19 Burst results for "President And Founder"

"president founder" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:03 min | Last month

"president founder" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"They need to find a pharmacy that offers end the best price are they looking for a service that could be better off using telehealth? So we created that highway that user Tabah personalized experience to find exactly what they're looking for men the third PS to bridge that gap giving them the information that they actually care about it. co-insurance Co pays deductibles or do people really just WanNa know how much am I going to have? Hey, a on my own pocket by providing that information by flipping the script in a way that people can understand. We can bring the user to the point where they're confident that they're either blocking using their insurance or prepaying or service, and that's really what helped. Karma have evolved to that end to end solution against people that single return to be able to manage their health and. I think that's really neat. So it becomes kind of like a virtual roker of some sort. It sends one of the things we really want to create an everything that we do it. People don't want choices to be made board. They want to be able to confidently make the choice themselves. So it is kind of that digital broker that guy them to whatever decision is right for them that healthcare is not a one-size-fits-all Yeah I love it. You know and that navigation piece is really big. Would you say I mean and honestly I it's the case we all need it whether we have insurance or if were paying out of pocket or whether it's insurance that that we pay as employers or it's an insurance that we get from an employer, this navigation piece. Is Critical. So who would you say you target mainly who can benefit most from the platform as as it sits today? Yeah. So I think the core concept that we milk help Karnal on was to be able to kind of curse line the experience whether you have insurance or don't have insurance. So who are we really providing that substantial value right now I would say it has to be the individual either they have insurance or they don't have insurance and well as what we call the individual employer and what the individual employer is. Is Employers that have one, hundred, fifty employees. As we started diving in, we found there was nothing out there to serve people in those two groups, the individual and the individual employer. So we want to create a place that if people are confused about their health insurance it, they are an employer that maybe they don't want to pay the cost to offer full health benefit they can partner with Health Karma. Able to provide at least a benefit that allows people to make the most out of their healthcare whether it's telehealth whether it's they have insurance being able to get that value out of whatever situation got. So the individual and then smaller employers your company is is able to help offer this concierge service to help them put together the best package that meets their budget needs, and that their healthcare needs exactly and one of the things that we looked at. It you started building help Karma's we started looking at other industries that might have had similarity in terms of very complex industry that was simplify using technology and the one that's dug out like a sore thumb with the personal finance industry, and before all those APPs nobody out there looking for a tool like this, they had problems that they needed to solve and these companies came out and really focused on three things. I being an incredible value or that user. Really charging that user. The second is the personalized user experience that's fun and youth in the third, and I would say most importantly is to flip the script of personal finance so that no matter who you are across this country, you could pick it up in exactly what's going on and we saw that we wanted to create that same person alive experience that provide the education, the insight guide in, and then also the actionable aspect of being able to look or prepay pay for. Yeah. So Yeah, interesting very interesting and so talk to us about what you guys are doing and how it's been able to help us far. So what spend I would say one of the challenges that we had to kind of tap into to be able to provide the value to end users is really starts solve the problem of unstandardised data. It could be one insurance carrier, and now they're and they're providing ending up with data on that insurance plan and different way there's no standardization. Now, we are certain to kind of move and standard direction but one of the things that we were on is to be able to take this unstandardised data and put it in a way that we can create a. More of a consumer experience. So that's been A. In finding the right data partners. So we entered with one data partner that enabled us to tap into over two thousand different insurance plans turning it into individual tatum point we partnered with another partner that enables us to has pricing data and provider data and for us it's all about inert twenty, all these different data points, and then putting it in a way got anybody who picks up Karma ten understand and then chew where are we today and How it helped again, we launched medics all dot com and marketplace three years ago in about sixteen months ago, we started building what we call the second generation and held Karma today. So we've actually went through seven interrelation out, but to iterating of aid to really get to the launch held. Karma to the public and that is actually November second but we've been able to start partnering with employers and one of them being a company called Oxford properties. And they're eight hundred agent brokerage out of New York that has always on it to provide health benefits to their age. But with how real estate and brokerages.

