35 Burst results for "President Chief"

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:42 min | Last month

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We work with large employers. All around the world and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction it really is about. How do we help. People be healthier happier and more productive at work in in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners. For those of you. Who haven't connected the dots virgin pulse. One of sir. Richard branson's virgin group companies. So with the gentlemen like that behind something like this and and rajiv and as part of the executive leadership team you can imagine. Some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by sir. Richard branson leadership in his philosophy is. If you take care of your employees. They'll take care of your business and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees so strong and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs. It seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on. What should be on every medical leaders agenda today. Well i'm biased. But i think it has to be a behavior. Change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem. The tide of rising obesity diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day. There's so much we can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives. Just how we're treated ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves and so. I think it's not necessarily a hot topic. I think it should be. And and i wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce greater outcomes and reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin pulse is an example of how you guys are improving. Health outcomes. well. I think we really tried to think. Outside of the box i think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective. And they've been around for decades so we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like. They're failures rather than telling them that they're sick. What if we actually make them feel successful. What if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat. What would that do for self esteem for their motivation. And for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth and the problem with that. Is they take a health risk. Assessment tells them. You're sick you know you have high risk. Your unhealthy needs to do more. Change your lifestyle. Get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating and so we've said is. Is there a scientists out there. Is there a behavior. Change model that focuses on success. We found a scientist by the name of dr. bj fog out of stanford university and dr fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change. And he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior. Change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it. It's called b equals m. a. T. equals motivation. Times ability. Times a trigger. And so what he means by. That is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do first of all. They have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it and a third is you have to trigger them a remind them to trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space. We ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability so we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go. That takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability Really know how to do that where to get started so forth so dr fog says well. Motivation is hard to change. You may be your motivation. Waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis. We can't really change. Somebody's motivation that easily. What you can do is changed the behavior. You're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that. They can actually do that very easily. It doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it you can help them build what we call success momentum and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change. We break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action. We asked people to do that with trigger then and then when they do it we reward them. Make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward and then we ask them to do something harder. The next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way which is really the key to behavior. Change is creating habits. Yeah ranchi this is a really interesting model and the science behind it. So i have used your application and i have found it to be really really cool. It's good to see the science behind it now. I appreciate the little wins and then you give badges and then on the back end is so listeners. If you're an employer. I think you'll you'll really like to learn that the way that they structure this is in such a way that they help the employee be healthier so part of the carrot is and they use more carrots and sticks in the software. They'll give you a your employer will give you a discount in your insurance if you can.

Richard branson sixty minutes dr. bj fog dr fog today Each time trump Second rajiv third four times a week stanford university one double digits One Virgin pulse first decades ranchi
"president chief" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

01:59 min | 3 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Work Inspired - A BOS Podcast

"In chicago about <Speech_Male> your <Speech_Male> o'hare expansion. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> We <Speech_Music_Male> yeah <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> so many <Speech_Female> years telling people that we only <Speech_Female> serves chicago <Speech_Female> midway airport and now we <Speech_Music_Female> get to tell him <SpeakerChange> we serve. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> It's very <Speech_Male> exciting <Speech_Male> more. Southwest flies <Speech_Male> to come. I'll be excited <Speech_Male> to follow you and <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> just your company. But the whole <Speech_Male> industry is we all <Speech_Male> navigate the <Speech_Male> our way out of the pandemic <Speech_Male> into the post pandemic <Speech_Male> world but <Speech_Male> thank you so much <Speech_Male> for spending some of your valuable <Speech_Music_Male> time <SpeakerChange> with us today <Speech_Music_Female> really appreciate it <Speech_Music_Female> enjoyed it <Speech_Music_Female> very much thank you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for listening. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you enjoyed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this conversation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Please take a moment to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rate our show. <Speech_Music_Male> If you haven't already <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> be sure to subscribe <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the work inspired <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast so that you <Speech_Music_Male> don't miss. Any of the incredible <Speech_Music_Male> guests we <Speech_Music_Male> have planned for upcoming <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episodes. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We'll continue to find <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the best and brightest <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> minds and business so that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement>

Biden urges caution as U.K. coronavirus variant spreads rapidly through United States

The World and Everything In It

01:27 min | 3 months ago

Biden urges caution as U.K. coronavirus variant spreads rapidly through United States

"As numerous states began to ease corona virus restrictions. The biden again urging state and local governments to slow down the president's chief medical adviser. Dr anthony fauci told. Cbs's face the nation. It really would be risky to have yet again another surge which we do not want to happen because we're plateauing at of quite a high level. Sixty seventy thousand new infections for day is quite high new infections peaked in early january about three hundred thousand per day and then fell off sharply for five weeks straight but around the middle of last month that progress ground to a halt over the past three or four weeks. The rate of new daily infections is virtually unchanged an epidemiologist. Dr michael ulcer home warned on sunday. We are in the eye of the hurricane right now. It appears that things are going very well. He will see blue skies but we know is about to come upon. Is the situation with this. Be one one seven. Variant of virus originated in the united kingdom. That today is wrecking havoc. In parts of europe dozens of countries have renewed lockdowns to try and control spread of the variant but even as the decline of new daily cases in the united states has leveled off. Since mid february new hospitalizations have continued to drop and some governors say. Now that most high risk americans have access to vaccines. It's time to reopen.

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Michael Ulcer Biden CBS United Kingdom Europe United States
Johnson & Johnson says its COVID vaccine is a "game-changer"

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

Johnson & Johnson says its COVID vaccine is a "game-changer"

"New corona virus response team is expressing optimism about johnson and johnson. Single-dose covid nineteen vaccine which could be close to securing emergency use authorization from the fda. Dr anthony fauci the president's chief medical advisor on covid nineteen spoke a short time ago but the eight j. and j. vaccine's efficacy against severe illness. In the study. That was just reported by johnson johnson and johnson. It was a trial using their at twenty six and the overall vaccine efficacy in in the in the study was sixty six percent but for the united states it was seventy to present. He says even in south africa where more virulent strain of corona virus is spreading quickly. There have been no hospitalizations for vaccine candidates compared with candidates who were in the placebo group

Johnson Dr Anthony Fauci Johnson Johnson FDA United States South Africa
Democrats to 'act big' on $1.9T aid; GOP wants plan split

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Democrats to 'act big' on $1.9T aid; GOP wants plan split

"President Biden's Kobe to rescue plan is turning into an early political test of his administration and the democratic control of Congress getting the one point nine trillion dollar rescue package through Congress is the president's chief legislative priorities we got a lot to do and the first thing they're gonna do is get this code Republicans though want to split the package into pieces saying it's a loaded with too many other priorities Democrats are threatening to pass the existing bill without GOP backing though Biden spokeswoman Jen Psaki says the president would rather not he continues to believe that this can be will should be and will be a bipartisan bill Republicans say Democrats would be undercutting the president's own unity message if they go it alone Sager Matt Connie Washington

President Biden Congress Kobe Jen Psaki Biden GOP Sager Matt Connie Washington
Italy: Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte resigns

90.3 KAZU Programming

02:22 min | 4 months ago

Italy: Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte resigns

"Prime Minister just separate content, resigned today pushing the country into political uncertainty. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports. The power vacuum comes as Italy grapples with the covert 19 pandemic and severe economic stagnation counted formally handed his resignation to president said drama to read law at noon today, public with some Latina Good. Sam painted, the president's chief of staff, said moderator will begin consultations tomorrow with all political leaders to try to form a new government contest. Government. A coalition of the anti establishment five star movement and center left parties is the 66 since the end of World War two in the fall of fascism. Political scientists, Roberto D'Alimonte, he says Italians are unfortunately used to government crisis. We have not resolved in Italy the issue of political stability of government stability, and this is another example of these Malaysian on the Italian political system. But this government collapse is particularly ominous. Italy continues to Battle Cove in 19, which has already killed more than 86,000 people and devastated the country's already weak economy. People do not understand really, why We were in the political crisis, which is really internal for the political plans flash of conditions. That clash of ambitions were sparked by grumblings among coaches coalition partners In recent months, they began to complain about his centralization of power and his handling of some $240 billion in recovery funds Italy is to receive from the European Union. Last week, former Prime Minister Matteo Renzi withdrew his party's support in protest over cold his handling of the second phase of the pandemic and what he called contest lack of vision for Italy's future. Dante hopes to get the nod to try to form another government. But Dolly Monte says he's not irreplaceable. My government as soon as possible, went without culture and go on and take care of the epidemic in the recovery plane. Members of the outgoing coalition want at all costs to avert snap elections, which increases pressure on the squabbling politicians to reach a compromise.

