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Europe takes tentative first steps to reopen

PRI's The World

45:35 min | 1 year ago

Europe takes tentative first steps to reopen

"We do get through. This phase of lockdown traveling abroad will be different expect temperature checks at the airport and maybe a lesson warm welcome overseas. Why the heck would I want an American here if they haven't been tested? I'm Marco Werman also. The holy month of Ramadan begins this week. The pandemic lots of Muslims will be missing out on large gatherings to break the daily fast. It's also an opportunity to actually self reflect. Tried to improve your morals try to increase. Enhance your worship as individual and what to do with our time and quarantine learn a language and musical instrument or maybe you're like me hunched over hundreds of colorful little pieces of cardboard. There is nothing more satisfying than putting the final piece in the puzzle. Those stores are more today here on the world. How the heck do we get out of this? No question seems more relevant right in a moment. We'll hear from Singapore where testing and contact tracing contain the virus for a while but I a Europe where a number of countries are taking tentative steps to reopen on Monday parks and forests in Poland. Went back to normal. In the Czech Republic people could go to open their markets and in Norway preschoolers went back to class with some restrictions as his dad explained the French news agency. Only we follow the kid in inside in kindergarten now. The parents not allowed to to go inside so we agreed are specific times that I should deliver my son to one of the stuff. Which was eight o'clock Germany's taking things? One step further smaller retail stores are now allowed to reopen chancellor. Angela Merkel made the announcement earlier this week with this warning to fit US above all him than the local. Of course. This is difficult but if we now ease restrictions than we just don't know exactly what the repercussions won't be and that's why we have to proceed incrementally slowly and carefully. It would be tragic if we knowingly relapsed and if we knowingly endangered these first successes and there's the key issue relapse no one at this point can be sure what will happen next. Germany has an extensive testing system in place along with contact. Tracing in addition pilot antibody tests are already taking place in different parts of Germany. The goal there is to find out how many people have actually had the disease already with a plan to test the entire population in the next few months. Chancellor Merkel said that some progress has been made you kind of Austin Own. Fallon does torts is not for a second. Should we lose sight of the fact that we are still only at the very beginning of the pandemic and we are still a long way off from beating it and I think that particularly at the beginning of this week where the first restrictions are being lifted? We need to make this clear again and again. That's a lesson Singapore learning this week. The small country in Southeast Asia has been held up as a role model because the government there acted swiftly to fight the corona virus by closing borders and using technology to aggressively track infections but then covert nineteen infections in Singapore suddenly spiked. More than ten thousand. There may be a sobering lesson here for the United States as the world's Patrick win reports. The new corona virus has generated lots of new lingo their social distancing flattened the curve the dreaded super spreader and in Singapore. They have the circuit breaker. Let's be quite clear about what this circuit breaker means. It really requires all of us to minimize movement and stay at home as much as possible. That's a top government minister in Singapore Lawrence Wong. The circuit breaker is basically a campaign to get people to stay at home. You can go for a walk. You cannot go to a party you can go grab a cup of coffee. You cannot stand close to someone in line or you might get a huge fine. It's not as hard core as say China's total lockdown and Wuhan or even Italy actually closer to New York and it seemed to be working great until Singapore has reported a record. One Thousand Four hundred and twenty six new covet nineteen cases the first time daily figures have exceeded one thousand the total big spike. Singapore a city state of five million people suddenly has the most cases in Southeast Asia. And this is a bad sign for everyone. Including the United States Singapore's recipe for success is circuit breaker plus testing people like crazy and aggressive contact tracing where authorities do detective work and find out everyone that infected person has hung out with and they check them to that cocktail of strategies is now being pushed in the US. Dr Anthony Fauci says contact. Tracing is key for America to get to. It's big reentry people going back to school and work. The real proof of the pudding of the success of this reentry is how quickly and effectively you identify them. You get them out of circulation you give them care where needed and you do contact tracing. But if Singapore is now seeing a second outbreak does that mean they're golden strategy. The one America wants to imitate isn't as effective as we'd hoped that's the fear at least so it's worth asking what exactly went wrong in Singapore. We've seen outbreaks in several fallen worker dormitories. Many domes have cases and some dome many cases dorms for migrant workers says Prime Minister Lee C. and loom recently addressing the nation. These are cement rooms with a dozen people just crammed in there on bunkbeds migrant workers from China Malaysia Bangladesh and infections. Were probably growing there weeks ago. Even before the circuit breaker policy kicked in the prime minister says Singapore would now be in really really bad shape with no circuit breaker at all. If some of US fail to comply strictly with the measures the circuit breaker will fail then. All inconvenience pain and sacrifice will have been in vain. What is the lesson here well for? Us cities like Say New York. There will be a lull in cases at some point and lots of people will think we beat it. It's over but even in Singapore an inspiration to health experts around the world. They still missed these hidden. Hotspots of infection. If you lift the lockdown too they explode and the quarantine starts all over again so for now as Prime Minister Lee says please just stay home. It'd be really have no choice but to go out for food on Assad's make sure you wear a mask and stay a safe distance away from everyone else and don't linger don't Dawdle for the world. I'm Patrick win in Bangkok when we do eventually start to emerge from our current era self-isolation we're going to be stepping into a different world and that's going to take some getting used to we keep hearing that but what will that world look like. Our next guest believes things like temperature checks and no swabs at airports or face shields for fans at sporting events. Those will be common maybe restaurants waitstaff and latex gloves and single use paper menus. This is the brave new world that former homeland security official Julia. I am is starting to see. We will be living with the virus for the years to come. We'll be managing around. It will try to box it in. We'll try to hide from it but unlike most recovery from disasters where the hurricane comes and goes. The tornado comes and goes. We're going to have to recover while adapting to the existence of the virus for one public transportation. Think about lots of people in tubes underground. You're going to have to ensure mass and temperature systems. Employers are going to have to have guarantees for their workers or employees if they need their employees to come back so let's look at international travel. What airports look like so airports will have to be testing spots in other words are going to test for temperatures and we already see this happening. Globally there will be passports for people that have already gotten the disease or that are showing immunity to the disease. So you're going to have a preferred class at potentially exposed class will probably have separate facilities if not airplanes themselves for multiple populations or populations that may be at own risk. We will sit differently. No middle seats likely and probably a requirement of mass so this is not guess. Workers Sifi speculation. Juliette you've been canvassing experts in a wide range of fields and this is what they're telling you right. Yeah absolutely. Our experience of going out in public will be different because for the most part we will have to wear masks for any area. That's not say a park or going for a run and if we want to go to a restaurant the restaurant will have half as many tables. The waiter will likely be in a mask wearing gloves a disposable menus. This is the way it is going to have to be until right and now I wanna do the good news. Which is we will learn as we go along how to do this better and less like a hammer where all of us are inside. Are you envisioning quarantines? After all international travel people that I've talked to who are who are planning out global travel. Say Look they were going to be countries that view the United States as a risk right so the irony is as. We're closing our borders here. We are actually a country that other countries say Singapore South Korea using land will view as why the heck would I want an American here? If they haven't been tested us so there will be quarantining which were already seen for people arriving which means we will be doing a lot less traveling. I mean you're not GonNa go to South Korea for business meeting if you have to be inside for two weeks after on a personal level. I am on the road once or twice a week in my old life. I've taken all travel offer this year. Not simply because it won't be allowed but something we're not talking about. Is You know. Governors can decide things. Presidents or prime ministers can decide things. We're each going to have our own risk calculation about whether it's worth it. I have three kids and responsible to them. I WanNa live a long time if I don't do a flight to DC this year that's okay. I'm thinking about Denmark for example where they're sending young children back to school and small classrooms with hourly handwashing argue sink some innovative approaches to our new daily life. That just are impressing you in one way or another absolutely so. I guess a lot of companies. I think one of things that this has done is it has gotten reluctant. Employers to the idea of telework much more comfortable with it now of course our productivity is probably high now because we wanNA prove that we can telework but the whole idea of bringing your whole workforce in is something that large companies and small companies are reconsidering. Now how they're thinking about. It is of course in waves. You'd have teammate team. B. Team C. Coming on different days you are seeing sporting planners think about ways in which would wear full plastic math which I know sounds scary but look get used to all of this stuff just to let people enjoy sports innovations in other countries. I yeah so some countries that are ahead of us in terms of testing are testing. Almost all public spaces whether you're going into a market or workplace employers are demanding it assess whether someone has on temperatures and of course schools. I think the big question marks still out. There is of course residential colleges and universities. No decisions have been made globally for dorms. And I think a lot of parents are waiting to hear about that former homeland. Security official Julia. She teaches at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Always good to speak Julia. Thank you thank you so much for having me just before we take a break. Here's a story that caught our attention today from a rural corner of Tasmania the island off the coast of Australia. It's about the return of the prodigal sheep. Her name is pickles. Seven years ago she made a break for freedom bolting from the farm where she lived during a bushfire this week. Trickles came back as farmer. Alice Gray told. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation trickles looked a little different oh she excellently round like a. Gregg fluffy full of wool. She's quite a sought to host precludes had been on the Lam for all those years and ahead not been sheared. She looked like a big punk rock. Cotton Ball and principles as head to readjust to life in lockdown. She was caught fatigued Boston to east when we first bought it back to FM. Yeah but she seems to now my friends with shape and Turkeys ducks and everyone else thinks to wonder three Al pedic. No the trickles is back home. That massive woolly coat is coming off but alice gray decided to make it a competition to guess the weight of trickles fleece the families raising money for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Gray said her family and pickles are lucky to be able to self isolate on a farm in Tasmania but they wanted to do more for those who can't aren't as fortunate as prequels. They ought to have size. Debate is on brickell will be sheared on May first. We've got pictures of her in all her. Willie glory go to the World Dot. Org You're listening to the world. I'm Marco Werman you're with the world one way. The trump administration has responded to the corona virus pandemic is by pushing forward a range of tougher immigration policies. Along the US Mexico border for example all asylum seekers are being turned back as emily. Green reports is also means that for the first time the. Us is turning away. Any children crossing that border by themselves at Matamoros Mexico just across from the Texas border. Hundreds of small tents or crowded together on the banks of the Rio Grande River around fifteen hundred asylum seekers mostly from Central America live here. They've been waiting for many months because the US government says they must wait until their cases are decided dino has been here for more than ten months he and the other silom seekers in this story as to use only their first names because their immigration cases are pending Daniels with his girlfriend in nine year. Old Son they fled Honduras. My business my son a better life he says one in the. Us conditions at the camp are precarious. People here share a few dozen toilets and illness spreads easily so late. March Dan on his girlfriend took a drastic step they tend they're sent to the US by himself for decades the US has allowed children who show up at the border alone to enter the country. Dana figure even though the US is now the epicenter of the coronavirus crisis. It was all safer than the tent camp in Mexico. His son walked across the bridge that separates Mexico in the US. From Theresa Point Lead Hooking up on the English side reach the US immigration agents. Told HIM TO GO BACK TO. Mexico. They weren't accepting kids now. That's because on March twenty first. The trump administration became summarily blocking all asylum seekers from entering the US at the border including children since then around four hundred kids. Traveling alone have been turned away. Us officials declined an interview but mark. Morgan the acting head of US Customs and Border Protection has had. It's a public health issue. The Krona virus. The disease doesn't know age in fact what we've heard from the medical providers that the younger children can actually be carriers. This is Morgan in a press Colin March when they come across the border they pose a absolut absolutely concrete public health risks to this country and everybody that they come in contact with so. This is not about immigration. This is about public. Health critic say that Morgan's reasoning is deceptive? That's just a flat out distortion perversion of the public health. Laws also misrepresents. What's actually going on here? Lucas and targets an immigration attorney and law professor at Stanford University. There's lots and lots of cross-border traffic that's continuing all commercial. Traffic continues. Trucking is continuing. So what's happening is children refugees. Who are entitled to Legal? Protection have been singled out by this order to further. The trump administration's immigration agenda Mexican authorities are also playing a role physically preventing children from reaching the US border like seven-year-old Haiti. Her Dad's center alone to ask for protection at the US border. Her Dad made this decision after a doctor told him the tent. Camp in Mexico wasn't safe. Here's Haiti's Dad. Pablo took care Along with a modest. The doctor told us if the virus hits a camp were all day. Pablo centers daughter with three other girls whose parents had made the same decision. The four girls ages three five seven and eight walked across the bridge toward the US. Mexican officials ran to grab the girls publicize. They held them in a shelter on the Mexican side. Pablo got his daughter back. Two days later he describes his daughter as quiet and patient but at night when they are in the tent together she cries runs off asked. When are we going to get the United States? Why can't we leave here? He says Pablo tells her. They must wait their next court. Hearing is in May but because of the krona virus. It's likely to be delayed chances. Are they'll be living here for many more months to come for the World Emily Green a famine of Biblical proportions? That's the UN's warning that urgent action is needed to avoid a catastrophe. The leader of the World Food Program says the Corona virus pandemic could bring hunger to more than two hundred fifty million people of special concern ten countries that already faced conflict and crisis Yemen Venezuela and Afghanistan among them. Meanwhile food systems have already been disrupted by the corona virus. The frustrating irony is at massive amounts of food. Are Going to waste Andrei Laperriere Montreal Montreal. The Executive Director of Don the global open data for agriculture and nutrition Dr Three basic steps the production processing and distribution and as food waste at all three levels exacerbated by the coronavirus I in terms of production. There's a lot of losses there because of their lack of unskilled workers the window that producers have to harvest crops and bring it to the markets is very short. So if you don't have the workers of Anabol- at that very moment then your crop is lost problem number two processing. We see that especially in the meat industry because meat processing plants. You're working on a chain so you're very close to other people so therefore the risk of infection is is very high. We've seen plants shutting down some trying to clean up in reopen bug west around ten percent of the meat. Production is currently being affected by the coronavirus. How much waste you see. The level of distribution like getting food to market. That's where we see a lot of losses right now half of all the food that's being produced ghost to institutions beat restaurants community services and and the other half goes into grocery stores. Where you do your shopping ever then. The problem now is that because most restaurants community services and others have shut down the producers that used to sound in Balkh in large quantities to these institutions. Now you have no market for a very limited so a lot of milk used to go to school for example as part of school with meals now that the schools are closed. There's no real market so what to do with the milk. You can only star so much for so long. So as a result of that excess production has to be thrown away and that is true with a lot of other perishable foods. Could food waste now? Do you think lead to food. Shortages further down the line. Yes but not the overall in terms of overall feminine or or food shortage We're likely to see more and more short-term shortages like you may go to the you'll reduce your market today there's no Marty bums available are. There's no park today or there's something else missing on that day. It may not be missing somewhere else but where you are it might so people should the thank God is to buy. Local went to come by locally. Makes a big difference because it to help support your local producers number. Two is far governments to resist the temptation to go protectionism to continue to let food flow and and seasonal workers. The same weight. I'm just thinking. Examples like Kazakhstan. Now has decided that they're going to stop exporting wheats because they feel that they need to keep more of their own production but as a result of that neighboring countries are suffering quite which in turn leads to social disturbances and other problems so keeping the food flows open and related manpower is really key to minimize foodwise inflation and hopefully up resume restarted sister. Andrea Laperriere is the executive director of good on the global open data for agriculture nutrition. He's been speaking with us for Montreal. Andrea. Thank you very much for your time. Does my bedroom Marco News headlines ARE NEXT. You're listening to the world as the corona virus spreads so does false information. Scientists aren't too surprised they've seen the same thing with climate change. You need experts to deal with complicated problems and you can't just has somebody tweeting at a virus to make disappear. That's just not gonNA work expertise and reliable information. It turns out work better. That's ahead on the world. Ramadan begins tomorrow night. It's the month long observance by Muslims around the globe marked with fasting and prayers in a normal year. It's time for gathering together to break the daily fast this year though. Islamic communities are adopting to the reality of marking the holy month during a pandemic nor had. He is an imam at the by Tofu to mosque in south London for us Muslims in the UK as you have cooled Through a look down across the country so of course Muslims won't be able to congregate at the mosques when Ramadan begins so I think it what's different. This year is the fact that what we would usually do at a Moscow bringing them online but enter be going live delivering them Alexis. What's different this year Because on newly US brings such a togetherness feeling people usually break their fos together on. They usually open their false together result so before sunrise on off to sunset. So they're going to miss that feeling of speaking on eating together right and just practically for people to break the fast together. You're going to be encouraging families to like put a laptop in the kitchen We've set up virtual raking with us together than before actually breaking the Fast Weeden. We have a customer in the mosque where there's short porks and is inspiring lectures and prays together. Though show talks will be online. You know that we will actually breaking fos together so it feels like you've got online work around to help people who would normally be isolated. What do you do for people for families who don't have computers or WI FI without having computer wifi we've actually set up a helpline? We have a national charity in the UK known as humanity. I without help line. Even if you don't have Internet just contact us to your local telephone and we have youth members actively waiting for the schools from eight. Am Monday morning to eight PM and evening on we tried to dispatch someone on that very day to go to the sovereignties on actually help them. Running errands like getting groceries. Prescriptions medication justify the help lines. I obviously hoped around five thousand full. Uk households newer howdy. I'm it occurs to me that congregating as Muslims in the UK. isn't just an expression of faith whether it's Ramadan or Friday prayer it's also an expression of solidarity in the face of continuing microaggressions and outright animosity. What does the Muslim community lose by? Not Having the month-long moment of community and solidarity of Ramadan does this whole. I think ideal that fine. Ramadan does bring allows togetherness and the sense congregation community aspect to it. But it's easily for go on that. Ramadan doesn't aspect on. That's the whole purpose of being able to self reflect on a previous is Muslims. You try to stay optimistic on positive when it comes to this. This month is giving us a time. Just like the Holy Prophet Muhammad Peace be upon spent in relation during the Madan. And it's giving US second month of days just actually self reflect tried to improve your morals. Try TO INCREASE OIL ONS. You'll worship as individual. This year is peculiar in so many ways what is Ramadan mean to you this year foaming Not only do I get a lot of time. D-r-i-z-l-y so for flagged as tried to improve myself as a human being bought because as Muslim huge poverty. Faith is that you will help one another. We believe that one of the rights that Islam or your religion has upon. You is that you take care of humanity. God's creation so now that we see our neighbors are need it gives us extra zoo this Madan because we know that doing this and helping others is actually increasing. Our specialty helping us get closer to nor had. He is an imam by two mosque in south London. Very good to speak with you. Thank you very much for being with US and Ramadan MUBARAK TO GO literally month ahead. Stay safe and take care early last year. Two men from Syria were arrested in Germany. One in Berlin the other near Frankfurt. They are both believed to be former officials with serious state. Security Apparatus tomorrow. Their trial begins the charges. Crimes Against Humanity Syrians are watching closely to see if the trial brings some measure of justice after so many years of war holly young reports from Berlin. The trial is taking place in the German city of coolants on the banks of the Rhine River in the western part of the country. Many legal cases here have been delayed because of the Karuna virus but the regional court decided that this one was to agent on hold. It's the first criminal trial worldwide on state torture in Syria. The two Syrian defendants are known for legal reasons as an were are I add a? They're facing charges of crimes against humanity. And we're ours. Alleged crimes include murder rape and torture. Both men are said to have traveled to Germany as refugees with gun is with the legal nonprofit. Echr in Berlin. He says putting to Syrian officials on trial is an important milestone. Western European countries did only arrest and prosecute those who are fighting in the in the various militias such as Isis and others but to cover the magnitude of what happened in Syria during the last ten years. One need to investigate and the torture regime President Assad alongside a network of European partners. Calix Group has spent years gathering evidence hearing testimonies of alleged atrocities committed by Syrian government officials the joint plaintiffs in the coolants. Trial are Syrian survivors of torture. Colic says he hopes that this trial is just the beginning. Syrian should see that the impunity will not be forever and President Assad and his people won't be imp- you and untouchable forever. The trial in Germany is based on the principle of universal jurisdiction. It allows states to prosecute certain crimes committed anywhere in the world and the past efforts to put Syrians on trial at the International Criminal Court in The Hague have failed. That's because Syria is not a signatory to the IC and Russia and China have blocked attempts to refer Assyrian Crimes to the court. Germany is home to a large Syrian refugee community. Mariana could Lee is a law student. An activist and Berlin. She says Syrians like our will be watching the Koblenz trial very closely. There's a sense of kind of justice that people can feel that can be delivered to them so in this sense. I'm really really excited. And I feel like we are like. We are witnessing as oracle moment in the sense. Kakudi is one of many Syrians who have helped gather evidence of torture in state detention centers they edit crawlers. Meant that this happened and this is still happening. And this is something that they can build up on Politics. So this says I feel like it's moment of hope for lots of Syrians like who also interviewed. It was a moment of yes. But this is not the justice we're looking for. We want to establish justice in Syria. But this could be the beginning of the road so beginning of a long road towards justice that is something Anwar Al Buni says. He's been working on for thirty years. He's a Syrian human rights lawyer today working in Berlin on behalf of torture victims. Albany says to him. It's not only these two men going on trial in Germany. It's the whole Syrian regime and ask for Syrians back home. Do you think they're paying attention to this trial? Think the Syrians now look for what happened? against like screaming added many Attention many Question we had bonuses the trial and Koblenz is important for the future of Syria. But he says it's also just a first step towards accountability for the world. I'm holy young in Berlin. President Trump says limiting immigration protects American jobs and health. That argument is not new whenever there's a crisis here in the US questions. Come up about immigration. Eric Lee is the author of America for Americans the history of xenophobia in the United States. I've asked her how he's seen this play out before the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic is actually really fascinating to compare it to. What's happening today? So I may have to understand that. Of course during World War. One immigration was effectively halted due to the war and the end of passenger steamship travel but even during the flu pandemic in which the US lost six hundred and fifty thousand lives. The country didn't try to limit immigration. In fact we still let in over a hundred and ten thousand immigrants and the Bureau of Immigration touted. Its kind treatment of thick immigrants. I mean Erica. The stories right now of hate directed at Asians asian-americans were hearing stories of acid attacks. So personally what is it's been like for you as someone whose grandfather arrived in this country during the Chinese exclusion act and I remember Hearing stories of my parents insisting that during World War Two into the nineteen fifties and sixties. They they still felt the sting. Not only of Chinese exclusion but also just anti-asian racism in general. Obviously Japanese American incarceration as well and their philosophy was. We need to show that were quote. Americans. I and Chinese second so for them. There was this sense of Ultra assimilation. We need to prove that we're loyal needs to prove that we're patriots. Need to prove that were assimilated. I think that the sense of worthiness you know is is really being questioned for Chinese Americans in other Asian Americans feeling like they're being suspected of bringing the virus in spreading the virus and it's you know it takes its toll. Let's not just these horrific violent attacks these physical attacks or the name calling or the social shunning. It's also just this internalized sense of Oh. I thought we belonged but look how easily the tables can be turned on us and I think there's a palpable sense of fear. Now that we're all supposed to wear masks out in public there is a racial is image of an Asian person in a mask that is quite different than any other time of personal wearing a medical mask. I had not even thought about that mask aspect. Yeah I think it's You know I certainly feel very self conscious now wearing a mask outside. You've also written Erica. That Americans have the power to combat xenophobia. Obviously as individuals we all have that power aside from a person's vote though. What would that take today? What would you like to say? It's a really tough one. I think that so many of us feel feel disempowered because the there is the legal challenges. Those have to continue but many of us aren't skilled in tool in doing that. We can support those organizations. We need to make sure that we're supporting immigrant serving organizations and of course vote but as we're seeing phobia serve spread out into the streets and into our neighborhoods in our subways. One of the things that we can all do is stop it. We need to be those bystanders. Who Don't just look away but actually take action to intervene and to protect those. Who are vulnerable. Eric Lee is the author of America for Americans a history of phobia in the United States. Eric thank you very much thank you. I am not kidding when I say this. When I'm done with this interview I will spend a few minutes unwinding and the dining room looking for a little piece a little piece with a blip of blue in the corner and a green and yellow pattern with fish on it. Yeah I'm working on a thousand piece jigsaw puzzle. Third One my family's taking during the lockdown. I hear others are busy on their own. Jigsaw puzzles a lot of people. Julie Wilkins is director of J. H G puzzles endorsed in England What's been like for you Julie? Since the corona virus outbreak in subsequent lockdowns took effect. Well probably our sales have cordray told maybe even higher that when when did your company? I notice the uptick in demand. We originally the it was mother's Day that was causing the incredible surging in sales. So that's Mother's Day in the UK right. Now This Day you K- yes and we normally get quite a bit then on sales go up because lots of do puzzles but it just never came back down again. How big is Your Company? J. Puzzles in. How many puzzles are you able to make in a day? We're shipping at the moment in making probably between two hundred and two hundred and fifty a day. There are only four of us. We actually glue and make the boxes by hand and then we have a couple of large hydraulic cutting presses. Which were used to cut the manually put in a box. Hopefully the right puzzling right box. But we don't always get it right so I've been going to Ebay defined jigsaw puzzles and it seems a whole new community of Jigsaw. Puzzle is has arisen and people are buying and selling almost as quickly Who's buying puzzles these days way? Saying a an upsurge in sales in children's puzzles because there are lots of children at home and slightly older children too who got a bit more time to spend with mom and dad or mom and dad have a bit more time to spend with them. And it's good family time Julie if I may be overly analytical The world is broken. Jigsaw puzzles give us a sense that we can repair things in make them whole again. Do you buy that explanation. I I sort of do. There is nothing more satisfying than putting the final piece in the puzzle. We all do lots of other things. But putting that last bit in is is really gives you a sense Am I think that's important? People feel that they can fix it. They can do it. They can make it and you get achievement when you see the finished picture. Much is the picture on the box. Julie Wilkins Director of Jag. Puzzles endorsing England. Thank you for your time. Thank you for such perfect explanations. Yo l comes as covert nineteen spreads sodas false information about the disease. No need for people to be in a panic. You Fake News. On Social Media Combat Widespread Misinformation Medical University of Vienna called Fake News. He need clear accurate information. And some ways. This is expected the false information about the disease has some similarities to the spread of misinformation about climate change. Stefan Lewandowski is a cognitive at the University of Bristol in the UK and an expert in misinformation. The number one misinformation is the Kobe. Nineteen is not much worse than the flu. When in fact that's unfortunately not true cove. Nineteen is a far worse virus. Wase a much higher fatality rate at the other end we have conspiracy theories and there's a whole bunch of those mainly about the origin of Cova. Nineteen What's interesting is you've spent part of your career looking at misinformation about climate change. I'm curious what similarities between misinformation about cove in nineteen and climate change. You're one of the similarities. Is that in both cases. The views are politically polarized. At least in the United States we know from a lot of survey data that in the United States. Climate change is denied mainly by people on the political right. We just did a survey last week in the US involving two thousand respondents and we found precisely the same thing people on the political right on more dismissive of the risk from covy then people on the political left we know With climate change that fossil fuel companies have sown the seeds of skepticism over the years? Is there any evidence suggesting doing this with misinformation around the corona virus and who might stand to gain if that is in fact happening with the corona virus it appears as though most of the misinformation comes from not leading political figures but from the population at large only about twenty percent of the misinformation regarding covert is issued by opinion leaders and celebrities and so on however the twenty percent of opinion leaders? Who are providing the misinformation. They receive a lot more engagement on social media so they're influenced despite being in. The minority is nonetheless considerable with someone who is misinformed. You're wrong is usually not the best way to open this conversation. What what is the best way to talk to someone who was misinformed about covert or climate for that matter? I think first of all you have to understand that. They're different people in different audiences. You must tailor your message to the audience. It turns out that most people are sensitive scientific consensus if you tell people that ninety seven out of one hundred. Climate scientists agree on the fundamentals of the science that is sufficient to boost their attitudes towards climate. Change l little bit with a bit of luck. Maybe this crisis is a global reset and people are beginning to recognize again that you need experts to deal with complicated problems and you can't just has somebody tweeting at a virus to make disappear. That's just not gonNA work. Stefan Lewinsky is a cognitive scientists at the University of Bristol in the UK. Thank you very much. We thought. Okay thanks very much bye. Today is Earth Day. Its fiftieth anniversary and the start of the modern environmental movement. This year people are celebrating. Virtually how exactly? We asked environmentalists around the world to share part of their day with us. Hello my name is Eliana. And I'm from MAHYCO. Hi My name is Samantha Sepia. I'm currently on lockdown in Manila Philippines. I am stuff are and I live in San City. The capital of Yemen. My name is prescribed Daca from Zimbabwe for me as the is day to just take a pause and really appreciate our beautiful planet and to think about what I need to do as an individual to protect it and to also inspire others. Hello everyone this. Rubber Jehad's from focused on duty reorganising and interactive panel discussion. That will be held online on. The team decided flagging the climate. Gov The lessons we have learned from the response to the Kobe. Nine hundred pandemic and how we can apply those good practices in Pakistan for positive climate action. Happy Day and sign up against an ingredient in Jemson added Indian school of Dhabi. My Wardrobe event for this day is artist for the earth. I believe that is a beautiful form of expression to create a long lasting and powerful impact on others. My name is Elliot's Davita also known as Zinger from Malawi? The wool matter of Africa and Co founder of Conservation Music Music Malawi uses. They'd Catalytic Pow of music and art can promote environmental sustainability. The message in these songs poems and Short Story. A focused on advocating for climate action to mitigate the negative impacts of climate change why? Dnc witnessed that this number school Be will aim we give them a micro the Colombian planet yes the only card Planet everyone and happy days. Twenty twenty my name is l. I'm a climate justice activists from Afghanistan and as initiate the Climate Spike Movement in Afghanistan at work together with a young strongly committed team of the climate activists and environmentalists from around the country. And we have organized unlined celebration. High that My name is Francis Hume based in Glasgow and we actually have been something. That's called a world interfaith Harmony Grove. And we've encouraged people to pay for trees in that Grove. My name is article who are cheap and they live in. Brennan in Serbia. I'm conductor of Youth Mix Choir or the Music School Yosef Marine Coach to support Earth Day. The created a virtual choir of forty singers. We have chosen the song evening. Rice the lyrics are evening. Grace Spirit. Com sound goes down when the day is gone. Mother Earth Awakens me we the heartbeat of the seat a lot going on even indoors. Those voices of people around the globe celebrating Earth Day in isolation today. They shared their stories with the world's Anna Customer. And that's where we leave you on this Earth Day the world comes to you from the non and Bill Harris Studio at wgn in Boston. We'll see back here tomorrow. The world is a CO production of W. H. Boston the BBC World Service and Pierre Ex.

US UK Germany Singapore America Prime Minister Lee Marco Werman Berlin Southeast Asia Angela Merkel Boston South Korea Pablo President Assad Syria Poland Dr Anthony Fauci Lawrence Wong
Do targeted killings really work?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

27:46 min | 1 year ago

Do targeted killings really work?

"Few will mourn the passing of Abu Bucky al-Baghdadi leader of Islamic range in how wars are being fought the targeted killing of modern times understand it is the decision by a state military to direct deadly force not shooting down in one thousand nine forty three of the Japanese aircraft bearing marshal planned specifically to kill him today's targeted killings up unlike a planet away this is not likely to become less common do we people are sometimes cynical about why certain people are regarded it's has not for example targeted President Assad of Syria to counter that narrative and to sort of explain our point of view and why we're doing this the are they more like combatants in which case they can be taken out as though you're listening center for Ethics and the rule of law at the University of Pennsylvania Law school she joins us from Philadelphia that and also as deputy executive secretary at the National Security Council from two thousand a month Lou. What kind of factors would play into the decision once you've decided not necessarily go ahead with it well I think broadly this decision falls into the rubric of something that overseas including a against US troops in in this case in northern Syria and target rather than capturing them just because that's the easiest thing to do well there's a concerned the legal criteria for those two sorts of acts are really very I to kill combatants of the other side and it's simply not necessary which you have to try to capture a suspect I and presumably with Syria and so it seems as though we ought to be using a law enforcement model Ooh that point does what you might think of as the legal environment in which a given eighteen and filing an extradition request is not really an option it might be argued that decision was made that that the United States was not getting the support I the logistical and intelligence that hill and I'm not sure it's that clear cut I mean I think the US preference I would think the Al Baghdadi blew himself up before he was able to be captured? Claire raid like this or may be in the vicinity D- do we understand whether there is even I guess an informal `calculation done about how civilians it would be okay to risk in order to get at terrorist you're and so we tried to capture in less capture is infeasible the billions around and going rushing in physically mm strike I mean in this case about daddy blew himself that is a question I doubt we do under the present circumstances Louis were talking a few minutes ago there about the symbolic value of a relatively new way of waging war do they have an actual strategic cj. I think the some of these people though sound bin Laden al-Baghdadi are incredibly charismatic spokesperson the chief organizer and those people are sort of hard to replace that and from the perspective popular at home unsurprisingly the tactic is not seen in quite Venturi for this program was the death of Abu Bucky al-Baghdadi so in his specific of course isis supporters are going to warn him and they have more him and they the people had seen in the presence of Baghdadi hope of restoring the a strategic blow because he didn't really have huge strategic role and the organization a strategic consideration or should it be one if you are going about ordering thoroughly because the word martyr is used author liberally region by these Kamal Tire and therefore we can look for example at the death we have a huge impact on his status you know he was of al Qaeda around the world at the time so when looking at Isis today successor even they recognized that mater or not they needed to living persons for people to kind of see as neither targeted killings of the kind we're talking Baghdadi rate walls by sending in special forces on the ground they usually done remotely innings that have resulted in the deaths of civilians as well we've seen things caused anger only when they targeted civilians that end up being collateral talks very accurate and civilian houses are attacked or medical oh agency no voice that they are at the issue of superpowers influencing their local or national level dynamics is also not something it doesn't mean that people generally like these kinds of attacks for all the reasons in these countries of the process by which the decision gets made about aftermath daddy was skilled stopped at questioning why now why was he only for obvious reasons I mean the United States for example is hardly going to reveal its harming people people are saying for example right now in Syria if someone like you knowing that the former US President Obama had said Assad must go talk and others are not even if they have committed even wider atrocities messaging programme at all attached to drone strikes targeted which is that these kinds of killings mostly happened to serve US interests huge bounty for him to be found but kind of everybody knew that host so this is what a lot of people in the Middle East are basically thinking that it is about so about particular political ambitions that guides the timing understanding is it possible to tell them at least whether targeted killings of toll I mean this is nothing compared to all the other things they are willing to snowing very well they could be killed any minute and so whether it's through they will say it's an honor to be killed in this particular way Dr Lena Kuttab the art classical Stein and Lukens Lou this is a relatively new way Laghi evolving and therefore the strategy alongside that well I think we've we've been watching and now under president trump to take out targets I think they're very effective they are very percents sure that you have the right target and your again going to be able to minimize or eliminate clarence very often the case not just with this kind of technology but with all kinds of technologies I more efficient way of eliminating individuals how do you see that legal at the ethics really lags behind the technology so in this case we the issues of whether or not we have the host country's permission to enter and Obama really used it to an enormous extent much more than President Bush had can people about why this was legal in two thousand fourteen he noticed this if this technology is going to be deployed in parts of the world where a lot of the population you were discussing earlier when you strike a target like bin Laden or Al Baghdadi but does the the conversation to try to have in the parts of the world where we're chasing terrorists and carrying out these kinds of attacks plane why we're targeting these people so I think part of and this is an argument in which is not robustly as we might be to counter that narrative into sort of explaining our point of view and why we're doing ordering such a strike especially if as has happened on at least one occasion the targets who was living in Yemen and who was part of Al Qaeda oiled in the District of Columbia District Court to try to get a similar case happened with a British citizen Raod con several years later in two thousand seventeen and come home and be tried and have all of the guarantees of due process the army and I think we never really sorted out that difference in what the theory was under which they saw that it's actually quite an easy sell to the voters you're able to go in front of them yeah no it's it's very appealing I think from politicians point of view to be able to present it that way to the American public the high profile top terrorist leader with minimal casualties on the US side available and usable to and by the kind of people it's currently being used law and state sovereignty and it turns local populations a deeply of

Syria US Al Baghdadi Abu Bucky President Assad Philadelphia University of Pennsylvania Law deputy executive secretary National Security Council Lou Laden Claire daddy Louis
Hard Factor 10/8: Trump Pulls Troops Out of Syria, Zombie Deer, Freakish Instagram Star Arrested, Another Disastrous Wedding Story & More

Hard Factor

31:56 min | 1 year ago

Hard Factor 10/8: Trump Pulls Troops Out of Syria, Zombie Deer, Freakish Instagram Star Arrested, Another Disastrous Wedding Story & More

"What he does it better myself go ahead tell me something right down late not a rate wooded you Joe Man Randy savage this factor in there is no one does it better now heard may turn to Syrian President Assad for protection from Turkey and he is in an alliance with Iran and Russia campaigned on bringing troops it's not a great what he's going to do even if it means leaving Syria in the hands of potentially adversarial countries like Turkey Iran and Russia and so what reason Iran Russia involved because the his surprise move to pull completely out of northern Syria all of our US troops and make way for a Turkish invasion into the country so wolves everybody From Nikki Haley to Lindsey Graham even cocaine Mitch have broken with trump on this one so I don't know anything about this whatsoever donald trump isn't going to have to worry about Ukraine Gate for a couple of days because he has pissed off most people working in American politics in both parties with have been our primary allies in Syria who've been helping the United States Combat Isis and attain their prisoners so Turkish may be cool with cats not cool with the Kurds is that the Turkish government is actively preparing to invade Kurdish controlled lands in northern Syria and considers the Kurds a terrorist group. The Kurds involves Turkey it's a whole mess so sounds delicious yeah sounds deliciously messy can I say how much smarter you and Mark Look Right now you see these ever scrolled glasses in action so after Syria Mark Wasn't pat will take us on a news buffet of other headlines Let's get it going so we're our allies so many people are upset about trump though has stayed committed to his stance saying on Monday that he campaigned on bringing soldiers home and thinking that bringing the troops home is good no matter what and generally speaking it is but the problem with this plan to bring home two hundred and thirty of our boys and girls and sound good no yeah he announced that on Sunday night so good news for cats they're really friendly Turkey is it true Yeah Watch the movie caddy but I do know that Kurds is really close to nerds so also runs with her does not a great name yeah I don't know how I feel about them being our allies I mean again I know nothing about this Kong no way the Kurdish have air conditioning you and your ac it's the most the most important thing that to to have peace in the world you know you guys should know I mean look at the garage will and I know for smarter today Oh yeah well I I it's a certainty that we are you also nude follow our facebook page and our Youtube Channel to make sure you can watch the full videos the Kurds oh they're the worst pickle imaginable it's like them in Hong Kongers like one one a one B in terms of shitty positions right now at least they got a c the another episode of heart Tuesday October eight top stories of the day I'm going to do one about the US pulling troops out of Syria so as you might nice eyesore actual terrorists right and so as you may imagine because we're turning our back on our allies here and basically leaving them whatsoever but just putting that out there health with isis good for them you're right okay and birds per expert analysis there's a reason mark and I fight like once a week as fucking hot yeah we'RE GONNA BE WE'RE GONNA be okay in the winter the winter in our in our movement ever scrolled came in they look fantastic yeah I like it you gotta weigh in listeners every smarter Sir and Evangelical Christian leader Pat Robertson who was appalled by trump's decision to withdraw US troops from northern Syria and he says quote the president all right so like I said trump announced he was withdrawing our troops on Sunday night after Turkey had already announced their plans to invade Syria and it leaves many and both stories feel like we've just given where position Syria for absolutely nothing in exchange while knowing that many innocent people who have been our allies will suffer if they commit any human rights violations on the Kurds but at this point everybody's pretty skeptical that he'll ever actually stand up to certain dictatorships like the Saudis the United States is in great danger of losing the mandate of Heaven if he permits this to happen unquote so right now trump has the magical when you say take those prisoners off our hands what do you think that really means I mean there's there's been some annoymous ready he must read it he meant he take their heads off a group that trump probably does not wanNA piss off heading into another election that's true I Robertson probably walks around the pearly gates does his own vetting after he makes it there are we earlier trump did get president Erdogan of Turkey to take our two thousand isis prisoners in the region off our hands and he says that he's going to economically punish Turkey is clearly just complete bullshit and that was complete bullshit but I have a political sex scandal here for you that does not appear to be bullshit hoping I was going to pan out twenty four year old body building competitor marine the day before that ridiculous press conference occurred or I think maybe like the morning press conference yeah we mentioned we also predicted that representative Ilan Omar is getting a divorce that much we know Omar cited irretrievable breakdown of the marriage relationship and she seeking joint cuss shake their hands off their with their own I mean he's just handed over he's like he's a here's the keys to two thousand prison cells so that's basically what's happening kill these guys yeah happen yeah yeah they're they're only friendly two cats it's a lot of the families of those troops NFL and West and West you've got a point there you may be the animated one yeah I'm not familiar but yes probably exactly like that taking it to the Internet we've got famed televangelist megapass data heaven that nothing you can do is wrong because having mandates that and Pat Robertson says it so but this could potentially take it away he must be pretty serious about this decision because big risk amended happens pretty rich huge risks pretty convicted and even thought this through Pat Robertson also called all non-christians Termites and probably thinks that Mike Pence goes easy on the gas well ends with her secluded Italian restaurants in Plaza del Ray California all the way back in March Jordan monette fifty-five the doctor says in divorce documents that her husband told her in April this year fever three children with current husband here see so that's always sad when there's like a divorce involving kids hopefully they do get joint custody to the co-parenting thing always good they're not he just made spent the termites or Pesky he's intelligent he by a lot of things he's intense but he does draw a lot of water in the Evangelical Community so that is they got back together now this is what caused this time Omar is accused of having an affair with political aide Tim Monette by his now estranged wife Dr Beth Jordan Monette and national finance director so he likes to work in Minnesota Omar's campaign paid Menendez Company the East regroup over two hundred and fifty K. and consulting fees and travel expenses last year eastern group. He's he's her lobbyist right he's a lobbyist she home wrecked her a lobbyist of hers awesome has home wrecking herself. Yeah I think there might be some Bruce springsteen relationship I'm going to check into this bruce springsteen's probably not happy about this the boss no word yet from predicted if they will have divorced markets for politician slash heart factor twenty and create an account in less than two minutes and depositing at least twenty dollars in your account you hit twenty or more we're going to give you free twenty there if you think you know what's going on to be with the lobbyists that's like on the scale of sleazy things you could do during your first congressional term that is probably number one or two I don't know how much Ah Erdogan in Turkey and Putin and Russia so we've got an old fashioned standoff on our hands in the Republican Party and we're GONNA have to see how it plays out will let me ask you a question forced once before this is not the brother thing right but this is the guy who's very short alleged brother right in between and then got back that caused a wrinkle potentially after Dr Lover Okay he likes smart people too and there have been reports that the thirty eight year old monette had been seen getting up close and personal with more including holding and clearly some of that money went to crap affair hotels and dinner's getting D. dubbed with cash slam in she's like well let's just pay more for the nicer room with the SPA that he omar were romantically involved in that he was in love with Omar so that yeah that that's bad that's Dow seal the deal on on a divorce that's a that's a irretrievable as in the future although a trump divorce marked by a certain date would be absolutely banana pants in terms of volume predicted so maybe we can talk business on that what you can do is bet legally anyways let's take to the newsbusters Enga- about this one baby Josie you may remember last week us mentioned the Liz worn affair with the with these guys aren't gay guys looked at me a little gay I wouldn't know because I've never had a so we've got our own Guy Manning the gates pat anything about doctors they're pretty smart so I'm GonNa go ahead and believe her never scrolls exactly what I'm telling you S- probably true I don't let anyone touch my body never skulls on you don't think he's going to get any more today leaving just October eighth and half of October ninth so the markets we're looking at here under thirty nine tweets looking very strong and forty two four live is tweets but he's not hitting like he's regularly not heading more than thirty tweets and like you mentioned he's only at three at the time there was recording which is very very very late in the day he tweets at the time of this taping this show and it's really only one one and a half days left yes he did hit one hundred eighty tweets this last seven day period so he's averaging like twenty five money and I'll show you the tweet to prove it anyways there you go we've been batting about seventy five percent on trump tweet markets that we've suggested so take our advice or take your own advice and wins and the bartenders are real nice there they don't want me to drink and drive while for me but definitely in college I got towed like regularly I have an awesome college does story and what's happening in the news and politics you need to get on this one new market you can bet on now is how many tweets will add real donald trump post from noon October seventh till noon October nine more put Monette is a campaign fundraising expert guy consultant he previously worked for Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison as timer to whether out of penis AK being too hung over to go get your car from a place you knew it was going to get towed from lying yourself right and they don't tell us thirty nine the one right next to that as it's not gonNA pass it would have to be a really ridiculous twitter storm day for debris has forty tomorrow or today when you're listening I I had Owning a lobbyist to home wrecking their marriage to wreck yours with the lobbyist that's I mean that's that's it's sleazy without a rip-off name of the e street band works last Promo Sauce Heart factor twenty the news predictable so get on the ship all right guys I assume at this point in our old degenerate lives we have all had a car towed in all fifty United States on predict it's several hundred markets they have available they're always changing and get a free twenty dollars going to www dot predicted dot org slash promo flying on and I can't I'm an Oregon you can't get all up in this cause I'm in Oregon I'll be right there not only that but if you were paying attention they're paying his group consulting group that's a market hard factor pat one five hundred dollars on last week the two day trump market got any advice spot on this one yeah here's what market fucking Fox it's doc in money by making bets right after listening to our podcast here and then we can all just be like one big happy rich family laughing at the news together one more time that's www predicted art markets two days so it's a lot easier to predict trump's tweeting I did the math he's tweeting between fifteen and twenty times a day tops so right now I think three ah or let him free who knows what they're going to do hopefully not that you ever seen robinhood prison and Robin Hood having cost him once not great no that's not good around the corner in the apartment complex and then I went to the cops in Blacksburg and I was like what do I do here's what happened they found the guy because the thing was like traceable my bedside is split two hundred fifty dollars evenly between the two markets getting six hundred thirty shares in each so if I hit either of those markets under thirty nine or forty to forty nine more the apartment complex and he needed because he was a guest and there were no guest spots because we're having parties and so he went in my car which I didn't lock stole my sticker put on his car and then part of the Ella tell yeah all right so we actually had a big party at my apartment complex amazingly someone went in in the middle of my party that was indoors and outdoors and starts party early twenty-four-year-old Damian Howard came across forty-one-year-old Tariq Butler in the process of towing his car and the two fought about it and how it got Butler and a choke hold suburbs just outside of DC is now being charged with second degree murder of a forty four forty-one-year-old tow truck driver after the two got into a fight over a telling now bottom of find it at the toe place I'm missing my sticker from my apartment complex which I own and it was in the back of my car someone broke into my car and stole my sticker turned out to be a guy that was fucking a girl that was with them he they're like absolutely we don't want to deal with so I call this can we meet at a seven eleven turn out to be like a rich Persian cat drove up in a brand new BMW and I was like okay I'm I'm getting some money using spotters to tell you immediately after you leave like five minutes some fuck with huge some some fucking with a huge storage fees so they told your car and they charge you like fifty bucks for like an is your car and I get it if you want your car towed all the rules only person to blame for your car being towed is usually you right well that's not the case in a lot of companies use predatory tactics like the multiple days every day it costs extra dollars it can get expensive as is terrible shady business and people generally hate tow truck drivers especially if you happen to come across strew you like to get funded by smart people yeah I'm lettuce Dr Inside every doctor not a lover Automun called his mom and called me and said do you want to press charges against some more like we talked to his mom he wants to settle with you out out of the stunts like Oh you guys cool with me settling food in the act of trying to steal your car when all you WanNa do is get in it and drive drunk home after a long night top gone yeah and it can turn ugly unfortunately a twenty four year old man Maryland man there are up all night and everything and long story short the next day my car stolen like did what did I do I thought it was my home the whole time get to the four well yeah four three or four guys living there was like frat related type they read a lot I it's hard for me to believe you even drink when you're wearing those ever scrolls let me take off quizzing secures accomplish this is going to cost me seven hundred fifty bucks writes a check for seven fifty nine eleven immediately cash it and then I have for the next month he's like sucker I would the fifteen down no yeah the checkbook ready yeah that's awesome yeah I mean there's nothing worse than searching for the fucking sign let's you know which piece of Shit Eddie over those videos a bodybuilder Warner's probably hoping I was going to pan out she's a freshman Minnesota Rep yeah yeah I I I was like I missed a quiz the next day off Bosnia letter grade healed by the co two hundred dollars but I missed and he just wasn't I guess skilled in in Jujitsu enough and no one the right go just strangled him to death how can you not realize he had like past the hi out like he was in a blind drunken rage probably I dunno most like choke holds ending a pass out right exactly and the guys August using its state slogan battled born when it comes to fighting the ever growing problem of Zombie deer that has ravaged roughly twenty four states yes includes the brain and spinal cord which contain large could can contain large concentrations of prions which is how the disease spreads so I'm sure you can humans creepy lethargy and Mason so when when these symptoms are seen in humans they're usually associated with being an American apparel model at a relatively harmless but in hooked me sting disease which coincidentally plagued the men of hard factor weekends for the better part of the last twenty years not that's chronic wasted I'm kidding it played of the Mormon Church of the nerds prostitution lawmakers in Nevada this year they banned bringing certain animal body parts into the state altogether Hamels it can really decimate entire population so point in an effort to protect their ear from the fate suffered by animals in their border state of Utah Nevada is locking down a really important question I if you do end up eating a piece of tainted deer meat and you suddenly find yourself growing antlers and hooves wandering around the forest with a pack of Zombie dear who's it's plagued our weekdays to still wasted all right CW SIMS and deer and elk include guys a lack of fear take care of your family and that's where policy genius comes in causes genius is an easy way to shop for Life Insurance Online in minutes you can compare quotes from top insurers to find the best price possible once you apply the policy genius team will handle all the paperwork and the red tape and Palestinians just doesn't just make life insurance easy they can also help you find the right home insurance autos you gotta leave your hunting bounty in this in this other state and they're gonNA come and like rub their antlers all of your house fuck your house up orgasm go to jail for a long time I mean it sounds like this guy this was going to happen the twenty four year old GonNa do something like this eventually you can't just you know strangle a guy spital but died an hour later don't fight it's not worth it and you know shit like this guy's Nevada is leaves his car and tollways zones and then murders the to- driver he's probably gonNA commit craps named Damian yeah so unfortunately the office time they tried to do cpr in the man he was rushed to the smart yeah preventative actions will guys we have another preventative as opposed to reactive exactly yeah basically just putting a condom around the whole State of Utah Lobby dear of course Nevada oh it's close Nevada's trying to do all they can to make sure it doesn't get in there smart Yeah Zombie here's a slang term of course guys for C. Wd or chronic waste insurance and disability insurance you're all that if they're going to record cars yeah they might even have some sort of an insurance for hunt insurance in case the Nevada Game Word and tells you Aston full to Houston police the wedding scheduled for the next day Saturday didn't happen has here's how we know because quote no wedding took place that I know indicating he had a weapon and demanded money then while he was getting away in his car with the stolen cash bump has got a call from his fiancee where she told him that she's just seen surveillance bring your dear but you're going to have to leave its brain and spinal cord in Idaho dammit certain tax derby done out of the exactly that must be hard to enforce for you I feel comfortable reading these stories as an authority on marriage since I am myself happily married thank you thank you and have also officiated in wed multiple what is your him robbing the bank or local police facebook so he was caught like an hour less than an hour later she called him as like what are you doing he's like just driving love it didn't happen in my jail said sheriff what he so not a lot not a lot of room for love and sheriff what he's heart all that space is occupied by enforcing the law and helping provide yeah unless unless your wife's that metal framed bed its borders Nevada lawmakers this they just don't want nerds in the very cool could be nerve well and the students are breaking off from Utah because they didn't want to be oats and apply in minutes you can do the whole thing over the phone right now policy genius is the easy way to compare and buy life insurance thank thank you for that taking instagram stars in the world Sahar Tobar S. H. A. R. T. A. B. A. R. will post a picture on the blog who models for look after a ghostly and Zombie Angelina Jolie couples including good friends of hard factor in Texas and a loving couple of strangers of the Cannabis Cup in Flint Michigan to a live crowd I'm also a humble on marriage to boots oh by grove ten on Friday morning the day before his wedding according to Trinity County Sheriff Woody Wallace also pretty good name for chef just went into the local bank in that was really honestly it needs that good call I guess we have another time I'm GonNa try for the fourth time right we have another vasteras wedding story something fuck your car up homeless dirty deer out there exactly don't eat them this October guys take the scariness out of buying life insurance with policy genius go policy genius dot com get like what are they scanning check points and cooler rains like they're like tapping on the dears dead hollow I gotta be honest if you're a cop it's probably pretty identify who's got a dead deer in the back of the medical not hard to spot Utah I sucked sprains out before I got here because this this does bring up around she's like do you have key did you rob the bank he's like Oh shit so she also then convinced bump is to turn himself in he did he convinced he ring and the cost of the venue according to police so I guess he just kept telling his fiancee I'm GonNa get you that ring is going to be surprised ring better fucking get it he you're welcome about marriage that's true do this sad aside one but romantic one guy's a Texas groom robbed a bank the day before his wedding to pay for his fiancee's injuries and a touch of makeup. What's that like girl at from Creepy Pasta we scroll down it's like that horrifying face that's been around the viral thing you know what I'm talking about Heidi attack like a six-day anxiety attack they give him one call and the rotary phone they won't even let us like fiance or anyone come visit him did he get did he get married let me check hey bob girl she looks like this creepy pasta white faced freak you with a tinge of Angelina Jolie right like a little tiny bit yeah just just like a day Iran where free speech isn't exactly thing She has been charged with blasphemy promoting violence illicit education promoting corruption amongst the youth and insulting the Islamic Veil Texas in Iran she was blast me was was white around the corner any day she's making life harder for everyone having to look at her it's that bad but it's not a crime you just got to see this thing it's it's disturbing she basically looks like you're you're underplaying timber I am I mean it's it's it's another level fucked up it is it's weird she looks like temperatures if you want to express yourself in any way other than how you are told to express yourself gross but I mean she shouldn't be arrested for no no she would be ostracized a bit in Austin just he's he's still has bumpers locked up and he said that bump isn't allowed any visitors drank bank leads to drop charges yeah bumpers are just sitting in jail having the worst things what kind of ring did he have beforehand was it just a promise so heath which is really all that matters this guy's name he bumps segue portion also we're mad I don't see too many deer so I feel pretty safe from Zombie a lot more wild horses where I am I'm glad you guys are taken care of the problem before it gets there jumped by the star saying it's all makeup photoshop but I've seen videos of I don't know I don't know all eighty percent no it shouldn't be a crime apparently is blasphemy have you seen this is blasphemy the flight on Saturday morning after the airplane's instruments interfered with her invisibility and she was discovered to be on the plane without a ticket identification of any kind outweighed that's not it for being too weird over there what happened tough place look at look at the blog and you'll you'll see what we mean all right guys an invisible woman was escorted off adults uh-huh in Iran facebook twitter and Youtube all banned people have been arrested for dancing to happy by Ferrall Williams on youtube the young girl was arrested for so fucking right the woman wasn't invisible at all but she somehow boarded a plane with no credentials whatsoever she must have walked by a very satisfied gate agent as a he's forced her to exit the airport because if it wasn't invisibility it must have been hand jobs how else could this have happened the gate agents like I'm willing to lose my job of crack this Crockett Texas about one hundred twenty miles north of Houston by the way he robbed the Citizens State Bank in hop onto a family no problem I got a story that evolves most of us here it was involving sneaking in on the fourth of July for the Washington nationals football teams I like Home Fourth of July game I think they're second into thousand six we all got hammered and for some reason we thought that the tickets would still be available someone someone gave us the tip Blaine Line this is why you always want will on your team when you're solving riddles alice creative yeah that was like that urban legend should happen all the time when you're at the airport extra kids could just in two thousand nineteen inside incised don't look right before bed whatever you do anyway she has been arrested for blasphemy in her home country of and we all walked in and they're like what in the hell are you guys doing we're like we're here to buy tickets they've been sold out for months it's the fourth of July in Washington DC on our first bride She originally became famous in two thousand seventeen when her appearance freaked everyone out in the whole world and news outlets report she had over fifty cosmetic surgeries theory that was later D. we're not sold out Madison never drink and hurricane forties minivan on the way to the stadium already drunk or unrolled America Ed Angelina Jolie exactly she looks like a dead Angelina Julianne Zombie Shanzer Yes yes just look her up but if you do Julie do it on like a busy street and Broadway the slippery lady the one that got kicked off the plane she told Orlando police that she'd thrown her ticket away and didn't have an idea I mean I can see getting through TSA because those guys give less yeah I got a theory about how could happen how what do you think she could just be super small and she like snuck in as an extra kid like in both TSA line and the get off board and go back through security as a precaution gladly done that in the end pissed but I would have been like I would have been anyways it's like this girl at the Long Whiteface sunken you're talking about urban legend thing it's the new version of that it was like the Jack the killer before announce this Tucker's Oh and we got a big ass batches stickers in so if you've DM does your address will be getting a sticky bastards in the mail tomorrow and if you haven't the industry address you want some hard factors tickets and ever baseball teams fourth of July made sense what do what do we do because we're to hurricanes in and so we'll actually found a way in yeah exactly both the song on you it's called sad it's pick quiet Iran sounds like a terrible place to be a human really and she was basically yeah we're lucky for us the the stadium workers were new to vendors we'll just like chilling at this entrance that was open and helps us a lot grow this thing Oh and have a great fucking day art factor Hey guys we have full episodes on Youtube and facebook if you want to see usually how do we are but today how smart we look so check those out there up everyday round one o'clock eastern Bill Aka 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Amanpour: Brett McGurk, Rashad Robinson and Reniqua Allen