partner Karma Karnal New York
Jack Chisenhall and Vintage Air

Cars That Matter

05:49 min | 4 months ago

Jack Chisenhall and Vintage Air

"Welcome cars the matter I'm Robert Ross and joining me today as Jackson Hall, President founder of the vintage air and recipient of the prestigious Robert. E Petersen lifetime. Achievement. Award. Welcome jackets. Good to have you here. Thank you Robert. Appreciate that glad to be here. You've kind of an entire industry that's really come to be known as performance air conditioning. Vintage Air was founded longtime ago now in nineteen seventy six primarily to serve builders who wanted to bill. Really Cool. Hot Rods Right. Talk about how you got to where you are I. Understand you started rich and early age well, yes. I started reading a hot rod magazine and it was hot rod magazine, an Rod and custom which were once at the time that everybody was reading. It had got me interested in old cars and I was about probably thirteen isn't it? Funny? We're in it always starts Yeah. Well thirteen years old I think so long story short my mom my dad was an air force and he was at this particular time was overseas along so she would take me out looking for old cars driving around we drove by one old junkyard that had some pretty nice cars and for Junkyard, and there was a little Mali sedan sitting right there and so. With that one and that started it really which pay fifty bucks hundred bucks for no one hundred dollars ran and drove off. There's a lot of must have been a nice car. It was decent in Iran in my mom felt that was important. So she said that'd be good one it actually Lebron's than I thought well, mode will be in their law anyway but. What did you put in that thing? Jag. Let Me Guess Flathead v Eight maybe something like that. Yeah. The first walk was a mercury by then the mercury and the flatheads kind of really on their last legs so cheap and a guy out of Mercury, my dad and military, and so I could go out to the base hobby shop at work on it therapies they have the tools and equipment wilmer stuff anyway he was out there and he was pulling that thing out and he was gonna put an old set I'm looking at that thing going he san now I gotta get rid of this thing and I'm going hey, wait a second I ask him what he'd takes Twenty. Five Bucks for so. Two fifty, five key begins Mercury, flat. It sounds like deal and boy that was the bee's knees back. Then there really was water fun car that must have been what happened after those formative years he did some college worker well. And as going along I kept working on our of data as we went along than mercury got lost and I put a pontiac over at bow the eight. Okay. Okay. And I use that to go to school I drove that car was my only car and so yeah I, I went to school studied industrial design. Guy Down College it was Vietnam era so. I joined ROTC after I got out of college I went right into the air force that was pretty ambitious endeavor especially at the time you fly planes her through for a little bit and then I did other stuff when emir force well, it sounds like an interesting stint obviously got out your passion for hot rods did not diminish in the lease no it. Always Hot Rod Guy, was there an a Ha moment that you had that said, he wait a minute I'm going to get serious about this. Well, when I got out of the Air Force, I had to make a decision. I think a lot of people that go in the air force consider staining and making a career out of thought about that for just a second and pretty much decided that I wanted to do. It always wanted to do I told my mom when I was about thirteen or fourteen. I told her not WANNA build parts for Cars I decided. Well, if I wanted to do that, this long should stick with that I started looking around. What can I do at that point? Pete shakes had started a year before that. There was a couple of chassis guys out there now and I've thought well I don't want to go jump in the middle something someone is already doing so look can I do that's new made any backup just a second I had started an air conditioning repair installation sinner right after I got out of the Service in seventy three head that stuff laying around so I thought hey, street rod nationals coming up here in August August load up the van take a bunch of stuff up there and made three unique parts to have up there for that deal were no condensers at that time in the condenser is the part that goes in front of the radiate sure that support that takes up space and. A hot rod that could be a sore thumb and of course, in those days, it was all about thirty four. It's some people would say it's still. Also, we'll get to that I designed and had a company make me condenser company up in Minnesota. Make me a condenser that was vertical so it would fit that format because there was nothing like that available number one that's right that narrow narrow grill and the yeah it had to fit just right? Yeah. There were narrow ones but they laid down the width of the cars that were going on now. That's right. So we did that and then nine designed a compressor mounting bracket for a small black Chevy because there were more sponsorship, he's going in at that time anything else. So the hoods were narrow on hot rod so it couldn't hang out sides like they did in the newer cars. So that was the second thing we did that bracket and then the third thing we did is I made a mold. been working with my hands long enough that I just figured hands I can make them all and I can make my own plastic evaporator out in. That's right and put the coralline and I'll have a unique evaporator to fit of thirty, two

Air Force Vintage Air Robert Ross Rod Magazine E Petersen President Founder Jackson Hall Rotc Chevy Lebron Iran Pete Shakes Pontiac Mali Vietnam Minnesota
"president founder" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:36 min | 7 months ago

"president founder" Discussed on WTVN

"International you will change the world for that child just text the word child two eight three three nine three to sponsor right now traffic and weather together powered by Tim star and classic err on Johnny hill on newsradio six ten WTVN during the six first warning weather chief meteorologist Marshall because freeze warning that goes into effect tonight through nine AM tomorrow morning and then twenty nine that's going to be our overnight low if we do hit that we will set a new record Marshall just saying the current record is thirty so we could set a new record overnight and that that's not the records though that you want to say they said that tomorrow dry but breezy and fifty for the high on Saturday weather powered by the basement doctor forty three at your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN three words to describe my mom patient smart crazy quiet reserved and funny inspiring strong beautiful eyes as happy mother's day from news radio six ten WTVN the economic downturn is affecting every area of our country here in Ohio that could mean some companies will offer buyouts there's a buy out right for you hi Mike Martin is president founder of the pension group potential buyouts because uncertainty at the pension group we understand your desire to safeguard your retirement benefits for more than two decades we've helped thousands of individuals manage their pension options in four oh one K.'s will listen to your concerns and review your situation to help determine if a buyout makes sense for you and your retirement the it yourself to being informed learn more about how potential buyout could affect your pension options give us a call today for a complimentary phone six one four six six two forty six hundred six one four six six two forty six hundred back six one four six six two forty six hundred or visit the pension group dot com investment advisory services offered through the pension just in time for mother's day it's Oakland nursery's annual flat sale select flats of marigolds begonias petunias impatiens regularly sixteen ninety nine only twelve ninety nine during this huge sale Adbul marigold soft impatience break petunias in amazing begonias to your landscape and save at Oakland Oakland's annual flash sale is just in time to celebrate mom the outdoor registers are open in line distancing is in place and ongoing cleaning is the rule since nineteen forty if you have many local nursery you simply haven't been to a nursery and medical for universal windows direct you are open for daily business and are committed.

Tim star Johnny hill chief meteorologist Marshall Ohio Mike Martin founder Oakland nursery Oakland president
"president founder" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