Sylvia Poggioli Italy Roberto D'alimonte Battle Cove NPR SAM Prime Minister Matteo Renzi Dolly Monte European Union Dante
Biden reinstating COVID-19 restrictions for overseas travelers

News, Traffic and Weather

03:37 min | 5 months ago

Biden reinstating COVID-19 restrictions for overseas travelers

"Is is reinstating reinstating coronavirus. coronavirus. Travel Travel restrictions restrictions resented resented by by former former President President Trump. Trump. Trump Trump rolled rolled back back restriction restriction on on travelers travelers from from Europe, Europe, the the United United Kingdom Kingdom in in Brazil Brazil in in the the days days before before he left office. But Biden is reversing that he's also adding South Africa to the travel ban list More now from ABC. It's George Stephanopoulos. We're joined now by the president, chief Medical advisor Dr Anthony Fauci. Dr Fauci. Thanks for joining us again. So we've seen this announcement of the travel ban from South Africa. Reimposing travel bans the other is but at this point are they really going to do any good? You know, I believe so, George. I think that was a prudent decision because Right now, even though our surveillance isn't as comprehensive as we'd like it to be. Yet it does not appear that this particular mutant is in the United States, although it well may be, But if you have AH, free inflow of people From a country in which that mutant is clearly dominant. I talked to my colleagues, often in South Africa, It clearly is dominant there. I believe the travel ban will be important. In addition, Having a situation where anybody coming into the country now is going to read me quiet toe have a negative test before they even get on the plane when they land to have a degree of quarantine as well as another test, so I believe it was prudent, even though it's never perfect. There's always a possibility and even a likelihood of some slippage, but but I think the band which was discussed Very intensively by the group was the right decision. Let's talk about these various. I know you're concerned about the South African very not sure if it's here yet. We've gotten some evidence over the last several days that the United Kingdom variant Is actually more deadly. Explain what we're finding. At the beginning, George when it was first studied intensively in the UK, the UK scientists made a statement which was clearly obvious that this was more easily spread. I am or transmissible When they looked at it did not look like on a case by case basis that it was actually more virulent is the word they used, namely, more likely to make you seriously ill will kill you when they went and became more granular and look at the data. He became convinced that it is, in fact, ah bit Maura of virulent, namely, make making it more difficult when you get to the point of serious disease and even death, So I believe their data. I haven't seen all of it. But from what I've heard, I believe the data. We're still seeing shortages of vaccines all across the country. At this point. I know the president. Has has issued a serious of orders that are designed to increase vaccine production. What more can be done right now? Well, I think it's exactly what the president is doing. We've got to pull out all the stops. We gotta find out. You know, there's a lot of disappearance in this big disparities that you see and discrepancies. George, for example, you might call up one group locally and say that this vaccine there it's not getting into people's arms. It's available. You make a call to another group. When you say we don't have enough vaccine, we have people lined up. We've got to get into the trenches and figure out exactly at that local level What's going on and how to fix it? Because President Biden has said right from the beginning, he's going to pull out all the stops. If things don't look like they're working well, instead of blaming people were going to just try and fix it and jump all over it. That's what we're doing. It's gonna take a little time You're going to still hear about people who are not getting vaccine You wanted as well as vaccine that's on the shelf, but hopefully within a very reasonable period of time. That's going to get corrected from good Morning America. That's Dr Anthony Fauci.

President Trump Trump Trump United United Kingdom Kingdom South Africa Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Fauci Brazil Europe George Stephanopoulos George UK Donald Trump Biden ABC Travel America Maura President Biden
"president chief" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

05:04 min | 6 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"Know nine of the top sixty four already honest for a initiative so some of the big leagues in the world in fact. Es g claims that nine of the nine largest a big date environments records on eight of those nine and the one that they didn't get confirmation was one that would reveal. What the use. So we're still at the top of the five hundred but my point beans will work with you when we staffed appropriately. We're not a company that can take you out for a a turkey. Melt more dinner in every little city in the country because that'd be very expensive go to market but if you don't mind working remotely with us we will put people literally on zoom. Call you right away. That will be extension of your team. That will help you build up the poc criteria. Build the justification. Help you build the models that make you successful. Because we don't want any unsuccessful missions. We want successful missions. That help you be more competitive on in a very competitive market is people and things get loosened up a little bit but great t of question does thank you know absolutely on i think all of our audience and probably very tech savvy into. We were already doing work from land very used to is aging into environments remotely to work like online so zoom and whatnot was very native to us and As much socializing in person for catch up to by tweeting. The beverage was fun. we were already doing. Remote coles group calls around the world to get the best of the best very picky about who they talk to. I imagine it's the case that you really that concerned about the type of organization particularly the industry or even the data type. It's most of the problem they tried to solve. And you're welcoming those conversations with people to bring the weed earliest problems to you when they've got a simple problem. Data management data storage and performance. That's fair we do. We tend galvanize or on a couple of use cases a little bit easier pharmaceuticals life. Sciences are no brainer. I obviously financials especially around hedge trading a quad trading and We do a great job. In examining and finding out the experience a false positives for fraud detection. So financials are good work. In you know in videos in investor in us and we just went public this morning that are a reference architecture for the one hundred the flagship line for invidia. Who's a great work of them. Their customer service they're a great partner and Know we a representative for a one hundred. Basically we do a great job of creating a need for a gpu or getting a better utilization..

coles group
"president chief" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

Conversations with Dez

04:36 min | 6 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Conversations with Dez

"Even though we can give x performance and ease of management the benefit hears you consume our pride either on aws in the cloud for example or to some of the server partners. You've known in love. For years hewlett packard dell super micro attached to entira penguin etc. So you keep find from doing business with traditionally and then like twenty years ago you might have bought a computer from intel inside within so people say by that new. Hp dl three twenty five or a big twin super micro. But i want to have within welcome to come stations with dez. I'm your host does blanchfield. Today i'm joined in.

hewlett packard dell intel Hp blanchfield
How is the market responding to the passage of stimulas relief

Bloomberg Businessweek

02:46 min | 6 months ago

How is the market responding to the passage of stimulas relief

"Is Hillary Kramer, president, chief investment officer to Angie. Capital research, author of Game changer. Investing how to profit from Tomorrow's Billion dollar trend. She is on the phone in New York City. Hi, Hilary. How are you, Carol? I'm very well, Thank you. Oh, good. Well, it's good to have you back on. Interesting day. I called it kind of a moody day, which is maybe just cause I'm in a mood. Um, It's just that kind of a day, but I think you know we're realizing I think watching the pandemic we got You know another round of relief. But folks are saying it's really just not enough. Even though we got it done. How do you see the market environment right now? Hillary like again actually hit the bingo. Which is that In many ways, it is a moody day. I mean, this is the This is the pre Christmas slowdown in terms of volume, of course so Mean that that's kind of the foundation. But at the same time we have the vaccine priced into the 2021 numbers. We have the end of Covitz president into the toilet 21 numbers and and even amount market bounced back very quickly. Yesterday. Once everyone understood the virus mutation news that it But it doesn't make the vaccine void and it still could be very effective. Um, it just it just to mark it didn't really liked what it heard and had a chance to really digest. Um and that's what you will see my dirty down modernist down today and usually that stuff. Is that all the time, but expectation and realization is setting in the stimulus. Carol. That's another important point that you bring up when it comes to the stimulus. If you really take a look, I mean, there's there's money for food international there. There's money for new car. I was looking at 5000 pages, but we're skinning to know it. We're joking about how long it is. Yeah, there's money for new cars for the Agriculture Department. I just There's just stuff in there, and it's very disappointing on even the summary of it. Anyone you know who doesn't want to read the 5000 pages? It's very clear that, um there's just a little too much port. There's a way too much pork in there, and and then there's also some fatigue. You know, there's There's been a lot of anything that had the name cloud to it. You know, those stocks have gone up in the Amazons and apples. I mean, you know, and they hit their peak a while ago. But still the markets trying to find its footing since September that this small wrestle small cap is up 35% September alone. Uh, that's the mood of the market. Yeah,

Hillary Kramer Carol Angie Hilary New York City Hillary Agriculture Department
Chief of staff Mark Meadows tests positive for Covid-19

The Autolab

00:32 sec | 7 months ago

Chief of staff Mark Meadows tests positive for Covid-19

"Member of the Trump White House has contracted covert 19 Here's White House correspondent Greg this time it's the president's chief of staff, Mark Meadows. Officials confirm that Meadows tested positive for the Corona virus as the country set to daily records for confirmed cases in the pandemic. He's the latest in a long list of White House and administration officials who have been diagnosed with the virus. Meadows traveled with Mr Trump in the run up to Election Day and last appeared in public early Wednesday morning without a mask when the president first spoke after the election,

Trump White House Mark Meadows White House Meadows Greg Mr Trump
Trump's chief of staff argued that Covid-19 cases on Mike Pence's team should be concealed

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:28 sec | 8 months ago

Trump's chief of staff argued that Covid-19 cases on Mike Pence's team should be concealed

"Vice president Pence. Staffers testing positive. ABC News senior White House correspondent Cecilia Vega sources telling ABC News. The president's chief of staff, wanted to keep the outbreak on Pence's team from becoming public. Mark Meadows now says that was because of privacy concerns. Democratic nominee Joe Biden, saying the administration is waving the white flag of defeat, and that quote it's sadly no surprise, then that this virus continues to rage unchecked across the country, and even in the White House itself. Well,

Pence White House White House Correspondent Abc News Vice President Joe Biden Cecilia Vega President Trump Mark Meadows Chief Of Staff
Pence's Chief of Staff and Other Key Aides Test Positive for Coronavirus

Ric Edelman

00:45 sec | 8 months ago

Pence's Chief of Staff and Other Key Aides Test Positive for Coronavirus

"Members of the vice president's inner circle are now testing positive We get more from ABC is Kristine Sloan. ABC News has learned. The vice president's chief of staff, Mark Short, another top political aide, and at least one additional staff are in the V. P s office. All tested positive for Kobe nine. Teen, the vice president and his wife have tested negative and Pence will continue his schedule, including a planned trip to North Carolina, despite being in close contact with his chief of staff, and that chief of staff now in quarantine after testing positive for covert 19. He's one of three of the vice president's top staffers currently diagnosed with the Corona virus. Dr Anthony Ferrel CI, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and

Vice President Chief Of Staff Abc News Dr Anthony Ferrel Ci Kristine Sloan ABC National Institute Of Allergy Kobe Pence Mark Short North Carolina Director
Poverty rates continue to rise as virus relief talks fall through

