35 Burst results for "President Eisenhower"

Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:44 min | Last week

Amy Coney Barrett & The State of SCOTUS

"So the topic I want to go to now is on the question timing the fact that this nomination is coming rather late in the fourth year of a president's term has made it controversial in fact, timing of just. Nominees to nominations to the supreme. Court has been controversial now for four or five years for a variety of reasons. So that's the first question. I would like each of you to tell me your position on on the question. Should the Senate be voting on a nomination to the Supreme Court right now sire you yes or no on that? I. Mean Yes. John All right cy you are yes. On the same question Irwin should the Senate be voting on a Justice of the supreme? Court now yes or no no amy honeybear bear should not be confirmed at this time. All right. Thank you I. Want to go first use for your reasons. Why are you a? Yes on the on the question of the timing of the nomination right now well, on the question of timing I think the Senate has the authority to consent the president is nominated someone. I don't see any reason why the Senate Caq Senate is doing other things it's it's considering thrown a virus relief. Of course, it can legislate until the members leave. and. So nothing nothing prevents the president from nominating someone nothing prevents Senate from acting upon that nomination and I think there three positions John. I think one position is you must vote on the nomination I. think that was Erwin's position for years ago. A second position is you can vote on the nomination, but you shouldn't that might ear ones position today and I the the middle position, which is you can vote on the nomination and you should. Thank your ticket back to you. So what I hear size saying is the Senate has every legal and constitutional right to be doing this now. They, certainly have the legal and constitutional right to do it, but they shouldn't do it. This is stunning hypocrisy by the Republicans for years ago Senator Mitch McConnell said, the American people should have a voice in the selection and the next Supreme Court justice. Therefore, this vacancies should not be filled into we have a new president. Antonin Scalia died in February two, thousand sixteen. President Obama named Mira Garland for that seat in March of two thousand sixteen. There was eight months before the election was to be held in the Republicans wouldn't hold hearings or wouldn't hold about Ruth Bader Ginsburg died on September eighteenth of twenty twenty, and already the Republicans are looking to fill that seat. There is historical precedent. On October twelfth eighteen sixty four chief justice Roger Tawny died the president Abraham Lincoln didn't try to fill the vacancy in the month before the election or nineteen fifty-six Justice Sherman Minton resigned from the court but President Eisenhower didn't try to pick the successor instead an October fifteenth. He made a recess appointment of a Democrat William Brennan. So whoever won the election would pick the successor? Alright let. Let me jump in because I I WANNA give cya chance to respond to some of what you're saying. So so I think we heard from Irwin saying that. eight months. was enough of a lead time and they were talking about the case of Merrick Garland back in two thousand sixteen. But that one month one and a half months is too short and he sites precedent of other examples where presidents had more of that timeframe. So what's your response to that? I think are ones making a slightly different point I think if. They. Can See had risen eight months ago I think are only making the same exact point, which is what's good for the goose is good for the Gander. So it's not really a question of timing. There's plenty of time as Irwin and other people now there there's GonNa be a vote in the Senate. The point is about equity I. Think the point is about precedent in Irwin has some precedents would, of course, you can go back to previous administrations in sight other presidents. John Marshall was appointed days before John Adams left the Presidency Steven Briar was nominated and appointed to the circuit court after Jimmy Carter lost. So there, there are precedents obviously for acting after the election. Let alone before I understand there's some raw feelings about what happened four years ago and I understand that people have flipped Irwin. Himself is flipped a apparently senator McConnell may have slipped as well. I think. It's unfortunate. This game of delaying nominations has gone on for quite a long. I have a colleague who waited two years before she withdrew for circuit court position because it wouldn't allow vote. That's just sort of power politics on both

Senate Caq Senate President Trump Supreme Court Irwin Senator Mitch Mcconnell President Eisenhower Merrick Garland Ruth Bader Ginsburg John All Justice Sherman Minton Antonin Scalia Senator Mcconnell Twenty Twenty Erwin William Brennan John Abraham Lincoln Barack Obama John Marshall
The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | Last month

The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

"Hi, Brian, how's it going good Dylan Grades Swell. Thank you so much for making it onto our show. Absolutely exciting. So can you just tell our listeners late more about your background? Yeah. Well, actually lives nutrition twenty-five day for three years. I've been making a film I'm just all in I just read studies I watched lectures I go to conferences. My whole world is around finding out about health and I'm making film called food lies, which is all about that. It's trying to demystify nutrition nutrition super complicated right everyone has their own idea diet everyone someone who went vegan in loss late and someone did. The. They went carnivore they lost weight and they feel great houses even possible. So my big overarching goal is trying to get the average person to understand nutrition and eating and how to be health. Yeah. So I've been a reading about the documentary lies that you're working on and I think site were saying that you know the documentaries reading intended to cover the history of dietary. Guidelines the epidemic of chronic disease and obesity that followed from that on the new signs actually telling US humans what we should be eating and how to eat that food sustainable. Let let's unpack that actually one by one because I'm curious about what you mean actually when you talk about the history of dietary guidelines. Yeah. Well, there there's a long history there and actually I should say. I've been doing this longer than three years. I just spent three years full-time actually actually have background mechanical engineering and tech, but also had my own sort of health during my family I lost both my parents at eight thirty, thirty one to these chronic diseases from people eating the wrong diet, and this leads into dietary guidelines because we follow the dietary guidelines, our whole life they ate. The Food Pyramid we ate the low fat foods cooked food ourselves. We weren't going out to McDonald's we weren't. You know doing anything crazy. We were we were just making our own food and falling the guidelines and they slowly got just sicker as they aged and we kind of except that, right it's people like Oh. Yeah. It's like the dad body you know yeah, you're supposed to. Get a dad bought as you grow up, wait a second. That's that's not right. Actually you know and look myself in my twenties. I was getting that dad bod I didn't I have great health I was getting sick every once in a while I had just pudgy and now I'm ten years older thirty seven now and I'm in way better health than I was when I was twenty seven and it's because I went away from the dietary guidelines on way from the Food Pyramid and you know as the cliche goes you do the opposite and just to be clear like when when when you say food pyramid, that's something that was introduced by the Food and Drug Administration like what's sixty sixty seventy years ago? Yeah. Whilst Nineteen, seventy, seven, there was the original deter nineteen eighty. I. Think was a even more recent. Yeah. It started. Okay. So I will go into that. The actually history of it started around nineteen, fifty five with President Eisenhower had heart attack right? So this is the time when a lot of people smoking and a lot of these all these new vegetable oils are coming through diet like, Fried, foods and people are moving away from the national foods. You know they cook for themselves. So there's a lot going on in this time and yet he was like, Hey, what's going on why do I have heart disease and he had more heart attacks basic put together. The McGovern. Committee. Also in the in the nineteen sixties and seventies is one is all taking place and there was a guy named Ansel keys that was kind of tasked with figuring out what how does heart disease developed right and he looked any thought it was saturated fat and cholesterol is it that was his hypothesis and he did the famous seven countries study and there's a lot to that story. Some people turn a million times something have never heard of it but he basically looked at all these different countries in he cherry picked seven out of twenty two and showed this correlation where the. More, saturated fat cholesterol, the country eight, the more heart attacks died from and you know it, it's actually wasn't done well it it's correlation science not causation on he also cherry picked it and we look at all the countries he skips there was no direct correlation was all over the place and there was another guy named John Yetkin who had a competing theory that it was the sugar and the refined flour that was causing the problem and he was over in England and looking at all these different societies that just recently changed their diet than started adding a lot more. Sugar and flour and stuff like that, and they were getting sick. So that was his idea but he's won out eventually we came to these dietary guidelines like I said in seventy seven and nineteen eighty was food pyramid. Now it's called my plate, but it's all about the same and is kind of the same around the world and those guidelines to told us to what like eat more grains and less meat dairy or what was it exactly the Food Pyramid people don't even remember the food. The whole base of the Food Pyramid is starches and grains. You know it's like e. Eight to eleven, servings of starches and grains, rice, and Pasta and bread, and all this stuff, and then it was fruits and vegetables in the next level and it was like whatever five to six servings of each and then we finally got to the the highly bioavailable nutrient animal foods up up near the top and in the very top were you know backed sugar and oil I guess we're the very top. So yeah, this is what they put out to the world. They basically put the world's on an experiment unproven low fat diet and they actually said, what's the worst that could happen? The world on the low fat diet and you know how can be bad fat Scott would be bad for you even though we've been eating fat for all of human history

Food And Drug Administration Brian President Eisenhower Dylan United States Mcdonald Ansel Keys Cherry Mcgovern Scott John Yetkin England
National Memorial to President Eisenhower To Be Dedicated Tomorrow In Washington DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last month

National Memorial to President Eisenhower To Be Dedicated Tomorrow In Washington DC