13:44 min | 8 months ago

"president founder" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris and welcome to today's guests interview. Our guest interviews are long-form interviews with leaders from around the world. They've each been selected because of their valuable perspective on leadership and work. They've accomplishing the space. Today we're joined by Kim Addis President and Founder Frame of mind coaching welcome. Kim had her audience. Hello hello and thank you for pronouncing my name so perfectly. I bet you get a lot of AIDS instead of Addis I really do. I really do sorry about that. I feel about every time that happens. I my name is pretty easy to pronounce so I don't get that a lot but I but I feel for you. You're perfect. Thank you told her. Audience a little bit about what you do and how you got there so I own a coaching company called frame of mind coaching. I've been doing this for about fifteen and What I do is I look at. How leaders thinking how they're thinking impacts not only their performance but the performance of their team and so how did I get here years and years and years ago it used to own a software company and we used to build simulation based assessments and my interest was how do we help companies find top performers? So I thought well what if we tested them and looked at their. I Q their personality. Their selling skills that kind of thing and brought those pieces together to really try to predict who would be the top performer in a series of interviews. What I discovered was that depending on the job different factors were important but universally in every single job in every single industry in every single position. There is one key differentiator. That would help us. Figure out who a top performer would be that jumped up over and above all other indicators and that was if a person had a high level of emotional resilience they would be much more likely to succeed so that was very interesting for me because I thought well. What exactly is emotional resilience? It's a person's ability to bounce back from adversity with speed and agility and leveraged the adversity some way. I thought well what if we could teach people that and that's how frame of mind coaching was born. I said instead of helping people reach their goals by giving them a million things to do and holding them accountable. Getting those things done. Let's look at what prevents people from having that strong emotional resilience unless help them build that. And that's how I mind. Coaching came to be. So you have a little can of worms here for me. Because I feel like this is a skill that can be taught but is so much easier to be taught when you're a child and it's your parents teaching it to you. What are some of the things that that can be done to teach somebody emotional resilience so there's no question that some of us are just more resilient than others and perhaps it's in our DNA? Perhaps we were taught as children. Perhaps our parents taught us to kind of get up. Brush ourselves off in moving along right. Maybe that's all true but there is no question in my mind. That emotional resilience is a teachable skill. So how do we do it? How do we teach people to build that backbone? That strong muscle first of all. Let me just describe our coaching process. Because I think in and of itself it's pretty unique so we start off with this ten week intense coaching period and in those ten weeks. There's a call every week like normal but we record every call and we ask our clients to listen to the recording. Why so that? They can hear themselves speak. They can hear the language. They used the stories they tell where they get emotionally charged and they can start to become observers of their own thinking in their own language and their own state emotional state. The second thing we do is we asked them to journal in an online journal with their coach so at the beginning of the week we give them a journal in question or prompt and they start journaling. Every journal goes to their coach than reads in response the Journal. What is the coach really doing aid? They're collecting a ton of data to understand. Patterns patterns of thought patterns of behavior perspectives values upbringing experiences. All that kind of thing but at the end of the day what the coach is really doing is understanding. What beliefs drive your emotional state? What beliefs drive your behaviors in those beliefs are fueled by thoughts are thinking? So what are beliefs? It's thoughts that you have over and over again. And the job of the coaches to identify beliefs. That really don't help a person that really hold a person hostage. And the coach's job is to challenge those beliefs in the most loving kind embracing way but still challenge them and when your beliefs are challenged. Your thinking changes your emotional resilience solidifies. I feel like a person who is desiring to change us about themselves. Probably naturally has a better ability to do it by definition of the fact that they they want to change about themselves. I know a lot of people who if someone else brought this to them and said we need to make you more emotionally resilient however they they go about saying it that in of itself would almost be triggering a lot of people sore absolutely but at the end of the day if I say to you hey I see. You're suffering a lot and I want to help you suffer less in a great reason. Why you're suffering is self-imposed want to lighten that load for you. Might you not say. Hey what is she talking about? I'm curious I'm open to hearing more one hundred percent but I will say that I think it rests heavily on how strong the relationship is between that leader and that employees hundred percent so I mean interestingly enough we coach leaders and we coach. Let's call them employees who are leaders and so not only does. It rests heavily on the relationship between the employee and the leader. That relationship between the person. We're coaching and the coach is the critical element that determine success like that's the vehicle with which travel occurs. So If if I'm coaching you and you don't trust me. We don't have a relationship. You're not going anywhere. So how do I build a relationship with you? A by going deep quickly but also by frequency of contact and that's where the journal comes in if I'm talking to daily and if I don't show up for you daily or like I don't know what she really intends for me. I don't think she sees me in the best light and on and on and on and if that's how you feel you've put on the brakes so let's say a business owner or leader comes to you and says. I WANNA make my people more emotionally resilient. I want to help my people get to the next level of performance. I feel like