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:40 min | 8 months ago

Poverty rates continue to rise as virus relief talks fall through

"What is at stake here for this economy as there is clearly no relief coming right unemployment numbers yesterday still hundred and fifty nine, hundred, thousand people industrial production is down people are spending the savings they accumulated when they were getting the six hundred dollars of extra unemployment money How okay. Here's a starting question. How bad is it? Well I. Feel like I'm I'm I feel like I'm always so gloomy when I come on your show that. The situation does seem like it's getting worse I mean the number of Americans in poverty has grown by. Sixteen million in the last few months. Based on some estimates. And it had fallen at the pandemic start because of government aid of that aid had helped, push up household spending the summer probably economy. But now it's really long gone I. Feel like we're definitely at risk of the kind of persistent economic as we saw after the financial crisis so that really matters but administration officials now say it's GonNa be hard if not possible to get something done before the election. As you know, the President says he's grappling with Anti Pelosi, over an aid package by you know, the president still has pretty big. Divisions as well with Mitch McConnell I'm the president is floating figures on north of eight trillion for potential aid package by Senate Republicans. Say the reluctant to go above five hundred, billion of quite a lot of distance there between them well, Catherine Pell that gets me to you and to a newsletter that you and I both subscribed to which the politico playbook right? It's you know political details, gossip items and lots and lots of news there there afternoon update today had this as this subject line. We regret to inform you that Larry cudlow is saying things again, Larry Cudlow of course is the president's chief economic adviser one of them anyway, and he is Once again, saying things about this economy that are simply not true. and I wonder how troubling that is to you. Yeah I saw that I wasn't sure whether to laugh or to cry when I saw that headline kudlow basically said, we shouldn't be worried about the many many people who are unemployed because they're all starting new businesses and this is just creative destruction at work and look at to the extent that new businesses are being founded. That's good news we want more business creation. The real problem is that we've lost many multiples of that presumably thousands and thousands of small businesses not because their business models weren't viable not because you know they were unproductive they were shut down because of this massive force of. This sudden shock of the pandemic and for many of them, it became unsafe to continue operating. So it's not as if created described destruction usually think of as something where the unproductive businesses go out of. Operation because they don't, it's not they don't deserve to survive what they just can't compete. You know that that the strongest survive and get replaced the the ones that are not replaced by stronger ones. That's not really what's going on here. It's not that these companies were unproductive they were viable they're out of business because. The pandemic still sucks and the government response to it sexist well and. You know they're they're essentially the victims of mass government failure at this point, I would argue so celebrating this as. A flourishing of American capitalism, which is what Kudlow hit essentially said I, think is a little bit wrongheaded. Yes. Celebrate the entrepreneurs but remember that entrepreneurs are also going out of business through fault of their own Joseph Schumpeter Peters, probably rolling over in his grave. I would also point out honest once in that Mister Kudlow said today Oh yeah. We could totally get Republicans on boarding pass this bill, which is simply not granted in fact as Mitch McConnell told his yesterday but I wanna to pull back from the American economic situation for a minute and and point out two things internationally, which were times normal. We would be all over on this program number one? Boris Johnson the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland said today yeah. We're GONNA have to do brexit without a deal with the European Union and that people just have to get used to that number one and number two reporting you've done the European Union is going to be allowed by the World Trade Organization tariff the United States over its Boeing subsidies and I just global trade goes on and we we seem not to be paying attention. Yeah absolutely. I. Mean I think there's the prospect right now some really significant trade disruptions on between the in the UK and between. The you in the United States while both. And the United States have these weak economies in their seeing no end in sight to their krona virus cases. So I mean with Brexit you know this is just the latest deadline that they blown through and tax will continue but the prospect of this no deal Brexit is definitely getting more real and that could mean you know massive gridlock at the ports. All kinds of problems this December when there is this real cutoff. And with the Deputy o'casey mentioned. The now has the right to impose a four billion dollars of tariffs on the US in a trade case. There was a similar case last year where the US had got permission to impose seven point five, billion dollars in Paris on Europe. So the question is, can everybody come to a deal here? That would roll back both of those tariffs are we are we gonNA see more tensions in higher prices on both sides of the Atlantic now

Mister Kudlow United States President Trump Mitch Mcconnell Brexit Larry Cudlow Atlantic European Union Catherine Pell Senate Joseph Schumpeter Peters Europe Boris Johnson UK World Trade Organization United Kingdom Of Great Britai Boeing Pelosi
Trump leaves quarantine to pay 'surprise visit’ to supporters outside of hospital

PBS NewsHour

02:25 min | 9 months ago

Trump leaves quarantine to pay 'surprise visit’ to supporters outside of hospital

"Sunday evening while still contain jizz. The president briefly left the hospital. He made a surprise drive by visit to supporters outside the hospital. He wore face masks as he wrote in a sealed presidential SUV. White House officials say his medical team approved the trip, but it potentially put at risk for exposure. His secret Service agents, more facial coverings and medical gowns this morning, an attending physician at Walter Reed blasted the president's visit. This was a dangerous move. There is no medical benefits for this to taking place. It violates CDC guidelines that come from the president's administration. They absolutely must quarantine. The CDC guidelines are clear that if you spend that period of time within 6 Ft of a person requires a mandatory 14 days. Quarantine. There are no caveats for masts. This wasn't just the normal conversations in a lot of chemical weapon proofed vehicle. Shortly before his surprise drive by President Trump posted a video on Twitter praising his nurses and doctors. Now, several months into the pandemic, he said he has a deeper understanding of the virus. I learned a lot about covert. I learned it by really going to school. This is the real school. This isn't let's read the book school and I get it and I understand it this weekend, The White House also released photos showing him working at the hospital's presidential suite. Not wearing a mask. All this is a credibility crisis at the White House has deepened the biggest issue now who should the public believe when it comes to the president's condition and treatment? On Saturday, his physician evaded questions about the president's treatments and painted this rosy picture. It's morning. The president is doing very well with the team and I are extremely happy with the progress the president has made. But soon after the president's chief of staff, Mark Meadows contradicted him, Meadows said the president's early vital signs were quote very concerning and that he wasn't yet on a clear path to full recovery. What Still unclear is precisely when the president was infected, and just how many people were exposed as a result. Today. White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany, along with at least two of her deputies also tested positive. McEneaney tweeted quote after testing negative consistently, including every day since Thursday. I tested positive for Corbett 19 on Monday morning while experiencing no symptoms. Mcenany has regularly briefed reporters without wearing a mask, including as recently as yesterday. Three journalists who work at the White House has also been

President Trump White House CDC Attending Physician Kayleigh Mcenany Mark Meadows Twitter Walter Reed Corbett Press Secretary Chief Of Staff
Doctors: Trump's blood oxygen level dropped twice recently

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:01 min | 9 months ago

Doctors: Trump's blood oxygen level dropped twice recently

"Concern about that. You know, he had a fever and a cz blood oxygen level and dropped, Uh, rapidly and, uh, And yet in typical style, this, uh this president was was up and walking around. So just another thing that adds to the confusion and undermines the credibility of the White House. Why did Mark Meadows decide to do that yesterday? Unclear? Was he trying to correct the record was he trying to set the stage for a dramatic recovery? We don't know. Richard, What's your Take on what seems like a back and forth between the president or at least the president's doctors in the president's chief of staff. Yeah, I I actually differ tomorrow on this. I think it's more politics than medicine. As far as I can tell. The statement about critical 48 hours really tells us that the public was not hearing the whole truth about the president's condition on Friday. Saturday. You know, after Mark Meadows acknowledged that the president's health was more precarious on Friday than we've been led to believe, kind of helped fill that in a little bit, you know, but medically, there's nothing magic about 48 hours. This disease could be unpredictable for more than a week and supplemental oxygen. I mean, we heard many reporters asking about that, Richard. Why's that so key to knowing the president's condition that they chose to hide that he had been given it. Well, People get supplemental oxygen if their lungs aren't working at full capacity, and most people who are infected with the Corona virus don't need oxygen. So that's actually an indication the president really got hit by this virus. The president, you know has was suffering from fatigue. We now know until that's consistent with the idea that he was. He was really taking a hit here and, you know most people who get these symptoms recover and we're told that the president doesn't need oxygen at the moment and doesn't have a fever. But because Cove it can be unpredictable. His condition now really doesn't tell us about the ultimate course of his disease. Mara.

President Trump Richard Mark Meadows Fever White House Mara Cove Chief Of Staff
Trump Tests Positive for the Coronavirus

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

Trump Tests Positive for the Coronavirus

"It appeared largely devoid of social distancing in masks. The White House has announced that President Trump and first lady Melania Trump Have tested positive for Corona virus. The president's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, told reporters this morning that the president symptoms have so far been mild, but he declined to say if Trump was taking hydroxy Claure Quinn I'm not going to get into any particular treatment that he may or may not have. He has mild symptoms as we we look at that The doctor will continue, Tio. Provide expertise in the resident's Trump has publicly championed the antimalarial drug for the treatment of covert 19, despite fierce objections from medical experts who say A drug not only doesn't work, but it could also inflict serious harm. Doctors are testing anyone

President Trump Mark Meadows White House Chief Of Staff
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:31 min | 9 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits. Yeah Ranchi this is a really interesting model and and the science behind it. So I have used your application and I have found. It to be really really cool. It's good to see the science behind it. Now, I appreciate the little wins and then you give badges and then on the back end is so listeners if you're an employer, I think you'll you'll really like to learn that the way that they structure this is in such a way that they help the employee be healthier. So part of the carrot is and they use more carrots and sticks in the software they'll give you a your employer will give you A. In your insurance if you can achieve certain metrics and along the way you get badges, there's social sharing within the platform. So as a user of it pretty cool and now to put together the science, Rajiv is really fascinating to see how you guys put this together. Yeah. We're excited about it and the best part is that we have demonstrable results over years. We've been at this for about fifteen years now, and we've been able to show some pretty compelling in sustainable behavior change over five, six, seven years with participant. So it really does work. Well, this year I went to the dentist one more time because you guys. You Go. Rajiv, what would you say a time within the last fifteen years at the organization that you guys had a setback and what you learn from it As you may know an entrepreneurship there are setbacks every single day, and it's it's a crazy roller coaster I..