"An important day here in Washington, D C is long awaited Memorial honoring President Dwight D. Eisenhower will be dedicated this evening. The new memorial to the nation's 34th president and World War two commander was originally scheduled for Dedic dedication Back in May. Today, seven o'clock ceremony's been scaled back to follow the CDC guidelines. Republic gatherings. The $150 million structures and a newly created park along East bound Independence Avenue, right across from the National Air and Space Museum. It'll open to the public tomorrow.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower National Air And Space Museum President Trump CDC Commander Washington Dedic
Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

06:07 min | 2 months ago

Newt Minow on the Presidential Debates

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan and this is intelligence squared US part of our discourse disruptor series and what we're going to be focusing on. Our the coming presidential debates they are coming sort of starting September twenty-ninth, the first of three. And of course, because everything's different this year, the debates are going to feel different almost certainly going to be. In some fashion remote, maybe the debaters, the candidates won't even be in the same place. There's only going to be one moderator. We're not gonNA live audience because you can't have that many people in one space in this dangerous time. Also what we have going on as a conversation simultaneously with which is focused on, maybe we shouldn't have debates maybe it's time to wrap up that whole institution and go back to a time of no debates. And when I say go back did you know that for most of American history this institution that we know is the debates did not exist that for most of our history, there were no debates and did you know that once we started having debates that in the first series, there was a remote debate the candidates were not in the same place and there was no live audience. And there was only one moderator. So maybe things are circling back. There's a lot of history here and we are interested in that because. At intelligence squared, we are very interested in history and we are also very very interested in debates. So that's what we want to focus on and we want to focus. In this case of discourse disrupters with an excellent source of information about the past and the present and potentially the future, and that is a gentleman named Newton Minot and Newton Minnow is an old friend of intelligence squared us and he's also known as the father of American presidential debates and we'll talk a little bit about why that is. But first, let's bring Newt Minnow into the conversation newt. Thank you so much for for joining us. It's really a pleasure to be back in communication with you. John I. LOOK FORWARD TO I. Admire your work or the intelligence squared very very much. Well, thank you. Can I ask before we start everything else I find it interesting that for folks who don't know you have lived through some very, very disruptive times and this one in your nineties a comes at the after a long series of other adventures. I mean, you have lived through I, think twenty three presidential elections. At this point, you have seen twelve cycles of the debates that we're GONNA be talking about. You lived through the major disruption called World War to. Use served overseas you went into politics You're an aide to ally Stevenson who ran for president does the Democratic nominee twice in the nineteen fifties. So you saw two elections then you joined John Kennedy's administration and you saw the trauma of his assassination and then you were very close friends with Robert Kennedy and you saw his assassination and lived through that and and now this. Just just to take a moment is, is this disruption different in dramatically in kind from all of the others you've seen so far? Well, I lived through all that, but then I had another. Exposure to politics with Obama, the because Michelle worked for our firm and and Barack came to be a summer associate and they fell in love and so we got. So we had another round politics with with with the OBAMAS. About that but all throughout, I would say the last fifty years of this you have been intersecting with this institution that we call the presidential debates take us back to nineteen, fifty, nine, nineteen, sixty, where as an aide to at least Stevenson. You actually were involved in the idea of pushing forward the idea that there there. He did not get to take part in that kind of debate but was interested in enemies interested because you are suggesting it. You have a very strong faith in the idea of technology. To be a force for good and for communication and you saw television as this, you're right as this big thing happening in the sixties. Well, it actually was in the fifties in when. In in the fifty six. Presidential, election. The incumbent President President Eisenhower. Having a heart attack. And there was a big question whether he would be able to run again. And I suggested to adly that instead of the candidates. Rushing. All over the country and speaking crowds that that. Now, we have television which reached every home. And that instead of traditional debate that. There'd be a series of joint appearances or debates between the presidential candidates. As they considered that his advisors thought it was a gimmick and it was he never suggested it. The Federal Communications Act when it was originally passed during the new deal. Required equal time for political candidates. The law said section three fifteen FA broadcaster gives or sells time to one candidate. At must give ourselves time to the opponent on the same basis. As a result that was interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission to mean any use of the air by a candidate including being in a news program. So the broadcasters were pressing to get news programs exempt. From the equal time requirement and they finally succeeded in the late fifties. But debates were not regarded as a news program.

Stevenson President President Eisenhower John Donvan Barack Obama Newton Minnow Federal Communications Commiss John Kennedy United States Newton Minot Robert Kennedy John President Trump FA Summer Associate Michelle
Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

The Strategerist

05:45 min | 3 months ago

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

"Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader very. Very charismatic you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies,

Small Business Small Business Administration Hector Baretto Hector United States America Business Owner Latino Coalition Kansas City Kansas City Hispanic Chamber O Missouri Hispanic Chamber Laura Collins Smu Economic Growth Initiative Kansas City Missouri Chamber Of Commerce Chairman Director Bush Institute President Eisenhower Dallas
First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

"A man who served eleven presidents in the White House starting as a cleaner passed away after contracting the coronavirus Wilson Roosevelt German died of cold it last Saturday at the age of ninety one according to his family he started at the White House under president Eisenhower was promoted to Butler under president Kennedy held other positions along the way finally retiring under president Obama tributes poured in former First Lady Michelle Obama said with his kindness in care Wilson German help to make the White House home for decades the first families including ours Hillary Clinton tweeted our warmest condolences to his loved ones I'm Julie Walker

White House Wilson Roosevelt German President Trump Eisenhower Butler Kennedy Barack Obama Michelle Obama Hillary Clinton Julie Walker Wilson German
First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

"A man who served eleven presidents in the White House starting as a cleaner passed away after contracting the coronavirus Wilson Roosevelt German died of cold it last Saturday at the age of ninety one according to his family he started at the White House under president Eisenhower was promoted to Butler under president Kennedy held other positions along the way finally retiring under president Obama tributes poured in former First Lady Michelle Obama said with his kindness in care Wilson German help to make the White House home for decades the first families including ours Hillary Clinton tweeted our warmest condolences to his loved ones I'm Julie Walker

White House Wilson Roosevelt German President Trump Eisenhower Butler Kennedy Barack Obama Michelle Obama Hillary Clinton Julie Walker Wilson German
First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

"A man who served eleven presidents in the White House starting as a cleaner passed away after contracting the coronavirus Wilson Roosevelt German died of cold it last Saturday at the age of ninety one according to his family he started at the White House under president Eisenhower was promoted to Butler under president Kennedy held other positions along the way finally retiring under president Obama tributes poured in former First Lady Michelle Obama said with his kindness in care Wilson German help to make the White House home for decades the first families including ours Hillary Clinton tweeted our warmest condolences to his loved ones I'm Julie Walker

White House Wilson Roosevelt German President Trump Eisenhower Butler Kennedy Barack Obama Michelle Obama Hillary Clinton Julie Walker Wilson German
First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

First families pay tribute to longtime White House butler

"A man who served eleven presidents in the White House starting as a cleaner passed away after contracting the coronavirus Wilson Roosevelt German died of cold it last Saturday at the age of ninety one according to his family he started at the White House under president Eisenhower was promoted to Butler under president Kennedy held other positions along the way finally retiring under president Obama tributes poured in former First Lady Michelle Obama said with his kindness in care Wilson German help to make the White House home for decades the first families including ours Hillary Clinton tweeted our warmest condolences to his loved ones I'm Julie Walker

White House Wilson Roosevelt German President Trump Eisenhower Butler Kennedy Barack Obama Michelle Obama Hillary Clinton Julie Walker Wilson German
Former White House employee who served 11 presidents dies of coronavirus at 91

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:22 sec | 5 months ago

Former White House employee who served 11 presidents dies of coronavirus at 91

"Former longtime Playhouse Butler Wilson Roosevelt German has died of corona virus at the age of ninety one granddaughter G. milieu Garrett center grandfather began working as a cleaner under president Eisenhower before being promoted to Butler in nineteen sixty thanks to his report with the Kennedys Karen said he was always about service to others

Butler Wilson Roosevelt German President Trump Butler Karen Garrett Center Eisenhower Kennedys
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 8 months ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
How Did Armistice Day Become Veterans Day in the United States?

Paul W. Smith

01:11 min | 1 year ago

How Did Armistice Day Become Veterans Day in the United States?

"On veterans day the government offices are closers no mail delivery post offices are closed in many schools are closed as well as America honors the nation's veterans reporter Chas Henry explains how this became a day of remembrance there's a reason we commemorate veterans day on the eleventh day of the eleventh month because it was at the eleventh hour on this day in nineteen eighteen the World War one came to an end it'd been bloody and heartbreaking more than five and a half million dead close to thirteen million wounded more than four million missing when the hour rolled around a year later people around the world begin commemorating the armistice agreement that ended that four and a half year conflict when you see people in Britain in some other countries wearing small paper poppies on their lapel it's a tradition related to the beautiful flowers that grew on the World War one battlefields that took so many lives in nineteen fifty four president Eisenhower change the name of the holiday from armistice day to veterans day day to recognize all men and women who've honorably war in the U. S. military uniform not just those who gave their lives we recognize them in may on Memorial Day today marks the occasion for remembering and thanking those who have served both in peace and war more than twenty million still among us I'm

America Chas Henry Britain President Trump Eisenhower Reporter
A special relationship?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

14:42 min | 1 year ago

A special relationship?