this is an issue. What percentage of those conversations and with you doing an inventory of the business and saying you know what this isn't going to work until you do some work as a leader I because I can see there are some there are some pitfalls here that will prevent this from even being successful until you change the way you interact with your employees so we love coaching leaders first and then integrating this into the business. We love that methodology hundred percent having said that a leader is a leader is a leader at any stage of a company at any level of company. So we're also Kedah coach leaders and help them look at what's happening kind of up and down right so the ideas that as an individual. Let's call you leader. You have an immense amount of ability to influence in all directions. So I don't want anybody to think that they need to change per se. What I want them to do say. Hey I'm struggling to reach my goals and my intention is to help you reach your goals with the premise. That you're thinking is the number one influence her in your ability to reach your goals. And if you're not reaching your goals your thinking is tripping you up. It's getting in the way so let's help you a line. You're thinking with your goals. Which is very different from there. Something wrong with you. You need to change to you. Think that there are certain traits or characteristics that a leader is a has to have now or will have to have in the very near future in order to keep a workforce like this engaged that they didn't have to have maybe even five or ten years ago so my observation and we've coached like literally thousands of leaders and I want to share with you. Two things number one is every time I do a lot of presentations and asked to go. Speak all over. North America and the presentation is really on helping leaders learn very basic coaching skills. And so before I go and speak in these environments I typically ask them to fill out an assessment just to help me understand how they view coaching. So how important is coaching in your organization And I asked two more questions asked a series of questions but here are the two critical questions number one is how skilled do you feel as a coach in your organization? How do you evaluate your coaching skills? On a scale of one to ten the second question I ask is. How satisfied are you with the performance of your team? So here's a very interesting finding after literally. Hundreds of people had filled this out. Is that the more skilled you feel as a leader in terms of your coaching skills. The more satisfied you are with your team's performance and it's a one to one ratio. It's remarkable so what do I think leaders need? They really need to understand the role that coaching plays in their leadership. I think that a coach must see the best in the person in front of them. Regardless of what they're demonstrating or deploy dis- displaying. They must see past. What's right in front of them? Is there a lesson you have learned over the time you spent with all these leaders that have led you to change the way you do business as a leader so you kind of think? This is the way I've been doing things this works and then something happens that this lightbulb moment where you think wait a minute. Maybe this wasn't right. I need to do things differently now. So let me go back. Sit in fully. Answer your last question and then I'll come to this so the last question was. What do you see leaders meeting? Like what are the three whether the skill sets what I've observed over the course of my career is? There are the three thinking strategies that leaders exhibit. Who are really performing at the highest levels. And I'll share them with you. Number one is they tend to challenge their own beliefs so whenever they get stuck whenever they have a problem that they need to solve whenever they are frustrated. They ask themselves a fundamental question. What do I believe to be true about this? And are those beliefs actually true so they they are constantly saying may seeing this clearly or my thinking about this properly and they challenged the way they see. What's in front of them? That's number one number two. Is there resourceful and you're probably thinking okay? That's nothing new but what I want to say is that they think about resources differently from the rest of the world. They think to themselves. There is nothing that is inaccessible to me. There is no shortage of money. There is no shortage of talent. There is no shortage of anything I need and I'm entitled to those resources I just have to. You know think about what is that. I want and know that it's out there within my reach a lot of leaders. Don't think like that. They think about resource shortage and number three is that these leaders are very very focused. Unlike a lot of us and they're focused specifically on the vision that's in front of them or specifically on what it is that they want they do not get distracted from that vision right. They're not a shiny object kind of leader right. They're very very focused. And so for me as I've observed these leaders one of the things that I try to do is rather than blame the world for my you know I. I'm not moving fast enough. Not Getting where we want to go. You know things are tough whatever it is I say okay. So what role do I play? How is my thinking influencing our outcomes and let me kind of go back? Let me in a way retreat. A little and really think about my thinking and how it plays a role not only in my leadership but in our strategy in the way that influencing the team etc so I take responsibility for our performance. I think that's a big thing. It's not easy to do because when things are working we would like to point a finger somewhere and said that is the reason why rather than pointing it in work saw a couple of reaction to that first of all on number your number two bullet point on resources. I don't want to minimize it too much. But that sounds like optimism to me. That sounds like either. There's nothing in my way or there's things in my way is that is that too minimalistic on that now. They have a different way of thinking about what's accessible to them and I would say that they go the distance in terms of being creative to figure that out instead of saying well you know. Think about a business owner. How many people want to start a business but they say well. I don't have the money. Okay well I'll go do something else right so it's this this different kind of drive. That says it's not that nothing will stop me but I will figure it out. I will solve this problem. I will see how to get it done. I will look around. I'll come up with creative solutions. I'll give you a small tiny example and was many many years ago..

