. And chief our executive producer is Kevin Sullivan. Our theme music is camaraderie might me. Support for veal's provided by the raven David Logan foundation. The John D and Catherine T MacArthur foundation. The Jonathan Logan family foundation. The Ford Foundation, the housing Simon's foundation and the ethics and excellence. In journalism foundation reveal is a co production of the center for investigative reporting and PR X amount. Let's and remember there is always more to the story. Ex-?

Keith Keith Jackson White House George H W Bush crack cocaine president cocaine congress America White House basketball Don shots Lafayette Park Bush United States Washington Post reporter Chrissy Clark President Bush
From Bushs Iraqi Liberation In 2003 To The Chaos Of Trumps Iraqi Sanctions Today..

Rusted Culture Podcast

35:45 min | 11 months ago

From Bushs Iraqi Liberation In 2003 To The Chaos Of Trumps Iraqi Sanctions Today..

"Welcome back to the rest of the culture podcast. Everybody I'm frank ever sold in heavy ever had the feeling folks that maybe we're we're on the road come on inside job. I've got this nagging feeling that we're on the road to nowhere folks you know. Have you ever heard this one. This one say and I'm sure you have at something is rotten rotten the state of Denmark. Of course it's a famous line from Shakespeare's hamlet but folks. There's something rotten in the White House right now. It's it's rotten. We're GONNA talk about it seriously through something. That's not right just to today a day between today and yesterday Iraq's parliament the first thing that triggered this thing off this thought pattern that I've got the first thing that triggered this was that Iraq's parliament on Sunday voted to expel. US troops from Iraq following the assassination of Major General Sulejmani in in a drone strike. As we all know the second thing that happened. That was a little bit unusual was US Marine in Corps Brigadier General William Sealy who is in fact the commanding general of US Task Force. Iraq wrote a letter to the Iraqi prime minister that basically read Sir indifference to the sovereignty of the Republic of Iraq in ads requested by the Iraqi parliament in the prime minister the US will be repositioning forces over the course of the coming days and weeks to prepare for onward movement. Basically what he's saying there is that we will it'll be preparing to withdraw from Iraq and this is the. This is the brigadier general of Iraq Iraq. That saying this this is the man that is in control of US forces in Iraq that saying this and then the third point then from the White House Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Mark Milley. Kelly said yesterday that the letter was a draft. It was never supposed to be released. It was a draft and at the same time yesterday we had defense secretary Mark Asper also said on Monday that there's been no decision for the US to leave Iraq folks. There's something rotten in the white. How about this first of all a brigadier general in control of U. S. forces in Iraq doesn't make mistakes? No he he does is not make mistakes in a what. I think that we're seeing here is basically the implosion of the US policy in Iraq brought on by president trump. Trump's whizbang decision. Listen to assassinate a top Iraqi. Her excuse mayor ran. General has left the US at huge risk in the region. Basically that that quick decision to take that general out has loved the US the US at a huge risk in the region and Brigadier General. seely was simply acknowledging that scenario in a way he was acknowledging the impulsiveness of Donald Trump they chaos of the White House has put our troops in that region in harm's way with one simple action. No the letter didn't state that it is a hunch but that's the feeling feeling that I'm getting from this in Juneau folks our presence as you well know our presence in Iraq began in two thousand and three at a US led coalition. Were then President George Bush in UK. Prime Minister Tony. Blair stated together that the coalition's aim was to disarm Iraq of weapons of mass destruction to end Saddam Saddam Hussein's support for terrorism and to free the the Iraqi people now contrast that if you will contrast that statement from two thousand three to today where the Iraqi parliament voted on Sunday day as a sovereign country to voted as a sovereign country to have the US leave Iraq. That is monumental monumental folks that that is monumental. That is a failed policy. The basically was culminated in one act by Donald Trump that through everything America has done in Iraq for the past seventeen years into chaos that litter by Brigadier General seely to leave Iraq. Iraq wasn't a mistake. It was an admission to a failed Iraq policy accentuated by Donald Trump's killing of general Israel. Sulejmani now Sola money as we know he was no angel but as one leaves another takes place I suspect folks that if trump had asked Brigadier General Marsili what he would do it would not have been to assassinate Sulamani at that point if if it all just tonight. Donald Trump is drafting sanctions against Iraq after publicly threatening threatening the country with economic penalties if it proceeds to expel U. S. troops sanctions. So what an unusual situation in here. We stand America from George Bush saying back in two thousand three that he wanted to liberate liberate the Iraqi people to today president trump promising to hit Iraq with heavy sanctions. What in the hell is going on my friends? This is what chaos looks like this. This is the face of chaos and quite honestly I fear for America in the leadership that we have at this point. But what can we be thankful for in. I've said this again in the past what we can be thankful for is that the president doesn't have a full run of the political table label in that. The House is out of his control. Does not control the House and given given the current cult of trump status that that some lawmakers like Lindsey Graham Senator Lindsey Graham where literally trump can do no wrong in in times like these where we have some real questions as to why trump is making the decisions he is making that genuinely are increasing. The overall terror were threat to Americans both here and abroad given these questions along with the ones that many of us have had for years about about his temperament an overall handle on reality given all of that. I'm happy that Donald Trump doesn't have the house of Representatives in the palm of his hands like he has the Senate sitting in the palm of his hand. Because of this folks because the house is not in the control of Donald Trump trump. We can expect the house to continue to be the voice of reason and it's one heck of an argument here for not giving Donald Trump unbridled control so folks. Let's look back a little bit. Here's what happened this week. Back in nineteen forty-three our president. At the time Franklin Delano Roosevelt was meeting with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill it Casablanca in Morocco to work on the World War Two ending strategy. If you will. They met on January fourteen and through the twenty third in nineteen forty three at the conclusion of that conference. Roosevelt and Churchill held a joint news conference during in which Roosevelt announced that peace would come only by the total elimination of German and Japanese war power in other words. The unconditional surrender of Germany Italy and Japan. The fact is folks and let. Let's let's let history be our guide. It's easy to start a war but it's hell to end war and it wasn't until August six six of nineteen forty-five when then president Harry S Truman. Drop the first atomic bomb that basically ended World War Two and you know there is a time for war but given the way the situation with Iran has escalated as I discussed in my last podcast. Do you really think that now. Is that time. Aim for the war that we should have with. Iran is now the time in. Here's something else that happened during this early January timeframe back on January first of nineteen forty two twenty six countries met with resolve in signed the declaration of the United Nations in Washington. DC EH affirming opposition to the access powers and confirming that no single nation would make separate peace. You see back then folks folks. There was a clearly defined united. We nations stand together in divided we nations fall together. That was the approach that they had to facing the big issues of the day at that time. World War Two. So where is our administration's outreach like that today. Where is the consensus that he's forming with other countries and I don't mean on the the general strike of Sulejmani but where's the consensus in the approach? That was so important to us in the years during during World War Two and since World War Two that we would form a consensus before taking action in we would have a unified approach. Where's that outreach? Today instead of working with our allies on issues like Iran trump is taking an isolationist approach in its dangerous. It's a dangerous approach. In fact Donald Trump according to the New York Times who spoke with senior Administration Chretien officials over the course of twenty eighteen donald trump privately said he wanted to withdraw from NATO. So here we are folks with an isolationist deletion EST president dangerous isolationist policy in no channels of communication or diplomacy open between Iran Iran and Iraq. Or excuse me