Amanpour

58:13 min | 2 years ago

Amanpour: Brett McGurk, Rashad Robinson and Reniqua Allen

"Tired of spending hundreds of dollars prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five visits any today at Zanny dot com slash CNN. Hello, everyone and welcome to almond for. Here's what's coming up. Unacceptable and a non starter. That's Democrats on President Trump's idea of compromise to end the government shutdown and amid the president's controversial plan to withdraw troops from Syria. Former envoy Brett mcgurk says Trump's new policy will give ice is a new lease on life. Then a Martin Luther King day, the president of color for change. Rashad Robinson tells a hurry suite of us and how the internet can help achieve racial equality and Justice, plus the journalist and writer Renisha Allen tells me why the American dream is dead at least for black millennials. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane Amanpour in London as the longest US government shutdown in history enters its fifth week now. Hundreds of thousands of federal employees remain without work and pay including nearly a quarter of a million veterans who worked for the government one union says the former service personnel are among the hardest hit by this furlough. So morale-sapping news at home and also abroad in the field after four Americans were killed in a suicide blast in Syria last week at the very time. The president is rallying to withdraw all US troops from the country. The decision sparked several high profile resignations from his administration. I there was the Defense Secretary James Mattis, then Brett mcgurk who was the presidential envoy for the global coalition to defeat. Isis mcgurk work had spanned three administrations. And now he's written an op-ed. Trump said he beat ISIS. Instead, he's giving it new life. I've been speaking to Brett mcgurk who tells me the president Syria policy is a total Vercel of everything the administration had been trying to achieve and worse that it strips the United States have any leverage with its partners and adversaries. Brett mcgurk. Welcome back to our program. Christiane? Thanks so much for having me. So we talked to a lot over the years when you were all sorts of different iterations of envoy presidential envoy, basically ISIS point man over the dos. Many many years, you have resigned, it was very public letter and public moment. But I want to ask you first, the consequences of the US pull out, and we hear today that the Turkish president has decided and has offered to be, you know, the security force for man bitch that famous town in northern Syria. What what does that mean is that a good thing should the US be happy that the Turks are gonna take over when we formed the coalition really in late summer early. Fall of two thousand fourteen we started with twelve countries it's grown to seventy five countries. American leadership was really critical to that. And of course, was a was a key partner in this. And in our our initia-. Plan plan A if you want to say that. Was to work with Turkey to get a handle on this problem. And I probably spend most of my time in the first year of my job, including when I was working with general Allen. Most of our time was spent inaugura because most of the material coming to to fuel the ISIS war machine. Frankly was coming across the border from Turkey into Syria. So we we clearly identified that one of the things we wanted to do was to work with the Turks NATO ally to control their border, and quite frankly, it was very frustrating because Turkey did not take much action on the border. So we have worked very hard with Turkey on in various ways and nothing's really worked out. And there's a number of reasons for that, quite frankly, I think our interest in Syria in fundamental ways really diverge, and when when president Erawan puts on the table proposals. That might look look good in concept. Every time we send our best people or best planners to really dig into. What can actually we do together? It never really pans out. I'll just give you an example. The opposition groups that Turkey supports that it would send for example into a safe zone. Are simply not groups that the United States of really work with. I mean, they are very closely tied with tied with with with extremist groups, and if you just run if you just look at the northern tier of Syria and just run across what is now that the Turkey border in it live province that's an area that we don't outbreak in. It is a really Inari influence for Turkey. It is really dominated now entirely by groups with ties to al-qaeda all the border crossings with Turkey are controlled by kite, very serious problems. Very serious problem. I it is I sort of see what you're saying. I'm you saying that that is not the solution to replace US troops who are leaving. So let me wind back a little bit this tape to when you first heard that the president was going to be removing US troops from Syria after all the hard won gains that you describe. Well, I. We knew that the prisoner to want to speak with President Trump and president Erdo wine was sabre-rattling about sending the Turkish backed opposition forces and Turkish military forces into areas of Turkey where US forces are operating, and we've been dealing with this for a couple of months or message to Turkey was just but do not send your military forces in because that's going to create a very serious situation. And frankly, put American lives at risk. So that was the policy when president it'll on called President Trump. This was really upended. Instead, President Trump did not say that. And he basically said look we plan to leave Syria fairly soon, and then basically a green light. So that just totally reversed everything we have been doing for a very long time. I was in Iraq working with the new Iraqi government on on making sure we sustain the very significant gains against ISIS when I was informed of the call. I had a phone call with. -tary Pompeo, and I came home to Washington to try to manage the fallout from this and immediately got on the phone with my coalition partners in capitals around the world and tried to explain what was happening, and it was just a total reversal of what we had been telling them for a number of months, and you did resign to be fair. You we're going to plan to leave mid February. But you brought that up to the end of December. And in your letter to your colleagues, you said the recent decision by the president came as a shock and was a complete reversal of policy that was articulated to us it left, our coalition partners confused, and I'll fighting partners bewildered you've expanded a little bit about that. But when you say, what was your foot, what came out of your mouth? What what was the first thing? You said when you got the call that this was going to happen. Well, there were two Eissa look at at one was okay. The president has asked us to leave Syria. Let's try to figure out a way to orchestrate this in a way that can still achieve all of our objectives. Syria, and all of our objectives and Syrian clued. And again, this these are the instructions from from the White House. So this is not a policy is just cooked up in the State Department our policy in Syria articulated by the White House national Security, John Bolton and others was that we would stay in Syria until number one the enduring defeat of ISIS that was the primary mission that was my mission. Number two will stay in Syria until all Ronnie's are out of Syria, whether or not that was real realistic. That was the stated policy or ticketed again from the White House and number three. We'd stay in Syria. And there was a euro versatile mental was the phraseology to the UN back political process in Geneva, which dealt with the Assad regime in the civil war. I frankly believe that if we are leaving serious, the president has now very clearly instructed, those objectives simply are totally unachievable. Another thing that really concerned me Christiane is that asking a military force to withdraw under pressure or from a combat environment. As one of the most difficult things you can ask a military force to do. So if the orders are, and these are the orders from the president to withdraw that has to be the mission, the mission cannot be withdraw and do a number of other things complete ISIS campaign, which of course, we want to do keep the Russians and the regime out of the territory, we continue we now influence try to do some sort of engineering to allow Turkey to come in to replace us in a number of other things that's impossible to ask the few Americans on the ground to do. So is really mission impossible. Well, I mean, it just does sound absolutely awful. And I wanted before I get into most Pacifics about the particular fallout that you would just referring to how does it make you feel? I mean as a person as the ISIS point man now seeing four Americans killed this past week in the days after President Trump made his announcement. Where look anyone who works on these issues where professional worked across three administrations. Republicans and Democrats I've worked on policies I fully supported I worked on policies. I might have thought of been. Unwise, but you always your voices at the table, and you try to influence things based upon the facts and the analysis, and and you do the best you can so in Syria, for example, we are not doing the fighting on the ground for over three years in this campaign until just last week. Two Americans had been killed in action. And then tragically last week. We lost four additional Americans that pales in comparison to the democratic forces that have lost thousands of casualties in this campaign. American taxpayers are not spending money on civilian reconstruction. And other types of those tests as coming from the coalition that we built so it is a very sustainable low cost high impact mission of mission. Let me interrupt you the kind of mission presumably, the President Trump would love you just out of the magic woods low cost the people of paying the bulk of the money that it takes his you've just described begun to to help design a campaign plan that was succeeding, and it was reaching a really critical. As and we were talking about the longer term transition and to have it all ended in a phone call with a foreign leader without any serious consultation with the national security team with sector defense and others. That's just not the way to run foreign policy effectively. So this was a complete reversal. And I'm concerned about the the fallout one can say that the president has a fairly unusual relationship with Russian President Putin. And maybe he doesn't castle much if the Russians fill the void that US is leaving. But he doesn't have a cozy relationship with the Iranians. And you just said one of the principal aims was to degrade Iranian influence as much as possible. And the stated aim of the White House was to stay until Iran was no longer a viable player that, but you're on staying not only that the president himself said Iran can have it. You know, we don't want it. It's just sand and death. I don't understand that policy. Do Booker, Sean. You hit on a good point. And this is there's a bit of, you know, I'll be careful with my words, but there's a there's a bit of incoherence between the views of the president and the views of some of the most senior members of the national security team, particularly in the White House the views of the president. Clearly, he's been very consistent. He does not want to be overly invested in the Middle East, particularly with with the US military power, the views of the national security visor seem to be quite different. And so that is a divergence that makes our foreign policy. There's lens element of incoherence to it that we hear about this from partners all around the world. And and that's something that ultimately, I think they're going to have to address it still really weird because everything the president has done speaks to wanting to isolate Iran where the pulling out of the Iran nuclear deal with a being so cozy with Saudi Arabia despite everything including the kashogi Moda just because they partly see it as a bull walk against Iran. And then to say that it can. Have if it wants we don't want Syria. It's just sand and death. But you just mentioned being presidential envoy Europe presidential envoy for President Trump. Did you have a meet him? Well, every ministrations different. So with President Bush in the White House. If I if I was overseas every morning we were in the Oval Office, President Obama a very regular exchanges. President Trump just runs the operation differently. So most of my most of my interactions than Trump administration's were at the sector defense, the secretary of state and our military commanders. I was obviously involved in every major decision of the ISIS campaign, but turns of direct interactions with President Trump pretty much interacts with his cabinet secretaries. No, basically, the president did not meet the presidential envoy to Syria. Yeah. That's right. All you concerned as one writer has said senior fellow at Brookings. The advent of a more unified and predictable US foreign policy is likely to weaken American influence and destabilize the international order a deeply divided. Trump administration was the best case for those who believe in the United States postal strategy defined by strong alliances, an open global economy and broad support for democracy. The rule of law human rights, all the rest of it. Again. Just go back to my earlier point. There is a there is a disconnect and just my own personal experience instructions from the White House from very senior levels of the White House to tell our partners are allies, the Russians or adversaries that we are staying in Syria until these very these these objectives are met, for example, until Ron is leaving Syria that those are instructions that we were carrying from the White House and that was completely reversed by the president. Therefore, I think we have to be. Very realistic about the situation in Syria and number one. I think we have to be realistic that President Assad is staying in place this objective that somehow we were going to work through UN process to to remove sharla Saad, I think at this point is unrealistic. And if we if we continue to reach for unrealistic objectives US credibility will continue to be further diminished in other words side wins. And he gets it back. He wins, and he gets pretty much all of Syria back. Well, that's the consequence of our of our leaving Syria and announcing to the world, we're leaving Syria. You know, Christiane I also did a lot of negotiations with the Russians on Syria. So I kind of understand exactly where they come from those negotiations are very tough. What gave us leverage at the table. Was the fact that we are present on the ground, and that we have influence over significant portion of Syria, and we actually drew lines on the map to make clear the Russians you do not cross this line, or you're going to have a very bad day that gives you that gives you leverage with the Russians and we getting to the point where with the defeat. Physical caliphate. We'd be able to sit down with the Russians, but very serious conversation about the future of Syria announcing to the world that we were just leaving basically all of that leverage completely evaporates and just not to put too fine. A point on it. The main reason that you stated at the beginning for the US presence and the US campaign and the coalition campaign was to defeat ISIS and the president described ISIS as defeated that's a quote, an absolutely obliterated in terms of territory. But of course, you know, many reports released late last year, including the Pentagon inspector general, the UN's and strategic, and it's national studies estimates that ISIS has twenty to thirty thousand members in Iraq and Syria is era is ISIS defeated can the president leave Syria knowing that they'll be no more threat from ISIS. Crescendo? Look, it's a great question. And in early December secretary, Madison I met with all the military contributors of our coalition, including many countries they've been attacked from ISIS out of. Syria, and the unanimous view was that is not defeated. This mission is not over. I do not think there would be a single expert. They would walk in the Oval Office until the president that this is over. And that is why we always said that the mission was the enduring defeat devices not just taking physical caliphate. But getting the arrangements in place to ensure that vacuum out open in its wake. And that's why we were setting up the conditions that have this very serious intense negotiations with the Russians which I think was setting up in a pretty good spot. Until again, we we we throw away all of our leverage by announcing we're leaving on. There's also very serious risk to Iraq. This is of course, one third of Syria in which thousands of foreign fighters and suicide bombers poured from Syria into Iraq that we are. Now, a announcing to the world that we are going to leave without having any plan for who is going to take our place. So again, I think the consequences are quite serious. That's why I would recommend to the president to halt these orders reassess the situation but short of that. Think we just have to face very hard reality. I mean, you couldn't make it up. Really it just does sound very perplexing. Indeed. For all the reasons that you state, can I ask you to give me your personal analysis opinion of what role secretary Mattis played? And I don't just mean as a foam Kamanda a secretary of defense. But a somebody who it has to be said the rest of the world look to as a salutary influence on a president who is not versed in military affairs, or foreign affairs secretary Mattis is one of our greatest Americans, I the honor to work very closely with him over these last two years, but also many times previously really over the last decade combat veteran spent a lot of time in war-zones that is actually very important experience. You wanna have people have actually know what it's like on the ground. What this is like, no we're talking about. So his voice in the room was just a critical. Kind of stabilizing factor as the national security team deliberated and made decisions when President Trump came in. You know, we did we did a strategic review of the Conroy campaign. And we looked at elements in which we could exceleron the campaign, and we put a number of decisions to the president and the president made those decisions and those were good decisions. That was a that was a strategic review that was really run by my office together with secretary Mattis in sector, Tillerson at the time. And I think it was actually done quite professionally and thoroughly and have you heard from America's allies in this, particularly the ones you've been talking to in the wake of this decision. There is concern about where this is heading. And I think particularly are our allies in Europe that were prime targets for ISIS, and you're the attacks and the attacks in Paris, one hundred thirty civilians dead in the streets of Paris, those attacks came directly from Syria, they were planned in Raka. They were organized in Maharaj, they terrace combat team out through Syria. To infiltrate into Paris of the same thing with the Brussels airport attack. So these are very serious threats emanating from Syria, and these countries and capitals, all of whom have put their blood and treasure on the line as part of our coalition under the umbrella of American leadership are extremely concerned about the decision that was just made. And the fact that again, we don't have a plan for what's coming. It's one thing to say, look, we should leave serious think of plants note that thing to announce we're leaving Syria, and then to try to think of the plan later, and that's what's going on now. And I think it is it's increasing the risk to our forces on the ground. It's increasing the risks to our partners who under threat from from ISIS. You know, you've laid it out very succinctly. And you've sort of touched on the fact that yes, of course, if we want to withdraw troops, but we should have a plan. Not do it vice versa. But what do you say to the American people to the president who ran on a promise of bringing back forces? These wars have been going on since. Two thousand and one after nine eleven, you know, the forever wars people in America fed up with them against the great question. That was those a drive that was it's obviously a driving influence within the Trump presidency and President Obama also, of course, had that view in that comes from the American people in the the experience of our country over the last decade that is why how ever we design the counter ISIS campaign to address that. And again, this this element of a very low cost very high impact campaign Americans are not fighting in the streets of Syrian Syrian cities and towns series are doing the fighting rocko, which was the capital ISIS through its under which all these threats were being these plots were these plots being hatched and launched ISIS was taken down by series without the loss of a single American life. So we designed this campaign actually to address that. And again, my head is spinning because I recall, very, very very very clearly so many in the national security. Of field and also Trump when he was running as campaigning with very very critical of President Obama precipitously pulling out of Iraq. And what did that lead to ISIS the rise of ISIS? And then what that lead to reinserting tens of thousands, if not more US troops. I mean, we've seen this movie before in the Middle East to two things presence matters and credibil- credibility matters. So an American handshake has to matter and your presence on the ground matters. And that does not mean again that we were planning or we should have planned to stay in Syria forever for twenty years. It does mean that we should have presence on the ground to help us in a negotiation with adversaries like Russia than our presence on the ground helps at the table and having been a diplomat at the table. You wanna have that on your back number one, the consistency of American foreign policy in the leadership behind you and presence on the ground. That is what it diplomat really needs to get things done. And we just pull the plug on that. It's really very perplexing with very very potentially dramatic consequences. Brett mcgurk former presidential envoy for Syria and ISIS. Thank you very much. Indeed. Thank you, Sean. Sean. You don't want not smart job boards that overwhelmed with tons of the wrong resumes. Luckily, there's a smarter way to hire at ZipRecruiter. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology finds the right people for you. And actively invites them to apply. It's no wonder that ZipRecruiter is rated number one by employers in the US this rating comes from hiring sites on trust pilot with over one thousand reviews and right now listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash on poor. If you love this show show, your support to it ends up recruiter by going to ZipRecruiter dot com slash AM. A N P O you are tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Our friends at Xeni optical offer, a huge variety of high quality stylish frames and state of the art optics starting at just six ninety five. You can get multiple frames with this great pricing for less than one pair. Elsewhere start building your eyewear wardrobe from the comfort of your own home, eggs, any dot com. With the latest trends in eyewear available and hundreds of. Frame styles and materials there isn't a better way to change it up for every season. Plus Xeni offers prescription sunglasses at incredible prices. Visit Xeni today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. That's Z E N. I dot com slash CNN. Remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com slash CNN. Turning to a day of reflection because America's mocking Martin Luther King day. But no public holiday for congress because of this continued shutdown, however, congress can claim an important markup for the first time in history African Americans hold the same proportion of congressional seats twelve percent as their proportion of the population at large and yet while more than half a century is passed since Martin Luther King spoke about his American dream today, racial inequality. Stubbornly persists in a moment. How it affects black Manelli millennials when we talked to the author Renita Allen, but I those fighting for racial Justice. Give us a reality. Check. Rashad Robinson is the president of the leading nonprofit color change. And he tells a hurry screen of awesome that we need to confront the calls. Instead of the symptom. For those familiar with the organs. Asian what is color of change? Do what's it's mission color of change in next generation, racial Justice organization, and we were founded after Kane, Katrina, and that moment where black people were literally on their roofs begging for the government to do something. And we're left to die and the feary behind the start of color of change was that the movement needed a new type of infrastructure to capture the energy and aspirations and demands of black folks in their allies if every race folks were giving to the Red Cross when they could be working for systemic change. How could we pay our technology and media and organizing together to build the type of momentum in power that did the thing that was really at the heart of Katrina where no one was nervous about disappointing black people government corporations and media. And so the idea behind color of change is how do we translate these wide Ray? Range of moments that are happening every single day, and our society and give people the ability to collectively take action, and then translate that action into strategic, cultural and political change. How do you do that? Is it public pressure is private pressure? It's a mix of both, you know, private pressure for us only really works. If there is this idea that public pressure as possible. And so sometimes we have to hold out the idea that public pressure is coming sometimes we can work behind the scenes to push our demands sometimes this about reward. Sometimes it's about a shame. But all of that is about creating a sense that those who are empower need to know that there are consequences for racism there consequences for behaviors that put our community imperil one of I remember guys coming on the field, so to speak even post Katrina was. When you were able to exert pressure on Glenn Beck and looking back now, I mean that was because of some of the comments that he was making the divisive rhetoric looking now, and that was two thousand nine and here we are nine years after and we have nine term members of congress who are just starting to face consequences for things that they've been saying that episode. Glenn Beck relatively speaking seems tain today in some ways, it does seem tame I do think. That some of this is is Evan flow. And I do think that while it's important in the media culture to think about rhetoric because media oftentimes about rhetoric when we look at what's happening in our congress with someone like Steve king. I think it's it's it's important that folks are calling out his rhetoric now though, I think more journalists to ask why now and why not just Steve king? But the larger question is not about folks in power and policymakers rhetoric, but actually their policy what are the impact of the policies that they are putting forth voting rights civil rights. Like, these are all things from criminal Justice immigration that Steve king had a say over he was able to implement and move racist policies policies that have deep impact on people's lives. And so I. Really hope that as we move this discussion forward than we talk about sort of the words that were able to not just kind of have outrage about those, but actually go much deeper and be more clear that it's the policies that have the real deep impact on people every single day. There's sometimes this conception that racism is a generational issue that it will die out over time that it will move towards equality. We have those images and Charlottesville, these young men that just maybe out of college or little after that. And with their faces in full Tiki torch light. You know? The voted ever since Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act in the Voting Rights Act. No democrat that needed black votes has gotten a majority of the white vote. We do live in a very deeply divided country along race. And I don't think we get around that by refusing to talk about it or thinking that it will just change overnight far too often people think about any quality as unfortunate almost like a car accident. And I don't just mean people who don't always agree with us on the issue. I mean, lots of people and so instead of seeing inequality as unjust. And when you see inequality is unfortunate, so many of the solutions that people think about our charitable solutions. Let's in water bottles to Flint and said of working to actually deal with the pipes. Let's clean up inner city school instead of dealing with public education making public education equal, let's deal with reentry. Sense versus versus the cause. And so part of the challenge that we've had over many decades we've worked to deal with a lot of symptoms and not a lot of causes and change has actually happened. And in in that sort of where we haven't done all of the work to bring people along at the same time. They're powerful forces in the White House on their powerful forces in the media, their powerful force in our culture that have a lot at stake at keeping the status quo in place at keeping the rules rigged and keeping us divided to in order to do that. And and for people of good faith who are watching this for people who are on the sidelines. The, you know, the fight to ensure that our democracy allows all of our voices to be counted is not just the fight for black people. Not just the. Fight for people of color the attacks that have happened. Via racism on our education system on our health system on our environment. The way that racism has been used as a wedge has hurt all of society and the question will be is keeping racist status quo policies in place. So been official to folks that people are willing to risk their own health their own environment their own education, and all the other things that have really the gun to fall apart because racism has been used as a wedge to break down the structures of our society. The ways that we ensure that Justice is actually served in our systems, one of yours focusing on social platforms. What are you asking of them? What's happening there like many institutions that grow very quickly? There have to be rules of the road. And as we started to deal with. Platforms like Facebook and watched how they dealt with low enforcement without any rules or regulations oftentimes, bypassing kind of warrants in civil rights law by providing information to to law enforcement, really violating the the pack that people thought they had about privacy with those platforms the way that algorithms could be used to violate the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act. Like you could put an ad on Facebook. That said I only wanna market this house to white people. And and the way that race was weaponized during the twenty sixteen election, really breaking down. A whole set of trust about how we think about our elections, and how we think about voting and democracy, while we have been engaged with Facebook really pushing them to do a civil rights audit and look at all their policies put into real structures about how they think about policies and practices. We found out via the New York Times that while they were telling us sort of really great things about what they were gonna be doing and talking to us about this audit and hiring the people to do it. They had hired a PR firm to attack us at the same time employing, this firm to sort of move these narrows about who was funding us, and that we didn't have our own ideas, which were deeply racists in this idea that black people don't control their own ideas of many of the ways that the student nonviolent coordinating committee, and Dr king, we're sort of tact in the sixties by saying that they were puppets of some larger. Entity as if they didn't have their own ideas for fighting for their for Justice, and one of the things that we really need from both. Our regulators members of congress those that invest in Facebook is to hold the largest communications platform that the world has ever seen one of the largest corporations out there accountable for basic practices around privacy around data sharing around civil rights, and that is going to be incredibly important because they have so much access to so much of our information. There was a now famous litter from a former employee of theirs Mark lucky as he left the company. He had great statistics on how much more engaged African Americans are on Facebook all the metrics Facebook wishes that had about other communities as well. But that it was also not a positive experience for so many of them. Because when they would post something either the algorithm or other people were able to essentially create ways for that content to be censored. Well, I mean, that's one of the things that we've seen in. And it's not just that. It's organizations having their content blocked. You know? You know? Many kind of forces inside of Facebook conservative force inside of Facebook have put this idea of conservative bias at the same level as civil rights. We oftentimes talk about is there's left in there's right. And there's right and there's wrong, and so civil rights somehow a left issue now. And so Facebook will do a training for their folks that are monitoring around the election monitoring the platform around the election and the same day, they do a training on voter suppression. They did a training on voter fraud. Which is basically this. Donald Trump conspiracy theory on that's been advanced by the right? It's like why don't you do training on is the world flat? And the and the idea that they they've put the politicized civil rights to such a point where ad for a pride parade in a pride celebration becomes a political ad and not just like an ad for people coming together is an example of many of the ways that Facebook has to sort of recognize and all these platforms have to recognize that they've gotta have a moral Rutter one of the big or challenges that they've had. And this is really a challenge that they're trying to fight because of what's happening in Europe is that these companies are trying to avoid any type of regulation all cost. These companies will have to think very clearly about how they engage in his upcoming twenty twenty election back in twenty sixteen. We've. Forced many companies to divest from the RNC convention because of the rhetoric of Donald Trump in the lead up to the election all of the platforms, like Google and Facebook, and we got on the phone with them and urged him to divest from the RNC convention. They told us that they were media platforms that they had to be at both conventions for both sides. Now, we've seen Mark Zuckerberg go to congress and say that they're not a media platform. So now what will their excuse be for enabling racism? There's also the power of traditional media. Whether it's the news industry or really the entertainment industry. There's a relatively small group of people in Hollywood create and manufacture the perception of how life is or how life should be. So how does an organization like yours tackle that? We really think a lot about this. We a couple of years ago opened an office in Hollywood and put real energy behind focusing on these images with the larger. Idea that we do have to change culture culture, oftentimes precedes policy shift, and and one of the couple of things that we really focus on we've worked with UCLA USC on a number of reports to really look at both diversity and writers rooms, the writers rooms that create this shows and look at how these shows are created who's in the room who's writing the stories that reach America and as a result. What what are we missing as a result and seeing? A whole set of challenges in terms of access that black folks if people of color and women have had to being able to create and write Intel authentic stories, they're going to reach folks, we're releasing a report that looks at crime on TV and all the crime shows, and how they not only portray black people on those shows, but how they portray a criminal Justice system that is deeply unfair that we've had folks on the left and the right say is deeply unfair. But our Justice system is oftentimes portrayed on TV is just a set of individuals moving forward the law that the heroes are the folks working inside the system everyone on the outside is a criminal. You see oftentimes these cases that start with the crime, and in with a verdict within an hour when people when what we really know is that people are oftentimes lacking behind bars for months and months and years and years way. Waiting trials. And oftentimes they're not because they are guilty. But because they are poor because they are black because they're not powerful. Here. We are more than fifty years after the I have a dream speech, and you talk about civil rights, and you talk about voter rights where are we in that longer arc of not even achieving the dream? But in the process toward it. You know, I think that we're in a deep struggle right now. I I look at many of the rollbacks on many of the ways that voting rights were under attack doing this past election in places like Georgia, and Florida and elsewhere, I think about the work that we have to do to not just be on the defensive so much of the work in previous decades was about defending and protecting the things that were one doing the sixties and as a next generation racial Justice organization. I really do believe that so much of our work. Has to be about what what are the next generation campaigns the next generation policies that we are putting forth that will allow us to move forward in a more multiracial, democracy, more multiracial society. And so not just thinking about how do we protect things like the Voting Rights Act, but what is the new Voting Rights Act? What are the policies in states around the country and federally that we need to push to ensure that not just that we protect the vote, but that we make every vote or cat not just every vote count. And for us at color of change constantly sort of thinking about that. And thinking about when we asked people to take an action on something that they're outraged on something that they're worried about how do we translate that into a policy fight? And you know, the politics are not always going to be there. And so some of that right now has to be about. Tilling the soil about putting forward big demands. Even know we may not yet have the policy, but recognizing that will never get there. If we refuse to actually be aspirated if we fuse to actually put forward what we really want. Sean Robinson color of change. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. So daring to know what you want. It is perhaps not surprising to hear about him next gen approach to civil rights when so many young black people in the United States feel frustrated and disillusioned by the current state of play author unequal Allen talked to dozens of black millennials from all over the United States for her new book. It was all dream. It's called a new generation confronts. The broken promise to black America. And I've been speaking to her about those broken promises and the significance in front of her books title. Renisha Allen, welcome to the program. Thanks for having me here cushy on. So you've risen this book. And it's getting a lot of buzz, and you particularly have sort of the millennial experience. What is the significance of the title? It was all dream. So it was all dream is a lyric from rob song from the notorious via gee, when I was growing up as a young person in the nineties, and it was about this rapper from bedside a very poor neighborhood in New York City, having his dreams become realized he was making it he had money all of a sudden. And for me, I realized that something that didn't quite feel so possible anymore is I inter my thirties. And as I saw a lot of my millennials. Peter's really struggling to have their dreams realized. So I was wondering is it all it dream? It was all dream. It felt like, you know, Barack Obama his presidency was ending and people were still really struggling. And while millennials. I think overall struggle black moon. Were having a specific and unique time and in a hard time kind of just dealing with growing up. So let me let me just get straight though, you sort of on the cutting edge in that you're one of the original sort of older generation of millennials right now. So are you saying that when you heard this song and his experience Dettori is about this other Rapa things were looking like they were better, and you feel now than not so good? Absolutely, absolutely. I came of age like like, you mentioned I'm an older millennial and when I came of age things felt possible. Jesse Jackson was running for president. That was a big deal are parented endured. Affirmative action had benefited from -firmative action. Argentina parents like the first people that really were in corporate America. They were African Americans who were by all means kind of succeeding, even though a lot of them grew up with with segregation. But our parents were doing well by by many. Accounts in all of a sudden when we came of age, it didn't seem like that necessarily was the case, you know, Barack Obama was such a high moment for a lot of young black millennials. But at that same time, we had a proclaim to the world that black lives matter that our lives matter. There was a humanity that I think we've still were fighting for and it felt exhausting. We have cell phone technology now. Right. So you can see a lot of our pain and struggle every day. We saw Mike Brown laying out we see these videos of young black bodies getting attack constantly over and over people getting shot in the street, and that's a hard place to be. So so let me ask you because I want to you've done a huge amount of research you've written this book. And I wonder whether you have synthesized why this is happening. I just read one of your quotes you write today. I laugh at my early nineties. Notion of making it yet out his cool. It never really changed. My American dream was not to mess up. My dream was to defy expectations to be unpredictable to do something better. And something more than my ancestors. So I mean, you had those hopes what you think went wrong so to speak who I'm in student debt college. What went wrong, I think America, his always been hard for young black people? I think it's hard for millennials in general. You know, there was a piece just this week about millennial burnout from BuzzFeed. So I think it's hard for this generation. I think there's a lot of uncertainty. We don't have the jobs that are parents that we have to get degrees. If we wanted just make it ahead a little bit those factory jobs. Right. The you could go to high school, and you know, have an have a job on a factory line in in B. Okay. And have a home on. That's the -bility has gone. Right. So many of my peers are freelancers, there's uncertainty. We have a lot of student debt those jobs. I don't know anybody who's been on a job for ten years. And I definitely don't know anyone who's had a pinch in. So I. Think that it's really difficult. There's a lot of uncertainty in that's being passed down to this generation. And I think that is the difference. And then I should say I think the other difference is having Barack Obama become president. Right. The idea possibility realize Obama was such a tremendous figure whether you like him or not or disagree with his politics. It was the site of. Yes, we can't achieve but then I'm looking at the world after and I'm looking at black America after I'm looking at how people of color in this country being treated, I'm looking at what happened in Charlottesville enough to all that after all the excitement of having someone like the rock Obama in the White House where we are today. We feel more divided than ever feels like we have to still fight and fight and fight for humanity. And we saw Barack Obama and Michelle Obama in their kids have to do that. And that's a hard hard place to be. I mean, I don't wanna say that many of us bought into this kind of idea that we were. Becoming a post racial society. But even the young men and women that I talked to some of them actually believe that they thought that we were going to be in a better place and to see that America's not if we're actually in a worse place than ever. And that's that's a tough thing. I think to deal with what it is tough. It's tough to hear you say as well to you said to be in a worse place than ever. It's really hard to hear you say that. And of course, you do highlight the difference the actual factual difference and difference of opportunity between black and white millennials which presumably mirrors the difference between blacks and whites in America, period. But let me ask you this. Because you quote in your book, the current President Donald Trump who once said a well educated black has a tremendous advantage over well educated white in terms of the job market. Now, I believe he said that in one thousand nine hundred nine and he may or may not still think that but do programs like affirmative action help. I mean, I will what do you make of that statement? I think it's misguided. I think it was misguided in the eighties. Misguided? Today's though, I mean, we know that this thing that is white privilege is like it's not made up lake being white in America does provide you with like a boost in society. Whether you see it or not, it is a thing by virtue people just giving you the benefit of the doubt when you walk into a room not saying, I grew up with a lot of privilege, right? I grew up in the black middle class. I did not actually I did not come from many slums or poverty, but I will say that programs. Like affirmative action. I think actually did benefit people like myself, my mom, just because we don't have the networks. Right. You might have had if it Donald Trump's father. I mean that gave him a huge boost in while a lot of Americans don't have that they may have a friend or no friend of a friend. Let me just give you some statistics. Go to what you're saying. The National Academy of sciences lost year said hiring discrimination against. Hasn't changed in the last twenty five years, if you're black Latino you have to work harder just to get an interview. Even if you as well qualified as white candidates. I spoke with William John Doe who has you know, was working in the Obama White House in the my brother's keeper program, and he said to me even a year ago similar to what you're saying. Let's just play it been ninety nine percent of American communities, if you're black boy, you're going to have a consistent and persistent income gap from your white male peer, even if you were born with the same economic circumstances. So if you're a millionaire black boy your chances of being incarcerated or the same as a white boy from the household that has thirty six thousand you're just as likely to fall out of the top income brackets as you are to stay. If you're an African American boy. So just just stunning data. Is that consistent with what you're finding? Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, one my name is Ronny CuA. An obviously I have been able to. Some of those barriers and get job interviews, but you know, just having a name Renita on a resume, obviously impediment. Studies have shown over and over and over again. I mean, my the people that I spoke to in the book consistently said like so much that I actually was like tired of hearing it that they said we have to work twice as hard. We cannot screw up in in. You know, Bill say that I saw this myself that I saw my white colleagues saying, oh, we didn't have to. We didn't get internships. We just kinda got drunk the whole time in college where so many of these young black people having internship after internship having to consistently prove themselves on the workforce to their pairs to their bosses. It's hard for everybody. Like this millennial generation has it rough. It doesn't always matter about skin color. We have an uncertainty in an economic ins -iety that I think we haven't had in the past. But on the job front. It is still hard even with a college degree in generally because we have more student debt black America does not have wealth. We saw her parents become wiped out by the recession. And it's actually quite outrageous. When people say, well, it looks like a even playing field. And I think that's like the hard part for me about this generation that yes, the black man can become president Oprah's on television. There's each suray there. There's black success out here. But like, why aren't we getting it and people don't quite get it that like those folks are like the exceptions you broach. Black lives matter, we have seen actually a sort of almost culture shift in some areas, you see what's happening in Hollywood, major black directors major stories that they're directing you can see in editors of major cultural magazines and things of black people of color and they're changing the tone of the editorial. And what you see on the cover of these magazines. I wonder whether whether that strikes you is. Hopeful how you how you analyze that? Yeah. I think it's absolutely hopeful. Right. I think that people are recognizing that African Americans and also people of color like their voices in some ways do matter. However, and I say that with a very follow fire that we're still not the folks that that whole power. I mean a piece on Twitter pitcher on Twitter was just posted a reporters for another network. And it was no African Americans that is a huge overnight. Right. You look at Hollywood you look at. The number of executives, and they're largely in for television and film right there, largely white and largely male still. So we have a long long way to go. You look at the people who have power, even though, you know, despite Barack Obama and house and congress, and it's still largely white this, particularly with this current administration the people that are on the top that are millionaires at a making success. Like that power structure still hasn't changed. You do actually talk about a maybe self selecting solution. I don't know, but you describe this phenomenon which I found fascinating. And I didn't know about of so many young black millennials actually moving from the north which we thought was the land of opportunity Gnoll and all these other states that once save holding states a moving down south that I find fascinating what is going on there? I mean, I was sitting in a election night in New York City in a bar and someone. Said, you know, we need to make America great again. And I don't think it's solely about this administration or or just Donald Trump or who's in the White House. But I think near city it doesn't exactly feel so great and liberating anymore. Teen Lee get followed. When I go out in a store in the upper east side, and the south has like a different vibe. There is a vibrant middle class there. HP see us for the people that I interviewed in this book HVAC us were huge Houston. And I mean, historically, black universities. It was a huge part of their identity in them coming to terms with themselves and their blackness people felt in ease of the south going back home. They felt welcomed and they felt that race relations somehow it was all out there. And so also economic opportunities. Right. Absolutely. Absolutely. I mean, you have I think there's more black wealth. There's educated they're more networks where people to tap into. So people really young black people are leaving New York and leave. Another places in Chicago that were deemed the promised land. Because I think if feels like they weren't so you know, they weren't fulfilling its promise. So why not go to places where it feels like home? Well, Bruni Allen. Thank you so much. Indeed for joining me. Thank you so much for having me here. Some sobering reflections on the lack of structural change for the civil rights movement. Join me tomorrow for my interview with the former British Prime Minister, Tony blab as the parliamentary struggles to unstick, the Brexit stalemate he'll lay out the options facing the country and why he would buy a second referendum on e you memberships. But that is it for now. Remember, you can listen to podcasts at anytime and see us online at dot com. And you can find me on Facebook and Twitter. Thanks for watching. And goodbye from London. Are you interested in learning how great companies grow? Download the Mark podcast. Amar tech podcast tells the stories of real world marketers who use technology to generate growth in chief business and career success from advertising to software as a service to data getting brands authentically integrated the content performs better the TV advertising. 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president Syria President Trump US ISIS President Obama America White House Turkey Iraq Renisha Allen UN President Assad Sean Robinson Brett mcgurk congress Rashad Robinson
Full Episode: Monday, October 14, 2019

World News Tonight with David Muir

21:25 min | 1 year ago

Full Episode: Monday, October 14, 2019

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started indeed dot com slash tonight that's indeed dot com slash tonight tonight breaking news as we come on the air we have just learned president trump is called the president board get started today at indeed dot com slash tonight that's indeed dot com slash tonight into the Northeast and the alarming headline tonight involving the deadly Tripoli virus this is ABC news tonight with David Muir it ceased fire after president trump himself just one week ago announced he was pulling US troops out of a key area of Syria Turkey than moving in quickly the president demand striking a deal with Syrian President Assad they say they had no other choice ABC's Ian Panel in the region on the breaking news leading US off tonight and American forces hunkered down nearby but preparing to depart the Kurds until days ago allies in the fight against Isis now celebrate birthday party the FBI now involved saying she is in extreme danger drenching rains flash flood worries major system moving across the south and then right trump now talking about those sanctions against Turkey also tonight what about US troops now caught in the region how to get them out safely Martha Raddatz standing by why on that in other news this Monday night growing outrage after a woman is killed by police in her own home tonight the officer has resigned authorities apologizing how earn now about pulling US troops out of the region with Turkey's forces already there and now Syrian forces closing in on the border to and now in need of new allies the Kurds regime that's bombed and gassed its own people now the savior of the curves chances name and on the other side Cullens of smoke actions against Turkey's economy until they bring the violence to an end. We want an immediate cease-fire now the thing that immediate ceasefire in the offensive against America's allies the Kurds president trump says he will also issue an executive order to authorize sanctions on Turkey and tonight major visited now president trump announcing sanctions will be imposed president trump made it very clear that the United States is going to continue to take a diplomat about the hundreds of millions in USA being held what he's expected to reveal about a conversation with President trump urgent hunt tonight that three year old kid did this happen it's deadly hotel collapse into Orleans tonight the search for one continuing more than one hundred construction workers were inside at the time of the collapse Indian former White House official testified behind closed doors today and then all eyes on the US ambassador to the EU who was exchanging text messages with another the wounded we met Sarah just eight years old playing in the street when a Turkish shell landed killing her thirteen year old brother the youngest suffer the most when men uh-huh own move deciding to pull the US forces from a key part of Syria Turkey didn't moving into target US allies the Kurds now with the operation spiraling president the targeting of civilians a convoy packed with civilians and journalists was struck by Turkish ass strike on Sunday forces around while they wait to extract the dangers grow too large armies now potentially facing around the strategic town of men bridge the reveling Kales in parts of Syria one thousand US troops ordered out now men and munitions on the move to the border but it could take weeks before AAC war the human toll growing by the hour tens of thousands have been displaced families who now call the desert home this mother pleading good evening it's great to have you with us here to start another week and we begin tonight with the breaking news just moments ago the White House revealing president trump has called Turkey's president air to one and has asked for an immediate show one leading Kurdish political leader have ren- collapse dragged from her car and shot in the head if verified this is a war crime for Anti Isis and counter terrorism missions but without American troops in northern Syria without influence there and now without partners the Kurds it makes elegance gathering for potential missions much more difficult so in many ways it is even more dangerous for US forces and more likely that Isis could the arrival of Syrian military forces hoisting soldiers high bred listen images of the Syrian dictator Bashar Assad the leader of a brutal all these alive shredded in an instant heartbreaking scenes from the hospital where the wounded were taken a young boy in shot very small contingent of American troops in southern Syria but they're not really near the isis fight through rest of the American troops about a thousand will go to a rock and be available establish itself David Wow spiraling situation in just a matter of a week Martha Raddatz our thanks to you again tonight and to the other news this Monday evening and the growing outrage in Texas tonight Syria they will remain in the region to monitor the situation to try to prevent a resurgence of Isis with news that so many of these isis fighters douse gaped that's right David there will be a isn't trump had a conversation with the general who leads the Syrian Defence Forces these have been our allies in the fight against Isis he asked him to communicate a message to prison them out safely and then of course news of this call for a ceasefire tonight let's get right to ABC's chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz and the President says even after US forces get out of window of the House the officer resigning today the family accusing him of murder and ABC's Marcus more talked with the family tonight authorities say the officer at the center of this early both John Inside his home with anger growing in the killing Jefferson in front of her nephew this shooting comes less than two weeks after Amber Geiger former officer from the nearby Dallas Police Department was found guilty and then the White House indicating that Turkey was about to move in yet that's right Davies water different seven days makes rice originally the agreement was for US troops to pull back that trigger medical Islamist fighters Turkey Sentence Assyria are accused of horrific violence gruesome videos of route signed executions many too graphic community fort worth city leaders announcing investigation but also apologizing for leaking that Jefferson had a weapon in her home now calling that detail irrelevant John Turkey president trump did that an offer to broker a ceasefire between the two sides now here's the problem prisoner one thinks that the SDS the Kurdish we're open to capture some of the breeze that open door getting the attention of a neighbor who called the department's nonemergency line doors have been opened since ten o'clock when killed by police in her own home body cam video shows an officer outside the house he responded to a call from a worried neighbor about a door ajar the officer then firing through Police Department since April of twenty eighteen and the chief also revealed but they've turned this case over to the FBI they have submitted paperwork for their for the green light for president and adorn to his forces across the border and we've seen the devastation death the destruction that came as a result of that now we understand that first of all rising from relentless Turkish strikes capturing Kurdish territory defiance president who to win today he's troops went back down and now news of this call from President trump to president aired awad now calling for a ceasefire and as we all know it was just a little over a week ago president trump talking with air to one on the phone then missile terrorists and he says the absolutely will not negotiate with terrorists David all right Ian thank you and what about those US troops now caught in the region the Pentagon is now trying to get after reviewing the video he would fired officer Aaron Dean but he quit I had the astronaut resigned I would fired him for violations of several policies including review for possible civil rights violations David Laura Marcus more tonight thank you marcus next this evening the deadly hotel collapsed in New Orleans the search for a missing construction worker continues at this the civilians and see what they did this mindset the suffering firsthand this is one of many hospitals throughout this area that are treating at the time of that collapse authorities are now worried about other buildings in the area that they may also be endanger than ABC's Victor Oquendo from New Orleans now the building apparently have crews in the building as we speak there now with some search dogs tonight officials say the structure is still unstable and dangerous complicating rescue efforts one of the workers are you supposed policy family members say twenty eight year old Tatyana Jefferson was playing video games with her eight-year-old nephew early Saturday morning and had left the front door own and that he never identified himself as an officer fell within seconds dean firing that deadly single shot through the window our at cell phone video showing the moment the hotel under construction came crashing down killing at least two people more than one hundred construction workers were actually inside urban policies now and the chief now saying charges could be filed against that officer who's now resigned David that is what the chief indicated this afternoon and Dean had been with the Fort Worth Rabid there of Bruni where can I go with my children but in war there's often no west safe to hide so let's get right back to IAN panel he joins US tonight from Iraqi tonight Jefferson's family demanding criminal charges the fact she got sacked for look into her own window amazing to me that they could even try to justify it messages with another diplomat about the hundreds of millions in US aid to Ukraine being withheld what he's now expected to reveal about a conversation with president trump and then crashing down without warning on my God the New Hotel New Orleans under construction raining concrete and steel on busy canal street president trump's former Russia adviser Fiona Hill lawmakers plan to press her on the president's attempts to get Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden and the role of his killed forty nine year old Anthony McGregor his body recovered late Sunday night. N- Orleans mayor vowing not to give up the desperate search for the missing worker and to investigate the call as of the collapse this continues to be a rescue mission at this time and Victor Kendall with us live from New Orleans tonight and victor they're still worried about other buildings in the area need to investigate Biden in text messages turned over to house investigators America's top diplomat in Ukraine Bill Taylor rights I think it's crazy to withhold security embassador to the EU Gordon Sunland a former trump mega donor sunland worked with Giuliani behind the scenes to carry out trump's wishes in Ukraine a country that it's angers me that my sister's not here she will get the thirty and marcus more with us live tonight and I know Marcus City leaders are pledging to have an outside agency review the Fort Worth Police there was just smoke and debris everywhere more than one hundred construction workers inside at the time of the collapse Saturday morning thirty injured two killed one still unaccounted for we news tonight in the impeachment inquiry a former White House official testified behind closed doors today and then all eyes on the US ambassador to the EU later this week who was exchanging those text personal attorney Rudy Giuliani who led that effort the arrows continue to point in just one direction which is that a crime was committed on Thursday lawmakers will hear from the president that might have been damaged in all this yes they are David in tonight we're learning that both of the crain's here with a construction site or unstable pushed everyone further away several of these nearby build a text message that mentioned no quid pro quo Mary Bruce on the hill tonight arriving on Capitol Hill today the first White House official to testify in this impeachment inquiry Edel weakened encounter were an innocent woman was killed inside our own home chummy address is not cooperating with their investigation the Fort Worth police chiefs the president was telling the truth trump has cited ambassador sawn lind's text to clear himself text message that I saw from assistance for help with a political campaign sunland response the president has been crystal clear no quid pro quos of any kind but according to the Washington Post exclusive interview Amy Robuck and David in that interview he is talking about this issue and much more Hunter Biden over the weekend announced that he is stepping down from the board chinese-backed equity firm and he is now committing not to work with any foreign entity if his father is elected President Mary Bruce with US Tonight Mary thank you and again hunter by without things have been evacuated and making matters worse there's rain in the forecast tonight that could make this structure even more dangerous David Victor Kendo in New Orleans tonight thank you victor we will still keep fighting we will do what we can try make sure this doesn't happen to another family in her first statement to the media Sequoia Sean Land is expected to tell Congress that response was essentially dictated by the president that he spoke with trump before replying to Taylor's text and doesn't know whether where are police parking around the corner to do a welfare check in the video you can see officer Dean walking around the back of the isn't even in the EU he's also defended the president against accusations that trump was withholding nearly four hundred million dollars in aid to Ukraine until they agree wants a coolest to face justice in the UK for the deadly accident outraged she left after telling authorities she would cooperate what should never goes back this streetcar newly engulfed in the cloud of dust and debris those on board narrowly escaping with their lives when you step off. Charlie you couldn't see twenty feet in front of you written apology from the American woman responsible for their son's death is not enough seven weeks on and we've had to do this to get an apology she is devastated by what happened and would like to meet with Harry Dunn's family his family says they are open to the meeting but only in the UK David wife hit the nineteen year old done while driving on the wrong side of the road near a US base three weeks later she left the country claiming diplomatic immunity three sixty with lifelock membership and you'll save twenty five percent or more of your first year at Norton Dot com slash ABC that's Norton Dot Com slash ABC housing she is an extreme danger and the major storm system tracking tonight drenching rains flash flooding worries is that storm moves across the South and then right up into the northeast in Alabama authorities expand their search for this missing three year old in Georgia Tennessee Mississippi and Florida police say that Camille mckinney was kidnapped from not from the American woman but she says fall short here's ABC's Ada pilgrim tonight Harry Dunn's parents flying here from England demanding justice saying he killed by an American diplomats wife driving on the wrong side of the road coming to the US now with a message the mother breaking down before the cameras today after receiving a written apology is it in trump and Rudy Giuliani of course we're pushing Ukraine to investigate former vice president Joe Biden and his son hunter the buys business dealings in Ukraine and now we know that Hunter Biden is given the other hand that's another story because when you shop bank or browse online your personal information gets out there and you can lose control of it exposing you to Cybercrime but you can get Justin writing on August twenty seventh and so cool as a diplomat I shot a Maryland parking garage today police Thomas bomber was found with a gunshot wound after making a radio call about disorderly subjects in the Silver Spring Maryland garage he twenty five percent off next Monday night the FBI is now joining multi-state search for a missing three year old girl from Alabama tonight allegedly abducted from a birthday party pilgrim with us tonight as well thank you there is still much more ahead on world news tonight this Monday to veteran police officer shot in a parking garage after calling it a report about disorderly subjects yeah I do in my baby so far police say they don't believe the two people they're questioning have any connection to the missing child's family police also say I'd later at the hospital the officer leaves behind a wife and two children potentially dangerous new storm system that will sweep from the south right into the northeast this week the front will I moved to the device security identity theft protection vpn for online privacy and more plus if there's an identity theft related problem they have agents who will work to fix it outside a birthday party in Birmingham Saturday evening and security cameras took these pictures of the Blue Suv that took her away authorities say that this unidentified man fifty nine at just thirteen she received three encores and she would come back often this weekend she was back and proving she's America strong Dolly Parton has been performing at the Grand Ole opry in Nashville for decades for first performance in nineteen back a sense of control over how to help protect yourself and your personal information thankfully there's Norton three sixty with lifelock and all in one membership for your cyber safety that gives CNN surveillance video and a woman he was riding with inside that Blue Suv are persons of interest police found the vehicle Sunday night and are questioning those people to see now no one can prevent all cybercrime and identity theft but norton three sixty with lifelock is a powerful ally to help protect you today's connected world sign up today for a Norton Matt being on it talked about her parents as she marked he was then discovered with a gunshot wound did not survive and we'll have more on that in a moment also burgeoned hunt tonight the three-year-old kidnapped from birthday party the FBI is involved tonight Gulf states tomorrow bringing possible flash flooding before combining with a second system and then pushing north up the east coast into Wednesday with heavy rain and high winds and we'll watch it and Indiana tonight leave there are other people involved in this child's disappearance David were all thinking about that little girl Steve Thank you to the Knicks of other news tonight on a police officer fatal here since one thousand nine hundred ninety eight there are at least fourteen deaths now tied to Tripoli this year finally tonight it's been decades since her first performance at the Grand Ole opry Turkey asking for an immediate cease fire it comes as president trump says he will also issued an executive order to authorize sanctions on Turkey just one week after President what did you think of the fact that she had relative studies it was devastating it was awful it was like losing hungry again it was so hurt that much. John's parents no signs of the child at home they call her cupcake she was last seen wearing a pink Minnie mouse print T. shirt parents are devastated I wanna Big Bay people are now being questioned but no sign of the child and police believe she is in extreme danger tonight here's ABC's Stevenson Saami the FBI tonight is on this case and their help the well a lot of people think this is my fiftieth year Grand Ole opry is actually been sixty tomorrow good are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions then zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online reporting that states I a deadly case in Tripoli outbreak the CDC confirming a resident in Elkhart county died after contracting the mosquito-borne virus that's the first triple leafy Taliban Amy Rohbock first thing in the morning on Gi again tomorrow night right here on world news tonight in the meantime the case making international headlines Tonight the British parents of that teenager accident they're going to be conducting an extensive interview and investigation to hopefully further lead us to this young baby so far because I am I got to sing on the opry I was thirteen years old and actually johnny cash introduced me she said the Grand Ole opry was always her dream occasion I just wish mom and daddy could here but I think they are and she thanked her fans posting what a beautiful weekend thank you to everyone who celebrated with me Fifty Years Memories imagine what more could a girl one Dolly we celebrate your milestone right there with you thanks for watching I'm David Muir Woods we come down to Nashville back and forth you know beat up car sleeping the backseat go to the Grand Ole opry wait backstage looking at all the greats that was always my dream is the new track just ahead here more news ahead break back how you spend your time and what you listen to is totally within your control your personal information on the Joe Leib seventy four ask settlement whose EILLY respected was there's no quid pro quo. He said that Mary Bruce with US live up on the hill tonight and Mary.

president trump US ABC FBI Turkey Tripoli President Assad David Muir ABC Martha Raddatz Syria Mary Bruce officer Isis America Northeast Ian Panel Elkhart county N- Orleans
Morning Joe 10/14/19