the Journal AIDS Kim Addis business owner Chris North America President Founder Frame
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

09:46 min | 1 year ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"I went back in my career and I said who are the people who I think would be great to work with me so I went back to a guy from who had been a director finance with me and I brought him as my business manager and I brought in somebody worked within the theater as my operations person and I put what a team together that I knew had worked with them all so I knew they were like minded people and and we we did it together so that's that's leadership of of what I do. That's the leadership I know. Guy I mentor people bring them in and I and I know you know that I can work with a with a good group of people and Kingdom on task and keep moving because you know if I had one in eighteen months nineteen months if I had one wheel falls off one flat tire. That's in the race is over. How do you look now and Ah Gui Gazelle Twenty nineteen as opposed to Guy Gazelle and twenty twelve when I opened. What would you look at yourself objectively. What are you you most impressed with. What how how you've changed in. What is that change. Oh boy what am I most impressed with. the the fact that I've been as resilient as I have been that because it's been it's been very rough. There have been some very I lost my lease and and we were closing with without without knowing where we were going. I had to pack up my entire theme park into shipping containers and store them in a parking lot wife not knowing where I was going to open the very next season and that's one of those things were in the time. I was just doing it okay. Let's we're just GONNA pack this up and solving the crossword as wills the so that time and time again. I think it is yeah. Any sensible person would have said. Oh lost the lease. Let's just smell the dinosaurs and move onto the next thing and now you know pack them into shipping containers took him apart. Art didn't know how to Tweeden. You know we didn't know how to take him apart but like brought the crew in and said we're. GonNa look at pictures of when they were put together and figure out how to take him up put Otamendi shipping containers and then we did find a a new location and the next year. We put them all back together again. This is in Jersey in New Jersey. Yeah so what prompted Okay Jersey Derby Kansas is a big stretch. What prompted the so here in Kansas they have the star bond can't program. which developers can qualify for a bond? If part of their development is a regional tourist attraction action and a developer wanted do a development in in Derby and needed the tourist attraction so he traveled all around around the country looking at tourist attractions in fact I met him at a at a conference of attractions and he came to feel safe dinosaurs in in New Jersey and thought this would be a great traction. I think this would be super in Kansas and he approached me and said. Would you be interested in doing this and and there's incentives for the attraction. I mean this and I looked at it and we sort of did a business plan and I came to Wichita and I really like Wichita and which does a good is a good place for a dinosaur traction. It's it's it's a lot of fairly well educated people. It's very you know the lot engineers for sure yes a lot of a lot of families it just seemed like a very good market and so that's that's how I ended up in and which Utah we had to get approval from well first of all the city of Derby had to approve it and then the a state of Kansas had to had to prove its I had representatives from the from the Kansas government flew from Topeka to to New Jersey and came into the dinosaur park and they said yeah we can see that this this is a this is a regional tourist attraction and that's how that's how it all happened. Does that's how I ended up in Kansas. I love this story. There are so many things explore with you on this with the sacred time though I guess what what is next for your what is what are you excited about with the dinosaur this report in any other projects. You're working on smacks so now that we've done to obviously the plan is. Let's try to do a third heard one and see what we've learned by doing to and see what we can do in a third so when you're a not for profit and you and you say your mission driven well your goal list to provide your service to as many people as you possibly can if you're UNICEF you want to feed as many starving children as possible well I want to to educate as many kids as I possibly can and if that means opening up one in Houston or Dallas or Denver or Santa Fe New Mexico. That's that's what I would explore now because I opened in New York City I or I'm six miles. AL's away I got a ton of attention we were on nightline. We've been on on all sorts of TV shows. Since then we've been on good morning America Fox and friends. We've been a lot of national and we were in the The New York Times and the Wall Street Journal which although they were covering us as sort of a local those are national public we were in. We were not all of that so we get a lot of calls if somebody's starting thinking about doing a dinosaur park if someone's looking for an you know we have a lot. We got a lot of calls from retail developers. WHO The you know trying to find retail tenants not the easiest thing in the world right now. They're always looking for something new to do you as we get a lot of calls from from different people and now we sort of we take all those calls. We don't leave any stone unturned yeah so so that's what we're doing sort of travel around and meet people and this is a good fit for the park and then look at the lessons we learned from from Derby and say okay. What are we going to do next time. What did we do right. And what did we do wrong and what can we can. We learn from it. I I think that one of the things that that that I really push on on everybody and have since I was in the theater. Is this sense of taking the responsibility you yourself and I'll give you a quick example in the theater. When I was there theater around the country theater attendance was down down and attendance in our theater was down and the artistic director of the theater at the time said well well. Our attendance is down because attendance in theater around the country is down. I said that's like me saying I'm fat because the average American is is getting fatter yeah if we are going to say that the responsibility is on something we can't control. We're just GONNA loose yeah. We have to look at everything and say what are we doing nine. What can we do and what is our responsibility and that's your I mean we were hit by superstorm sandy and yes. That's a that was a freak storm. It knocked over some dinosaurs but I was still. What did we do yeah well. We didn't secure or those dinosaurs yeah well. That's what we did. You know we can't control the storm is GonNa calm but all we can do is look at what we can do and what we did so oh. That's one of the things that we talk a lot about at across both of my parks. I love that and that's a great. That's a great point to end on. You're absolutely right that Person Accountability Hound Ability Personal Accountability as owners as an entrepreneur as what can we do right because the the other mindset like you said just breeds kind of a well and it breeds the mediocrity and the stagnation that that we see so prevalent and everything yet right. I love that a great in the difference all it is is the difference difference in Mindset Shift Yep. It's not gonNA get a new certification. GotTa get a new that it's a mindset shift taking that accountability. I love that guy. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you let me explore your mindset and kind of your your path in your Jerry. There's so much more we could explore for. We gotTA keep it to thirty to forty minutes so and we're hoping I can't believe it's been that line there like quick. Thanks how can people have links of this but how can people get in touch with you get in touch with the the dinosaur park both Jersey and endure so the best way is it's go door website and you can shoot me an email right from the website which is field station dinosaurs dot com and actually that that's a landing page they tickets you either to Kansas sorts of New Jersey depending on where you wanna go home excited to see what happens over the next five ten years in the I I loved dinosaurs and I've been to the park and I love it. The kids love of it and they're getting a little older. Younger would be even more fun for him so go check them out guys. Thanks for coming on the show. I have links to all this at the post..

Kansas New Jersey Derby Guy Gazelle director Wichita New York City business manager Otamendi developer Tweeden AL The New York Times Santa Fe New Mexico Jerry field station Topeka America Fox superstorm sandy Utah
A Chat With Guy Gsell, President & Founder of Field Station Dinosaurs