"Among British diplomats few postings are more highly prized than that of the United Kingdom's ambassador to the United States. The occupant of the role becomes a key component of what has become known as the special relationship the transatlantic mutual admiration society founded on a shared history a shared language and shared values even special relationships have their rocky patches however and this week the U._K.'s man in the U._S. found himself if we can extend the relationship metaphor to the verge of breaking point I in the Doghouse and then gathering his belongings from beneath the window succumbed Eric resigned after the leak of dispatchers shows he sent back to London which described the administration of President Donald Trump in terms unflattering. If unsurprising it is certainly a test for the special relationship but is the special relationship really as special as the U._k.. In particular likes to think and what might the special relationship look like the other side of Brexit if conducted by Donald Trump and Boris Johnson this is the foreign desk up up until now Britain had if you like to wings to fly on one of the European wing and the other was the American now it's only GonNa have Washington relations with Brussels again to be fatty sour after Britain has left the European Union apple the special relationship going to become even more rational as the knowledge and experience of the ambassador to put the information in context to synthesize it and to focus it on the things that really matter to the government government said he would have been sitting back to the government. Here's the rhetoric you're getting from Donald Trump by trade deal. Here's what the sector state for coal minister saying. Here's what the senators are saying. Here's the reality both countries are going through interesting times signed and at the end of the day to be frank every other country and I include the U._K.. In this every other country will spend more time thinking about the United States than the United States will ever be able to spend thinking about that country entree to the foreign desk on monocle twenty four with me Andrew Muller on today's show on joined by Mara Colin and Edward Loose. Mara Colin is Director of Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins University and a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She joins us from Washington DC and Edward Lewis is the Financial Times U._S. National Editor and former DC bureau chief. He's also joining us from Washington. <hes> welcome both to the show. I want to start with the the affair that has got us here which I don't know if it actually quite qualifies for the full blown gate suffix but nevertheless let's call it Derek Gate Edward First of all how damaged do you think relations between the U._S. and the U._k.. have been by this reasonably damage. I wouldn't want to blow this particular incident out of proportion. I think what it sheds light on is the likely relationship between a prime minister. Boris Johnson led British government and the trump administration which is going to be quite different to the normal U._k.. U._S. government relationship and essentially Kim Derek's resignation as ambassador was carried out by Boris Johnson. Even though he's not yet prime minister I step because he refused toback Darach in the Conservative Party leadership debate he essentially made dykes job over it impossible and it was done essentially on the on the instructions of Donald Trump and if you have a the next British prime minister taking an internal suffering British decision at the behest of the current U._S. president you have if any walked British government before it's even been formed Mara we should probably bring some perspective to bear on this. We are talking and we'll talk further about the damage that may have been done to the the special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom but obviously the last few years have been fairly rough going for most countries which thought of themselves elves as American allies before two thousand sixteen. Is this any better or any worse than any of the <hes> the ruptures between the United States and say we'll take you pick France or Germany or Australia Troglio or any of the many others Donald Trump has managed to upset. You know it's important that we put this ambassador gate into the larger context as you note the last few years have been bumpy. America is in anomalous period the U._K.. is in an anomalous period in so what's happening. Now is one bump among a very mountainous road. Both countries are going through in both countries are travelling through and it is in Dubai audibly affecting the special special relationship as each country tries to figure out who are we and what do we stand for. It can't help but influence how we think about one another it would we should look a bit at that phrase the special relationship. It's a phrase that gets bandied what about rob the more I think in the United Kingdom then in the United States. Is it fair to say that it's something that various British governments have placed rather more store in the various American governments yeah that that that to say I mean I think I think it's also fair to say that under the Obama Administration took name the second time Germany with the sort of key special relationship and it's also a phrase with some variation used in Germany but everybody's prime minister including Theresa may the Pros Johnson is obsessed with getting an Oval Office meeting the moment they're they're in office. Theresa May with the first part needed to visit Donald trump so she kept that batting average opposite well. I think it's going to become a lot more pronounced announced on the British side and a lot more asymmetric as well in terms of the emphasis once Britain's left the European Union because up until now Britain you know had if you like to wings to fly on a European wing and the other one's the American now it's taking to have Washington relations with Brussels again to be Fatty Fowler after Britain's left the European Union and death of the special relationship is going to become even more obsessional Mara. What's being your experiences? Somebody who has worked with a variety of American administrations about what the special relationship actually means to American administrations do they regard the relationship with the United Kingdom as any more or less special than they might regard the relationship with say France. The relationship with the U._k.. is just so special precisely because it is bureaucratized every single day there are meetings between Brits and Americans in in our governments in my decade in the Pentagon I spent more time meeting with British counterparts more time in London than anyone else and it is a relationship that really is deep textured and white that said both countries are going through interesting times and at the end of the day to be frank every other country and I include the U._K.. In this every other country will spend more time thinking about the United States than the United States will ever be able to spend thinking about that country in that relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom. Where do you think the balance is between a purely practical functional arrangement between to approximate peers and a sort of sentimental friendship which is rooted in all the stuff that British prime ministers in particular enjoy banging on about that shed history in the shed values and so on I wouldn't overstate the shed history in Chad bodies? I mean if you look back on the postwar era. There were a lot of bumps. It wasn't so the plane failing till trump cable pretty power was ended at Suez by President Eisenhower who withdrew support from studying because Britain because of the anglo-french attempt to invade Egypt and and Britain didn't get involved in the Vietnam War I mean it wasn't always sort of hand in glove but there is an affinity between political cultures points out by going through interesting times. There is an affinity through history PA through language language and political culture between what happens in Brooklyn in America so even though Britain isn't as important in Washington as it might like to think Washington I think reads a lot more in its news pages about what happens in British politics than it does how's about gentlemen politics toddy and politics French politics pays more attention and pointed out there. Is that hard edge to it which is the interoperability of military systems. The five is intelligent sharing which you know uniquely Britain is the only country in Europe that has that kind of close relationship and I think that's probably immune to whatever antiques and <hes> Circus Act Spurs Johnson and Donald Trump trump dream out between themselves but you can't becoming competent of anything nowadays truth is change of infection at the moment Mara how does that that same equation look from the side of the from the American side of. The Atlantic do they regard Britain as a purely practical partner and we'll talk shortly about those defense and intelligence aspects of the relationship is the part of the relationship which is rooted in a basic even Atavistic sophisticate fullness does the United States just proceed from an assumption that Britain is a friend that Britain is an entity that liked some gets on with look. I couldn't agree more with Edward in his characterization of the relationship there there is this idea of shared values albeit. Both countries probably reassessing what those values look like there. Is this kind of deep technocratic bureaucratic collaboration that it that is meaningful when I worked in the Pentagon I had Brits rich who worked for me. <hes> as full full staff members like other Pentagon staff members <hes> so traditionally these bumps are seen as kind of fights within a family going forward as these bumps grow more into mountains. Perhaps the the family will will start to separate you know if we just look at the last two decades or so in our countries have gone to war together and these wars haven't necessarily gone as well as one might have liked and that no no doubt is causing reassessment inside London and potentially inside Washington as well would you raise things like the five is intelligence sharing setup and NATO of course another obvious area cooperation between the the U._S. and the U._K.. How important are they not just to the United States in the United Kingdom but to the the entire political architecture of the rest of the world well I think that the sort of stabilised and something solid foundation nation of what we call the West is NATO <hes> even the West you know don't belong to NATO and NATO was originally an Anglo American project which others were recruited to in the postwar? You're in the late nineteen forties so NATO is the hardest part of that special relationship. I think what makes things different. Now is although Boris Johnson is so the conventional NATO supporter Donald Trump very much isn't he's very skeptical about NATO if he sees it as a number of these and his eyes cartels terrip America off where partners and not spending as much as America on defense and that's got to end and it's not inconceivable it probably nightly but it's inconceivable where he be elected <hes> he could even put America out of me too. I'm not predicting that but I'm saying I wouldn't be. I wouldn't be totally shocked if he did Boris. Johnson has conventional views on areas where his personal personal interests hasn't clashed with them but he's very much beholden to donald trump in a way that you know in spite of all the rhetoric of Britain being America's poodle that you get from anti-americans in a way that no previous British prime minister within and that means this is a dynamic situation. It's going to be very very hard to predict what demands of him and how various response we'll talk a bit more in the second half of the program about the future of the special relationship and how special it might might look a few decades from now but before we do that I want to reflect a little bit on the past of it sort of look at some highs and lows of it. We'll start with the highs Marar and I'll ask you do you when you think of the the special relationship between in the U._S. and the U._k.. Working as it ideally should or at least as it should in the storybook version of it often presented by British prime ministers in particular which moments or which incidents or which periods do you think of you know. I have a great memory just after nine eleven of President Bush giving a speech in the first ally I remember him. Calling out was the U._K.. In was highlighting the special relationship and it was important as an American to know whatever chaos was going on in this international security landscape. There was a capable military that was there to be helpful under these kind of dire circumstances would if we think of absolute low points and probably we can take the war of eighteen twelve as read. How bad has it ever got was Su as the absolute low point yes because that was the ending somewhat say belated and I think very very skillfully and gently administed ending British imperial pretensions is now is like close to chill as close to ends meet British Prime Minister at the time and he was very much magnified being based in Britain of course for the D day operation during? The Second World War and that I think was probably the low point you had the old story imperial classes you know pats at a moment of peak anti-americanism at that point. I think the second point though <hes> I I loyd identify would be would be now well on that happy thought we will have more from both of you later in the show for the moment though Edward Loose on Mara Colin thank you both you're listening to the foreign desk