Rajiv Sir Richard Branson Dr Fog scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj fog Reggie Stanford University executive
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 9 months ago

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
WWE names Nick Khan as new President & Chief Revenue Officer

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:56 min | 11 months ago

WWE names Nick Khan as new President & Chief Revenue Officer

"Did you see the news of Nick Khan and I don't know how many people in our audience know that name Nick Con Heading from CAA to the wwe all of a sudden a weird. Just a weird thing to have happen is the pandemic is going to shift a whole bunch of things. I'm guessing next to nobody knows who nick is wrestling fans will now get y'all have an idea of WHO, Nikon. He's one of the most powerful sports agents at. The most powerful sports agencies CIA who represented many big clients, many ESPN, and now he's left for what he thinks to be greener pastures. You can make the argument as some in our business do that this guy runs espn that basically all the people that have been hired here and got contracts is because this guy makes money for clients. Now I left ca a while ago because it was totally soulless like it was just this shiny thing. I. Really had an experience with my agent that was like Tom Cruise in Jerry Maguire, where he's he looked around, he was like. And I'm like, yeah, I don't want to be there either and because it nick cons trying to replace this radio show ESPN for the better part of years like he said, we were gonNA fail along and he's been trying to replace us with his clients the entire time and he hasn't been able to do it. But this move to the wwe out of nowhere when you're representing the, you know the power agency not just in sports to God's but. Ca like they do all the shining things when I was there, it's like Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt and Surreal Shiny Hollywood thing and I hated it i. thought it was I. Thought was awful. Oh, I think from a business standpoint there the agency that runs sports and they're certainly the agency that controls the runs Hollywood There's no question ought to go from there to Vince McMahon to Vince McMahon to be president and financial officer of WWe of all places. Like that, that right there is oil that deserves each

Espn Nick Khan WWE Tom Cruise Nick Con Vince Mcmahon Nick Jerry Maguire Angelina Jolie CAA Nikon CIA Brad Pitt Wrestling President Trump Officer
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | 11 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Of different forms and formats to to bring our teams along to educate to bring New People on board right that that have different experiences and I think all of that approach those learnings of have again been been confirmed by what we've experienced with corona virus this year. Yeah. No, that's great and you know it's it's neat how you guys approached it the different frameworks around innovation hey, you you could. Start doing something and then evolved to be something completely different. But that answers Aena the market you're serving and you have to keep your eyes and ears open. So it's it's an it's sometimes it's hard to do right timmy you could be so honed in on what you're producing that. You don't stop and put your head up look around and listen to what the market actually wants and that is the key absolutely and I think just the having a spirit of partnership I think it's partner is not easy right? I, mean a nine in life right relationships are wonderful but relationships require work and understanding and all. Of these things I think in business. That's that's the same and I I think back in Miami I. You know a twenty year career in healthcare now and I remember very clearly sitting in a meeting time with a hospital supply chain leader and and he looked at me and he said, are you working with you know with Med tech and pharmaceutical companies? This was at a different company out when I was accurate syntax and I said, well, you know, yeah, we we love to be able to work with those other other groups and he said, well, we don't want you working with them because they're the enemy. And it made me pause though because I thought about and I said, you know you know drug treatments are used and over ninety percent of all patient care right medical devices. A medical technology are used a hundred percent of surgical cases. So when you think about the spirit of partnership, you know to have these stakeholders be an opposition to one. Another was crazy to me right because the success of the patient right the health of the patient literally depends on these different groups being able to work well and collaborate well, together to produce the best outcomes and I. Think there's been this sort of adversarial undertone. in our industry for a long time, and so that's another thing I think that we have to be able to get past that we asked to learn as an industry, how to how to work together actually one of our core business principles that garrison tax wind together you know collaborating with partners, customers, vendors to achieve common goals week and figure out what that common goal is which for us says, you know saving lives, how do we work together to achieve that common objective on that's it can be a very allusive thing Tim I'm glad you mentioned that because you're right and many of us are. Either probably laughed when Tim said that they're the enemy or you're like, yeah, are. and. The reality is we have a lot of habits in healthcare and some of these habits may not be serving us and tim you bring about. You know not only operational practice and in the work that you guys are doing it carson tax but also a good mental framework around this, we let's let's all win together challenge yourself. Let's challenge ourselves right include myself in that. Challenge to think about our partners differently in a way that we could partner to win together side thing that was a that's such a great call out to him and you know as as you as we get to the the end of this chat today, you know what would you want to think about and what's the closing thought that you leave us with? Yeah, I. Think you know for me when I when I kind of look at where we are today I think we're you know we're at an inflection point I mean healthcare we've been talking about for years, but we really are I believe that at an inflection point where we have to move beyond some of the limitations that have held us back in the past we talked about. Some of them today technology partnership. But I think also you know especially for the US healthcare system, I think a central driver of what we've done a lot as a system has been driven by you know, what do we need to do to bill and collect on acclaim and I started my career in the healthcare revenue cycle cycling speak a pretty firsthand that and I think. We need to move beyond some of what we've the habits like you said and learnings that we've developed in the past, and we have to invest in working smarter together and really improving quality at the individual case level and I think we can focus on doing that as an industry right that that will ultimately scale across the system, but we have to make that decision to. Invest in providing the best outcome for the patient because it's the right thing to do, and I think Kobe's highlighted that for us again and and a lot of areas right and then just to kind of come full circle on our earlier conversation I think collaboration really is the key righteous to look and say there are multiple stakeholders. How do we all work together so that? We can win together because if we can do that collectively providers, technology companies, insurance companies, right ultimately, the patient will win the patient will be safer. The patient will be healthier and one of the things that inspires me care sin taxes, how many of our employees around the world have shared with me that the reason they came to work for Care Semtex as because they are. A close family member a loved one had an experience in an operating room that cost them a life or almost cost them their life or somehow kind of impacted them where their life was changed limited forever right because of of a safe safety, your quality issue but then also shared with these stories around how a surgeon or a healthcare team save their life and I think. You know I would love to have more and more stories of of a life saving or life being restored and fewer and fewer stories of allies being being compromised or somehow harmed right and so I think that would be I. Guess my closing thought is to let's take advantage of this opportunity we've been given to rethink our paradigm to to really collectively try to move. Forward with that focus on really you know making surgery safer and smarter for every single patient when a great closing thought Tim and and go back to your comments about aviation and how there's monitoring and you know there's tracking their why why aren't we doing it in the or because we shouldn't have as many deaths as we do So keep up the great work. Folks. So Tim and the team care syntax can be found at care syntax dot.

Tim I partner Aena the market timmy US Miami Kobe
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:07 min | 11 months ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You'd have a case You know there'd be a medical device rep you know who would Be In that case and they'd be bringing in some of the tools that were needed for that case, it'd go through the surgery with a surgeon and the surgical team, the nurses, etc, and the tax all kind of working together that patient leaves maybe they have a good outcome maybe they have a bad outcome. Let's say that they have a negative outcome and they have to have a revision or they have a post operative infection, right? How do you understand what the root cause of that was you have today from a from a workflow documentation perspective, we have the electronic medical record, but a lot of that is you know it's the personal recaps of the teams when they get time to document read, there's a lot of templates in the Mars. Nowadays, you know all of my kind of physician colleagues. That's one of the things when I get together with them, but they always talk about his just the amount of documentation burden and how difficult is to sort of write everything down. And do it timely and make sure that it's accurate and so that would be sort of your pre world. Right as I have a case, maybe it turns out well, maybe it doesn't I'm not really sure necessarily if it turns out poorly, why would I can go back and try to read the documentation, but it's a difficult position. It's a he said, she said in a lot of cases or maybe there's documentation when you translate that into care syntax world. So imagine a hospital equipped with our platform where and I'll take it in a post Kobe landscape. Maybe, the hospital wants to limit the number of people in the operating room because they wanNA keep infection risk down right. So you could have the medical device rap because their company is interoperable with our platform maybe they would remote into the case from a command center saw the pre prep would be done because of the scheduling and the Front End Management Rep would know. Exactly where their cases were when they would join the case and remote in through our platform and still be able to guide the surgeon and the surgical team through that case That case would now have in addition to the normal `electronic medical record write it would be fully documented in video. So we could see any time in a case where there was a challenge. The decision that had to be made right and you would now complete that case and let's say on the back end there was a negative. Right now, you're equipped to be able to go back in with that pure source of truth and say, let's go review that case right as there's something we did mechanically in the cases or something that we we miss something in the checklist. was there any point in time with the closure of the wound treatment post operative Lee right where we could have done better it gives you the ability to really understand exactly what happened a you're mitigating potential risks up front and then be if there is a negative outcome, you can go back and really understand at every facet along that surgery you know what could have been done better do we use the right products was the surgical technique? Good right is there anything that we could have done? That would have made that outcome better than you can stack those improvements into. Future cases or if you're the medical technology company, you could factor those learnings into improve products right. So this again is kind of where you bring the stakeholder convergence and to the mix, and then we also and we're doing a lot of partnerships. Now with you know with insurance companies, well because they have in their vested those top quality outcomes as well. So now you get all these stakeholders have the same interest, right which is, how do we learn and how do we guide the process to optimal outcomes? Why I think that's really neat and being able to have everything. And available post op is certainly an asset. Have you ever run into just the maybe like stage fright you know somebody says, Oh, I don't Wanna I don't WanNa do this on video yeah. I think that's I think that's a pretty common common thing and I think. There's a ways that we've handled that one is you know in the United States, we are an approved patient safety organization by the Federal Government. So if a if a hospital in the US is using our system, you know all of that. Kind of work, it's done to review and sort of analyze. The case for quality is considered patient safety work product read. So you can actually operate that environment and a very sort of safe protected way from a litigation standpoint that's usually ended the number. One thing that people are worried about is just sort of litigation, but I think you know as we talked. To surgeons and there's actually see technology and think through how they would use it the The response has been really really positive for us over the past I'd say twelve to eighteen months as we start to introduce this broader ecosystem into the market and as you think about other industries I like to use sports as an example or the airline industry. You know it's really the use of data capture and video analytics that is enabled. You know in the case of aviation for to be extremely safe. You know if you chart aviation dust versus surgical deaths, I think you'd be it's staggering rights, how safe aviation is and how dangerous the operating room and So that's that's I think an easy compare but think about athletics right I mean you know you go to put together a good baseball team or a good football team right and you have you know literally hundreds of hours of video footage on every single player and these are players at the top of their game, right? Right but these guys are still. Going, everyday day to practice you know and Tom Brady every day still watching film right to looking to see what he can do better and how he can be a better quarterback or how they can run a play better I. think we're seeing that from you know from the top surgeons as they know, they're the top searches, but they also recognize that the they still want to see that footage, right they still WanNa know how they can up their game. They still want their patients to have the best outcomes US I think we've seen a real receptivity to maybe not a hundred percent because it sort of you know something new to introduce a little better. But I think like any other area were videos being used we're gonNA see more and more adoption as we go. That's really great tim and I appreciate you mentioning that because it was the elephant in the room, right I mean before wondering it. So I WANNA ask it and it's really neat rights of the safety piece where can't be used for litigation huge right I mean that's that's concern for a lot of physician and providers and and secondly to think of it like a pro level player washes his games are her games right and does it to get better what a cool way to continue working on your craft and getting better and increasing The the quality and the outcomes that you're getting I mean super super interesting. So as you think about how you guys have improved business or or outcomes I to hear an example from you yeah, I'll give you maybe just a couple of examples. So you know new technologies currently any used in thousands of operating rooms around the world right now about fourteen hundred in the US across the full spectrum of we we offer So we definitely have you know just a lot of great anecdotes and great data on especially the sort of efficiency and throughput pius ride being able to use technology to you know to schedule more efficiently to drive the surgery more efficiently. So there's Literally from a business standpoint, I mean millions.