Dose of Leadership

10:31 min | 1 year ago

A Chat With Guy Gsell, President & Founder of Field Station Dinosaurs

"Now. Let's join a conversation with Guy Gazelle the president and Chief Executive Producer of field station dinosaurs here on those leadership guy. Welcome the show so happy to have you here. It's great to be here. My curiosity is piqued. I have so many questions first and foremost I'm a kid I was. I guess every boy's goes to kind of girls. Go through horseface think little boys go through dinosaur phases maybe right. I was like a dinosaur fanatic. It was a freak about dinosaurs. Now we see more and more girls are into the dinosaurs in fact one of the most popular web series now is Dyno Dana. Yeah that's right. That's right. I've seen that that it had really gone out of fashion have they. They just always consistently popular yeah when I was putting my business plan together and I I was going out to investors trying to convince them to invest in a dinosaur park which is not something that exists you know really and because what I had to sell was the popularity of dinosaurs yeah and that the dinosaurs have been popular so they I sparked the imagination. You're in the eighteen eighties. They were lines around the block right to see the first dinosaurs in in London and in Philadelphia the the biggest blockbuster movie of the of the nineteen teens was was Gertie. The dinosaur which is a which is a cartoon in on the biggest blockbuster movie. The of twenty eighteen was drastic world three. I mean it's just has never has never gone down right. Why the FA- I mean I guess I guess it's intuitive who'd of why we're so fascinated with him because he seems so unreal I guess but what do you think the fascination is around. I think that they seem unreal but they were real and that's the fascination and that's what kids love about them because at an age where more and more things taken away from kids so there is no Santa Claus there is no tooth fairy. There is no Easter Bunny. There is no abominable snowman but but there is this they were real. We never take the dinosaurs away from the kids and the other thing that I think that really resonates with children is they have a shaky sense of time a few days in a while two years ago seventeen million years years ago. That's all the same to a little kid but when you tell them they lived right here so here in Derby we have a you you know a tyrannosaurus which is the kind of dinosaurs that actually marine reptile that lived right here in Kansas Yeah and when you tell them they lived here right where you are that really resonates with kids. They're like Oh. This giant thing was here that I think is what's interesting you so. I oh I think back to that. When I was that age you know eight nine when I was just so every tunnel to the library has picking a book doing learn everything that could about it and this isn't the seventies and when I found out that these lived here and I remember going to one of the I guess it was called the on this fear here at the time it was used to be the old original library and they had you know those fossils of this marine animal lived here and I'm like what you know. This was an ocean just fascinating. It's interesting that you put it that way. Yeah how how okay so. How did it all start so were you fascinated with dinosaurs as a kid yeah I was? I might really really early. Earliest memory was going to the New York world's fair in the in the nineteen sixty five at the world's for ran two years but I only remember number nineteen sixty five to sixty four and they had the the very famous sinclair dinosaur exhibit and I remember that exhibit and being really fascinated with with that and you know my first my favorite book when I was a kid was Danny and the dinosaur the whole dinosaur kids still read that makes me very happy happy and if I go anywhere and I say have any of you have read this book all the kids for his hands so yes now. I did not stay a dinosaur this or fanatic I mean that was something from my childhood that that I remembered fondly search like dinosaurs went ahead kids of my own taking them to the American Museum of Natural History three to see the dinosaur bones Was You know a big highlight of of being a dad for kids that age but I came back to the dinosaurs really when I started working in the exhibit business and how do we get involved in the business. I mean were you kind of looking at your background where you you integrate drama theatre acting. That was kind of what you thought your dream. Your path was going to be yes so I worked in the theatre. My my whole career as of of playwright as stage manager I did. I did some acting I became the managing director of a theater company. I mean I sort of worked my way up what you would call a theater generalist and so I was working at a theater in Red Bank New Jersey in we've did the capital campaign and we built a brand new theater and what happened is that caught the attention of some New York theater producers they were developing. I Am Exhibit Hall in The New York Times building in Times Square and because I had years of theater experience and I had just built a brand new building just done exactly what they wanted to do and almost built from scratch an organization they hired me to come in and and develop Ben. I was the original director of Discovery Times Square so that's how I got into the exhibit business guys in the theater we're going into the exhibit business and they hired a guy from the theater to go into the exhibit business with them and it was in the exhibit business and we did. King Tut and Titanic Harry Potter we did the the largest taurine exhibits that are that are currently out there and in the exhibit business we were constantly doing testing trying to figure out what what what exhibit to bring in next and dinosaurs always scored the highest every every time we did any kind of Nielsen intesting audience testing dinosaurs came in as the thing that was going to be the most popular and it wasn't appropriate. We had fairly low ceilings. Nothing being big enough to bring in a giant dinosaur. We were doing more high end. Shows like King Tut. We did the densities girls the producers didn't I think that animatronic dinosaurs really was a good match with the Dead Sea Scrolls so I got the idea then I said yes I should somebody should go out out there and do an outdoor animatronic dinosaur exhibit in New Jersey and sort of hit me that is actually the most qualified person to do that so in what way why why well I had the exhibit experience. I've grew up in North North Jersey just outside of New York City so I knew the the area. I knew exactly what would happen. I just built a exhibit hall. I had just built a theater so I had a lot of experience launching things and building things so I don wow so. Let's hang hang on so that that nudging that you've got he say okay I'm going to we need to put this dinosaur park. In New Jersey came in a dream and a PIFF AENA calling thing on a train on a journey what if you had to look back in retrospect and evaluate why this calling you think is it because you like the excitement of creating an exhibit. Do you like the educational aspect of it. What do you what what is it So I spent twelve of my years in theater. I spent working in children's theatre. touring internationally with a theater company called the paper. APOR bag players so teaching kids entertaining kids that is something that that that I really like and and understand hand so that aspect of it is very exciting to me. and that's what we do there. I mean in addition to Amtrak dinosaurs we have over forty live chain games and shows and activities that kids participate in so it's. I really did take my my years as a theater artist and combine line that with my experience in the exhibit business and my experience in in administration and and and management and I said I'm just gonNA put these altogether and I'm just GonNa Start this dinosaur park so sitting on the train you felt this was the purpose of calling. It was so strong that you immediately jobbers is something that you ruminated marinated over for quite a while so I not a fool so I was gonNA. Just quit my job I because because I had been working in the theater and had done a capital campaign. I knew a number of people who were both philanthropists but I also knew a number RAV people who were had had done some investing in theater had done investing in Broadway shows and I went went to them and I said to this my my business partners now my business partners then my perspective business partners and explain to them the the allure of dinosaurs and why I thought this would work and I said I need some seed money. I and the seed money was enough for me to quit my job and to scout out locations and try to secure location for the park and to find out more more about the business of dinosaur park because they exist. They're not they're not as big in North America much bigger in Asia and there are many more in Europe than than here it and find where I would find these animatronic dinosaurs and what they would cost and sort of got a business plan together so those investors said yes we. We are excited by this. We think this is great. We see the good work.