between Iran Today there's basically nothing but tweets that they can and look at if you can call that a diplomatic channel in anybody who may have pushed back back on some of the impulse of nature that Donald Trump Pat. I'm talking about Gary Cohn by General Kelly General Mattis. They're all gone. They're gone and there's nobody but yes men around the president today. We are we in the state of affairs where diplomatically the only channel that we have. I've is the president's twitter twitter feed and we know how volatile and combustible and vitriol that can be. We should all be concerned. We should all be expressing. Concern to your elected senator or congressman or congresswoman. Don't sit back folks. Make your voice heard. After all these elected officials they don't work for Donald Trump. They worked for you Democrat Democrat and Republican in while you're pressuring your legislators in Washington to open diplomatic ties perhaps stress. What you think should be done in Iraq and maybe a more cautious approach? You can add this to the mix Senator Chuck Schumer said there's a decent chance and he just said this a couple of days ago that four Republican senators will join with Democrats making this impeachment trial a fair process us. And you've heard me talk about this on previous podcast. If fifty one senators make a motion to compel witnesses and demand documents it will happen and just today John. Bolton former trump national security advisor said he is willing to testify given a subpoena. So why would anyone want the Senate to do do anything other than to hear that testimony whether you're a Democrat Republican infant. Anything else in the middle. We did not elect these people to hold anything but a fair impeachment process in. I think it was just yesterday yesterday. Senator Lindsey Graham suggested changing the Senate rules so that the Senate could hold the constitutionally mandated trial without the articles of impeachment from Nancy. Pelosi changed the rules so they could make this trial. Just go away without any witnesses or documents is being brought forth and keep in mind folks. The only reason why more documents and witnesses weren't called in the house was because Donald Donald trump just simply wouldn't allow him to testify and he wouldn't allow the documents to be tendered to the House of Representatives so if Donald Trump doesn't have to follow the loss of this nation. You could ask yourself. Why should anyone else follow the laws of this nation? And that's a problem. Obviously so stay right there folks. We're going to kind of go into some other news. He's here. We've got some interesting stuff to talk about. So hang right in there seat say folks. That's actually a good rendition of the talking heads song from way way back many of you will live that but this is is by a band called the school. School is cool which is a Dutch ban and They record this way back in two thousand twelve and I'm not sure what happened to the ban and since then but actually a pretty good lead singer if I do say so myself. So here's the interesting thing about this A he remember. Congressman Duncan Hunter of California. Don't you Duncan Hunter remember him. He was in the news and the he's the news again. Actually this to San Diego Tribune. You'll recall that Duncan Hunter. Hunter Congressman Hunter was indicted died back in August of twenty eighteen on on sixty federal charges that he stole two hundred fifty thousand dollars of campaign money and he used it for family vacations nations groceries extramarital affairs. Of course why not and other non campaign issues are uses dating back to at least two thousand and ten two hundred fifty thousand dollars. It's quite a good chunk of money. Well according to the San Diego Tribune Duncan Hunter will likely receive his taxpayer-funded congressional pension despite guilty plea. Doesn't that just make your day so last month according to this article. Representative Duncan Hunter pled guilty to felony conspiracy for converting campaign funds funds for personal use. But that doesn't mean taxpayers will be off the hook for supporting the congressman after he retires. Duncan Hunter Republican. Who was sworn sworn into office on January third? Two thousand nine has garnered at least eleven years of service that counts toward the congressional portion of his pension meaning. He'll still likely likely received thousands of dollars. Retirement benefits related to that service in addition to benefits from prior military service and even to this day quite comically Representative Hunter remains in Congress. Although he said he would step down shortly after the holidays. Okay okay. We're waiting. He is two percent. He's going to be sentenced on march seventeen and based on formulas outlined in a paper released by the research service earlier earlier this year. It's estimated that hunter who has forty-three would receive an annual payment of at least thirty two thousand five hundred thirty eight dollars due due to his congressional pension which she can begin accessing when he turns sixty two. And I quote Oh to I do not have any information to provide regarding congressman hunters personal finances including the status of his retirement pension said Michael Harrison who spokesman for Hunter Legal and policy experts interviewed by the Union Tribune said Hunter will most likely keep his tax fare pundit pension even though he violated pleaded the public's trust in folks just so you know no members of Congress have been stripped of their retirement benefits due to a conviction. Isn't that kind of interesting. That means they were all angels. They've never done anything wrong. And unfortunately I have to say that. The wrongdoing actually is on both sides. Democrats eight Republicans and the San Diego Tribune list former representative corrine Brown. Who was a Florida? Florida Democrat convicted on eighteen of twenty two corruption charges including mail fraud and filing a false federal tax return in two thousand seventeen is still collecting being pension benefits from prison. God just slide under the under the bars I'll I'll take those checks under the bar please. And as as a another formula former Pennsylvania Representative Presentative Checkup Fata who escapes my memory but was convicted on twenty three counts of racketeering fraud and other corruption charges way back in twenty sixteen gene. And let's not forget former San Diego Representative Randy Duke Cunningham a seventy eight year old Republican. Who was convicted on federal charges of tax evasion and conspiracy conspiracy to commit bribery mail fraud and wire fraud all the way back in? Two thousand five is also still eligible. or He's currently receiving his congressional pension today and according to this article legal and policy experts said that hundred unlikely to be the first member of Congress to his convers- congressional retirement benefits stripped away because while conspiracy is among them one of the crimes that can cause allows lawmakers to lose their pension. The law only covers conspiracy to commit twenty nine specific types of acts in all of them relate to conduct has an office holder or involving federal government federal employees or public like property since hunters conspiracy. Crime was related to campaign finance activity. That is not one of the specified types of acts that qualifies for him losing his pension. He plead into a single felony but not one that is specifically included in the honest leadership up and open government act. According to Beth wrote Rodman. WHO's an attorney with the money and politics and ethics program director for Good Government Group Common? Cause well the fear not here folks. The guilty pleas on on Dunkin hunters behalf that he's putting in could still cost the hunters if their sentences include the maximum two hundred and fifty thousand dollar fine for example or if they did not declare his income tax returns one hundred fifty to two hundred thousand dollars. They've admitted to using personal expenses. And and if the IRS comes calling back to collect back taxes that might not be good either so you know it just never ends it does it. I mean Dunkin. Why is he still there i? It's just it's just unfathomable get rid of him For God's Sakes get him out of there I mean well folks you know just as a reminder that trump's tax cuts have have benefited some of the most fortunate in profitable companies out there. Here's one from A The story now. We're Chevron has made four and a half billion and twenty eighteen made four and a half billion so why did the irs give them a tax. It's refund again insensible. I mean you can't tell me that the system's not rigged. You can't tell me it's not stilted towards the wealthy you can't run a country on zero taxes and you can't run a country entry on a tax refund when companies made four and a half billion dollars so this report singled out Chevron for having benefited generously from the new tax code thank you Donald Trump despite a US pretax income a four and a half billion. which would mean nor a new corporate tax rate of nine hundred fifty four million or a mere hundred sixty two million of taxed on the average rate of other oil and gas corporations Chevron paid about a negative? You've negative one hundred eighty one million dollars in taxes. That means that the massive oil company can enjoy in luxuriate in a tax rebate from the irs of one hundred and eighty one million dollars. Can't tell