United States Kobe landscape Tom Brady Federal Government Lee tim baseball football
Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

Outcomes Rocket

05:24 min | 11 months ago

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lant

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and thank you for tuning in. Again I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lance today. He's the president and Chief Operating Officer at Care Syntax before that Tim was also the Senior Vice President and general manager at Sentry Data, systems, and previous to that managing. Director of supply chain. Academy, he's had multiple leadership roles across the healthcare. Industry and today he gonNA be talking to us more about health technology and what they're doing to impact global healthcare markets with their work at Care Syntax Tim such a pleasure to have you here with us today. Thank you. It's great to be here. I appreciate you having me. Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do at Care Syntax me a little. Bit about you and what inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah happy to so you know for me it's a it's been an interesting journey into healthcare. I think a lot of people get into healthcare sometimes because their parents are involved in was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician she was in healthcare for thirty years and I learned from a very. Early, age how important it was to have a well-functioning high quality, affordable healthcare system in any community that I also got to see how complex it was for my mom both as a clinician as administrator and healthcare I watched a lot of challenges that she faced and so I promised myself that I would never work healthcare and graduated from college I immediately started working in healthcare. And You know I think today you know almost twenty years later now right would. Kinda keeps. ME excited and getting up every morning. Excited about what we're doing is you I experienced firsthand during my time spent several years with with your on healthcare and I worked in the frontline. Saw You know I'm not a clinician but I worked side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care inside seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is. But critical it is to you know to our communities into our societies and in some ways I. think it's a it's a little bit how I feel about golf right as you can have A. kind of a a tough rounding Gulf. But you have that one magical shot met keeps coming back for more in healthcare little bit that same way. I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems and healthcare. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life writer keep a family together bring somebody back from the brink of death and I think there's no greater thing that that I'd want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our healthcare system. So love at your those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul. And so I, appreciate you sharing that. Plenty of like I'm not GonNa get a nail care you graduate. You're, in. Healthcare. I there's something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact. You could have in health care and I and I share that with yeah and I think a lot of listeners share that with us Tim, and so tell us about care syntax and what you guys are doing add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Yes. So I think care syntax is we're very focused on. Surgery and on the or which I think in some respects especially in the US a little bit is oftentimes I don't WanNa say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last ten years and we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care in these kinds of things and we're very. Focused on surgery, which you know if you take a step back, you know it's a, it's not the majority of cases in our healthcare system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the healthcare system for most hospitals comes out of the or and it's also a place where from a quality standpoint you know a lot of quality problems can begin. In the or you know if those surgeries aren't optimal. So this is where we've chosen to focus and you know in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives on specifically for us. Kind of Our big vision is millions of lives around the world you know to be saved through use of our technology by by those. Caregivers at the frontline. So that's really really where we're focused and the think You always think about adding value to the ecosystem I, like to look at it in a couple of ways but I think the thing that makes us really unique that we've you know we've chosen to look holistically at the healthcare ecosystem and within that world of of the or. And try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, financial stakeholders, stakeholders, and operations, and supply chain, and then obviously the patient. So we really try to look with our technology at how we can bring those key stakeholders together right and drive convergence there, and then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe. Surgery and so you've got you know operational components, throughput capacity management logistics supplies, and then you've got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics learning and Research and development that comes on the back end in that sort of trust creates a continuous cycle. Then that's really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value, not just one small facet but looking at how can create. Value

Tim Lance President And Chief Operating Senior Vice President And Gene Sal Marquez Sentry Data Director United States Golf Administrator Writer
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You'd have a case. You know there'd be a medical? Medical device rep you know who would be in that case, and they'd be bringing in some of the tools that were needed for that case it'd go through the surgery with a surgeon and the surgical team, the nurses, etc, and the tax, all kind of working together that patient leaves. Maybe they have a good outcome. Maybe they have a bad outcome. Let's say that they have a negative outcome. And they have to have a revision, or they have a post operative infection, right? How do you understand what the root cause of that was You have today from a from a workflow documentation perspective. We have the electronic medical record, but a lot of that is you know it's the personal recaps of the teams? When they get time to document read, there's a lot of templates in the Mars, nowadays, you know all of my kind of physician colleagues. That's one of the things when I get together with them, but they always talk about his just the amount of documentation burden, and how difficult is to sort of write everything down. Down and do it timely and make sure that it's accurate, and so that would be sort of your pre world. Right as I have a case. Maybe it turns out well. Maybe it doesn't I'm not really sure necessarily, if it turns out poorly, why would I can go back and try to read the documentation, but it's a difficult position. It's A. he said she said in a lot of cases. Or maybe there's documentation translate that into care syntax world, so imagine a hospital equipped with our platform. Where and I'll take it in a post. Kobe landscape. Maybe, the hospital wants to limit the number of people in the operating room because they wanNA, keep infection risk down right so you could have the medical device rap because their company is interoperable with our platform. Maybe they would remote into the case from a command center saw the pre prep would be done because of the scheduling and the Front End Management Rep would know exactly where. Where their cases were, and when they would join the case and remote in through our platform, and still be able to guide the surgeon and the surgical team through that case that that case would now have in addition to the normal, `electronic medical record write. It would be fully documented in video, so we could see any time in a case where there was a challenge. The decision that had to be made right, and you would now complete that case, and let's say on the back end. There was a negative outcome right now. You're equipped to be able to go back in with a pure source of truth and say, let's go review that case right as there's something we did mechanically in the cases or something that we we miss something in the checklist. was there any point in time with the closure of the wound treatment post operative Lee right where we could have done better. it gives you the ability to really understand exactly what happened A. You're mitigating potential risks up front, and then be. If there is a negative outcome, you can go back and really understand at every facet along that surgery. You know what? What could have been done better? Do we use the right products? Was the surgical technique? Good right? Is there anything that we could have done? That would have made that outcome better than you can stack those improvements into future cases, or if you're the medical technology company, you could factor those learnings into improve products right so this again is kind of where you bring. Bring the stakeholder, convergence and to the mix, and then we also, and we're doing a lot of partnerships now with you know with insurance companies well because they have in their vested those top quality outcomes as well so now you get all these stakeholders have the same interest rate which is, how do we learn? And how do we guide the process to? To optimal outcomes why I think that's really neat and being able to have everything live and available post. Op is certainly an asset. Have you ever run into just the maybe like stage fright, you know somebody says Oh, I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa do this on video? Yeah, I think that's I think that's a pretty common common thing and I think. There's a ways that we've handled that one. Is You know in the United States? We are an approved patient safety organization by the Federal Government, so if a if a hospital in the US is using our system. You know all of that. Kind of work, it's done to review and sort of analyze. The case for quality is considered patient safety work product read so you can actually operate that environment and a very sort of safe protected way from a litigation standpoint. That's usually ended the number. One thing that people are worried about is is sort of litigation, but I think you know as we talked to. To surgeons and there's actually see technology and think through how they would use it the the response has been really really positive for us. Over the past I'd say twelve to eighteen months as we start to introduce this broader ecosystem into the market and as you think about other industries I like to use sports as an example or the airline industry. You know it's really the use of data, capture and video analytics that is enabled. You know in the case of aviation for to be extremely safe, you know if you chart aviation, dust versus surgical deaths think you'd be. It's staggering rights. How Safe Aviation is and how dangerous the operating groups and So that's that's I think an easy compared to think about athletics right I. Mean You know you go to put together? Together a good baseball team or a good football team, right and you have you know literally hundreds of hours of video footage on every single player, and these are players at the top of their game right right but these guys are still going everyday day to practice. You know Tom Brady every day still watching film right to looking to see what he can do better and how he can be a better quarterback or how they can run a play better, I think we're seeing that from you know from the top surgeons as they know they're. The top surges, but also recognize that the they still want to see that footage, right? They still WANNA. Know How they can up their game. They still want their patients to have the best outcomes us. I think we've seen a real receptivity to maybe not a hundred percent because it sort. Sort of you know something new to introduce a little better, but I think like any other area where videos being used. We're GONNA see more and more adoption go. That's really great. Tim and I appreciate you mentioning that because it was the elephant in the room right, I mean before wondering it, so I wanted to ask it, and it's really neat rights of the safety piece. Where can't be used for litigation? Right I mean that's that's concern for a lot of physician and providers and and secondly to think of it like a pro level player washes. His Games are her games right and does it to get better. What a cool way to continue working on your craft and getting better and increasing the the quality and the outcomes that you're getting. I mean super super interesting, so as you think about how you guys have improved business or comes a to hear an example from you, yeah! Yeah I'll give you maybe just a couple of examples, so you know new technologies currently any were used in thousands of operating rooms around the world right now about fourteen hundred in the US across the full spectrum of we, we offer so we definitely have you know just a lot of great anecdotes and great data on especially the sort of efficiency and throughput pius ride being able to use technology to you know to schedule more efficiently to drive the surgery more efficiently, so there's. Literally from a business standpoint I mean millions and millions of dollars in benefit to.