MSNBC Morning Joe

51:09 min | 1 year ago

Morning Joe 10/14/19

"Let me start by asking you about reports at Rudy Giuliani is now under investigation and involving the Ukraine there is some confusion as to whether or not you still consider him your attorney your attorney yes it is a great gentleman he was a great mayor Rudy Giuliani's behavior around the globe running what amounted to an off books shadow foreign policy circumventing the national security process pursuing the since political objectives with people like with henchmen with names like Ebor and love so the picture whatever legal jeopardy or digitally he's the Co host and executive producer of showtime's the circus columnist and associate editor for The Washington Post David Ignatius and Syria forcing the Kurds to make a deal with Russia backed by Shara Al Assad Good Morning and welcome to morning Joe it is Monday October breaking lobbying laws his dealings with Ukraine another lawyer of Donald Trump's now being investigated that reporting and I know he's an honorable man that honorable man is reportedly being investigated by federal prosecutors in Manhattan for potentially eighteenth with us we have White House reporter for the Associated Press Jonathan Lamar National Affairs analyst for NBC News and Msnbc John Heilmann they might be in on the backside of these investigations the the optics of the picture that's emerging of his role running around the globe and doing these things for Donald in big legal trouble yeah and Joe I think you know someone the other night said to me that Rudy Giuliani was like a criminal lawyer except without the lawyer part so yeah in order to keep quiet as expected to testify this week as president trump orders the withdrawal of all remaining US troops from northern Alexa look like a choir boy you have of course is Camp Donald Trump's campaign manager in jail will probably be there for the rest of his life is yes and his lawyer his longtime lawyer white how a personal fix her in jail and now here's Rudy Giuliani under investigation. Somebody said I heard a report today I don't I can't imagine it he's a man that looks for corruption and whatever he does I really believe he's a totally I national security advisor admitted to breaking the law committing of fell and you can go down the list is foreign affairs the testimony just a a preview of what's about to unfold over the course of the week is a lot of detail that's going to be exposed around and and it does not look good for Rudy and by extension does not look good at all for the president who yet again has another one of his surrogates his lawyers end up in jail his fixers end up in jail wow the US and Belize sees US ambassador by now whom the trump administration up is just very very ugly and I think it's one of the safest bets in American Politics Right now is that at the end of this week the situation is going to look way worse Rudy Giuliani that it does sitting here on and since Donald Trump shows absolutely no loyalty obviously there aren't a lot of people that are willing to destroy their life's work for this guy on that Donald Trump's may not be around forever and they don't want to end up in jail or certainly don't want to end up in trouble like everybody else and all trump who is supposed to play down new supposed to lie now saying he's going to actually tell the truth and testify investor on who actually just admitted Monday and of course Jonathan Amir you have a guy that gave a million dollars to Donald Trump who was supposed to play ball with don again increasingly look more like that you know look I think it's the problem for the president right now is that it looks like it's GonNa get worse because what we know about Fiona Hill and we know about this mm says we start another big is it that everybody around him ends up in jail in Toronto it's Nice unbelievable seriously trump administration should cooperate with house Democrats the impeachment inquiry and sixty one percent said the president should not ask foreign governments impeachment inquiry into president trump the latest CBS news YouGov poll has that approval at fifty three percent sixty three percent said that the White House correspondent for Reuters Jeff Mason joins this John Highland it really is it's just remarkable this guy is making that's right this potentially a very damaging week for the president with all the testimony we're expected to hear on Capitol Hill Fiona Hill who episode very recently was top advisor about Russia matters is going to be yes that tax that I said that was written by Donald Trump and I don't know whether the guy's telling the truth or not it's almost as if people understand an adds to this confusion this week for the White House and frankly more pressure on Senate Republicans who now have to face the cameras this Congress back in session this week is and potentially a White House meeting down the road in the exchange in which some diplomats expressed real concern at this arrangement after a long three hour break in the text messages or help with election campaigns I think it's important to highlight this because again the White House really wants to lead that people don't understand hedlund is going to speak later this week and suggest because he's of course been in the news last couple of weeks because he is in those text messages that we all saw that were released to Congress it's not his but rather what the president himself was saying after they spoke on the phone so that of course shake changes the narrative of the story could change the shape of the story completely house needs to investigate are the White House needs to cooperate with this investigation with this impeachment inquiry sixty three legalities or illegalities of it which exist but in simple terms people are like no you don't do that that's not right and of course very important member that ambassador you not only said Donald Trump wrote that taxed that he was quoting also said he didn't know whether it was David Ignatius only twelve percent almost one in ten Americans are saying that it's okay for foreign countries the and also puts pressure on the White House unless they just WanNa see their numbers just continue to collapse is almost two thirds of Americans are saying the white eh interfere with our elections and it's okay for Donald Trump juries doing but the number in this poll that is so fascinating end of Americans say the trump administration Lau should cooperate with Nancy Pelosi should cooperate with Congress should cooperate with this impeachment there was no arrangement here this is all on the up and up the now the reporting is that the ambassador when he testifies for Congress this week is going to say that the quid pro no quid pro quo comment including is the president of the United States pushing the president of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden a political foe in exchange for military arms. Tom Only hurts himself politically even more so the strategy of the trump administration since the beginning of these investigations has been later today and is GonNa leave the reports are that she's GonNa very damaging information about this shadow foreign policy that was being run as you just said the ambassador to the U. and bathrooms I and in it he's the president has pointing to one of his master saying like no this is not a quid pro quo referring to the alleged deal between Ukraine the United States knowing the truth or not okay fantastic we're gonNA get to more on this in just a moment but let's show you the latest polling that shows a majority of Americans support the see the Ukraine investigation simply as an add on to the more investigation there's a phrase I remember from the Watergate days I believe it was something that always attack the news always blame the news it's their way of escaping any responsibility for their evil deeds well in donald trump's quarry so as they stonewall and look even more Nick Sonian by the day I suspect that sixty three percent number just goes higher donald trump in the equation here and it's very clear just don't you talk to people about it and they just don't like it rubs him the wrong way they may not know about the range ambassador silent comes back and says no there's no quid pro quo here the president has time and time again pointed to that as evidence that look there's nothing shady there's no deal look the people are saying case he's always blamed the news are he's blamed the news for reporting on Muller here this is a story tyrants people that are running white some label illiberal democracies across the world sorry that he's already admitted to in front of a Bank of cameras that yes he's trying to get China he's trying to get Ukraine he's trying to get foreign he desperately try to blame the press blamed Democrats but it looks like Americans are onto him as David Ignatius just said just to try to the fog them to to make people think it's all just this Washington a circus of endless investigations back in aren't going to stop because they see those poll numbers too so I don't think as as as Jonathan and and others have said says president trump orders the withdrawal of all remaining US troops from northern Syria the decision was revealed by the Secretary of Defense yesterday the of we're not going to cooperate and yet the fact that these people are testifying this week the fact that the former ambassador Ukraine testified on Friday sort of the last couple of days last couple of weeks but we also saw last week was a letter from the White House to Nancy Pelosi saying essentially in crystalizing their strategy all of this they're seeing this polling you're certainly right to say the president criticizes the media and lashes out the media when he feels under pressure and that is usually a big part of his strategy and we've seen I WANNA be a part of it this time yeah absolutely and I think it's it's interesting how what what sort of ramifications that has for the White House strategy and dealing with it we're entering a different phase here there is a tipping point in this investigation I think this week we may go over that you know Jeff as and autocrats it seems to be coming down just as the pressure on the president is going up I WANNA turn out to the fast moving developments in the Middle East A- as this continues it looks like every tree may fall because people don't want to end up in jail they've seen the history of Watergate one of Bob Woodward sources said to it was every tree in the forest will fall and I have a feeling that processes what we're beginning to see the as people realize they face legal jeopardy as people I Gordon Sunland a funeral he'll realize they have to testify truthfully because these investigation fourth and the these poll numbers suggest that people aren't buying it that that they that they do want to get to the bottom that they don't Kurds of Syria advancing with the help of Arab militias. US officials tell ABC News and they say the militias include former members of it was at that strategy is already crumbling I was talking to a White House official last week. WHO said this makes it looks like this makes it looks like we're caving so the White House strategy the US is getting out of Syria at the worst time justice Turkey is making rapid advances in its war against US allies Kaieda and Isis it means Turkey a NATO country is using alleged terrorists to attack the Kurds who fought with US troops against Isis for four years and carved out their own unofficial little state in the process now that autonomous zone the Kurds call Rosia is collapsing and who said Turkey's invasion has increased the risk to US forces on the ground there we'll get the latest from NBC News Chief Foreign Correspondent Richard Angles Kurds in Syria fear they'll be ethnically cleansed by Turkey and its militias and Isis is seizing this chaotic moment to regroup told me it's a failure of US values helps American adversaries and gives isis a new lease on life Richard Engel NBC News Northern also an ally of Russia to deploy along the border it's the end of Kurdish self rule here which they earned fighting alongside US forces a US official removed American troops and now is cheering basically al Qaeda and Isis working alongside with dads the Turks and their militias pushed deeper into Syria the big news dropped like a bomb nearly all of the one thousand US troops still in Syria are Lee grids of family members of Isis fighters today broke out of a detention camp a middle this president trump tweeting the Kurds Turkey have been fighting for years other may want to come in and fight for one side or the other let them and tonight facing an assault they cannot stop Kurdish forces called on Syria's president but Charlotte with Turkey to destroy to help Isis I it's just unspeakable help isis westerners they were beheading because of the danger that they pose Donald Trump said they posed not only to the Western world to America and now donald trump basically rebuild their caliphate and to ethnically cleanse the very people that helped destroy the caliphate? It's so painful to watch this if you've had a chance as I have to be on the ground with these American troops and their Kurdish allies I hear from contacts that president trump is getting overwhelmed by requests from Republicans from prominent Republican when he says that the Turks and the Kurds are fighting and we shouldn't get in the middle of it let's just get out of the way of course Donald Trump knows real united the president's either lying or stupid we'll let the president give us some insight into that later on today reading announced by Defense Secretary Marcus Ber plus spoke with the president last night he directed that we begin a delivered withdrawal with no US protection the to me a unilateral sanctions against Turkey today Congress when it gets back later this week is likely to vote those sanctions so trump might try to get out ahead of it just so he must be lying. Donald Trump knows that we send our troops over there because of the rise of Isis because of the is is state because of all the people isis was killing because of all Assad in Syria they believe Donald Trump in this one move is aiding and abetting just about every country on the Donald trump is aiding and abetting isis they believe Donald trump is aiding and abetting Russia they believe Donald Trump is aiding and abetting Iran they believe Donald Trump is aiding and abetting gathering Saturday night that included many senior special forces veterans intelligence veterans there was a mood of deep gloom at the emotion at finally just slammed it we'd now today see the breaking lasts an blood just a brutal process that serious conducting I talked to people in the US military feel a sense of almost literally physical sickness as they try to digest this news I'm told me note it may be too late to put this toothpaste back in the tube even even a trump announced sanctions the Kurds have had to make a decision according to experts who know this area the most according to Republicans ib according to Lindsey Graham this is a guy who is reinventing isis and as the earth that consider themselves to be our greatest enemies right and at the same time the only person or entity that Donald trump is not aiding and abetting right now uh-huh to reexamine this policy before it's too late there was a tweet that president trump put out yesterday amidst a flurry of that suggested that he might impose trump goes ahead and does exactly the opposite with this move in addition to all of the profound strategic global ramifications that this has what he's done blood will be on Donald Trump's hands so they believe Republicans believe as do most foreign policy experts in Washington around the world Republicans have said as Isis emerges and is isis gets powerful again it will be the blood their words not mine where the wholesale condemnation of trump and public by republicans president has invited that and thereby put himself in a position of vulnerability at the the House of Representatives. You're going to get impeached though the road to salvation here is keeping that red wall solid behind you in the in the Senate as long as you could keep all the Republicans line waibel ally and whom they could depend and they had to look elsewhere so that that reality is really sinking in for military and it's very painful for them needs to be attacked I the hardest hardest thing possible this has been coming at us now for many many months seems like a car wreck were watching and himself Joe because you think about you know if you were giving political advice donald trump at this moment we ago you would've said hey Mr President Eh alternate rail politique who can protect them and they turn last night as Richard Engel said in his report to the Syrian regime and invited them to join up behind you standing by you you'll survive any kind of a trial that when it comes to the Senate on this impeachment thing don't do anything alienated Republicans in the Senate and then cancel of the trailer for US military officer the idea of leaving your allies in the field to be slaughtered by these guerilla forces Their family gene the Donald Trump accused Barack Obama of inventing isis because he took he took our troops out of Iraq inventing is here you have Donald Trump Donald Trump Republicans believe donald trump is aiding and abetting isis the rise of isis the Syrian Syrian army is now at the border working with the Kurds because the Kurds decided so hard to say this occurs decided that America was not the lack of guardrails around him there's no voices in the administration or even over at the Pentagon who could stand up to him let's talk for a moment about former Defense Secretary James Mattis and you know Jonathan Hi John John Hayman look back to the two thousand sixteen campaign and see all the times in fifteen and six wanting to push his Polish troops. US troops out of Syria people around Mattis have said that at the right moment he would speak he'd be compelled to talk he would give his of course Americans are with the rise of Isis That that will happen because of this new and Israel Israel has Iran aiding and abetting Iran according to Republicans according to foreign policy experts aiding embedding Vladimir Putin and his expansion is he has created this shocking and really unprecedented for trump in the era of Donald Trump nearly three years he's been in office we've never seen anything like this for James Mattis if not now when very very good it's a good question because again just talking to Republicans of power in the Middle East same with Assad and who is endangered here our allies the Kurds every reason to be absolutely terrified by what's going on here because with our small contingent of Troops David Ignatius that just gives the Iranians that much more freedom that much more power do expand across Syria and Build Bat Bridge to Israel that Land Bridge to Israel that they have wanted for a long time so they could help in every way loudly over this policy you know it is a campaign promise he had made to pull US troops back although flies in the face of course if his all other promise to stop the basic idea was that in this next period the access that's dominated by Iran includes Syria regime of Bouchara loss on Russia missile anti Israeli forces like Hezbollah Joe This is a policy that makes no strategic sense at all about Isis it's one where he was outmaneuvered by John in a phone call at the White House a few weeks ago and he has received almost universal condemnation and it also goes to show again when he when he needs to have solidity his position vulnerability and you know again I think it's really one of the most it's a mystery nion and if needed take on the president yet he is still holding still held his tongue he is still in media appearances even over the weekend has refused to do so so joe my question is this in a week the common wisdom in the Middle East. It's GonNa take a long time to dispel that sense that America is an unreliable partner you know Mattis has not spoken out as as Jonathan Amir said he's held his tongue but if his resignation letter quit it's so it's so averse to his own self interest that it is a profound mystery of what is that actually got into Donald Trump's head at the moment when you decided to to invite this this kind of behavior so we'll see at some point I think there's a story here to be told I don't know what the answer is but it is it is a really devastating thing that he's done one of the greatest maybe the greatest mayor the history of New York he was a fantastic prosecutor I know nothing about him being under investigation Klay but I think we all get the point that the damage that was done by the Syria decision will be lasting all we're going to be talking a lot more who just released new book and did a media tour supporting it and said he didn't want to criticize the president at the time wasn't right this very issue that he resigned over the president about this issue Admiral James Debris disks will be joining us ahead also still ahead on Morning Joe. SNL tackles the past week's headlines with the president and both on the global level and in terms of politics Hamas right in terms of reality is it's a rare issue where Republicans in the Senate feel free to break within publicly and will hurt us I I fear for years to come I was in they ruled Lebanon on Thursday and Friday and I talked to every help us in World War Two World War Two it's kind of hard to know who trump means by US Joe Biden for the first time called uh-huh Biden as the punch lines troves unexplained withdrawing troops so northern Syria saying that we didn't need to defend our Kurdish allies because quote bathed president trump to be impeached and removed from office after he realized finally that that Joe Biden trump keeps attacking was him because he felt when America does not stand with its allies it suffers reparable harm repeated that yesterday be nice if he said it more specific and maybe Turkey to is just going to be on a roll at America's friends have learned bitterly that they can't depend on us and so this is because Joe were finally over our major winter storm for the northern plains but the leftovers of this storm is that bitter cold temperatures waking up this morning to frost in Lebanon politician and one after the other they said things like we pity you we feel sorry for America attempt we're GonNa talk more about the twenty twenty race straight ahead but first here's meteorologist genetic web check on the forecast Janetta Good Morning Mika in country and to try and get a medal and medal with American elections and you see these numbers skyrocketing this is something that through the mid West Chicago very frosty this morning in the twenties with temperatures continuing to really cool off fall below average for the next twenty four hours turns with overnight low still in the mid twenties but when you factor in the winds the feel like temperature in the teens so this cold front will continue to spread ice chunks and in the federal government that's certainly ver-very important that's this week on M._S._N._B._c.'s the oath available now wherever you get your podcasts he put together as Socialists game of bailout of agricultural industrialists sixteen billion dollars after all the damage after Donald Trump's tariff taxes impacted working class Americans after Donald Trump's tariff taxes required that fifty billion dollars in US agricultural products and also includes commitments by the Chinese related to intellectual property and so a lot of talk and a lot of this is not clear and certainly not written down assigned you know the thing John Holliman that is so concerning to me is subscribe the president on Friday announced that the US and China had reached a quote substantial phase one deal on trade that will eliminate a tariff hike that had been set to take effect tomorrow trump said that China will purchase upwards of and its currency trump said the deal would take three to five weeks to write and could be signed by the middle of next month the subscribe to the Msnbc daily newsletter you'll get the best of what you've missed during this unprecedented era of news text Msnbc two six six eight six six the president said that more things had to be worked out before something could be signed so a number one nothing is on paper and in order for two beside it has to be we'll which will cause heavy rain from Texas all the way to the Carolinas Hi it's cater WANNA keep up with MSNBC while you're on the go well it's really interesting the discrepancy between how people are describing it the president as you say is calling it a deal secretary Mnuchin when we were in the Oval Office on Friday watching works city we're back in the mid seventies even for the South and southeast and that's going to continue before that cooler air really starts to spread by Tuesday ah the President keeps talking about a deal but the Chinese don't think it's a deal his own his own treasury secretary and listening to the two sides discussed this said that there had been a fundamental understanding on the key issues well there is a fundamental understanding on the key issues in May something he wants to emphasize because he wants to show farmers in key swing states that he has their back but the Chinese have said before they would make agricultural purchases and then not follow through his dawn to trade and all the damage it's done actually helped to bring about and even conservatives will admit this of manufacture listen then we were when Donald Trump began the trade war yes I I was very surprised to your into Wednesday afternoon in Dallas you're going to be finally cooling off back into the mid seventies by your mid week and we're also tracking this big time storm in the when China walked away from a deal that was nearly ninety percent ready the Chinese have not called it a deal are saying that they need to have more talks and even both sides minutiae it has to be put down on paper and be the president is emphasizing the fact and you mentioned this figure of forty to fifty billion dollars of agricultural products that's US had been set to raise tariffs from twenty five percent to thirty percent on two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so they're facing it is not saying that it's deal in fact suggesting it's not yet a deal they're just talking right is there what deal is there right now hiring recession the worst manufacturing recession in over a decade every we get this so-called quote deal we are in no better politics by which it makes sense for Donald Trump to have done what he's doing with respect to Turkey and the Kurds in Syria than other is this is this question which is I understand the politics it was not going to mean that at the end of it we're going to be better off in fact it meant almost certainly we'd be worse off and I I've been grappling with the mysteries this morning one of which is kind of the rhetorical politics the populist politics related to beating up on China I get that and how that works with the president's base what I think we're seeing to your point about a manufacturer in your mind about that job in the there's never been I mean Joe Donald Trump famously said the trade wars are easy right and of course there's no literally not a single piece of demonstrable empirical evidence session across a bunch of states that trump has to win if he's GonNa get re-elected is a in terms of the actual policy not the rhetoric of it but the policy here that is producing over the history of the modern economy batard global economy does that suggest that that's true and so as soon as we started down the path towards a trade trade war through all of this farmers went through all of this working class Americans went through all of this Donald Trump started again not only cross another area in which I think the president's behavior is just on the on the facts of it or is incredibly counterproductive to his own interests and it's cost tens of Americans really working class Americans farmers and of course people across the world coming up much more in the US troop withdrawal from northern Syria millions of dollars for working class Americans for all Americans if Viola and again at the end of this what ever quote deal he ends up getting and I know that he will it's going to look no better than how it was before he started so people are going to say wait a second we manufacturing recession as you pointed out and that is making it more difficult rather than than trump to get to seventy rather than making it easier for them and so NBC's Kearse Simmons will join us live from the Turkish side of the border plus Admiral James Stavridis joins the conversation more morning joe in just a moment in West but across the world of manufacturing recession the worst in the decade because of these trade wars and we're no better off than we were when he started this thing which is what of course everybody told him the trade wars are not easy and so he's learned he's learned this and guess who's paid for this twenty four hours we learned that they likely intend to expand their tax further south in originally planned and to the West and so we know that's happening we also have learned last twenty since he is reporting live from Turkey just over the border from Syria here what are you seeing seeing there this morning to to counterattack against the Turks in the north and so we find ourselves is we have American forces likely caught between two opposing advancing armies and it's a very untenable situation spoke with the president last night after discussions with the rest national security team and he directed that we begin a deliberate withdrawal forces four hours that the Syrian forces in ten I'm sorry the Kurdish forces are looking to cut the SPF or looking to cut a deal if you will with a Syrians and the Russians saying that the president of the United States was scared of Turkish forces and scared of other forces and so it was uh failed failed again we care while we're what we're trying to get him back for more than Syria Defense Secretary Mark Espera yesterday joining us now NBC News Senior International Correspondent here seven it's a very terrible situation over there a situation caused by the Turks by prison Erta wont last nobody the Russians the Iranians the Turks the series nobody was going to push those troops those American troops around the border you really did put those troops in an untenable situation the this mistake is so profound and untenable situation and we had to retreat we had to cut and run we had to escape when you've been over there first of all it sends a horrible message across Joe I have been there repeatedly this is the some of the finest military officers and soldiers Turkish forces and other forces which sends first of all it's laughable but also you were over there David and you know green countered They have been backed by awesome power the the problem is that once president trump announced that we were pulling back from I'm David Ignatius I just I was struck by what the Secdef what the clip we just played at the sector you basically have an American Secretary of defense he has been advised by every one of his senior leaders not to do this in the phone call with Turkish President Air to one essentially will end up engaging with the Turkish forces right here in other places along the border or whether a deal has been done and of course in their heyday k yeah well listen just listening to what Joe is saying I've got to tell you we ran into some Kurdish village. He is the chess player leaning over this very complicated chessboard and he is a few steps away from checkmate's in relation shooting series of big new war or get up I believe we have here Simmons back here give us a sense of what you're seeing and hearing on the ground keep things away and Joe I minimum we hear those words from asper they're shocking You know this untenable situation for American and with the plan that Russia has set out four Kabbani behind me here the reality is that Americans in two thousand sixteen voted for America to withdraw and let other countries deal with situations around the world well here that is exactly what they are getting Putin is in charge here in Syria he is as far as we can see at this stage and things are moving very fast fought together against Isis but things are moving so fast here now in the last few days the Turks have been shelling this town troops for the most powerful military but you know in in a way at ground reality that's understandable there is you know they were either going to start shooting Turks and Washington because if he can do a deal that insures that Turkey and Damascus do not end up at war with each other where Americans were stationed before they left and of course the question now is whether those Syrian forces the year well we know that Isis prisoners are escaping because not far from here there is a camp where around then he will be hailed as a peacemaker no matter how brutal those Syrian forces aw they move across retake huge parts of Syria on behalf of president a high me is the village of Kabbani the Syrian village of Kabbani. Now you will remember that village because it's famous famously where the Americans in the Kurds eight hundred or so isis foreign fighters were being held by the Kurds they are now gone missing in that case that many of them were to make predictions about what happens next we may be heading for a truce or we may be heading for a conflict that spreads ages on the way here they ask who where we separate from American television they said Oh Americans you'll chickens so that's the whole reality right here Syria those isis jihadists if they are found by those forces don't stand a chance President Assad will have little taller women and children there's one case for example of a British Isis woman with two children who is now missing who was known as the matchmaker she her Isis Korea involved encouraging European teenagers to come to Syria to marry jihadist she herself married three Isis fighters all of whom died aside so cure this David Ignatius I wanna ask you a question that sure everybody in the region certainly here in the US is worried about and that is the possible core part of president trump space and that's evangelical when you have someone like Pat Robertson saying he's appalled by the president's decision and saying that he may lose the in twenty twenty Thank you very much jeff and joining us now former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Retired four-star Navy Admiral James Stavridis Bonner but now as you can hear it is silent and that is because of this news that the codes I've done a deal with President that we have a commander in chief that is as weak as he is and and cuts and Ron's staff that says oh well we were going to get caught in the middle of four members

Donald Trump president US Syria republicans Isis Korea President Assad Joe abetting Turkey David Ignatius Russia James Mattis America Rudy Giuliani White House White House NBC News
Elf School In Iceland; Poverty Rate Increase In U.S. Counties

Here & Now

42:21 min | 1 year ago

Elf School In Iceland; Poverty Rate Increase In U.S. Counties

"From NPR and WBZ. You are on Moseley. I'm Robin Young. It's here now. In Syria. The year is ending the same way every year has since two thousand eleven with a civil war we're still raging. Government forces are on the offensive in Italy province in the northwest fighting to overrun. What's described as the last rebel stronghold in Syria? In this case Al Qaeda fighters lighters hundreds of thousands of died in this conflict that started as a peaceful protest but since turned into a complicated proxy war it's also triggered a refugee crisis this with millions of civilians. Fleeing people are trying to get away from this latest fighting the BBC's Middle East analysts Abeche. Usher is in London and Sebastian. Many Americans kinds might be forgiven if the last they heard was that president trump pulled US troops out of parts of northeast Syria back in the fall which cleared the way for Turkey to attack the US. Allies allies the Kurdish fighters Turkey sees them as terrorists but fill in the gaps. Where are we today in Syria? Well I guess we're in a stage. Were President Assad is master of much of a country in a way to three years ago would have seemed unlikely. Thanks to the Russians in particular the Iranians to their backing the Russians in particular backing Syria with air power. They are I mean without that APP. Power President Assad. God I mean before the Russians came in back in late twenty fifteen. He was very much on the back foot and it Lib had been taken at that point By the rebels when you could really call them rebels when it looked like you know they had a chance of actually overthrowing prisoner side and his regime. Since then each month month each year has seen President Assad with Russian help with the help of Iran as well very much and militias but they have sent that they've backed he's been able to push back the rebel so there was a deal done a few months ago The fighting had had had really reached a level where there was is a great concern that a new humanitarian disaster was about to erupt Russia brokered at but since then that was back in August. It's been broken time meantime again. This ceasefire. What we've seen in the past week has been a serious new offensive? Launch by Syrian government again backed by Russian airpower airpower moving further up from the salvage lip and the goal. I mean one is of course to try and take it La- back but more so to take full full control of the commercial artery that runs through Syria. which is the m five highway which runs from the Jordanian border up up into Turkey? It runs through Damascus. It runs through hammer runs homes and it runs up to Aleppo now where the fighting is taking place at the moment is again just bordering that motorway so there is a strategic interest for the Syrian government in this latest upsurge. -able what happens now because we also know no Turkey as we said crossed the border and was attacking the Kurds who they see as terrorists but Turkey also backs Syrian rebels. And you. You know what happens now. It does but in a sense it bucks slightly different rebels from these rebels. I mean it is. It is a complicated situation. And that isn't the kind of dismiss it and to say that we shouldn't think about it but it has reached the stage as I say what you want to talk about rebels in. Some ways doesn't really make sense anymore. More music militias forces which are fighting for various reasons. The main militia was once al-Qaeda's franchise In Syria they sort of broke apart from al Qaeda some time ago but they've kept the jihadist ideology now. The rebels that were fighting Turkish side over to the northeast actually really different group of rebels. Maybe the ones that once backed by the Americans by the West The Free Syrian army they have essentially lost their causa longtime ago. Yeah and a fractured are now. You know basically fight again for their own local reasons but also forever is paying. So that's where the difficulty understanding. What's tapping their comes from? But I mean I think each winter really seems that we're talking again about a possible humanitarian catastrophe in Syria time and again there's been one on city or one region which has come under attack. Winter is very harsh there and we're seeing tens of thousands of people many of them children again who are having to flee. Many of them are fleeing the second or third time during the conflict. There as I said many have come from other parts of Syria. They may be moved to another part before reaching Ed lib-liberals essentially the last Stop Matt Trail. The next stop is Turkey. Many of them are going towards the border but Turkey is not allowing them in now. Turkey has around three point seven million Syrian refugees and part of that incursion. You were talking about over to the northeast from a Turkish perspective was to repatriate was to send back at least in the first instance million refugees there so the Turks have been saying. We're not going to allow these refugees in this is a problem. The whole world needs to face stopped and do something with. We can't just be again. The country that has to deal with this overflow so huge complications again. But I mean I think from from the public perception what will grab attention again will be this idea of children out in fields Away from their homes having to fend for themselves without able to get through even if they've escaped the bombardment and and you know none of them have been just today We heard at least five. Children were killed when a school was bombed BBC Middle East analyst. Sebastian usher in London speaking of the terrible conflict in Syria Sebastian. Thanks so much. Thank you the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report then twenty seventeen gun related deaths in the US US reached the highest levels in decades. That was true in the city of Columbus Ohio where one hundred and nineteen people were killed by guns that year. Since then the city city has tried to lower the homicide rate it formed a task force that takes a public health approach to every gun-related death and hard hit neighborhoods as page Pfleger earlier reports from member station W. S. U. Officials. Believe it's helping. It was April first at exactly noon when Crystal Logan got the a phone call her daughter. GENIA enter son. DONAL had been shot as often as we see on the news. You really never think think that it would happen to you. Just I mean literally Twenty minutes I don't even go on twenty minutes. It and in twenty minutes my whole life change the south side neighborhood where her children were. Shot is among the three neighborhoods identified by Columbus officials being hit hardest by gun violence and shooting deaths at a two thousand seventeen press conference mayor. Andrew Ginther decried the upswing in violence we know that our minority communities are disproportionately affected by this spike in homicides more than seventy percent of the Homicide Messiah Victims Have Been African American men between the ages of eighteen and forty ginther announced. He was forming. A new. Citywide taskforce made up of several agencies. It's called the Violent Crime Review Group and its goal is to lower homicide rates by tackling the underlying factors contributing to violence this comprehensive comprehensive neighborhood safety strategy reflects our shared belief that every resident in every family deserves to be safe in every free neighborhood. And if we are to achieve this goal we must begin new initiatives to address crime differently. Doctor Sheikha Roberts is the director of the city's Public Health Department and she runs the Review Group. Robert says their approach is to treat gun violence like an infectious infectious disease. We try to figure out what the culprit is what. The trend is and where an intervention can be immediately after a shooting members spring into action recreation and parks finds out if the crime was gang related and tries to prevent retaliation to deter crime the department of neighborhoods assess. If streetlights lights need repair. We went all the way down and canvas on both sides of the street just to make sure that the residents knew that we were here for them. Marianne stuck shows me around a west side ride neighborhood which has high rates of gun violence. She's a member of the care. Coalition an offshoot of the Public Health Department that works specifically on outreach after shooting her group knocks on doors to see residents. Need to be connected to therapy or other resources. She remembers knocking on the door of a mother who said she dove on on top of her children to protect them from stray bullets and so she was telling us that she was scared to even answer the door so for us to come in to check on her. She felt really grateful for that and she was ready to see what she can do to try to work through some of those trauma symptoms because she was scared. Have just being in our own. Our own apartment. This year care has knocked on more than eight hundred doors. They've identified more than forty vacant homes to be boarded up after the deaths of her two children crystal Logan getting joined the care team and now helps with community outreach after shootings when everything first happened I remember asking God. Why why me? Why Hi my family? And he gave me back in a very quick answer and said their deaths were necessary in order to bring about change as we speak a man walks up to her. They talk for a moment then. He hugs her He recognized me from the office in just wanted to give me a hug in encourage me And to say that are motivating him being strong after the loss of my circle despite all the violence. She says there's still a lot of love left in these neighborhoods. Since the city's efforts launched in two thousand seventeen seventeen homicides in Columbus are down about thirty percent for here. Now I'm page Pfleger. Ooh I robin young thanking you for listening to the here now podcast and inviting you to contribute Chevy to support it at donate dot. MPR Dot org slash now for all the reasons that you listen here now helps you make sense of the world and when you donate to your NPR station. You're supporting the journalism that brings context and perspective to the news and conversations with people making a difference in the arts music and culture culture so please make a donation to your NPR station today and that investment will come right back to your ears. Just go to donate dot. MPR DOT ORG slash flash now we'RE BUILDING NPR and its member stations. Thanks to you now. Let's get back to the news. In Iceland. We have our own Santa clauses there are thirteen brothers. They live in the mountains with their parents on our reason trip to Iceland. We heard a story. We thought appropriate for Christmas Eve. It's not though about Iceland's sibling. Santa clauses who have names like Door Slam and candle steeler and who children try to placate eight by being good so when they put their little shoes on the window sill at night they will get a gift and not a rotten potato or worse of visit from the Santa's mom SUV would come to town and and catch the naughty children and when I was a kid I knew that she would cook the kits for dinner. Yes that's terrible. Yeah well I was afraid of her. She died of starvation. There you get a sense of icelanders dry humor and storytelling skills may be borne born of long dark winter days with only a few hours of light and there are other worldly landscape that inspired tolkien. Jules Verne it's easy to believe. Volcanic Mountains Mountains might be home to ogre Santa's or else. My name is sue burkle started but everybody Cosby Sipa and we are now so in the cafeteria of the elves in not fear that yes els and SYMPA is about to give us an Elf. Both tour fifty four percent of Icelanders. Believe in the so called hidden people rest. They don't disbelieve them. Yeah Yeah See. The thing is they don't want to rule it out. I don't see the myself as because ask you. Have you seen one now. Well I've only seen one in my dream and it's not important and whether you believe the Elsa here or not. This is part of the culture. It's just part of life. Well we have a map that we are given on the tour beautiful. Little drawings will have pictures. Yes at here now or things like els like to live near the swimming pools beautiful homes while the this is a Map made by the Year Atlas Stefan Stop there sear in that literally. She could see the could see those scriptures and people i. I don't mean to be disrespectful but people didn't make fun of her. They didn't. I'm sure some people did but also see respected so we begin our walk. They just have to cross the street. Shares hearing how when God paid a visit to Adam and Eve eve was so ashamed. Her children were dirty. She hid them in the mountains. God declared that what what was hidden from him would remain hidden forever. The Hidden People Super Zone uncle claimed an Elf helped him ten sheep at night when he was a child. gave him a rock as a gift. Then when the uncle grew old he can no longer see the Elf as an old man he was looking for the rocket given him and he founded destroy he held it in his hand and the rock vanished and he told us he was sure his friend was still round and had taken it. Okay here we need to watch our step up. Become this way SIS. This is enchanted. We are in a beautiful park of our field of black rock and Dark Green Moss Birch trees as and red winter berries display supposedly silly with ills we scramble up on a huge boulder called L.. Frock you can come up here and see his home. uh-huh people come here to meditate and feel the hidden people energy. Maybe ask their forgiveness if recross them if we try to break down their house or do something they don't like they will put a spell on us. We see you know people trying to build roads and people protested the building the roads because it might go through a boulder. A man that studied at the university he collected stories from older Dr Roach Workers of sitting. What saying when the guys were making a new road would come to a rock or a hill? Everything would go wrong and in the end they will go around the room and then everything was. Okay around nineteen seventy. They were making a big wrote out of Reykjavik and in the middle of the road there was a big rock and things started to happen. Guys are falling down hurting themselves and people were saying this is L. Frock and this. This is why everything is going wrong here. In the end it was decided to have somebody come in who negotiated with the elves. They moved out and the Rock was moved to the side of the road. And it's still there do seem to be almost a conscience of the country when it comes to caring for the countryside. Well when I was growing up my father had many stories from his family about the elves and he taught us his children respect for nature. I think in many ways it is. It's a it's a great great word to use conscious of the country. I like that all right here. We go looking Elf living spaces I think most I Iceland Izumi if he would ask them if they believe in elves trolls you know hidden people they would say well. I can't out rule birthday exist and that is my answer that's Iceland's young. Progressive Minister of the environment. Good under good Brinson the son of farmers who went to school in the the US. I was telling my classmates especially from the US. The elves Charleston Iceland and the hidden people could read from there is center ex-presidents since he's crazy. He's so crazy until I met a student from Hawaii and she was like yeah. Of course. Yeah yeah no I understand. We have those two to Canada islands. Is there a connection there. I ask myself. Is it in our environment. That makes us the more likely to believe in hitting people to him. It's The rock formations as a child. He was told they were trolls. Frozen into contorted positions and when the sun hit them and you know we can point at something in the landscape that is sort of a proof. Personally don't think that has nothing to do with it only has to do with with Wendy six accepted which is still in Iceland. Then everybody dare to talk about their experiences. That's why so many believe else that's professor Magnus Carpathians at the L. Stool in Reykjavik. Actually Magnus is delightfully cluttered apartment. Books and L. Figurines piled high. We've I pulled up chairs and a small parlor with five students from around the world as Magnus look some little satellite himself tell stories and takes questions so we have hundreds we have thousands of such stories. We collect them. We store them in special files the climate change and staffs connected at least disappearing of the Arabs. That's right I met more than nine hundred. ICELANDERS and five hundred foreigners from forty countries that he knows sixty five or seventy have met them regularly the hidden people in the always asking them humans. Why do you pollute so much? You have to stop this the global warming and stops pollution. You will kill yourself and he will also kill us. You have to change. When did you start and why do you think here here? There's only one reason why we have the else that is because the enlightenment. It's starting to Europe. In sixteen hundred was very good. Movement very changed the world more than words can express but it has price it killed faith in the World Can Clean Donald All myth mythology and the enlightenment never became to Iceland. That's why we still have the oath thing. You have to ask your first nations about that. That's Tina Bucher from Germany. In the American Indian the indigenous people probably had some of the same beliefs that were wiped out. Think spirits like we're on the world. Can I just ask just everybody in this room. WHO's at the class here now? Are you here now because you also have a belief in else or you wanted to find out more so I believe and I know that the exist. I just wanted to know if I could find them myself one day. You're I think there is a connection with nature. I'm very interested in myths and legends. Harland that's Patricia Mcateer. Before that her husband John from Ireland we also heard from a woman named sunshine. Enshrine from New York but John and Patricia from Ireland actually claimed sightings mine was in Donegal in a very sacred site called on Green and the Elf was halfway up the mountain almost like the age of about a fourteen year old but much older in features did have pointy ears was ause in the expected. Green Brown outfit was very wary and cautious of me. Hugh sure that it was announced absolutely and utterly positive and he just went like that Professor what do you say to people who are going to hear this. And just think you are. You're all out of your mind. Yes but the most recent fifty four percent believe knows is all is no some weaknesses that grandma or Rand Paul Parent when it tells you there as Elva -xperience the very sincere. This happened to me and that's why people talk about an experience. This is accepted. Part of the culture else are a wonderful creatures. The we'd take him seriously. That is Sticky Hill Morrison remember. He showed us how to bake bread and hot springs. WanNa leave you with his thoughts on els. If we come across huge rock we sometimes get A special person that speaks to the elephant get permission Russian serious. Yeah it's a it's a smiling serious thing that is A. That is a song that you should listen to. The the lyrics are else perhaps man Oliver come skiing We smile but would take it seriously in this year marks the first time in. US history that we've started a decade without a recession and and ended it without a recession. And while that's good news not all Americans are feeling that expansion in fact according to a new state line analysis of US Census Census data from two thousand sixteen to twenty eighteen. The poverty rate has actually increased in a third of all US counties for more let's bring an LLC MSNBC ANCHOR in economics correspondent. Hi Allie and by the way happy holiday security you but yes apparently not to everyone. So we've been hearing for so along We know the economy is strong. The bull market unemployment the national poverty rate fell from thirteen percent in two thousand sixteen to twelve percent in two thousand eighteen eighteen. So that's going down. These are household before living on less than twenty six thousand a year but at the county level tells about this variation. Yeah and I would say about ten years ago you could take top line numbers like GDP and unemployment and things like that and have it have some sense that it was reflecting the economy. What we're learning here is that in our current economy that's not the case so we've got good GDP we've got stock market's at great records We've got unemployment below three percent and got half a million people living on the street. We have forty million. Americans who are food insecure the more than the entire population of Canada. And we've got poverty. Increasing in number of counties thirty percent of counties increase their poverty rates between two thousand sixteen in two thousand eighteen so while the national poverty level is coming down certain parts of the country are getting poorer right well Bullock County Alabama one of the biggest increases poverty rate jumped ten percent over. The last is two years too an astonishing forty two point five percent and this is a county with jobs at the airport the poultry plant which is just no one's willing to work those jobs. Well also what you'll find is Places where the poverty rate is increased are places where there's a very low Minimum wage the federal minimum wage remains seven dollars and twenty five cents. There are lots lots of states and municipalities have higher minimum wages including some that fifteen dollars an hour but through the southeast where you've seen most of the increase in poverty. That's where where you're seeing it in places where people are discouraged. They remain in poverty. Even if they're getting a job at doesn't meet their expenses and people are aging Out So it's got to do with the makeup of the population. We still have a shortage of workers for jobs but the jobs aren't in the places where people are and this whole concept of economic mobility ability. which we're really built on as a country isn't working for people because we're not we don't really have methodologies forget peak getting people out of coal mining towns manufacturing towns into high wage in many of these people aren't showing up on the unemployment rates because they're not looking and he's just in the minute we have people might be saying? Oh that's just public radio throwing a bucket of water on President. Trump's economy KONAMI. No the Brookings Institute has written about how a decade ago voters and Republican and Democratic districts. Earn the same amount today. The median in a Democratic district a sixty one thousand in Republican districts is fifty three. Yes so there's automation. There's a working class. Men have really suffered and before morning. Buddy thinks you're throwing hot water on it. The economy strong. This is a Western world developed. World problem it's not a uniquely American problem. It's just a little bit exaggerated in the the United States so we have to say it's in pockets of the country that had been promised that certain jobs would come back L.. Evil she MSNBC ANCHOR. Economics correspondent always a pleasure. Thank you federal a little while ago we covered fast fashion and its impact on the environment and that got us thinking. Have you ever considered where your clothes come from our producer. Marcel Hutchins took to the streets of Boston to ask folks this very question. What about you? I mean I would like to know what you're wearing wearing a nice warm vested. I got as a gift from my mother in law. This is a sweatshirt from when I used is to work on movies. I've had this for over. Twenty years I've got some running shoes on that I bought from my town and Belair. That's run it's locally Leone and then if I have anything on this probably somewhat irresponsible as a fairly new pair of leave is can you explain what you have on right now. I have on a graph sleman code A sweater was to be by someone in the pants from goodwill. And when you think about the clothes that you buy do you think about who made them where it came from or you just looking for the style in like what's trendy no. I'm on a budget. I have college credits I. I've shopped to supply up my pockets. Can you you told me where you bought your clothes. So my shirt and pants are from Rodney Melville. I'm wearing a doc martens and a Columbia jacket and do you know which country you're close me. I do not specifically no but what I would think is possibly from South America or somewhere I don't know like I'm not sure that was tally. Duckworth Lorna Boston and Bob Schick for more on where our clothes come from. We have with US maxine a debt. She is the founder and director of the New Standard Institute and online data platform for designers and brands. That want to become more sustainable. maxine joins us from London. Welcome to here now. Thank you so much for having me. MAXINE You know the Global Fashion Industry has surprisingly complicated supply I chain. It's not really easy to say. Okay I'm going to start a clothing company. Hire some folks to make some clothes and sell them at least not on a global scale But a lot of the general public. We don't really know this. Can you explain how you work with designers and brands on how to become more sustainable. Yeah I think for listeners. It kind of seems like magic. We go to a store in clothing as they are. It's online and with the click of a button. It's at our doorstep but what might not be taken into account and it might not be aware of is that that garment might have traveled around the world in its creation. The cotton might have started in India. The material then have been produced in China might have been cut and sewn in Bangladesh and then sold to us in the United States so it's really a a global journey that clothing can take Before it's even in our hands and what has happened in the past two decades or so is that the clothing companies have really lost track themselves of where their their own clothing has been made. So it's really yeah. It's quite astonishing uh-huh and so really. The way that we can work with. Brands is by getting them reconnected. With their supply chain through each of those steps that I mentioned working on on how how to make it more sustainable both from an environmental perspective and also from A Labor side as well. Let's talk a little bit about the Labor side of fashion boutiques boutiques like Fashion Nova. Have recently come under fire for producing clothes made by underpaid workers here in California. It's actually part of the reason why we want it to do this story. How common is this practice? Very common. Unfortunately the the US Department of Labor which does research on in kind of the global hotspots for exploited Labor and Modern Day slavery and child Labour really zero in on the fashion industry. Because it's almost a par for the course in terms of the clothing that were wearing today is a very often from that type of exploited labour. It's a kind of become almost integral to to how're clothing is produced. What are some of the regulatory standards? were making certain that these clothes close especially sold here in the United States are made in factories that are up to code and where people are really treated humanely. Yeah so I think the thing to keep in in mind certainly with fashion over which was found to be made in the United States with exploited Labour The good part of that story was that it was uncovered uncovered by investigators in the Department of Labor. So in that respect it's Showing a system that is functioning that is what makes in the United States and Europe. Different than where a lot of our other clothing is is produced in places like China in Bangladesh in Vietnam Are there pressures from the United States To these other countries to have tougher regulations if these clothes are being sold here not yet and I think bringing bringing to light that this is how our clothing is produced as the first step to get those type of pressures regulations. Because it's not there at the moment you know I remember back in early. The early two thousands There was a big campaign to get folks to look at their labels the made in labels at at the time the push was to get folks to buy made in America clothing but taking this idea step further what does actually made in so and so tell us what. What do we do with this information? If we're looking at are labels and we say okay. This was made in Bangladesh. This was made in India or China. How do we make sure from that? Point that we push these brands to to source responsibly. I think at at where we are at this stage If you look back at the food industry may be twenty years ago is where clothing is today where we are now brought to light that these issues exist and now is the time especially with social show media that we can begin to ask brands seriously. who is making my clothes. How much are they being paid? How workers being treated and it's only by asking asking that question will brand stand up and begin to take responsibility for the conditions in the factories that are producing their clothing? You're actually a CO chair are of the Fashion Revolution Day. Tell us a little bit more about that. Yeah so fashion. Revolution Day is a wonderful campaign that began in honor her of the Over one thousand lives that were lost in a in a building collapse in Bangladesh. What the Fashion Revolution Day is is is Bringing to light these issues Having people take a look at their tags and asking the brands who made my clothes as really the The start of the effort for brands to again take responsibility. I can say you know what is happening. Right now And this was the case with fashion Nova as well Is that brands are kind of hiding behind. What is called these industry agreements agreements It's a it's a vendor code of conduct and what they are saying to the to the factories the fashion Nova factories. If we work with you we expect that your workers hers are being paid fairly and that your factory is safe but on the other hand they're only paying the factories very little and so the factories agrees are really stuck between a rock and hard place where they get the deal and not pay their workers or have to say no to the deal and so what we really. A New Standard Institute are relief. Zeroing in and focusing on is not just as vendor code of conduct. But we want to know. How much are the workers who are producing the clothing that the brands are selling? How much are they making? And what are those conditions in the factory. Because only with that information do we really get transparency An understanding standing of of what the conditions are that we can feel good as consumers about what we're buying. Wow so this is now an issue in the public consciousness You know my a daughter showed me a website. The other night where their clothing companies are given scores based on how sustainable they are how they treat their employees And the reforms that you're talking about as we enter twenty twenty. What are some things that you really want to see as the next step? What you're saying is the beginning of US really paying paying attention to this and pushing these companies to take action? Yeah I think on two things on the Labor side of things. There are two critical issues. One one is. How much are the workers that are producing the clothing being made and what are the auditors that are going into those factories? What grades are they giving those those factories because that is also information that they are collecting? The brands are collecting so on the Labor side of things. That's what we're calling for. And then on the the environmental side of things it's understanding what is the carbon footprint the chemical footprint inside the factories that are producing for the brands. And what are the brands targets. For reducing the maxine Dat is founder and director of the New Standard Institute and online data platform for designers seiners and brands looking to become more sustainable. Thank you so much maxine. Thank you so much for having and by the way in a story about Fashion Nova and the New York Times. The firm's general counsel is quoted as saying any suggestion that fashion Nova is responsible for underpaying. Anyone working on our brand is categorically false. I'm working on a novel. It is a story of and my sisters shortens little women. The movie based on Louisa May alcott's beloved novel opens in Theaters Tomorrow and it set when and where or she wrote it in mid eighteen hundreds Massachusetts has WBRC Andrea Sherr reports. The filmmakers went to great lengths to ensure the film would look period. Perfect down under the food. There is a pivotal scene. Little women where MEG. Amy Beth and Joe March come downstairs on Christmas morning to a homey breakfast of eggs. bangers there's and poached pears instead of eating it they pack it up for a poor woman in her hungry children when a wealthy neighbor learns of the Girls Charitable Act. He surprises them with a colorful. Spread of decadent treats presented beautifully unsealed over platters stirring center transplant grandfather. Giving your Christmas breakfast away. Anyone do enjoy the Gecko the number one priority for this. This Christmas feast from the Lawrence House. was there had to be ice cream and it had to be pink like it is Alcott's book as the film's Food stylist Christine Tobin managed a mountain of pink peppermint onset replacing scoops as they melted in a punchbowl. She researched designed sourced and prepared all of the Food and little women to be period appropriate. Much of it here in her Boston. Kitchen Tobin shows me how she made molasses cookies. As for the movie the way nineteenth century families like the marches did with ginger cloves and cinnamon everything that they would have had in their kitchen tobin in perfected pop overs hand pie shortcake's biscuits and found scones and brambles at local bakeries. She says the marches who are based on alcott's Real L.. Family had fruit trees and garden so she pickled plums veggies and limes months before filming began. You had a really then research and make sure those foods that are on the table would have been brought in or taken out of jars because they preserved. We all wanted the movie. You feel very real. That's little women film producer Amy Pascal. She also held the Nineteen Ninety four adaptation for her laboring during over historically accurate. Touches makes the world we see on screen believable movies work on such an emotional level when they work and and all of these things are things that you experienced cognitively while you're watching film so when someone doesn't think about all of these details movies just don't feel as rich. Pascal says the movie also needed to be geographically correct it was critical that it'd be filmed in Massachusetts that a gigantic part of what the movie is about and we needed to capture it. Because the movie is also about Louisa May Alcott and Louisa May alcott life. Life is here. Film crews transformed more than a dozen historic properties and places like Ipswich Boston and most importantly concord where alcott lived. She wrote little women in Eighteen. Sixty eight at her home known as Orchard House today it survives as a museum. The filmmakers couldn't shoot there so they painstakingly constructed a replica of the exterior a few miles away to stand in as the March family's Home Adam Rothman crunches through a snowy field where the temporary exterior used to be their houses right over. Here just passed this tree here. So they had a view you of the Lawrence House. He oversaw continuity with the films art department as Onset Dresser and says the interiors were reproduced in Franklin warehouse. House about an hour away Rothman recalls. How director Greta Gerwig wanted every set and prop to lived in and of it's time delays curtains the batting the furniture? The team even used real candles and vintage oil lamps for their natural glow and the Sudi smudges. They left on wallpaper. Claire are decorator in our art directors. And just the designer all spend a lot of time at the actual Orchard House speaking with all of the experts experts on Louise May Alcott and her family getting as much information doing as much research as possible to get the house right. This house host hold such a motion for people. The book hold such emotion for people. Now this movie will hold so much emotion for people it connects with their daily really lives. Jan Turnquest Orchard House Director of Twenty Years says this in a room filled with alcott's actual furniture artwork and piano she fielded ended a slew of questions from the people who made little women and thinks they're hard work will pay off turn. Quiz talks to a lot of discerning alcott fans and says one person mused that visiting Orchard House could almost be like going to hogwarts after seeing Harry Potter but hogwarts is imaginary. You can create it but there is no real hogwarts. This is the real thing so to have that authentically recreated means everything to many many people turnquest included. She's already seen the movie a few times and is preparing her staff for a flood of little women tourists after the film opens tomorrow. Tsk for here. And now I'm Andrea. tice can't wait to see you here. Analysis production of NPR WR in association with the BBC World. Service from the gang here kwanzaa starts this week Christmas tomorrow. Hannukah ongoing happy holidays to everyone. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Robin Young. This is here now.

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The Conspiracy Farm Ep. 76 Journalist Eva Bartlett