me there's nothing wrong with that when it happens time and time again I I just I just don't get me started on this. The middle class is suffering and we all know it in companies like this continue prop at the top one percent continue to benefit. It's just It's just ludicrous. That article by the way came from other Jones an interesting read read about Chevron so folks we know that man these these fires in Australia are absolutely abysmal. I mean horrific horrific the loss of human life and the loss of the wildlife. It's just absolutely heartbreaking. But there is there is some good news out there in all of this tragedy and sometimes you have to look for it because let's face it you know. I read the news a lot. I'm sure you do too as you're listening to this. There's a lot that can depress you out there about the news. There's a hell of a lot of sadness out there. I mean sad stories are basically aplenty but in this tragedy. There's there's an interesting article about the Irwin family. Remember Steve Irwin the conservationists they have his his family has basically stepped in and they've already helped over ninety thousand animals. Here's how they're doing it. And according to this article I'll tell you that Bush fires in Australia isn't a phenomenon that's entirely heard of it says however the Twenty nineteen to twenty twenty Australian bushfire season. It's something the world has never seen before record breaking heat and drought lightning strikes arsenal. Lack of hazard reduction are the main causes of the enormous damage that the bushfires have inflicted so far with the fires still raging in. Its how long. It's it's hard to say how long the season that started back in August of twenty nineteen is going to last with the world's attention on this continent. People have been sending out aid as well as bringing attention to the ongoing problems. Well here's Bendy Irwin late late. Stephen Erwin's daughter. She went on social media to assure everyone that their family is safe and doing everything in their power to help the animals that are in need. The young conservationist posted an image on instagram together. With a caption explaining the situation. She says with so many devastating fires within Australia. My my heart breaks for the people and Wildlife Life who have lost so much. I wanted to let you know that we are safe. There are no fires nearest were conservation. Were near our conservation properties. She goes on to say that our wildlife hospital is busier than ever though having officially treated over ninety thousand animal patients. My parents dedicated Australia Zoo. Wildlife Hospital to my beautiful grandmother we will continue to honor her by by being wildlife warriors in saving as many lives as we can ninety thousand and it's just not them so many many people are pulling together in this disaster people out there doing good In whatever way they can maybe they don't have a lot of money to help in this disaster. Maybe you you don't have a lot of money but here's a story. Folks about the Animal Rescue Craft Guild. And you can find them on facebook. In fact it's called the animal rescue you craft guild and check that out but what they're doing is kind of interesting there. The headline here of the story says that Kuala Mittens Joey Pouches Australian wildfire spark global knitting frenzy. And this just came out today via Reuters in its stead in it. Basically says that knitting needles are clicking furiously around the world to create hundreds of protective pouches and blankets for native wildlife made homeless by Australian wildfires. Does that have raised. Large swaths of Bush land the Animal Rescue Craft Guild. Said on Monday that has been dealt with offers of help after putting Out A call for volunteers to make bad raps. Joy Pouches bird-nest possum boxes. Koala Mittens and other snugly homes for marsupials so donations. They say to the volunteer group have come in as far as the United States. Britain Hong Kong in France and Germany. It's been going crazy. Belinda or Alana. A founding member of the guild told Reuters the response has been amazing and some experts are estimating Put the number of animals including domestic pets and livestock killed his half a billion with potentially benchley hundreds of thousands of injured and displaced native wildlife. And I quote here. It's the poor little souls that survive. Where are we come in said Orelon? Our group creates and supplies items to rescue groups in cares around the country who take care for the Wildlife Orlando said the guild supplied thousands of rescue groups around the country and demand was growing heading. There was an urgent need for fabric donations. It's just absolutely amazing raising and somebody some good coming out of this and people pulling together and they talk about this one lady here at whose name is Larry McKay. She's a new volunteer who lives in New Zealand has just made her first makeshift joy pouch which she enlisted her cat to test down at home. I'm planning to make as many as possible on. I'm asking fabric outlets for fabric donations to so in over in Singapore. Somebody named Leslie. DOC was working on her fourth joy pouch meeting up with other volunteers to share materials and tips. I will knit as long as there's a need for the pouches and Just amazing story about something. Good coming from some of that devastation. That's there well. This next story actually goes down into Florida Florida police respond after a parrot cries. Let me out let me out. This took place pretty close to my old hometown hometown area in Lake Worth Beach Florida. I'm from West Palm Beach and This kind of caught my eye because it's You know there's some it it's it's not a zero crime zone. Let's face it so I mean when somebody's crying let me out. I mean my gosh. In this case it was a parrot but at least at least the Floridians are doing the right thing so when somebody in a Florida neighborhood heard chilling chilling cries and the words let me out. Let me out. They dialed nine. One one thank God little. Did they know the crowds were that of a forty year old parent forty years old come. I'm on that's getting up there After the call for Palm Beach County Sheriff's deputies pulled up and re question and a man who appeared to be repairing a car driveway. The Palm Beach Post reports. When the deputies explain their concerns the man smiled and then he told deputies he'd introduced do some to the perpetrator when he turned with the parrot? The deputies burst out laughing. The man told offers officers that he taught Rambo to scream cream. Let me out. When he was a kid Rambo lived in a cage Tom that when he was a kid? Can you imagine the parents forty years old. Well folks. This is an interesting cap to the PODCASTS. Here's a case of just plain dumber and dumbest and I read this and I just I just couldn't believe it. This is coming out today. it's coming to us by way of W. TV station wwl bt it Jackson Mississippi where two men were arrested after trying to cash in fake lottery tickets. Police said flow. Would police received a call from the Mississippi Lottery. Artery Corporation around nine twenty eight. Am Monday morning about two men trying to pay pass a fake lottery ticket and after speaking with officials officers I learned that the suspects presented a hundred thousand dollars winning lottery ticket that had been altered. How did they alter it? And of course they just simply glued the winning numbers on the ticket that matched the prize. I'm surprised they even got that. Right ticket was signed while they made sure to sign in it. Like you're supposed to on the back and then it was presented to the Commission for payment. So what do you think that. The commission thought when they saw this lottery ticket with the winning numbers pasted on it coming in like what the hell are they trying to pull. I mean these people are among US everyday folks these kind of folks. They've been at their inner. Were passing by the grocery stores or driving by you on the roads. I don't have to tell you this. These dimwit Sir. Out there you've been warned well this one There are two names were Otis Letham. He's forty seven and forty eight year old Russell sparks. Both of Columbus Mississippi had been charged with conspiracy to commit felony and uttering counterfeit hundred fit instrument over a thousand dollars lay them was also charged with false. I D information and the manner comfortably being held at the Rankin in county jail with no bond in her scheduled to appear court appear in court on Tuesday. He just can't make it up and this certainly would have made a good reality show. Wouldn't it folks. We could have had them Report to the courthouse. I could just see right now. We can have them report to the courthouse to claim their winnings right. Yeah we'll have a report to the courthouse to claim their winnings. Aim will have judge Judy. Eighty standing there smiling and waiting there with a big three foot. By five foot. Cardboard checks check it takes an smacks them with up and down saying what were you thinking you. It's what were you thinking my God. It doesn't get any worse than this. Well folks these stories just keep on coming and they kinda temper the political climate that we've got going on Something to kind of take our mind off of that for a little bit. I WanNa thank you for joining me again. And of course we're going to be watching the news and We'll look for you next time till then Inside no UH.