United States Kobe landscape Federal Government Safe Aviation Tom Brady Tim baseball Lee athletics football
Trump eyes police reforms while ignoring systemic racism

WBZ Midday News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

Trump eyes police reforms while ignoring systemic racism

"Another update from the White House following days of unfettered support for law enforcement president trump now says he's interested in discussing ways to police in a quote more gentle fashion and it's as one of his most senior aides is reportedly in talks with Democrats to advance parts of their police reform plan here's more I'm Stephen Portnoy in Washington the president's chief of staff says Mr trump wants action on police reform sooner rather than later mark meadows another raid settled yesterday with South Carolina senator Tim Scott the Senate's only black Republican has taken the lead for his party in crafting a police reform bill a draft of it is in many ways similar to what Democrats have proposed but it doesn't make tweaks to the immunity officers now have from lawsuits nor would it ban chokeholds or no knock warrants a tweet by president trump continues to draw criticism from Democrats and even some Republicans the president suggested that the seventy five year old man seen pushed to the ground in buffalo during a run in with police may have been an antifa agent will congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio Cortez reacted on Good Morning America it was horrendous and horrific had the president targeted a seventy five year olds and man justice loving man who who want to stand up for his neighbors and wanted to stand up for his fellow black Americans and making sure that everyone is treated equally in the eyes of a lot in that widely seen video the victim could be seen falling to the ground and bleeding from his ear and

White House Stephen Portnoy Washington President Trump Mr Trump Mark Meadows Senator Tim Scott Senate Alexandria Ocasio Cortez Good Morning America Chief Of Staff South Carolina
Trump heads to Phoenix to tour Honeywell plant

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Trump heads to Phoenix to tour Honeywell plant

"President trump is headed to Phoenix in a trip designed to give the appearance of a return to normalcy president trump says he's getting state governors a lot of discretion as they work to reopen their economies with mitigating measures in place to prevent a surge in corona virus infections our country should think of themselves as warriors our country has to open trump spoke to reporters before heading to Arizona to visit Honeywell plant where they make and ninety five respirator masks trump also defended a White House memo limiting testimony by members of the coronavirus task force without approval by the president's chief of staff they put every truck painter on the committee the same old stuff Jennifer king Washington

Donald Trump Phoenix Arizona President Trump Honeywell White House Chief Of Staff Jennifer King Washington
"president chief" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"president chief" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to your leadership guests series where we explored leadership and culture through the eyes of leaders around the world. That's right Chris. We hand selected leaders that we believe are positively influencing leadership in their industries. We sent them four questions. We think are important in gaining insight to their leadership beliefs and style. If you'd like to be part of the hacking your leadership guest series. Shoot US an email to guest at hacking your leadership dot com. And let's talk and now today's guest. Hi I'm Lena. Greg's president and Chief Culture Officer at culture connects. Thank you for listening to hacking leadership. Podcast gift serious. The first question is who has been the most impactful leader in or mentor in your life and I actually have two people that I like to talk about when I think about this question. This to individuals have had an incredible impact in my life my career in Hawaii Person. Today they both came into my life at very different times. One of them very early in my career and the second person Just most recently but I believe that in many different ways they both have had a tremendous impact and who I am today. The first person is pulled by air. Ski Paul is a leader who very very early in my career. So the passion within me to succeed this when I said earlier. I'm talking about when I first moved to the United States and face all the challenges that immigrants face when move into this country not speaking the language just trying to understand what life was all about and the United States and really trying to work towards building or live in that American dream. Whatever that meant at the time I had no idea what that was but I just knew I wanted to be a part of it. This leader give me an opportunity that in my opinion no other person would have ever given me at that point in my life and technically. I was just not ready for it. I spoke broken English and it was difficult for me to communicate and there were many many other challenges that was facing at the time but he truly believed in me. He believed in me even at times where where I didn't believe in myself in one of the things so it's impactful to me about this leader in something that I think about to this day. Is this phrase. Said he said to me at some point in time while was working with him he said that I was going to do not only great things for myself but also for others at that point in time had no idea what he really by that and I just listened to that I continue on working really hard and given it my best. He really went past the traditional requirements. To give me an opportunity ignore really was on paper because he really so my desire to grow and today when I think about that phrase. I can't help it to realize that with the career that I have today not only as an HR professional but more importantly as a cultural champion. It's a person who wants to help. Every individual be the best that they can be in every leader be the best leader that they can lead. Inform in ways of shaping. The culture of our country should look like in every organization. It's amazing and is humbling to realize that he still passion within me even before. I realized that I had in. So thank you Paul. I haven't I don't even know where he is at this point in time but is definitely someone that I will always remember. And then the next person is Dan Hirschfeld. Dan is an amazing leader. Who's had an incredible impact in my life in the way of how he leads people. Dan is definitely one of those leaders that puts people first one hundred percent of the Times. Dan is a high level executive. A C over an organization leaning or leading companies with over twenty thousand people in the end still manages to respond to every single email question or a concern that comes his wave from employees to me. This is so impressive to this day I always ask how. How are you doing? And the truth is is that his answer is very simple in it. Makes a Lotta sense yet? It's hard to grasp for those of us who have crazy busy schedules. How he does it his answer me when I asked the question of how he manages to respond to everybody in stay so connected to everybody. He said if they took time out of their busy schedule to reach out to me it really means that what they have going on is very important to them and therefore in as a needs to be a priority in my life and I need to be able to make sure that the people side of our business are always at the top of our priorities and with that mentality. He manages to respond to every individual. And I just I have so much respect for that and I can only hope that I m s responsive in working as close with people at San always has but definitely somebody who's taught me alive in terms of leadership. I mistake that I made leader of people in. What did I learn for mad? I actually love talking about this mistake. Even though we traditionally don't like talking about mistake but this mistake was one that taught me a wad of great things in form in terms of being a leader when I first started leading people. I had this mentality that it was my job to get people to serve the organization into get people to give their all to the company that they work for and I believe that that was my job is a leader and what that could be too through a cernik sense. I quickly realized that the most important job that I had a SA- leader was to be there serving the people that entrust in me with being their leader in so it is a mind change when you start thinking about people I and about serving them rather than than serving you or the organization things change pretty dressy clean changed for the best because people realize that you are there for them. I really believe that when we go into relationships whether it's a business relationship leader employee relationship or vice versa or any personal relationship for that matter I believe that if we go into all of those relationships with the mentality of what can I do for this individual rather than what can they do for me. They change that happens within people is that they start trusting. You is so trusting you as a leader because they know that you are there for them so I practice that not only in business but I also practice in a personal level. What can I do for others and I think that the best reward that you can have is being able to serve people and being able to help anytime that you can the difference between a good and a great leader. I personally don't believe there is such thing as good grade or even bad leaders in my eyes if you get the recognition of being a leader. You're automatically doing great things for the people that you support if you're not getting the recognition of a leader if leader is only a title for you then in my opinion you're a manager you're a manager of people a manager of processes or somebody who directs a particular process in or workforce and by definition if you're managing your doesn't necessarily mean that your lead in so if you get that recognition from your people as the leader the you should take that very seriously because that means that you're doing great things for the people that you support on the other hand if people don't see you the leader you're automatically missing out under interests and getting to know you as a person and you would miss out on that interest then. People automatically continue to perform. Because that's what they need to do but not because you're leading them in the right direction so to me. If you are a leader you are automatically doing wonderful things. How do I measure success as a leader of people in developer of talent and I think that the leader of people I measure my success by my ability to influence inspire others to give their absolute best? I believe that within me. Leisa responsibility to help others switched or full potential potential by helping them develop every aspect of their lives not just professional but also in a personal level. If I have team members that come to me for advice in all things life then I feel like a have earned. The trust necessary to have timber. Lie On me for something much more important than they do at work. Don't get me wrong. Developing their careers is important but having the trust of people to have have you guide them with all things. Life related is a whole different story. And I think it's a complete game changer. And lastly I would say that I measure my success Leader but the endless counts of individuals who reach out to me even be on that technicality of me being their leader meaning that when we no longer worked together where. I'm no longer their supervisor. Or The employment relationship ended one way or another. They went somewhere else knowing that I have had such an incredible impact On people in in regards of having that positive influence in having them continue to reach out to me be on that leadership relationship but they trust me in seamy ESA leader. I think that's a huge A huge thing that shows your success in shows how much of an impact you had in somebody's life and I think that would be the most rewarding thing that I could have happened to me leader if you want to learn more about my passion for Culture in Building Organizational Nexus. Please join me in a group of extremely inspirational speakers at the culture connects conference this coming. Fall October..