The Conspiracy Farm

1:04:11 hr | 2 years ago

The Conspiracy Farm Ep. 76 Journalist Eva Bartlett

"Ah? All right, ladies and gentlemen. Here we go another installment for the archives of the conspiracy farm Jeffrey Wilson riding with you here. Shotgun that militants. My co host is flying in the sky off to I think, Orange County California for access TV fights Mark Cuban's network for ELA. So he's not going to be joining us today. Ladies and gentlemen, you're gonna have to deal with me once again deal with it folks, another jam-packed episode, and I'm so so glad she has returned. We had her earlier what was it last spring or summer had some had some internet difficulties. Yeah. She had just got back from Syria, one of her many trips to Syria, which were of course, going to talk about here, man. Like, I told her affairs. She worries me a bit, man. I I worry about her a little bit. But she's she does have some guardian. Angels watching her. She's awesome. Canadian journalist Eva Bartlett. How are you today? Thank you for your very kind words. Well, of course, you are. Well, deserved of them you. Wow. I obviously you on the face space. You just got back from Iceland amazing pictures there you got back from. Insane victors. And then obviously last spring or whenever you got back from Syria once again that was what your fifth or sixth run out there. Excuse me. But yeah, I mean, I I love the work. You do. I mean, it's so it's very often in your boots on the ground. Because obviously, we get such a different narrative with the mainstream media. Excuse me, not just in Syria, but Gaza is well where you were you lived for a while. If you don't mind set one up for you defeated knock out of the park here. What's going on over there? Obviously, we hear everybody hates Assad. He's gassing his own people. But I mean, again, they're beautiful work that you do your there your boots on the ground with your videos, your cab drivers, your interviews with families whose who've been freed and saved talk to us about what we're hearing as far as the mainstream narrative on on what's going on over there in which you've seen boots on the ground for the ninth time. I'll oppressed by saying to fight trips were with peace delegations in April twenty fourteen in February twenty fifteen the latter being with Ramsey Clark. I'm sure you're wear of was the former attorney general on an amazing man amazing antiwar activists so very honored to gone with him and Sara flounders at the national action committee or center and also Cynthia McKinney those phenomenal two or three day trip. But the other tons of gone Syria have been on my own, and I won't dwell on the organizing of these trips, but it will just note because he did make a reference to corporate media on on fairly certain that when corporate media do deign to go to Syria, most of the journalists that go, you know, everything's taken care of for them, all the uranium visa, the travel, etc. And people on invented journalists and other visitors activists that go to Syria dude on their own. And I think there's a lot of planning that goes into it. A lot of for people like myself, and my colleague Vanessa via the and other people. I know I know we always do it very. Shoestring budget? I mean with which also lends itself to your credibility because obviously for getting paid by network that tends to kinda skew the content or skew the narrative. You know, the nice thing about doing things shoestring is that for example to go to Damascus from they route I take share taxi so right away on meeting series is interacting series. And usually I I hear a ton of stories before I even reached a mascots, and I say in a hotel in the old city, which enables interact with people randomly people that I know and since I've been going to two thousand fourteen in saying the old city since two thousand fourteen and of course, traveling around the country, you you mentioned, you know, corporate media trying to convince the western public that doesn't Assad isn't popular amongst his people. And I realized there's a segment of ideologues that have their own Muslim Brotherhood or will hobby fanatical ideology that don't like President Assad, but they are a very small minority. And I swear if you go to Syria, you don't have to take my word for it. Go to cert-, you'll meet some these will make Christians you'll make. Series. It's all fates that support President Assad. Yes, they have legitimate grievances with the government, and they want change. But they're issue was never win business odd. And I can't reiterate that enough because listen Syrians, tell me this every single time, I go, and I know by now, it's like, yeah. I know, but they clean this because it's important to them that people understand this isn't about a solid in. Furthermore, people who might have been not crazy about President Assad at the beginning. Now, definitely rally behind him. They seem the unifier. They see him as be force that have sending up to these sectarian terrorists that had sledded their country in that have made it like living hell for the last seven years. And I think we since we're not there we really hard for us to really understand the kind of hell you're talking about. These cities are being leveled ancient cities are being leveled families separated hundreds hundreds kidnapped. I mean, the the what is it? What I write down the the torture the the kidnapping star. Asian. I mean, it's just it's it's absolutely insane. What's going on? And it just goes. Like what you had said. Like, you know, there's all these different sects and all these different ethnicities and languages living together, but over here, it's like, no, this is civil war. It's just absolute chaos in again. I don't think I don't think we really get how horrible it's been over there. I think the last time we spoke to eighteen thousand kids who have their organs harvested. I mean, just the level of death and destruction over there is just I don't think we get it in the thing that really just for lack of a better term pisses me off is almost the inversion of reality. And we've seen it w MD's Colin Powell with his little powder manufacturing shit to go in and killed scores and scores of people and then over here in the west, we're just, you know, Rah Rah, do it again glass parking lot, it just it. It's obsessive we greatly. I mean, obviously you too when you're boots on the ground seeing. It's just why we were so willing to just by into another war like that is. It's crazy. It's it's you know to trust my own experiences. I would encourage people I can send you the link a blog post they did from one of my trips which was actually two months in the summer of two thousand sixteen during that time I was travelling extensively around Syria went during that time. I went twice to Aleppo to still the centers were still occupied by al-qaeda and other terrorist. Noted inas inking known for heading children are the one child and in my travels aside from one to let go I went to coastal areas like Tartus and Latakia in Germany and in those areas, it's notable. I mean, you wanna you wanna talk about a civil war these areas comprise Syrians of all fates and from around the country, millions of Syrians who are internally displaced refugees that corporate media don't talk about these are internal refugees, and they've gone to government scared areas because they're getting away from the terrorists that are slaughtering them that are imposing sharia Lon them all the hellish thing. That these terrorist groups are doing to them. They don't want to be a part of it. So they fled to government areas and they rebuild their lifestyle. So this is another important point when corporate media lakes to disdain people a whether they're activists or journalists or simple observers that go to Syria. They they are disdained. Corporate media will say things like well, they only went to the government areas. But in the government areas, you can meet Syrians from data Zoellick from has to come from eastern Syria. You can be serious for all over, and they will seek most of them will speak honestly about why they fled. So again that that posts the updates from on the ground in Syria. I think I called it from summer twenty sixteen and I have for example, an entry from going to area in a village called town in China is just on less than Columbia away from another village called octa. Now Auckland now might have the date wrong. But I think it was December either twenty twelve or thirteen there were a massacre of civilians, there was an Oscar of civilians in over a hundred civilians killed so when I went to Taiwan that was able to meet some of the people that were able to flee up and this massacre again, I'd have to check my notes, I believe it was the free Syrian army that committed the massacre so going to tell knows able to. Both talk with survivors of the massacre, some of whom their loved ones were still missing. So they were free to use the real names. I don't know if that's the same one. I have your August two thousand thirteen I'm gonna Mascow these names Mottaki, I think you said in in Balata two hundred villagers massacred by ISIS two hundred villagers kidnapped. Yeah. No, this is a different area. This is in Hama province. So this is another one got us tons of massacres end at one point in October twenty fifteen I wrote an article called deconstructing, the NATO narrative on Syria, and basically I looked at various, misunderstandings and myths, including whether or not Assad is fucking Garrity. But also, including on the number of massacres. I wasn't even able to touch on all the massacres. I looked at some of the prominent ones like the one you mentioned in beluga and other massacres committed by these terrorists. But yet in octave or sorry Integra I met these villagers that had to in October when terrorists basically came into their village held them in a building for up to ten days. I think it was deprived them of food and water. I remember they they said something about sticking their handkerchief out the window to try to collect rain they'd be shot at by the terrorists. And anyway after that then after being kept for around ten days, then some of them were. Well hundred or more were massacred and others could not. So this is in a village that is in a government secured areas, but you could hear these bloodied perfect testimonies. This is what the people have been living with and fighting off. Also when I was in in messiah region. I want to another place called data mama, and there I met a man who had been in the Endre industrials on nuts just outside of Damascus. And now, I forget the date. I'm sorry. But let's say twenty twelve or twenty thirteen there was a horrific mask there where terrorists infiltrated the Audra industrials on which had residential areas for the workers and slaughter people. They there's an RT article with RT journalists Russian journalists that was on the ground. And I think the articles something like slaughtered links sheet, and they burned some of the people in in other words like it was horrific what they did. Anyway, this man was there whose working in Audra and families with them and he happened to be on a week. And unfortunately, whereas Syria has long stood against sectarianism as one of the things searing are very proud of this nature. Unfortunately, the thugs that the west has sent into to industry. Terrorized civilians, whatever faith, even including Sindhis, they do especially target out Elise. So this man whose family into neighbors were always from the region, and he announced forget all the details some years ago, but he basically fought as much as he couldn't fought the tourists for. I think it was up to one month. I'm sorry. I don't remember these see tales. He lost his entire family when he actually escaped everybody thought he was dead. And this is just one of so many massacres that serious than enduring when we can't overlook something you just said, and we speak about it often times on this show when I talk to people about it face to face they act like they look at me. Like, I'm crazy about these terrorists these ISIS forces. These are you know, they're funded by the west. I mean, this is another proxy army. Just like the mujahedeen. This has happened several times throughout history. But this is another western operation. Saudi allies Israel. I mean, and that's the manufactured nature of it. Again, this the Cy up of that inversion of reality aspect of it. And then you bring in these white helmets that go on to win an Oscar for for just like one of the biggest charades ever. And then we cut off funding. And then we were zoom funding. I mean, talk talk to me about what not does your thoughts on it. But the locals thought on the west funding and arming the terrorists to be able to wreak the havoc that they do. Well, hearing types met I've encountered so many Syrians just randomly like in homes in Latakia in Damascus who talked like a political analyst. They know about the project. They know that Syria was in the crosshairs as being targeted before twenty seven through the eighties in Hama with them to listen brother had committed massacres and after the Syrian president in army quashed that massacre that pocket of of terrorists. They were in fact terrorists, and they started the NASCAR I'm not an expert on the eighties or anything in general. But after that what they say we see what's happening now is a repeat of the eighties these sectarian folks that want to destroy us that want to put us under their their warped version there worked interpretation of Islam. This is what's happening again on the list is enabling it. But even aside from that. Now, it's it's a twenty eighteen and we have access to so many leaked documents showing that the west was funding the terrorists that before twenty. Seven and you have other leaked documents saying the west foresaw the rise of this lung state. I think that that one was in twenty twelve we've had onto Yana guy ton. I we spoke to you about this before. I mean, she pretty much blew that wide open as far as catching catching weapons that were left behind something. You just mentioned in. It's it's interesting because General Wesley Clark said it, you know, five hundred and seventy years or maybe it was the reverse. But obviously it's taking longer. They've knocked up several of them. Why is I mean, you have so much speculation? They want Syria as part of a pipeline China went to the part of a one belt one road. I mean, there's so many different reasons as to why that place is never going to leave the crosshairs. I don't think why is that the central Bank. They're not a part of central Bank like Iran, it's et cetera. What are your thoughts on? Why? It's so. Why they have such a hard on for Syria. Wall. Sorry crabs. But. All the points. You just mentioned also in Syria support to distance whether it's a Hezbollah or it's Palestinian resistance. It's refusal to own no series land is occupied by Israel series. Officially, you know, technically at war with Israel in Rowland heights area wanted slammed back and it hasn't related to any of the demands of the west of Zionist needle alliance. So that's another major factor and America wants another presence in the Middle East. They already have Israel. But you know, they the more the better, there's a number of factors. But certainly, I think the points you mentioned to about not letting IMF in not being think, it's they're not a part of international banking system. And they were they were completely self sufficient for twenty seven, and you know, the the western sanctions, I'm serious. This is a crime against the Syrian people that very few journalists talk about now, my colleagues and people ever stuck to talk about it. The corporate media won't talk about. It. They want address the reality in severity of the sanctions, they'll say, no, no. The sanctions were just are just on serious leadership. But I know for a fact the sanctions are affecting the people like they can't get the medical equipment needs to can't get the can't improve the medical equipment. They have or get the expertise to come in. The can't get in on cancer treatment medication all these things are sanctioned by the US by the western countries, but primarily by the US and just on my last visit this year, I met with the ministry of health, and I was asking specifically how are how's the health sector coping, and it is coping an end even the W H O prior to twenty seven rated series health system is topnotch one of the best in the area. But over the years, the combination of the war the sanctions terraced blowing apostles like the Kindi hospital, which was destroyed truck bomb destroyed in twenty twelve or thirteen minutes was like an amazing anti-cancer and on specialty hospital in in the lepto in its served the whole region. It's just destroyed and I actually just as a segue. But I I met the former director of that hospital, and he said to me, he implored western organizations international organizations when hospitals I occupied by terrorists to do something. And he he was not silence. And then he implored them for a reaction with hospitals destroyed and he was met by silence. Will you got these certain organizations? I was going to ask you about how the what role they play like a US aid, which is often heard as being a front for the CIA. So they're probably not going to be two two on too quick to help them out. Another you bring it. You're you're bringing up points that I was going to anyway, Zionism, you'd said like design est, you know, obviously, we've a lot of people have heard about Vina's them, and I had a guest on around nine eleven and we were talking about that. And I wanted to make sure he qualified that because the people have a very short cut to thinking they hear a certain term. And they just wanna think it means XYZ, you're you're anti semitic or anti Jewish cetera. Talked to me if you don't mind just kind of for lack of a better qualifying. What do you mean by when you say Zionism in the role Zionism plays? In geopolitics and has for a very long time. Political ideology to basically invade and genocide Palestine for state for the Jews. What essentially it was. But the regional sinus leaders weren't even religious Jews. And it was it's it's on me. I'm not I'm really not an expert on this. I speak more from on the ground experiences. But my I would say in general, it's a project. It's a colonial project that took over Palestine that serves clone interests it a Britain and America and also Canada. I won't I won't negate Canada's role in supporting this project, so to go back to the I think it's called the Balfour declaration of whatever it was that that gets into a lot of how the originated to basically hand over Palestine to design this juice that wanted to go off by Palestine when there's always that the grand chess game going on because you hear you know, supposedly designers are Israel created HAMAs as that kind of another kind of proxy force. Against other elements of the Piel. Oh, I think it was. But I mean, there's always these kind of internal shenanigans that again, inverse invert reality. And I guess I could ask you Palestine what's going on in Palestine what's been going on for a very very long time. But looking at your work and looking at your post and seeing other things on the internet people. I mean kids are being sniped. But we don't hear anything about this here in the west children are being sniped. And it sounds like. They're always looking for a rationalization. I'm doing some prep for my JFK episode next week and Colonel Fletcher Prouty was on and talking about back in the day when they first started clandestine ops, they had to go to the NFC in the NFC when I was comprised was more of a reactive force not saying, hey, here's what's going on in the world. Let's go start stuff over. There was more reactive but individuals like Allen Dulles would come in. And be like, hey, look what they look what they're doing over here not saying what they did to provoke them. And that's what we get over here with often news over what's going on the Golan Gaza, and everything you just hear about the reaction why they're behaving this way. They're not even close as far as arms, they got US tanks and all that other stuff and for the most part two area aren't near as armed. But no children are being sniped, and they somehow rationalize it in the news. It's a completely unequal playing ground unlevel? Playing unequal fight this rallies have state of the art technology. They have I'm not a military person. But I know I know fast sixteen because I lived under them. They have drones. They have a Paci helicopters. They have tanks. They have remotely controlled machine gun towers that fire on people in the border regions. And look spent three years in dozen, I work with farmers and fishers, and these are people that are media doesn't talk about if were to hear headline about a farmer being targeted. It wouldn't be something along the lines of these rally defense forces, which they are not retaliated against us suspicious terrorist or something like that. Look I worked with farmers, and these are elderly these are shebab like young men that are working paid laborers and their families including children, and they're literally in an area that's been bulldoze race. There's not many trees in the border regions. Whereas it used to be plentiful in trees fruit, not all of another trees. Now. It's it's it's been it's over the years. Israel has raised these trees. So with the blind eye looking towards the fence between the border region and so-called Israel. And I'm sorry that I do say so called you throw because it's. Eight is built on the genocide of Palestinians on Palestinian land. But in any case, you can see you can see clearly they can see clearly that they're shooting on unarmed Palestinians initiative that they have the technology. They're not just there either you think drones they're using surveillance balloons, and they're using whatever binoculars so they can see very well that they're targeting unarmed. Farmers and they do this stay leaf, and they shoot to kill. They shot around me as activists. We would stand there with the bullets flying around us the shot around feed in the end shot a young at the China seventeen year old deaf Palestinian farmer who was literally working to support his family and his cousin was shot in the neck and killed three weeks prior to that. The American journalist. I think maybe she was Canadian. I forget the she's got ran over by a bulldozer steamroller. I mean, that's what's fairly under reported here. But I mean, it just it just defies logic. Even that that that I don't we just don't get the depth of the darkness that's going on there. And if we always synthesize it through this other Muslim, you know, what I mean, like the cultural war that they've created the east versus west and the anti Muslim stuff that goes around here. It's absolutely insane. Because whatever, but it's how would so underreported and yet it's so the pictures used you posted the white phosphorus that's being used up so in so it was April this year that all the west and all the newspapers and all the civil humanitarian organizations in western leadership, and is rarely leadership blamed Syria blame the prisoners Syria blame the Syrian army offer having allegedly used to come go up in into now. I know that's not true and any independent journalists. That's goes, it's gone. There knows that's not true and Robert Fisk who has a hate on the Syrian government knows. That's not true. And he went there, and he talked with the Syrian medical staff there. He concluded himself. There was no attack and the OB CW went there the organization for the prohibited. From addition of weapons went there and did not find the alleged nurture nerve agent Seren that was alleged to have been used there. But in any case at that time, Israel is rarely leadership. I forget which leader it's probably Netanyahu was pointing their finger at Syria, and you know, on crocodile cheering about chemical weapons have been used when I lived in Gaza was living there during the war on Gaza in December two thousand eight January two thousand nine Israel used white phosphorus, and it wasn't used as a smokescreen. It was fired deliberately at civilian homes in residential areas. It's a school that was housing internally displaced Palestinians in in the main hospital shield Haas. Spital unmet family half the family. I later learned was killed by white phosphorous shell the other half were grotesquely mutilated by this. This this chemical that burns till bone. It's not even supposed to be used isn't like against the Geneva accord to youth that. Understanding is that it's permitted to use in non civilian areas as a smokescreen, but as you know, Gauzes a tiny place now to people living there, it's like forty kilometers watt long and at its wife's point a twelve plumbers lied, and there's hardly a place that you could imagine would be acceptable to use white Kloss for since it's so densely inhabited. And I mean in the destruction. I just I mean. What it does to people is? So there's really no words for it. Because the pictures you showed were about big drives and even seen some of those before about, you know, infants and and you just don't hear about it. I mean the last couple of in the last month. We've all it sucks. The Kosovo g the journalists who wouldn't happen to him. I mean, that's that's messed up, man. But I mean, the list I mean, what twenty there's so many different journalists who've been killed not just in Palestine, not just in Syria, but Turkey, and the list is absolutely insane. And we don't hear anything about it. All we get is the complete opposite of you know, it's crazy. The again, the version of reality just really freaks me out because the media there's so culpable in this in the power of the median controlling in controlling the narrative, which in turn controls people's perception of events is so powerful, I mean chair saying right now this is so opposite of what we hear complete opposite. They're creating the narrative, they're controlling an creating the inventing things. That never happened. I mean, another thing I've been doing on my recent trips to Syria is to really try to collect as many testimonies as I can about the early days in Syria. So in on my first trip to Syria with a peace delegation went to the Kita, and I spoke with this mother and her son Lilly and his son, Steven we're talking about April two dozen Levin in how the LA times issued a report saying all these things happen security forces cracking down, blah, blah, blah. And she said she was in every single place out doing errands, visiting friends she in every place that this Elliott times report named and she said, none of that was happening. And I can't tell you. How many times of heard the same words from serious Syrians here saying, oh, I saw an ear that something was happening in homes or in my home. So I called my family, and they're like, no, nothing's happening. But more when I was in Syria in may and then in September. I went to da, which is folks to be the so-called birthplace of the revolution. And a gain. I collected many testimony. These people saying, no, no, no, no, the protests were not unarmed. They were not peaceful. They were sick, Terry. There were people that had weapons they were shooting on security forces. And by now twenty eighteen is not just me Hussein this, and I certainly not the first this is a chorus of people not corporate media, not mainstream who have collected testimonies who done research Sherman, nor Wani wrote an excellent article called the hidden massacre looking at the early months of twenty seven and how scores like nearly ninety. I think it was Syrian soldiers were massacred and Oscar by OSU details. She details. The ambush is that this is a current at a time. When all the western world is saying NL Jazirah saying the protests, are peaceful their uprising against the tyrant. When in fact, actually, just recently, I interviewed two different Syrian doctors. And one of them was basic Saudi Arabia, and he was going to Damascus every two weeks, and this is in twenty seven and I asked him the same kind of questions. What did you see where they case full protests? Cetera. And again, everything that key witness was the same as what have hurt in Syria. No, they were not peaceful, they were sectarian in it out L just tell you one anecdote. I haven't gotten the interview published, but he said. Now, I forget if it was June twenty seven earlier, his family was going to area outside of Medina, which is west of Damascus. It's like a nice very pretty mountain area. Cheers used to go to for internal tourism to get away to picnic or go to restaurants. And he said his family was out in one of these villages and heading back to Damascus and as they approached Medina. It was a convoy of six cars like they're extended family. They had the windows up the music on. And suddenly they see an armored car in a Syrian soldier jump out the armored car run for them run at them waving his hands in the couldn't hear what he's saying. The unrolled the windows. He's like turn back to back. There's firing and it turned out. There had been this is like early twenty seven during the peaceful protests. There were militants in the hills of Medina firing on the Syrian army post, and it wasn't even a tank. It was just an armored vehicle at a checkpoint. And this soldier the soldier of the army that is allegedly killing people versus on like jumping up into the gunfire to waive civilians back and make them turn around. And he said that the doctor said he was he was doing surgery when his wife tax system saying we're going to die. And he didn't see it. And then, you know, twenty minutes later, whatever she texted him hunted a lot with survived and the rest of the story was that they rerouted their return to Damascus win on different road. And as they were driving back some cousin or something said, don't go to Madeira, the Syrian regime is firing on civilians, and they this person was seen on el-jazeera something, and they just come from there. This is just one example. Money. Not sure if I told you the other example, last time to spoke about the the doctor honor onto who was in the military hospital in DARA government, this hospital was around forty kilometers from Dada city, and this was early twenty eleven and he had his his hospital had been given commands from the military commander, treat civilians. I if the come to the hospital civilians before soldiers, and he said there were so many doctors there that he had nothing to do. So you sitting there drinking coffee watching undesirable and aljazeera was saying the military hospitals turning away civilians, the military hospital doesn't have enough doctors. He's like this is not true this obsolete. Not true. I mean, just complete fabrication is like you said, I mean, it reminds me of the Kuwaiti embassador daughter before the Persian Gulf war. They're turning over babe incubators with babies when the babies are rolling on the floor. I mean, just a complete what in this is the national defense authorization act two or one or two that Obama signed made it basically illegal they'd been doing it already. But basically codified the fact and legalize the fact. They can use propaganda against civilians. Crazy it clearly it works. The omitted own run own run. Doug Nisha that we talked about him last time that was a huge tool as well. Explain who that is a little bit. If you can. So he was a young boy, a really, you know, gorgeous cute young boy with a bowl haircut and in. I think it was August two thousand sixteen this is at a time. Those a lot for propaganda around Aleppo because eastern and some southern another pockets of Aleppo is in areas where occupied by al-qaeda and other terrorists. And Syrian army was there was a siege on these areas. The Syrian army was opening corridors to allow civilians to come out of this incident was before those quarters anyway, but the army was fighting terrorism these Al Qaeda terrorists that were essentially holding the population hostage in eastern Aleppo in around that time in in one of the districts in eastern Aleppo, there was a story that searing Russian governments had bombed a home, and this is the home of each and that he was rescued by the billion white helmets. And the photo that went around the world was taken by a man named Muhoza us land and the photos showed this gorgeous young boy sitting in an ambulance. Looking completely stunned with bits of Justin a little bit of blood on his face. And at the time. Many people theorized people who are skeptical theorized that the entire photo was staged an obvious among them that was very skeptical. Like, oh, come on is this for real. I mean because I worked with medics in Gaza. So I know you never a medic would never just sit a child down take photos and not minister for state, right? He's in shock. So you do something for the first date, but he wasn't being given treatment. He was being photographed in a member seeing a clip, and he was sat there for ten fifteen seconds being photographed. So clearly medics were not involved in treating what was appearance appearing to the young wounded void. But this photo was said to be the face of suffering in Syria now as it turned out. There was neither Russian nor Syrian air strike on his home. And I was in Aleppo in June two thousand seventeen and I'd heard that maybe the family was still there. So I asked around and to be honest. There was a person near that deals with reporters since is not here. I said, really, please. I heard he's here. I really want. Him. And as it turned out the same day. He gave an interview the father gave an interview to Syrian in on some other affiliated media. So the next day, I pushed and pushed knows finding able to get an interview with the family and the father, basically, his story invisibility later on interviewed him as well and found some other interesting details, but the father basically told me there was no air strike. I heard no airplane. I cannot I cannot testify to something. I did not hear or see. There was a blast. He gathered his family into one room during the darkness in in the darkness together. This family to one room some point undone his young boy went missing and later on he learned that had been taken to hospital, and he went there, and the story was on that he maintains a gun there. No earth strike and us very upset that his his boy had been taken from. He felt like he'd been his son had been used. They were trading in his blood as he said, and he said that he was pressured from terrorists and media on sympathetic to terrorists to tell their story. He said. They tried to offer bribes to get him to tell their story to to leave with them. He chose not to eat. And also at some point I asked him about the Syrian army and his he's a total support of the Syrian army. And I have that on video. Syria. So none of this narrative was followed up on by western media by that CNN. Blonde. Reporter the name is Dan or something like that who literally summer stammered on on on reading her script stammered saying how sad she was for. And there's a poor that weaved almonds photo. I think in Sergei Lavrov faced if I remember correctly saying, look, what you've done look what you've done none of those people have gone back to Aleppo, and they can, but they haven't gone back to you know. Editor correct. Their story. Exactly. It's extremely exploited at the same time just a a month earlier this group that I mentioned earlier the not missing key had the headed methodically in slowly beheaded a Palestinian boy after torturing him, and he was a apparently he said just shoot we just kill me. And they didn't they slowly beheaded him and the person that took runs photo is buddies with those exact terrorists ahead of the Lisa Mahmoud Abbas Munn who cries for Syrian children has grinning sell fees with not mincing. And this is the person and is another point. I just wanna make for move on. This is the person that western media put on a pedestal and gained accolades two I photograph and time, and again, if you look at the sources that need are relying on they almost inevitably always have a terrorist connection. You look at the Facebook page, they're praising Jason Islam. Tom the praising tourists. They have photos of themselves with terrorists. And these are always people to John McCain taking a picture with Baghdadi. I mean, that's yeah. But but then you have other people who go to Syria who take literally take the test. Money's what's your name? What happened to record you and those people are discredited because they're in government Aries. It's just absolute obscene. Wow. And like, you said, they just can't fabricate it I mean, it's it's so wickedly diabolical and just like, what's, you know? Yemen. Yemen is just an extension of all of this and just Yemen doing what they're doing with American weapons from it. Rabi doing it too. I mean, it's it's absolutely crazy. What's going on talk to me about Yemen? Another thing we hear barely anything about. You know, I have to say, I'm not that well versed on Yemen. I know the basics that it's been award upon and besieged by Saudi Arabia for believe it's for years. I really deferring the show. Some people now defer to people like there's a woman on Twitter Seraya, she goes by two claims burning I can send you her Twitter handle Marwa Osman political commentator who's on top of things Venezuela's. Well, but basically Canada is is quite guilty of selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, and then at pure odyssey foreign policy Canada on Twitter will tweet something about human rights violation. And they're the ones that are neighboring Sodhi Tomasa ker Yemenis, and and now the numbers I again, I'm sorry, not more well versed in, but I believe it's seventeen million Yemenis not are on the brink of as being said, they are starving. They're not on the brink of survey shin. They're they're being slowly Jenna cited and its Poors entirely. Preventable. But. To my understanding impossible to get aid into Yemen. It's impossible to get into Yemen period. I suppose the N can get in. But it's a really completely preventable. Utterly obscene a tragedy. Doesn't even suffice. It's it's utterly obscene genocide Ronan. It's again you so hard to describe it. Same splits going on, you know, in Palestine in Syria to just we were we we live pretty cushy lives over here. A lot of us. We just don't especially with the media, not even touching it. At somebody. I had on a couple of weeks ago. I've always I've kind of tried to pivot away from the politics of the geopolitics because it could be freaking exhausting. It's I've always been fascinated by ancient civilizations. You know, kind of ancient history ancient civilizations. And something that came up about the war in Iraq in and even what's going on in Syria, and the destruction of you know, things in none of that. It's an archaeological war that certain forces are going in and taking ancient relics or ancient history, tablets or things that lend itself to ancient history that might change the story on kind of the history of civilization. And why we're here and things like that have you as Ernie any conversation over there about things coming up missing. Remember when the Iraq war started like the the library of kind of antiquity was just kind of looted, and I've heard that kind of throughout history of going in and taking out different the library of Alexandria. Another example, just burning certain Brecher that are eliminating if you will. Any conversation about that going on over there? Yeah. I'm sure there is again, it's not my specialty. But I meet with the director of antiquities back in. Twenty kosh. I think it was twenty fourteen so few years now to talk about the theft of the the relics and the destruction of historical sites. And then there's the guy college an asset. I think his name was the man who basically is responsible for having protected the relics in Tadmor era, and he he paid dearly terrorists killed him. When they took over polling you're off. But it take a town lake Montana, which is an ancient Christian air makes taking town. And when I first went there, it was let's see it was June twenty fourteen in two months after Palmiero was liberated by Syrian army has fallen local defenders and the damage was incredible devastating. They did these terrorist home your own the name liberty Syrian bringing democracy. They really what they couldn't steal. They gouge. Out if it was fabric, for example, or they burned or they shot, you know, they specifically were destroying on heritage. They're all saluting looking for golden valuables. But they definitely distinctly needed an effort to destroy the heritage there. That's why when I went back to my Luna this year, I've been back once before that I think it was once this year when I went back it was September. And it was for the annual festival of the Holy Cross. Now, I'm not religious myself. But I definitely respect people who are and it was very moving to in Mahmuda for this tradition. Just set to be nearly seventeen hundred years old has to do with finding across sending a message to Constantinople today that crosses on top of mountaintops, and my Luda, and I was told by a resident from it's the only area that still does this ancient tradition. So this is like credibly historic moving. And the only time they didn't hold the festival across was in September twenty thirteen when it was occupied by elk. Made another terrorists. So that's just one example. And I think it's a very poignant example that once was restored to security and stability life went on in the ancient traditions carried on and that can be said throughout Syria. Maybe maybe not always ancient traditions, but aspects of life return as soon as eastern Gupta is cleared of Jewish slalom and Paiva as soon as was cleared on this past April. Roy away people were working to rehabilitate the towns to bring electricity to make the schools functional gun instead of the news headquarters for the chargers, the schools could be used at schools again net, you know, when we're talking about propaganda in child, and I think we might have already talked about on cheese, one of the the star icons of, you know, child propaganda in Syria, the poor Charleston exploited by her own family, and by vulture media, and and the UN itself, but one of savannah, I think people know that just to the store she is said to the Selecta when it was occupied. When it's being under seat for the military fighting against al-qaeda and Bono was said to be tweeting this these disturbing tweets about how bad life was and it turned out later that her mum thought admitted to pending typing. Most of these tweets down, there's a whole lot of nuances with the bonus story. I saw one interview where I mean, she clearly had tried, you know, plus or hard to memorize this. Krypton that the interviewer was like, what's your favorite food? And she's like free the kids in Syria. Please like, okay, save save the children of serious. What she said. Yeah. I was just like, dude. Let the food in his son. What's your favorite food? And then the mom translated what she should say. Right. Exactly that he asked her a follow up question. Like. How you doing now? And she said fish or something like. But anyway, so just in brief with Bonna on her own father of by all rights seems to be a member of the name. I forget the name of this this one brigade. So there's a terrorist brigade than they worked with ISIS, and he was working in sharia court I hospital complex that was occupied by terrorists and turned into a headquarters in into underground on prisons dungeons. So the father worked, you know, they're in and he was at her and whole family where they lived that their apartment was surrounded by terraced headquarters, and there's one point scene were now I refer to hearing journals, HUD, escaped who found this out. Once we're gonna looks looking doorbell talks about how sad she is. And so after it was liberated escaped went to this particular area. He's like all right. This issue standing now. Just turn your camera as they did not turn a camera in there, so named al-qaeda headquarters in northern Syria. Now, this raises two important points number one. She was very close to a very important Al Qaeda headquarters, but number two, they wouldn't have let her film there had she not been part of this whole propaganda sit ever searing civilian I've met that's come from areas that were occupied. Whether it's a Aleppo, Madonna or Gupta has said hell, no. We didn't go near them. If we did they would have emptied their guns into us. We were terrified of them. But the other thing is with the bona story done cheer family when lep was liberated went onto Turkey got Turkish citizenship. And then she went on, you know, eight or nine years old to write memoirs or she didn't write it and the United Nations modern term and even retweeted her her reverse speech of her English much better by now, I'm talking about how she went Syrian children to back to school on the supreme irony is that her own family were the reason one of the reasons that certain children were going to school this terrorist occupying schools every area every thirty occupy schools will you said, and I've seen I mean, it seems like Syria is winning Assad is winning in like you said things are sort of getting back to normal. But like I said the beginning. I don't see what do you know, look through help me out. Look look through EVA's crystal ball. I know you're going to be heading back. If you bet I mean for boots on the ground. You're very experienced in this area prognosticate for us if you will. But. Next six months to a year. Are we going to be seeing more of these false flag chemical attacks because I'm seeing I'm seeing reports to help me if I'm wrong that there are bombings taking US bombing certain areas in that area in in Syria in certain areas. What do you what's happening? What's going to happen to you, see, obviously, I don't think it's getting taken off the plate as far as you know, it's still going to be in the crosshairs. But what do you see going down? Yeah. So I'm gonna preface that with the caveat that I cannot predict what I saying that you're right about the factum scrolling down. I save something to mention you're right about the fact that the the gaming the US game is not often Syria, even that certain people have made it very clear that they want their president. And they don't want the US presence in Syria. The us presence in Sierra is illegal Sarah never invited the us led coalition to invade occupy eastern area or any of Syria on the continued to occupy the continue to aid ISIS, and this is the supreme irony. Now, a friend of mine he goes by lead seven nine. Seventy one on Twitter. He hadn't seen this. And I was a skit on scrolling Twitter today, I saw his tweet saying the Trump administration is still adamant on regime change by any means in Syria on Pao's special Representative for Syria James Jeffrey yesterday made that clear, and he linked to short excerpt of Jeffrey, basically talking about how the west must find a so a regime that was acceptable to them kind of thing in that the current government had to go. As redeemed change is just a foregone conclusion. You know what I mean? It's like we're not even going to discuss a government with Assad in it Ciprian arrogant, you know, they're still uncovering mass graves in Raka, which the US led coalition destroyed. The us is directly responsible for thousands. If not more dad's a Syrian civilians, let alone deaths a Syrian soldiers. Now, there's an incident in I think it was the third not to not make your own but that name in Denison O eastern Syria in September twenty sixteen when the us led coalition sustained prolonged attack on a Syrian Arab army position for at least if not more than one hour killing untold numbers. Now, the number of the Syrian officials put out is something in sixties. But Tim enersen went there and did an extensive report on this in the numbers much higher than that believe it was well over one hundred ten soldiers killed in a sustained attack. It wasn't a one off up. See it was a sustained attack. The us clearly new all the technology very well that they were tacking series. The army positions and after their talk finished than ISIS took over that position. And I'm sure people are aware that Dutta Sor was siege devices. And so this is a very important position. There was in the countryside still important position. And it isn't the only time that the US. It's certainly not the first not the last time the US has deliberately sabotaged Syrian army in order to let ISIS advance. Isis couldn't have taken over Palmera had the US not stepped on them. First hundreds of kilometers have opened hurt and more recently. The us is on multiple occasions. According to Syrian media has has been using both white phosphorus n cluster munitions both which are prohibited against certain civilians. And then they're doing this repeatedly. Meanwhile, in it live now, I have an article on forget the guy's name. But my article my last article for RT was about it live, and then assess ity for the to be liberated of al-qaeda because I cited OSHA member's name offhand. I can dig it up. But. I'm excited even US official himself who acknowledged that it live isn't al-qaeda hotbed al-qaeda safe haven. And yet the way western media's report portraying in the so it Louison like northern not quite western Syria. But north west of Aleppo corporate media is portraying it live as just filled with three million civilians are being, you know, potentially going to be genocide but the Syrian army, but if we look at past examples Aleppo, go tough wide homes, the old city of Homs 'Data in each case. There have been Reconsiliation deals. There have been Manchurian corridors there have been negotiated to transfer the terrorist groups out of the area in question, or if they're searing not foreign they can take Reconsiliation and they down the weapons and go back to the normal lives. And I interviewed the minister Reconsiliation back in June two thousand fourteen and at that time was already over by belief in it was eighty five thousand series who had taken reconsider. Nation says this this is hugely humane effective way to bring peace and stability to errors. And so with regard to hit the the same offers had been made that the terrorists inside refuse reconciliation, and they've they've come right out in threaten other terrorists other so-called rebels. If you take Reconsiliation we're gonna snoring. So they're holding civilian population on hostage and at the same time they're firing on areas outside of their areas of control. So they're not going anywhere anytime soon. You know, I can't predict how that's going to play out the Syrian does. This does this narrative of trying to rep it does this narrative of Trump. You know, when he was campaigning. He was like, you know, Hillary and Obama they make the terrorists that because he was kind of a basically looting to the west of the terrorists. And so now the supposed- defunding, which I don't think has happened is this narrative, supposedly Trump fighting the deep state at cetera et cetera. Or is he just going about things in a different manner? Since the cats kind of out of the bag about the west in NATO, funneling weapons, I really can't speculate onto that. I know some people would say, yes, he's fighting the state, and they would say for example in April of this year when France UK and the US attack Syria on the premise of attacking chemical weapons sites. You know, people that say Trump is fighting deep state would say, well, they chose sites that were effectively useless earth did not if they talk I disagree with that actually because one of the sites they talked like they fired over I think it was one hundred three missiles in one of the sites. They talked was inside of Damascus itself. So Damascus has millions of citizens in the area. They talk was better say, and it happened to be a facility that was one of the things they were producing this cancer treatment drugs, and they're they're producing other sorts of things to be used in medicines. And this is this facility is completely destroyed. So I don't necessarily agree with this notion. But I'm not a not an analyst. In russia. Russia's obviously, they're not question. What I will say is that there are going by all rights is going to be another stage chemical attack the Syrian and Russian not just media. Their intelligence have reported time and again seeing terrorists and the white helmets moving canisters or containers of chlorine. To from one area to another and Vanessa Bailey in September. It was was in an area of eastern the think it was that was. Where she was able to meet with civilians whose children in loved ones kidnapped and there's so many people have been kidnapped and they're most likely going to show up in one of these stage videos. So I and this is what the Russian ministry of. I think defense has been warning about a game in a game will be a chemical provocation, and they're going to blame it on the Syrian army or on the Russians. So I think that's something definitely to be wary of I think a lot of us expected. It would have happened by now I thought it would have happened in September October. Most humane thing to do if the west actually cared about human rights and stability must mean thing to do would be to allow a peaceful political resolution to it live and take these terrorists, especially the foreigners out of Syria, and the ones that wanna reconsult Ken, but to law the people in live to return to civilian because in every case where happened elsewhere people go back to the normal lives. And this is something the media went whenever they're crying about save Aleppo, save gouta said it live the follow up. Oh, you know, it wasn't that Aleppo fell actually lepto is now functioning and rebuilding and people are at peace. They never follow up with that. But that's always been the case. And I've been as I wrote in this Arklow refer to a tavern major place Aleppo Gupta. Dada. Madeira awhile homes old city all these places that were once occupied and that at one point or another the media was racing cries of alarm over the genocide. Of the horrors that we're going to happen due to the Syrian army siege or the military operations and each time. Yes, of course, civilian lives will be lost because it is a war, and they are fighting terrorists. Nobody could say civilians aren't being killed. But it is not a systematic and deliberate. Killing as Lear. And to the contrary if they this same crocodile tearing journalists would deign to go to these areas now and talk to people they would find out people are saying thank God we can afford to buy food. Now, we're not being held hostage. They're not public executions in our main square our neighbor to not being the headed or pointblank assassinated now, I mean, certain occupation gentle euphemism had been such a freaking nightmare. I mean, I it's like a horror movie it truly innocent. That's why to be honest to get his soft when people here comfortably in the west harp on about having read some report by Human Rights Watch. Who's directors the dictator human rights, Raj for two decades, and he can rock? He's tweeted photos and footage of areas that are not even in Syria and alleged damage done by Saad and his person. Armie it's Syrian Arab. It's comprised of series of all faiths from all around. It's a conscripted army. It's not an Alemi army. That includes a significant number of cities, and these people are fighting for Syria. I mean, like all these people that believe this rhetoric. Just ask yourself if the situation was reversed and the counter city lived in the suddenly infested by al-qaeda terrorist at one imposed sharia law, you that are going to exit for any frivolous reason. Would you not fight back? You don't what would fight back you'd have to be brainless if he did not play it back and use for your army needs support your political leadership in bringing peace after that. It's up the Syrians to decide their future to resolve their political issues is not up to some, you know, Harry hobbies stuffed in a suit to so-called represent Syria, and imposed a type of rule on on secular Syrians that no secular series went whether they're Cindy's or Christians or whatever their faith. They don't want any then one dictating to them. Mm how they practice their faith. No, I lived in Gaza, and I love Gaza. It is a more. Conservative society and HAMAs in charge. Okay. And look I initially supported Palestinians election of HAMAs because I thought it was their right to choose. I don't support moss. I do support resistance. I'll be clear about that. I think Palestinians, I know Palestinians have the right to resist the Israeli occupation of their land. Although end by any means possible, that's international law. But I don't support HAMAs movement. They are missing brother of it. But in the end, it's not for me to decide for Palestinians. But Syria, I've never seen what a secular society comprising all the face, look like and told the story kneeling times, but I was invited to this wild Easter party where people were drinking dancing, and the people that invited me to sending Muslims, you know, and they're not an anomaly, this is Syria. It's up to them to practice their faith as they see fit or not have faith amid so many agnostics eight days in Syria. But the bottom line is it's up to them. And nobody wants this. Hobby on crazy extras ideology posts on him. And that's what Canada America Britain. France, Germany are advocating. While this is that's why I feel your work is so invaluable because this kind of information late legit if you're listening, ladies and gentlemen, thinking. Wow. This is the complete antithesis of what I thought was going on or what I've ever heard. That's because it is. You know, this is the absolute truth. And man, I can't thank you. I mean, I tell you all the time online. But you're so so brave. They're like you said we're so comfortable here. People people don't put their skin in the game. Like you have. And I can't thank you enough for you Vanessa of the whole crew that really what's the boots on the ground hangs with the people. I didn't know you're so fluent in airbag listening to you talk with the cab drivers like annual black belt and taekwondo am I wrong at that. I see that online. I saw this. I saw I'm not sure what kind of kick. I was like chick her out. That's cool. That's obviously take care while you're over there. But any any plans to head back anytime coming up? I'm not saying the exact date, but definitely smart. And I do have some more interviews coming out, and I'll just say like on my YouTube. I've made play lists and one of them is Syria. And I would encourage people to scroll down back to twenty fourteen of what I really try to do is like I try not to. I know. I am innocent speaking for Syrians relating. What's turns told me, but I really try to record their voices in let you hear them new decide because I really think it's important here spectrum Assyrian voices. So I'm still working subtitling. I have. Interviews from Dada people I met in daughter that I both in may in September. It takes ages the subtitle. I have another interesting interview mufti has soon now I'll just say he's one of the most amazing people have ever met he's series grand mufti. Now, if you compare there is no comparison, the sounding to to move to how soon it's night and day, the Saudi move team wants to radically in destroy all churches and the Syria. Move teen is beloved by Christians. And he he loves, you know, loves all faiths, and he calls himself, the mufti of all Syrians, and he's extremely open minded person, very filled with love, and unfortunately, he has also been vilified in western media. His son Saadia was executed October second believe was twenty thirteen because when I met with him this time it happened to be the anniversary, and he said five years ago, my son sorry, I was executed, and but this is the extent to this. Just amazing compassion he publicly forgave the assassins. He understood they were doing a job, and he implored them come to Syria. And now I wrote about this some years ago, but the the day that he did that or the next day he received a text message saying, we don't accept your apology more coming for you next kind of thing. So early a hundred started off nut western media, misconstrued his words and. In the interview. I did Tim recently, which I'm also I've subtitled, but I'm having two different sets of people review my subtitling site want to be as accurate as possible despite takes me forever to on my own. But in that interview, I asked him to just that he said what he said, and what was deliberately mistranslated. He said, essentially, we are fighting terrorism in this terrorism has stopped or it's going to come to you. And the medium is construed as work to say with gas soon pledges to send suicide bombers to Europe or something like that. Anybody who's met? This man will be totally odd by his his compassion and his humility. So that I'm gonna get that out to two. And then I mentioned that you audio interviews have done recently with Syrian doctors which are just fascinating because you don't have to beginning. I think you did you mention SAM's are my making that up who's that? Okay. There's an association called the Syrian American Medical society. Sounds and they have you what you mentioned US age. I was thinking you a State Department that I liked luck to thinking about SAM's, anyway, SAM's is very entrenched with the US government and has received millions of dollars from them and predictably they tow the western propaganda on Syria. These two doctors have interviewed and I will be interviewing one more were at some point involved in SAM's, and they basically talked about how SAM's went from being an actual professional ethical medical association to being rack lies in. Pretty much Muslim Brotherhood front group. So it's it's very interesting. I'll try to get these interviews outs. What work shout out working do you ever one stop shop or do you like a little bit? I know you're on Twitter Facebook, where would you like to point people to to get a hold of you? All right. Well, can you give a shout out to my patron as him? This is what helps me exist in my very humble apartment, you consider the cutter. So yeah. My patron on. Yeah. On Twitter Facebook omitting, but any my continuing post there, and my YouTube, okay, how soundcloud, but I try to put everything for example. It's just empty it put on soundcloud, but I also try to put it in video format on YouTube. So can post your patron Lincoln check. Check your videos and stuff. By the way, is open content. I don't put anything behind firewall just put one or two. Thank you messages for patrons only. But I don't believe in hiding content Georgia. Gotcha, man. I can't thank you enough. Again, you're bold. Brave. Beautiful. And just let me tell you. What be please be safe on your next trip? Take care of yourself and just keep doing the work you're doing it. So again, most people who don't know they're being played. Don't exactly understand how invaluable this information. Is you have? But I'm telling you. I can't thank you enough. And then keep doing it. Keep doing it again today. I don't mean to jinx you. I just you know, it's like I said, we there's I can't I'm not going to massacre the names, but you know, them you've heard them the journalists who have disappeared who've been killed. I mean, it's a it's a very dangerous game that you're in and. All of us who go to Syria. I mean, first and foremost, of course, it's Syrians for the most exposed to danger. But like in going to Aleppo before it was liberated you had to go down a road that was prone to being sniped or shelled saying with going to the state hospital and daughter were Abbas told snipers for just one hundred meters away. So I'd say that the most dangerous parts are probably in my past. So don't worry too much about my safety. Good that that gives me a little bit of comfort. Even thank you again, so much very generous with your time pieces so much love. Stay tuned. Ladies and gentlemen. There will always be more.

Syria Syrian army Syria US Aleppo President Assad Israel army Palestine Gaza al-qaeda Oscar China Damascus Aleppo Latakia Hama Damascus Jeffrey Wilson
Amanpour: David Miliband, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Hoan Ton-That

Amanpour

58:31 min | 1 year ago

Amanpour: David Miliband, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Hoan Ton-That

"Hello everyone and welcome to on four. Here's what's coming up freezing and trapped a humanitarian catastrophe grip Syria as the regime's russian-backed offensive. It live takes an even deadlier turn. I speak to the head of the international rescue committee racing to keep civilians alive then. The American revolution was fought by many people from many backgrounds. Black Patriots. Nba Legend Kareem abdul-jabbar new film on the forgotten. Black Heroes of America's War of independence. And do I own my face anymore? It's your face. Of course you do the facial recognition company that could end privacy as we know it. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. Hundreds of thousands of Syrians of fleeing for their lives right now as United Nations warns the biggest humanitarian catastrophe of the nine year. War is underway. Syria's Assad regime backed by. Russia is accelerating deadly offensive against the last opposition stronghold where also there are millions of civilians the UN's human rights commissioner calls it cruelty beyond belief as children freeze to death in subzero temperatures and families walk for days on clogged roads with no transport correspondent our Damon has been reporting on this unfolding disaster. And of course some of the images in this report are upsetting to watch is barely enough light to see as we head toward. Samir's tent in one of it lip sprawling camps a couple nights ago. Temperatures dropped well below zero and the family didn't have enough to Fisher. What do I fed my baby and he went to sleep semi at tells us still in shock at six thirty seven. Children woke me up screaming. I touched him and he was icy. The doctors told them he froze to death. Her husband walks out before he breaks down. She doesn't have a photograph Hopton. We'll have a live just this image as they said their final goodbyes. She can't forgive herself. She can't understand how life can be so cruel. Few People here Ken. We have made multiple trips into the province none like this roads throughout the province are clogged with the traffic of those on the run. Unending waves many have been displaced multiple times before. But this time it's different. They feel like no matter what they do. They won't be able to outrun the war seat on these children walked for seven hours in the middle of the night to get away from the bombing near their village. But it's not far enough is I'm Gina. The they want to leave from here but they they need to try to figure out transporters in things if they try to go walk just impossible down the road dima and but truly clutched their stuffed animals for the last time for there's a world war toys are not considered essential survival. Is They don't cry or complaint that they're loaded into the truck. There is a sense of finality. Costra phobia compounded by the collective misery of those trapped here with the regime rapidly closing in an emptying out entire areas. Abates tent is perched on a hilltop away from the countless other makeshift camps in the middle of three Marshall Sort Bullshit. Our conversation is broken up by warnings from an APP. He has on his phone about where. The planes are flying and bombing. His elderly mother lies in the corner. She's been that way ever since they found out that his brother died in a regime prison and the regime. It's getting closer to small Switzerland. My it yeah you can hear that. This is his brother who was detained in two thousand twelve when he was part of the protests and then in two thousand fifteen they got notification while you sorta this is the photograph. They got him got in prison. Sorta becomes all I have. Is this photo just this memory? He says haunted by his pain. Even if the regime tried to reconcile it's impossible. He swears you can't trust them. It is such powerful testimony and things will likely get worse in it live as President Assad and his Russian backers have made it clear that their only goal is total victory. Listen to him on national television and we are fully aware that this liberation does not mean the end of war nor the collapse of schemes with the demise of terrorism football nor does it mean that the enemies have surrendered but it certainly means rubbing their noses in the dirt as a prelude. I complete defeat sooner or later we rubbing their noses in the dirt. Well David Miller Band is head of the International Rescue Committee. It is one of several aid organizations on the ground. Desperately trying to save Syrian lives. And he's joining me now from New York David Milliman. Welcome back to the program. Thanks Christiane you know. We've had you many times and each time. You give a very eloquent disclu discuss position about what's happening to the people on the ground and even as we speak there's a UN meeting going on and where does it bring us if the world doesn't act now. This terrible catastrophe is going to get worse. You're right what we're seeing from. Some of the extraordinary journalism by people like Damon is a political emergency as well as a humanitarian emergency. The pictures and the stories are absolutely telling of a dehumanization that really shames everyone but the political gridlock is also very very striking not just the combatants and the new humanity with which hospitals and people fleeing are being bombed and shelled but also the politicians and the governments who are turning away to focus on other matters. I think this really is now a question of fundamental importance for the meaning and purpose of the United Nations and I would like to see the sector general of the UN get on a plane a Goto Lib. Talk to the people that you have been talking to. Your correspondent has to go to Moscow a talk to the Russian backers of the Syrian government. Of course talk to the Turks and then come back to New York and urge and drive and shame the nations of the United Nations to live up to the most founding elements of the UN Charter of seventy five years ago. Well that's pretty strong coming from you directly to the secretary general. Why do you think he doesn't do that? That that is within his remit it. It is within his power even if he can't turn on off switch he can bring the moral case to the world and the world's case by all politics is politics is what's led us to this. Impasse it's important to underline what you'll correspondent said which is that. This is the largest displacement of people since the war began and that's nine years of war six million refugees eight million internally displaced over just this weekend one hundred thirty thousand people driven from their homes with nothing to hold not even the children's Teddy bears that you referred to in the film and the fundamental aspects of the Post. War Order is that civilians in war should be protected. And I call this in the age of impunity because there is no accountability for those who are literally committing war crimes. As we speak David Milovan lists talk about what's happening on the ground. So you've mentioned the one hundred thousand this weekend alone since December some nine hundred thousand. That's nearly a million people trying to get out. We've seen these pictures of what we called clogged roads. There are loads of trucks. But many many more calm get on any transport and can't get out. What is the actual physical reality beyond what we just reported that these men women and children are mostly women and children facing now as they flee well? The physical reality has to differences to what you just said. I will not trying to get out. They can't get out what they're doing is they're moving west and then moving north into a tighter and tighter more densely populated in clave press. Stop against the Turkish border. Turkey already has three point five. Three point seven million refugees from Syria and it saying it will take a no more. The second aspect is different but was evident from the film you showed is how freezing cold it is people. Don't associate the Middle East with minus eleven degrees Centigrade. But that's the kind of weather conditions that have led to the seven deaths report of children freezing to death that had been reported by the United Nations so the clogged roads. Yes but also people fleeing through from abandoned houses that had been shelled Fleeing through fields I am finding that way to the quote unquote finality. Think that was your word of being huddled up against trees. Fifty thousand people under trees others intense with no heating aid trucks going through the border crossing to Turkey at the rate of about a thousand a day but at the UN meeting you've just referred to the coordinator of the UN humanitarian effort referred to a five hundred million dollars deficit. On a need to widen the number of trucks that are getting through to me. Immediate humanitarian need. Well the agenda for the secretary. General is absolutely. It's a ceasefire which is complicated but necessary an absolutely justified. Secondly it's accountability for the crimes. Thirdly it's proper humanitarian help on a scale that is needed given the physical conditions and then fourthly and critically remember the whole argument of the Syrian government is that they're rounding up terrorists but they're not amidst the three and a half million people live province. That may well be twenty to thirty thousand people in various terrorist factions. But they are not the victims of this at the moment they're actually profiting from this quickly. Take the humanitarian urgency. You mentioned you know. They need food. They need a huge amount or the head of the World Food Program. David Beasley has been talking to the Europeans about this. This is what he said is urgently needed for us. To feed a Syrian support. A Syrian in Syria is about fifty cents per day. And that's almost double the normal course because it's a war zone. Logistics cost more in war zones that saying Syrian. That may have lived in the Bascus if we're in Brussels or Berlin. The humanitarian package is fifty to one hundred euros per day. So He's obviously making the case that it's better and cheaper to be able to immediately send them sustenance. Let me also ask you because the second part of what you said is to get a ceasefire and hopefully somewhere down the line. Some kind of accountability but a ceasefire. You heard what we ran from Bouchara. Assad the president who believes he's winning. He said rub their noses in the dirt. What do you? What does that look like? That looks like children freezing. It looks like two hundred and fifty civilians being killed over the last Three months it means innocent people losing lives and livelihoods in the most unspeakable way and so the human toll here is not just some sort of collateral that can be added onto a balance sheet at the end of this war. It defies the very purpose that is alleged to be behind the battering ram that is being applied to the people of live. And it's important for your viewers to remember many of the people now crowded into Italy. Province have moved from other parts of Syria. That's why David Beasley of the world. Food Program referred to someone who was previously in Damascus in Eastern Guitar or previously in Dara. One and a half million people have been shepherded into it. Lib as a result of previous settlements in other parts of the country and this is all about leverage. Is All about pressure at the moment. Turkey is facing the conflicting need on the one hand to defend his soldiers. Six Turkish soldiers were killed Earlier this month. Thirteen Syrians were then killed in a reprisal but on the other hand is trying to figure out how to deal with the pressure of more refugees. Arriving and that's why this is not just a Syrian issue. It's a Middle Eastern issue but frankly also a European issue because Europe struggled to deal with the refugee flow in two thousand fifteen sixteen. We discussed it at the time. And it's going to struggle again if it can't find a way to a ceasefire that holds the line on the civilian slaughter. That's happening in the moment. And do you expect it to? I mean the terrible specter. That's just being raised by the president of Turkey is the Turkey could intervene militarily. And I don't know take on the Russians. What is that going to look like? I mean Turks has that Turkey's already into being military. Turkey has thirteen oversight points in Italy. Province they are armed with one hundred eighty to one hundred soldiers each and it's made very clear both through actions and words that it will find on Russians but it will file on Syrian troops eight to thirteen and troops as I said were killed so the diplomatic action here is Syria. Russia also vital to see Turkey as part of this equation and Iran. Those four countries have taken occupation if you like of the diplomatic effort the UN mediator the U. N. special envoy has been pushed to one side the UN has been pushed to one side. And that's a further reason for the secretary general to reassert the role of the United Nations as the preeminent peacemaking body because as long as the Syria conflict is a matter for Russia for Syria for Turkey and for Iran. But not for anyone else. You're not gonNA get the kind of settlement that can bring any kind of sustained peace to the country. It's important to also remind you to aid. Workers were killed in the south of Syria earlier today. Not shows you that. There isn't a sustainable peace even in areas where the Assad regime has now established control. You mentioned Russia you mentioned the UN the British Ambassador to the UN took on the Russians. And you know we've heard whether it was Susan Rice. So Samantha power as ambassadors under Obama. Whoever it might be they're always trying to shame the Russians who have the ultimate power there over Assad into something and this is now what Karen Pierce said in public at the Security Council. Just take a listen. The reconstruction will be made infinitely harder by the destruction the wanton destruction that the Syrian and Russian governments carrying count now so it will be for Russian taxpayers missed precedent possibly assisted by Chinese taxpayers. But it will be a Russian tax payers to put Syria back together again. Well David Miliband. The humanitarian appeal to Russia. Didn't work for the last nine years. Is this GONNA work? Well obviously the reconstruction of Syria is not the issue at the moment. Issue is stop the fighting. Obviously the Europeans have made absolutely clear. They're not paying a penny until there is an inclusive political settlement. I also want to remind you that there's a second area of Syria is not yet under the Assad government control and that's the northeast of the country. There's a thousand American troops there and that is being a more stable part of the country. The Kurdish part of the country around Derozan around Hasa province as well. And so you have these two parts of Syria. That remain outwith. The control of the government. the remain a sore that has to be addressed in a political way. Not In a military way. Was I want to tell you that there are still at least three hundred thousand people in it lip city? We've been talking about it Lib as a province. It's also a city. It's a built up city. No one has a military plan to go street by street through and so I think that the pressure now has to be for a halt to this senseless bombardment. The both sets bag any hope of reconstructing Syria never mind compromises the safety and security of civilians who've already been twice three times four times displaced. You mentioned that other space there which is quite a significant space occupied by the Syrian Kurds and their American troops in that area. You've said what you think the. Un General should do. What should the United States do? What should the president of the United States do or say to try to effect this and remember very prominently Syrian? Exiles went to the president of more than a year ago and warn them about being in the crosshairs of outside and this would happen and he promised them to take you know. Take it seriously into look into it. What should America be doing when you're making a really important point Christiane? This is about geopolitics as well as humanitarian aid the American troops the lead a humanitarian organisations. I'm not making military recommendations but I can report to you. That American troops have been part of fragile equilibrium in the northeast of Syria of made it the more stable part of the country over the last nine years my plea to the president would be twofold first of all to make sure that humanitarian concerns are fully integrated into every military decision that he takes about the deployment of the thousand. American troops under two thousand American troops. Who are in the north east of the country and secondly that he throws diplomatic priority and diplomatic weight behind the resolution of the situation west of the country because without leverage without priority without consistent pressure without linkage between the Syria issue and other concerns that Russia in America have together without that kind of leverage that will be no respite for the people in the north west of Syria. Nor will there be any kind of sustained stability in the Middle East. David thank you so much for yet again bringing district before this terrible time. It is a terrible forgotten war sometimes. Democracy is a birthright sometimes. It is a gift. It's a fight and I'm asking you to stand and fight with me Michael Bloomberg Green our country back together. This election is a referendum on the meaning of America. It is about what we will tell our children what we did at this time. This election is about whether we recognize that all groups who have been marginalized excluded scapegoated or far worse rise and fall together and that is our best hope standing together rejecting demagogues who tried to seduce us by dividing and uniting behind the only shield that can protect us our common values as American citizens and as God's children. That is what this election is about and that is why. I'm running to repair the damage and to move our nation forward together we will get it Don Mike Bloomberg candidate for president and I approve this message paid for by Mike Bloomberg Twenty. Twenty hiring is challenging. 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The smartest way to hire see. Why ziprecruiter is effective for of all sizes Ziprecruiter for free at our web address ziprecruiter dot com slash CNN pod that's ziprecruiter dot com slash C. N. N. P. O. D. Is Your Pals Impractical jokers. And we made a movie called. Impractical jokers. The movie we came up with that title ourselves is in theaters on February twenty. First I'm not going to tell you how to live your life but go see it. You have to do it make it happen. We love you. We're GONNA turn now to a new documentary. That's shining light on the forgotten. Heroes of the American Revolution Black Patriots is NBA. Legend Kareem abdul-jabbar latest project. The documentary tells the stories of the black revolutionaries who helped establish America. But who often left out of the history books and Kareem abdul-jabbar. Join me now from Irvine California. Welcome to the program. Thank you very much nice to be here. I know that your history buff but I'm not sure how many people knew that. I know you've written books about this subject to keep the black participation in the United States fronton center as much as you can. What made you do this particular project. It's really really fascinating. Well I thought that most people don't understand why America became what it has become and there are many reasons for that and part of the American Revolution was in the hands on Black Americans. Who made it possible for the American Revolution to succeed? And I think that We should all understand that especially black Americans because they have to understand their stake in our country. Their country yes. At what point did you realize I mean? What what was the thing that triggered you? When did you realize that their historic role was written out of the book? So to speak well just when I thought back to the history books that I had to deal with when I was in grade school and high school they never ever dealt with this subject and All American kids learn about the establishment of our country. It's a part of our civic education and a black people are are were never included in that Recitation of history. And we have to change that so we have a few images of some of the black people as you mentioned who profiled in the in the film one of the first one. We have is Christmas Attock now. He was the man who stored to have a black father native American mother. He escaped slavery and was working around Boston. Harbor and is widely regarded as the first person killed in the Boston massacre which essentially triggered the American revolution. Here's a little clip. And then I want to talk about his life and his contribution group of these black and white dockworkers who come together and try to form a public procession to declare their outrage that point because he was a runaway that the prudent thing for me would be to quietly back away and kind of get out of this fight but but that was not his I think character and personality addicts is described as being at the front of this crowd big guy and he's carrying a big club and some of the British records would say that he's brandishing the club that he's menacing they're British soldiers. We know that the British soldiers were harassing them. Back and so it was a back and forth the British had guns and the British use them. So that's some of the historians were telling us and showing US some. You know some of the imagery that has been discovered but give us tell us about the importance of what he did. The significance of of Addicts well I think. The significance For historical perspective has to do with the fact that From the very beginning black Americans had a stake in what was happening during the revolution because they saw that if the colonies we're going to be free maybe they could be free. A number of black people in in our country were free and posed a direct contradiction to The slaves or and other people of Color who had to accept a second class citizenship. So all these questions were in the air and we're going to be resolved by the end of the revolution. Okay so you mentioned some. We're free but others. For instance another one who you who you profile. Pitas Salem. He was born into slavery but he was freed by his own. Ah By is master to serve. And it's believed that Peter Salem shot a major pitcairn who was an officer in the British Army Bunker Hill and we have this image up now this amazing painting which is of the fighting a bunker hill and you believe the pita. Salem is hidden in the corner that what does it tell you just the fact that you can barely see him. By the way you have to really squint. What does it tell you about? Even how these brave black patriots are even remembered in culture in are not not mention history. Books were painting points to the marginalization of blacks and other people of Color When history is written and retold that's been the problem The people who write the history Seem to want to marginalize or eliminate certain segments of society out of their contributions. I could name Many more contributions that have had gone unnoticed store a marginalized because of of this phenomena. The the people who write the history books have some crazy ideas In Texas at one point they tried to refer to slaves as workers. You know people who came there to work This is not true. These were enslaved people who had no choice in this matter You know the the spin that is put on historical events By a school districts and people who write history books is very important when you talk about the effect that These books have on students. And and you say some crazy ideas well you report in the documentary that even at the time. There were crazy ideas. Or maybe even. In retrospect you know there were. There were aspersions cast against blacks for their ability. Could they actually fight where they're smart enough to figure out what to do? I mean these. These are quite shocking. These stories that are told in this in this documentary of course at some point people who own slaves have to justify the fact that they are enslaving people and at some point they say it. It's good for them. Teaches them or any other reasons. Usually it's Financial slavery in naval certain people get rich and have privileges so we have to understand. What the facts are and point them out and you know. Let let the chips fall where they have to another one of the people who you profile in this in this film is a woman. Called fitness wheat lead now. She was born in West Africa. She was then sold into slavery at around eight years old and then transported to America where she was taught by her slave owners to reach began to write poems and twenty. She's the first African American. I enslave person and only third woman to publish a book of poems but significantly. She writes a letter to George Washington. Tell me about that and why that is important. I think Phyllis has led to George Washington really show George Washington that the people that he looked down upon as being second class citizens and not as human as he was really work human and they had human feelings equal to and every bit as valuable as The feelings of Europeans so You know that that was something that must have gotten through George Washington and had him understand that he did have a quandary. The the whole idea of of Getting black slaves to join. The army was really embraced by both the revolutionary side and the British side. Plus if that happened Their armies would have been able to deal with the manpower shortages that were chronic on both sides. So you know there's a method to A lot of the madness that would that we see going on during this time. This is really important. Because many of the black fighters and there's one by the name of James Ostad Lafayette many. Who played a very significant role at the end? You know basically forced the British surrender but many of them believed that they would be free. Many of them thought that if they thought they would win their freedom and it didn't come to pass and yeah the British did promise them freedom and you report that four times as many North American enslaved black people fought for the British Dan for the colonies. Yes that's true. And when the hostilities were over many blacks left the colonies and were able to enjoy freedom outside of the colonies whereas the ones that took the offer from the United States. I'd found that the the promises we're going to be kept and they had to be returned to slavery. The person that you mentioned James Armstead he had been a spy and could not gain his freedom because he did not fight but The comfortable I forget the petition the Virginia legislator to to Free James Armstead and they did and James armistead adapted Lafayette's last name in appreciation of the effort that he made to to gain his freedom is really an extraordinary thing and it's a great reminder to all of us and I wanted to ask you about the current war. Let's talk about the current political electron war. That's going on in the United States Obviously all the candidates are trying to court. The African American vote. We're talking about the Democrats now and of course president trump. You have said the Democrats should adopt. You know sports tactics in order to fight this. This fight well. Well what do you mean exactly? What do you see going on in this race to that the whole idea is about teamwork you know we have to work together into Achieve the goals and we have to have clearly defined goals. So you know any any team that comes together to to achieve. Something has to really have a good plan that everybody agrees on is willing to work hard to implement so I hope that's what happens for our side. And what do you think about the chances of a Joe Biden? Who's WHO's relying on the African American turnout in the next primary probably in the caucus to Bloomberg who's also surging in the polls do do. Do you have any particular thing to say about either of them? No I think we have to find out. Exactly what their positions are in. That isn't really clear yet We we really haven't narrow the choices down enough to where we have a clear and clearly discernible. Choice to make between a clear positions on Whatever side trying to support so we we. We will get to that point just because the process demands that. And you know I think that's the good part about Our electoral process and people have to go out and state what their positions are and how much support that they they actually are going to get so you really are in a wait and see mode. I just very very briefly. Bloomberg has apologized for stop and frisk but it seems to keep haunting him and following him. Do you see that as a as a black as as I was going to say a black mark but you know what I mean as counting against him. Well I think the people who suffered through that other people have coloring New York who were harassed by police. I think we've got to hear from them and see what that's all about their experiences. Really define Mr Bloomberg's presidency As far as That issue is concerned. So we'll find out and get down to the facts you know we have to find out. What the facts are in that takes discussion. So I'm I'm eager to hear what everybody has to say on that Mr Bloomberg the other side and then we'll make our choices. Well we'll hear I in the Wednesday night debate but let me just finish by asking you. You lost the world. Lost a great great teammate. Kobe Bryant of the Lakers last month. It's shock so many people just your your your thoughts now. A month or so later on on the void he needs in the legacy. I suppose. Well I don't think that we've really gotten to the point where we understand what that legacy is going to be because You know we still getting over what happened and still don't really understand it on such a senseless loss of life. And you know that that's really what we're left with a big hole in the in a lot of people's lives it's it's unfortunate but there we go and I just Send my condolences to family and friends and You know along with all the other people that helped him and supported him You know I'm shocked and saddened by it. Well I mean again. You both Lakers. What what was your. Do you have a standout memory? You knew him very well. I mean just some personal recollection that especial. I remember Kobe's daughters really well. I got to know them away from the game and everything just as a parent and grandparent. You know I think that that's really what the What the real tragic aspect of the loss has to do. A young life just gone along with eight other lives in no reason for it exactly. We'll everybody is still grieving. We thank you very much. Kareem abdul-jabbar Java those sorts and so the documentary black patriots. Heroes of the revolution premieres tonight on the history channel. And now we turn to a controversial new op threatening to weaponize profiling like we've never seen before clearview a I is a groundbreaking facial recognition technology scrapes billions of images from social media and all across the Internet it is currently used by the FBI and hundreds of law enforcement agencies in the United States and Canada to identify suspects. One Todd is the founder and CEO of clearview and our hurry us and asked him what the company can do to keep law enforcement and other uses from abusing this powerful new tool. So let's the basics how does automated facial recognition work? This is what we do at clear. Views actually not automated facial recognition okay. We're investigative investigative tool off the fact investigation. So after someone has committed a crime. There was probable cause for example a bank robbery. Then a detective can use out tool take a photo of that face and then perhaps lead into who. That person is beginning of an investigation. Not The end. So let's say you get a picture of a bank robber. How is the software working? How does it find that face in SIA faces what happens is the investigative can find a right screen cap the right frame and then run the APP take a photo and his searches only publicly available information on the Internet and then provides a link so just looks like and feels like Google? But you put in faces instead of words. Okay so how does it know? My face is different than yours when we actually in sort of computer speak. What does it looking for? What are the similarities? What are the differences that make our faces distinct yeah so the older facial recognition systems because facial? Rex Been Around for twenty years. Yeah we're more hard coded they would try and measure the distance between the eyes or eyes and nose and what the next generation of artificial intelligence is allowed is Neural networks where you get a thousand faces of the same person I in different angles or with a beard without a beard with glosses without glasses and the algorithm will learn what features stay the same what features a different so with a lot of training data. You can get accuracy. That's better than the human eye. So training data means more samples. Yes more apples. So the larger the sample set the better. The software gets exactly. And how big is the sample that you're working with now? So we have a database now of over three billion photos. Three billion photos yes correct. We're ready to get three billion photos from there actually all over the Internet so you have news sites. You have mugshots sites. You have so for media sites have all kinds of information that's publicly available on the Internet and we're able to index and search it and use it for to help law enforcement solve crimes. Okay so let's see demo of how this works. I'm going to try to show you some photos. And these are photos that we have permission from a couple of the people We're GONNA probably shield their faces. Now let's try a blurry picture. I don't know if they work or not. But you know a lot of times police officers not going to work with a beautiful perfectly. Infocus shot and one thing to keep in mind. The way the software is used and the protocols that law enforcement have is only only run a search if a crime has happened right in to is not sole source evidence to back it up with other things so it's the beginning of an investigation so never tried this before and it's a little blurry bud. Taking a photo of photo in out searching all three billion photos that might actually because it's blurry find other blurry photos but looks like we do have one match there on instagram. And you can click on it and you can see if that's the same person or not. Yeah so it looks like that's the actual same photo that we found and in fact. That is the same photo that we found exactly so. That's that was posted on instagram. And your software had that photo in its Corpus. Three billion photos correct is that because at that account was public yes so it so it was a public account and that photo was posted publicly. Okay so if the if if law enforcement is investigating actual crime now is not a crime to be at a protest. That's and there are concerns about how technology is used and that's why we have controls in place and that's why we want to be responsible. Facial recognition is just an example. Sure man let's try somebody who says that she keeps herself. Pretty Limited to social media. Let's try that face again. A photo of photo just for demonstration purposes. And that is the same woman so this these three billion images that you've got in the system here pretty much. Every major tech platform has told you to cease and desist. Stop scouring our pages. What does that mean to that? Three billion image set so first of all. These tech companies are only a small portion of the millions and millions of websites available on the Internet so We've received from some of the tech companies and Al Lawyers are handling it appropriately but one thing to note is all the information we are getting is publicly available. It's in the public domain. So we're a search engine just like Google. We're only looking at publicly available pages and then indexing them into our database so how many police departments are using this now. We have over six hundred police departments in the US and Canada using clearview. And when you say using that means that they are running this they the their officers have them in hand. How does it work so? Typically it goes to the investigators doing crimes and they might have a different number of people using it to solve cases. Do you have the equivalent of God view that can see what every department in every investigators searching for so what we've done is we have an audit trail from each department. So say you're the sergeant or you're the supervisor in charge you can see the history of people in your department to make sure that using it for the proper cases so they're not using it to look people up at the protest it each check that they have a case number for research that they've done and things like that. Yeah so who's policing the police? So they have procedures in place about how you meant to use facial recognition so some of these departments of editor for over ten years Procedures in place on how to probably do a search and all the guidelines and there and so on so you know who they feel have pretty good. Procedures in place and police are some of the most monitored people in all of society. So you know they don't WanNa make a mistake and we don't want them to have any of us that we're building tools for the police department and we're adding more things to make it secure for them. How do I know how many bad guys the cops have gotten using this versus for example the number of good people that it might have wrongly identified? Yeah that's great so I think the Val tool. We haven't had anyone wrongfully arrested. Wrongfully detained with facial- facial recognition at all on the flip side of cases. That are being solved. We get emails daily. I got one two days ago. That said that These highway patrol could run a photo of someone. They couldn't identify it. He was picking up three kilos of fence. So we get emails like that. Every single day. from law enforcement. So we really think that the upside is completely outweighing the downside. I understand that there's a Lotta concerns about misuse. All that stuff but so far. They've all been hypothetical and misidentification so our software is so accurate now as you can see in the demo and we made sure it works on all different races and all different genders and it's also not used as evidence in court one of the things that you said Interested me how do you make sure that the software is able to find distinctions in people of Color or by gender So one thing how software does is does not measure race it does not measure gender. All it measures the uniqueness of your face and when you have all this training data that we've used to build the algorithm. We made sure that we had enough of each demographic in their other algorithms might be biased in terms of having the minority is enough training data in the database for them. So that's something we made very sure of and we've done independent testing to verify that that were not biased in have no false positives across all races. You're Vietnamese Australian right. But you've been in the United States for a few years and I've just got to ask. Have you ever been stopped in? Frist not yet right I mean. Do you know what that's why that's so important in the United States. Why people have this feeling that even if there are ninety nine point nine percent the police are out to protect. Us doing a great job. There have been so many encounters with police for certainly for people of color where they feel like. I don't need one more tool where it will be used against me on the streets of New York or some other city right absolutely. So we're again. We're not real time surveillance investigative after the fact and yes stop and Frisk was definitely too aggressive for what the benefits were for. It was for and I think with our tool. We'd be able to even decrease that kind of behavior amongst the police if you're just profiling people based on the color of their skin you know. That's not a fair thing and I think that's why there was such a backlash against stop and Frisk because people of color were just you know totally innocent getting stop and Frisk all the time. Now maybe in a different world with you could be a lot better with accurate facial recognition. But here's the thing at this point. I'm a fourteen year old boy of color walking down the street. A police officer now has your APP also puts my face into the system over time the next time. I have a photo of me taken for any reason. Now here's a track record of one more photo that's been taken by police officer. Is there something suspect of this child? Right I mean that's one of the ways that people fear that these technologies will be used against us though right now just to be clear. This uses investigative tool so people aren't how they're just taking photos in the wild right now. Some crime has happened there's probable cause Cetera and that's your intent. That's the intent of your company today but the technology is what the technology is. If someone else had access to this tool could it be used in a different way? Yeah that's why we have a lot of policies in place but also technology is not done for its own sake. It's always run by people right. We have a company. We have very strong beliefs in how it should be used and so the society and we don't want to have anything that was too conflicting or we don't want to create a world we don't WanNa live in personally. So yes maybe someone else could build something similar And use it. Misuse it for other things. But that's not what we're GONNA do. So how do I? How do I have that assurance you look? You're smart guy. There's lots of tools that have existed on the planet. Like you could say cars or guns right. There depends on who's driving them and how they're used and we have tons of regulations and laws and safety measures in place and even with that we have thousands of people die in car accidents and we have mass shootings on the edge. Cases are very very bad. Yes and that's with lots of guardrails in place in this arena. There's no legislation will listen. We're actually for regulation in a lot of ways. We think it is a powerful tool. I think the public has a right to know how it's being used currently. That's why we here in talking to everybody but I also think that federal guidelines on how it's being used would be probably a very positive thing it would put the public ease and it would law enforcement understand. You know this is how you use it how you don't use it and I think the choice now is not between like no facial recognition and facial recognition is between you know bad facial recognition and responsible facial recognition and. We want to be in the responsible category. You're also trying to take this business global. It's not just police departments here but there have been maps in some of your literature. That says that you're selling it overseas. Is that true right? So we're actually focused on the US and Canada but we've had a ton of interest from all around the world so what is interesting. Is You know as awards more interconnected. A lot of crime is also global. But you know we're very much focused in the US and Canada and it's just the interest from around the world is is just a sign that it's such a human need to be safe but inevitably as you just said the the the rationale for having it overseas is that crime knows no borders and that you WANNA help law enforcement authorities all over catch bad guys but those other countries might have different value systems. Sure I there's some countries that would never sell to that very adverse to the US for example like China and Russia Iran North Korea. So those are the things that are definitely off the table countries that think that being gay is should be illegal crime so like I said you know we want to make sure that we do everything correctly mainly focused on the US and Canada and the interest is being overwhelming to be honest just so much interest that you know taking one day at a time you also said something like you don't want to design a world that you don't WanNa live in. What does that world look like? Just so I know great so I think that you know your private data and your private thoughts you private emails. They should stay private right. I don't think that it's unless you have very very rare cases around national security. Which is what the fives courts for surveillance into. Everyone's private messages. I don't think that's the right thing but I do think that it's fair. Game to help law enforcement so of crimes from publicly available data we have had post Edward snowden revelations we we have plenty of evidence of our own government overstepping the bounds. What if you're software facilitates a world? You didn't WanNa live in. We're not going to make sure that will happen but to be clear like did you. Do you think Mark Zuckerberg thought that his software would be manipulated in an election. Of of course he didn't. But you know I think. Facebook provides award a lot of good. It connects a Lotta people had otherwise been connected tons of people have gotten married through facebook and I think the benefit of it always against the platform. It's it's an right but what I'm saying is is that. Are you planning today? Are you figuring out what are the edge cases and how to insulate it myself against the worst thing that could happen? He seems like if you can design something. There's someone out there very smart trying to figure out. How can I abuse his tool exactly? We always think of the cases. That's where we WANNA go with everything I've when you think about risk mitigation so like you said cars very regulated but you can take a car and drive it into a building very rarely happens. Same with guns were controls over guns and school. Shootings shootings are very unfortunate to have in this country. And we've actually helped with some of these active shooter cases. That's pretty interesting but with this tool. It's what's the worst that can happen with it. You know we always think about that. How to mitigate that and make sure that only the right people using it and that the more sunlight show and on the use of the tool and the more controls for law enforcement so maybe someone doing too many searches of the same person or there more things we can add to our system and that's why we're excited to start the debate or like learn more from people in government about. What is the right thing to do? There's a certain level of obscurity. Almost that feels part of being human. I interact differently with you than I do with my family than I do with my colleague drinking and so I guess it's kind of philosophical question but do I own my face anymore. It's your face of course you do but like what you're talking about. There's more like so who context and who you're hanging out with etc. Sure so context to dissolve. If it's really up to your search right your search if you did my face right now you can do. There's going to be hundreds and thousands of pictures of me probably doing television shows and whatever there might be some of my family. There might be some with whatever it's all. There's no context it's just all one set of images. Yeah exactly and I agree with you like this tool used in the right context. And that's why we've found. Law Enforcement was by far the best and highest purpose and use of facial recognition technology. Now on the flip side like you said if I had this APP and I saw you on the street and I ran your photo and I ask you questions and you know a lot about you. I don't think that's the world I wanna live in either. How do you ensure that whoever takes over your company when you will onto the next thing Liz by these same values so for us? It's about the company culture what we believe in and also the real value in the thing. I get excited about every day is the psychic value from all great case studies. We have and all. Is We help solve. So that's what we're really in for it. You know. We're not really in for for the money and other people have said maybe you should do a consumer. It's a big market. Many venture capitalists said law enforcement so small market. Why don't you do something else? But we really believe in the mission and we really believed the value to society so much higher if we do it in a responsible way do control. The bulk of your company similar to what lots of Tech Company has done. Meaning you have more voting shares like the Google guys or Mark Zuckerberg or anything else. Let's say at some point your investors outvote you and say we really should be looking at the bigger picture here because we can make more money. We've invested this for return. They're not in it for the psychic value. They're in it for the dollars. I think investors have both motivations. You can't say they're always in it for the money. We try and pick investors that have very much aligned with the mission. That's why the ones who wanted us. Consumer we rejected in the ones who really believe in law enforcement law and order we worked with and for now we do control the division and the direction of the company and got to understand businesses adhere to make money. And that's a good but it's more important to provide value to society and I think we're doing that and I really big level who who were the the big investors or how many how many investors do you have or what what. What part of that information do you share? We have? We've done two rounds so far. Investment a seed round in this series. And we don't really talk about our investors. So here's the thing it's like. I WanNa believe the fact that you WanNa pick investors that are mission driven right. But if you don't know who those are. That doesn't look like a lot of transparency. Either they just don't want to be named at this point right and we want to protect the privacy. That's important to us. That sounds the most ironic because okay I know I. It's like I get that. You want to protect their privacy. But everybody's looking at this APP saying well. What about our privacy? What about the three billion images that exist you know Peter Thiel as Navarre Ravikant? We have a whole wide range of investors and thrilled to work with them. We love their support. They're all US based or UK based and that is important to us to make sure it's in the hands of you know American investors aren't on TAP. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you very much appreciate it. Then Harry had a good point. There finally Wednesday night is democratic. Presidential Debate in Las Vegas will mark the first time that a climate journalists will be a moderate up. She's Vanessa Auk a prominent Latino reporter for Telemundo and she'll be joining us on the show tomorrow and also on the program. Journalists McKay coppins whose groundbreaking investigation for the Atlantic reveals. How the trump campaign's digital and disinformation strategy could be a game changer in November. So be chewed. Be sure to tune in full of that and that is it for now you can always catch us online on our podcast and across social media. Thank you for watching and goodbye from London.