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Morning Joe 7/2/20

MSNBC Morning Joe

52:04 min | 5 months ago

Morning Joe 7/2/20

"I'm Nikki Boyer. The host of wonders new show the daily smile. Every day we share heartwarming stories that will make you smile like the episode with astronaut Katie Coleman on how one teachers advice changed her life, and how she hopes to inspire the next generation of space, travelers or the story about an eleven year old girl. WHO's kind? Thank you note to her. Local mailman sparked a national response from mail carriers far and wide. The daily smile is about how small moments can change your life for the better subscribe to the daily smile, an apple podcasts spotify or the wandry APP join one three plus in the wondering how to listen. Ad Free. Looks like by April. You know in theory when it gets a little warmer. Miraculously goes away. Hope that's true. He's going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle. IT WILL DISAPPEAR SITCOM Go Away. It's going to go away. This is going to go away and I think we're going to be very good with the coronavirus I think that. At some point that's going to sort of just disappear I hope you still believe so disappear Ado. Yeah sure. That last one from the president yesterday on the same day the US single day, Corona virus case record for the fifth time in the past eight days, good morning and welcome to morning Joe, it is Thursday July second along with Willie and me? We have White House reporter for the associated. Press Jonathan Lemere so new cases of Corona. Virus continued to skyrocket across the country. Country Setting a single day case record for the fifth time in the past eight days and this time topping fifty thousand new cases in a single day for the first time yesterday. That comes just a week after topping forty thousand for the first time among the states with the highest number of new cases California Texas Arizona. North, Carolina and Georgia all reported record daily totals. We're going to showing you in just a minute polls from these states, many of these states just a few months ago considered to be safe state Sir Donald Trump no longer. You'll also see some Senate races of Republican comments who are getting absolutely thrashed in the polls and the reason why. Well. There's so many reasons why. They continue to stand next to Donald Trump and support him even as he keeps talking about a virus magically going away while they're having spikes in their own states, president trump claims increased testing for the surge, but data show cases are also rising in places where testing has decreased at the end of February. When the US was investigating its first few cases, the president said the virus would quote disappear like a miracle. We're now at nearly two point. Seven million cases and more than one hundred, twenty nine thousand deaths, and the president is still saying the same thing. I think that at some point that's going to sort of just disappear. I hope you still believe so disappear or do. You just have to think that was months ago. Actually happened yesterday actually saw it yesterday and I asked wait was his back from February. Because again we're. We're setting new records every single day. And we heard him say it in January and February and March. It was one person going away. Fifteen people completely go away very soon said he was doing great I mean. Why don't we go through the list of just some of the things that he said on February tenth, he said this looks like by April. You know in theory when it gets a little warmer. It miraculously goes away on February twenty seventh. He said this is going to disappear one day. It's like a miracle. It will disappear March sixth quote. You have to be calm. Okay, you have to be calm. He said it'll go away. April twenty ninth. It's GonNa go away. This is going to go away. June fifteenth at some point. This stuff goes away and it's going away. June, seventeenth it's fading away is going to fade away June eighteenth, and it's dying out. The numbers are starting to get very good. And then yesterday as we just heard, he said. At some point that's going to sort of just disappear I hope with so Britain thirty thousand. Americans dead and more dine. And Willie! Fitz is just been an ongoing thing. We talked about it. In March, we would quote what he said. In January February and said he needed to wake up. He needed to get serious about this. He kept telling people who's going to magically go away. that. We had nothing to worry about one person coming in from China can go away fifteen people coming in pretty soon. That infection number will be down to zero, so we're doing really great job on it. But it continued as ten thousand died thirty thousand died. Fifty thousand died. We pass that threshold not so long ago. Where more people died? In the Vietnam War of REDAC- aid than died. From the coronavirus, which the president said he was going to go away. We're now at a point where. Twice as many people have died. Of this pandemic. which the president claimed was going to magically go away and was one person coming in from China. Than than died and the Vietnam. War, we had more people die. From the corona virus and died in combat deaths. In World War. One, world what we're talking to world wars, and the president still is saying. It's going away on June eighteenth. It's dying. This is again. This is. When historians look back. They're not going to have any question as to why. Donald Trump's poll numbers collapsed the way that they did. We kept saying a million times on this show. Take care of the health care crisis, and you'll take care of the economic crisis, and when you take care of the economic crisis, then you'll take care of your own political crisis, so it's in your best. Best interest in the country's best interest to do the right thing. He just hasn't been able to do it. His Year of magical thinking continues even continued yesterday with US breaking the record for the fifth time in eight days for the most infections with one hundred and thirty thousand Americans dead from this disease that he said would go away and not kill anybody. This is where we now the president of the White House. is having a devastating impact on the president's poll numbers on. Republicans poll numbers, and of course more importantly on American self. Yeah the only strategy the president has had over the last four months is to wish this away to wish away a pandemic by way of Miracle Will. That strategy hasn't worked very well and I thought the same thing as I listened to that yesterday I, thought boy. Is it July first and we're still wishing for a miracle and hoping this will go away we. We heard yesterday from white. House Press Secretary Kaley mcenaney. Who Said we are aware? There are some embers that need to be put out now that suggest that fire has been put out, and there are few embers left on the ground that they're just going to hose often, we'll move on well. Those embers are national record again for the fifth time in eight days. Of cases in this country. They're not embers, their hospitals being helmed, just because it's been put down somewhat in New York that doesn't mean that it's good in Houston or Los, Angeles or Miami, or in Tennessee or an Arizona or Georgia. North Carolina all these states. They're setting records. These are not embers. The fire is roaring in the state so. Miracles, we've said many many months ago and we can pull up the tape. We said the country just can't afford to listen to Donald Trump's hunches anymore. We need to listen to doctors who actually have a strategy. What the doctors told us this week? Dr Fao Chasing. We could be up to one hundred thousand cases a day. If we're not careful here if we don't mask if we don't take this seriously while the president showed again yesterday, Joe that he's not taking it seriously, he's still wishing for a miracle. Still still wishing for a miracle and We can we can go back I think. It was in April where the president was saying. This is going to be gone by fall. It's IT'S GONNA. Look nothing like this by fall in Dr. algae had to get up right after that he said no, we. We're going to have a second wave and it is going to come back in the fall and. Meka. What. We're experiencing right now. These record numbers of infections every day. This isn't a second way. This is still part of the first wave. The second way Dr Fauci said comes in the fall, but the president's wishful thinking again. I mean we can? We can look at June the first. It was a devastating day for the president politically. Devastating Day for a lot of lot of sycophants. Who followed him? In uniform. Some self corrected themselves. But but this is this is gutting his poll. Numbers Systems regarding his support and we saw it with with a spate of polls came out yesterday. Yeah, he's killing his campaign, and also Americans are dying. Due to his hunches, many would argue the example is to lead on this to push for social distancing and masks, but politically he's hurting. According to the latest, CNBC changed research poll Joe Biden President trump nationally by eight points forty nine to forty one percent biden also holds an advantage across six key battleground states up seven in