Dinosaur Park New York City New Jersey King Tut Guy Gazelle Red Bank New Jersey The New York Times American Museum Of Natural His President Trump Dyno Dana Chief Executive Producer North America Managing Director Derby Gertie Nielsen North North Jersey Discovery Times Square
"president founder" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"Thank Michael Pinto, president founder Pinto portfolio strategies that did I make your head spin nothing. Well, but I think it's a better that we hear about it. I think I love about the rich radio program is we give our guests a lot of time to explain things, and I'm going to invite him back because I have more questions. Now, I did that and come back and explain things more because that's how we learn. That's what I was just gonna say this left me with a lot of questions that are now going to start pursuing. So kind of Michael Pinto is the author of the book the coming bond market collapsed how to revive the Mayes of the US debt market. You see it's not the stock market. That's gonna crash as the bond market is gonna crash. He's not the only one saying it but records to say, and I'm personally very weak on the bond market. I don't understand it that well because I've never had any money to buy bonds. And he also said what happens when all the pensions come crashing down. And there's no money in all the pensions, including social security. That's a scary thought. Correct. And it's happening already today. It's happening as we talk about it looks that on the news today that conham is fine. You know, Trump's in idiot and. Jobs are plentiful of looking for workers, both be Konomi strong. But that's on the surface on a Nathe surface is what you listen to a rich dad radio for because he feels what's happening on CNBC are those magazines called bubble vision or money magazine, my favorite magazine, you know, you're not gonna get straight because he's always trying to sell you something I'm not trying to sell you anything. So once again, this is asked Robert section, and you can ask you can submit your questions to ask Robert at rich, dad radio dot com. Maleta must the first question. First question, Robert is from Emile in Houston, Texas favorite book, rich, dad, poor debt with the market's trending the way they are. How do you prepare for when the economy crashes? That's a very very good question. I let me just say this much, you know, people semi pessimists, look if you're going to be a professional investor or any kind of investment today's world, you've got to be a pessimist as well as an optimist, so Kim, and I are pessimistic at times..

Michael Pinto Robert Nathe surface money magazine US Emile Houston president Trump Texas CNBC founder Maleta Kim
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:18 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"But really what it comes down to is. I've started to kind of like, the the the pain and as far as from an entrepreneurial standpoint, you kinda get conditioned to it. And you kinda like jumping in the ring and you're gonna get hit in the face every once in a while. But that's just part of it. And I think if you adopt that mindset going back to mindsets. And you're gonna Dopp that mindset that you know, this is just part of it. Yeah, you're gonna get face. Every once in a while. This is what we do is in the brochures signed up for it. And this is the price that we have to pay in to live life on our terms. It's a great way to look at it. Right. I mean, a great mentor. She's helping she passed away a couple of years ago. But. She was helping me on my speaking business, and she was great. She was actually an acting coach, but she helped me with my presentations, and I was standing behind stations. My biggest presentation up to the point. I mean, there's. Fifteen hundred people out there at the time. I was nervous is gonna puke, you know, and she goes, she she grabbed my shoulders, and she said are you nervous? And my tendency was to say, you know, of course, not and I'm like. Yeah. There's she gets. That's right. That means you're alive if you're live. That's what it's all about. Right. And so I got a customer to that that feeling laments. The good thing. Right. And so like fears a blessing like this. Nervous this this nervousness? This unease in that. I'm feeling is blessing barometer to steer me towards doing something. Because I know if I work through it something significance going to happen. Absolutely. And I think probably share a little more than I maybe should about that. I had a similar experience where I had a big speaking engagement biggest of my life in front of at at the time. I think is maybe a couple thousand people and I had a some tremendous Zayed's while I decided to drink a beer just one beer one beer an hour before very strategically to help calm you down. You know? And I did it was just one beer went out there. I was feeling confident relaxed absolutely no nerves. No anxiety whatsoever. IBM deliver my speech. And I was just crushing it. The crowd loved it. I was on fire. And then all of a sudden, I forgot line. So I went from having zero nerves to one hundred percent Zayed in front of everybody. And I always think back to that. And I. Thank you know, granted, I'm probably a little harder on myself. No one really knew how it up except for myself. But I think back to that. I wish I would have had that enzyme in that nerves. I could utilize that instead of going from zero to one hundred in front of a thousand people, you know, I could have been maybe from seventy two one hundred and I would have been able to manage that a lot better. But I know we're not talking about public speaking here. I think it's important though to have that to have that perspective into be able to understand the the Zayed in the nerves the pain is it's all part of the game. And we need we need to be able to leverage that to our own advantage. I like we said is the price of admission. Right. It really is. And when you can look at it that way, that's how you deal with it like this is normal. And so to me it's being the calming force the chaos, I think we spent a tremendous amount of time energy and resources and efforts and people make a lot of money off of people promising things are going to be.

Zayed IBM one hundred percent
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"I think that that kind of come to Jesus talk with your own mindsets going to happen sooner or later. So I find that that that self awareness piece is incredibly important gonna leadership and in entrepreneurship in general. So it's huge. And I think a lot of times I used to think that from a leadership perspective, it's like, well, if I. You know if. It from leisure perspective. I just focus on you know. Well, lost my thought there because guys I had two thoughts, the entrepreneurship dot that. I was thinking was is like if I emulate what this guy's doing. You know, I'm going to be successful. Right. I'll just copy what he's doing for mannerisms to business philosophy and everything else right is marking plant, and it just doesn't work in the moment. I got thin with who. I really wasn't what I was strong at and everything else starts to fall in the placidly. Today is incredibly important. We keep talking about being benthic to your true self. But just because you wanna put on a black turtleneck doesn't make Steve Jobs. So you need to know what you're good at what you're not. And and hopefully. I also don't buy into the whole do what you love, you know. I don't buy into that. Just because I think. You know, oftentimes, if you do it you love, and you make it a business you'll find you don't love it anymore. Right. It's just like Sally going back with the with Sally. The pine maker. You know, I think after if after she's made a couple of thousand pies and her industrial kitchen, and she's dealt with angry customers as you probably won't want to be baking pies anymore. But you know, there is some there is some truth to the fact that you need to be passionate about what you do. And maybe not even love what you do. But just just be passionate about what affect you make on the world in going back with with in my own personal experience for us. I mean, rob -solutely business were were were not a charitable organization. But when the heads the piddle when the head hits the pillow the end of the night, we feel good about the impact we make out in the world are products. Enrich life's of animals, and they they take paint away. And ultimately, it's important to have something. Like that something that you're passionate about that can keep fuel the fire when everything else is going against you for me. I'm lucky to have that. And and I guess I'm just lucky where I am the type of entrepreneur where I I really do love what I do. And it's the it's the chase as the game. It's the dealmaking. It's the sales is the teaching. I'm very blessed and fortunate to be in a position to do what I do in very a very gracious that I am in the spot. I don't think everybody's as lucky as me or they get or they get to love what they do that way. You know, I often often even the bad stuff of entrepreneurs stuff you start to kind of acquired taste for it. I don't know how to explain it other than, you know, maybe a football player boxer may be after why you wanna put those pads on and get some contacts running running socks might hurts. But if you do it long certain point six week thin, you become addicted to it where you don't feel. You feel worse that you're not running. Right. It's not that you're dicta pain. But you your dictate to you. Love the process you love you love the challenge. Chase all that stuff. I get what you're saying. Yeah. I mean, and I like to use the boxing allergies or so many great boxing allergies with being up against the ropes or being in the corner, picking yourself up off the canvas or answering the bell..