Donald Trump United States Britain United Kingdom Boris Johnson Prime Minister Mara Colin Washington America London President Trump British Government Nato European Union Brussels Pentagon
"president eisenhower" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

06:02 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KNSS

"Was in nineteen forty two that's early early. I'm not ready for a white now. Not either Halloween. Not yet. We've had those we have. Yep. We're going trick or treating in the snow. Really? I don't remember that. It was on this date in nineteen fifty five following word that President Eisenhower had suffered a heart attack. The new York Stock Exchange for its worst price decline since nineteen twenty nine now. Eisenhower, of course. Of everybody that was our president. And he was he was the guy in all of a sudden, he's got this heart attack. He did live to be. I don't remember the and at least into his eighties. I believe seems to me that he died in the industry sixty sometime mid sixties. But Icenhower, of course. He'd been like a three pack a day smoker. For years and years. Week plane claim him as a Kansas native. Although he was born in Texas grew up in Abilene. You've got the museum up there. It's fascinating. It's been while since I've been up there. They're they're doing a complete review of it. Right now, they are did not know that they're going to have everything brand new basically by twenty nineteen and I can Mamie you're both buried there. And that little house where the was it four or five. Eisenhower boys is five of them in his family all up in this little tiny house. It's interesting character. Of course, one of our heroes national hero in a hero for all of us in Kansas. Eisenhower, so when he had that heart attack that stifle his second term at all. Or how long was he out of commission apparently not long? Okay. Is this is fifty five and he's finished up in what sixty. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I I just remember one photo of him that I've seen a time out in Denver recuperating. And he's got these little funny. Little house slippers on and he's in a wheelchair. And it's it's kind of cute. Why was the out in Denver? That's where he was treated. And I think he suffered the heart attack in Denver. Oh, maybe Dowd. His wife was from Denver. That's right. That was her hometown. So. Yeah. All right. Let's see what happens when you spend time with the in laws. Yeah. Anything can happen heart attack. Anything can happen. The we've got the story of the couch asking the woman, then the police officer this morning. Authorities in northeastern Arizona see a sheriff's deputy had to use a stun gun twice to drive off a large cow. That was stepping on him in a field. I'm surprised you didn't use his shishkabob, right? There is service gun and just shoot. The thing. The sheriff's office in Navajo county says the officer responded after a woman called say she was being pinned down by the cow. That's that's not good and aggressive cow. Or are you kidding me? The deputy used a stun gun to get the cow off the woman, then the animal charge the officer. Oh, angry mad cow. Mad cow deputy used a stun gun again drive, the cow off for a second time either human required medical attention, other than what paramedics administered at the scene. No word on what happened with the cow. Now, you have a very large heavy animal there if it's going around sitting on people. Yeah. The problem. Some big problem seven thirty eight that guy you sat next to on the plane the other day. Well, he wasn't. He wasn't a great rolling over on you. Okay. The thing was he was gentleman weighed in excess of three hundred pounds in. What is called economy class? My wife book an economy to save a few bucks. Okay. We're going ten and a half hours across the ocean. And we're back there in the economy class in the seats are about as wide which accommodate about an eight year old. Yeah. If you're any bigger older than an eight year old you're uncomfortable. The guy sitting next to meet Google three hundred and thirty pounds easily. Oh, boy and bless his heart. He could keep his arm sort of arm Reynaud tweenies, and but then he'd fall asleep crammed all of a sudden. Yeah. Yeah. I've got three quarters of a seat that human being an adult human being for ten and a half hours. I've been whining about it for three days. But it was a challenge physically a challenge. That's it's a long. Anyway, I told I told her next time we're going first class to know you can't afford it. Three or four times a fair to go first. Anyway. Choice. Do you have your sale take you three weeks to get there? That'd be a something. Anyway, enough of that seven thirty nine now, Stephen hidden. We have a new edition that by my daughter's house. Stacey in grandkids after in Westwood Utah. They've got a new dog he's he's a rat terrier and his name is Pete. And they already have a rat terrier named Rudy Rudy needs a little socializing company. So now, they got Pete. So last night, I got to meet Pete for the first time. Go. Well. Yeah. Like most rat terriers. He's a he's a nitwit. He's character a great little dog rat terrier dog I've had two of them. They're clean. They got a lot of personality. I had a dog fair rat for twelve years never gave the dog a bath never needed to take care of himself. So, you know, if you're lazy like me, and you don't like to give your dog a bath a rat terrier man, they got two dogs. And then there are other pets in that house. Don't oh, that's it. Okay. And is just celebrated all we we all went out to the Freddie's and had. Had some friends had a dog. Hotdogs nice, always nice to go to Frederick, stupendous. You can't you can't lose it Freddie's an evening with a rat terrier and Freddie's that is an exciting evening in Wichita, Kansas. No doubt about it. I'll tell you another exciting emus going to come Saturday night Saturday night. What are we got entrust Bank arena, Leonard Skinner? Yep. Last of the street survivors, farewell tour. That's right. And I've got a pair of tickets. One of our Stephen listeners is going to go see Leonard Skinner right down. I'll take caller number five. Excellent. Eight six nine thirteen thirty caller number five eight six nine thirteen thirty. You.

heart attack President Eisenhower Denver Kansas officer Pete Stephen Leonard Skinner Freddie president York Stock Exchange Abilene Navajo county Arizona Mamie Icenhower Rudy Rudy Google Dowd
Trump administration to send U.S. cellphones a test alert on Thursday

Monique Marvez

07:46 min | 2 years ago

Trump administration to send U.S. cellphones a test alert on Thursday

"And get somebody just texted me and said, you better watch it about informing people how to disable amber alerts and all that on on your phone because we operate at the pleasure of the FCC. Unlike other businesses, accept airlines and things like that that that operate under the the view the FAA. Our license is granted, and I know first amendment Schmertz amendment. You don't have a right to just put up a stick at six forty amplitude modulations six hundred forty kilohertz and start broadcasting rust. You can't do that. If c c regulates that and also regulates things that go out of my pie hole into this microphone right there. And so I'm going to back off on informing you, but if you want to you can just do a Google search for disable alerts IOS, Android, you know, whatever it's actually pretty simple. But anyway, I'll get to the Russia. China thing let's kind of a deal. But I I guess this is a lot more serious than than I thought it is. It is a it's a done deal here. It's going to happen on Thursday, the very first presidential alert. The Trump administration is going to send all US cellphones. Attest alert on Thursday. The Trump administration will send a message to all US cell phones on Thursday to test a previously unused alert system that aims to warn the public about national emergencies. The message will bear the headline presidential alert the Federal Emergency Management agency or fee Ma said in a statement this week the phones will make loud tone and have a special vibration said FEMA, which will send the alert the test message, which will be at two eighteen PM eastern daylight time that would be eleven eighteen AM Pacific standard time in Los Angeles on Thursday at eleven eighteen AM, you will get a message were they super special vibration, and it will read quote all caps. This is a test. The normal case of the national wireless. Emergency alert system. No action is needed close quote. The test has been scheduled to ensure that the alert system would work in the event of national emergency US cellphone users will not be able to opt out so start the freaking out at this point. I you know, that the people from the far left and the far-right are gonna this is red meat. This is absolute red meat. And like I said the back story here is that. This debate took place in the fifties. And the sixties about should we have a national A-Bomb alert. Should there be one day just like they did in the Soviet Union, and they do in China till this day? Should it be one day? Everybody goes into a bunker. They they find out where the nearest bunker the workplace or they're tiny dreary little apartment in Moscow is and all that we never did that never did. Because it it the in the end behind closed doors between the Pentagon and President Eisenhower. The the whole thing was what's the point? There used to be you can still see to this day around Los Angeles that that upside down pyramid that gold upside down pyramid. And it says CD civil defense. Civil defence used to be a big deal. There were there were you had blocked captains and things like that was sort of an outgrowth World War Two. And then it went away for a long time. It's still maintain. Paned? There were these bunkers, and they had long term storage for fresh water and all this, but you know, no Cold War anymore since Ninety-one ish. Decreased nuclear threat, we really haven't recharge civil defense. We haven't worked out the civil defense muscle. And part of the reason like I say was because the powers that be said is it worth the conspiracy theorists in the panic? You know, what are we getting out of this? If we did this it would be expensive people would take a hours off from work in. What what really is is the purpose. What are we getting out of it? So we never did that. And then like I say we also for the same reason the the Russians sent. People at their workplaces and at homes, this this vitamin called potassium iodate because it can it helps people in the aftermath of a nuclear war shed radiation that they might be absorbed. We never did it because there is a vocal tiny minority that starts screaming. What does the government know? How come? They're not telling us, they must know something. No one would just do this. And that and that's the reason. And by the way, you you want the latest evidence of that. Why is the FBI taken over that solar observatory in Albuquerque New Mexico outside of Holloman Air Force, but we'll get to that a little later. But that's absolutely this evidence of that FEMA camps. Remember those FEMA camps. So the president is going to do this for the first time ever. He's ordered at FEMA is going to do it for the first time ever on Thursday. You cannot opt out of it. And between now. And then you you watch everything from. From. I'm thinking of I'm trying to think of some very far left websites. Daily Cho's up in the bay area. Huge huge liberal website. That this is Trump's abuse of power. He must know something. And also, why would he be doing this? If he didn't intend to go to nuclear war with the North Koreans point in fact, if if an ICBM if they wash on fifteen or forty of them one of them with an actual nuke at thirty nine of them decoys they were launched from North Korea on a ballistic path towards the United States. You would be getting that presidential alert. If as long as it's somewhere on the laminate as long as someone somewhere said, oh, yeah. That's that's right thing. Number twelve alert the American people, but but this is the part where when you war game at and we're talking about a missile with a forty five minute time of flight to the east coast and about a thirty nine minute time of flight here, the west coast, and in the they go through all the procedures to retaliate and the whole thing. What would you be doing? I mean, you got you. You would get that alert. And by the way, just like a weather alert or an amber alert, it's not just a tone at center tone, and it can send an audio message. Some if you're driving down the seven ten to insert name of freeway here in Los Angeles area and you hear a tone. You've never heard and you can't override it. You cannot meet your phone, this overrides, your settings and a vibration, you've never heard you're you're gonna feel it felt you're gonna feel it on Thursday. And then a recorded voice of the president comes on saying an impending nuclear attack is going is targeting the California coastal cities of San Diego, Los Angeles. And San Francisco we may not even get the the current emergency broadcast system alert yet on that. But but part of the war gaming on this is why would we send that message? What are you gonna do? What would you do pull over and get under an overpass? Something mean, what would you do? What what what good is knowing? You call and say so long love you, man. But that's the other problem. You know, what would go down a second after that presidential alert the cell system. So my bold prediction eleven eighteen AM on Thursday. The first presidential alert is going to be