Arizona fifty one to forty four. Up Five and Florida fifty to forty five up five in Michigan Forty, eight, forty, three up seven in North Carolina fifty one to forty, four up six and. Fifty to forty, four and up eight and Wisconsin fifty one to forty three, and just bringing in Joe Ronan virus numbers. Let's keep. Let's keep this up for a second, but bringing in corona virus numbers. There are a lot of folks on the local level. And in the national media watching the coronavirus numbers in states like Arizona where trump held super spreader events, and we're coming upon two weeks in the next week. also the big rally in Tulsa where he had six thousand people squash together. Those numbers are being watched by health officials because most doctors. Thought that was an extreme danger for the people that attended and you know Jonathan Will Mirror you. Look at these numbers I. Remember you telling me some time ago that the trump White House was already so concerned about Michigan that they were wondering whether they were going to have to just move on and go elsewhere. Let me give you three states numbers coming out of three states that. That, really underlying how devastating, this is. For for the President Right now and again I've put most of this back on his failed response to the pandemic and the continued wishful thinking but Arizona State that the trump campaign six months ago was confident. They had in the bag so confident that they bragged about winning New Mexico as well Donald. Trump down seven points to joe. Biden Arizona, those numbers. From everything I've heard. Those numbers are going to solidify. He is Arizona is slipping out of his hands. Just like Michigan North Carolina a state that Republicans in one every year, except for when Barack Obama won it in two thousand eight North Carolina. Plus seven in North Carolina. And wait till we show you. The Senate race in North Carolina to show you just how horrific things have gotten for Donald Trump's Republican party, and then the state, but if Tim Russet were still with us I suspect. You'd be talking about Wisconsin, Wisconsin, Wisconsin. But this one's. Getting further and further apart. We saw another Wisconsin poll last week that showed Joe Biden with a comfortable lead. This CNBC poll has Joe Biden plus eight. And I would ask you as I have been asking you for the past two weeks. How Donald Trump can turn things around? How he can take a new tack. On the pandemic, but we have him talking yesterday again about it magically going away. So Joe, the strategists from both parties and pollsters that I've been talking to in the last few days of all kind of combat with the same refrain looking at these polls the newest wave out today. That showed Joe. Biden up significantly in all the battleground states, and even bigger in the national polls, which of course means less, and the refrain sort of been. If if two thousand sixteen hadn't happened. We'd be thinking that Joe Biden was on his way for route. That everything is his direction. There doesn't seem to be any way. For President trump to reverse this slide. We're four months away now. We're not GONNA do that. Of course, we're going to put the asterix up. Early July we saw how things changed dramatically in the final months and weeks of the twenty, sixteen race Donald Trump has been proven to be resilient. Politician but he's an insignificant trouble I on the Biden camp. You're right. They feel they're being quiet about it, but they feel extraordinarily good about. Arizona, you mentioned that. They think that they're primed to take that The Republicans are playing the defensive, the president and his Super Pac. They've had to make ad buys states like Georgia. Ohio Oklahoma is coming. These are these are very defensive moves here. Because they're concerned about. He's just bleeding support basically across map for so long announces of this race stopped to tipping. Point States the states are decide. Who won this election Wisconsin in Arizona right now Joe Biden has a pretty significant lead in both the president and his team right now scrambling for answers. They thought with that Oklahoma rally a couple of weeks ago, followed by that impact event in Phoenix. They thought they can start to get back on the road start. Start, having rallies start having these political events that would drive up enthusiasm cater to the base trying to get dominate the headlines again. Those who faded away with the resurgence of the virus across the country there are no political events on the president's count right now and none set to be announced. This would have been. This was supposed to be a week where he was been talk of having banner to He's going to Mount Rushmore for Fourth of July event. But there are no rallies on the schedule and they're not sure how they can do one right now because they're. They're not sure they're going to get enough people out, nor they should have the optics of a political event while the print while the coronavirus is surging in so many states across the country I. Think Joe is a final point. We're also seeing this difference. We are seeing Republicans break with him on masks. The president and his interview yesterday did say that he was okay with Max even liked the way he looked in one of them. He compared himself the lone ranger, but yet he's still not wearing them in public until he sets that example, it remains to be seen. HOW SERIOUS THIS NEW PRO MASK! Strategy is new pro bass, talking point, but I think in the early months some Republicans, some of the supporters willing to forgive the handling of the pandemic that came from China. We did the best we could. No one could stop this dispute whether or not that's true, but that was the thought, but now this resurgence this not really second way for the second half of the first wave that comes after the president encouraged all these states to reopen sooner than they should. This is being put his feet in his feet squarely. When. We again I is Willie said. It's all on tape US said it a million times on this show. The only thing we were asking the president to do as he states reopened. The only thing we are asking the president to do the only thing we are asking governors to do the only thing Anthony Fauci was asking governors to do. Was To follow the White House's guidelines two weeks of declining infections before you reopen and then when they refuse to do that. We begged the the president. Would everybody masks? We talked about masks. We talked about our friends that had small businesses. And in the we wanted those small businesses to stay open, and they could do it by wearing masks, but then the president decided. Other Republicans decided. I can't believe what I read yesterday. He won't even say his name a Republican operative that has worked. On Mitt Romney's campaign and John McCain's campaign and the Bush campaign's Jabs campaign. was talking about. How I I won't even get into it. I don't WanNa I. DON'T WANNA. Even by basically saying that masks were superstitious that it was just. Like a member of a cult if you wore a mask this again. was yesterday and so this sort of talk. Maybe it was. Acceptable by Donald Trump supporters and those who leaned Republican. When most of the infections most of the hospitalizations, most of the deaths were New York City, but they're not now. They're in Arizona there in Texas there. In Florida, they are in California. They're they're in states though outside of New York City. That are hitting a lot closer to home for trump supporters, and they're having a big impact me cannot just on the president's numbers, but also the numbers of some of these key. Key Senate races that are going to termine whether Mitch Mitch. McConnell is the majority leader next year or nine. Yeah, IT'S THE CNBC change research poll which has a Democrat Gary Peters. A seven point advantage over Republican John James in Michigan in Arizona former astronaut mark. Kelly is up nine points against incumbent Republican Senator Martha mcsally, and in North Carolina Democrat Cal Cunningham leads incumbent Senator Thom Tillis by ten points. You Know Willie. Again. Let's just stick with North Carolina this is this is a swing state that Republicans usually win it is. It is not purple, yet more red. Then purple and yet the president down by seven Thom Tillis. WHO's been having troubling into the low thirties for years as far as approval, rating goes Thom Tillis, getting absolutely pounded, and that North Carolina race, a Republican also in big trouble in Colorado probably almost likely surely to lose the Colorado seat. Up in Montana of course. Steve Gullick probably the favorite to win that seat up there. You just go around the country and again. We're we're not talking about? The president said over the past nine months for the president, said yesterday, and yet with all of this happening. You Have Donald Trump talking about? The coronavirus pandemic, that's good, one hundred thirty thousand people magically going away still in July. Yeah, it's amazing I. Mean that Tillis. Number down double digits as an incumbent as a Republican in the state of North Carolina and you show Arizona, you talked about Colorado all these states where we're seeing that there's a reason the majority