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NPR News: 02-28-2020 4AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 02-28-2020 4AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. Us House Speaker. Nancy Pelosi says bipartisan. Congressional leaders are near agreement on emergency funding to deal with Gerona virus. Pelosi also says she spoken with Vice President Mike Pence about her concerns that he's overseeing the administration's response to the disease. We have always had a very candid relationship. And I expressed to him the concern that I had of his being in this position while I look forward to working with him about his at when he was governor of Indiana slashing the Public Health Budget Pelosi says congressional leaders want to work with science-based professionals to find ways to prevent the spread of Corona virus in the US Asian stock markets have fallen even further on virus fears after wall. Street's biggest one day drop in nine years. Tokyo shares are down nearly four percent. Paul stocks in Hong Kong and Shanghai or down around three and a half percent the major. Us indices tumbled over four percent in yesterday's trading and US futures are lower on the eve of the South Carolina primary. A number of the Democratic presidential hopefuls are in the state to make their final pitches. Npr's sauce Mukalla reports that Joe. Biden's campaign is banking on a boost from black voters. Joe Biden needs a win in South Carolina. He has staked his campaign on the theory that none of the other Democratic candidates in the race can win as many black voters is him. Biden has multiple events in the State today as does billionaire entrepreneur. Tom Steyer former south. Bend Indiana me or P Buddha Judge in Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren pull show Biden in the lead here though well. Some of his rivals have been campaigning and other states biden his spent the entire week campaigning exclusively in South Carolina. It's a sign of how much he needs. A Victory Bernie. Sanders was widely seen as the front runner will also be in South Carolina for an afternoon. Rally though he's been darting around on a plane trying to campaign in a number of Super Tuesday states where over a thousand delegates are at stake us. Npr News Sumter South Carolina. Turkish defense leaders have taken positions near the Syrian border to direct around ground. An air assaults against Syrian forces the BBC's Paul Adams reports that uncle. Tom Is retaliating for the Syrian Air. Strikes that killed at least thirty three Turkish troops and it lip. Turkey is furious about yesterday's strike which killed at least thirty three of its troops possibly more in response. It says its forces inside Italy. Province are hitting all known Syrian government targets but no details have yet emerged. Turkey blamed President Assad Syrian army for yesterday's attack on its troops. But it's Russian jets that have been carrying out almost all s strikes. During the recent fighting President Edwin is clearly trying to catch the attention of his Western allies. His government warning last night that it would no longer stop Syrian and other refugees from crossing into Europe the BBC's Paul Adams reporting you're listening to NPR. News plans to open. The Nation's first medically supervised injection site for addicts. Who use illegal opioids? Philadelphia is on. Hold THE NONPROFIT GROUP SAFEHOUSE says it will determine its next move after meeting with and hearing the concerns of local residents who strongly opposed the idea. The delay came a day after a federal judge cleared the way. For the group's plans organizers. Say they believe an injection site would save lives in a city that seemed roughly eleven hundred overdose? Deaths a year federal judges cleared the way for millions of consumers to sue two major drug companies over the high cost of epipens. Dan Margulis of member station. Casey you are has details. The litigation against mile and Pfizer was consolidated in Kansas City. Kansas and twenty seventeen and alleged companies violated racketeering an antitrust laws when they raise the price of epipens by more than five hundred percent epipens auto injector devices containing epinephrine which is used to counter the effect severe allergies and people at risk of going into life threatening and lactic shock. The judge certified the case as a class action under the federal racketeering statute and state antitrust laws. The drug companies could not immediately be reached for comment but lawyers for the plaintiffs. Call the judge's ruling a big win for consumers the case has not yet been set for trial for NPR. I'm Dan Margulis former Baltimore. Mayor Catherine PUGH has received three prison sentence for conspiracy and tax evasion. She sold herself published children's books to nonprofits to promote her political career and campaign. I'm Shay Stevens. Npr News in Washington.

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Exclusive extra: John Kerry and Will.i.am

The Beat with Ari Melber

22:54 min | 2 years ago

Exclusive extra: John Kerry and Will.i.am

"Hey, everyone listening to the podcast. This is Ari and we have a special edition this week with two interviews from the show, a lifelong politician and a lifelong musical activists. I, we have more from my discussion with John Kerry who I once worked for back in two thousand four. We had the interview this week, but one of the things we like to do here for the podcast listeners is show you and help you listen to things that didn't even make air because we edit up the interview. So we go deeper into this, which we haven't aired yet on the podcast on the discussion about not only Donald Trump's foreign policy, but one area where John Kerry told us he does agree with Donald Trump the very controversial Assad policy and bombing Syria. That's one thing we got. And then later on our podcast of this weekend, we have the full interview I did with will. I am from the black eyed peas, but it's also pretty political. We talked gun control immigration and also who he has his eye on for twenty twenty. If you are a big music fan or a big user of the. Internet you may remember will made that big viral hit? Yes, we can for Obama before he was president all of that plus extra stuff from the interviews and of course as well. We have in there what did air on TV as always thanks for listening to be well, we are joined on the beat tonight by a man who defined many of those battles during twenty eight years in the Senate John Kerry until he left that public service to answer a call from President Obama to replace. Of course, Hillary Clinton as secretary of state Kerry won the democratic nomination for president ran against George Bush in two thousand four a campaign I worked on and as people explore the lessons from the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings. I wanna welcome secretary, Kerry and begin by looking at how you approach that issue then sir, because there was as you know, skepticism of Anita hill from senators in both parties, you were especially direct about the gender disparity and sexism in the Senate at the time. Take a look. That is not the accuracy of those accusations. That's an issue here. It is the relationship of ninety eight men in the United States Senate to the majority of the citizens of this nation women and whether or not we are capable of saying that when one woman stands up and suggests this not because she volunteered it, but because the Senate committee came to her and then she felt they weren't listening whether we're now going to listen. That's what it's about. Senator you look at that is the Senate doing any better in your view is Dr Ford, credible. And what does the Senate? Oh her in this process? Well, I can't speak to the issues of credibility are there's no way for me to, you know, I don't have all the facts and I'm not going to venture forth on that with respect to the Senate, doing better the senate's doing better because it has more women in it than it did. I mean, when I came to the United States Senate, I had as many daughters as there were women senators. That's two and one shortly after it was beaten, Paula, Hawkins of Florida. So we've travelled a long way since then, but I think the critical thing here and it's very, very difficult to work through. This is not easy. But people work through these all the time. In our Justice system and in daily life. So people just have to, as I said in those earlier comments, you listen carefully, but most importantly, you've got to be open to trying to understand exactly what happened and respect everybody in the to get there. And then you mentioned key. You mentioned gender? It seems sometimes the gender is a bigger dividing line than even the parties are partisanship, which we know is big in Washington. Take a look at Joe Biden in part of the way he approached miss hill. In those famous hearings we comfortable, you're barrister not concern you. How did you feel about it? Can you tell the committee, what was the most embarrassing. Of all the incidences that you have alleged. You think do you think Joe Biden and you guys serve together? Got that wrong. And what can the senators do better this time. I'm not ducking you, but I literally do not have the full context. I don't know what preceded it. I don't know what followed it, so I can't possibly pass judgment on that are in. I'm not avoiding. I just don't have a recollection of exactly what was going on at that moment in time. I look, let's think bigger here. I don't wanna get into, you know, specific people and instances, obviously. This woman. What I do know of it the little I know of it is that she told her husband and she told a professional counselor some years ago before George Cavanaugh was nominated, and there are other components of the case. I mean, I was a former prosecutor. You've got to look at every circumstance here and I'm confident senators on both sides of the island gonna do that. I understand. There's going to be a hearing, I think it's important for the Senate to listen and to be seen as protecting rights on both sides, all sides and doing a professional job here, and I hope that's what will happen. Your new book probes, public service. I want to put up on the screen something I think you're may enjoy every day is extra and you get into that. Then the photo here we're going to show folks is of you and another famous individual Bob Muller on your high school hockey team. I will say. You both have pretty long faces then the now and good heads of hair for what that's worth. But when you think when you think about the two of you as military veterans as prosecutors and people who've lived very different public lives, what is important about public service that you learn? What do you remember of him and how is that challenge during what is obviously current currently time of strain in the Trump era where he's a terrific public servant, and I had occasion to work with them a couple of times in the course of my career, once on the BCCI Bank issues where he was in the Justice department and the criminal heading up criminal division, I believe and subsequently director of the FBI which he held. I think longer than perhaps anybody else did. It was an extraordinary tenure extended by Republican and democratic president alike. I think he wouldn't be doing what he's doing today. If his credentials weren't impeccable, and I have great confidence as I think most. Americans do as people have gotten to watch how he just quietly steadily proceeded to perform responsibilities. You know, America has to wait and see what happens here. And I reserve judgment on on those aspects of the investigation that pertain to what he's doing, though there is much that's already out in the public, and we all are hearing about. I think that. But I think people can have confidence in the job that Bob Muller will do serve this country with distinction in the military in the marines, and he's done so ever since he's he's a public servant you ask. So what I mean in the book I write about what we learned as young people during that period of time, we were the children of the greatest generation and we were patriots. We are patriots, and I think we came to our service a nine hundred and sixty five sixty six for our particular class with a sense of responsibility to serve our country to give back and my heroes during that period of time where people in public life, people who are trying to make a difference. And we touched in the civil rights, boom, we're a part of the early days, the environment efforts inspired by Rachel Carson, and then taking part in Earth Day and other things. And I try in the book to write about the continuum of that up into the Senate where people work together. A bipartisan fashion. I was privileged to work very closely with John McCain. We came from opposite places in essence, but we came together and worked together very, very hard on the issue of POW MIA. We were able to alternately move forward in a relationship with yet nam and I think we contributed hopefully to people feeling better about themselves here in our own country about the service during that war. And so when you look at the congress today. Based on, as you say, the lessons you've drawn from public service, what do you see as the biggest problems? Is it money and politics? Is it the sort of internet, Twitter, televised problems with everything being sort of only operating at a surface level of conflict, or is it really something deeper? I mean you, you mentioned what you and John McCain did together. I don't know that there are duos like that in the Senate right now. Well, there are wannabes that's for sure. But unfortunately, the caucuses tend to be more polarized and the positions are more polarized. I think. I mean, I really began to see that happen in the early days of the Gingrich transformation in the nine hundred ninety s then to the tea party then to the to the caucus to the freedom caucus and ultimately did, oh, Donald Trump effected what was essentially a hostile takeover of what was there and the Republican party, and he's changed it now. So it's much. More polarized much more divisive, but the problems are many. I mean, one is there is too much money in American politics, and it steals the agenda from, you know, average folks from working folks in the country who don't get the same kind of a break in a tax cut that the billionaires get. The second thing is we have gerrymandering up the gazoo and it stealing our own democracy because with gerrymandering we have, we don't have a real democratic election fully democratic in every state in the country. When you have a general election in every two years or four years because the gerrymandering deprives people of that Troy's by creating safe districts, then you have the multiplicity of media. Let's and diversity of self selection by people in the country as to where they go for their news. So we'd have no longer any arbiter about what are the facts. So you hear somebody talk about alternative facts. There's. No such thing. But today the number of daily lies in American politics. The number of accusations being accused now of some, but but they're all destroyed benches. They're all jump jump in since you mentioned it, we'll we'll put a direct point on it. You had tweeted back to President Trump saying he should be more worried about Manafort meeting with Muller than your meeting with Iran's foreign minister, and then you plug your book which you know you and Trump could go back and forth in that way. Now, of course, he had said John Kerry had quote, illegal meetings with the hostile Ronnie and regime which only undercuts our great work to the detriment, the American people that's not true. There's been no legal finding to that end. Well, they decide go just five minute leave aside. The question of illegal find there is nothing to find that is a lie with president is doing is trying to distract from a reality I had, you know, I think it was three meetings. I can be precise now is three and one was at a peace conference where many people were invited from all over the world. I had nothing to do with that, and I met there and another meeting was that the UN general assembly in New York during the course of the UN general assembly when people meet with everybody. And when the foreign minister of Iran actually gave a formal speech to the council on foreign relation met with United States. Senators met with lots of people, and the final one was in Munich at the security conference where he was invited by not by me, but by other people and ever since Donald Trump has changed the policy at once he pulled out of the deal, I have not met with anybody on that. So this is just to use the term MRs trumped up. This is absolutely fraudulent and it's purposeful to try to create another storm where. People can get confused and not debate the real issues. This administrative doesn't want to debate the religious because they can't. They don't have any facts for why they pulled out of the Paris accords. Well, we have climate change coming at us on a daily basis in its its impacts on our country. They don't have a rationale for why it is. They can explain that China, Russia, France, Germany, Britain are all trying to keep Iran deal alive. I don't have anything to do with that. That's their decision. So this is just an effort to avoid their own incompetence their own inability to do things in Washington in a presidential manner. And I think the American people see through it well, and that's the final big foreign policy question I want to ask you. It's often reference that Donald Trump seems to try to roll back anything he can that Obama did part of that is really rolling back a lot of what you and secretary Clinton did in US diplomacy. As you mentioned on Iran on China on Cuba, north. Korea going, I suppose a different direction TD. And then of course, these trade wars plus Perez and the environment. It's a long list or so I would ask you, what do you think is the most concerning or dangerous approach that he's taking a broad. And is there anything as we talk about bipartisanship? Is there anything you've seen Donald Trump do on the world stage that you can get behind when I did get behind, got behind his his firing missiles to send President Assad a message. And the Russians I supported that though, I would be more comfortable than I said this publicly if there was some diplomacy backing it up rather than just firing one off missile and then firing one later on there needs to be diplomacy to end the war in Syria, and there isn't believing that aside. I think the general challenge of the administration's approaches, they're attacking our friends. They take on Canada and dressed in Trudeau. They take on Mexico. They're hammering away at NATO there. Isolating Europe, they're, they're, they're sending general tremors through the world with respect to the reliability of this administration of the United States, except in a couple of quarters where they've been people have been given a carte blanche to do what they want, but that too is is risky because it doesn't keep the United States actually in control of situations that may drag us into conflict. So I think it's been a disengagement. If you wanna pick one big thing, it's been disengagement. Now I support I support it is effort to reach out to North Korea. I certainly supported the efforts to get China, increase the sanctions. We did too ratcheting up of sanctions. We knew it wasn't enough to move North Korea. We urged and President Obama left a very clear statement, the President Trump biggest issue of your own terms. Security is going to be North Korea and to his credit President Trump raise the sanctions on two different. Occasions until finally that began to bite. But let me tell you something the sanctions against North Korea which has nuclear weapons are less strict than the sanctions were against Iran, which didn't have it and doesn't now. So there's still a journey to travel here, and it's obvious from the glitzy Singapore summit that took place that they didn't work out what denuclearization means. They don't yet have specific means of inspecting specific means of accounting for what the arsenal is and so forth. And that's the real stuff of an agreement. And there's no evidence right now that that's happened. So Kim Jong UN got exactly when he wanted what is father wanted what his grandfather wanted. And other presidents didn't grant immediately because there wasn't sufficient answer the questions I just raised, but they had a meeting and we'll see where it goes. I certainly every American wants the administration. Be successful there. Every administration wants this nuclear issue with with with North Korea to get resolved, and everyone of us will hope for the success of the administration because the United States of America and the world will be safer well, and that's a fitting point depaz on secretary, Kerry the book is every day is extra great to see you again. Appreciate you coming on the beat. My pleasure. Thank you very. Thank you very. I'm pleased to well Hoed will. I am to the beat. Thanks for being here. Pleasure to be here honored. What are you saying about guns and life in American schools today in this new song? As parents, adults, we have to do a better job. Set in a course in the path for our youth because they will be our leaders tomorrow. And why are we the only nation that has kids learning to eventually lead the nation in harm's way? Like why can't we have you know, procedures put in place to where our kids are safe in alerting place. I don't understand how we can separate kids from their parents that are trying to come in the country, but we can't find the logic to separate guns from kids in our country to keep them safe and the way you write the song and the way you shot the video, it makes us get afraid. And also I think empathize with the students on the other end of the gun. Whereas I mentioned in the lead a lot of movies and some old rap tried to get us to think about being the person holding the gut. But why was that for you and important shift? Well, it's that's not just rap music. I just wanna clarify. Movies do a very good job promoting gun holding and gun shooting dirty, but and movies have a far greater reach than hip hop music. And but what you don't see is kids going to school in France and killing students which you don't see is kids in the UK or Spain. So why are we the only country rap music promotes violence? Is it promoting it? Or is it just showing you the reality of the neighborhoods in which to build on your point? These movies and this music is available in France? Exactly. It's available in France, bailable in China. What you don't see kids going to school in China, shooting up kids. The gun control debate in this country is fierce. I remember that when I worked as an aide in the congress, I see it now in the news media and school seemed to be the place where it gets the most fierce because when you see innocent, chill. Children getting gunned down. It is probably the hardest thing to make sense to stomach as a human being. Even though the other stuff also messed up. And yet it's also the place where we see some of the strictest response from those who are defending widespread access to guns. So let me play for you a President Trump on this point. Take a look. The coach had a firearm in his locker. When he ran at this guy coach, very brave, saved a lot of lives, I suspect, but if he had a firearm, we wouldn't have had to run. He would shot and that would have been the end of it. So you see the president, they're saying, oh, if there were more guns in schools that would help. That is the part where I travel around the world, and I'm in the public eye and in other countries and when other media outlets look and asked me that question, that's an embarrassing thing to answer because it's not logical. A horrendous thing happened in New York, and because of that, we all go to the airport and dam there take off all of our clothes, but we cannot protect the kids in school. I don't understand how we could respond to one thing where people died, but we can't respond to the other where people died. Since Louis decks, and then you're also taking on immigration. I wanna play this. So if you can get a sense of it because you have to music videos with the same song. And here's part of the other video which focuses on the migrant child separation policies at the US border. Doc nece chains, heartless Houston to guide you be there regardless situation. Global will lack in a Roble tomb up the river, so I can deliver message masses, no matter your status nothing's ever over. We believe in second chances, many people diet for miss Alliant temple rights police. With the kind the United. Is your hope when you do this people empathize more or that they actually change maybe their mind about US immigration policy. It's the people that are coming in that they're having strict laws around who enters the country and who doesn't to the point where they're separating kids from their parents are not the ones that are shooting up students in schools. So if we can do the most inhumane thing by separating the child from their parents and I know we don't practice at anymore, but we did. We can do that. Why can't we take guns from kids? I don't understand the logic, my mind and my heart, my heart cares and love so much that the truth and the reality that we're living with as a country and the leadership that we have to keep a safe to week at perform an outperform tomorrow, do not seem like the path toward success, right will I am from the black eyed peas. And as we mentioned, the new video is big love that's out tha. Morrogh also check out the first album. You guys have done in about eight years masters of the sun, which is out October twelfth scams, sex, even murder committed for money. I'm Stacy Keach the boys of CNBC's crime series. American subscribe to the American League punt shocking cases, all some people will do anything for money.

United States Senate President Trump president John Kerry United States President Obama Senator Iran China North Korea Bob Muller secretary President Assad Washington France Hillary Clinton Syria congress New York
Scott O'Neil | Secrets of Happiness, Leadership, and Success from the CEO of an NBA Team

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

1:31:16 hr | 2 months ago

Scott O'Neil | Secrets of Happiness, Leadership, and Success from the CEO of an NBA Team

"A good friend of mine randall. Right said you need to publish this like this can actually help. People said you're talking about leading leaders talking about helping build next like what if you can touch somebody like what if you could make an impact. What if what you do actually makes makes a difference and so the process. I see i hired a writer. Show bender whose amazing Because of my age gentler said something really. Funny when i was talking to her. She said you're a book. This is not a book which i thought was really really funny and very humbling. And so she's like i like. Yeah like what's in there but we gotta get what's in there on here. You know it was really funny. So i got real help. Which was great. And then and then the folks at saint martin's on tim bartlett athletes the best editor world Made sense out of the in allowed me in my voice to you know i told you i wanna i wanna make a dent on the world look at night and hopefully the row and this is the unmistakable creative podcast where you get a window into the stories and insights of the most innovative and creative minds who started movements built driving businesses written bestselling books and created insanely interesting for more check out our five hundred episode archive unmistakable. Creative dot com. Doing creative work can be kind of lonely. And that's why we built the unmistakable listener tribe. The tribe is a community for professionals to connect and support each other. Everything is designed to help you grow your business and share what's working and what isn't and that's true whether you're a business owner or an artist you'll get access to feedback live conversations with guests and so much more by joining the tribe you become part of a community of creators who all support each other. And it's completely free. Hopefully you'll see their visit a mystic creative dot com slash tribe to join again that's unmistakable. Creative dot com slash tribe scott. Welcome to the unmistakable. Creative thanks so much for taking the time to join us sri. Thanks for having me. i appreciate all. You're doing to spread the creativity in the world. I'm a listener. I love which you don't. let's it added. Oh it is my absolute pleasure to have you here. I found out about your work and your book by wave. Your publicist and as i was telling you before we hit record the minute i saw the word. Ceo the philadelphia. Seventy sixers. i was. I don't need to read any more of this description. The answer is absolutely yes. Let's do this But before we get into all of that. I want to start by asking what i think is a really relevant question given some of the content in the book and that is what religious or spiritual beliefs were you raised with and how those impacted your life and your career great question so i was born and raised catholic and through life. I look at what's catholic. High school our lady of lords high school in new york and though nova which is augustinian catholic school And generally not a not a christmas day easter catholic. Why we went to church. Most sundays We had a good spiritual base In the house. But but not overly end as i look at my family now. splintered so so very very few of my five of us for four siblings are throws sister and they go sporadically to church in some not at all. We were raised in a house with by two. Phd's a it was a laboratory for sure And whether it was on faith or sports or education or the way we treat each other we always had a pretty simple with three simple rules growing up. Let's put it that way we had No hurting each other. No hurting your mother and no no girls in the bedroom as a as a as a kid now again. It was a different era. So i grew up in the seventies and eighties for not savvy so totally different era. But that was it no curfew. No no no have to do your homework. None of that stuff up a really like I guess we grew up in sort of a hippie type household early in my folks. I was a product of the system. So food stamp kid. When i was really young bummed rice in powdered milk and And then my my folks did very well successfully. So i went from food stamps to country club and then back down again So i i think i learned a ton about Life and people in connection interaction Avalon a hundred stories of my childhood. That would that would be interesting at some longer. Point is it was a grown-up. I absolutely loved it. I had irish data in italian mom. And so you got a lot of energy in a lot of passion But but seeing feast or famine and backed am back to feast in them back. The famine was something that i truly appreciate cherish. I remember reading about that night. I do have questions. But i want to get to those later. How many siblings do you have. I have three brothers and a sister. Okay i was wondering what did being part of such a big family. Teach you about human behavior relationships in resolving conflict in communication. Well we were way so so many lessons. They're my best friends so so we had We had a very very very close all still are They're the they're the ones. I call when things go well. And they're the ones i call when i'm crying my pillow We were definitely like orange into each other so to speak We also my my dad would always say these kind funny. Things are sticking in my head right now but he always. We always competed hard but he didn't like comparisons to say comparison hurts compete compete compete so we competed but he wanted us to compete with ourselves. Not with each other a we. We were very athletic. Grown up on my sister ended up. She was all american lacrosse in high school and college. My other brother played at tends to holy cross one tennis and then the rest of us were just high school. We were almost always captains of all the teams were on typically most of us. I think all of us were student body presidents. so are those guys in in high school and am very active so it was a. It was funny as i as i lean into my children as a dad of three daughters. I think about you know. My parents never asked me to see my report card. I even imagine that you know one of my daughters. I stopped looking for another reason but I never was asked to do homework like they never it was. We were competing. You know it. It was almost like we were there was there was an expectation. But not really in all my devalue education as said both were. Phd's so they own. Actually you know. We appreciate that by moses but there is a family of entrepreneurs so that was different. So you know my my dad inside I guess when i was six started his own company. He's the dean of students at a local college. Mount saint mary college in newburgh and then started his own team building company. And so you know. As young as i can remember i was collating books for my dad on team teamwork and team building leadership which is funny to think about now and then. My mom operated to schools One for kids with special needs and one got matriculated school. I guess it was more like a charter school that you would think of today and And then my mom and dad partnered up my my mom began. The star of the Became a consulting business Xerox adp texaco around the world. So pretty pretty fun business and a great as a you know a as a thirteen year old senior mother up in front of a room back. Then you know committees. you're talking. It's all white males you know. It's a sales managers session. And she is just wowing the room back and forth back and forth making them laugh making them cry teaching lessons in our remember. My mom had made me go see her. I must have been acting up. I don't remember what i did. But i was a tough kid The toughest of the five terms of of their parenting with the deal with but they tried everything back then. It was like they took out sugar. They sent me to my room like they try and take away anything But but i remember watching her and thinking like i wanna do that someday and So i had a wonderful wonderful childhood in whatever way. We just competed and sports are release and it was a way to connect with my dad and my mom and each other and it was pretty special so i wanna i wonder. How old were you when you experienced that transition from food stamps to country club held for your siblings and as a byproduct of that sort of change It and this is something very serious because my dad is also a phd. Happens to be a professor. What what. How did the career advice that each of your siblings got contrast based on where your parents were at in terms of their life circumstances all right so this is a classic of catholic family like we had five kids in six years. So you know. We were effectively the same age growing up. I was the second born but most loved. Least that's the way Story sticking to it. In my. I was on food stamps. I think until age three. My folks started making money when i was about thirteen or fourteen so just hitting high school and junior high school and then lost it all when i was in college so it was the second part of your question how i guess. How did that affect the advice that your parents gave it was so close together. Maybe it's that is. Because i saw what happened when my dad you know. Look my sister. And i are five years apart and my dad was building his career. Lot of money And so my sister. And i have these wildly different experiences growing up like i shared a bedroom with my sister until i was in the ninth grade. Look i didn't even have my own bedroom. And then she got a very different experience. She got to do a lot of things with this much. Yeah love that we. We actually were four of us to bunk beds in a nine by nine bedroom until i was twelve and then i had my own room so it was like literally. It was like almost overnight. We had a. We went from that to a tennis court in a pool in her backyard. That's how stark it was like. It was bizarre and yeah my younger brother and sister definitely had it had a better in those years but then they got hit harder at the end because they were still in the house so they got they got some internal like i can't. I've got one daughter about to get ready taken. Sat's act's in trying to figure out where she's going to school. I never had a conversation with my parents but we're also planning and as far as career advice. I mean i remember. I was at the i was. After i graduated from villanova. i was bouncing at a bar called the princeton in avalon. New jersey and my mom like set up an interview for me that i was not prepared to go on with. Adp and i. It was a total disaster story. I i my car broke down the way from the shore back at. Are my friends close. Because i left my clothes in the car that broke down. And i end up in a in. His suzuki samurai which didn't have doors or a roof in. So i walked into this interview with close for someone the size of andre the giant and hair looking like don king and this guy is saying like you're not ready for this interview you you don't. You're not you're not prepared. Anyone that would work here would have been at nordstrom and gotten i said. Hey it's nine o'clock three in the morning hitchhiking back here. This is a great story. And the guy's name was paul bugling. I stayed in touch with them for philippe passed away about five years ago. And you know. I had a disastrous interview. My first interview and that was my mom's biggest client phone call land so i ducked few days as i was back at the shore and i didn't go particularly well. My mom was just i mean. She's the most wonderful compassionate Lovely supportive mom. I'd never heard her that nasty ever and a- integrate western oughta get right so i mean get prepared like i have a meetings without being prepared now. I don't anybody walks in like that with me. I would throw them out as well. You know but But man what a an kind of shook me back into real life like i went back to the shore and it just wasn't the same most playing hoop twice a day. I was working on a bar of going out all the time and literally two weeks later i just moved back my parents house and i said like hey. It's time to time to get on with this. And getting and my dad is the only career of aragon for my dad which was He said i walk downstairs. They had our office downstairs. Not walk downstairs. I said okay. What's up he said He said what's your plan sign. I said i don't know. What do you think i should do. He said i want to go stairs. I want you to write down twenty places. You wanna work. So i wanna stairs came back in earlier. I said. okay here are. He's like okay. Now you've got to get somebody at each of those places and this is before the internet like no. I'm like what how you know enough people start making phone calls and that. That was the best advice. I got from my dad and the the second was when i got hired at madison square garden. I was president assad's regarding he grew up in bayside queens. You know. and he and his he grew up. There were six of them six ceilings. They all stay in the same bed every night. Okay so he didn't come from a lot of means and so i grew up upstate new york and so working at madison square garden the knicks. I'm the rangers was like dream. Come true and i call them and say hey dad and he said son even. You can't fall this floor. So i thought that was good too. So so now he. He was like he loved. Coached me from when i was could walk in basketball. was always a huge supporter. But i didn't get like counseling today and it wasn't access to information and so so we kind of stumbled through it look. Staying healthy isn't easy watching your diet hitting the gym avoiding stress. But a good night's rest helps boost your overall health and wellness and it couldn't be easier. The new sleep number three sixty smart bet is the only that effortlessly adjusts in response to both of you the result you wake up ready for anything. Proven quality sleep is life changing sleep and now the new queen's sleep number three sixty p five smart bet is only seventeen ninety nine save six hundred dollars only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com sound plays a much bigger role in our lives than most of us even are aware of an e pas podcast powered by audio tell stories behind the sounds we hear everyday sounds it inform entertain educate get influence our behavior and save our lives randi zuckerberg under desks for audio shapes our experience. And how pioneers are creating the sound of the future you all those sound devices when you're using apps or receiving text messages or anything else online. Well it turns out. Somebody actually has a job. Doing that. Ready talks the experts behind. These sounds to find out about the work that goes into designing what she calls. A sonic logos as podcast. I think a lot about how sound impact says whether we're hearing it on a podcast or from a notification on phone or from some apple using and if you want to learn more about the impact that sound has on our lives listening. Subscribe to e passes powered by audio on a cast. I tuned spotify or wherever. You get your podcasts. It's funny because indian parents. Have the sort of doctor. Lawyer engineer jokingly say the indian parent motivational speeches. You can be any kind of dr laura engineer. You want to be the the thing that i wonder about is. The ceo of an nba team is not something that is. You know you're going to find in a high school. Guidance counselor's recommendations of okay. This is what you need to do to get the job it's not a linear trajectory. So i'm curious like most of the people that i've interviewed. Who have interesting chris. What what was the path the getting there. I mean you sounds like there's all there to have been all this stuff in between. Oh for sure. And a lot. A lot of bumps along the way i i i will say thank three of my brothers are running companies right now so we were definitely trained to be running companies in some some way. I don't think it was by design. But that's how we grew up thinking that we were going to do whatever we wanted. You imagine waking up every day in your dad telling you telling you you are incredible. You can do anything you put your mind to. There is no ceiling in what you can accomplish. Only you will decide limits of what you can. can you imagine. That's how i grew up. Wow every single day. And so. I've believed it. I'm like yes i can. Maybe it my my mom. She said she'd be an astronaut. Has like of course you know But that's how they were. We were taught to dream big Although my my folks were relatively parochial and And so the journey they journey was fascinating. I got hired as a marketing assistant. I make fifty thousand dollars a year living with seven guys in a three bedroom apartment. And i couldn't even afford lunch. You know i've lived in hoboken new jersey and no vacation no benefits no overtime and i spent my days fetching. Coffee picking up dry cleaning in doing crap work in spent my nights picking up projects from the other departments and being fascinated by the business. I love god. Loves like if you if you look for everybody needs a kind of a find some stillness in their life and for me. If bounce a basketball in the gym it could be five year. Old girls are nba players. It's my it's my peace at his zan piece When the business though. That's not what i love about it. What i love about it. Is you have this incredible platform. And i recognized it literally on my first day. You had this platform that brings people together and unifies. And if you've asked board today boy what a what. A great healing tool terms of of a divided nation on so many fronts. This is the one area of life that brings people together and has them like act like children. We screen we route whichever game last night. Losing my mind upstanding doubting because it's your part of that family part of that community but anyway going back to my my story. I was working for this legendary guy. Tiny jon spoelstra. Husan coaches the miami. Heat eric yup. I was gonna ask you. I was wondering about that mr About the same age. So i knew him when he was playing in a college basketball Wonderful wonderful guy Extraordinary coach But his dad was kind of the guy in sports marketing world and and the nets are were be brand at best maybe a siebrand and he decided to hire fifty some odd twenty two year olds and figure it out and i got promoted from the system to a sales job because i was in on a saturday fix the copier and he think about. Yes and he's like what's your name again kit. You know what do you do here kit. Can you come in my office kit when i went in there. You said what do you wanna do. A someone -gratulations you just promoted now. Twenty two years old. He's like take that officer there and then he he would take five us out Once a week for dinner drinks and you think about the president of the team and again i was thinking about lessons in how they impacted influence. Who you are and how you know when i spend time with my twenty zero reps now i want them to know who i am. Because i knew john wasn't he knew who i was and support But that was the first big big promotion if you will. I mean it's so you think back on it. And i didn't know what the heck i was doing. I mean they had these old. Sic bucks which effectively big red thick books probably six inches and they listed every company in the country. We're just call one by one. Mount exactly the marketing as you know these days but anyway and then I'd had an internship advantage or national which was a sports marketing firm in college in and the guy who was my boss there Suggested i call the the jeffey would just off the philadelphia eagles for then record price of one hundred eighty eight million dollars while what is he doing. And it's now worth multiple billions. And i called him out fifty times and doing yeah. I wasn't a good salesman. But i could get anybody on the foreign competition and And i do his assistance. You i was i call every call you every single day for the rest of your life until you let me into. See him until about the call. She put me onto joe. Banner who's now dear friend when up being the president of the eagles for very long times now since retired who hardly so. Yeah so. I was drector shells there. Twenty four years old director knee nfl. I couldn't direct myself to the bathroom and back. I was like learning how to write a budget and write a business plan. Had this incredible new boss commend length. Morowski us now in the ceo. The cleveland cavaliers. For last fifteen years. or so. who taught me You know how to how to in executive In there for harvard business school which was insane and wonderful experience There aren't too many kids from our lady. Lords high school going to harvard business. School is put it that way and and that was special. I mean talk about learning how to dream big. I was around people who were smarter more driven as experience and i loved every bit of it. I've been a lifelong learner forever and loved learning and that place. I couldn't get enough of people with big dreams big ideas and and down and wonderful and an an an attitude where you walked in. And he said hey. We're going to help each other every day every day somebody from the administration or professor would say to us. Hey was some from this class. 'cause you answer it you help them. That's what we do here and it became like this is a family not again going back to that. You know compete. Don't compare like the ikea to work twenty four hours a day. I wouldn't have been. I have done as well as half the kids there. But that's was a barrel about a. Let's figure out how to learn together. Let's go take on the world together. What what are what a great lesson for companies for teams for colleges for any anybody. And i just love that. That retali- there i came back and went back to. The eagles was probably my first moustache. Plenty mistakes but that was probably my first mistake going back there because they thought i was the same kid who left. I thought i should have been the see you. And they were more than i. I i known everything and you'll but that's what hbo is. It's the study of how to make you. Oh you just not yet. You know and then i left. It was the dot com. Boom aris are left to start a startup collapse. Tv with my dear friend. Seth berger who had just If founded and one the sneaker company basketball you may know him one and and iran that into the ground so raised fifteen million dollars some. Vc's some strategic tes. And i found myself outta luck outta working out of money. And seth we were competing the number two site behind. Nba dot com so we had pretty regular interactions with david stern. The former commissioner adam. Silver the commissioner and And so steph call and said you need to see this guy and they hired me that week and that kinda catapulted my career. I was a group called thi marketing and business operations and it was david. Stern's vision to create the mckenzie of sports so we were a consulting outfit that worked for the nba on behalf of the teams and building. Best practices so. I got a chance to work across three leaks. Nba wnba in analogy league. And help everybody from the receptionist to the president operate more efficient effective business. And that is that was so much fun. And eventually i i grew up there in the I ended up running the group and then they gave me a couple of other. You know the crm group an nba canada and then the g. league inside. I started if it was if it was a problem in struggling on the handed it to me. I love fixing things. I love. Turnarounds create culture. I say kind of a bubble cultural culture and then act. I hit that age. I was thirty seven thirty eight. And i went to david stern. The who's since passed away unfortunately and said hey. I'm ready to run something. And he said what are you looking for in. I said big turnaround big city a big challenge. But i want to run it. And he said what the knicks and so three weeks later i was named president madison square garden sports running the knicks and rangers liberty boxing college basketball. Tennis and that was that was an incredible. We spun the company out from from cable vision and created separately traded public company. And then put a billion to into rebuilding it The great transformation of massacre regard and then went out and paid for. Did these incredible deals. And the kind of with the who's who of new york city which is in the center of the universe when it comes to business and commerce so that was that was pretty wild and went through to the court which was fun. knicks arrangers. Both really struggling. When i got there in a both consistent playoff teams so so pretty good. was fired from their analysis. A fascinating experience as well. I'm reading about yourself in the paper. I never had any notoriety if you will not you know and that was the first time i i was like winston saying like. I hope my kids don't read this. I remember that. In the book. I i do want to ask you about that more that it was a fascinating time again. I learned a ton. And then and i met josh harrison. David blitzer you know. They had a really struggling franchise in a big market that was acting like a small market and they want to change the face of sports. Entertainment grow global company. I was all game. I wanted to be around people. I love and respect in love and respect them on the would people incredible dealmakers in and we've grown the business you know. We've grown at five times the size in the last seven years and then some so so that in on the court on the ice to really good stories as well we've had on along the way so it's been a journey to get from from there to here I've learned a ton of lessons along the way. But more importantly i just i don't know i feel like i have friends in every corner of the world in more than anything else that's what i cherish while so many questions. Come from this and we'll start getting into the book one thing that. I wonder you had parents who instilled this very sort of you know clear messages that you could be do or have anything you wanted and i had a mentor. Who worked with me for a really long time and one thing that he always talked about instill talks about to this day. All have to send you that conversation. Because it's one of our best interviews ever. He talked about the difference between probability and possibility and used as absurd examples which cited before so for example as scrawny indian person. The probability that i'm going to go head to head with lebron james even a pickup game is pretty much zero. And i'm pretty sure. My parents never told me something like you're going to be in the nba. Because of that very thing. So i i wonder how you find that balance between like where do you draw. The line between you know. Delusional optimism and rational optimism as i. Guess what i'm saying. Yeah great question. let me think about it. I i would say that. I don't i don't look i got i have physical limitations too. I wanted to play in the nba. And i went to villanova and turn out for the team in doug. West was squaring off in one of the tryouts. And i was like wow. This guy's six six to twenty is faster stronger. Smarter better shooter. Better handle better. Defensively is not going to for me was agreeable but nonetheless. I'm so physically for sure in business. I'm not so sure. That's the case. I'm i'm known from if you if you had my executives With a bright light in their face every one of them would say that. I set unrealistically high expectations And almost all of them would also tell you that we always hit them or exceed them. So i had this expression like why not us like why not you. Why not me. why not like what. What is making the greats of the greets so great like what what is it is it the unwavering belief in who you are and what you can accomplish is it the willingness to fail and be okay in trying to innovate is it. Like a relentless pursuit of perfection is like a unreasonably hard work ethic. Is it and understand your priorities. I guess it's some combination of all that stuff but but it nowhere there. It's like the smartest people don't answer. You're not really saddled by your iq right just you just work hard. That doesn't work You know so. But i do have this sense that that if you if you have the the will you're gonna find a way on. The challenge is a lot of us. Grow up environment where we don't know what's possible or was big enough. I think that's the that's the crime. So i guess i would to to answer question. I would air on the unreasonable. Whatever your expression was not like. I think that you should. I want people to stretch and grow and i want them to take chances and i want them to fail and faw and get up. Try again I want them to be leaders. And and that's what. I'm trying to develop here. I my whole life. i've tried to. I want to consider myself a leader. Leaders everybody needs something to get them out of bed in the morning. Not got two things one is like. I hope to develop the next generation of leaders in this business. I wanted to leave the world better than i found it. So those are two loaded. Things that any cynic in the world would be like. Of course you know blah blah blah. I'm like yeah keeping cynical. I'm gonna keep working In and i think that. I don't know i wouldn't want to put a ceiling on anybody especially kids like i. Yeah i just. I have this this my older daughter. Who's just wonderful wonderful. Incredibly gifted soul with people did awful school now told you like my parents never looked in my report card. I made a joke. That i buy one. My was doing so badly your freshman year and she can't be said you're putting so much pressure on me. I don't care how you doing school. The only thing. I could give a crap about is how hard you work that. That's the only thing that matters to me. And i think view in our education system for people like alexa. My daughter's name is like she is not cut out to sit in a math class. K never going to have And what happened to her. In by the way she's she won national art awards. And i'm like okay you know. Let's let's let's feed the beast a little bit. I know you need a foundation in math but we really need to be taken calculus junior year really so now. She goes off to college and she thinks she's not smart. And like now that that's the prob because you can find smart in so many different ways and And so i. I don't know i i wouldn't i guess. I err on the side of i want people to believe and dream and then be be cognizant enough to understand the kind of work that it takes be successful. I have yet to meet a person in the world who who's successful who hasn't worked or tail off And and so. That's what i want. That's what i want to see that from kids. I want them to be hardworking. That's a core value of what we are always tell you weren't born. Any gifts can't sing. Can't dance game right that good looking. You know what i said. But i do want them to have that at for work and i want them to believe they can. They can take on the world and by the way that same daughter. She's got three last and read me her. Dean's letter word for word. I thought it was a cutest thing. like she hadn't you could take all her. Gpa's from our entire high school and they went ended up three. And here's is like stowe proud on like good for you found your zone. You're in now at a point where she's taking classes in their major that she's passionate about and she's into it and i like the for you kit. Am i think. I want more of those moments for everybody. I want people to be confident. Walked through the walk through life confidently and i think that's some of the secret sauce. That's really really hard to teach harder to find while. I think that it makes a perfect segue to talking specifically about the book. What the of all the things. You could do a ceo of an nba team. Sure you're pretty busy guy like why. Write a book like what the what motivated you to want to do this. Yeah great question again. You're obviously pretty good this so my my best friend in the world. We'll car took his own life couple years ago and with shotgun and he was suffering from depression and he's got five amazing kids in incredible wife successful guy and could not get through it like he could not beat the beast and he fought. He fought for fifteen years of hard breasts in and out of facilities in and out of medication. All that kind of stuff and spoke funeral and aggrieved. I didn't know what i i've never grieved before i didn't know ref- was and i couldn't focus. I was a meeting. Somebody would say something completely unrelated. I would just get out walkout. Start crying and so i was struggling in started to write as my own way to heal and started to talk to friends of mine and ask them. And you have this notion that everything is okay everywhere else. You see a a picture on instagram. Or you see this holiday card it comes to your house like wow that family avoid. They have at all or wow. That's that's amazing that. Ceo boy how smooth in easy was that ride. He must be so lucky. And you look at life. It's just not the way life works. Life is messy. And when i found when i was talking to my friends was they had stories that were as messier more messy than mine and gave me peace and comfort in a strange strange wick. So i started to write. And i had my friends right A good friend of mine randall. Right said you need to publish like this can actually help people. You're talking about leading leaders. You're talking about helping build next-generation he's like what if you can touch somebody but what if you could make an impact if you you do actually makes it makes a difference and so so i just went through the process i see. I hired a writer. Michelle bender whose amazing Because of my age general said something really funny moment was talking to her. She said you're a book. This is not a book which i thought was really really funny very humbling. And so she's like. I like you like what's in there. But we gotta get. What's in there on here so it was really funny sites. I got i got real help. Which was great. And then and then. The folks at saint martin's on tim barley The best in the world Made sense out of up in allowed me in my voice to you know again. I told you i wanna i wanna make a dent on the world and hopefully to starts well. Let's get into this. i think to be. It's funny because my absolute favorite parts of the book were the ones where you wrote about your daughter. And i want to start at the very beginning of this because this is raised a question for me because you start out with this Story of being with your daughter at a camp and you say these three things to her that all of them really struck me. Said friends are terrific. But they come and go in your life boyfriends are fleeting all in connections are just that but our family of five is forever love more lean and lean on and cherish our bonds focus on how you can contribute as well as draw strength from connections And then the other thing you tell her is no matter what it is. How tough how deep you in that valley know that it will always be okay. You always be okay. We'll get better. Sun will come the next day. You have to know that it will always be okay and then third. You said you can count on me. You can call me. You can text me. Facetime me and i'll be there. I'm here for you. I hope to be a sense of comfort. A reality check a loving shoulder support system in the person who you can call when you need to laugh or cry. I will listen. I will not judge on only love. You're never alone. I love you forever. And a day. And i think the reason that i actually highlighted that and it's the first question i chose. Jesse what the book is. Because i have a question that nobody's been able to answer for me but given this relationship with your daughter. Maybe you can. I've always wondered what it is because my sister and my dad are incredibly tight like she calls him every day. I hit a roadblock with him in about fifteen minutes later that i gotta go and but for them. It's this bond where you i don't know if you've ever seen the movie meet joe black but the older sister describe the younger sister as you know when she walks into room your eyes light up the whole the entire mood of the room changes on that my dad and my sister in a nutshell and just based on the way that you wrote about your daughter i am wondering what is it that leads to that kind of a bond between fathers and daughters like why is that so powerful. Love that question and i don't. I'm not going to be able to answer the question. I can tell you though that there is such a special bond between fathers daughters and I have a very very different relationship with each of my daughters in each of them are very very special in terms of relationships. But my my simple lesson is i. Try to meet them where they are. I'm not think dads have the ability to do that. I'm in a different way. The moms do moms oftentimes played the disciplinary role. The oftentimes they play the operational role in the house. Dad's at least traditionally have been free. You know we we're. We're free to take the good stuff if you will to to cuddle up. When they're crying announced make cry to to be to be a support system Somewhere to listen to them But i i'd man that relationship is just it says juror in special as you can possibly get in. I remember my wife's wanna spend time with your kids. You wanna play basketball. Spend time all they want to do is spend time with you and i. I work hundred nights a year. I'm out early out of the pandemic. The best blessing for me ever. I'm home mon Didn't even with family. Dinner was twenty five years. And now i'm home. All the time is fantastic. So but i'm trying to get one on one time with them whether that's driving into basketball practice or sitting up in watching a one hundred which i am with my fourteen year old daughter. Some dark show on netflix. Which is fantastic. But i can't do in watching over fourteen year old daughter and or just chatting on the phone. My oldest is interning with the utah jazz right now just so cool so we can actually talk about business so i i'm just finding them. I tried to meet them where they are and i love them no matter what and they know that i love them but boy oh boy. That's such a good question. I have no idea what the answer is. But what a gift that exists. Yeah it will like. I said i think those were the things that having a younger sister who has spawned my dad. Those are the ones that that struck the most. In fact you mentioned you're not being home in we wanna ask you about this and i think this is my favorite quote from the entire book. You said of the iconic sports franchises nba nhl e sports et cetera. Under my supervision. There's no team. I take more seriously than the rocky. Crushers lisa's basketball team. I even skip out on. Nba all star weekend in chicago a day early. So good coach. The team like i mean you're the ceo of an nba team and that yet. Your daughter's seventh grade basketball team is a bigger priority. Which i appreciate that so much like it. Just that really touched me. That was my favorite line in the entire book. What's informed your philosophy of choosing to prioritize daughter's seventh grade basketball team over the nba work ceo of the damn team. Yeah no such a good question. i do. I coached my daughter's now for fifteen years until high school member. They're free to do their thing either. Playoff light but until then they have a have. A data will coach damage. So i'll i'll bounce out of the office. I'll go late back to gains anything. I can to make practice games with them and and we're never very good. I you know it's it's i get your friends. I wanna know your friends and so this is a way like. Can you imagine having like as a dad as your girls get older. You just don't have time like we wake up this chaos. In the morning. I go to work. They go to school. They have after school sports. Some activity i get home. We rush through dinner. If i'm even home until midnight and they have homework so like how much time do you have like an hour a day to get two hours a day. You get three hours a week of real time. And this kind of forces time. And i i always say like i'll know i know my daughter's if i know they're friends and so this was a way to get them together in and in quality time with them and boy i think sports are the best teacher in particular for girls. Boys have had the competitive advantage for the last hundred years on sports Catching up now. But what you learn to lead into follow into win and to lose the sacrifice for others and to be a good teammate. And you understand. What a bad teammate is. Because you see it you see people on any see their parents and how they interact awkwardly with the referees or the coaches in as a kid. You're taking all this in and it's formulating who. You're going to be as a mom in who you're going to be as an executive as who you're gonna be as a leader and all the stuff and i get to spend time with them every week being part and helping frimley those little things and yes we talk about. What your favorite ice cream is. And what your favorite place to go to vacation. As as much as we talk about switching from his own to amanda man. I will say like i always say the first practice we sit. Sit on the court circle and we talk and we get to know each other. I will tell you like all my my view of success always is how many of the young ladies come back and play the following year and they almost always come back and play and because i want them to love each other. I want them to fall in love with basketball. I want them to appreciate what competition means in. Get crab if you can drain eighteen foot jumper with somebody in your face. I actually don't care. But i do wanna see you give your all every single possession especially on defense. Everybody can give effort and i love that. I love the lessons. The lessons are so applicable to life in family relationships. And and how i go you know. I i will say like I had so many experiences like that. I remember coming home. Look you need people in your life. I'm sure you have someone in your life that tells you the truth my kids. My daughter's will tell me the truth. Some houses it's not great. My wife always tells me choose. Our member out was in the book that was coming on one day. We'd lost again at in new york. All the teams rebuilding. I was all grouchy in difficult. My wife said it's like this. You really re talking about is you're gonna be on. A loss by twenty points is like okay. So how many games. She'll lose a sharon's like hundred. Okay so one every three days. You're gonna you're gonna come here come home and be in a bad mood. This doesn't work for me now. it's not gonna work the girls. I was like all right. So i was like so. She's like yeah. Like in walked away and i was like I can figure this out. And so i'll tell the story because sure have to figure it out like i have to decompress in maryland systems to come in the house. Be fresh. be clean when you walk in at that gym and your coach gals. I better be fresh. I better be present. I better be where my feet are. One hundred percent have to be there and and they know it and i am. There's there's a lake and have to meet them where they are just like your kids are member like this practice. Had this one gal gallo girl and she was on doing tiktok dance. And i was like yo. Hey we're trying to learn a in basketball scored two weeks. Now she's doing to is like okay. You want to dance so we did tiktok dance together. Everyone made a video all over the world wide web for everyone to stay and because i'm meeting where they are i'm with them. You know and and i am the coach to coach them about boys or school or their mom or their dad. Or whatever you know. i'm there in and we all need people in our lives. That are outside of our direct line. Help us and and that's for the gift gift beyond measure so. This is another question i had you share the experience. You both men in the book about going from being on food stamps to being extremely well off to being oregon. Now i assume the of yovany. Nba team is fairly well compensated. Which which makes me wonder having had that experience In your own life. How do you make sure your daughters don't overlook the fact that they're you know growing up in an relatively privileged circumstances. Yeah high compared to most people. Because i'm guessing many of the players on your team's probably came from far worse backgrounds than your daughters do and so how do you instill that sense of humility in them to make them understand that. Hey this is not normal yes no. It's definitely not normal. And i remind them that. And i'm very fortunate my wife i remember. I don't sports step function increases in pay like you. Don't make a lot of money in all sudden you get a big step function. You're like wow so good living and then steph functions up. And i remember i was at the nba. And i was making a good living by anybody's standards. And my boss had left to go. Run the hawks in the thrashers in atlanta and have been given indication by the emission that i was going to be his replacement and mass cinema wife coming to get promotion. The raised like that's awesome as like. Yeah that was it. That went to work in. I'm sitting with david sternum silver He was a really tough guy very abrupt nasty in. I threatened and all that stuff so he was promoting me by yelling at me at the same time. It was kind kinda awesome. And he's in he says you know what you're gonna make. I was like Knows you have any other questions. I was like yeah. I want to hire people. And then he says Continuing to to give me a tough time and he said well what are what are you asking for house like whatever whatever you think is fair walked out and so he called me later afternoon told me what i'd be making which is about double what else making the time before which was still for me at the time like more than i ever thought making. My life is so jam in is cool. Job living dream great family. I'm happily married. Life's good and then. I i get this promotion periods in our home to my wife and i said lisa I gotta raise the making and she says she wants me dead in the is. He's like your magin all the people we can help thought definitely married right one and it's it's to me like the most powerful we intense momment where you understand that my kids are going to be fine now. They have a really grounded house like we get up on saturday and we do chores. We go serve people who need to be served They understand what their obligation as. They understand that this is not. There's and i tell them that all the time you know this is this is not. You haven't earned anything you know And so i think the kids are are grounded. And i know that they understand that. They're blasts they also understand what the world looks like. I've had a daughter. Serve in an orphanage in zambia And sleep on a dirt floor. In a tent. Little barbie doll out in the middle of of the bush leaping attempts. I've had a dog work in a syrian refugee camp in athens which she described as and i quote that extremely dangerous but not as bad as the subway to my hostile by way of not going down as daddy year. I have a daughter this year. We're going together to zambia to build a school starting up nambia to build school and And so for us. I think our girls kind of get it I don't want to come off as like on the perfect data or everything's great. These perfect i struggle. Okay my girls struggle. My wife's we struggle like we are. We are the classic american family. You know we do the best we can with what we have We love each other a lot. We understand the power of family. We understand the blessings. We how we tried to give more than we take and we talk about this stuff. Allies a family and i feel like lisa's the big anchor on that one look. Staying healthy isn't easy watching your diet hitting the gym avoiding stress. Put a good night's rest helps boost your overall health and wellness and it couldn't be easier. The new sleep number three sixty four bet is the only met. That effortlessly adjusts response to both the result. You wake up ready for anything. Proven quality sleep is life changing sleep and now the new queen sleep number three sixty five. Smart bet is only seventeen ninety nine save six hundred dollars. Only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com. Have you ever downloaded a computer and drove yourself insane. Trying to find it. It's a bit like tearing your whole house apart to find your keys. 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That's charlie spelled c. H. a. r. l. i. dot ai slash podcast this episode of the unmistakable creative is supported by remote works podcast that tells extraordinary stories of teams. That made the shift of flexible. Working if there's anything that last your tatas it's at the way we work has changed forever. And in each episode of remote works host. Bowling green tells an inciteful story about how people in companies are adapting talks about the very problems that all of us are dealing with last season in preventing burnout. People learn about the challenges and rewards of working remotely during the pandemic. Now i know about you. But i have definitely felt that their days when i am burned out and sometimes i don't even know when i'm done working because it's all i do. A recent study found that five percent of workers have experienced burnout and forty percents had their burnout was a direct result of the pandemic. But what if we don't know the signs of impending burnout. You'll hear firsthand from someone who has been through burnout as well as get expert advice on how to recognize it and what you can do to prevent it from happening in this season. Remote works explores several other topics related to the new world of work for those of you. Who are baseball fans that are missing those days of eating overpriced hot dogs and drinking oversized beers. They pull back the curtain at major league baseball for a glimpse of how america's most beloved pastime is working remotely. You'll hear how the mlb has had to adjust just about everything but they do from new rules about how we gather to virtual fanton stadium. You'll get to look at how they've embraced this new world of flexible work. I recently listened to the burn out. Episode of the remote works podcasts. And here's what i thought. Melanie does an amazing job. Bringing diverse perspectives from experts and people who are dealing with the issues. These experts are trying to solve. It's basically a combination of great storytelling with practical advice. That you can apply to your life or your work. So search for remote works anywhere. You listen to podcasts. Thanks to remote works for their support. Well i want to get to my my specific. Nba related questions. Like i said. I'm the one who plays sports video games religiously but couldn't tell you most of what's going on in any major sport at any given time lake surprisingly knowledgeable about the nba only because two k. Commentary basically is like an encyclopedia of random. Facts that you get to hear while you're playing the game But one of the things that you said in the book is that being at the top comes with pressure along with the assumption that the best player on the field already has all the answers will be perfect and shots and passes and will score the game winning goal with no time on the clock. I e robotic perfection star athletes internalize these demands often form cold hard walls and barriers between themselves and their teammates coaches and loved ones. And one thing. I wonder so. I've i've had a Nfl player who was here. And you one of the things. I asked him was you know. Why does somebody like tom. Brady become tom brady And you know the rest of the people in the nfl most of them. We don't even know who they are. You know like. I couldn't tell you any single name of a defensive lineman or tackle on any team Because they're pretty anonymous in the grand scheme of things and i distinctly remember that scene from any given sunday where lawrence taylor is talking to jamie foxx. He mentions all these star athlete. He's like for every one of them. There's a million people you never heard of. And so. I wonder you know you've what you've been part of a team. And then i guess the example uses as i've verson because he's the one who drives me crazy onto case since i can't seem to slow him down. I what i wonder is. Why does somebody like alan iverson. And up in his circumstances and white is. How do you get an allen iverson with this insane town. And then how do you get a michael jordan. While wildly different life outcomes like what causes that I'm not sure I mean they grew up in very different circumstances. Allen was not born to a fifteen year old single mom in hampton roads. Virginia in a really difficult time and then ended up in a really racial incident. We ended up. He would argue a maybe many might Unjustly put in jail His life experience was really hard and people in that community wrapped their arms around him and saved him. If you will And one of those savings became john thompson a former coach of georgetown university who brought him in. But alan allowed things. That people don't know about him. I happen to to know him fairly well in love him. I love him for the person he is the person he aspires to be. He was taking care of thirty eight families. Thirty eight is peak. And you know why. Who's taking care of them. Because they took care of him. And i love that and i i wish some of the decisions he made were different than i'm sure he wishes that as well boy. Oh boy here. Here's a a person who wears his harness leave. He takes care of those he loves. He is as passionate as anyone. You'll ever meet and appreciative of the moment. Time that he had That is very different from michael jordan jordan. One grew up in a nice nice family and had a a really good lifestyle growing up and laid. Unc was drafted third overall in in life. Guy good and he. They both have tell you what they have in common. They both have like insatiable appetite to compete in a crazy drive to win and They to be elite elite person at any level. I think it's i think you have to make trade offs. And i think that's the case in business or in your faith or in the community or as an athlete like life is about trade offs and they both made different trade offs for different reasons at different times. Got different outcomes I don't think either of them would would trade what they did or how they did it. appreciate about both of them. I will say that being an athlete. I'm not one as you know being around a lot of them. It's hard and i wouldn't aspire now knowing what i know now. I wouldn't aspire to being pro athlete. It's too hard You don't know it's very very difficult terms of the trust You know relationships are somewhat fleeting and peak by the time. You're twenty eight. And you know. I i look at warren buffett and warren buffett made ninety percent of his wealth after the time he was sixty five as so. I don't know. I think it's i think it's a hard life they live. I agree with the one and a million one you know in a million might be ten million or twenty million or one hundred zero but but i. I think that lifestyle is really really hard. I think though that makes perfect next question i had. I think those of us who are on the outside we look at you. Know sort of Watching the star athletes and we think they live these incredibly glamorous lives. They're all well off after reading andrea gonzales biography and then there was another Book that was written by sports. Journalists called forty million dollar slaves You know and they both talked explicitly about race in the nba. Which i'm curious like you know how all that has affected you. Guys what impact. All the black lives matter movement has had on both the league and individual athletes But i think one of the things. I distinctly remember was the jeremy lin documentary where he had mentioned it was an interview. He did on a podcast where he said. You know the fantasy reality are really different. You know your he's like it's a high paid job but it's a job just like any other job and your asses on the line every single night and there's always the possible you're going to lose their jobs so so two questions. Come from that one is you know what's the what's the difference between the fantasy people have about this life and the reality and you know what is it like what is it that enables guys to perform at the level that they do and do it night after night after night. Yeah the first part is the only thing we see is the gladiator mama. I guess the only thing we say we see them walk on the court as fans and cheered or boot and we will. We don't see is the thousands thousands thousands of hours of work work on their bodies. Work on what. They eat how they take care of themselves working on their craft. We don't see it. I see it by the way. It's unbelievable how hard they were. I think the elite elite guys they have a a drive they have all the physical tools they have all the mental tools and they haven't insatiable appetite to compete. And so you have. Those three things are or what happens when when they stay healthy so But i i. I wish people could really see how hard dwell bead works. Or ben simmons works or jack shoes nico he shorts. I mean it's this is a total complete commitment and think about what you're giving up your giving up any sort of private life right anything you do. You go out to restaurants again photographed in you know anyone you date is public fodder Any mistake you make or you think about last time you were frustrated at work or you said the wrong thing to a friend or you had a bad breakup like want that on. Espn sportscenter and they haven't and it's hard. It is really really really really hard. But i like. I said i don't envy the lifestyle. I meyer now And i do you know what. I am a little bit. Maniacal about is. What i talked to him about is making sure that they're protecting themselves financially to they have to figure out who to trust in her life and and they've got to save their money when you're when you're when you're peak your peak. Economic windfall is between twenty and twenty eight. I mean think about yourself. When you're twenty years old i could. You can find my here. No if i had that much money. I would have absolute squandered it and when you said that reminded me of this podcast that died charles. Barkley was on with dr phil. And i don't remember which player it was. It was a younger player on the team with him and go. Somebody had scolded him. It was one of the older guys on the team because he bought something like two or three cars right when he started playing and the older guy was like. You're an idiot. What are you doing and he said. This is actually one of the reasons. A lot of these guys make all this money but they end up leaving broke because they are just caught up in the lifestyle. Yeah i don't know. I think a lot of misconceptions about that. There are a lot that end up that way. The problem is they're young and they have time and those are too bad too bad things. If i were twenty years old and you gave me five dollars a year. I wouldn't understand taxes. I i wouldn't understood like this is going to end ever of course because i was immortal twenty. I wasn't thinking about retirement. Nouns guys these guys coming through their smart brands. it's it's different than the especially. The league is the ben simmons. Joel embiid they have. They have you know. They have a complete understanding on their their brands. In how they their money they have people around him and that's great so for the league. Is there most of them are really good hands. It's the guys that come in and for anyone else making a million dollars a year should be enough. You do that. Five years should be good to go it. Just as i say wealth is not about what you earn is about what you save and so our council is to save fifty percent of their salaries and get him to a financial adviser before insta check in. Go have fun with whatever else they they make and many cases they'll never know the difference in the wake of when they're thirty forty fifty and have plenty of money for the rest of their lives and their family's life you know but you get that but it's hard it's hard you got people tugging on your left and right not sure who to trust. Everybody has idea Everybody wants to be. Your friend is a ton of ton of pressure. But i think the the the players union has been greet the the nba nhl in terms of education in. I've seen a huge movement from when i came into this league in early nineties to now terms of players managing their brands managing their money managing relationships. It's a it's a whole other world. It's been promise more to go of course but a good practice You know it's funny. Because i the question i had next sort of About the contrast pre internet pre social media Versus now because one of the things you say is a world dominated by instant gratification and obsessed by the spotlight of now trust. The process is a commitment. You'll keep a long term view at the forefront of your planning and decision-making this has implications far beyond basketball. And the reason that struck me in particular is because you have a world particularly for these young athletes right who basically grew up watching. You know people that you've worked with like they saw the early nineties and they've come into a world with instagram and twitter and all the stuff that they didn't have before like effectively like you said they're their own brand and cal newport. Who was a guest here. Who wrote a book called digital minimalism. Another one called deep work had done some work with nba teams and one of the things that he told me that i found really interesting was he said when people tweeted the night before the game their performance actually suffered and so i wonder you one. What's been the contrast it from pre internet. When you see these guys come into now. And how do they not get sort of lose. Their sense of driver caught up in all this instant. Gratification it's yeah i'm not sure it's instant gratification. As the issue. I think that there's so much negative pressure out in the world to stand out that people you know we have seven and a half billion media members now and the way they get attention is to be critical and again i go back to my twenty year old self and what if i got five thousand in my era i guess it would have been handwritten notes. But now it's it's tweets saying how terrible was how awful i was. That couldn't shoot. Couldn't pass should be traded suck. The worst person of all time don't belong in the city like that's what's happening so now you're twenty years old and you have five thousand people and you read every gone. Because you're twenty you can't auto and having had a little bit of hate tweets come my way i will tell you like as a much older much more mature much more secure person just because of my experience it hit me and hurt me and i was thinking about like okay. What is it fans only new impact that they were having when they were nasty with these kids. And that's what they are going to come in the league. I know they grow into men for years. Old you're still a kid. I think it's really really difficult and i. I couldn't imagine when. I say how difficult it is to be a star in. Oh i think it's hard. And i think if fans ever knew the impact that it's their virtual boo what that has on players in their psyches and we've seen it. We've seen players come out and talk about a the mental mental illness. They've had or the mental fragility. They've had in this league. I think a lot of that has to do with social media. And you don't see that in our teens to so forget about athletes. It's happening in junior high levels of depression or up levels of anxiety. Where he does coming from. Like that is eighty. I need to be perfect. I need to be i. I need to be liked. I need to have everything. Go well or reading something. That doesn't feel good or feeling like you're excluded or that. Welcome to real life And i think they're. They're in a fishbowl. And i think it's very very very difficult thing and if i if i had a son and he was playing in the nba or daughter playing the wnba. I tell him to shut it down. Just shut down. We'll go have some fun. Be be president. Beware your feet are in. Let's go you know it's say that. Yeah it's funny. You say. I'll send you the article cal. Newport wrote an article on his blog about bryce harper the baseball player. And i don't know anything about baseball. I just remember this article very distinctly. Because he said you know. Bryce harper doesn't use social media and he apparently landed a four hundred. Thirty million dollar contract was like that's the upside of not using social media that much. I think that that's a pretty strong case right. Yeah we have some players now that if you ask them like some. They're building big brands on social media. that's wonderful to and others. That don't have interested in actually have some doing it for them. So they don't have they're not saddled with it so they're not saddled with someone saying you can't shoot you can't jump can't guard or whatever but it's too much and it's nicely said it is. I mean it is a is a bastion of hate. That doesn't belong world totally. Yeah it's funny because we always so you. We have certain players that we struggle with onto k for some reason me and my roommate really cannot get chris paul to shoot three pointers. And i'm like wait a minute cripples a lights out three point shooter like maybe we should tweet him and ask him like. Is there a reason. We're not able to make threes with you like maybe you'll have an answer But this is a question out of morbid curiosity. So i admire ongoing. Joke is always that the only reason i'd ever need a billion dollars as to buy an nba team and my mentor. Said okay tell me something. What would buying an nba team do for you. Like what all that actually give you. I was like courtside seats. You don't need a billion dollars for that. I'm sure you can find these cheaper way but with that in mind you get the the people who you report. I'm guessing your bosses or the owners of the team. What actually enables somebody to get to a level where they can buy an nba team. Yeah i i. The word owners pet peeve of mine just because it has such such negative connotations on when you're talking about people so i was used managing general partners managing partners. Yes what they're both private equity guys. I'm josh harris. David blitzer Both self made one was at one of the co founders of apollo josh harris and one is one of the early early guys at blackstone They are considered some of the greatest deal makers in the world. Private equity is has been a really good business apparently over the last twenty or thirty years. So yes so they've a they came in Before the steve farmer purchase of the clippers for over two billion dollars which really catapulted the prices so they got in at least. Today's standards are really reasonable number. And if done really Business but he had no. It's it's you have to be you have to have a b. in front of your wealth to to be a control partner in one of these businesses now but boy. What a room like you walk in. You know i've been in the nba boardroom. Now for Eighteen years and i've been at any for twelve years. And i mean everyone you'd want to to be or do business with you know from ted. Leonsis mark cuban to jim dolan to joe lake St bomber titans of industry. Dan gilbert. I'm you have like the the who's who of of the country in a room and they're your partner anna and so that's that's the end inter scarcity only thirty teams. I think that drives a lot of value. Well it's funny. Because i remember even mark cuban said in an interview with chase jarvis on creative live. He said you can become a millionaire through hard work. He said becoming a billionaire involves a bit of luck. Yeah marks very humble. He he happened to get got to know him fairly well over the years and i mean he's brilliant and so he would always say you know when people would give him a hard time when he was first in the league. He's like no no. I was just lucky like that. Guy's never been lucky this life. He is brilliant in hardworking passionate and compassionate and has an incredible high for brand. And he's the best has the best. Pr mind on issues of anyone ever met in my life. But i i appreciate what he's saying and there's a degree of lock that happens to all of us. There's also people who make their luck and he seems to be one of those guys if you want to couch it as lucky. He's a guy who's made made a lot left for himself. And i don't think it's an accident and they're they're look what i have loved for my father to be a billionaire. Impact me down money. Yes i would have Broke unfortunately but however if he did any passing a billion dollars eighty for sure. I'll take you there. Were these sports. I really do love him. And and it is fun and you should tell your mentor. Wherever told you that you can buy courts. It's better than that. You run the thing. So special and spectacular. You're around the greatest athletes and performers in the world. And you have this incredible platform to get out and do good and drive. Change community is. It's i tell you what it is wonderful. Yeah that's that's literally by sort of crazy ridiculous out. Their goal is to basically own an nba team. Oh you'll be my first call. If i ever in the position to be like to actually by a team of oh scott. I'm ready. i actually that. I have a couple more questions for you. And then we'll wrap things up so one of the i wonder is i. There's also lessons here for life. What what goes into a turnaround. It's like you get something. Remember as i was telling you before we hit record when i was in college. The warriors were the worst team in the nba. To the point where you could buy season tickets for sixty dollars on a tarot cheat at the berkeley campus. In fact our season tickets for cows ball team were more expensive season tickets for the warriors at that time. So how does a turnaround like that happen. And then what happens when you have an organization like the spurs where they've just had dominance for so long because i feel like every. Nba team goes through turnaround period. So how do you won you know. Bring the turnaround about and then. How do you handle those transition. Years was rebuilding years. Yes i think in many cases You know turn around. There's a there's a. There is a formal china. Take one is you have to be realistic about where you are when you when you walk in and you truly have to get a real assessment of where you are. Then you have to have a really clear picture of where you're going and then you have to be willing to make the tough choices to get in the that formula will take place in the form of people you know. Do we have the right people in the right places that will take place. Do we have a culture that is inspiring one of accountability one of challenging immobile. Keep our best talent here in going on. And that's you know players otherwise and do we have the resources to get us there. And then there's the great arbitrage which very few people ever talk about patients and that go with life that goes with business and it goes with sports can imagine. Imagine if you said five years from now. I want to be able to speak mandarin or i would like to understand financial accounting or i would like to have two million followers on my podcast or i would like to write another book or i would like whatever that is like key match if you just took a five year view and you said okay now. I understand where i am understand where i'm going now. What tough choices to make to get there. You're gonna have to sacrifice. Give some things up. You're gonna have to bud. Can you imagine if you got incrementally better everyday towards that goal Given our day towards that. How much better would we be. But we don't because we live in this world talking about instant gratification. Right now everything that and this is not the way that you find sustainable success and you find sustainable Over time people who are great but they say overnight success takes about eighteen years. Maybe not now if you want to be a youtube star. But i don't have you know like i'm going to create something meaningful and like i said whether that's a whether it's a an organization or or family or driving change a community just it takes a plan right people time patients while hopefully i'll get to come in sit courtside with you at some tower soon as world opens up. Come see me. we'll have some fun. I d i will absolutely take you up on that despite being the weirdo who never even watch sports. nba gator suitca team to be scrambling to contain. You won't believe how good these guys are. Oh that's like a guaranteed loss for me. It's like when you play those online. I like i always tease my roommate. You know who basically you know. Basically jokingly in our household refers tells says the nba god. I'm like you know what go play some thirteen year. Old kid line and we'll find out how good you really are. Because i done that once. And you look at their records and we're like oh three or four games here there. Each of these kids is like ten thousand games under their belt nearly yet and in ten minutes. They're up by thirty points so fun. Yeah i'm still. Wow so i have two final questions for you has your definition of success and what it means to be wealthy changed over the course of your career and with age yes considerably You know i just read this. Incredible book called the psychology of money. If you haven't read each picked up a read it's on my list on list is it okay get it talks about a couple of things. One is not moving the goalposts and another talks about is when is enough enough So sure when it comes to financial security know having gone through what. I went through with my folks. I'm definitely on the more conservative side in terms of saving. so so that's been good But what would. I have to have to call call on a day if you will feel comfortable. Continues to to increase over time and that may be natural fact. I wish it weren't true but but it is And that's something that is evolving For me But i i'm ma'am way way way to blast like i said i i don't i don't have any material needs my wife doesn't have any material needs So you know. I mean our our view of success is very different. It's you know we live comfortably. Can we not have to worry about money in the future in. There's some number for everybody that can do that and then can we help those. We love along the way on. We've both been helped along the way and oftentimes for some people might be helping them with other people. It might be helping him with the car. It's appropriate data and other people might be buying a car or helping them with some little things and we typically stay close to those we love and are close to us and who are less fortunate financially. They might be made way more than others of life may have a great spiritual center. They may have a wonderfully peaceful family and they might be like thrilled and happy work in a nine to five job and that's a guest in a different way. I don't have that gift you know. I have this insatiable appetite to grow and and the only thing that upsets me status quo. And that's that's that can be. I'm sure you know i know. We're real in towards the end. And i don't want to throw bombshell in. But i the older i get the more i sense that our best drinks are also aquiles. He'll vice versa. And so if you're a slave to saving that might be. That's that's not great for you right. You might miss opportunities to create experiences for you and your family it you know. So so there's this whole notion of you know if you're this route leader is not me but around that might be be great also mike grindstone people out. So i don't know. I just keep the notion of of Sometimes you're should think about that as it might relate to you like your your strength near your achilles heel and related they are so i know i've kept you here well over our time so i want to be mindful of that so i have two final questions for you one quick but i'm wondering what the impact of race relations has been you know particularly in the wake of black lives matter and everything we've seen in in the nba. Because i i know we've seen things like players you know basically not playing first quarter and then stuff like that. If i remember correctly on you'd for you guys like on the management side. How does how this affected your relationships with players and vice versa. Sure well first off. What a gift. What a gift to have a platform that is meaningful enough to drive change. And that's that's not something i ever overload secondly building diverse teams for my career. And when i came here to the sixers. I used to joke. Needs to make everybody uncomfortable. There all looked down. I would say hey. It's great news. We have such a diverse team. We have old white men in young white map and everybody will take their heads and i started putting processes in place to change that and you know. Half of our final candidates had to be diverse. Candidates in time never happens overnight but over time you look forward now. We had one person of color director above. We had one woman vp. Bobby and you look down. Twenty six percent of our staff is african american. And we've got nine women were sdp's or bunk including our sciarrone cr Officers had charges. They can like okay. We're making progress so when this came when this one i mean kind of the the great white awakening is i call it when it came in and hit america finally I wasn't embarrassed. I'm proud of what we are organization. I'm proud of the first to be half. And i'm very well aware that the nba. You know seventy five percent. The league's black. You know and i know that our staff has to reflect america and so in when friends of mine call me scrambling i i said to all like. Hey brace yourself like hiring chief diversity officer. It's a nice step but about five years too late you know. And but it's definitely that will add. It's best time to plant twenty years ago. Second best time right now for sure. I just saying like there is a high risk time for white males running companies for sure and you know what it should be and we have an obligation because we can do better and we should do better and to do it. You know you can have to work harder. And you're gonna have to recruit harder you're gonna have to recruit and you're going have to have a long lens and you're going to have to take some chances and you gotta get out of that notion that. Hey i'm not hire the guy i worked with last time every time because that's what's happening because we're more comfortable hiring people that look like us we just are you know And that's okay. What i what i love is the next generation is much better. The generation of my kids is even better and we're my generation is better than my parents is better than their grandparents. I just wish the rate of change were faster and we were fortunate. We have a doc. Rivers are coach and elton brands are joel manager of to african americans who are incredible kits They they're incredible leaders and inspiring inspiring. Not only to me in our team work but also to the community at large in the world and we need more smart talented people out there ringing the bell. That is not okay and so i feel like it's been have been a blessing. Nba absolutely incredible leadership on. This issue has been been fantastic. And let's hope this is the start. This isn't something that goes away on. This is something that we we spent time. We focus on and hopefully can be a platform to accentuate all the good. That's happening in the world and we're doing we're doing cool stuff. Do we set up a by black program where we highlight. Five minority owned businesses in it by the devil community newark and in philadelphia with the seventy sixers. We've increased vendor spending to have a minimum of vendor spend which is which has been unbelievable education for me We've invested in our first real estate project in a community of need a predominantly african american community in philadelphia. That's the first of many and we're working on some credit programs. Is it enough now. it's not you know. Can it be more of course. Can't do we like to do be an example to others we do and and this is a place. I'm not. i'm not ashamed or afraid to be. I am not afraid or ashamed to trip and fall and sometimes i don't say all the right things sometimes i don't do all the right things as a leader of my heart is in the right place. My intentions are in the right place. And this is organization that cares and it's diverse inclusive enda and we look forward to hopefully being a leader considerably for a long time. Oh wow this has been absolutely incredible. So i have one final question for you. Which is how we finish all of our interviews at the end mistake creative. What do you think it is that makes somebody or something unmistakable. I want people to be understood by being their authentic self. They used to have this t shirt that said be yourself. Everyone else has been and i wish more people live like that. I mean it's okay to search and to have a mentor teacher. And that's okay to have a role model But the truly unmistakable people or authentic or i find or are authentically. Themselves an amazing. I can't thank you enough for taking the time to join us and share your story. Your was so is just pin wonderful and funny in an eye opening and insightful. Where can people find out more about you your work the book and everything we up to other than going to a seventy sixers came. We'd love to see the senate. You're definitely coming to a sixers game. Oh i will absolutely take up. On december the world you can go to amazon barnes and noble of course but most importantly i would love for you to go to an indie bookshop near because small businesses are struggling right now and they need your help. So if you're going to buy this book. And i appreciate advance Take care of that local bookstore. The canadian you can find them online wherever you are and keep listening to this podcast because i am visit so matter so thank you. I thank you very much and for everybody listening. We'll wrap the show with that. Thank you for listening to this episode of the unmistakable creative podcast while you're listening for there any moments you've found fascinating inspiring instructive. Maybe even heartwarming. Can you think of anyone a friend or a family member who would appreciate this moment. If so take a second and share. Today's episode without one person because good ideas and messages are meant to be shared. Look staying healthy isn't easy watching your diet hitting the gym avoiding stress. A good night's rest helps boost your overall health and wellness and it couldn't be easier. The new sleep number three sixty smart bet is the only that effortlessly adjusts in response to both the result. You wake up ready for anything. Proven quality sleep is life changing sleep and now the new queen sleep number three sixty five. Smart bet is only seven hundred ninety nine save six hundred dollars. Only for a limited time to learn more go to sleepnumber dot com.