Dan Hirschfeld US president and Chief Culture Of Hawaii Chris San Paul Greg supervisor ESA SA executive developer
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Established executive provider leader in an industry Facet you really have to think and surround yourself with contrarian view sometimes even though it's not the comfort zone it may be what helps you see that blind spot that could potentially be fatal to your business and so really great call out the Reggie. Thank you for sharing that. What would you say one of your proudest medical leadership? Experience to date is so for years. I've been working with populations both an employer groups as well as in the community sort of running these kind of behavior change campaigns fitness challenges and competitions grassroots efforts to help people improve their life and my proudest moments were really when people would come up to me and you know. Even though I wasn't their primary care physician I still think of them as patients but people come up to me and they would say things like you save my life. You know not really you but this program saved my life. You know. I've gone off my medication. I was diabetic. And I've reversed my diabetes season. I'm off my medication. Lost so much weight that my knees no longer hurt and I can walk again. You know I took my grandkids Disneyland for the first time and I was actually able to keep up with them. So it's really those moments and I. There are hundreds of them in my head. The people that I've met that we've actually had an impact on and using technology people we have never met before but using zinc technology and using the science and figuring out a way to sort of engage that we were able to help them and empower them to make small changes led to huge results. And I think those are the proudest just moments you know. I don't know if the call that leadership or not but that's certainly where we get our excitement from working out of bed every morning. Yeah for sure. That's definitely leadership. Reggie even behind behind the motivations that you do this every day. Is there any story that you wanNA share that really got you into this because you have such passion United Behind Passion. There's a story. There are a ton of stories raise for me. When I was the first medical student I was shadowing physicians and working in their clinics and seeing a lot of patients and it just struck me that there were so many patients the majority of them struggling with? How do I lose weight? How do I eat healthy? How do I be physically active? And how do I if I have a condition like hypertension. Ah By blood pressure. How do I lower my cholesterol? We had no tools to help them. We really didn't other than just some sort of empty advice right going to join a gym though. Checkout outweight watchers. We were sort of resigned to the fact that they probably weren't gonNA change their behavior and ultimately we will put them on medication and that would be sort of the end game and that was frustrating to me. Because I knew that people had potential a change and we simply weren't giving them tools and understanding. What would work then? So I really thought how can we prescribe health and wellbeing and is there a resource that we can send people to program that we can give them. That would be truly successful. And I couldn't find one and so I created it in that was originally called shape up Rhode Island which was the precursor to our company shape up and now virgin pulse. So that's sort of what my motivation was was. It just didn't feel resigned to the fact that we would have to prescribe medication for everybody. Everybody felt like we should really be focusing on prevention and when I talked to people who did change once in a while we get a patient that would say you know I lost twenty pounds or we they come in and their blood pressure will be down and say what did you do and they always said the same thing. I had an exercise buddy. I formed a group of friends and we motivated each other. My family did this together. It was always. That's social thread. And that was my sort of inspiration to say you know. Let's figure out a way to connect people and this was at the dawn of social media around two thousand four hundred thousand five and I thought maybe we can sort of take a facebook like approach to bring people together online to support each other offline. And that's what we did. That's so awesome and listeners dare to be the change you wish to see in the world and Rajiv found himself in the situation where he just didn't accept the fact that empty promises we're going to be what he gave patients and he thought bigger. He saw a couple of things at work in Iran with it. So I think Rajiv embodies that quote is he was the change that he he wished to see in the health world and with that has been an amazing ripple effect of better outcomes for patients stories that continue to come in to his inbox of people's lives that he's changing so the question is what can you do. What do you today find unacceptable and health? And what are you GonNa do about about it. Because it's doable. You just gotTa move it little by little. And it'll eventually get their Rajiv. What would you say an exciting project or focus that you guys are working on today? We're spending a lot of time. Around artificial intelligence we believe that one of the keys to motivating people will be giving them personalized highly relevant recommendations nations things that they can do and so we're trying to use artificial intelligence to learn about people over time and also to learn what makes people successful over time. So we've got millions of people on our our software. They use our mobile application on average three times a day. We're collecting seven billion data points every single month everything from biometric results to health risk assessment results. What's interests goals activities healthy habits? You name it. We're collecting the data through our platform. And so what we're trying to do is kind of track. WHO's successful and one of the things that they do? In what order they do them. That helps them succeed in the program. And if we can match personas and profiles we can put other people on that same track to be successful and and and it's very hard to program that with rules engine so we're using artificial intelligence so that the platform itself can learn over time and then guide people in a much more successful hustle way. And that's really. I think one of the most exciting areas in healthcare technologies the use of Ai to create highly personalized highly relevant experiences. That will drive the people toward success so in five years. If you're a I focus works. What would you be able to do what we will be able to say? You know you're a member of our platform we would be able. Also you know saw other people like you have done this next step and that next step has led them to this result. Would you like to do that as well. And we don't necessarily as individuals need need to know anything about you but the platform does ascertain who you are. And what you like to do. And what's your health status and demographics and all of that and now it's starting to coach shoe in a very automated way and hopefully it'll be very successful because it will understand what you're likely to gravitate toward and want to participate in and so the the platform will guide you through behaviors through programs and interventions it will provide motivational messaging. That will pick you up when you fall down and it will be that sort of coach in your pocket that seems to know you so well and feel like it's sort of part of you and that's really what I think the dream is. I love it man and you know what Rajiv you. You've done such a great job just building this and partnering with Virgin and getting it to where it is that. I have no doubt that you'll get there. I sort of got goosebumps when you started saying what the vision is in five five years and to think it's not too far away even with like I was sitting with my wife Over the weekend we were GonNa Watch a movie and Net flicks. Does this like match. You know eighty nine percent percent ninety percent match and sure enough when one of those matches is high without fail. We enjoy the movie you know and like similarly if you're a patient and these guys over at virgin pulse are putting this engine together and you are in a certain state or in a certain point in your care and they make a recommendation for you. How L. Inspiring is it to know that you have something at your fingertips to be able to to make adjustments in what you're doing and that'll make you healthier and happier and that's inspiring Rajiv so Man Keep it up. This is really exciting. We will we will. We've got big plans or making a lot of investment in research and development and I feel like we're just scratching the surface. So there's there's a lot more to come Love it so Rajiv getting here to the end my friend. This has been a really great conversation. Let's pretend you and I are building a medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful. Fill in medicine. It's the one of Dr Rajiv Kumar and so got four questions. Lightning round style for you followed by a book and a podcast that you recommended mended listeners. You ready okay. All right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes focusing on sustainable behavior change what is the biggest mistake or or pitfall to avoid believing in quick fixes? Hebrew changes hard. It takes time and requires multiple vectors multiple approaches over a a significant period of time. How do you stay? Relevant as an organization despite constant change you constantly experiment with new ideas and you embrace failure. What's the one area focus? That should be driving everything in your organization. Adopting the consumer mindset understanding. What people are doing in their personal lives and how healthcare can and be more relevant to them than more similar to the types of programs and services and products that they're engaging with on their own time and finally what book? And what podcast would you recommend to the listeners as part of this syllabus. I've got a couple of books that I find that I keep going back to in the course of Sort of entrepreneurship and healthcare technology. They're not necessarily surly healthcare books but they seem to be relevant and kind of timeless. The first is crossing the chasm by Geoffrey. Moore it's been around for years It's not a new book book. But it's really about kind of high tech entrepreneurship. And how do you bridge the gap between can early adopters of a of an innovative disruptive solution and early majority ready which is where most people are so the visionaries versus the pragmatist. A lot of people can get visionaries to adopt their new way of doing something but they fail and getting sort of the rest of everybody everybody to come along and I think it's a fascinating book that has ramifications for almost any type of interpret Murshid Entrepreneurship whether you have your own company whether you're trying to innovate inside of have a larger company. I think it's a really relevant book and we go back to it again and again another author that we really can embrace. Here's Patrick Muncie Oni. He's written a lot of books about how how companies should operate the one that really resonates with us as the five dysfunctions of a team. At the end of the day. We have the best ideas in the world and the best innovations autumn's on the people. And how do we get people to work successfully together as a team to execute across industry across product it's all about people and so the five dysfunctions functions of a team sort of looks at one of the reasons why teams failed to achieve their maximum potential and Y Y companies and ideas often fail and how you can avoid that in how do you kind of constantly invest in a team and teamwork and so. I think that's a book that I would highly recommend everybody read wonderful. And what podcast would you recommend. Well you know I I love your podcast so keep listening. Keep listening to your podcasts. I think there are so many podcasts out there there's not one that kind of stands out out for me. I keep trying to experiment and just constantly listening to a lot of different ones. I I kinda like the idea of. Don't pick one podcast just constantly kind of rotate in experiment. Urban and try a bunch of different ones and see what you think of it so there you have listeners. The one of Dr Rajiv. Kumar go to outcomes rocket dot health. Slash Rajiv Steve. That's our a J. Iv You're going to find all the show notes to our discussion today. Full transcript as well as the syllabus that we put together links to the books is that he recommended and by all means the understanding that he just share with us is GonNa make a difference so go back and re listen if you found something inspiring before conclude Rajiv. I'd love if you could just share a closing thought. And then the best place where the listeners could follow you or get in touch with you. My closing thought would be that there is so much opportunity eighteen eighty for innovation in the space of behavior. Change lots of people are going after there's massive amounts of venture capital and private equity money being invested and we're just scratching the surface of. What's possible mobile.

Dr Rajiv Dr Rajiv Kumar Rajiv Steve diabetes Rhode Island Reggie Iran facebook Murshid Entrepreneurship Virgin Patrick Muncie Geoffrey
"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"president chief" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"We work with large employers all around the world and our our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system. A little bit and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate rotate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction it really is about. How do we help? People be healthier happier and more Productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners. For those of you. who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse? It's one of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentlemen like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team you you can imagine. Some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir. Richard Branson's leadership in his philosophy. Is If you take care of your employees. They'll take care curb your business and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees so strong and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and Aside from labor costs it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits that front. What are your thoughts on? What should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well I'm biased. But I think it has to be a behavior change too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity diabetes and heart disease as in our country and at the end of the day. There's so much we can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet our physical activity or lack thereof the stress is that we have in our lives. Just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic. I think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie what would you say right right now at at at Virgin pulse is an example of how you guys are improving. Health outcomes. Well I think we really tried to think. Outside of the box I think traditional health interventions inventions and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective. And they've been around for decades so we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people people feel like. They're failures rather than telling them that they're sick. What if we actually make them feel successful? What if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat? What would that do for self esteem for their motivation? And for the ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth. And the problem with that is they take a health risk. Assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk. Your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure..