leader in the Senate Mitch McConnell for the last week, or so has very publicly begun to break with the President I on masks. We'll see if he goes further than that. In some of his policy questions about what? What the president is up to, but we haven't seen Republicans do that up until now and now in the last, let's call it a month or so. We've seen Senate. Republicans come out critical of the president breaking with the president on the way he's handling corona virus, raising questions about this Russia bounty story. It is clear to them that there are no coattails at this point for Donald Trump and when you look at even right track wrong track numbers. Seventy four percent of Americans seventy four percent of Americans in a new MONMOUTH poll yesterday believe the country's on the wrong track right track number is down in the teens, so these are smart politicians. They're good at putting their finger up. And knowing which way the wind blows they see what's happening to incumbents in states across the country. They know that Donald Trump is leading them down a path toward defeat. Eighteen percent is the number of the right track number and mom, this seventy four wrong track you can't win on those numbers plain and simple and Republicans know that, and it's showing up in these polls across these states. Let's bring in more now. Infectious Disease, physician and medical director at the Special Pathogens Unit at Boston University School of Medicine Dr He'd been Delia. She's an NBC News and MSNBC. Medical Contributor Dr. Delia, it's good to see you. We've been talking about the pandemic in the context of politics here, but let's get back to the public health questions. What are you seeing in all these record-breaking states right now? Willy We are hitting about fifty thousand cases. A day were hitting more cases per day air in the United States and some most countries had in entire pandemic so far we're heading into July fourth with part of the country. Thinking that pandemic is a hoax in what a uniquely American tragedy where we have the most public health resources, and we have one of the worst of responses to this pandemic What we're seeing is you know you asked me you don't i? Don't remember March thirty first you ask me on this show. What do I? Say to people who haven't seen this virus into their communities at where? Where it's only happening in New York and Massachusetts I said it's going to be a slow burn. We're going to see those in other states. It's going to slowly make it out to all these days and we're seeing that now. The trouble is no. The virus doesn't see red or blue states. What we need is a national strategy and the vice. President Biden on Tuesday presented his national plan. We. We got the hint of what a national strategy looks like in response to this pandemic, which is centralizing testing, because it is so important mandating mass nationally because Assam We've talked about how states are not able to keep up with his Cases, because there aren't enough contact tracing resources well, having a federally trained and hired contact tracing. Core can where they're needed. Those kind of strategies is how we get beyond this. We worked together because states are not independent. You know they're going to send us here. In Massachusetts Florida's GonNa. Send US their students in in August and we're going to send them. They're seniors in December. We're all connected and without that national strategy is going to work the other thing that I'm seeing the states really need to learn from each other's experiences. You know when Massachusetts stoller fattening in new. York lockdown immediately. Governor Santa Santa's needs to learn from Arizona's experienced. Arizona's going through a period of time where they're now. Looking at crisis standards of care which means that their healthcare systems are so overwhelmed that they're having to come up with Basically you know principles of what they would do if there are brown out of beds out of ventilators, run out of healthcare workers. And Florida's not taking that. Q. And shutting down the way that they should in advance of the July fourth weekend, and Willie. Exactly as you said, you know the the biggest thing that we've seen as a as a hampering element of this is that the president of the United States is not taking this pandemic seriously is not modeling the behavior that we need to to let his followers who still follow him. Say Red leaning of. America's still follows president, trump or coronavirus advice. If he followed public health advice, we could make a big impact on the spending. Doctor I do remember that conversation I remember the many we've had since then and it staggering and maddening to a lot of people that the exact same things you were saying on March thirty first. You're still having the say, on July, the second two days before the fourth of July that we need a national strategy that we don't have one, but when you listen to the president, say this is going to disappear yesterday when you hear the. The White House press secretary say these are just embers in these states. We'll put them out and we'll move on. It's clear that there's not going to be national strategy in that country can't afford to wait for it. So what should these individuals states doing right now? Should they shut down like many of them are doing rolling back there reopenings? What should southern California be doing? What should Miami be doing? What should Houston doing right now? Yeah you know I think? The states need to look at and plan for cases that will occur shoe weeks from now because this pandemic disease is is is bound for exponential growth. We're already seeing at a national numbers, and so they should clearly rollback close everywhere where people gather indoors. And can gather without mask and keep transmitting the disease as far as indoor dining, large indoor groups of any sort and it's just it's one of those things and the other is. The states need to revert to the federal government because they will need help in many of these days, I'm hearing that there's still personal protective equipment shortages, and maybe that's a distribution issue. Rather than actually the fact that there there isn't enough heat, the and mass. Where Federal Government can actually. Actually play a role The biggest thing is for politicians. In those days. We heard from Lieutenant Governor of Texas. The other day talked about the fact that he wouldn't listen to you anymore. We need the leadership in the states to listen to their scientists do not vilify their public health officials who, by the way have many of them have come under threat to have been you know, have been harassed were doing their jobs. DOT has to be the way forward. Talk to Padilla, wondering where are standing is in the world, as it pertains to corona virus cases and other countries that have been working on mitigation efforts, and is there any science and I'm really not asking you to comment on the President I'm just curious where this statement is coming from. Is there any science and he doctors out there that? Have a hypothesis or data that proves this goes away. Is does not go away on our schedule. It's not going to go in. In fact, the worry is in the fall. What the reason we're worried about a second wave in the fall here is I thrown virus season traditional coronavirus, Lucy's oath intersect in the fall together. We have a certain amount of people. We admit every year for influenza in hospitals. Now you're going to have an additional burden of front of ours cases which will overwhelm our healthcare systems even more. There is no evidence that that's not going to. To happen. We hope it won't be as big a burden. Maybe we've discovered treatments between now and then we certainly won't have a vaccine. Maybe we've turned the corner in stopping those naturally, our best strategy is to reduce the number of cases. We're seeing because the next thing that's GonNa happen is fall will come and as you know. Many states are opening colleges students from all over the country will merge into other states bringing back. You know some of this outbreak into states that we have seen their cases receipt. Doctrinal, he'd be Delia. Thank you very much once again for coming on the show this morning, and still ahead on morning, Joe. The president lashes out at New York City's plan to paint black lives, matter on Fifth Avenue, calling it quote a symbol of hate. Plus loose of the Financial Times on how the US could fail. It's democracy test. You're watching morning, Joe. We'll be right back. You Know Willie yesterday you asked mayor, De blase a lot of questions about New York City and the mayor volunteered that. Black lives. Matters out. On Fifth Avenue Right in front of trump tower, obviously it's. The mayor of Washington DC vows did the same thing in Washington DC. It was a dramatic sign of our times. The Lai circles for the LA. Times wrote this about again. We're talking about how the president can't turn the corner. And meet where the American people are. He talked about how president trump on Wednesday suggested that the painting of the words black lives matter on New York City's fifth. AVENUE WOULD BE A. Symbol of hate and then he complained that it