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Seven demands of Faith

Romeo Siaw-Mensah Podcast

1:04:35 hr | 7 months ago

Seven demands of Faith

"What show ever born gone overcome make the world and this is the victory that will come world even our faith which comes by hearing and hearing the word right divided here with paul tori and conviction by revenue seattle. Many some of them makarios change at during this annoying tech teaching you will telling you strengthen you and equip you for a royal life in the be transformed as listen for the bless your hot desire is to know you and to know your will for the lives in jesus name amen. Please be seated hallelujah. Are you going to have faith in god. Powerful now tonight. This morning i'm willing to about seven demands of fish. Seven demands that we must have believed how faith in god say in code so they are seven demands that you need to apply to make your fifth come alive a man number one. Faith demands obedience to define destructions. Hallelujah bruised up. Eleven this number eight to ten faith. Demands demands obedience to divine instructions divine instructions. Nobody hurts hallelujah. Hebrews chapter eleven fifty by fit abraham when he was caught to go out to a place where he should after received for eric dance obeyed and he went out nano win away. He went nine by fit. He's join in the land of promise. As a strange country dwelling in tackles with isaac and jacob the haze with him of the promise for he looked for a city which has foundations whose builder and maker. Is god. a man hallelujah. so faith number one manslaughter. Obedience to divide instructions when the bible said go for stop must believe it should be the ultimate answer to your problem and it ended the bubble demands from you because where bible is aware of gordon so to believe me that you must believe his weight and his instructions. Hallelujah amen. the fasting is we must be willing to goes brushes. If you know a big goes in stressing me that you cut yourself from his plans for your life because he has plans for you. I corinthians nine hundred that i have not seen has an head now has it enter the thing that god has prepared for them. The laughing so one got us. Prepare something for you in kumasi. Any say let's go to kumasi. He's hitting me. I'm going to talk about it. We already missed. What has prepare for you hallelujah. so divine instruction is the fast to exercising in your feet. That is what the bible must be your source of reading and listening to the word of going hallelujah fit. There are so many instructions in the bible is dry. Twenty eight verse one. Dasa hack into the voice of the lord and observe to do all this commandment going to give it to you. Then be above only prosper. So if you don't obey his instructions his voice you cannot receive. Goes blessings and plans for your life. Hallelujah a man so there are so many things that go but if the father you have so many. Take your plan for your child before the become matute. So if you insert your son to such an do certain. He doesn't want to give you the harrison's hallelujah so everyone of if we want to receive what our blessings in goddess then you might be willing to obey divine instructions one on a divine instructions for christian is to be willing to pay you. Tight is an instruction. Bring me my tight. If we do find it difficult to bring your tied to teach then you have to pay fast inspections continue because he said when you our review of or for your sake up your windows of heaven and pour you epilepsy. Would you are looking for. But you said that. So you have decided to choose which one to believe or not believe. One abraham was split. Your parents leave your friends leave and go to another place to make a blessing. He has to pay a live. Many over you still stuck to your boyfriend because you've been going on the same term fornication mind mind instruction if you want go to divine instructions not at pastas instruction get his goal. You wanna bless him from is notre so it goes as top. Do stop stealing and stealing somebody employ in office. And then you are in charge of some two. And then you are stealing from the company has given a commandment lewis you've been. No no stealing. That shot knows to and why stealing you disobeyed divine instructions and so the first step for your faith to receive. What has you know have destroyed it. Are you going to obey divine instructions. A man so the bible is full of instructions. And now your father and your mother is divine instructions so that be with you and you don't respect your father. You don't respect your mother when there's a divine instructions for you. It means that god can be involved in your transformation of places. But i see you obey the instructions from a man number tune. Fed demands adjustments from familia comfort zone. Fed demand would assessments dust mites. Best nine he brought up eleven the by faith. He saw joan in the land of promise as a strange country dwelling in tabernacles with isaac and jacob. The hess with him of the same promise someone who was living in his house very well established what he has lived in the house if his fumbling for almost seventy five years. God this to another place and then what was living in tabernacles not have been the whole building. I promise has to adjust himself. Adjusts if you adjust. You can see the hand of course hallelujah. Anytime gordon sticky to a big up. And if you make you feel electoral inconvenience by who are comfortable with. Hallelujah is coming out of fidgets. They were happy living easy for four hundred years. It co kambas. What do you call it. A menace now. Certainly they have to live a place of kakumba place of golic and they found himself in the wilderness. It didn't mono- everyday. Meanwhile i'm talking to a land which flows smoke and we have been read the malkin on land yet. So what do we eat now. can we continue to eat. Kakumba no need for old testaments and that is one of the kids in the midweek says not willing to do. Sometimes you'll be forced to leave your parents and just leave you someone who is not your parents and you must be able to adjust your lifestyle to enable passage to take you to another level of your destiny but many people don't know how to adjust their fit. The no no no. No i mean. I can understand this person but it is goes on a ticket you through the process so you must be able to used to drink tea every morning but president assad now. He doesn't drink every morning by you. Must be able to adjust your your current lifestyle once a day. You use three times. Slacks life is not. It's not only be only your mother or your father who through all quotas send you different people to training and so if you're not willing to adjust typical of to take you through the next step of your life and that's a man this you another chris. Sal you could go to go to drink by by what you become a you go out to stay alive. It's time to test. Its say so is. You're fed that there is something i had of me to be able to address. You used to pray to print. It's to receive what god has for you. Continue to live the same life day was ask was living in the tent in tabernacles in the wilderness trump who was living in his own house by by faith he was able to endure the assessments. He he and his tutor rob said they were hess has to the promise. Promise something is going to receive. He was supposed to receive the lunch so he i don't in the land of promise astray john country. In strength country dwelling tabernacles goes spin my own house to live how. How's foul bedroom apartment night after that is sometimes when you travel outside your country you realize that sector lifestyle that you were doing in the same lifestyle in foreign land. It's an adjustment to enable you to fulfill certain days or the purport process in that for relent. Hallelujah one you how to assess you can see the hand of god amen with you because you sleep you wake up at ten be because you live with your mother and your father by what does somebody has to take you in life and help you. He said no. No no no no is the way you know just meant nope no blesses which for you that is one go to the army. You go to the trae you to move your mind from the ordinary way of living and call a civilian after the military lifestyle. Yes because they want to make sure that you adjusts to the system otherwise you cannot. You know winning two tasks that has got to be shouting shot. I said because. I said the echo of your voice is going down is that you run out of the comp- so when you get there assigned bought sale make noise liquids. Yes you are not but this is where we are training you. Then have the food out to get food the bring the ford and give you two minutes to it and we are moving to calm on certain us. Doc to one you fall down in. You died hallelujah. This assessment some of it is difficult to marry you because what we marry. You bring you to your husband house. You are not willing to address you. Want a husband to dust. you know. Said he's the head you have chosen to put him as your head so you do what the head likes. Not what you like lettuce if you are willing to us. No mono mario i'm telling you mario trudeau not one. You slip want disturbance. But hey my ring and i don't want to disturb you shopping. So why should i do. What do the reason why. I brought you to this house. You must workup jessica activity. Who's who's out about. Who is that. How i dust mites dust. What do come to church. We have to train. You tend your man mindsets so that you got adjusted to what we are preparing you for toward from you know. Happy to address and one who are going through our desmond. Don't cry it is part of boss. Only a preparing you for a good blonde. Because babo said that by he. He was in inept strange country dwelling in tabernacles with isaac. Who has of the promise. There's ten what for. He looked a city. Okay so you cut see. Abraham how to moses has to adjust to read about who has debbie was living inside this house by he funds. The kiss palace has to test to be able to fit hallelujah. Many of us are not willing to change and that is where we can see the blessing of god. But i believe that today go is. Prepare you for lessons ahead of you. It took some people to train. You your mother or you're not give you the kind of training for your future policies. Not you're not to but why you serve your aunt she will saw to on. Is that this man bam cookie cookie to marketer by tastes and biden. And if you don't know how to go to markets markets. You don't know how to you don't know how to by tomorrow but you have any idea. So why are you still have to buy. Somebody's wealth because they are not trading somewhat has to you and you must be willing to adjust to land it. I know how to go within in the house because my parents at eight or twelve to step my grandmother very hard woman. She treated me an hour. That in cia documents and i realized that the more resistant. The mope was tense in the house. And there's no heavy me. He told my mother. My mother was the only daughter is coming for your son. Is that if you don't come. And i don't come to my stop because my it way through this with your and is a common wash utensils the and took him to this room. Yes we used to. I used to go to school from one end to another and one you cut it what we call it home to go to the and i go to school. I your mom go to carry a deploys for me. I just you meet all the ladies. You are south. Because i do. I learn how to address and one. Just the my lifestyle to monica she. There was so much peace there was so much love heck was might montgomery does care for me was more than my parents said. I fell in love with hair. Everything i needed to give. It is through that. I came to rest due process. This my dusts has to do anything house. I wash i wash. Why not get them to those. This is like my ankle was when i came to the first place. That's what legal was sutton. And because of my does training at an instructive mongo. I was able to fly. And in all because i was rookie to cry and the only one i knew across my uncle who was like my grandmother. It was the offer. Montgomery da to an interdisciplinary. I'd be able to stay and then finished my calls to become oil today if our no willing to adjust. I wouldn't have become today. But i believe that from today. You are destined to everything hallelujah. Willing to this effect is that you must be willing to test. Because if it's not. Bill is about your expectation. What you hope to become and so along the way you miss thane up force you to address. If you're not winning to us you can't go there sometimes. You are driving but you have to your comment spot and must be foster joined. The trucks role. Must be willing to. I guess this is me. I don't travel within. That is a template. He does not come from the old that the village one truck. I still have an sit one tax cipla in it. Usa does behind. This hallelujah are you. Are you willing to adjust. Amen not close fed demands looking for gotta be foundation so godly foundation so godly foundation. That's for he looked for a city. What has foundations food bertha. Is god hallelujah. Isaiah chapter twenty eight best number sixteen isaiah twenty eight sixteen therefore the load go behold. I live on four foundation as a tried stone shows on us to assure foundation that bill limit shah not make his isaiah twenty eight with sixteen. Therefore that said the load go. I live in zion for foundation as tone at triads to at pressure on stone as off foundation gordon describing it. I say that channel. Mickey's what did you mean by having luke godly foundation. Now if you believe in god for anything you keep watching and knowing defenses or different people assume but a good husband believe in a good husband. Okay that thousand mandel come propose you but how do you know that this is one that god has planned for me hallelujah. So the bible said that abraham was so dawning on stangeland he was also looking for where the foundations be made by god. He was put in his camp anyway so remember his son isaac he did whole they were fighting. He moved on a place in fact. When are they got another place when he caught an nobody came and said this my rehoboth. So it's not that you are looking for goes will for your life you mitt. Different kinds of people or situations looking for be different jobs. Now keep coming but you must ask. The fed full besson look at got live foundation. Because god have a place is stone pressure on us to and is foundation. That means that passage few is already but god will build it for you barton on the give. You a foundation delusional. If you can't look for a foundation. Why am i saying i was looking for a wife you now. I was looking for a wife. Join lighthouse no meridian. A young handsome accountants. My apartment mattis reading my bed. My everything is ready. My whole body's ready. What does the left is the right woman to stand by me. I said pessimism with a calico blue colours sip of what have to look for a foundation of boats. So many we might came into. My life are started talking to one. Then i realized that. No it's beautiful. Medicare doctor great future but the foundation. I was looking for foundation. Not the building are looking for. What a godly foundation are looking into that in. What is built already. Because see chris you must live by script bobble the city and said you was giving you my back. A house completely built. He said he was looking for a gotten me foundation. That is that important. So as i was moving moving found this beautiful girl chattan. She took it to me. I said do. I wake up at dawn and go for a go and go for broke us and when i got to admit which is. Hey what just didn't know. It went from village. Which is what is i don. I realized that she was no watkin. She was not doing. It does a student but the hey some can't pray someone who can see what he's somebody who can go walk us. Postal never knew that. I was because i was looking for a godly foundation at foundation of coaching. Is that found a lawyer who was well established lawyer driving olca traveling abroad every weekend and got doctor on on on on unemployed. Want you to choose what you choose but the youngest one man come to propose you know interested in the is interested in in the type of guy tries right. I'm gonna taste in front of his chest. You're interested in this town of the foundation. What is because god has build the foundation. You are that bottle completed in the better way for you. Yes fsr is looking for something that's already built at fifth person is looking for a foundation. Because if i cannot i found this guys. I'm so that you are blessed personnel. Ready many of board. It doesn't come in the food package. It comes in the foundation. And if god said said. I have a little zeile at foundation. Stu tries to rescue cornerstone. Breast cornerstone is you suppress loss cornerstone. You're looking for at what is that. What has an ice in. The building is nice but found if the foundation. Despite what can rachel's to men of your certain foundation interesting foundation. I'm interested what got stacked something. One asset view our choosy to reject somebody. Who's driving a nice car. Because i know it's not as rich as but he also looking for a godly foundation and not knowing boras plunder together bridge to over twenty years. Now i've minister mistake by choosing by not the foundation but for looking for that doctor america the lawyer. But he's he's she's into some tennis. But i tell you a fit person fifth placing look for a lee tissue. You are because it's a is a is on dishes. That was that you can't guarantee that to be built for you. Why god has led a this process. Cornerstone i lost to one. That will hold you and not think. Come move a strong foundation. Hallelujah is a fifth person. Look forward a courtly foundation if you if you get a new job and you're going to pay you so much by its affect your ability to save coach. Thank you very much for the show. But i can live my life without court. Minute of your tuesday's doesn't any truth. Since it will affect me my bill to have it will not give it a chance to go to protect and took the job. I would have been maybe rich in so many ways. But i choose to look for found dishes to build my life for twenty years. I've been pasta. Yes and i'm impacted of many people and that is to meet. The ghettos drove my life to both houses on we were the has kept is legal here. This fund the plenty of five million dollars. It's five hundred thirty five. I'm going to is not a top selling in this area of five hundred messages. Not doesn't a time we were we were. The panacea is improving record looking for foundation. How by this time yes. Many of my mitch are cheaper. Tickets officers of the banks in the country this back lesbian. I was senior editor for forest. Could have been a good if it's about now if our needed i didn't want to build my life on something. That has no relevance looking for some of dish rather to seven people in the corner chapas and pestis then to be a cheap upper bunk. And i. that's that's all about my no. I was looking for cutler foundation. Because shoe found this hallelujah somebody. is accepted about a fifth person looking for godly foundation. And the thing that will take you away from court letting go who wants to marry you. Want to sleep with infest. He doesn't have found issue. Brother you can't go don't rush appointed. He's living you because he doesn't have the foundation and no one who wants to marry you. He's ready to wait for you. And what about price. Because if i want to marry you. Sister i mean out until the fullness of you not only three minutes of enjoyment so i rather grim cost to do mind into my idea. I will really bora bora to go and episode four of you in my house view because from modern doll two minutes of his too bad that tender buttons. Or let's have some fun. Two minutes a lady. I wanted tomorrow. She's see who come for we can and then he will go and i say look we are looking for. We can funnel. I'm looking for food tom. Wife food. Tom weiss the phone. I took one now. I said hey touch all your we continue. Hallelujah you look for godly foundation. That can and you can sell that. There's no in his life. You must rejecting where he doesn't have a foundation on his pocket he's talking about that knocked script but newark cassatt. Better means no one script is a sign that he doesn't have the foundation alleluia number. Four seven point two. And i haven't phone fat demand forgetting your past so forgotten pass fed s in must always look for something bigger and greeter. Forget you pass. If you don't learn to forget your pass you can receive the blessing of course because faith is the substance of these hopes for. You're looking to your future. Not your past you go so you must be willing to forget your pass. Hebrews chapter eleven. V eleven fifteen hebrews eleven fifty watch. It truly had been mind that the mice are few of the country from where they came out. They might have opportunity to have retained an attorney. Who thinking by a former boyfriend and you are struggling bellinger struggles you say quote and then as a struggle it jack and monitors don't wanna come in now you remember from about this time two to say i have to go back to got. It made that your mind of where you came from. If your mind is do four of where you came from. You always feel like we by this time. By this time it will egypt's ubt co koumba by now cairo's by now golic by now. The minds were still full of the past is of looking for the future christian. A fit person. Look for tomorrow. Not pass when mind is full of your pass. Gold can listen. Bob will say that. I think hebrew chapter nine also ten ten. Tend that to go back to tented now. That tussle lead by it but if the mantra pack my sosa have no pleasure in him. If you drawback effect person draws no the difficulty you are going through. You can cook. I won't go back. I will not retreat. I'm looking forward for something good to for i'm looking for what's even though i'm struggling to the i will never go back. There is nothing buck that is well. Bitcoin buck for hallelujah. Bible said announced that i by his faith. You're fed is your live by tomorrow not your pass and the who draws back you been member of a pretty good method that you have a brighter future for you and because never know yet seen it and who are going to some small challenges you said no no. No no no no. I'm too to so. I'm going to back the bible. Say that if you drawback is god said if you drawback my so interesting you. Because i want to see that there is something apropos and i'm waiting for you to come to that fit for point to receive it. The woman was bill issue black for many years. He had tried all doctors. It didn't wake by. He did he say that. Have given a look at head. There's not a person who who's working. If i can go enrichment him of his comment something she was not willing to resign to the pass and said after all that outside of there was have given that no tell you can't give you can't keep up now. You have come to the house we have come to find. You have come to fine. If in what do i expected have not yet come by faith. We saw half. Its we have it. We cannot give up now. We cannot keep up now. There is a god whatever we are looking for in life. you will give it to us hallelujah. Amen now follow up past drive. We have been mindful full of the they came from. They would have risen to return. But you are not returning about your retaining the way you're not returned to so number. Five number five is fair demands. Strong desire strong desire and experimentation of the best of tomorrow hallelujah. You're looking for the best of tomorrow. The best of tomorrow tomorrow is coming. There used to be a sarafina song. Victory hernandez was in a free. You don is common to more see the for many years mandela been in prison but they sat kept sinking disown. The kept south african kept sinking. The free dome is coming to. They kept the hope of one. Dismantling will come out of prison the the fifth give up about what they are big drew but there was thinking too so fleet is coming tomorrow. Freedom is coming tomorrow number coming tomorrow. Something good is coming tomorrow. Sitel one buffalo tomorrow hallelujah. Why what what what came from. There's this little once. Been eventing for two waste. Thought two ways. Predessor scientist said margaret gary l. Cut murder get ready. Every like i become even a new way. Because he thought at the point that they'll do this hd nobody's coming by ladies and gentlemen freedom is coming tomorrow on the twenty eighth of this month. She's got him alive. And kelly who said god dot com. Who said your son who set to lead to get married come tomorrow. This committee stomach immoral. Plus tomorrow. keep you tomorrow. Nas car is looking for his tomorrow and not hallelujah. Yes there was a wedding at back. I want to call. The god is one of our buses up sixty one sister one ready yesterday. Free is common to sister. one has died and left her. Many's stiff nobody was to sixty one. She had that. Where did you say your story is. Tomorrow is come in excess. Something get for your d'amato as exciting wonderful for goodness this apple a day. He's able to make sure that the despise soon who were to off the that set a table before you process of your enemies. Your caps are fed. I say you're better tomorrow. come in. that's a better tomorrow. That's a moral comment from my dad. Numbers love to see that my association. That's a better tomorrow. Comment set pattern is in the expectation of a better tomorrow and see you tomorrow. So frightened soap lawyers. With son for your. Don't porno who he saw coming to you. Come see the of code rice up. What food is coming tomorrow to is. I oh yes hallelujah. Expected designed that royce coming. Beat you turn you act. Dot santa tomorrow is louis gives you a coffee. Something hallelujah must have been six. We are closing. Fed demands trusts absolute. Trust 'em full persuasion of ability of goat ability of coach. Now mitt to me. Over to me i no one wanted and johnson at fed passes somebody who believe in the ability of court got is able not among is able. God is april. The god said he is able god is able then. You might go before you said i am. The lot. is that anything. Too hot for me is anything. Is there anything that too hot for me. Hallelujah reminds the best number nineteen to twenty one. What's ebrahim romance for. You're talking about the twist of -bility of court reminds of the four best nineteen hundred. Be not rick in faith and being not rick in faith he conceded that not his own body now dead. What was over one hundred years old that that nest of sarah's womb. She was looking at his wife. Not looking at himself i yes. He's that not at the promise of quote through but a strong in faith giving glory to god west twenty one and four live with it. You are fully persuaded fully. That what god has promise. He's l. boom to perform it. Whatever god has promised abraham said that if got us promise me it's not about me on my wife but port ability to make me have children did hundred. i don't know. But i know the power wa tweets and so he's got nuts with on belief he was to leap sweated that. What courthouse promising. God is not a man that issue. Lie noah son of that issue to half. I said it. And i will not do it. You have faith in god. Faith in god. The thing that has promise you tend to have had me or in the past spoken to you in your life a dip. What software. And i'm not some swat on sending you believe in your heart. That gold is able to tweet for you. Don't consider yourself man for frizzell and the change in the. You'll hear what somebody would come in mary. You the nest spawning after murray. You are certain in the plane. Go into america gorgeous. Able to said god is it. Rebekah woke up in the morning going to fetch water. He didn't do that. Somebody has been prepaid phone murray maritz. She found herself in a different country in the blessed family. Suddenly the richest of some family has become part of life stories. Saddam story among your civilised. Robert has done before but god is going to send a right and montgomery you tony. The class of the richest people in the community. So you talk to the house sadullah. You've got your husband. Have five houses and you want intact of pundits now face. the guy's already packed the said. Mon- i don't know what to drive. Received this comment you by fast. You are blesses. god is april. I said god is able. I said this it's good. It's not a what we believe in him. Have faith in. God believe in the ability of court because this that god is able as stunning. It could be that unless you here. I've been transferred from somewhere. Because god is able to this jack. Jack does some few district as scummy and has got to change. Your story forever says something. I've got to tell your story hallelujah. Yes i believe in god. Who can tease you too. Need one crossed by your life. Essential possible by your life. You are one just one percent one right fest in or it doesn't want ripe preston you life while pinpoint that's what business by business right. That's of life has changed. Recip- the chris of believe in philadelphia fought to cost besson business contacts. Joe torre forever. Couldn't life settled. Look i wrong and to run your life. You need to buy you can buy. This received that race of going by seth. Enter those ramps. Somebody oh mom is number. Six group number seven number the months on niaz herein of the of course luria now because fed combi oven and hear about the word of god. It is important that from today. You must soon yourself to always been listening to the word of god that is what is going to build your faith as you came to catch you hear me. That's enya keep listening. Keep listening listening listening listening. Kipp gone to the podcast kept listening. Because the hear the more you're fit level goes up hallelujah. So that is why we correct kris to always be listening to messages because it is. Then you hear people's testimonies testimonies appoint testimonies debit set a testimonies amer meditation. Because what you hear people stories that today you come to touch and have you heard me hooters. Veggie for put to win is getting married. Somebody who assisted why has gotten marriages. It's not testimony. Will compel allows. But i'm wanted for crying out for somebody that he can turn for me. The young word of the you hear that one this people what god has done for them done for percent for the sam muscle. You're prn it. Listen to give audits route here and it is building up your faith and one day. He said here the thing that you hear that it's out of your life of your says i hear it because the hearing your level down but the lord is about to take your story samper who has done it for somebody. He did it. For abraham he did it for isaac he did it for did for debit. It did for tausif. He did it for something he did it for. Everybody read the bible sip gore as keep reading the better. Keep hearing their way. We'll see him. Also written you sir. Richard you and richie you said that the woman was one she had this s was passing by is a hearing. It hearing fit come by here and so seventh and most important point is that you must be hearing here. Keep keep hearing. Don't give up some of you on social media fully water and see listen to the tips. Read the books. Listen to the listen to the podcast listening to get listen to them. You see life filter enough from one level faith to another level of faith and you see that here at ontinue of is seen you are working with the low. Bless your approach my new fit. Lift little your hands and touchy load to the load. The so low seven demands seven demands of my faith seven demands spring the points all seven points. We are going to them. Oh yes yes. All the seven points demands divi instructions divan instructions demands number two assessments assessments. No matter looking for godly foundation godly foundation. Full forgotten. your pass. Forgotten your purse number. Five strong desire for greater petition of your tomato. Tomorrow number six pursue up the ability of god full of the ability of god and number seven continues heeren of the way of code. Lift up your hands and pre pre. Everybody prayed lord increase my faith my faith my faith my faith my faith faith in god i want to fit in you might go. My future is price. I see bright up future. I see my. He transformed by faith. Five or sort of i desire pre our hearts hearts hearts by faith. I've got to have it. I believe i have asked. I say i dissolve out peripheral. I receive it i receivers gone. I thought could finish the practice for me. You took her for god my spout mackinaw simple word. My call the smoking michael. Thank you spilling we'd love you with thank you. We'll give you the glory ask every about every closed. Maybe you are here. You don't believe in jesus but today you can give your life to him. It's faith that the ten minutes your future. Your life is in your home every head. But i want to give my life to jesus price lift up your hand. I'm going to give your life to christ if you are here. Come onto jesus gig give me a call you a okay. Now everybody you feel that your faith in god has come down you want to build you up to see a brighter and glorious future if you are here you feel like you need to mic. You have more faith. Raise up your hand preview up. Listen up listen up. Listen god bless god bless you bless suit therapy. Hold the hands of your people. Jesus you said have faith in god and these are the ones who are to the hands that they won't have faith faith in you want to look forward to your ability to help them not looking at themselves and what they have by helping them to mold that there is a gone who is what can out for the one day. Look around their lives. Today there seemed to be no hope because they are trust and confidence in you can see a brighter future according as they have desire you grant on the the hope and yet desires. What sincere. sorry about that. They desire grunted onto the blood by v grunted onto the let them walk into the blessings that are desiring that there was stunned somewhat and testify that by faith they have become that stories will affect the lives of many jesus name odd man. I believe you were blessed by the message. Do visit as this. An every sunday at a hotel and suits during at age steady and wednesdays at seven and god bless.