Federal Emergency Management A Los Angeles United States China President Trump Cosco FAA Google FCC Russia Donald Trump President Eisenhower Moscow Soviet Union Verizon
US to continue backing Saudi coalition in Yemen war

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

US to continue backing Saudi coalition in Yemen war

"Pentagon says it will still accident led coalition fighting rebels in Yemen even as new u. n., report says some of the. Nation's involve, may have, committed, war crimes US is not directly involved in the fight against the rebels in Yemen but it does support the Saudi led coalition. That is amid allegations of civilian casualties war-crimes defense chief Jim Mattis says the, US has been working with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates for several years to cut down on chances of innocence being hurt we have not. Seen any callous disregard by the people were working with Mattis Says the US is constantly reviewing its support for the coalition, and gives no indication that support will

United States Jim Mattis Yemen Doctor Levin Saudi Arabia Dr Sheldon Levine Hazel Crest President Eisenhower Public Indecency Patrick Walsh United Arab Emirates Washington Pentagon Attorney U. N. Fifty Thousand Dollars Seventy-Seven-Year Fifty-Three-Year
Tour de France all but won by Brit Geraint Thomas

To the Best of Our Knowledge

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Tour de France all but won by Brit Geraint Thomas

"Able to figure out a lot, of information about, where they are which they they're in and how are they, are being impacted seventeen states across the country have joined Washington in suing the government over its immigration practices for NPR news. I'm Ana Boyko Iraq in Seattle today is. NASA sixtieth anniversary President Eisenhower signed the. National Aeronautics and Space act on this day in nineteen fifty eight four years later president Kennedy called for NASA's famous mission to the moon which was, accomplished seven, years later, in July nineteen sixty nine all its left and cycling's tour de Frances today's largely ceremonial ride to the finish. Line, in Paris a Welsh rider garren Thomas all but sealed his victory yesterday holding, onto the leader's yellow jersey after the time trial and Francis Basque country barring a crash, in the procession Thomas is set to become the third British writer to win, the tour after Bradley Wiggins and Christopher from I'm Joel Snyder. And this is NPR news from Washington Support for.

Nasa Ana Boyko Iraq Washington President Eisenhower NPR National Aeronautics And Space Thomas Bradley Wiggins President Trump Joel Snyder Seattle Paris Frances Kennedy Writer Christopher Nineteen Fifty Eight Four Year
"president eisenhower" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Of statement jonathan marcus so donald trump has now arrived in the uk for his first visit since becoming the us president before leaving brussels he acknowledged there would be demonstrations against him mr trump woo visit the prime minister at checkers and the queen at windsor castle before heading to scotland to play some golf but this will be a much shorter and more limited working visit compared with some of the more extensive trips made by his predecessors diplomatic correspondent james landale looks at the history of us presidents visiting britain and asks what can we expect of donald trump he works her to newcastle he won't be given the freedom of the city and he certainly went greet an doering crowd of twenty thousand people like this i'm very grateful to jordan now so it was jimmy carter won the hearts of toyed in nineteen seventy seven outside newcastle civic center this is how it used to be british crowds cheering american presidents now just because they were more popular in the past but also because their visits were more rare the first to come was woodrow wilson in one thousand nine hundred eighteen but it wasn't until the end of another world war twenty seven years later that a us president once again greystone shores welcome to my country mr president is the royal beating on the deck of the british cruiser a british tribute to president truman's great leadership if you didn't catch a glimpse of mr truman and plymouth harbor in nineteen forty five it would be another fourteen years before another president came along in nineteen fifty nine razan is an hour arrives in london the second stop on his momentous tour of the western allies capital earlier and he was given a unique owner one that's not been offered to mr trump next day queen elizabeth and the royal family or the president's hosts at val morale castle in the scottish highland wanting president eisenhower did have in common with mr trump is the owned property in scotland knows a golf course but an apartment in a castle that had been given for his war service and he spent a few days there on holiday but such privacy was ref his successor john f kennedy and his wife who came in nineteen sixty one something not even the cabinet could've plan is the half million people lining the route from london airport to the west end just tear a hello to jack and jackie notes that half a million people inevitably such popularity could not last president nixon came in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and visited the prime minister her wilson a check very little indication of disturbances from andy nixon campaign american and british security man had clam to tight ring around the medicos first citizen lyndon johnson never made it nor degenerate ford ronald reagan came a couple of times unlike mr trump to stay at windsor castle and go for a ride with the queen bill clinton came nine times in office and unlike donald trump even to attend a cabinet meeting one of ten blaze i in nine hundred ninety seven i'm not going to give any advice i'm gonna sit here and take of course this trip by mr trump is not a state visit the actually any being too for george w bush in two thousand and three and then barack obama in two thousand eleven when david cameron cooled on his skills as a chef we've just been having a barbecue in the guns of number ten downing street it was a great event there was also probably the first time in history as we stood behind that barbecue that i can say a british prime minister is given an american president a bit of a grilling unlike mr trump president obama was given the rare privilege of addressing both houses of parliament in westminster hall i am told that the last three speakers here have been the pope her majesty the queen and nelson mandela which is either a very high bar or the beginning of the very funny joke donald trump's visit will be more low key in less public than his predecessors to avoid protest and diplomatic rows but even with popular presidents there are always risks in nine hundred seventy seven president carter decided to bid farewell to the queen mother by kissing her full on the lips something that apparently had not happened since the king died in nineteen fifty two i took a step back she recalled later not quite far enough that report by james landale the british government has published details laying out how britain plans to trade with the eu after brexit.