would be denigrating to this luxury avenue. That came shortly after a threat by president trump to veto the Pentagon's budget legislation. If it included a measure to take the names of confederate generals off of military bases, which of course, he then blamed on Elizabeth. Pocahontas Warren of all people that came only hours after his declaration that he may end of federal housing regulation aimed at desegregating and neighborhoods. He's talking about going back to the early nineteen sixties because he said. He said that the desegregation of neighborhoods. had. A devastating impact on suburbs. What what exactly? Does the president mean by that and that came roughly a day. After he released video of supporters in an almost entirely white Florida retirement community, shouting white power. Lays this out. And a devastating time line over the past several days where the president makes one racially insensitive or someone say racist. After another and again we keep talking about it. He picks eighty twenty issues, but unlike Ronald Reagan he never sides eighty percent of the Americans he'd sides with the twenty percent of the Americans who still want to fight the civil war still want to fight for confederate soldiers, not even Mississippi is still fighting that fight. are talking about he's going. To try to re segregate neighborhoods and end desegregation in neighborhoods because it hurts suburbs it really. is staggering not just the blatant racism, but also of course just the political ineptitude that has everybody from Mitch McConnell and Thom Tillis to Lindsey Graham shaking their head going. How for down is this guy going to take us? The president's really digging in on the side of the confederacy all these years later it's staggering to watch. He's still tweeting about preserving the heritage of the country, and he's talking about statues of Robert e Lee. He's talking about half to be clear holding up military funding so that they won't change the name of a base named for Robert League. That's the hill. He wants to die on in terms of that funding, but to go back to your original point about his tweet yesterday. Clearly, he was watching our show. Because yeah, we asked Mayor de Blasio about that. And he said Yeah we're GONNA paint black lives matter on the street and the president tweeted. tweeted about it, calling it a symbol of hate, which gets at his fundamental misunderstanding of this movement of this moment in the country right from the beginning, which is to focus on the side of the small side of this movement that has been committed violence, and has been looting, and all. That's all the video and the and the talking points we've seen pushed out by the president, and not listening to the majority voice in that movement that says this country needs to change the there has to be fundamental change. He doesn't want to hear that. He thinks he's on the right side of the issue, but he's living in different time because as you say. Seventy five eighty percent of Americans believe that this movement is based on something important that it's based on something real that they need to be listened to in the country needs to change based on that. The president is stuck in cement, still tweeting about preserving. Tributes to the confederacy, while not listening to the black lives matter movement that is changing the country. Right before our eyes. Joining us now, US national editor at the Financial Times. Et loose. He's out this morning with a new piece entitled how America could flunk. It's democracy, test and ED. Some would say we already have but take us through your theory. Well this is based on them exercises I did with a group called the transition integrity project as a nonpartisan group that conducts. Much like the Pentagon basketball games, they do electoral campaigns and they had four scenarios for this November election. Three of which ended up in constitutional breakdown by January. Really the this was a equally divided between Republicans and Democrats I've participated in one of them, and it was extraordinary to see how it three out of four cases. President trump. Simply refusing to leave office at using the awesome power of his disposal to federalize the national, guard, for example, the bill by two contested states like Wisconsin Michigan so forth to stop recounts. The trump be prepared to use those amazing positives disposal America's quite unusual in that it gives another ten weeks of full power in office to the losing chief executive to losing chief executive. Power has would narrowly not been misused may think of the last two one time. President George Bush senior. In, nineteen, ninety-two Jimmy Carter in one, thousand, nine, hundred eighty. Men Who Asana fide fat play well now we got somebody very different. Now we've got somebody would be a sore loser. Would not be had to leave, and so I think the risks. Of Constitutional, breakdown in those circumstances very very real, and that also includes the situation that trump wins the electoral college on. You know a Larry Low China election where you know. Absentee balloting has been repressed and the krona virus is is rampant. But loses the popular vote. I say six seven million votes to Joe Biden. It would be very very hard. For the losing side the Democrats to accept a result like that, so this isn't just. This isn't just trump by tiny biden victory. It's Democrats. Saying that trump victory under under those circumstances. would be fundamentally illegitimate. Well You know. We have long believed. Conservatives I think that you hope for the best you plan for the worst. So, it's I these exercises are extraordinarily important. Just so Americans can go into the fall with their eyes. Wide Open. But that said I look back to June, the first and I say the response to the events of June the first I see especially about how military men. Made the mistake of stepping over the line in politics for a couple of minutes, and they were scalded by their. Peers and also by retired generals and retired admiral. The entire military! Establishment And I'm wondering if you look at what happened on June first and how quickly? These soldiers and Marines returned to being soldiers and Marines, instead of political players for Donald. Trump and Let me ask if that provides you any solace going into the fall. A dozen I think forewarned is for this project that it's a very important project. Set up by Rosa, Brooks, Georgetown and nails Gilman of the Bengal ruined institute. this project is not an exercise in prediction forecasting. It's it's taking us through exercises. What could happen so that we're better? Able to anticipate and prevent them from happening and no doubt the events of Ali G. Have I think a lesage. He founded the Pentagon. Through the dangers of what could happen in a muggy election. Results in November, but it is less stressing. You know if you look at the stains. The places like North Carolina Michigan. Pennsylvania Wisconsin all of them have split control. All of those states have Republican legislatures, and democratic governance, and therefore a very real potential with Bilbao's assistance to have competing slates with Mike Pence's president. Of the Senate accepting only one set aside vacations now in those circumstances, the Supreme Court is not going to want to get involved Actually the military is not want to get involved. And you have left to competing candidates, Bible and the president of the United States with none of the. misgivings compunctions Jimmy. Carter or George Bush senior would have had. Election! So I think the danger. Of misuse of presidential power during transition with trump is president. Is something we we should. Be Allowed to. Town. Jonathan Mayer has the next question Jonathan. And good to see you. We've talked about this week about how we see some Republicans standing up to the president or breaking with him on issues of say like masks, and we just outlined all these base plays whether it'd be. The black lives matter the confederate names. The president is making. It doesn't seem to be resonating anywhere point to the idea of enthusiasm moment. Where they country's going the right direction, and so many of them are saying no, which is potentially very damaging to the president's reelection hopes so in this outline rather bleak outlined that you're describing here. Do you have any hope that Republicans much like Republicans did in the nineteen seventies where they're the ones who finally stood up to Richard Nixon and said it's time to go. Do you have any hope here? That Republicans either before or after the election would stand up to this president and try to finally enforce some of the norms of this democracy. is very questionable I have. People like Mitt. Romney will continue to stand up draw red lines I'm sure. Susan Kelly Susan Collins will remain deeply consent whatever happens but I think the pouches hall is too deeply invested in trump of by this point too tight on it to town him wholesale. You might get little. Little quacks like Mitch McConnell saying look, we should wear masks. But I don't think you're gonNA see rebellion of the GOP. Until trump is defeated, it's very interesting. The full of those scenarios that the transition integrity project, and