Sir Richard Branson Virgin pulse Virgin Group Rajiv Reggie
"president chief" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

12:27 min | 1 year ago

"president chief" Discussed on The Playbook

"On this episode of the Playbook I have Jerry Jones junior the executive vice president and chief sales and marketing officer of the Dallas Cowboys and we're going to learn do things one nobody understands the stage theory better than the Dallas Cowboys from Jerry Jones down and secondly how did the greatest athletes celebrities and entrepreneurs to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in what made them champions on the the old and in the boardroom I'm your host and CEO of Sports Marketing David Meltzer Meltzer with entrepreneurs booked and I am so excited.

Jerry Jones officer Dallas Cowboys CEO David Meltzer Meltzer executive vice president and c
"president chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"president chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With president chief. See what happens. Probably sometime after g when the president commenting while making with Francis president that G twenty summit scheduled for the end of the month, and we have a warning to the US from the Chinese telecom equipment maker, qualify miekel outta this is always VP for cybersecurity and privacy was saying, the US is shooting itself in the foot by shunning Chinese technology. Now, you'll recall it last month the White House band while away from doing business in the US, the global times saying that while way is planning to boost our Indy spending by nearly one and a half billion dollars this year and yesterday authorities in China approved for operating licences for five G networks in that country. Well, meanwhile, the extradition Fash for a CFO has been set for next. Yeah. A code in Vancouver says the proceedings could be done by the twentieth of January. Joe has been living under house arrest in Vancouver off to being detained last year in Bloomberg BusinessWeek smacks, Cheffins says it's still pulse. Among could get off the hook before. Then I mean you could imagine a situation where China and the US reach some kind of grand bargain, and this is a part of it, somehow where where there's a compromise a plea deal or the US dropped charges as part of some kind of larger agreement with China now, the US's asking for custody of mung, it accuses her fraud and line to banks to trick them into conducting deals that violate US sanctions owner, Ron. And we know how African swine fever has devastated. Poor Kurds in China, but there is another problem with Chinese food supply. Bloomberg's Rishaad Salamat says that Beijing is pumping efforts to fight it. Jonah's central government is locating more than seventy million dollars in disaster relief to control the spread of the full on me when the situation is considered severe and the ministry of agriculture and rural affairs, cools the task of fighting the Caterpillar, you is the best is already hit cool and sugarcane crops in eighteen provinces. Cooling prices in China a close to the highest in about four years. The crop is used primarily for animal feed. An ethanol production in Hong Kong. I'm Rishaad Salamat, Bloomberg daybreak Asia. Japanese Prime minister Shinzo Ave wants to help mitigate tensions between Iran and the US in Baxter has all the global news in the Bloomberg.

US China Bloomberg president Bloomberg BusinessWeek Vancouver Rishaad Salamat global times Hong Kong Fash White House Jonah Asia fraud CFO VP Beijing
"president chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"president chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The president's chief of staff John Kelly outgoing has told the LA times today the president backed away from his campaign pledge for wall months ago early in his administration. He says what the president is talking about. Now is not a wall, but many different things meanwhile on Syria Graham, says he disagrees with the president this is being done by President Trump against sound military buys the president is went to a rock. Thank you very much for going on ask him to sit down with us, generals and reconsider how to do this. And he says the president has agreed to look into looking into it. Russia's President Vladimir Putin reportedly told Turkish president Recep tie up Erdo on that the two have a crucial role in Syria. This after the Trump announcement as well and Syria and Iran today have signed what they call a long. The term economic agreement North Korea's Kim Jong on Santa letter to South Korean president moon Jae-in saying that he wants more meetings this year regarding talks involving denuclearization moon says cameras apologized for having to cancel meetings earlier this year moon, saying it's a good sign. But there is still a rough road ahead North Korea. UK's international trade minister says chances of Britain leaving the e u of the prime minister's withdrawal agreement has voted down in January. Now is fifty fifty Liam Fox saying that as a matter of message, betrayal to the people who voted for the referendum. He says it's a matter of honor now for him to back Theresa May. But he says he doesn't know what's going to happen. French president Emmanuel Macron's government cracking down on executives you avoid paying taxes in France as part of efforts to quell yellow vest protesters. French government scrutinizing, the tax situation business leaders, and we'll take measures to force them to pay their taxes in France if necessary and some very strong words today for. I'm retired general Stanley mcchrystal regarding the resignation of US Defense Secretary James Mattis. He says it leads directly to the morality of the president of the United States. Why did he do? We ought to ask what kind of commander in chief. He had that you've Mattis that you know, the good marine felt he had to walk away. He says it's not all about Syria was about America's role in the world. In San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg got all right week seventeen in the NFL. That means it's the end of the regular season down to page here. Looking at the action. Hey, don. Hey, Doug, right. Several playoff spots were up for grabs on this. Final day of the NFL's regular season in last game of the day. Indie leads Tennessee seventeen seven in the second quarter or two seconds left in the second quarter, barring a tie. The winner will earn a wildcard berth and a trip to Houston for playoff game sometime next week. The Texans beat the Jaguars twenty two three earlier today to win the AFC south New England and Nile aided the New York Jets thirty eight to three to clinch a first round. Bye. Meanwhile, the jets will reportedly fire head coach Todd Bowles Kansas City crushed Oakland. Thirty five to three to clinch the AFC west title and earn a first round by Baltimore topped Cleveland. Twenty six twenty four to win the AFC north and the LA chargers down Denver Twenty-three nine. So the ravens will host the bolts next weekend in the NFC. LA Rams beat San Francisco. Forty eight to thirty two to clinch a first round bye quarterback Jared Goff through this four touchdowns including this two yarder in the third quarter giving L A a forty four to seventeen lead..

president President Trump Syria James Mattis Liam Fox Syria Graham San Francisco NFL LA times North Korea AFC John Kelly Vladimir Putin France Stanley mcchrystal Kim Jong New York Jets Jared Goff
"president chief" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"president chief" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"I and the president's chief economic adviser Larry cudlow, explain why the administration may take this action. There's disappointment that it seems like GM would rather build so electric cars in China rather than the United States. The president also tweeting General Motors made a big China bet years ago when they built plants there, and in Mexico don't think that bed is going to pay off. He continued. I am here to protect America's workers, the nation's largest automaker says restructuring is needed focusing in part on scrapping sedans that aren't selling. The White House says President Trump has no intention of asking the acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker to fire the Russia probe special counsel. Look, I think that the president has had Robert Muller doing his job for the last two years, and he could've taken action at any point me hasn't spokeswoman Sarah Sanders. Also, again, denying any campaign collusion with Russia and saying the president's not worried. After his latest stream of tweets about the probe. He calls a phony witch hunt that's ruining lives. This after Muller accused former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort of violating his plea deal by lying, which Manafort denies two hours left to vote in the last of the midterms Republican senators Cindy, Hyde Smith facing democratic challenger, Mike Espy in a Mississippi run off a day after the president held two rallies for the incumbent. The race will determine the final margin in the US Senate either fifty two or fifty three seats for the GOP majority..

president President Trump Robert Muller Matthew Whitaker General Motors Larry cudlow Russia China Mike Espy US Senate Paul Manafort economic adviser GOP acting attorney general United States Mississippi America Mexico White House special counsel
"president chief" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"president chief" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"Be the president's chief of staff is critical of the controversy over a recent condolence call fox's john decker is live at the white house during an emotional 20minute briefing white house chief of staff general john kelly a gold goldstar dead criticized congresswoman federico wilson for politicizing what he called the sacred call between a president and the next of kin to a soldier killed in action by just thought the selfless devotion that brings a man or woman the die in the battlefield i just thought that that might be sacred kelly said that upon hearing what he called the stunning comments from the congresswoman he had to collect his thoughts by going to arlington national cemetery for more than an hour lisa thanks john congress woman's response just a short time ago the dog can back at the moon all night long let it doesn't come in issue until the blogs bay she's accused the president at being disrespectful to the family president began defending the federal response to hurricane maria and puerto rico in this instance uh it's a more difficult situation uh but i think the understand said fema the military first responders cannot be there forever in his during an oval office meeting with puerto rico's governor ricardo was sellout we gotten some reports that the food was getting either from three hour from la private sector or not for profits the differ municipalities and they weren't being distributed appropriately he says they are investigating for any mismanagement at the local level any thanked the president for supporting proposals and congress to eight longterm rebuilding efforts late surge on wall street the dow up five points the sp up a fraction both new records on the fox reports fair and yes this network on this thirtieth anniversary the nineteen eighty seven crash otherwise known as black friday the dow closing slightly higher for a new record close closing up five points the.

president fox john decker white house federico wilson puerto rico fema ricardo congress dow black friday chief of staff john kelly arlington national cemetery three hour 20minute
"president chief" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"president chief" Discussed on Super Station 101

"President chief counsel for the american center for lawn justice on all these all these issues that we're seeing popping up and fascinating stuff jay great to talk to you how are you doing great a regular i'm great explain the a m k move for in layman's terms for our listeners well i mean what you had was a situation where the nights working correctly the ninth circuit i whatever ever kick them electric by can't which is where we were duped but what we got higher well highest over to her you know this better than anybody overturn rate uh in the cukurca upwards of god was eighty percent of what it what what your doctor so you have it's what i call picking apart uh by the district court judges in hawaii and california trying to pick apart the uh executive order that the president issued when challenged and they're picking apart continued in the ninth circuit where they did not like being recently where the winds were drawn by the government which at the park with the party that under article one so big california court redraw local wines and justice code he said you don't get to do do that at least not right now and which they temporary order employee ordered additional briefing which i think is to next tuesday and the keith altman spring argued october temps with the murder of a case will be reached and it the merits that are critical here there there really is no question that the president the constitutional we statutory fierce was start gory language that has look with the president put the constitution does don't need to start your so in really what's happening right now is rewarded with yukio you in these other groups are doing anything they enter try to pick apart a little bit of this them a little bit of bad and you drew the wind at uh at all but should work in grown it sucks cousin and i think what you're kennedy relaying in.

chief counsel american center hawaii president murder yukio california executive keith altman kennedy eighty percent