uk jonathan marcus donald trump twenty seven years fourteen years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Of statement jonathan marcus so donald trump has now arrived in the uk for his first visit since becoming the us president before leaving brussels he acknowledged there would be demonstrations against him mr trump woo visit the prime minister at checkers and the queen at windsor castle before heading to scotland to play some golf but this will be a much shorter and more limited working visit compared with some of the more extensive trips made by his predecessors diplomatic correspondent james landale looks at the history of us presidents visiting britain and asks what can we expect of donald trump he works her to newcastle he won't be given the freedom of the city and he certainly went greet an doering crowd of twenty thousand people like this i'm very grateful to jordan now so it was jimmy carter won the hearts of toyed in nineteen seventy seven outside newcastle civic center this is how it used to be british crowds cheering american presidents now just because they were more popular in the past but also because their visits were more rare the first to come was woodrow wilson in one thousand nine hundred eighteen but it wasn't until the end of another world war twenty seven years later that a us president once again greystone shores welcome to my country mr president is the royal beating on the deck of the british cruiser a british tribute to president truman's great leadership if you didn't catch a glimpse of mr truman and plymouth harbor in nineteen forty five it would be another fourteen years before another president came along in nineteen fifty nine razan is an hour arrives in london the second stop on his momentous tour of the western allies capital earlier and he was given a unique owner one that's not been offered to mr trump next day queen elizabeth and the royal family or the president's hosts at val morale castle in the scottish highland wanting president eisenhower did have in common with mr trump is the owned property in scotland knows a golf course but an apartment in a castle that had been given for his war service and he spent a few days there on holiday but such privacy was ref his successor john f kennedy and his wife who came in nineteen sixty one something not even the cabinet could've plan is the half million people lining the route from london airport to the west end just tear a hello to jack and jackie notes that half a million people inevitably such popularity could not last president nixon came in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine and visited the prime minister her wilson a check very little indication of disturbances from andy nixon campaign american and british security man had clam to tight ring around the medicos first citizen lyndon johnson never made it nor degenerate ford ronald reagan came a couple of times unlike mr trump to stay at windsor castle and go for a ride with the queen bill clinton came nine times in office and unlike donald trump even to attend a cabinet meeting one of ten blaze i in nine hundred ninety seven i'm not going to give any advice i'm gonna sit here and take of course this trip by mr trump is not a state visit the actually any being too for george w bush in two thousand and three and then barack obama in two thousand eleven when david cameron cooled on his skills as a chef we've just been having a barbecue in the guns of number ten downing street it was a great event there was also probably the first time in history as we stood behind that barbecue that i can say a british prime minister is given an american president a bit of a grilling unlike mr trump president obama was given the rare privilege of addressing both houses of parliament in westminster hall i am told that the last three speakers here have been the pope her majesty the queen and nelson mandela which is either a very high bar or the beginning of the very funny joke donald trump's visit will be more low key in less public than his predecessors to avoid protest and diplomatic rows but even with popular presidents there are always risks in nine hundred seventy seven president carter decided to bid farewell to the queen mother by kissing her full on the lips something that apparently had not happened since the king died in nineteen fifty two i took a step back she recalled later not quite far enough that report by james landale the british government has published details laying out how britain plans to trade with the eu after brexit.

uk jonathan marcus donald trump twenty seven years fourteen years
Donald Trump, Newcastle and Britain discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

03:23 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Newcastle and Britain discussed on BBC World Service

"Donald trump comes to britain this week he works go to newcastle he won't be given the freedom of the city and he certainly went greet an adoring crowd of twenty thousand people like this a very grateful to jordi now so it was that jimmy carter won the hearts of tyneside in nineteen seventy seven outside newcastle civic center this is how it used to be british crowds cheering american presidents not just because they were more popular in the past but also because their visits were more rare the first to come was woodrow wilson in one thousand nine hundred eighteen but it wasn't until the end of another world war twenty seven years later the us president once again greystone come to my country mr president is the royal speaking on the deck of the british cruiser a british tribute president truman's great leadership if you didn't catch a glimpse of mr truman and plymouth harbor in nineteen forty five it would be another fourteen years before another president came along in nineteen fifty nine arrives in london a second stop on his tour of the western allies capital earlier in bonn and he was given a unique honor one that's not being offered to mr trump queen elizabeth from the royal family all the president's hosts about morale castle in the scottish highlands one thing president eisenhower did have in common with mr trump is the owned property in scotland a golf course but an apartment in a castle that he'd been given for his war service and he spent a few days there on holiday but such privacy was ref his successor john f kennedy and his wife who came in nineteen sixty one something not even the cabinet could've plan is a half million people lining the route from london airport to the west end justice here a hello to jack and jackie notes that half a million people inevitably such popularity could not last of course this trip by mr trump is not a state visit that actually any being too for george w bush in two thousand and three and then barack obama in two thousand eleven when david cameron called on his skills as a chef we've just been having a barbecue guns of number ten downing street it was a great event there was probably the first time in history as we stood behind that barbecue that i can say a british prime minister is given an american president a bit of a grilling unlike mr trump president obama was given the rare privilege of addressing both houses of parliament i am told the last three speakers here have been the pope her majesty the queen and nelson mandela which is either a very high bar or the beginning of a very funny joke donald trump's visit will be more low key and less public than his predecessors to avoid protest and diplomatic rows james landale reporting stay with us if you can neil we'll have a summary in just a moment i'm jackie leonard you've been listening to the newsroom from the bbc in london distribution of the bbc world service in the us has made possible by american public media producer and distributor of award.

Donald Trump Newcastle Britain Twenty Seven Years Fourteen Years
TAIPEI, Taiwan | US lauds Taiwan ties in dedication of new de-facto embassy

Morning Edition

02:35 min | 2 years ago

TAIPEI, Taiwan | US lauds Taiwan ties in dedication of new de-facto embassy

"As the relationship between the united states and china has gotten test your the trump administration has quietly been drawing another player in the region closer taiwan has received unprecedented attention from washington including a new complex to house america's defacto embassy that is going to be opening tomorrow here's npr's rob schmitz on the second floor of taipei's swanky grant hotel there's a bright red hallway dozens of frame photos featuring famous guests from the past sixty years president eisenhower lyndon baines johnson king of saudi arabia and then here in the middle nineteen seventy eight the negotiation for the united states break diplomatic relations with taiwan happened right here the us officially recognized china's communist party as the government of china taiwan status plummeted and so too does the status of the famous guests at the grand hotel world leaders are replaced with b movie stars local politicians and the king of tonga taiwan is never recovered says former senior adviser to taiwan's national security council wenchang lean not will mean that took the boots on the our minister of defense can't meet his us counterpart our foreign affairs minister can't meet his counterpart either our president can't meet trump even a phone call caused an international stir the phone call from taiwanese president cy young went to trump to congratulate him on being elected president may china uneasy the clerk will report the time live the bill h r five thirty five bill to incur that turn to anger earlier this year when both houses of the us congress did something they rarely do anymore they unanimously passed a bill the taiwan travel act which encourages officials at all levels in the us government to visit the island was later signed into law by president trump the taiwan foundation for democracy is georgeanne shoe says in his more than a decade of lobbying on capitol hill he's seen a change of attitude towards china say which friend clock back a satanic or fifteen years ago the atmosphere was totally different totally different whereas nowadays on the hill you'll hear the voice defending chine shoe notices a china fatigue setting in as beijing becomes bolder in its often ham fisted attempts to influence the world both politically and economically these efforts may work in the developing world taiwan sentinel editor j michael cole says but the west is growing weary of beijing so as the world seems to face a bit of crisis.

Taiwan Foundation Editor Beijing Congress Cy Young Tonga Eisenhower Lyndon Baines Johns America J Michael Cole China United States President Trump Senior Adviser Taiwan Saudi Arabia Taipei Rob Schmitz NPR
"president eisenhower" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Corrugated and left out of restaurants and other public places along the highway and they're all kinds of protests and the ghanaian ambassador was embarrassed and as an how're invited him to lunch to try to make up for it and at the meeting of the cat his cabinet president eisenhower agreed to set up a civil rights commission and to ask for a voting rights act in fifty seven and to work for that in the congress and that the commission would have subpoena power in order as he said to put the facts on top of the table about all these events and to make recommendations that might help to solve the problem so it was international events as well as domestic events and the commission was established after a hard fight by the segregationists in the congress and he worked at nineteen fifty eight is an hour did to appoint people to it and get them through the senate while strom thurmond the senator from south carolina filibustered all the time and the commission got set up and its first hearing was in alabama where some of the commissioners were threatened one had the woman commissioner had someone tried to get in her room i mean it was terrible but this was a landmark in the history of civil rights listeners we want to continue in this segment with listeners oral history elements of our series the eight for today who listening right now was involved in the civil rights movement in nineteen fifty eight in any way we would love to hear a little bit of your story how do you remember the backlash in those days or maybe on the other side of the fence you yourself or people you knew were part of that backlash did your did they change over time or could the seeds of the modern culture wars be seen even then say brian my own personal recollections as a i guess i was seventeen i was in the bus station in huntsville alabama passing through there i was after high school i was out doing a road trip as it were and went to the segregated window where the.

eisenhower congress senate strom thurmond senator south carolina alabama commissioner president brian huntsville
"president eisenhower" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Service and we hope you guys didn't get too much rain and but what he didn't realise is the soviets had captured the plane and the pilot gary francis powers who admitted what was going on ultimately president eisenhower had to admit it this was followed then by other public dressing down by khruschev and the negotiations were off the table for a while we're seeing hints of this right now but we're seeing his force were not hudson his strategy received as far as anything involving little rocket man is usually a force little rocket man over in korea's threatening to cancel the long promised peace talks that are supposed to take place june fifteenth i believe in singapore he says the us and south korea they're conducting regular military exercises and i don't like it they have to call it off or we're going to cancel the summit this is the big wrench in the peace talks sarah sanders the greatest press secretary ever she's so good she handled this perfectly she said quote if they wanna meet we'll be ready if they don't that's okay too this is something that we fully expected and of course they expected it of course we knew that this crazed little dictator was gonna try to throw a wrench and things at the end of dry to trick us and get a leg up on the united states as fine they can do it we don't need this we don't actually need these peace talks donald trump doesn't need these peace talks he doesn't you know brock obama had absolutely no legacy he knew that his legacy was going to be a raced by the end of his presidency so he pushed for that iran deal so hard because he needed something needed that legacy he was dense even if it means we fly airplanes full of cash and free up sanctions and give them a path to a nuclear weapon even if it means.