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Amanpour: Jim Sciutto, Steve Hall, Waad Al-Kateab, Edward Watts and Sarah M. Broom

Amanpour

1:00:13 hr | 1 year ago

Amanpour: Jim Sciutto, Steve Hall, Waad Al-Kateab, Edward Watts and Sarah M. Broom

"Finding the right pros for home projects can be tough and spark a lot of questions like how do I find a pro who can help will they do a good job. Will I get a fair price. That's where homeadvisor can help from leaky faucets to major remodels. homeadvisor connects you to the right pro for the job in seconds and even helps you get a fair price. Read Reviews News Check Project Cost Guides and book appointments go to Homeadvisor DOT COM or download the free homeadvisor APP to start your next project. Hello everyone and welcome to I'm on four. Here's what's coming up. President trump fires his hawkish each national security adviser John Bolton over foreign policy clashes amid news of a CIA spy extracted from the highest levels of the Kremlin then in my life and death in Aleppo Award winning documentary makers wideout Katiba and Edward Watts take us inside serious loss city and show us hope joy and deep sadness kitten within the ruins plus if something is there the day before and then suddenly seventy not the mind has a really hard time trying to process what happened oldest. Sarah Room tells all Isaacson about lawsuit recovery after Hurricane Katrina. Welcome to the program everyone I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. Joan Bolton is out after seventeen months as national security advisor to President trump the president announced on twitter that he asked for Bolton's resignation saying I disagreed strongly eh with many of his suggestions as did others in the administration and he said he'd Announces Replacement next week this major shakeup comes off the public disagreements Ayman's on Iran Afghanistan North Korea among other issues and just often major revelations regarding use national security and Russia new reporting by CNN and backed up by the Times revealing that for decades a spy with extraordinary access to the Russian government has been providing vital information to the CIA a top level asset that was extracted by the US in two thousand seventeen joining me now is the journalist who broke this incredible incredible story Jim shooter in New York. He's also author of the shadow war inside Russias and Chinas secret operations to defeat America and Steve Steve Whole the former chief of Russia operations for the CIA gentlemen welcome to the program and let's start with the breaking news news of the National Security Adviser controversial. John Bolton is out Jim shooter. Why do you think this is the case. The president has made his tweet but bulletin is also also tweet it and send a message to his allies at Fox News that he in fact that I offered his resignation. That's right. This is what we understand. CNN's reporting is it. The proximate cause of this was a disagreement that developed into a heated argument last night over the issue of the president's invitation of Taliban leaders to Camp David David in advance of the nine eleven anniversary that was the proximate cause but in addition to that suspicion from the president and the vice president that Bolton was either creating a false narrative or leading get out that there was disagreement in the White House over that very invitation and that the president and the vice president were uncomfortable with word of that disagreement getting out but bigger picture just the latest issue disagreement between the the president's national security adviser in the president himself on key national security issues this one being a possible deal to end the Afghanistan war for deep disagreement there as you noted disagreements between Bolton and trump on North Korea Bolton more of a Hawk Hawk on North Korea more of a skeptic of president trump's continuing continuing diplomatic outreach to North Korea. Even North Korea has made no discernible steps towards denuclearization their friendship if you could call it that started on the issue of overrun in that the president knew he was hiring in Bolton and Iran hawks someone who would oppose the Iran nuclear deal which the president of course withdrew from but even on that issue in recent weeks months there had been disagreements and really there had been something of a death watch in the White House in recent weeks on Bolton folks inside the administration saying the looked like he was not in a good way that they were having these very public disagreements on these issues and now of course it devolved in an argument last night and Bolton is out so Steve All from your perspective I know you've most concentrated on the Russia desk and we'll get to that in a second but when you view national security security foreign policy of this administration and you see as we've been discussing these very very difficult issues of what to do about North Korea should try to bring Kim Kim Jong UN in from the cold what to do about Iran. Do you bomb as potentially Bolton wanted or do you not as President Obama President trump apparently decided not to do do that a few weeks ago over the Gulf crisis and of course about Afghanistan from your perspective and as a CIA kind of perspective Tiv- what does this say about the current state of National Security Christian you know from my purchase. I WanNa used to work there. We used to watch the National Security Council and of course you know the the the direction that the administration was going in and your characterization of John Bolton as a hawk is of course accurate and that is indeed. I think what president trump was looking for in Iran. The RUB has come though when you get somebody like Bolton who is Hawk across the boards you know somebody who supports strong muscular overseas activities on the part of the United States using being built hard power the military saw-power as well but when you get somebody like that who begins to take the same approach on Russia and on and on North Korea which is at odds with the president then you got a problem obviously in the in the National Security Council. I think it works best when you do have people who are disagreeing with each other so in a good normal healthy administration. You come to some sort of conclusion. The president makes the final decision but there's a fine line between that healthy discussion in chaos and a Guy Kylo Bolton has a long history of being controversial being abrasive and being very very pushy with his own staff and with others so the question is if John Bolton is on Sorta Sorta the out outer ring of of normalcy in terms of just how you behave as a bureaucrat and how you play as a team member and he's not acceptable trump who's next. Where do we go from here is he. GonNa in somebody like Devon Nunez or somebody to this nationals to be the national security adviser. I don't know where you go from Bolton. It'll be very interesting to see what the president decides on that you're right and certainly everybody overseas is waiting and watching to see what comes next and who they who who who speaks for US foreign policy. You're absolutely right. It's going to be fascinating to watch coach who is nicknamed and what this actually means on these key issues. I'm Jim let us now talk about this story that you broke which is the extraction of aw this asset for want of intelligence inside word who for decades has been cultivated apparently by the CIA as he apparently apparently moved up the ranks of policy and I inside Russia what did this person bring to the US that was so valuable enormous insight into the inner workings of the Kremlin but crucially into the plans and thinking of the Russian President my my reporting is that as you noted this is someone who had been providing information to the US for more than a decade during that time period had risen to the top of Russia's national security security infrastructure it has its own sort of National Security Council as well and with that position this person had access directly to the Russian president including I'm told by former trump administration official the remarkable ability to take photographs of presidential documents now that intelligence bore more fruit for the intelligence community because it was partly based on Intel from this asset or source or spy that the intelligence community assessed that it was Putin Putin himself who ordered the interference by Russia in the two thousand sixteen presidential election and crucially specifically in order to advantage trump over Clinton so the loss of those eyes and ears inside the Kremlin is enormous is an enormous one for the US at a time of growing tensions between these two countries as you well know. Intel agencies consistently place Russia and China together at the top of the prime threats to US national security yeah and we have now lost a vision inside one of those threats. I mean I it's very interesting when you put it that way to lost vision inside so let me ask before the details. Let me ask Stephen Hall Steve. Whole who's you were in charge of the Russia desk. I know you can't address this particular issue but in general what does this mean gene elaborate on losing vision inside such a crucial I mean it's being described as a hostile power. Russia is a hostile power. According to America's intelligence operation sure that there's no doubt that Russia's is adversarial is hostile and uh-huh Lottery Putin sees things in a zero sum game. You know Russia wins the American the Americans lose. That's the way he see things he sees things you know not to sound like the CIA spokesperson I can of course confirm or deny anything that Jim has been has been reporting on but it from a broader perspective. I think it's troubling when you have a president who sees is the the collection of intelligence which is done for the entire. US government by the US government as his own personal bank account of information to US however he wants wants to it's going to have an impact downstream with entities that want to cooperate. I want to pass sensitive information to to the to the US government in the future I I you know most egregiously I recently when you had the president tweeting out pictures of Iranian launch sites and the destruction of a launch. I should've vehicle there and then subsequently tweeting very quickly. You know hey I can. I can release this information if I want to because legally I can declassify whatever he wants to me if if you're a either a foreign intelligence service or another entity that wants to pass information to the US government you can look at that and you're going to say well if I pass really sensitive stuff a a can the US government protect itself against its own president to tweet out those secrets that you know is a servicer or another entity has chosen to share and that's going to be a real downside but the president apparently doesn't care very much about that. Cnn I think reported also earlier about the president's reported disdain for human intelligence and how he doesn't think it's particularly useful for to begin with so perhaps he just doesn't care well. Let me ask you Jim then because this is the very controversial part of it not just the safety and the security of this operative what it means for extracting and knowing what's going on in the center of the Kremlin but also what does it say about President Trump and the White House has pushed back very firmly firmly against the notion that this is -struction happened because intelligence was worried that perhaps president trump might advertently or inadvertently Salihi reveal too much about this set. What evidence is there for that though well. I'll tell you I spoke to a former trump administration official who was involved directly in the discussions when the decision was made to bring out this Russian spy and this official told me that the president and his administration's repeated mishandling of intelligence factored into that decision the timing is indicative as well because I'm told that a phone call took place soon after a may twenty seventeen meeting in the Oval Office office in which you'll remember president trump discussed and shared highly classified intelligence with Russian officials. There's a picture there Sergei Lavrov the foreign minister the former Russian ambassador or to the US Sergei Kislyak and when when the president did that although the information he shared was not source to the Russian spy came from Israel it it caused pause within the intelligence agencies about what risk that might pose in future conversations with the president that had already shown himself else undisciplined in the way that he handles classified intelligence. I'll tell you that there was another incident that followed just two months after that which again alarm the intelligence and agencies you'll remember this Christiane July two thousand seventeen. The President meets with Ladimir Putin at the g twenty in Hamburg Germany. It was a private meeting. He took the unusual step of confiscating skating his own interpreters notes afterwards. I'm told by an intelligence source that after this meeting as well the intelligence community was concerned that the president again improperly early discussed classified information so it was a series of events over time that that has worn away the intelligence community's confidence in the way. The president handles handles this material. I should also note though that leading up the decision to extract the source there were other concerns the length of service by this Russian spy and also the fact that intelligence from this Russian spy had been included in the public assessment of Russia's interference in the election in two thousand sixteen so that the at the end of the Obama Administration the Obama Administration actually offered this source the ability to be extracted at that time the source refused. It was only months into the trump administration when the extraction took place. Let let me ask you both slightly the flip side of this coin that you seem to be describing you write in your report that in part they were concerned concerned about the president and his handling of intelligence and classified information but we've also noted and we've reported and so is every other news organization that the president it seems to have a warm public relationship with President Putin so some could suggest that perhaps perhaps he's he's doing that in public precisely so that he doesn't compromise the fact that they have somebody right in there who can get to the president's desk and take pictures in the Kremlin for heaven's sake. Maybe he has to be pleasant to in about Putin to throw him off the send many Steve that and then you. Jim sure sure well Christianity Vladimir Putin a former intelligence officer himself so regardless of whether he has pleasant Nice conversations nations with Donald Trump or they're more pointed and more difficult. Putin is going to assume that the United States is attempting to collect clandestinely Salihi information against Russia so I I'm not I'm not sure I'm buying into that but I do want to add to to Jim's comments earlier about about how this president handles information and intelligence poorly in my assessment and I can tell you that if I were a you know a a foreign intelligence service I'd be really scared to share information with the US government over my right now but that's particularly important as we think back this week on the nine eleven attacks because the bulk of the information that we get from our foreign partners is counterterrorism information in short short. This president's handling or mishandling of intelligence is making the country more vulnerable because it will result in others not wanting to share information with us. It's just it's just the way the the game works and kin to two point on that another story out today and again speaking to officials who served this president and we're in the room when he made comments disparaging foreign intelligence sources including intelligence sources inside countries hostile hostile to the US. I spoke to a former trump administration official who said that the president quote believes. We shouldn't be doing that to each other. I spoke to a former senior intelligence official who told me that trump's trump's believes quote there are people who are selling out their country therefore he doesn't believe that information but but crucially and this gets to. Steve's point earlier that the president views is those sources though essential to the intelligence communities work as somehow damaging his personal relationships with those leaders Putin included but we have a public comment it from the president to this effect in June this year when there was a report out that the CIA had used Kim Jong UN's half brother as an informant for some time the President Said said publicly that under his leadership he's communicated to the North Koreans that would not happen that hobbles US intelligence collection for a sitting US president to say he he doesn't want that kind of information even from countries hostile to the US. We're such sources are essential to protecting US national security. We have a soundbite soundbites that assay within a player. I saw the information about the CIA with respect to his brother or half brother and I would tell him that would not happen under my under my auspices. That's for sure okay so you both have weighed in on about that. Steven whole all I can see you shaking your head but the one thing I do want to ask you is this and that is reporting that this asset in the Kremlin was also compromised by intelligence officials revealing the severity of Russia's election interferes with unusual detail the news media picking up on all of this. I mean doesn't there's also a problem there right. We had extraordinary information a to the to the extent that the intelligence believed that Kremlin sorry Putin himself was responsible for this interference with with trying to swing the election and all of that this came from intelligence officials. Steve Yeah again without coming into commenting directly on on this particular case I can. I can say that you know. Oh you when you have in from especially with this administration. It's got to be an extremely difficult position to be in if you collect information as part of the intelligence process whether it's CIA NSA or whoever it is collecting sensitive information. You've got to wonder as an intelligence professional working in this administration. What do you do when you collect that piece of information formation that you know it. The president is going to have issues with and then you've got a president. Who is you were just saying says? I'm not interested really in I guess naively at best saying I'm not interested in you know gentlemen reading others gentleman's male as you know of an old famous quote about how intelligence works but yes yes when you're successful it collecting really good intelligence and then you give it to the administration who might not disagree with it might not agree with it and furthermore might actually put it out out there then you've got a serious problem with the messages that you're sending to our former allies into others that might be willing to cooperate and margins on China Russia Iran all opposition issues and very importantly. I mean you both know about this. But what is the fate of this asset who's been extracted. Where is he kenny ever high. From the long arm of of Kremlin revenge look at Paul the Novi Chalk that was used against him others who've been caught and killed in revenge for this is Jim. Well listen. We have deliberately not delved into any speculation about the name or location of this particular. I individual Joel. I do know that that in the agency there is concerned with scrip all in mind that already the Kremlin was looking for people like this and and to have this discussed publicly embarrassing to them and that they will look even harder the fact is this was an extraction traction took place two years ago it I was told it's my understanding that soon after this asset disappeared that the Russian government became wise to to why this person had disappeared so it really depends on the ability to protect these people when it takes them out of the country. It's something that's how to do for a number are a number of years and listen. I it's something that we were certainly sympathetic to it. It's why initially with the story we withheld a whole host of details that we knew and we continue to withhold details that we know so as to not contribute to his or her identification. It's really tricky one Jim shooter and Steve Hole. Thank you so so much for joining us and of course all of this in the backdrop with Putin's United Russia party having lost a huge amount at the elections this this weekend for the Russian parliament in the city of Moscow so that was a big political a blow to Putin as well but as for reaction to the story on his spokesman when Cole's it pulp fiction. Martha Stewart wants to give you three meals for your own in-home taste test. That's right Martha's meal Kit Delivery Service. Martha and Marley spoon is giving away three full size meals to be part of Martha's free atom taste test visit Marley spoon dot com slash rush. CNN forget about awful frozen food and unhealthy fast food. Martha wants you to enjoy three of her best thirty minute meals for free go to Marley SPOON DOT dot com slash. CNN that's Marley spoon dot com slash C. N. N. Guys are terrible at taking care of their health. 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Oh to get Roman dot com slash on poor to get a free online visit and free two day shipping. That's get Roman dot. com slash on poor for a free visit to get started. Get Roman Roman dot com slash Amanpour. I am Bill Kristol feeling confused about politics. Who isn't that's where I host my podcast conversations with Bill Kristol. I have thoughtful conversations with leading figures and politics and public policy. We reflect on where we are and we consider where we're going. Our latest releases with Foreign Policy Expert Eric Edelman who discusses the dangerous world we live in please subscribe today to conversations with Bill Kristol no spin no soundbites just thoughtful real conversations. Russia certainly has the upper hand though over the United States in Syria without a crucial support from Moscow and Tehran President Assad would not have survived even won the civil war there one of the hardest conflicts to cover the best storytelling storytelling and reporting came from Syrian journalists. Women like the award winning film make a wide Al Qatif who picked up a camera in twenty eleven at the peaceful all star of the Arab spring when it came to Syria but then turned into a brutal civil war for years. She provided a window into her war-ravaged city of Aleppo. Now she's made her first feature documentary with filmmaker Edward Watts. It's called for summer a letter to her infant daughter and it's already won best documentary mentioned prize at Cannes where wide her doctor husband and what made this powerful protest against regime attacks on hospitals. The film film has been praised for showing that amid the horrors of war. There was also huma love and life. Here's a clip from the trailer. Some some Janik jacket nominee attention semi Nevada scenic procedure sure I share non completely at the philosophy actually what White Alkatiri Edward Watts welcome to the program. Thank you so that is a just such a strong trailer and it speaks to the real strength of the Phil you call this four Somma. So how did that come about. Why did you decide to take this format for your daughter. Does something we've we. I knew from the beginning but we were discovering. This is through the process that we did for two years. We felt that all the conversations through the material was telling everything the this is for some there was like a natural conversation as anyone around the world everyone speaks with our chart even if we to just bring it on and was just like kind of the conversation natural one one which it was through the material and Twas my daughter. Twas something you've seen it so it was really like breathing through the footage that was that the footage was about heart was the relationship between widened sample but did you make a decision to make that and to keep going back and forth because if you look at the trailer and obviously we've seen your report is through the war. It is relentlessly really dark. It's terrible terrible war. The siege of Aleppo is a terrible terrible thing. The bodies piled up. What did you think when you had to take all her footage and make it palatable well. The thing that was so incredible about what this woman achieved and what she managed to film was the fact that her footage route huge archive when I saw it for the first time I so the full spectrum of human human life in this conflict situation so the horror was there the human suffering as you talked about but also so much joy so much about the spirit of people in these kind of situations so it was more just trying to say like there was so much. How can we squeeze all of this life that was in the footage in the archive archive and container in a manageable form for the cinema so in the opening opening narration of yours. You say I made this film feel. You're dressing your daughter. I need you to understand why your father made the choices that we did what we were fighting for. What were you fighting for you then later on in the film you say we don't forgive me. Forgive me for staying saying and in fact leaving yeah twelve we have fears are Syrian. All the time about our story will not be told our voices we were all like against the under the the says you on the Russian were trying to just destroy the dream that we have a freedom of dignity and like we W- ah every parents in Syria and everyone who lived through the first year and two years of the peaceful demonstration we have that's that maybe this could be really reached the next generation so in one part of this. I really wanted to tell her about like what we went through how we started this erosion android and and it's not just for some for some for all the other children of Syria for all tied directly to understand like what we went through as Syrian people dame of freedom them let let's take a few of the elements that we just saw in the trailer because again. I think the world is familiar with the barrel bombs and the chlorine gas and the chemical could weapons and the and the slaughter in the hospitals but they're not familiar with the individual stories of the family your neighbors who profiled the little boy on the on on the balcony who had his hand his head in his hand and he was afraid that he would be taken away from Aleppo this city under siege age as thrilling so complicated to understand like how they would outside could be act for something. It's more about like unfortunately not just like the bombing was familiar also like bombing hospitals killing children. All this started to be as numbers on the news or for people watching like their news at home after dinner and all these things were coming through the mind of the of the people and then just like move onto their normal life. I felt that maybe the story in the best. One way could attorney affect every parent's every mother every human being around the world to start thinking about one step forward to do something for this people. An Ed Wood wide came out eventually after Aleppo fell and she had she you managed to bring out hard drives an hours and hours. How many hundreds of hours of footage were you looking over five hundred hours without the whole story of the his holy jeter and she'd been filming filming little bits and bobs every day pretty much through five years so is beyond the age it was right the way back to the very first days of the peaceful protests and incredible huge huge expanse and I mean we start going through it together. I think we narrowed it down to three hundred hours. Go directly relevant. That was still a huge amount of footage because you had to get it down two to ninety five minutes which was quite a task. What did you think I mean you have been a documentary producer editor for a long long time and here you are partnered up with wide now's out of Syria and has handed you her life's work until now and you've got to help edited and make it a story that may may not have exactly been what you thought it might be or how it should unfold Gimme. The creative process will actually that opportunity to collaborate in that way a was it was an honor for to begin with but it was also made the film I think strong is because both of us were coming with their own perspectives. I was trying to think about like what does say your average person in London or New York who's coming off the streets living a completely different life and then you're taking them to the heart of Aleppo into the heart of its life. How can you bring that person. In how can you keep them with you on this very tough story and had was looking from the point of the inside a point of view and so we had a lot of very robust conversation some creative green test the first really the main things was how we were so honest each other and we were like whatever his so-so all my thoughts we were really so honest and like we trust each other we try to work on this for two years and the end of the thing was like of our sources on the story itself and the things that happened so it was also like my bath we have that has received rapturous. Welcome all over you on the best documentary and can and from what I have read. It got a six minute standing ovation shen. Did you even expect that the first screening before we go to the first public screening out we were extinct. They're thinking about how how many people will leave before the finished because us what they would get tired of it or it'll be too tough too much to take care. We did a screening for friends and family earlier and they were just like overwhelmed with our earlier version which was tougher even than this overwhelming otherwise they couldn't. They will hand in front of their face and it's more about like we've been told a lot and we knew this may be that people around the world are so tired from this from the blood from the stories. They want something as people really don't care anymore about like their stories from like so far places and we were just like shock people really care and people really like they were amazing in connection. I wonder if that forced you to bring out some unusual images and stories from the war because you have this beautiful picture of the kids playing in a bombed armed out bus and I mean I guess not everybody can relate to that. Buchanan relate to kids climbing up a jungle gym climbing frame pretending to drive the bus having refund painting the bus and then you have this great story about a persimmon of fruit now. Tell me that one. This is like some movie like not uh not a lot of the moment but it's few minutes gives you a lot of flack hope and field okay I will stay alive. I will survive like Saddam after gets. It's many people in your friends who you profile and there's like the hospital staff and many of this like moments when you feel that we really together in this whatever happened and all the horror that we lived through but there's like part of the whole band happiness we still like can feel it whatever the situation where basically from somewhere her husband discovered a fresh fruit and brought it to yeah yeah. I mean it's beautiful moment because she so zoe delighted with this simple piece of small piece of fruit. He's like Oh my God. It's like I bought you a rose or something. That's like the greatest romantic gesture but that is the joy of this film my thing I mean you've covered a lot of conflict zones and I think and I've been to some as well and what the truth is is that the people tell jokes and they do these actions support each other and to sustain each other but we often don't hear about that you know you don't see enough of them exactly as the humanity which leads to the resistance of population so I I want to play a little clip which was really dramatic and it's it starts very sadly and then we'll we'll see it unfold which is a baby being born at the hospital and it came out looking like it was dead and here the doctors resuscitating and trying to give it so the baby. ABC and you just don't know tell me about tell me about this incident. It was just like normal day when we heard that there's shelling around the hospital and an injury or is coming to the hospital and take my camera and get down to see what's going on and we've found that there's a big unto men who like almost to give birth and there's like an she wasn't uses the moment yeah. This is the moment that all that work is successful in this child is alive and like you. You can't feel I was filming this just because this is my disposability to film every patient who's coming to the hospital and I've never expect that he will be alive so it was like I've just like keep filming doing this because this is important these people and their spe specialty is not terrorist as the world outside like these are human and being out terrorists and his his who was killed and suddenly you've seen like as as you've seen it. I've seen it in my own is that that's just this baby is alive now and his painting he's crying and the hospital is also a character in this movie not just the city of Aleppo under siege but the hospital in the city of Aleppo under siege and your husband plays a huge role in that Hamza is the doctor who creates this hospital brings all these other doctors and provides foulland's and thousands of hours of care and saves patients and saves lives. Tell me about how important that hospital was to the story of the war. the house at the beginning was one of nine hospitals who've been giving. Florida the People Inside Aleppo and there was like a great stuff foe from doctors and nurses and people who they've never been in this situation before but there's just taught how to do this and at the end of two thousand and extent in November the hospital's Hospital in the city after the Russian the Assad regime targeted are nine hospitals and they've been completely out of service and that time other some of the other doctors from other hospital count came to the applesauce and they were all like doing all this work together and just like the last hope for people they could have been treatment if anything cupping to them and it was just like place where you can feel that this is a place. Can I come in survive here and unfortunately like that all of the you your husband I come in the narration you say ah they target hospitals because that breaks people's spirits yeah it's happened before in eastern golden at also an old city of homes and there are and on this is just like the technique that Russian and Assad regime doing from the beginning from two thousand and twelve the first hospital was been like completely destroyed an Suppo- at all because they won't be afraid that there's no one here for them so let's go back to the title four summer. It's for your lovely daughter. WHO's now three years sold and was brought into the world in that siege and most of life under siege and you know this scenes there where you you trying to find the milk for her. You one thing we saw in the trailer where everything goes dark and you very comedy saying who's got some. Ah Y'all had to go down to the basement and every mother's nightmare to lose a child in the middle of this kind of this kind of crisis but of course she was fine and there's one another another really amazing scene that we can we can play and I'm going to play it and then I'm GonNa. Have you talked about it at would deem route. There should digital Dick having my MMJ. I wonder when you saw those five hundred hours of tape. You were amazed by how much she was also recording own side thoughts whenever something like this happened and this of course when a bomb damage to your home and you obviously you really afraid for your lives and yeah I mean one of the things he said to me was that the camera was kind of her confidante so luckily for all of us and for the film she recorded a lot of those personal moments that she didn't even talk to answer about I think and that was again one of the things that fell back extraordinarily really to be allowed into someone's personal world in that way that she her best friend was the camera in some of those circumstances. There's some of the worst circumstances and again we saw those beautiful pictures of you and getting married again under siege small party but absolutely beautiful. It's it's a life affirming scene and you filmed it phenomenally from almost all angles. I don't know how you manage it but it was pretty amazing French. Okay great friends. I'm but as as I said did hums a no has when he saw the finished product. Did he know all the things you told your camera without him being being around the said cigarettes messages. I was telling the camera he wasn't new aborted Patino that I was filming everything and he was the first I like that he was so annoyed by having all around all the time and he told me this directly many times like like I wanna live with you. I don't want to leave you with. Is it coming up and the fact that the first time I felt that he really recognized how this is really important was when we lost one of our vistaprint's yeah he was in the hospital before and at that moment not just everyone around. I felt that they've seen in their own is that this is really important for all all of us so. I guess one last question this is incredible storytelling which has taken everybody who seen it by storm and will probably go on on to win a huge number of awards and put Syria in everybody's face again in a very different way but aside as one. This is one of the things I'm sorry for this. I wish like I would love when someone said like Assad doin like he will never ever one like if he won Tom. This is Syria now. It's all destroyed. Thousands of people are being killed thousands of people in there in this and his brother presents the now six hundred Fiji Reggie around the world like if doin this people all should be back and unfortunately they lost area out of his control still being targeted and certain to be totally destroyed by the Russian on by his forces and now Syria. It's not like really Syria as like husband law forces Iranian forces. It's Russian forces and he's he's not in control anymore. It's more about really how we can start thinking about the first step of accountability T- of what happened in Syria and all this crimes thinking about how we can continue our life out of Syria until one they will be all back and hopefully in free any Sandia that we want and that's the message of your film which essentially is a letter for Somma your daughter. Thank you so much. Keep Edwards. Thank you very much thank you and you can catch this extraordinary film for some on PBS later this fall wide and Edward also hoped to play the film for the UN Security Council. So now we turn to hurricanes and the destruction they wreak Dorian has caused dozens of deaths in parts of the Bahamas but our next guest reminds us that the thousand remain long after the storm has caused back in August two thousand five Hurricane Katrina wreck the home of New Orleans writer Sarah Broom and tore up her city her debut memoir. The Yellow House is an intimate look at a family that scattered across America but felt the gravitational pull of home and she sat down with Isaac sent to tell him about healing and what remains after all seems to have gone Sarah Welcome to the show. Oh and this is such a joy for me somebody from New Orleans my hometown and you grew up and what we call the East which was one thousand nine hundred sixties development men and for our viewers who quite know the distinction talk about New Orleans East and what's called the lower ninth ward sure so new Orleans east part of the Ninth Ward and so oh the Lord ninth is in the Ninth Ward. Both of those areas are essentially bifurcated from the city by a navigation channel called the industrial canal which connects the Mississippi River and Lake pontchartrain and so New Orleans East. It's a huge area of of the city that is composed of many different neighborhoods the lower nine is closer to the Mississippi sort of right against in a way the canal and is one specific neighborhood and so the East I always think of as a much larger section of the city and the book the the Yellow House is very much a part of trying to own the city after the hurricane and you feeling like okay. It's my city to sure and for me. This is a very old feeling the feeling of what does it mean to belong to a place. What does it mean for instance instance to be a new ORLEAN and I was actually contending with this question long before Katrina. I was thinking about this the day after I left the a yellow house for College. I was thinking what does it mean that I grew up in this house where the ground outside was always soft so I was obsessing over that and then I think what ended up happening was after Katrina came and then in two thousand six when the house was demolished suddenly as a writer later I was contending with laws and you know I say in the work that I feel absence more strongly than presents and I think the fact of that led me to try to interrogate. Would it meant would it all match and that was an enormous voyage. Oy itch that I couldn't have predicted. What did it mean for your family in nineteen sixty one for your mom to say we're going to have a yellow house or awesome big deal you know my mother bought the house at when she was nineteen years old and it was her piece of land. It was her spot in the world. She made it incredibly beautiful. She sewed all the curtains for this house. It was a place I think she instantly felt tethered to and that part heart fascinates me because the house is the most perfect metaphor I think for who we all are in the world for or would it means to have a kind of interior already and to have a physical place that we're connected to so so from my mom I meant all of those things and then of course she raised her twelve children in that house and so we were in a way you know the little houses walking around the house wasn't wasn't there and it was my mother who had the insight about the ways in which people become houses and become places until you trace back one hundred years. I think your family to think rose Louisiana and then to the Yellow House in New Orleans East and it sort of culminates for you with this sense of place you get from the house. What was it like back when all of a sudden the hurricane heads so it's interesting because I had been having very conflicted feelings about the house in the years leading up to Katrina in two thousand and five and so I think the moment when the house was battered which was really Would it was was shocking for me. That doesn't quite say say it college shocking but the moment I always think about was going there with my siblings. We were there quite early back in New Orleans after the storm store. My grandmother had in fact died a month to the day of the storm the day after her funeral we drove to to New Orleans east and went to see the house my mother refused to get our car but all of us children's sort of ran to it and notice that by force of water there was another entrance made by nature essentially in the side of the House and so we all stood off from the outside peering in through this crack and seeing the detritus of lives lived my brothers dry cleaning and all the lampshades and the dressers from my childhood and that moment the feeling that something had been broken that it would never be see the same again is something that haunts me still tell me about Karl. Tell me what happened to him the hurricane and how he becomes a sentinel this book so Carl is one of my older brothers and probably for me. Just when I think of New Orleans I think of Carl he's that person from me and so he stayed in New Orleans during Katrina in fact he was acting like it was a really ordinary day. I I think many people do were and still do to this day. he drove home. He was aware that a storm was possibly coming and he fell asleep. He woke up and there was water in the house so the water kept rising and rising and of course this is after Katrina has already hit right right. What's happening now is that the levees have been breached and water is coming in and Curl essentially escapes the house by cutting through the roof with an axe he then stays on the roof for quite a long time and becomes a stranger in his own city and then shortly after the house was damaged. Njit was going there and checking on it and seeing how the house was doing is if the house was you know infirm like as if it were a person really or things that show painful painful in the book and I feel so sorry about too is that the house then get demolished by the authorities because there's nobody there array of the foundations and you never get notified. How tell me the pain of that well that that is a kind of existential feeling of loss for me and what I mean by that is it's sort of it's something is there the day before and then suddenly not the mind has a really hard time trying to process what happened and so because my brother Carl who is for me. The kind of sentinel of the book was showing up every day and sitting on this lot where you know where the house was and then he actually fell ill and was in the hospital hospital during the time when the notice was delivered in the house was ultimately demolished he showed up one day after getting out of the hospital and it was simply gone and then after the house was gone he went there every single day after work and sat watch and at some point he brought a very gorgeous ornate would table to the scene where our house used to be and he set up chairs around it and all of his friends would come and they'd hang out there. I would go there and we'd hang out there. He made it a place and in that way Carl is my mother through and through because that's the thing that she taught us whatever you have you make it beautiful you take care of it you see to it and curl did that all the way until the moment when the land was no longer hours when the Hurricane Katrina hit you are actually if I'm right up here in New York look city right. You're successful well known editor with Oprah's magazine but also journalists bride or had done many things at first you don't go home. I think you run into Samantha power the UN ambassador and your Barath and she gives is you one word on a map that you may not have even known much about right right. She says go to Burundi. It was the strangest thing I was sent in a kind kinda tailspin in the days after the storm you know where I just felt as if someone or something had died and those of us who've ever known grief no the feeling and the experience of that and I remember being at dinner with Samantha Power who then was you know had just written a problem from hell saying I giving her some very complicated idea about how I wanted to go elsewhere and think about the Global South and displacement this placement and she said you should go to Burundi and I said whereas Burundi and that sort of set off this journey that that I ended up taking aching Samantha Power had said you know you don't need a railing you know meaning you just show up and I don't know why I thought to take her at her word word. I somehow did but it was interesting to be in Burundi because I was completely stripped of any story ahead of myself or any story I had been and telling myself because in Burundi. No one knew idiot these things I was talking about the people I I was around barely knew where New Orleans was as none of this had any significance for them. It could not speak for me. I had to somehow be composed and be the person who who I was without any of the narratives I had or the stories I was telling about myself and Barundi was great for that for that reason wooded wooded you learn about home and community in your own connection to home and community by being in Burundi. Well you know it was interesting because the thing I learned about myself is that I go around essentially trying to find siblings and Bruni also reminded me that it was time to go back home that these people were home that Burundians had found their place and they were they're wrestling with it and interrogating it and being in it and it was time for me on some level to go back to the place I was essentially running from and that's New Orleans Not New York there from New York but when you say home you're referring to New Orleans after six months is suddenly moved back to New Orleans why you so after a year actually in Burundi a decided to go back. I felt the gaps were becoming very apparent to me in in terms of what I knew you know. I didn't know anything about my simply because it was really hard to talk to them. You know there was no what's APP at the time. My mother was writing these varies sort of scarce letters that didn't have a lot of information so I felt the distance and I come from a family that is very close and very connected so that that felt untenable for me and then also I got a random random call from a woman working in City Hall and Mayor Ray Nagin sort of embattled embattled at the time and and and it came about that I was searching for a job and a friend said I have the perfect person and then this woman calls me from City Hall and says we've read some of your writing eating about New Orleans. We think you would be you know really good and perfect to help us talk about the recovery and so I talked to her on the phone and it was a communication job. I decided it would be my way back into New Orleans. One of the interesting things about the hurricane is that it brought people like yourself back would left New Orleans a long time ago including me. I came back and moved back to New Orleans but on the flip side of that we lost a lot of people that haven't come back to the storm. How has that affected New Orleans and and to some extent your sense of the place well that's an important part of what happened and for me in my own family so many of my siblings have and yet to return you know they found better jobs elsewhere or they just financially haven't been able to come back. I think that has essentially essentially changed in a way the nature of the city itself I remember right after you know in two thousand eight when it came back to work for the Mayor Living on Kimbro street in the Carrollton area and realizing that the rent that I was paying was eight hundred dollars higher than the rent you know before the storm and it made me really think about how it was possible for people all to return and so I am hyper aware I think of of how the fabric has changed. I know that many New Orleans have and yet to return even now and you moved back. Do you think for good you know. I have a little yellow house. I never thought thought I wanted a yellow house but I fell in love with this yellow house in the Marigny neighborhood and you know I'm there in New Orleans at least once a month to be with my mom and my siblings and so it's where I live part of the time if I'm not in Harlem. I'm generally in my little house in the Marigny. Arnie is nice to have a yellow house that sort of inbetween the French quarter back in New Orleans East. I hope you make it home. Thank you so much. Thank you thank you even off to tragedy. The lucky. Ones can go home again but that's it for now. Remember you can listen to a podcast see. US Online landed on for Dot Com and follow me on instagram and twitter. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London. Are you interested in learning how great companies grow download the podcast the Mar- tech podcast tells the stories of real the world marketers who use technology to generate growth and achieve business and career success from advertising software as a service to data getting brands ends authentically integrated into content performs better than TV advertising typical life span of an article is about twenty four to thirty six hours for reaching out to the right right person with the right message clear call to action that is just a matter of timing ready to learn the secrets of technology driven marketing download the Mar- tech podcast cast just search Martin M. A. R. T. E. C. H. Wherever you download your podcasts are you interested in learning how enterprise scale companies drive organic traffic to increase their online visibility than download album the voices of search podcast from the heart of Silicon Valley here search metrics. 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president President Putin United States CIA Russia Jim shooter Aleppo Syria Donald Trump Russia President Assad CNN John Bolton New Orleans White House National Security Council Hurricane Katrina White Alkatiri Edward Watts
Democracy Now! 2019-05-16 Thursday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:44 min | 2 years ago

Democracy Now! 2019-05-16 Thursday

"I am Amy Goodman. If you're tuning into this podcast right now, you know that democracy, now is news. You can trust democracy now is independent, which means we're funded by you, not the oil, gas and coal companies when we cover climate change or the weapons manufacturers when we cover war and peace. Not the insurance industry when we cover healthcare. No, we're brought to you by viewers listeners readers like you committed to independent information right now. A generous supporter will double your donation to democracy. Now that means if you donate fifteen dollars, we get thirty dollars. Take advantage of this generous offer, and go to democracy now dot org to make your donation today. Thank you so much. From New York. This is democracy now. The Syrian security system has a network of prisons that have sucked in an estimated hundreds of thousands of people during this conflict. There's one hundred twenty eight thousand people who have entered the system and have never come out, and that's probably an under an undercount inside serious secret torture prisons. We look at a shocking New York Times, expose on torture, and execution inside serious prison system. And the detentions are continuing, even as the fighting wines down. Then a California jury has ordered Monsanto to pay a record two billion dollars to a couple who say they've both got cancer after using Monsanto's roundup weed killer Monsanto keeps denying that it causes cancer. And these two people here are casualties of that deception. This is going to continue until Monsanto and now Bayer takes responsibility. For its product. People are dying. People are getting sick and they have no idea that it's being caused by roundup then nearly every country in the world has agreed to curb plastic pollution. But the United States refuses to support the global agreement. Rustic every way, and we need a force to sort of be responsible to women one country to be all the countries of the world, all Schumer's all organizations have to come together. I the private sector of the plastic producers, you know have to come together before us to find. All that, and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now, democracy now dot or the Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman. Alabama governor Kay Ivey Wednesday signed the nation's most restrictive ban on abortion into law. The Bill, which faces immediate court challenge makes no exception for cases of rape, or incest. It was approved Tuesday by Alabama Senate with the support of twenty five Republicans, all of them white men under the Alabama law. Doctors could face up to ninety nine years in prison for, for performing abortions decades longer, than prison sentences typically given to rapists, even far right Christian. Evangelical leader, Pat Robertson called the Bill extreme saying quote it goes too far. Meanwhile, Missouri's Republican led Senate passed Bill early today banning abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy. The legislation now heads to the Republican lead, Missouri house of Representative. Cbs Republican governor Mike parson has promised to sign the Bill into law architects behind the bills, and Alabama Missouri and other states say they're aimed at overturning Roe v. Wade, the landmark nineteen seventy three supreme court ruling that recognizes the constitutional right to an abortion. President Trump declared a national emergency Wednesday over what he called threats to American technology, barring US telecoms from installing foreign made equipment, the move appears to be aimed punishing. Hallway, the Chinese maker of telecommunications gear, and consumer electronics. It's the latest esscalation of the US trade war with China, after Trump followed through last week on the threat to hike tariffs on two hundred billion dollars of Chinese imports. Meanwhile, the White House has delayed plans to place tariffs of up to twenty five percent on imported cars and auto parts. This comes this candidates, trade minister has left Washington DC without an agreement on lifting US tariffs on steel and aluminum. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin has said the US won't ratify successor to NAFTA, the North American Free trade agreement until Canada and Mexico reached an agreement to end tariffs. President Trump set to unveil a sweeping immigration plan today. That would prioritize high skilled workers in English speakers while further cutting the number of immigrants granted asylum, or allowed to reunify with family members living in the US. The plan would cap immigration rates at their current levels changing the percentage of those receiving green cards based on so-called merit system from twelve to fifty seven percent, it could even require Magritte's hoping to enter the US to pass a civics test. Trump is set to announce the plan, which was crafted by a son in law has senior adviser Jared Kushner at a ceremony today at the white House Rose Garden. Meanwhile, Guatemala's US, console says a two and a half year old migrant boy died in US, custody Wednesday, three days after he and his family were detained by customs and border protection. He's believed to be the fourth migrant child. Old to die in US custody. Since December the White House says it won't need a request by the House Judiciary committee to turn over documents and sweeping investigation into whether President Trump obstructed Justice in a letter to House Judiciary chair, Jerrold, Nadler, White House counsel, Pat sip baloney accused Democrats attempting to do over special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Trump. Congress member Nadler, accused sip baloney of quote, claiming that the president is a king. He said he was considering holding Trump administration officials who refused to testify in contempt and may Levy, very large fines against anyone defying a congressional subpoena in Paris, the leaders of France and New Zealand Wednesday, unveiled an agreement to combat online. Extremism, the so-called Christ's church. Call is named after the New Zealand city where in March a white supremacist gunman killed fifty one worshippers to mosques and live the massacre on. Facebook. This is new Zealand Prime Minister just send our Dern, the social media dimension to the attack was unprecedented, and Dow response today with the adoption of the crushed coal is equally unprecedented as well Neva before have countries and companies come together in the wake of horrific attack to commit to an action plan that will deliver collaboratively would can new technology built, to my cow communities, ultimately Sipho so far, the Christ's church. Call has support of sixteen countries the European Commission and eight tech giants, but the Trump administration said Wednesday it, quote is not currently in a position to join the endorsement, the White House cited concerns, the agreement could violate first amendment in New York Times opinion, piece last weekend, prime minister, ardor and wrote she supports free speech rights, but that quote that right does not include the freedom to. Broadcast mass murder in Yemen. At least six civilians were killed and dozens more wounded today as US Bax Saudi led coalition warplanes bombed residential areas of Yemen's capital sonata, the violence came as the rebels and Saudi back forces clashed in the port city of data threatening to unravel a ceasefire in a plan pullout from the city by the forces in Sudan's, capital, Khartoum government, troops opened fire on pro democracy. Protesters Wednesday with live on munition wounding at least fourteen people. The violence came just days after at least six protesters, and one soldier were killed a similar protest after the latest shootings, the head of Sudan's ruling military council said he'd suspended talks with pro democracy demonstrators for three days, accusing them failing to de-escalate tensions demonstrators have been demanding transfer military to civilian rule following last month's military coup that ousted longtime leader Omar al-bashir in the Gaza. Strip is rarely troops opened fire on Palestinian protestors Wednesday with live on munition and chemical agents injuring at least sixty five people, the protesters, marking the seventy first aniversary of the knockabout or catastrophe when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were forcibly expelled from their homes after the state of Israel was formed one protester was left in serious condition yesterday and sixteen injured by gunfire. Others were treated. For gas and hellacious from tear gas and skunk, spray chemical concoction that smells like corpses and feces Trump administration officials said, Wednesday photograph showing Ronnie and boats equipped with missiles, where the cause of the recent esscalation between the US and Iran, claiming they were evidence that Iranian paramilitaries and the Persian Gulf were preparing to target US. Naval vessels, the New York Times cited three unnamed officials who made the claim which widely contradicts other officials including Europeans Iraqis members of both parties in congress. And some Trump administration officials who reportedly said the missiles are likely defensive weapons. This comes just two days after the top British general in the US led coalition against ISIS said there is no increase threat from Ronnie, and backed forces and Iraq. Syria. There is no increase threat from Iran and back forces in Iran or Syria. Major General Christopher Geico was speaking via video link from Baghdad during a Pentagon news conference, though, there's been no increase threat from Iranian. Full Susan ero-, consider aware of the presence clearly and Mona to them, along with a whole range of others because that's the Lauren. Just hours after General Chris made those comments central command disputed them. In a statement, the US department of transportation has ordered a halt to all passenger and cargo flights in and out of Venezuela in the latest move by the Trump administration to ratchet up pressure on President, Nicolas Maduro as backs efforts by position groups to stage, a coup d'etat. Meanwhile, in Washington D C civil rights leader, Reverend Jesse Jackson, successfully pass through police lines Wednesday to drop off food and water to four activists who remain inside Venezuela's embassy building, at the invitation Venezuela's government in order to prevent it from being taken over by Venezuela's US-backed opposite last week authorities. Cut off water and electricity to the embassy to see our coverage of the occupation and protest at the end. The visit our website democracy now dot org in climate news. Temperatures near the end. Terance to the Arctic Ocean in northwest Russia reached a record shattering eighty four degrees Fahrenheit over the weekend, an area where high temperatures are normally thirty degrees, cooler this time of year. This comes as the national snow and ice data center, recorded a record low sea ice extent for the Arctic Ocean. In April noting, almost all of the sea ice, more than four years old is gone over the weekend meteorologist measured carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere over four hundred fifteen parts per million the highest level and human history and concentration. That's not been seen on earth in over three million years, California fire, investigators said Wednesday the Pacific ask electric company PG ni was to blame for last year's campfire the deadliest most destructive wildfire in California's history, which left eighty five people dead and scorch more than. Hundred fifty thousand acres. Investigators concluded the fire began after PG any electrical transmission lines ignited, Dr education, in at least two spots in a statement PG needs said it accepted the determination California has seen increasingly deadly blazes in recent years as climate change drives higher. Temperatures extreme droughts and severe weather that make wildfires far more destructive in New York City, the American Museum of natural history and the Metropolitan Museum of art. Both said Wednesday they'll stop accepting donations from the Sackler lers, the billionaire family that owns Purdue pharma maker of Oxycontin, the highly addictive drug at the center of the opioid epidemic. Other cultural institutions, including the Guggenheim in London's Tate modern museum have also severed ties with the Sackler 's President Trump has poured former Canadian Press baron. Conrad Black a longtime political ally, and former business partner who in two thousand. Thousand seven was found guilty of fraud and obstruction of Justice black. Donald Trump has described as a friend wrote a glowing book about the president last year. Titled Donald J Trump of president, like no other black was convicted for fleecing millions of dollars from shareholders of his company, Hollinger international his media empire included, the Daily Telegraph, in London the Chicago, sometimes the Jerusalem Post national post and Canada and four hundred other newspapers and New York City. Mayor Bill de Blasio is running for president joining crowded field. Twenty four contenders for the democratic nomination to Blasios kicked off his campaign today with video highlighting his experiences. Mayor of New York promising to fight for working families combat climate change and take on Donald Trump. I will take on the wealthy will take on the big corporations. I will not rest until this government serves people as mayor of the largest city in America, I'd gun just. Is that the president guys Donald Trump must be stopped? I've beaten in before and I will do it again. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren piece report, I mainly Goodman, and I mean, Shaef welcome to listen view is around the country and around the world. Inside syria. Secret torture prisons, that title of shocking expose by the New York Times looking at how showed us ads government has jailed and tortured tens of thousands of Syrian since the uprising began in two thousand eleven according to the Syrian network for human rights. Nearly one hundred twenty eight thousand people have disappeared there presumed to be either dead or still in custody, the group estimates almost fourteen thousand individuals have died under torture, and detentions are continuing, even as the fighting wines down over five thousand six hundred Syrians reportedly arbitrarily detained last year, a twenty five percent jump over the previous year while the Syrian government has denied running the secret torture and detention program. More evidence into internal Syrian government documents has emerged showing. The extent of the torture program over the past seven years times has been documenting what takes place inside the secret prisons, the accounts are hiring the times report into graphic descriptions of torture, sexual violence and murder. One form woman inmate Meriem Khalif told the New York Times, she and six other women report, tortured and repeatedly raped in a basement cell where quote blood from violent rapes stained the floor. Survivors also reported guards force detainees to eat excrement a prisoner named Mugniyah, faquir recalled guard, who called himself as rile, the angel of death who is also a nurse at a medical facility, where prisoners were often tortured and killed faquir told the times up to six patients, where chained naked to each bed faquir said patients were taken by us row at. At night, and quote, we'd see the shadow of someone hitting, we'd hear the scream then silence suffocating silence in the morning, we'd see the body in the hallway to the bathroom. You would see bodies piled. We stepped on our comrades bodies barefoot. The New York Times also heard testimony from former prisoners who said they were forced to act like animals by guard who went by the name of Hitler. The prisoners were beaten if they didn't, quote Bank bark or Bray correctly, a United Nations, panelists that the conditions in the prison including the positive toilet facilities rampant illness, minimal, and rotten food, and the absence of medical treatment are tantamount to extermination. Find out more, we're joined by the story's author and Bernard. She's a reporter at the New York Times fellow at the council on foreign relations. She was the New York Times bureau chief in Beirut from two thousand twelve to two thousand eighteen it's great to have you back onto mock. Crecy now. And we last spoke to when you were invaded. This is horrific story. Talk about the scope, the number of people you believe have been detained the number of people disappeared and killed, and serious prisons. Unfortunately, nobody knows the exact number because the government keeps all of this behind closed doors and doesn't release any information to the families of most of the people who are taken, but according to the Syria network of human rights. They have counted not estimated, but counted, one hundred twenty eight thousand people who have been reported by their families, or by witnesses to be taken by the security forces and not emerged from the prisons, that Eighty-one thousand of those people. Their families have not had any word from them whatsoever. So this is a sprawling system human rights groups estimate that the total number of Syrians who have passed through, it could be in the hundreds of thousands. Well, and you've been working on this fa- several years. Pining this evidence, as have a couple of other rights organizations, Amnesty International in particular, now, I'd like to go to the Syrian government's response to earlier, research, and documentation on these torture, prisons in an extended interview with Yahoo news in two thousand seventeen Syrian president, but shot said, claimed that Syrian refugees were quote definitely aligned with terrorists. And when he was shown, photographs exposing the torture of political prisoners by his government, he dismissed the allegations, as quote, fake news. Dick before to any court in your country. Good. They convict any criminal regarding this competitive was this question, who committed if you don't have this full picture cannot make judgment in just propaganda. Just taking us. They want to unite the government in everyone, you can have any individual crime, top overboard anywhere, but it's not the policy. So that was a President Assad in two thousand seventeen responding to earlier reports. And in fact, he was shown photographs. Of these prisoners. And then he denied the veracity of the photographs. So what do you think how has the Syrian government responded at all to your much more extensive report? And the fact that you make the case that his success in this war has been contingent on these prisons. They haven't responded at all, which is pretty typical. They're not very responsive to direct queries. From the press. Look, I think that, that their MO has always been to just deny deny deny anything no matter how much evidence there is. And he said, to, to my face in two thousand sixteen when I met him in Damascus that, you know, we have a normal Justice system operating here, any family, who's missing their relatives should just go and ask. But of course, families that I know personally thousands of fam-. Have been going for years to ask after their families on sometimes family for asking. Where do they ask who they make the rounds of dozens of different security offices? There's four different intelligence branches and each one operates dozens of torture in detention facilities. The New York Times expose begins with the story of Muhammad above his testimony echoed by many other survivors reveal that by two thousand twelve quote. There was an industrial scale transportation system among persons, detainees were tortured on each leg of their journeys and helicopters buses cargo plane, summer called riding hours and trucks, normally used for animal carcasses, hanging by one arm chain to meet hooks. Mr bashes? New cell was typical twelve feet, long nine feet wide, usually packed. So tightly prisoners had to sleep in shifts. Tell us Muhammed story how you met him. How you. Learned of the situation and then why you say you think actually the uprising in two thousand eleven was caused by this kind of sadistic tortures person system. Mahanta bash was very typical of the types of people that were sucked into this system. He was a protester and eventually, led peaceful protests in Aleppo when the uprising began in two thousand eleven and he was arrested the first time in two thousand eleven was arrested several times that year an inch thousand twelve and was taken to a number of different facilities. He said he was like a tour guide to torture, and he was forced to, as you said, act, the roles of animals, he was in kind of pseudo plays for officers and guards dinner kind of entertainment, so but, but also much more, I shudder to call it routine. But, but the more routine types of torture being hung by. Wrists being put into stress positions and beaten until he made a false confession which was something that happened to most of the prisoners. Look, I think the, the, the use of this system, followed a playbook that Assads father began in Hama in nineteen eighty two when there was an uprising and it the idea was to suck up the people who were non violent protesters because it's easier to go after the ones that are violent. Of course, there were all kinds of people arrested, but there was special focus on arresting civilian protesters because those are the biggest threat at the end of the day, we're talking about a state with all the machinery of state power and violence at its disposal. It's in a way easier for them to fight the people that pick up arms, and it's harder for them to face people that are using civile civil methods. You also say, though, in the piece that simultaneously, as the Assad regime was arresting more and more civilians, they also released radical Islamists, who had been imprisoned for decades. Yes. The vision, of course, helped funnel jihadists into Iraq to fight the US occupation there and arrested, many of them when they return now at the in one of the first big steps after the uprising began in two thousand eleven a lot of those people were released including the top leaders, the people who became in the future top leaders of the most hardline Islamist rebel groups at the very same time that those people were released into the population, they were vacuuming up people literally including followers of Gandhi, who followed a Islamist and his Lama cleric who believed in nonviolence and called on. People to adopt a form of jihad that was not violent, but it was based on non-violence this person's followers among the civilian leaders of the revolution at the beginning and many of them were killed right away or sucked into the prisons, and have not come out. We're going to break and then come back to this discussion and Bernard reporter at the New York Times fellow at the council on foreign relations. Her latest piece came out Sunday in the New York Times inside Syria secret, torture Persians, how Charlotte said, crushed dissent. This is democracy. Now, we'll be back with her in a minute. Saying to. Early. Water, too. Have you ever figured? What you gonna do. When you finally falls and even. Monsanto. No children. Be on your time. And live to fail. Shame. Your every. Donalds by now even say. A mess fries. Monsanto by the American folk singer Michael Hurley, a California. Juries ordered Monsanto today, a record two billion dollars to a couple say they got cancer after using Monsanto's roundup, we killer that's next but we're continuing right now with an Bernard. She's a reporter at the New York Times fellow at the council on foreign relations. Her latest piece inside Syria secret, torture prisons, how sharla side crush dissent. I made me Goodman, with Nurmi shape and tell us the story of Mariam clay and what has happened to her. Is the woman from Hama, who her crime was helping injured protesters which was considered terrorism by the government if it was considered a form of terrorism. So she was arrested in two thousand twelve and take into one of the facilities in Hama, and she was raped. She said every night, by the chief of investigations of the prison whom she Colonel Sulaiman. She knew him by name and documents that we've seen show that the head of investigations in that facility was, in fact, a Colonel Sulaiman Juma, and she was held in the prison with a number of other women in a basement cell where the six women barely fit. They were taken to the to the colonel's office, and he used to even bring his friends to join him in raping them. Well, I wanna ask about another question that you're a piece raises. I mean something that every. One has seen the torture prisons, of course. Scarcely known about and scarcely covered in the media. But of course, is the Syrian refugee crisis, the millions and millions up to six million refugees who are now living outside their country. President Trump welcomed Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban's to the White House on Monday, the far, right nationalist leader is known for his hardline anti immigration policies and rolling back democratic institutions and checks on his power. This is or ban. And then Trump speaking from the Oval Office. Approaches. And I would like we press that we are proud and together the United States on fight against illegal migration. On terrorism and to protect the Christian communities all around. I know he's tough man, but he's a respected man and he's done the right thing. Courting too many people on immigration. And you look at some of the problems that they have in Europe that are tremendous because they've done it a different way than the prime minister so von has toes down, Hungary, southern border building razor wire fence to keep out refugees. Many of them from Syria, and has also deported refugees already in the country. Now, the Assad regime has conflicted the refugees with terrorists and in your piece, and you say that many millions of Syrian refugees are now unlikely to return even once the war is over. If these torture, prisons remain in operation and also the fact that Trump a corroborated or, or said that what or Bunn has done is right. And the fact that the US in two thousand eight. Eighteen admitted only sixty two Syrian refugees. Right. I think that, you know, at the beginning of the Syrian conflict Syrians would say, if this kind of rights violations are allowed to go with impunity in Syria. It will affect freedoms in the west and that seemed at the time kind of history onic, but in fact was happened is that refugees have flowed out of the country? The refugee crisis proved to be fuel for the rise of the right wing and the divisions within Europe and the rise of leaders like our von who is eroding, civil liberties, and certainly fighting immigration and Trump is enjoying the same rhetoric. And as you saw agreeing now this just reflects asides own conflation of refugees with terrorists when, in fact. These are terrorism both ISIS and the violence of the state used against them is what these refugees are fleeing. Can you talk about the internal memos that you got hold of this question of we just listened to Assad the president, how much he knew. And how much is being directed directly from the top. So this is a state where there's a very close coterie of advisers and officials around, and they decide almost everything that after the uprising began. There was a crisis cell that was created to respond to it, and it reported directly to the memos show that, that cell ordered crackdowns on protesters on people who tarnish the image of Syria in the foreign media, that just means people who talked to lists, and the these types of people now later, the top security officials also asked for every death to be reported to them so that they would it was clear that they knew about the killings in detect. Shen they referred to by bodies piling up. They referred to the need to deal with all kinds of bad conditions that were leading to all these death, now it sounds in vacuum as if they're trying to correct these problems, but there's no record in eight hundred thousand documents that have been smuggled out of Syria of anyone being punished for any of these actions. It really just shows that they were aware of them. Can you talk about your methodology over? I mean, you've been working this for years and what first prompted you. I mean, there is some coverage of the catastrophe of war and Syria, the obvious barrel bombing all of that. But what about what's happening behind closed doors? Assads been very careful and would it means to talk to people about those who survived the lucky ones about this level of torture. They have endured. So in a way, this is something that everyone knew in Syria, in the sense that is not a new system. It's been around for a long time, but what we decided to do over the years. And of course, we did this while covering the daily news of Syria over the years was to try to go deeper to try to get accounts of survivors, who corroborated one another, and we're corroborated by documents, it took a very long time to get enough people who had their families safely out of Syria, and felt safely safe to talk and to get documents and to basically over the years. Many human rights organizations and journalists and lawyers worked on this issue. So we're talking about evidence that has a created over the years, and as up to this big picture. Now, one of the toughest parts is speaking to the survivors about what they've been through, and we spoke to dozens of them me, and my wonderful team of Syrian and Lebanese colleagues now. You need to be sensitive when you're dealing with victims of trauma, and without sacrificing journalistic rigor without sacrificing vacation. But this was a long process. This had a huge emotional impact on us as well as of course, on the survivors, who had to retell their stories. So it took time it took energy. And, and it does sort of make you ask yourselves, a lot of questions about humanity and how this kind of thing can continue to happen in the twenty first century. How did you know what survivors to speak to at some point, you ten a story of someone who sneaked out the names of some of the detainees can you talk about that? Well, so in terms of who to talk to basically almost every Syrian that we talked to who had any connection to the protest movement, and even many who did not had relative or friend, who was in the system. So it was not difficult to find people. And then through those people and also through networks of survivors, we would get different names of people who, especially in our quest to find people that were willing to use their names. That was that was the toughest part. But yes months woulda Omori is one of the prisoners who, who worked together in a cell underground, in the fourth base run by the fourth division, which is controlled by brother mad, and this group of prisoners decided, let's write down all the names of the people in our cell, and get them out with whoever manages to get out, I just to let people know to their families, and the world that these are the names of at least these people that we could identify here. Now they had to write the names in blood on a piece of fabric. They were so into the seam of a jacket and monsoon was the first one to be released and he managed to wear that. Check it out a shirt, I guess, and, and to bring those names out to first they were displayed in the holocaust museum in Washington DC. They were shown to many different officials, and they were recently submitted to thirties in Sweden as part of a complaint by survivors trying to get Sweden as France and Germany have done to open a war crimes prosecution against Syrian officials on behalf of refugees, and citizens who are in Sweden who have been subject to the system. And the Syrian government is very aware of this, and trying to protect themselves from any kind of war crimes or crimes against humanity charges. How are they doing this? Well, first of all, by stating in Syria. I mean there is already a an arrest warrant against Jamila Hasson, who's the head of the air force branch of intelligence and against Ali Mahmoud. Who's the top? Security official overall and those guys just aren't going to come to Europe to end up getting arrested. And but there are lower level officials some of whom have joined the refugee flow and have been arrested once they've been identified in Germany, and France. Now, they also in the memo's interestingly one memo from the military intelligence department says when you make these death certificates about each detainee, who dies, and no remember all these death certificates claim that the people died because their heart stopped, so that's kind of a tall j, of course when you die, your heart stops, and obviously all these young people that are in the prisons are not all suddenly, having an epidemic of heart disease. So the memo instructed them to write the memo's in such a way as to ensure judicial immunity from prosecution for the work of the intelligence officials in the future, one of the other things that you an international mechanism that you point to is the fact that the UN general assembly. Has voted in favor of establishing the international independent and impartial mechanism. What is the status of this, and what will it, what kind of mandate is charged with or will it be if it's a stylish? No, it has been established and funded, which is a big step and that was done through a general assembly vote in the UN in order to get around the impasse in the Security Council. The Security Council is blocked by Russia from referring Syria to the international criminal court, but the triple IM that you mentioned is a new body, which is going to be kind of a clearinghouse for all the documents and, you know, court ready evidence that's being collected by different groups Syrian, and European groups to try to build war-crimes cases now it has a mandate to, to build those cases for use in any future, prosecutions in international or national courts. But it does not have the ability to arrest or charge. Anyone? It's, it's a it's a sort of like a prosecutor waiting for a court, I guess you can say, well, we want to thank you so much for joining us today for explaining your piece and for the peace it self your years of work, and Barnard is a reporter at the New York Times fellow at the council on foreign relations. We will link her piece in the times inside Syria. Secret torture prisons, how Charlotte side crushed dissent. She was the New York Times bureau chief in Beirut from two thousand twelve to two thousand eighteen coming up a California jury has ordered Monsanto record two billion dollars. And then we'll talk about the US refusing to sign onto a global treaty around plastic stay with us. Sniffle party. All the snow is gone later in the show. We'll talk about climate change, but right now. Well, this is democracy. Now, I made me Goodman, with Nermeen Shaef. We turn now to the stunning verdict in the case against US business giant Monsanto, which has been ordered to pay its highest damages yet in the third lawsuit over the popular weed killer roundup, a jury has ordered Monsanto, which is owned by German pharmaceutical giant beta to pay more than two billion dollars in punitive damages to out of an out Berta Pilat, a couple who were both diagnosed with non Hodgkin's lymphoma cancer off to using round up on their properties for over thirty years. The main ingredient in the herbicide is life Assad and said to cause the cancer this has plaintiff Alberta. Pilat we've been finding kids for. Nine years now on the me and it was caused by round up. Changed our lives forever. We can't do the things that we keep be able to. And we really resent Montalto for that. We wish that monks Ondo had warned us ahead of time about the dangers of using Fava, and that there was something on the front of their label that said danger may cause cancer at that point, we could've used. Round up. We wouldn't have used it. But I'm sure a lot of people choose to. And they weren't giving it said a choice because from their ads. We felt that it was incredibly safe to you in turn, as for the plaintiffs estimate there tens of thousands of similar cases, against roundup pending and courts around the country last year during California ordered Monsanto to pay two hundred eighty nine million dollars damages to a school grounds keeper who developed cancer after regularly using the weed killer roundup, the forty six year old man, Dwayne Johnson also has non-hodgkin's lymphoma doctor says unlikely to live past twenty twenty earlier this month. The EPA said glysophate is not carcinogenic other scientific studies and the World Health Organization found human exposure can in fact lead to cancer will for more, we're joined by attorney Brent Wizner co lead trial counsel for alva-, Albert Pilat. Welcome back to democracy. Now can you start off by responding to this wreck? Third verdict branch two billion dollars. And what the says about money center, we've been litigating this case for over three years now and this, obviously, is the third trial that has gone to jury, and we presented all the evidence and we've been growing, we have a growing mountain of evidence that we've, we've been accumulating as part of this litigation. And I, we had finally had a chance to show at all and show, the jury that Monsanto is gauged, essentially corporate malfeasance the last forty five years, and in so doing, I think juries punitive damage awards speaks volumes about what the evidence shows a lot of people talk about how Monsanto you know, the says it safe or whatnot. But the simple fact is, when you look at the evidence, it's overwhelming and juries are resoundingly saying, stop it. I'd like to go to statement, from bay obey of the quote is disappointed with the jury's decision and will appeal the verdict in this case which conflict. Directly with the US environmental protection agency's, interim registration review decision release just last month the consensus among leading health regulators worldwide that Dreyfuss based products can be used safely, and that life is, is not personal genyk, and the forty years of extensive scientific research on, which their favorable conclusions are based Brent was no, your response to what bear has said. Well, it's the same response that the same thing they said to the jury it's the same thing. They've been saying for the last three years, and it's just simply nonsense. Simple fact, is that the EPA has got it wrong on life eight. We have study after study after study showing that in fact, does cause a specific type of cancer called them foam. And we see it happening and thousands and thousands of people across the country, you know, currently this administration and this EPA will not. Take action against Monsanto. We've seen the internal documents the text messages, the emails between senior EPA fficials and Monsanto employee's. And the simple fact is they know that this will not take adverse action against them. It is a travesty that this truth about it, causing cancer, and this awareness that we're trying to raise has to be done in the context of litigation. We only these lawsuits only just because the has failed the American public for forty five years and Monsanto's allowed to get away with, with reckless conduct with essentially impunity during the trial numerous internal Monsanto documents emails came to light, including the July two thousand eighteen Email from an analyst from the corporate intelligence firm hack loot. They Email read, quote a domestic policy adviser at the White House said, for instance, we have Monsanto's back on pesticides regulation. We're prepared to go toe to toe on any disputes. They may have with, for example, the EU monster. Ntoni not fear any additional regulation from this administration after the SIEM became public the center for biological diversity asked the Trump administration for public records to assess the pesticide industries influence on the proposal to reapprove glysophate, can you talk more about this sprint Wizner. Well, it's really interesting in the middle of trial, after we had rested, our case in chief. But before closing arguments out of nowhere, the EPA issues, an interim analysis, it was written by an individual, Billy Mitchell who doesn't have any higher or specialized education or training. And if you read the document, it literally reads, like the opening statement for Monsanto during trial, it was Monsanto wants to report EPA brings it, and that is shows you just that the level of capture of this agency that essentially does not work for the American public, but works for industry, these documents from these these corporate Intel. Agencies they show us just how deep it runs. And it's not just, you know, a political thing, but it's actually in the staffers themselves, the fact that the White House is telling Monsanto we have your back. I mean, it is tells us that we're going to have to keep fighting his fight that we're not gonna get any support or help from the public agencies that ironically are supposed to be protecting the public health very quickly. Duane Lee Johnson. You also represented him the schools grounds keeper who want to two hundred eighty nine million dollars in damages the Pilate's one two billion dollars. But actually what happens in these settlements. How do you arrive at these numbers, and do they actually get this? And what does it do to Monsanto? Well, whether or not Mr. Mr. Johnson will see the entire award. It's an issue that's currently being fought in courts on appeal the periods obviously ward was substantially bigger. And that's, that's a product of the fact that mister Johnson's case was actually rushed to trial because of his failing health whereas the period, case we. We'd had time to develop the full body of evidence. So that's one of the reasons why the number so big. But I think we look at the overall situation, what these numbers say is a clear signal to Monsanto and now bear that they need to do something. And the simple fact is currently, the leadership at bear is refusing to take responsibility for this health crisis that, that Monsanto created and the refusing to do right by these people, and we're going to continue to file these lawsuits. Take him trial, and get bigger and bigger verdicts, and till they finally do right by these people are talking thousands of lawsuits. Well over thirteen thousand and those are filed lawsuits, that's not counting. The probably twenty or thirty thousand other lawsuits that are yet to be filed. I mean, this is a health crisis that we have, and Bayer needs to sit down with these lawyers and sit down with these victims and find a way through this. But right now they're choosing to fight. And if they wanna fight we'll see him in court and what happens to round up twenty seconds. You know. Hopefully, we get a warning, we want people to know and have a choice when they use the product. Hey, does it cost cancer? They have a right to now should it be removed from the market. That's a difficult question. We have people still smoke cigarettes. We know they cost cancer at the end of the day is America. People have a right to make a choice, whether it gets removed or not. That's a different question. They deserve at least to know that it causes cancer. Thank you for being with us, attorney and the co lead trial counsel for alva- and Berta Pilat and a lawsuit against Monsanto, the Pilate's, both develop cancer after using roundup weed killer, on property for decades, California jury has just order Monsanto to pay the couple more than two billion dollars in damages. This is democracy now democracy now dot org. The Warren peach report, I mean, he Goodman, with Shaef we end today's show with the growing crisis of plastic pollution, the every country in the world. But not the United States took a historic step to cook pasta waste last week when more than one hundred and eighty. Nations. Agreed to add Kostic to the Basel Convention, a treaty that regulates the movement of hazardous materials between countries. The US is one of just two countries that has not ratified the thirty year old treaty during negotiations last week in Geneva, the Environmental Protection Agency, and State Department joined the plastics industry and trying to thwart the landmark legally binding agreement despite this, the United States will still be affected by the agreement because countries will be able to block the dumping of mixed or on recyclable plastic wastes from other nations, the amended treaty will make it much more difficult for wealthy countries to send their plastic waste to poorer countries by prohibiting nations from exporting classic waste. That is not ready for recycling only around nine percent of plastic is recycled the UN estimates. There are one hundred million tons of plastic waste in the. Ocean swell. For more, we go to Anchorage Alaska, where we're joined by Pam Miller. Co chair of the international pollutants elimination network, or I pen, it's global network of NGOs, dedicated to toxics free future. Miller's also executive director of Alaska community action on toxics, welcome to democracy, now, pants great to have you in from Alaska. Can you talk about what the US is refusing to do? And the and the significance of the problem. Yes, it was appalling really to see the US government behave in the way that they did at the Basel Convention last week, especially knowing that, they're not a party to the convention. And yet, they tried to thwart efforts to establish plastics waste under the Basel Convention, because they have a vested interest US is the world's largest exporter of plastics mostly to developing nations. And this has created a global crisis of waste in countries in south and central Asia, as well as South America and Africa. Lane how this entire process works. Is it possible for these developing countries to refuse to accept this plastic waste? Under the new amendment to the Basel Convention, which had been proposed by Norway and twenty eighteen yes. Developing countries will now have the right to refuse imports from developed developed countries such as the US so that they have the right to refuse dirty plastics, mixed waste that have created such a huge problem in so many countries, particularly in Asia where we see that, as you mentioned, most of these plastics cannot truly be recycled. So they're essentially dumped on the land adjacent to communities where these plastics are burned creating a huge health hazard, too many communities in these developing nations loss to it was just last year that China put a ban on foreign waste imports. Can you talk about how much aplastic waste was going to China and where? That waste is now going. Yes. So China did make this landmark decision, which was really important for their country to have the right to refuse the sturdy plastic waste. That's highly toxic. These these plastics are not only physical hazard in the environment, but they're also a human health hazard because they contain many toxic additives such as foul aids and bis, Fino's, and persistent, pollutants that are endocrine-disrupting and cancer causing chemicals. So a country, such as China made the decision because this was such a huge problem in their country to have the right to refuse it, unfortunately, than the US began shipping it to other countries in Asia such as Indonesia, at as well as India, Malaysia, and others. American explorer, Viktor, Vesco, VO, recently broke the record for the deepest dive ever when he descended nearly. Seven miles into the Pacific ocean's Mariana trench on the ocean floor. He saw new species of crustaceans, but he also found a plastic bag and candy wrappers this has Visco VO speaking shortly after the dive it wasn't completely surprising. That was very disappointing to see obvious human contamination of the deepest point in the ocean. Because when I first got to the bottom seemed very pristine, almost like a moonscape, and I did see life. That's American explorer, Viktor Visco vote, if you can respond to that Pam, and also just described the scope of the problem. I mean how large are these plastic islands that are floating around the world right now? These the problem of plastics in the ocean is just a mess. Mean the plastics and the Pacific Ocean are just a huge mass of hundreds of thousands of acres of plastics in a huge plastic dump in the Pacific Ocean. So it's the men's problem and it's not just a physical threat in the marine environment. But as these plastics break up, certainly, we've all seen the images of how plastics can can choke see life such as C turtles and marine mammals and birds. But as these plastics break up, they create an even more insidious problem. They become micro-plastics, which then can be ingested by marine animals, such as fish, marine mammals and others, which then pose a threat to human health because these these plastic. At see not only contain toxic additives in themselves. But when they're exceed they absorb persistent, pollutants such as PCB's flame retardant chemicals, such as PD's. These are highly persistent toxics, and these plastics, simply continue to absorb these toxic chemicals. Then when they're ingested by marine life, these toxics conveyed into the bodies of these animals, which then. Create a problem for human health because we rely on fish and other marine life as a source of food. And how is very serious not only physical and unsightly problem in the marine environment, but it's also a toxic problem that, that we really have to solve by stopping the production of plastic upstream, the, the production of plastic relies on fossil fuels, and ultimately, this is also contributed to climate change. So the entire cycle of plastics, production waste disposal and use is really a toxic hazard and circling back to the United States, refusing to sign onto the Scoble trading talk more about the significance of the US the most powerful player in the world, certainly historic polluter when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions. What is it mean when they don't sign onto a treaty that would curb? Plastics. Will the US is not a very good player in the international convention arena, including the three chemical conventions that have met over the past three weeks. Including cluding the Basel Convention, the Rotterdam Convention in Stockholm Convention, the US party to none of those treaties. However, the US department of state and EPA show up and in the case of the Basel condensed convention play a very negative role in trying to persuade a small handful of countries to go against the will of the majority of the countries who really wanted to include plastics, in the Basel Convention. So the US played an extremely negative role their position that they vocalized in the plenary sessions, and also in the contact groups that met to hash out, the, the amendments really mirrored the positions of the plastics and the chemical industry, the American. Chemistry council was there representing the major petrochemical manufacturers, there were plastic waste trade companies and associations, Beauce position was essentially the same so is really not only disappointing, but appalling as American citizen in an international arena, such as this to see the US behaving so badly. We wanna thank you so much for being with us. Pam miller. Co chair of the international pollutants elimination network, known as I pen, executive director of Alaska community action on toxics speaking to us from Anchorage, Alaska that does it for our broadcast option produced by my pertain Karla Wilson Millar enough, semi Sam, John Hamilton, Rava carrying Honey nece- and Dr tamer studio Libby. Rainy, I made me shake.