opted the one that didn't resulting constitutional breakdown, which was wet. Biden wins right clearly by the electoral college and the popular vote. trump still doesn't want to quit office. until the president elect Biden office him at a blanket pardon, at which point trump leaves office and. GETS OUT SAUDI FUNDING TO LAUNCH MAGAE TV I think the GOP is invested in Maga until Maga has been defeated shaggy. Promises of the likelihood of him losing I. Feel very confident of accepting defeat. Ed Louis Thank you very much. A new piece for the Financial Times is on how America could flunk. It's democracy test. Thank you, add and coming up. It appears the Russian. People just gave Vladimir Putin the chance to extend his rule. Until the year twenty thirty six, but critics say. The results of the vote were falsified. What this means for US foreign policy. Welcome back to morning. Joe Russian President Vladimir. Putin could stay in power until the year twenty thirty six thanks to constitutional amendments approved by voters, yesterday Putin the opportunity to be the country's longest serving leader since Peter the great join us now to explain NBC. News senior international correspondent here Simmons anytime. You're talking about Peter the great we're talking about long runs in the history of the world for any longer. So, what exactly does this mean? What was that vote yesterday? Willie geist here this week on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast Jake. Is latest run on Broadway. His blockbuster role in Spiderman and the movie he says changed his life forever. Get the podcast now for free wherever you download yours. Hey well, we're just getting the results now. The results will raise eyebrows in the West to Russia's saying that there was seventy eight percents approval for these constitutional changes which include a change which allows a President Putin to run for two more elections and also says there was a sixty eight percent turnout, but look there's no question that President Putin is popular in Russia. Though he's poll, numbers His approval. Ratings are lower than they have been in the past, but the opposition lead and of only. Describing this as illegal and illegitimate President Putin himself said that he wouldn't do this. We wouldn't say an office for as long as he if he wins the coming elections, which we assume he will stand in would be presidents, and until he was eighty three with a short period as as prime minister, of course, where really he was still leading the country. I mean the question that you ask. What does it mean for the world? World I think we will continue to see the same at nationalism, the same cynicism. We haven't always seen the same Putin over the past twenty years. You'll remember back with President Clinton. Even President Bush he was much more optimistic about relations with the West and then in a famous speech in Munich He kind of threw his cards on the table. If you like and changed direction, publicly and look in the end. History is hard to predict. But certainly I think we can predict more Putin. And that gives us some kind of guide to the future looks like I. Guess in relations with Russia. As. You say it could be there till he's eighty three eighty four years old here. Want to ask you as well about the Russia bounty story. We heard yesterday from the National Security Adviser that this. Did, intelligence was there, but it didn't rise to the level of telling the president and President Trump's daily briefer did not relate the information to him specifically. That's their argument here. The New York Times is reporting on a specific person from Afghanistan. Who was the go-between? They say Russia gave money to this man, and he gave it to the Taliban to attack. American and coalition troops is the Russian government saying anything more than they've said in the past where the spokesman for Amir Putin colorfully described this story to you as bs yes. No. That's that's their line. It's all BS sticking to that. I would just say this about that. Willie you remember that picture or President Obama. Pulling president. Putin aside and clearly having a tough words with him. One of the questions I've ruled. This is why I didn't president trump do that. Why wasn't he given this information to be able to think about doing that? Because we've said again again this week, intelligence is never black and white. It's never one hundred percent. It's there. It's a guide the president, so decide not to give the president. That intelligence is a pretty stunning decision, because the right words with the leave of Russia, even president, Putin might change the direction and being America's national interests. I'll just leave that that. All Right Simmons reporting from London for this morning. Thanks so much, Meka! Thank you care. Let's bring in correspondent for G. Q. Magazine Yawovi. Julia, WanNa talk about the election so to speak in Russia at first of all. What's the impact of President Trump Spending most of his time in his White House spending all of their time, trying to push off any type of facts that may relate to the president, being informed about the Russia bounty plot, and doing so without expressing any shock or harsh words for Russia about the Russia bounty plot. I, find it really stunning honest end. Part that we in the press and of playing along with the scale must Wendy's When did somebody brief? Him was written brief, was it? An oral briefing was in February was between nineteen The fact is quite simple. He's the commander in chiefs whether or not it was breathed in every. He was briefed in February nineteen. Now he has certainly been briefed. The whole country has been briefed essentially and the fact that he's still saying wasn't me or like. He said in the Rose Garden in his first coinage, a remembrance at responsibility in what kind of commander in chief is that? So. Obviously raises questions about how we feel about. His leadership or Americans feel about his leadership, but the impact on the relationship with Russia. Is it damaging? Does it put us? In a weaker position. I guess just say what relationship Russia. You have had very limited engagement. With the Russians on. On lower levels, you have A. A trump calling boot and all the time. You called him five or six times after he found out that. Either new or people below him were putting bounties on American soldiers heads. and. That didn't seem to come A-. A trump has talked a lot about you know pushing back against people saying he's too friendly with the Russians to friendly into deferential applauded near Putin that you know this. Power, nuclear power a matt. You have to talk to them whether you like it or not and as. Roma must investor Mike. mcfaul always said. Talk to them. Why have a good relationship wide? What end in diplomacy don't just make friends right? You make friends to advance your national interests and we haven't seen that here. He has developed. What he says is much better relationship with Vladimir Putin, but if he hasn't brought up the fact that is men and women in uniform are being hunted for money from the Kremlin that what is the point of that relationship? Jonathan Lemaire. Julia shifting. Focus back some to yesterday's election in in Russia. Curious outlined the president who had a few twists and turns Lead the country, but now that he is going to be power again for potentially more than a decade. What are you? What do you anticipate now that he's Secure Office for so long? Is it possible that he will relax? Some of his controls allows more personal freedoms in Russia or conversely will be more of the same tightening his grip on power you provide. Cover for corrupt practices. It's hard to predict the future of course. How do you foresee this next era of Ladder Putin going? That's a great question but I. don't see any reason for him to really the blues to anything he feels. especially in a place like Moscow, that he is less and less ability, he's less and less popular all over the country, but in Moscow particularly in the city that protests the most that eighteen the most is also where he lives. He just saw the trial of video city nick. The Auburn Card. Dome Theater Director. You know they didn't He essentially was freed. He got a suspended sentence. And that's the most. You can hope that as you know tantamount exoneration and freedom. It was something to celebrate that they didn't call. The child agent flows. You know they didn't. Close the investigation. They kept it going. I. Don't see this bounty program ending I. Just think there's no reason for him distinction. AIDS are all the incentive there for him to an intern. The Spurs crackdown led a few bubbles of frustration of frustration. ACID will thank doesn't bubble over, but mostly I think we're GONNA. See more of the same kind of gilded stagnation with a lot of economic and political rot underneath. Julia Yaffe. Thank you so much for coming on the show this morning. Appreciate it and still ahead we'll be joined by former FDA Commissioner Scott, Gottlieb on the heels of the United States, hitting another staggering new daily number of corona virus cases. You're watching morning, Joe. We will be right back.

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