eisenhower korea south korea press secretary united states brock obama gary francis president sarah sanders donald trump iran
"president eisenhower" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The origin of day and actually began in nineteen fifty seven in fact president eisenhower established the first law day adopted in fifty seven i think the first one was celebrated and commemorated and fifty eight and one of the key speakers at the event here in washington dc at the federal courthouse was we rogers was the attorney general united states is portrait hangs conference from the deputy attorney general's office and since then we've commemorated every year as recognition of the centrality of the rule of law to american life but in the president's today he makes two really important points first off is that he quotes supreme court justice antonin scalia who spoke about the fact that the law is not just about written words in the constitution it's about the culture of the people and you can write a constitution that has a bill of rights but there are countries where they don't enforce those rights so the rule of law is in part about the character of the people who are charged with enforcing the law and the other point the president makes is that the separation of powers enshrines the rule of law in america the fact that we do divide our powers between congress which enacts the law the executive branch which is responsible for implementing or carrying out the law and the courts which responsible for interpreting it now there are always disputes at the margins between the branches the differences of agreement over issues but the fundamental structure set up by the separation powers is really important to the garden wall so i think it's partly about culture partly about structure and partly about the rights enshrined in the constitution one more from rod rosenstein cut number five the department of justice is you just mentioned a part of the executive branch but it is also the anthony charged with enforcing the rule of law given how human nature works there are certain to be conflicts between the two can you tell us how you go about managing those conflicts conflicts between which the rule of law and certain demands made by the chief executive no no there are no such conflicts no i'm just saying that this is part of human nature writing is nothing peculiar to our time.

eisenhower deputy attorney general president antonin scalia congress rod rosenstein anthony chief executive washington rogers attorney america executive department of justice
"president eisenhower" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Bolton howen linda continues this incredible story linda joy in my twenty part earth bio fury about pi a weekold war that i call coopers gyn he described working with president eisenhower and vice president richard nixon in washington dc in the executive office building and in the white house he said quote eisenhower and nixon knew all about area fifty one and what was going on with the alien of course president harry truman knew all about it too but i think nixon and eisenhower were the last two presidential executives to know everything presidents were just chopped off from the need to know after eisenhower and they work given the highly class fide alien information nixon told us quote from all the reports i have received business nixon we don't know if they are trying to survey earth for attack later or thumb apparently do good but some torture people and let them go or we are missing people altogether we don't know if some ever come back that were abducted and we have no idea where the aliens took them or where they went close quote well that was the whole gist of information that up until 1960 that we really were not sure whether the aliens had come to kill us eventually or come to help us or what why were they here on earth why didn't they go some place else and leave us alone cooper's stein said they had cia meetings at the white house in fall 1958 with richard nixon and later in the spring of 1950 nine with both president dwight eisenhower and vice president nixon and cookers dine told me quote my boss was always trying to get more information from langley cia headquarters as far as the alien beings were concerned sometimes we had a huge amount of military society something that we knew or completely legitimate observations of alien activity all of a sudden we would have dozens of alien kraft in one region on earth in military radar screen the just flew right over at high speed though is we knew were authentic because they will recorded a military equipment we also had moving film of the craft on radar because there were cameras they could filmed the.

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"And george noory back with linda bolton how and linda continues this incredible story linda linda joy in my twenty part earth filed kyrie about i a weekold war that i call coopers stein he described working with president eisenhower and vice president richard nixon in washington dc in the executive office building and in the white house you said quote eisenhower and nixon knew all about area fifty one and what was going on with the alien of course president harry truman knew all about it too but i think nixon and eisenhower were the last two presidential executives to know everything presidents were just chopped off from the need to know after eisenhower and they were given the highly classified alien information nixon told us quote from all the reports i have received this nixon we don't know if they are trying to survey earth for attack later or some apparently do good but some torture people and let them go or we are missing people altogether we don't know if some ever come back that were abducted and we have no idea where the aliens took them or where they went close quote well that was the whole gist of information up until 1960 that we really were not sure whether the aliens who come to kill us eventually or come to help us or what why were they here on earth why didn't they go someplace else and leave us alone cooper stein said they had cia meetings at the white house in fall 1958 with richard nixon and later in the spring of 1950 nine with both president dwight eisenhower and vice president nixon and cooper stein told me quote my boss was always trying to get more information from langley cia headquarters as far as the alien beings were concerned sometimes we had a huge amount of military sightings something that we knew or completely legitimate observations of alien activity all of a sudden we would have dozens of alien kraft in one region on earth in military radar screen the just flew right over at high speed though is we knew were off indyk because they will recorded on military equipment we also had moving film is the craft on radar because there were cameras the.

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KOMO

"His home in north carolina abc's dan harris has a look at his life there are powerful god opened briefly for more than half a century billy graham brought the word of god brought him a million 100 required god is going to come back and set up his kingdom his influence reached every corner of the globe and all the way to the white house a long way from the north carolina dairy farm where he grew up during the great depression graham found his calling at age sixteen when a traveling preacher came to town by went back night after lunch for moonlight up the young to realize that there was an emptiness in my life quite soon he was filling revival tents and expanding into radio and television his message was for everyone regardless of race years before it was the law he insisted that his audience is not be segregated fight on what you're religious background a racial background on cultural background it makes no good graham first went to the white house in 1954 an audience with president truman it did not go well but he hit it off with president eisenhower and came to be known as the unofficial white house chaplain he befriended and vouch for jfk helping him overcome anticatholic prejudice he stuck with johnson through vietnam and nixon through watergate and offered his prayers and cancelled to every commander in chief through the rest of the 20th century and into the twentyfirst only presence need comfort the faith yes and really graham lloyd great dispenser comfort for me and for.

abc dan harris white house truman eisenhower johnson vietnam north carolina billy graham president nixon graham lloyd
"president eisenhower" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KTRH

"For a youth disciple ship he started in nineteen 45 as a youth pastor with it or with a youth ministry in two thousand eleven he said of his work with twelve presidents people in power have spiritual and personal needs like everyone else and often they have no one to talk to political reports the would council president eisenhower with ronald reagan it was a friend dating back two years before he became president the offer guidance to gerald ford discussing his plans to pardon richard nixon president george h w bush invited him to the white house at the start of the first gulf war president clinton sought graham's counsel during the monica lewinsky scandal perhaps most dramatic graham council president lyndon johnson soon after the assassination of president john f kennedy 65 johnson asked graeme to go to somalia bamut to help calm racial tensions there graham would go on to officiate lbj funeral 1973 president george w bush credited billy graham for leading him to his faith in christ in we'll develop a lifelong venture huh suwat were of another of his zoa savory pellnas it as well when muscle also my whitley said we'll take that into the break rest in peace milligram mm yes man uh ooh yes i was talking to dr thereto at houston heartburn it first street hospital and what's interesting is one of the only things one of the only conditions out there that people just selfmedicate is go out just artist figure it out on on my own and longterm acid reflux in heartburn can do some serious damage go see dr.

gerald ford houston billy graham george w bush lbj funeral somalia president john f kennedy monica lewinsky george h w bush richard nixon eisenhower whitley graeme lyndon johnson clinton white house president ronald reagan two years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WCTC

"Left all right pushy fast pull it back the guy owns a battery company go say but the car was owned by president eisenhower his motherinlaw wild your back excellent so fast forward two years friend of mine pulls up uses a check out my tesla take a for a dry mmm now drive into tesla right a hundred years later they right electric car and he says let go the steering wheel of the tesla of the tesla a you let go how fast we going about forty five right i as rival so now drove itself he sir right through role bridge really rights were over it while thanked traffic lights and it comes up in a chosen and whoever onto tesla knows what it's doing right of people who have been in a tesla absolutely amazing amazing car amazing amazing car i've been in a lamborghini right ferrari's ferrari porsche driven a ferrari are raceway racially park on the rise arodhes nazar ottis new lamborghini right i have been an right he says so we get into a safearea meaning down shiite right now and in the township raceway park right we're on air service wrote in step on a guess right literally two point two seconds they're calling from zero to six west and hoda chris mode the yeah that's the ludicrous as they go a wound may know absolutely a on the reporting so yes so a hundred years no no the span of that is amazing what we but there were led to calls back in the 1900s without ago yeah without a doubt and other walk who where can people vegas people is listening right now they want to open a business in all bridge they want to speak more about the how they can grow their business and overreach where can i goes or website is a something they can contact the usregistered you can jump up on the website or agencies just give us a call a mayor's office of economic development right of on the website to adds up on our website tune and yet just reach out to us.