United States Monsanto Syria The New York Times President Trump California Amy Goodman president Syrian government Monsanto President Assad Environmental Protection Agenc New York City reporter Arctic Ocean White House Washington DC Trump administration
Tuesday, September 24th, 2019

Up First

15:44 min | 1 year ago

Tuesday, September 24th, 2019

"On the US froze military aid to Ukraine this year multiple news outlets now say president trump personally ordered that freeze days before his phone call call asking you about political dirt house this all look in Ukraine's capital. I'm Steve Inskeep with David Green and this is up I from NPR news. In the president's spoke rejecting globalism the last time he addressed the UN the United States will not be taken advantage of any longer so what to expect in twenty nine thousand nine also a network of torture survivors is trying to hold the Assad regime to account in Syria their work lead to the arrest of a Syrian military officer. He's the the biggest fish arrested in in the west to this point while anywhere in the world to this point could their efforts lead to government officials prosecuted for war crimes. Stay with us. We'll guide you through this. Day's news support for this podcast and the following message come from simplisafe a wireless home security system with video video verification technology that can help police get on the scene faster. Get Free Shipping on your system and a sixty day money back guarantee at simplisafe dot dot com slash. NPR support also comes from honest committed said better for you. Organic options for all on his products are fair trade certified and when you choose to drink and honest beverage money goes to fair trade certified suppliers to help support their communities visit honest tea dot com slash podcast cast to learn more. Let's hear from a country that has been a special focus for president trump right the country is Ukraine to which the United States froze vital vital military aid now president trump also had a phone call with Ukraine's new president trump acknowledges seeking dirt on a political opponent Joe Biden though he insists he was speaking against corruption the Washington Post and multiple other news outlets now come close to connecting these events they quote senior officials who say the president personally finally ordered the military aid withheld at least a week before his phone call to Ukraine in Washington. Democrats are increasing their calls for impeachment. There was a lot to discuss is here so let's go back a few years and also go over to the to another continent here with NPR's Lucian Kim who's in Ukraine's capital. Keep Good Morning Good Morning Steve. How're Ukrainians responding. Branding is more is known about trump's actions. Well unfortunately Ukrainians are very used to corruption scandals and are also used to their prosecutors doing almost nothing to go after corruption in fact. That's one reason why Vladimir's Alinsky who professional comedian was elected president this year it was a protest vote against the old way of doing business as for Ukraine being in the middle of this partisan scandal in the US. I think it's unpleasant to say the least people here see the US as Ukraine's most powerful ally and it puts them in a very uncomfortable spots ought to be in the middle of this political firestorm. I've tried speaking to people. Ukrainian officials are not commenting on this. They want to wait until their president's alinsky meets President President trump tomorrow at the United Nations and when you say most powerful ally we should note Ukraine's neighbor. Russia has has attacked the territory in various ways and that's why the Ukraine Sir relying on US support now how Joe Biden rather his family get involved in Ukraine at all well Joe Biden Son Hunter Biden showed up pretty much out of the blue in two thousand fourteen and joined the board of an energy company run by a former environment minister now hiring hunter Biden. This was at the time when they were also hiring in a former president of pull into the board was part of an attempt to give this company some respectability. There are a lot of questions about its owner. this former environment armament minister he was being investigated for money laundering and there are questions about how he obtained his drilling licenses so the accusations of wrongdoing actually predate Hunter Entre Biden and hiring him was actually part of this sort of cleanup effort what frustrated Western countries including the US and many anti corruption activists here in Ukraine crane was that prosecutors were not investigating this company or basically any other wrongdoing in the country or what drew then Vice President Joe Biden into into your crane well. Steve the first thing to understand about Joe Biden and Ukraine as vice president he was the Obama Administration's point man on Ukraine he often visited and it was is really part of his brief to monitor of the reform process that was supposed to be going on here now the accusation we hear that Joe Biden tried to use this position to somehow on how protect the energy company where his son was on the board. I asked Brian Bonner about that. He's the editor of the key of post-ukraine's English language newspaper. Hip Joe Biden as vice president did not try to kill the investigation into Barista in fact one of the reasons why the prosecutor general was fired was because he obstructed one corruption case after another. He prosecuted no one for corruption. He protected corruption option so you know Biden's pressure to fires prosecutor was really in line with what other Western governments were demanding at the time we should emphasize this then since president trump faces this questions about his conduct and he says no actually the problem here is Joe Biden. Is there any evidence that Joe Biden is vice president or otherwise did anything improper well here in Kiev if nobody is saying that the fact that he was pressuring Ukraine to fire this prosecutor was the US government's position as well as that of other Western countries one anti corruption activist here in Kiev told me Ukrainian reformers were actually thankful for that pressure and that this kind of carrot stick approach was the only way to push reforms Lucian. Thanks for the insights. Appreciate it thank you. NPR's Lucian Kim is in Kiev. So how does all of this look to the White House. Let's go to NPR's Frank O. DONA WHO's traveling with President Trump in New York today Franco Good Morning Good morning so what is the president saying to justify his various actions here and especially that phone call demanding information about the Biden's well. He's been an extremely emphatic that he did nothing wrong but he really hasn't been able to get away from it even trying to get to New York in Washington pressure continues to build seven Freshman Democrats who are also members of the military. They wrote an op Ed last night in the Washington Post saying that if the allegations are true they represent a threat to what they swore to protect attacked as. I said he's been very emphatic. He teased US reporters that he might share the transcript but he stopped short doing it saying that he would do it he. He just says it sets the wrong precedent for the calls. We've heard that kind of thing before I am sure based on the new reports that will hear about it again today so if they were the Franko because of course the president has a big appearance in New York where you are today. He speaks before the United Nations General Assembly. That's right in. US presidents have often used this speech as a way to emphasize America's leadership role on the global stage. This great institution must work for great purposes to free people from tyranny and violence hunger and disease illiteracy and ignorance. Let's in poverty and despair we can choose to press forward with a better model of cooperation and integration or we can retreat into a world old sharply divided it is entirely up to us whether we lift the world to new heights or let it fall into a valley of disrepair eh trump's address at the UN this year comes against a backdrop of a trade war with China also insecurity in the Persian Gulf and of course calls for stronger action on climate change. Did you talk about Franko. So what will the president say well. The president and his staff are being a bit coy about his speech. White House officials say the president will present the US as an alternative to authoritarianism Arion his They'll probably discuss respect for independence of individual members particularly on national security issues. I was among reporters when he was asked about Iran that it will certainly come up. This is what the president said. A lot of things are going to happen. Let me just put it this way. A lot of things are happening with respect to Iran a lot more than you would know a lot more than the media announced. The things are happening. I'll be discussing it a little bit tomorrow. Trump got a boost from Germany France and the UK last night. They released a joint joint statement also blaming. Iran for the attack on the Saudi oil facility president trump also said yesterday that he's going to talk about the US economy and the global economy all right. Let's face did the president of course still a very powerful figure president of the United States but also very unpopular figure globally. Do World leaders still listen to what he has to say. Well world leaders certainly listen but they won't necessarily follow the reality is American global leadership isn't what it used to be. I spoke with Yvo dolder who who formerly served as the ambassador to NATO. This is what he said. Woody Allen once said that eighty percent of life is showing up the Chinese are showing up in places where the United States used used show up and as a result the Chinese are gaining influence. The reality is president have pulled back in many ways. He's pulled from the Paris climate accord. He promise that he wouldn't be president of the world and we're seeing that break. Oh thanks thank you. NPR's Franco or Donas is in New York City today. of documents in Europe has become evidence against the government of Serious Bishara yet. These are documents from inside. Syria revealing abuse in Syrian prisons lawyers and survivors collected these papers and NPR has gained access to them. Some cases against the Syrian government are now getting into court in Europe. Many of the hundreds of thousands of refugees who arrived there bring personal stories of the torture they survived. NPR's Deborah Amos has seen the evidence and talk with witnesses and she's on the line good morning good morning. Where do you go to see this evidence well to get into the offices of the Commission for International Justice and Accountability or CJ. You have to agree not to say where the offices. It's a security issue. These are experienced war crime investigators and they are storing evidence eight hundred thousand documents three and a half tons of paper. All of this official documents smuggled out of Syria over eight years of war this this February this paid off. They were part of why the German police arrested a former Syrian intelligence officer who had slipped into Berlin with refugees now. There's going to be a trial and Bill Wylie. WHO's the Canadian investigator he founded seizure. He says International Justice is based on what's called Kalinka JR cases because International Criminal Justice is focused on higher level perpetrators who normally don't get their hands dirty. Those who are known to the public appear in impeccably tailored suits speak fluid English in the case of President Assad ultimately those are the guys that were after because they are most responsible for the offenses. Oh you say linkage cases because these people may not personally have killed someone and yet get their participants enter even directing the effort so you have documents that you've seen relating to these cases also survivors right. Yes and many of these people are becoming witnesses and it's restored some hope considering what they've been through in two thousand eleven. There was an uprising the Assad regime responded with violence in then they had sweeping arrests tens of thousands of people were jailed. They say tens of thousands and there are documents wants to show this were tortured to death Omar. I'll show gre- is someone I talked to his twenty four years old. He was arrested when he was seventeen years old. He endured three years years in two of the worst prisons in Syria. You can't ask me how many thousand times I want to die but I never want want to see how kill me. I want them to come Eli fast but they didn't he survived. His mother paid an intermediary twenty thousand dollars that it saved his life because it got him out. He's now on a mission. He's talking to Swedish war crimes uh-huh units. He's talking to German prosecutors. He is helping to build these cases against Assad. Do some of those cases go forward well. Last year the French the Germans issued arrest warrants for senior Syrian officials. There's this upcoming case in Germany and what I am told by lawyers and the people apple is there's about a dozen of mid level Syrian officials who are in Europe. These are the most promising cases because there is documentation. Shen there are witnesses in Europe. There's thirteen European states who are moving on these investigations and I'm told that they expect more trials to come although I have to ask. Is there any chance that a Syrian official is going to be brought out of Syria and into a French or German court if they stay in Syria. No Oh they are immune from arrest but in a way what the prosecutors lawyers witnesses say is the effort sends a message for one thing it encourages is prosecutors to open more cases but as important it gives Syrian survivors away to be hurt to testify in open court you now the experience of torture is a loss of control. They have control back. It's it's almost like therapy. They want to sign up to become witnesses deborah. I want to circle back to something you said at the beginning you said the documents that you viewed are in a hidden location. They're in hiding. I would imagine some of the people you talked with their also so being quiet about their exact locations are they in danger even though they're far beyond the borders of Syria I you know I can tell you that that Omar Al.. Show is concerned about his security. He has been threatened on the telephone. Sweden is so open that you can find anybody address address online. They're all supposed to be there so you have to ask. If you want yours to be private. He has just gotten that there are plenty of Syrian Syrian intelligence officers in Europe and those witnesses who have family in Syria or even refugees in the surrounding countries. That's where their families ended up. They won't testify justify. They're afraid there is still fear that the long arm of the regime can can reach them all the way to Europe so the people who are testifying fine other Syrians think that they are the most brave the most remarkable people to bring these stories to the open. I'm just trying to get my brain around the idea idea that European justice cannot reach into Syria and yet Syrian power potentially can reach into Europe claim by different rules. That's what these trials about Deborah. Thanks so much thank you that's. NPR's Deborah Amos and that's up I for this Tuesday September twenty fourth. I'm Steve INSKEEP and I'm David Greene. We hope you come back here with us again tomorrow. You can subscribe to US wherever you listen to your podcasts and if you've got a minute or two we'd love if he would rate us in review us on Apple podcasts. Thanks for waking up with NPR news. Remember the NPR station makes up I possible every day you can support them and support us by going to donate that. NPR DOT org slash up first no matter where or when you're begins started with morning edition from NPR news on demand weekdays from seven to three just say Alexa. Excite play morning edition.

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It's Election Day In Syria. The Outcome Is All But Guaranteed

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:11 min | 3 weeks ago

It's Election Day In Syria. The Outcome Is All But Guaranteed

"You know authoritarian governments around. The world embraced the forms of democracy. Even when they don't manage the substance. Today is election day in syria. President bishara lawsuit is on the ballot but his regime does not tolerate real opposition. These elections do show. Who's in charge. Npr's ruth sherlock is here to discuss out work. Say they're ruth. Hi okay so we have this. War torn country. What does the election look like. They're well in. Damascus says these huge posters of president. Assad all over the place you know there's been dinners and dances held to support his election and lots of these been held by businessmen and others who see this as a chance to kind of ingratiate themselves with the regime. That controls every part of life in syria steve. I spoke last night to a syrian businessmen in damascus. Syria doesn't allow free speech rights groups of showing that which is part of the reason why this person doesn't want to be named people inside syria right now. Believe that the best solution for them is the current president. So you'll see lots of people they want this election to be done and let's start focusing on building better syria and you know this does reflect the views. A lot of a lot of people are now serious. Economy has been destroyed. So many people's lives have been wrecked in the war. People just want stability even if that means keeping the regime it's revealing. I suppose that someone can't give their name even to tell you that they're voting for a shower all outside How much trouble do actual people in the opposition. Get in well you know the regime still imprisons and tortures people. I said does have opposition. This election he is up against two candidates. One is seen as being pro government. The other is part of the kind of sanctioned regime sanctioned opposition and the issue here though is that regardless of how legitimate candidate might be. They've only been given ten days to campaign so hardly anyone knows who they are Donny mukisa syrian british journalist and analyst in damascus. And he tells me. These candidates haven't had the funds or time to mount any kind of challenge syrians chosen to remain in the country. Either through opportunity or through loyalties at anyway because there's no real alternatives. The assad family has ruled syria with this iron grip for five decades. This election is really more about syrians. Sharing failty to this authoritarian regime. And you know another big problem here is that it's excluding the millions of syrians who live in areas that are still under opposition control. That's about a third of the country. Can you just talk us through the thought process of authoritarian regime in in holding an election with rules. That it's just so obvious that it's not really intellectual. Well this is actually a really important day for the syrian government because it demonstrates its power so you know you have areas like duma gouta on the outskirts of damascus which supported the opposition in the war. They were placed under siege by the government. Hit with airstrikes even reported chemical attacks and now they have posters of president assad up so it's an important moment to project power to its own people and even the western countries have dismissed these elections as a sham the government is hoping that it can project legitimacy in the region and maybe get some regional countries like saudi arabia which is opposed the regime in the war to reopen their embassies. There this is not going to solve serious underlying problems. The economy is in real crisis and the war in. Some parts of the country continued bruce. Thanks for the insight. Thank you. That's npr's ruth sherlock reporting from beirut this message comes from npr sponsor forward the all electric mustang mach e and twelve foot rocket. Take off the rocket launches up into the atmosphere while the all electric pony takes off toward the horizon at full speed visit four dot com for a new perspective on range.

syria ruth sherlock President bishara damascus Donny mukisa Assad Damascus Npr ruth Syria syrian government steve saudi arabia government npr bruce beirut npr
What to Worry About in 2021

CFR On the Record

1:03:14 hr | 5 months ago

What to Worry About in 2021

"Anki salmon good morning everyone. I'm delighted to be with you on such an important topic as we enter. Twenty twenty one with a lot of wild cards a lot of fires out in the world that are going to be a threat to the us and our allies. Of course we have this esteemed panel to talk about this all this of course. Cfr's what to worry about in twenty twenty one conversation with michelle flournoy who co founder and managing partner west exact advisers david portray partner in kkr chairman of the kkr global institute and paul stairs General john wbz senior fellow for conflict. Prevention director of the center of preventative action at the council on foreign relations. I am beyond a goal addressing your global affairs analyst at cnn. And i will be presiding over this morning's conversation. So paul i think the best way to begin. This conversation is to talk more about this survey and this year survey in particular. The preventative priorities survey. What stood out to you. In terms of what foreign policy experts said they're most worried about well. Thanks bianca in thanks for everybody on the coal and thickly for those members who filled out the survey this year very appreciative bat. So if i can just take a few moments to sort of get some background on the survey for those. Who may not be familiar about how we do this so for the last thirteen years. We've been a surveying american foreign policy. Experts about potential sources of instability and conflict in the world for the coming twelve months essentially provide them with a list of thirty contingencies which we think are plausible for the coming year and we asked them to assess likelihood and the potential impact on us national security interests. So it's basically a crowd sourced risk assessment we aggregate the respondents and The responses rather and then we saw them into three tiers relative priority. The basic rationale here is that not all foreign policy. Crises equally threatening to us interest in. We need to prioritize where we focus attention results and resources so this year by far the highest source of concern for those who responded to the survey is north korea People are clearly concerned out Renewed tensions on the korean peninsula presumably stemming from resume nuclear weapons related activities north korea resumption of long range ballistic missile testing. I think there's a general skepticism to president. Trump was able to really diffuse this crisis in. It's just a matter of time before is renewed crisis not far behind. North korea is a while three contingencies. What were deemed to be highly likely in the coming year. One was a lapse of the peace process in afghanistan People think that this is extremely vulnerable. And i think we've seen an uptick in violence in recent weeks and a general skepticism. The the The time line if you will of. Us withdrawal draw will be. We'd be met Secondly an intensification of fighting in syria iras President assad reasserts control over syria As the civil war lines down. And i think people think that's going to just get worse can gets any situation in venezuela it's also not improving President maduro has clearly In there and resisted the maximum pressure from the trump administration. So that is is another concern interesting. I think the wanted the one contingency fans out for me in this top tier is is taiwan. And this is the first time it's been what we call a tier one priority in previous hasn't hasn't actually featured a toll i think last year was a to z. And it's leapt into the top canterbury clearly reflecting a general concern about the deterioration in us relations. And these i should say are in addition to what we call the a haughty perennials. Each year potential cyber attack on. Us infrastructure Awesome -bility of mass casualty terrorist attack. Us iran is always on the top on an sort of russian intimidation of a nato member. But they they're the key highlights. This year's so had to say and i told you all off line that i thought was interesting to north korea topped the list in young four years ago we had an incoming administration where president obama the time president trump at. This will keep you up at night and here. We are four years ahead. And we're in the midst of a massive cyberattack act in the us Caused by the russians and yet it does seem that that north korea least for these survey responders is still top of mind for them. So i just found that really interesting are on this survey. I just want to let you know before we opened it up to michelle. I'm david we we about twenty twenty five minutes into this conversation. We're gonna for any participants or want to ask questions. But let's begin with michelle. And i want to start with. Taiwan and tensions between taiwan and china really rising top tier conflict for the first time in. It's really reflecting the heightened concern over growing military confrontation. Tween major powers. We just saw the previous secretary of state is in the final weeks of offense and unofficially changed the wool books with how the us views taiwan in return china were sanctions at trump officials. But i just was surprised by an an alert. I saw this morning. Us sent an aircraft carrier. Strike group into this South china sea. This comes the same day that china smash latest thirteen warplanes including nuclear capable bombers over taiwan. How concerned are you about. An increasing s relation between taiwan and china and obviously the role of the. Us will find. I am very concerned about the risk of miscalculation between us at the us and china given the heightened tensions and given that we tend to fully understand each feather in terms of resolve interests capability and so forth and taiwan really has become the flash point Because it is the number one priority for china but also because as you mentioned the departing trump administration made a number of very aggressive moves with regard to us s. taiwan policy. That we're really a departure from the bipartisan norm of several administrations and really sort of hope china in the eye on this issue and has now sort of increased the tensions in that area but i would also say that the thing that worries me most not only about taiwan but of all the tier one and tier two issues uphill mention. Is that you know what we've been going. Through as the united states The mishandling of the pandemic The incredibly dire economic impacts. That's had on us. And in the internal political divisions that erupted in violence and attacks on our own democracy that that sort of narrative it feeds a narrative of us. Decline which. I don't agree with and i don't think is correct but if you watched chinese television russian television you see the tapes of chaos over and over and over again and if they really start to believe their own propaganda about us that could increase their risk taking behavior it could make them think well the. Us is distracted their week there in decline maybe now is the time to push And try to achieve our interests so that certainly could. I think is part of the context. We have to watch on taiwan but also on the range by the threats that paul mentioned and with china at us relations overall is interesting to hear Tony lincoln say during his confirmation hearing last week that he overall thought that the trump administration was right to to target china's bad behavior in address. It just didn't agree with the tactics that you've been. The situation had taken what what are the more effective tactics that new biden administration could play in addressing some of china's aggressive behavior. Yeah no i agree. I think there is actually a lot of. Bipartisan consensus on the diagnosis of china. Problem china challenge. I think what you can expect to see. From a biden administration is a much more strategic in multidimensional approach that seeks to re engage china and a strategic dialogue to have very frank conversations about our interests what. We're willing to defend where what are capabilities to do that. To try to reset deterrence with china but also to have a channel to talk about the critical issues on which we must cooperate like climate change and non colouration and oh by the way preventing a future pandemic So i think it's going to be a more nuanced approach. I think they'll be very tough But it won't be so transactional and just trades focused. It's really going to be a comprehensive strategy and you see them bringing in old crows. Like people like kurt campbell to sort of orchestrate that whole of government effort which i think is a very good son. General betray us. One of the priorities in the trump administration had been in one of his talking points had been to bring us troops home And and on the heels of that we obviously saw the negotiations with the taliban in the agreement in afghanistan that us troops would be returning home and leaving afghanistan. by as early. As may of this. Year i i know that there were some officials in the biden administration. Who said that. They were open to continue these negotiations and in holler through on them but in your first year perspective is fine. Line is that a is that a rational time line and we expect to see us troops home within a matter of months and can the taliban requested and what's to be made of their relationship with the f. in government right now well first of all let me just say thanks beyond. It's great to be back with the council and great view with paula. Michelle as always and let me make a couple of other comments. If i could before. I address the issue of afghanistan. Although i'll give a hint to that the answer to that would be no no no. We will not withdraw all the troops unless we weren't afghanistan to collapse in no. I don't think that we will see Substantial progress keep in mind that the agreement that does exist between the us and the taliban it basically gives the taliban more of what they want which is less of us They still don't recognize the duly elected government nor the constitution of afghanistan. So there's a long long way to go in the negotiations that have finally begun between the taliban and the actual government or the representatives of afghanistan. But first of all. If i could just note i mean i very strongly agree with everything not surprisingly that michelle has said the big threats to the us actually year home it is the pandemic it is the economic collapse in certain sectors as the huge hyper partisanship in washington. The torn social fabric across our country in these are rightly what the president is already addressing. Focus on i think in the way ahead of. Interestingly i don't understand why north korea's at the top of the list The truth is we made north korea in issue. It was our rhetoric. It was a siemian assumption or an underlying fundamental that was accepted which probably should not have been that. We could not live with a nuclear north korea. Now we may not like that we will not accept it but i think there is a resignation that north korea is nuclear is going to have capabilities. Those will gradually get more range accuracy. And all the rest of this again unless you do want to go to war And i think the conclusion was after the two summits and so forth. North korea wasn't going to give us anything. They certainly weren't going to completely denuclearize before we relaxed sanctions. Which was the negotiating approach. Which of course was not one that was workable If you can get back to some kind of dialogue and you can get back to step by step starting with an inventory with they actually have at this point having not been back on the ground. I don't think in well over a decade. I remember it was. I think the year before. I was the director that was the last time we actually had boots on the ground inside north korea. So i think we're just going to try to manage. That and i think we will try not to overreact. What arguably Might be leveled or rss about what we did before. I am also not concerned about the collapse of the peace process in afghanistan. I'm concerned about the collapse of the afghan national security forces if it turns out that we have drawn down too far down to twenty five hundred troops. That's less than half of what the commander on the ground germ scott miller window. Well michelle knows. Well for many tours in iraq afghanistan during our time in government He assessed that we needed fifty five fifty six hundred a minimum to provide the advise assistant enable for the afghan security forces. And i'm concerned that there could be a point which is crumbling. there has been an erosion security without question. You could see a crumbling and again. The worst case that could come about would collapse. And then you're into a scenario where the international organizations ngos even our own forces and perhaps diplomats are starting to be evacuated from a country that desperately needs all the help it can get. It is not iraq with hundred billion dollars oil revenue. A year that can go on by its own if others forsake it. So that is. I think a real concern. I suspect that will be one. That would be purely near the top of jake sullivan's list to assess and now for the new secretary defense. Of course we michelle. Both know is well. Lloyd austin for multiple tours in iraq and afghanistan. So that is one that i think. Bears careful watching. And it's not the peace process which i don't see even incremental progress at this point in time it's what happens to the security situation on the ground now that we have given the taleban what they wanted at the negotiating table and really didn't give much to us in return. They certainly haven't reduced the level of violence as you look at the assassination and suicide bombing as that are taking place there I really come back to what michelle was just describing and it is. It's all trying all the time. It's the u. s. china relationship which is the most relationship overall and i'm not just talking about the threats to one another. I'm talking about in every aspect. And i agree with michelle. This will be a nuanced policy. Most likely again. You have kirk campbell. Pack tony jake sullivan and others know this very well. It will be engage cooperate. And i did pandemic to the topics that michelle highlighted for cooperation. There will be a competition and of course we have to sort out. What's going to happen. In the technology space which arguably is in a fracturing mode and you know arguably has been described by some as a technology cold war is the relationship overall may not be In obviously there's going to be a deter and if necessary defend and the possible flash points Do include obviously taiwan and white michelle the necessity for clear communication voiding misperceptions miscommunication understanding each other's core objectives and interests. And all. the rest of that in will be. I think coherent comprehensive and whole of governments with an s. on the end so it'll be all of the elements that can be brought to bear together with those of all of our partners and allies around the world as well and of course the biden administration has stressed early on that. It wants to reinvigorate These different alliances and partnerships And again the most important relationship around which that will happen. Notwithstanding issues with russia and the middle east in iran and all the others. That can be managed. I think Is the one was trying to. I think is foremost and again if you think of the. Us the guy in the circus that puts plates on a stick and keeps them spinning The china plate is bigger than all the others put together. And it's the one that matters the most yeah. I was really fascinated. The day after biden's inauguration in his speech The china daily obviously the state run media publication. They aren't the front page. Said biden balanced reenter appearance climate accord. So you look at areas where there could be cooperation between the two and it was interesting that that stood out To the chinese government. As sort of the one i at least positive step in perhaps Trying to simmer tensions between the two countries. Obviously we know that they are heightened. Right now general before i move on with michelle to russia. I do want to ask you about us. Syria policy. Because i don't believe we have heard a specific plan yet from president biden as to. What a us syria policy would look like in whether that includes keeping troops on the ground there in syria. Brett mcgurk is in favor of that. And he's now the media's coordinator at the nfc are you in favor of a us presence remaining in syria. Yes because i'm in favor of enduring defeat of the islamic state And avoiding the kind of comeback of the islamic state that we saw with the comeback of al qaeda in iraq actually in the form of the islamic state after our combat forces left although that was not the cause the cause was the highly sectarian actions of prime minister. Maria volunteer who had been our partner during the search and was a decent artan during that time when we did reconciliation and for three and a half years after the surge having driven violence down by eighty five percent during the surge is michelle recall and then stayed down for three and a half years and it was his actions that actually tore that fabric of society the part again and really reinstated the whole the alien nation and the grievances of the sunni arabs When you went after the senior senior opposition the vice president than minister finance than parliamentarian from our province. But to come back to now this really let me take this out a little bit because this has to do with the whole issue of ending endless wars and. I think it's really important to acknowledge that you don't end endless war by ending. Us involvement in it. You just end. Us involvement in the war goes on And so it's not a question of ending endless wars by pulling our troops out. it's a question of. How do you end the endless war. How you at least drive down our commitment to it. And i would contend that what we should be seeking to achieve is sustainable and sustainability is measured in the expenditure of blood and treasure. The sustainable sustained commitment. Which by the way also will then lead our adversaries to conclude the perhaps they really should negotiate in somewhat. Good faith because we're not going anywhere and we've gotten it down to a point where it is again. Sustainable we can afford. We can easily afford for example. Ten thousand troops in afghanistan. Remember when i was proved to be the commander we had one hundred thousand. Us troops thanks to michelle and dr gates and president obama and fifty thousand more coalition in iraq. We had one hundred sixty five thousand during the height of the search just. Us men and women in uniform and now we have twenty five hundred there in another couple thousand ish in syria that is very sustainable To ensure that the islamic state can't come back and that over time we actually do achieve the enduring defeat of isis which is going to require a number of other activities by host nation partners on the ground which we should support to some degree but we want them to do those for themselves. And i think what you're going to see is a bit of a gradual. I wouldn't say hardening but at least it will some degree of acceptance that there's going to be a us syrian democratic force area of northeastern syria There'll still be that camp. Also down near the border with between iraq and syria and at some point in time when there's a recognition that we are not going away were not taking significant. Cavalry's at all We lost more in training accidents. I think last year then We lost in the battlefield. So this this is a sustainable issue For us a superpower can easily keep a modest number of troops and by the way also in places such as again modest numbers and somalian and so forth. We pulled out smalley by the way in the last few weeks and already al-shabaab is expanding into the areas where we no longer have influence in no longer support the somali forces that we helped to build an obviously maintaining a stable. Us presence around the world only sends a deterrence young message to our adversaries but also since reassuring message to our allies. As what sound -solutely and. I think you can look back in the past where we have not done that. Were perhaps we're our rhetoric outstripped what it was that we were willing to do and suggests that that sent the opposite message. Well this is a time when again deterrence is going to be hugely important in that. Most important of all relationships says it is built And that's how i think you establish deterrence after all is the adversaries perception of your capability and your will employ exactly michelle. One of them. More complicated relationships biden will be have navigates that with russia and britain which in We saw those mass demonstrations over the weekend a in in moscow and one hundred cities route russia's eleven time zones following the arrest of nevada and all of his supporters. They're reacting not only his arrest but also new videos and investigative reports on just the level of corruption surrounding the firmly ladimir puccini and emily's heard strong words from the us. State department's at president biden has vowed to respond aggressively in ways his predecessor have not but my question to you is in addition in strong words and sort of going back in a typical. Us response How else can we affectively navigate or and we at this point effectively navigate sort of two pronged relationship with russia where we cooperate in areas out. We can such as extending new start with which They both seem to agree. On and also Responding to the lawlessness and the aggressive behavior that we've seen over the past few years from vladimir putin. It's a great question. I think one of the things you will see from the new administration isn't approach that puts allies front and center at doing as we can by with and through allies. So you're gonna see them reach out particularly to our. Nato allies have first of all show up second of all have deep consultations with through nato but also bilaterally on this question of how do we assess the russian set of threats. Whether it's you know the the the kind of threats to him human rights and democracy that we've seen recently whether it's their raise on behavior the poisoning of navalny cyberattacks the interference democratic systems in europe. And here and so forth But how do we together assess those threads. How do we Work together to be more effective in deterring them preventing them and when necessary responding to them and so forth But i think the the basic premises were going to be much more powerful and effective if we work together not just as on a bilateral basis. So i think you'll see already. You know president biden has asked the new director of national intelligence to do a deep dive assessing russian behavior across the board. I think that will be the basis for that. Engaging allies to come up with a shared strategy and i do think you'll see them pushback particularly on demain Anti democracy efforts from hooton. But also in we've just had this unprecedented cyber attack The solar winds attack. And i think there'll be a lot of attention focused on how do we shore up deterrence in cyberspace. What kind of cost to impose on on putin and so forth. But russia at is a classic example of this blend of shoring up deterrents reassuring allies mobilizing allies to be to to come alongside us and then engagement engaging with to press where we have issues with russian behavior but also to pursue areas of cooperation like new start. I was very very pleased to see that right out of the box. The administration acted to keep that strategic framework. Which is very much beneficial to. Us interests in place historically would let him a putin's been sort of backed into a corner. He reacts aggressively And we saw that. When there was unrest domestically and twenty eight and two thousand fourteen With the crimean invasion And i'm wondering because i'm reading reports from neighboring countries in particular former soviet republics that are worried that increased domestic unrest. There will sort of put him in a position where he's got to flex and perhaps acting aggressively towards other countries and in a us and logo western response would look like is in fact. That happens right. I mean i do think wait year. You're playing three dimensional chess not checkers vladimir putin then you have to think multiple steps down the road as you craft a strategy and you have to make sure you have alliance solidarity for those multiple steps down the road. I think at the same time we think about additional pressure. We need to think about shoring up deterrence in zero where we think he might go under pressure. My own view is the thing we should be. Focusing on is his use of chemical weapons against nevada. There's absolutely no international disagreement there On the prohibitions. Against that and that was sort of outside the bounds of international norms and air. National laws And i think that there's a strong case to be made about additional sanctions. They're my own view and again. I'm not an intelligence analyst. But i would like to see us more pressure on the people who keep putin power Oaks around him who do have money in the west who do have assets in the west. That are vulnerable the sanction and that those are the names of the list that novon himself summed. It's people did. Did his group finds would be more effective. Union sanctioning purse to The the country as a whole in having citizens they're suffering No issue with the russian people right right in with africa but it gets to putin's decision making not just make the russian people's lives more miserable and to go back to what general jason saying. It's all about deterrence to. He hasn't been to target at this point. I want to end before. We open it up to audience. Participation ripped general the trains and ask about iran. I know this isn't sort of a two minute. Answer but your perspective that you have president rouhani saying the ball is in biden's or president biden's or To return to that the nuclear agreement and lift sanctions. The biden administration has ended that they are very eager to return to the new. The deal. my question to you is How likely is a return. And do you think as many detractors had said with the initial bill that a vitamin straightened actually work a better deal. But clearly that's again what was hinted at When you have the confirmation hearing for tony blinken didn't employ. This is going to happen tomorrow. Or next week. there's going to take some time. The ideal world obviously would be that there could be an effort that is pursued in conjunction with our partners in the region with gulf states in israel So that we're not doing secret negotiations and they're not kept abreast. We'd want to ideally. Get a bipartisan support. On capitol hill so to could actually be a treaty rather than another executive order. Because of course those are not make those can be a bit fragile. If there's a change in the white house the the issues are well known That the agreement of course that was reached and signs. Some five years ago is now. Five years from the first of the sunset clauses And then there are others after that In what iran does that of courses open to question whether they truly do adhere to the additional protocol of the non-proliferation treaty But you know again. What about their malign activity which has continued to be as malign as ever in iraq which they'd like to lebanon is like to use the militias on the street like lebanese bullet for muscle. And then they like to have a blocking veto in the council representatives the iraqi parliament as they do again in beirut There obviously shoring up the murderers showroom acid in syria together with russia and active to varying degrees with these In in yemen among others nine and then of course you have the increasingly threatening missile program with more rain more accuracy And again more reach therefore already certainly able to range our partner israel. So that's the scenario that you have and i. I'm not sure that i that i would assume that. We're just naturally going to say okay if you all return to The conditions of the j. joint comprehensive plan of agreement That you know you get rid of all the medium enrich the twenty percent rich that you've done now. The ninety nine percent of the low enriched once again and Keep the four dow site from being used for enrichment which has been returned to senator etcetera all of which actually were quite good There were many good features about this along with the again the shortcomings of this sunset clauses and the fact that obviously iran then reach tens of billions of dollars of frozen reserves and was able to reenter the global economy to a degree. They never were completely able to come back in because of the looming possibility of sanctions. Once you had the trump administration elected So again i think this is a much more complex issue than it seems than just they Once again adhere to the provisions of the jcp. Oh and we once again. Just lift all the sanctions Because there's other sanctions that are connected to this as well that have some connection. Un sanctions to jcp la that also raise considerable concerns. And i think that the more you get into this in the more. The capitol hill provides its advice and consent That this is going to prove more difficult than perhaps it sounded on a campaign trail in also making this. This is not a bilateral agreement right there other countries and now the other bring most of the other countries would love to see us. Go back to that. I think that's accurate to say. But again i would love to hear michelle's view on this and i don't hear from michelle and then we'll get to sam with them are questions now. I agree i think. The administration feel some urgency to put time back on the clock in terms of lengthening. The time it would her iran to go from materials to an actual weapon and that timeline has shortened substantially with the departure of the trump administration from the agreement. So i think there's pressure to get back into the jc. Oh but i also. They've been very very clear that simply going back to the j. c. p. o. a. as is is not going to be satisfactory because we you know the time will be too short. They need to extend the sunset clauses and there's obviously shared concern among the united states and Certainly our european allies and other ignores to the agreement about iran's ballistic missile program and about their maligned behavior in the region. I also think you'll see this administration. Consult deeply with the key partners in the region who may have a different view about how to approach to ron but again this focus on allies and partners and trying to you know reengaged those relationships and have deep consultations and bring them along with a strategy. I think you'll see that effort beginning. The last factor all mention is iran has elections coming up. You know within six months of that may also affect their ability to come to closure on something new going forward so we'll see how the timing does great sam. When opened it up our first question will be from joe nye. Please remember to state your affiliate commission. Joe nye harvard university. I want to go back to michelle's answer about taiwan I agree with general point. That all of you said that i worry more about taiwan than a debate. North korea But there's a different kind of worry. How do we enhance our deterrence of any prospect. That she jingping thinks he might get away with something and yet not a polka finger in his. I know there's the the difficult question is what concrete steps can we take that enhanced deterrents that are not essentially so provocative that they have counterproductive effects so interested in both the michelle. Dave answer to what specific things they would recommend their joe. It's a great great to hear your voice and it's a great question on berry inciteful is always you know. I think that we need to think in deterrent in terms of deterrence broader than military turns. It's very important that we continue to show up in the region and do our part with allies to reinforce the un law see the serve international norms and rules of behavior A bit of the chinese military in the region. But i think with regard to iran. The important message is The clarifier interests that At that we don't want to see the status quo changed by force and that it's not just a. Us position is the position of the region others in the region and the international community. And i think there's a lot of diplomacy that we can undertake to shore up that message to say if you took the step you would. There would be a response not only from the united states but from the international community and it would not only involve potentially military measures but political measures that china would pay a very very high price that would be disrupted too disruptive to its quest for greater International influence and also highly disrupted disruptive to trade in its economy. So i think we've got a sort of think about deterrence with a full range of not only our tools with those of our allies and partners and really work on a strategy In a way of communicating that consistently to china so that they understand the caught the very real costs they would incur. If they moved against taiwan. You know in a way that was outside that that was unacceptable. Could i add Say a few words hitter. Sure and i will so there is a way you know. Joe races very important. Point about how you to to. China non provocative way and as you. Well no you know. There's two kinds of deterrence deterrence punishment and deterrence by denial. And so there's a way in which we can emphasize the latter which tends to be less provocative to china essentially conveys to than the fact that they would not achieve the objectives sutton in cheaper acceptable way and to me. That is the way you reconcile this. This central Challenges you will deterrence. I think there's a larger question here in michelle touched on it. At the beginning we are now in the long term competition rivalry with china and russia history suggests these rivalries last time in fact if you go back to eighteen fifteen they lost on average fifty five years and the last time the is in a major ivory with a major power Forty three years forty four years so we have to think long term here and we have to reconcile these these dilemmas the central to that kind of rivalry. We gotta figure out a way. We could avoid water in the way we just describe. We got away figure out a way we can compete in a smart way so that we're not engaging in wasteful competition. We got a huge deficit learning deficit other domestic priorities that we have detected. So we've got to figure that out and again as michelle said they outset figure out a way in which we can do all this without compromising prospects for cooperation on major global issues. And i think you know henry kissinger catching it. This the central challenge no better than anybody else in the nineteen seventies when he said we have to find a way to reconcile the need to compete with the soviet union with the need to coexist with them and until we resolve that central dilemma. We're gonna consistently run into problems with china and russia to so we have to think this through. We can't think in terms of short term. Fix says we're gonna think have a centrally a long-term properly integrated strategy and i agree with both of them. Very much joe and as always You have characteristically. Put your finger on the most critical issue. I think That's out there again. Outside of our shores noting all the actions that we need to take it home. This is a case where we clearly wanna be firm clearer. I have one soldier left my command and she is always on patrol at the the combat outpost in arlington virginia but again not provocative Again you'll notice. The need to engage discuss There have to be various efforts again again as should be a coherent. Comprehensive whole of governance with an s. on the end is both have explained There are activities that can be taken quietly to to help. Again with the denial component of this falls is rightly putting forward In addition to efforts were deterrence in other fashion. I should note here in part just because my great respect for the president of the great council actually do disagree with him on what he put forward some months back which was a public explicit declaration that you know an article five kind of public decoration again at the. We're with taiwan. In the way that we are with our other allies around the world. And i think that could be the kind of provocative action That could result in in some kind of undesirable activity and and again captured. Exactly right how do you coexist At this in this kind of very difficult rivalry But taking a lot of steps that can change the calculations a bit While ensuring that there is not a misperception or miscalculation it's interesting to hong kong hasn't been raised at all thus far in conversation is that sort of an indication that that it's unfortunately lost mas at this point. I don't think it's you know. I i wouldn't say it's a lost cause. It's a very very difficult case but here again. I think you know with an administration. Coming in wants to reinvigorate are focused on human rights and democracy wants to reinvigorate working with allies to achieve prominent directives. Again i think there will be an assessment and some policy review to assess whether there's more that can be done to to moderate Some of china's behavior then. But it's a very hard sam when we wanted to the next question. Our next question is from sara lee whitson. Hi this is. Sara lee whitson. I'm the executive director of democracy for the arab world. Now i wanted to talk a little bit about yemen which i haven't heard addressed and i wonder whether you think it might be appropriate or more appropriate to focus on america's own malign activities in yemen Which of course about three dozen Former obama current biden administration officials apologized for forgetting us involved in and war. Five years later were still involved in And wonder whether you have any reflections of reckoning for america's involvement in the score as well as the ongoing malign activities of our own allies For whom were providing Weapons either by sale or by gift and more. Broadly whether you think it's more parade as a priority to focus on ending america's own harmful activities in the region Instead of worrying about The harmful activities of others In other places. So i guess there's a us perhaps component there as well on modern. Show david start on this one in the commander of central command in iraq and afghanistan I i mean just in the region in general We did actually withdraw from ero- and we found that we had to go back in and we didn't want to get engaged in syria and yet we realized ultimately we had to and the reason that we had to do that was because the rise of isis the creation of caliphate That was of enormous size in northern and western iraq in northeastern syria was causing such a massive refugee crisis For our european allies that domestic populism lists the result and it went in. It was gravely undermining again the situation in europe so in a general sense i would just offer that as just one example of what happens if you withdraw completely inactive case in administration that definitely did not want to go back into iraq were go into syria in the first place Ended up having to do just that so i i don't think it's a case of just pulling out and everything will be sweetness and light. In fact i think us pulling out can lead to again us. Having to go back in once we realize the consequences. I would say that if you take the greater middle east the same is true probably extending it to afghanistan and perhaps parts of north africa when it comes to yemen with great respect. Sir i term it this a tiny bit differently because i was a partner for the president of south of honey. And you know he didn't initiate this this fight Who these They attacked a sonata capital. They ran him in his new regime out of Out of that capital city and then they ultimately ran out of the entire country Now that wasn't because of us you could actually argue that. Maybe if we had done something to help him early on and show them. That wasn't going to be easy. That it might not have continued. That's arguable But again there's a lot of blame to go to the other side especially for the initiation of that. They're certainly Blamed for those who have participated since then the inaccuracies of some of the the bombing attacks of whole variety of Shortcomings in issues. But again i don't at all see the who says blameless inness in the lease and an i think you have to acknowledge a bit of that If you're going to have a balanced approach to a situation that clearly is an absolute humanitarian disaster And certainly one. We want to try to resolve And now of course. Iran is very strongly supporting who also arming them with weapons. That are raining down on various saudi cities locations so I the the proposition as it was put is not quite one that i would accept I come at that one quite differently. I'm afraid Having been again the commander underground and having worked with the president of yemen who was actually quite a good partner in the fight against al qaeda in the arabian peninsula at the time which was at that time arguably had the most dangerous individuals in the world. Do i expect a biden administration to sort of reinvigorate the multilateral the mediatek un efforts in to bring a ceasefire of an kalunga settlement. Which which should i agree with it absolutely. I could just jump in you know. I think we have to acknowledge where we are. Which is you know the weather you. Yes they hit the. It should be blamed for starting this but the saudi emirati intervention was has been unsuccessful. It is crew. You know the the war between the two sides has created an unparalleled humanitarian catastrophe. Eight serve as the vice chair of the board of care. And it's just it's it's one of the worst. Humanitarian disasters were vision has ever tried to respond to. It's just an. It's doing to go on with huge portions of the population at risk of famine and dad's just because they they can't get basic supplies to day I think right you know. The uae has acknowledged that the way forward is to try to negotiate a solution. I think the us needs to press the saudis and iran and their you know a backing of the hutus to get to a serious negotiation at the diplomatic cable. But in the meantime i would say at this point. The us should stop supplying weapons to saudi arabia. That have been so Used so dis- indiscriminately. Nfl been responsible for killing so many innocent yemenis And we all of our focus should be pressuring all sides To get to a ceasefire and then to some kind of negotiated solution. This is a war. That's not going to be won on the battlefield and our complicity at this point given all that we know in supplying precision weapons to the saudis. Who are using them for imprecise attacks. That often have way too many civilian casualties. I think that just needs to stop. And we need to focus on negotiated solution and bringing our diplomatic haft and those of our allies and others to bear on getting to out clearly a really complicated issue obviously at another Another one the biden administration to tackle in the months and years ahead Sam i think we have time for a couple more. Our next question is from teddy roosevelt. Thank you all for Participating in like to address a question to general betray us. You articulated very clearly. The need to have continue to have troops remained in afghanistan where the obvious reason Stability to a large extent. Success in this is going to depend on having a partner in the afghan government that has the capacity to deliver reasonable government. Services and corruption is is controllable. All the things everyone on the panel understands far better than i do. How realistic is it to expect that our european partners will provide us with the going support both in aid military advice to help the government. Get debris provide reasonable competent services it will ultimately have the support of the vast aspects of a significant majority of the afghan people. I'm a little more skeptical about our ability to see that emerge. Well thanks dan a great question. Hi to you Look i think. The support of our european and other non-nato allied partners so australia japan others that provide both the boots on the ground training and economic assistance. In fact japan as i recall was number two To the us. During the time that i was privileged to command the international security assistance force. Look they will continue if we continue. It's really quite simple I've talked to some of our european. The leaders of some of our european partners in recent months and again it really does depend on the united states forming the foundation or the basis for all that is done not just militarily although that is essential again without security nothing else is possible. And as i mentioned security has eroded in afghanistan and we've got halt the erosion and reducing forces. Further is not necessarily the way to do that. I'd also just offer. If i could ted that we should remember why we went to afghanistan. And actually why we stayed. The core national interest was to eliminate the sanctuary in which al qaeda planned the nine eleven attacks and conduct the initial training of the attackers at a time when the taliban control the bulk of the country We have stayed because al qaeda has tried to reestablish that sanctuary in eastern afghanistan and sadly now the islamic state hasn't affiliate in pakistan in afghanistan. And they would love to do the same. There's something very attractive about eastern afghanistan to of them Obviously we want to get to a point. Where the afghans can secure the country the fact that we have been able to reduce from again hundred thousand men and women uniform fifty thousand allied down to where we were before. This final reduction was really quite significant. and the afghans are absolutely fighting and dying for their country. Doctor ashraf ghani is a very good partner. He's the first to acknowledge the various challenges that they have but at the end of the day. Ted i think it comes back to the point that i made up front. Which is that. Our european and other allies and partners around the world will stay engaged and will continue to support If we are leading that particular effort and the question i have is just. How low can you go. What is the sustainable sustained commitment That would be ideal for afghanistan. Our next question will be from. Jane harman hygiene. Hi everybody lovely to see you all so listening to this. I agree with almost everything but what is missing. At least it seems to me is what is our overall strategy new strategy for the middle east. I would argue. Trump really didn't have one. He focused on israel a bit. I would argue. That obama didn't have one either. Bush had one with respect to going into iraq and the domino theory. But most of what you're saying tactical and so is there an obama doctrine. Excuse me is there. A biden doctrine. And if there isn't one do we need one. Quick question who wants to snap out of the show was the policymaker can michelle. I think it's a fair criticism. jane That and it's a very tough Region but i do. I do think that this is a crowd of folks who would probably come into office sharing that critique in a bit in a way i also think that things have evolved since the period of the obama administration. So i think you'll see a fresh strategy review that really goes back to first principles about what our core interests are And they certainly go back to present. You know preventing any kind of attack fraught coming from the region against terrorist attack against the united states or our assets or our interests around the world. But it's also broader than that. I think they'll you know there's a there's a very important opening that's occurred and this is one of the few places where i think you'll get democrats acknowledging that the trump administration made a positive step abraham accords to really strengthen the cooperation between israel and the gulf states. I personally think there will be limits to how far that can go without some addressable. Some addressing of the israeli palestinian problems and the issuer. A two-state solution. But i do think it's worth supporting And then i think the third element will be trying to end Some of these wars whether it's yemen whether it's negotiated solution in afghanistan and so forth but then figuring out what kind of regional posture do we need both diplomatically and militarily to try to contribute to stability without you know Believing that we can have a large without pursuing large-scale military interventions. Which i think history has taught us again and again are not going to turn them. You know the middle east into a set of democracies are not going to be Successful um to transforming the region. So i think it's going to be a more humble approach. It's going to be a more clear eyed approach. But it's gonna use all instruments to try to get after objectives even as we also try to free up bandwidth both for focusing more of our tension relatively on the asia-pacific and of course the most important thing is for competing effectively is reinvesting at home re reinvesting in the drivers of american competitiveness. An influence here at home Which gets back to our technological edge. Our economic recovery in vitality and so forth. I strongly agree with that I do think again that you've gotta have in the back of your mind. This concept of again a sustaining sustainable commitment because of the national interests that we still have their Whether it is the nexus with islamic extremists or the free flow of energy resources are just sheer stability in the region And also noting recalling michelle's coming up at mach rec- recalling burn louis great prince stony said that democracy was strong medicine it should be taken small doses at a time in the middle east. And all of that. I think does lead to again a humbler approach to some of this and i think we have certainly learned a lot of art lessons over the past two decades that would council in that direction but would also council That you don't again end endless wars by ending our involvement There has to be some kind of durable formulation that allows you to do that without also say thanks jane for your eighteen years on capitol hill on your ten great years of the wilson center. Which i know we're coming to an end and a month or two year. We're all big jane yuba. We are at the eleven o'clock mark. And i knew we wanna stay on time. If i could just end by asking a question to the panel that you all began addressing at is the issue here domestically at home And and what. We've seen transpire over the past few months and weeks. No doubt was a big stress test on our institutions. And we you know. I wouldn't say we passed with flying colors when you have former defense secretaries than public letters stressing that the current defense secretary and the troops not getting alton artem paddock. Electoral process went from a global perspective. What is the reaction in. What what what harm has that done to are standing globally and in what needs to be done to to restore That standing the way you know many have you the. Us prior to past few months and years. Though if i go. I i think he's done tremendous And clearly repairing the social and political fabric of this country is is priority number one song obviously bringing the pandemic under control and i think we have to work to a sustained period of normalcy and act to a business as usual in in washington without majority of sense that times often use was associated with end. We really have to rebuild at l. standing in the world as a result of what's happened over the last two or three weeks old for years occupied and and that really is is a central goal. But we have to work on now. I would just add. I think that's right. I think we have to rebuild and also sustain that you know. I think it'll take a few election cycles or our allies to really trust that we have reset from the last four years and from you know a presidency that brought us to the point of insurrection But i do think i have. I mean till end on an. I'm an optimist by gene gene genetics. Whatever so to an animal positive note i really do believe in the american The resilience of the american system. The american people and i do think that we will if we play our cards right. And we invest in the drivers of our economic competitiveness research and development. He technology areas higher education. Smart immigration policy twenty-first-century infrastructure. And we get this country moving again. That's an play huge dividends to to reset the perception of the united states. And to give us much more influence and To to be a force for good in the world going forward but that you know. I do have faith that we can do that. I have a lot more faith in this administration than the last one in terms of having strategy to do that. But it's gonna take some time and it's gonna it's gonna take a lot of effort and this is. I do hope that we can rally around this as a country Going forward. look. I would echo. I paul said you know. It's hard to be shining city on a hill. The hill is under assault In that really was the case. Needless to say but i'm also hopeful We have weathered those challenges the immediate challenges. We have gotten through that. Obviously there are many many more that lies ahead. But i hope that the start nature of what we saw. Proves to be a moment of real reckoning and clarification in that we can once again proved the resilience that michelle highlighted rightly. Because i also believe very strongly in that. I'd like to think that for thirty eight. And a half years of government service that was those were among the values that we were seeking to To preserve and protect and that ultimately we will once again validate winston churchill's assessment that you can always count on americans to do the right thing. After all the other things i i would agree with that as well. I'm an optimist. I'm a political refugee from the former soviet union russia constitution. It's not a bad one but you know it's meaningless so at least hopefully this has been a reminder that it's to uphold our Our constitution as well. We all have work to do on that note. Let let us in this conversation. I think it's been riveting. Thank so much for your insights. General betray us and shall born on all. Thank you so much. Thank you to our members and thank you see. Offer having me host this conversation. Everyone thanks my.

china michelle united states North korea biden administration taiwan afghanistan syria taliban iraq president biden iran russia biden Anki salmon michelle flournoy west exact david portray kkr global institute paul stairs General john wbz