president tesla ferrari porsche eisenhower lamborghini township raceway park hundred years two seconds two years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You not we've randy forbes as soon as we know about nuclear winner until the 1980s but you had all these what's most shocking here's and we've had all these plans that have existed since eisenhower's year uh presidency and that continue and perhaps the most shocking thing here is that there's been a continuity of this in delegating more and more that's ray eisenhower himself further one of the secrets that i described in this book which is in a sense no longer secret because the documents have been available now for some twenty years or so and yet harding anybody seems aware when i bring it out what i told mcgeorge bundy the assistant hutu president kennedy back in nineteen sixty one a long time ago and that was william he didn't know at that point the president eisenhower had delegated authority to use nuclear weapons on their own initiative to his field commanders here so theater commanders in case communications were out or if there was another urgent to attack that they feel they wasn't time to consult with on they could go ahead and they had in turn delegated that to lower commanders so i knew that was true in the pacific medication was a true elsewhere in other words as ovation power and ever since there was not just one finger on the button people worry about as donald trump have his finger on the button on the answer is metaphorically yes but not only donald trump on it how very widely how many people could actually believes themselves authorized with communications outer some difficulty to launch this weapon of how many could get it launched under their command with or without authority manser is probably no president has ever really known that talking a daniel ellsberg and let me remind you that has a new book out called the doomsday machine confessions of a nuclear war planner that goes all the way back to herman cahn your title yes karn invented the notion of what he called a doomsday machine which would be a device that if triggered by a prearranged set of provocations of some either a nuclear attack or something else if you programmed reviewed with a computer would destroy all life on earth and the only reason for considering such a thing i shall determine khan was a worker rand would you therefore i was a futurist he was a a brilliant very fat very burning ferry fat.

randy forbes ray eisenhower mcgeorge bundy president nuclear weapons donald trump daniel ellsberg herman cahn khan harding kennedy william twenty years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The single most beautiful green i've ever seen anywhere in america oh yeah because route one was north of it which is the root the really connected florida two uh main and then later after world war to an end and when president eisenhower created the interstate highway system uh i 95 which kit again connects florida two main was also north of it it was completely bypassed in that sense of being bypassed for the same time dense and filled of history uh allows fragments of culture that are often loss um in american culture to be vibrant and presence in its secondly and the thing which i find the most interesting because you know i approached this not as historian a but as somebody who is just in the world building things you don't have built over 700 things in the last thirty years i call you a working historian this could be and it is is a thing which people associate with the england which is not truly of new england but his most prevalent in new england because they w england was not developed as much as the as the rest of the country and that is the covered bridge the coverage is is something you think of of course will that's up in vermont new hampshire in and of course the cover bridge had a reason to exist because it did ssh ed the snow that would fall in the specially in a little ice age new england just unrelentingly and and the bridges were colder because they were floating in space when it was twenty degrees outside lots of ice so if you could get the snow off of that it would be a safe transit across the the flowing waters but we also had a lot of woods so that was good but even though we had two we had on a road system that would connect towns and industries that road system was simply not updated flung over 100 years really until the federal highway program because we didn't have cars and.

florida world war eisenhower england america president vermont twenty degrees thirty years 100 years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Single most beautiful green i've ever seen anywhere in america because route one was north of it which is the root the really connected florida two uh main and then later after world war to an end and when president eisenhower created the interstate highway system uh i ninety five which kit again connects florida two main was also north of it it was completely bypassed in that sense of being bypassed for the same time dense and filled of history uh uh allows fragments of culture that are often loss um in american culture to be vibrant and present and then secondly and the thing which i find the most interesting because you know i approached this not as historian a but as somebody who is just in the world building things you know have built over 700 things in the last thirty years i call you a working historian this could be and it is is a thing which people associate with the england which is not truly of new england but is most prevalent in new england because the win good was not developed as much as as the rest of the country and that is the covered bridge the coverage is is something you think of of course will that's up in vermont new hampshire in and of course the cover bridge had a reason to exist because it did ssh ed the snow that would fall in the specially in a little ice age new england just unrelentingly and and the bridges were colder because they were floating in space when it was twenty degrees outside lots of ice so if you could get the snow off of that it would be a safe transit across the the flowing waters but we also had a lot of woods so that was good but even though we had two we had on a road system that would connect towns and industries um that road system was simply not updated front over a hundred years really until the federal highway program because we didn't have cars and the.

america florida world war eisenhower england president vermont twenty degrees hundred years thirty years
"president eisenhower" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"The first president was president eisenhower oh i join the rain for nineteen 61 uh halfway through kennedy was murdered uh that was short correct course we are the cuban missile crisis to uh while i was at the core and uh we were we were uh it's a lotta trauma in the country and we're prepared the wiped off the map but uh you know we also had two the vietnam war protests a lot of people were killed uh we had uh we had national sunk campuses uh couple students got killed in a shootout with that yeah and and uh let's not forget the democratic convention when uh when the police uh uh flew for wack and heads they called it a police riot right the news there was chaos i can sixty a genial no yeah but uh but this is different what's going on now uh president trump is taking a leadership of peeling back this onion of uh illicit behaviour uh going on in our government uh he uh he is able to do that because is hands or blaine and i believe i believe the man of the right hand and uh and he is going to bring down the establishment and he's doing it their fighting back aren't they oh yeah they are they are just uh just to said nailed because they are uh you know i'm watching and i'm going to be tweeting cnn and nbc and you just see that they are they are and the game they they they know they're in deep trouble uh i i watch the uh jeff sessions uh your roof testimony yeah on uh ceased by not taking those democrats that were uh ask questions they were nervous they they were worried about because they are looking at the guy that's going to bring them down uh because jeff sessions at my opinion is the righteous guy and he is going to uh uh.

president eisenhower kennedy vietnam war trump cnn blaine nbc jeff
"president eisenhower" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The cold war he wasn't just president eisenhower and president reagan president bush george herbert walker bush won the cold war plus a democrats president trump men and president kennedy and others democrats lace scooped jackson in the us senate so can we stop this idea that the democrats you can't work with them every successful american president and there are no exceptions every successful american president has worked with the opposition party even when then president commands a dominant majority in congress was this president doesn't you need to work with the opposition let's go for your calls to to jeff in houston you're on the michael medved show i remember the cold war that a great deal not because we were hurt throwing our weight around it was a far or order here predictable world at how kind of centrecourt but someone like saddam hussein and their hoppers dollar hardware cap and share a great theory of a rebulk markers there were no taliban and it would be no i uh thanks for be kept in order an abrupt and the and the often and what auditors rear and what about me feder hurt the american people would have no meroetic coworker tenure they never would have left the court and our barack obama anywhere near the white house and hoerster the nuclear football you went over there were we trigger a vacation we at a piece it are there and we will over at wish stopped though we start worrying about national defence we have a cost in europe which is still have you'll bomb a name on it and you're working bettered what we're saying he came barely hug over there and it's could joke i shoot at overly better better who would never worry granted apparently got eager to preface you'd on the earth quiet are good you would never bob way anderson somebody over there with a little bit or span at the the point is that are representatives of to to nato in the case of k billy hutchinson i did the representatives you send doesn't matter the people who make the policy matter a great deal and i i understand that being a texan you may have a particular problems with senator formersenator hutchinson but i frankly don't and the idea that that should be the focus of our concern is is not one that that i by the the.

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"president eisenhower" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"president eisenhower" Discussed on WJR 760

"In roswell between july of ninety forty seven in december 52 the military new weapon boyscout thirteen extra i feel spacecraft eleven of them into mexico one in nevada wanted arizona there were two other crash in mexico one in norway said they were going down pretty quickly and they had oldest you know fodder to reverse engineer well the military industrial complex you know if after two things here after the new weapon thicky united states on top of the world and they're also after control and so they keep the information from president eisenhower who who wanted to party he warned of the military industrial complex she could get lafayette up on google big ad because and the review is warning was because they were taking control this whole thing keeping it away uh and the reason they wear is because dig the majestic twelve expanding it and they were they realized that this technology has the ability to replace fossil fuels like measure and also change the whole uh you know the entire eu economics of the planet because if you have a free clean energy source that uh doesn't need any generators things like that it selfcontained uh did anybody can have electrocuted free electrically than anybody can you know britt raised her economics up in and said why why why haven't we why have we taken advantage of their lavishly exploited it while because big oil doesn't want it i mean dig oil sits on the board of this dis uh black ops programs as m j twelve which has changed its name to see core pi forty announced noted magic uh and they're they're basically a giant uh rico ac you know they're they're operating illegally they're using a eighty two hundred billion dollars in taxpayer funds that are secretly pumped through different pentagon programs that nobody has can have charge over and they're controlling an energy source it could it like you said could have could end uh climate change greenhouse gases could could save our planet could change it end poverty and they won't really fit.

mexico climate change pentagon britt clean energy eu google lafayette president roswell greenhouse gases energy source eisenhower engineer norway arizona nevada eighty two hundred billion dol