Sally Steve Jobs football six week
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Yeah. I love that answer. I mean, there's so many nuggets in there. I think the pull out an extract. What you said there that they are. Can't over emphasize. It's come through on the show and all the foreign A-plus conversations. I've had on here is that it's so less about the talent. So less about the great idea. So less about the unique product, it's all about the two massively. Everybody says that -absolutely it's all about be. I mean, if there's one requirement you gotta have in this life in general, you gotta be today. Shis right. If you're gonna create anything of significant to do anything for the long haul. You've got to be today. She got to figure out a way to because it's too hard, and it's easy to quit. And that's the vast majority of people, they quit on everything, you know, and whether it'd be a business opportunity, or whether it be a relationship, or whether it be, you know. Abandoned. You know, we over the years. You know, there's there's people who who are successful. And there's people who aren't and I think if you ask the commonality it really is that the people who quit obviously didn't win and winners don't quit. But a simplistic as that sounds there really is some some deep truth to that the ability to be persistent and not give up and not an and more importantly. Be able to handle it emotionally and be able to carry the flag Ford, even though everything around you might be on fire. I really think that that is what it takes to make things happen to makes make things successful. And that is probably the anti and the game you really need. If you're gonna get into entrepreneurship, you need to be mentally tough. I've seen it break down. You know, people all around me one thing. I don't talk about much, but I comfortable sharing with you is an experience I had with one of my one of my business partners. I had a dear friend of mine. His name is Dustin. And he actually approached him originally about starting the business because he's a great sales guy is very similar to me. And a lot of respects thought he'd be a tremendous asset, and he'd had a steady job for many years. And it just wasn't for him to jump away from that, you know, the security and all that. But after about a year he saw starting to get some traction he came back around. And he said, hey, I'd like to get in like to be a partner, and so we brought him in. And he went fulltime, you know, he he wasn't ready for it. You know, he'd had a steady paycheck. You know, he always had a boss you always had accountability. And all of a sudden, you know, he's finding himself, you know, owner in business with no set hours finding himself dealing with poverty because there's there's not enough money to go around for everybody, and we're still building and working our way through and I just watched what it did to him as a person, you know, he. You know, he struggled struggled struggled with substance abuse..

Dustin Ford partner
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And then I think you're you're you're -tunities to be successful is as exponentially bigger for me. It really started. When I got outta high school. You know, I started working in a call center. It was just a job. I didn't know anything about it. But you know, what I knew I discovered I was great at sales. And so within the first week on the phone, I became the number one salesperson in the entire call center. And there's about three hundred people there and then within a month I was running team in the call center. And then here, I am, you know, eighteen nineteen. Years old, and I've got fifty sixty year old people that are managing, you know. And I don't really know anything, you know, I thought I thought I knew it all back, then obviously. But that experience for me, and I I actually stated that call center for years, I became a trainer and really taught people how to sell which which really opened my eyes to what really filled my Cup. It wasn't just closing a deal. It was teaching people how to close the deal and that really brought a sense of fulfillment. In me that I still use today when I'm talking to my people and training them on stuff, but really automated, I think that that call center experience provided me an incredible incredible journey that I can utilize all that information that I learned. I mean, you think about the amount of people that came to that call center that we hired that we fired amount of sales calls we took amount of angry customers, we took the that we talked to that whole experience serve me. So well that if I were to go into business without that. I think I would be I would be missing a lot of the tools that I have right now. And so I think that encouraging entrepreneurship is great in the right context. But ultimately, I don't think that people should jump right into it. I think you should go out in the workforce. Learn thing to learn how businesses supposed to operate, you know, get a mentor and Groza person. And then maybe take it on if it's what's right fi. I love that view of it. You're right because there seems to be and it's one of my pet peas. I don't it's almost like entrepreneurship is an elite club that and I-. There's I've met a few people in entrepreneurship circles who says well, you got it you don't. And if you don't have it stay away. Right. And or at least the perception of that is like you're not you're not in this jerk club. And I've met you're right on this show. And and even here locally, some very successful entrepreneurs that we all know who did exactly what you just said, right? They were interpreting Moore's in the organization than they cut their teeth in. Right. So here they aren't an organization, and they were very entrepreneurial inside the organization and made a name for themselves and got connections and learned all these valuable skills. Like you're talking about that if they would have done it on their own because face, it could literally destroy somebody. If you're not careful. Absolutely. And you see it destroy people all the time. That's the flip side of entrepreneurship, you know. And I know that it's it's. It's very popular glamorous, you know, with all the shows and so grand valley, and and everybody sees us, great image. And I think every community is trying to encourage business development and entrepreneurship, you know, for the right reasons, I think though that we have to really cautious with that. Because. Just because Sally has always had this dream of these this pipe bakery. And she's been making pies or life doesn't mean she should go. Take a second mortgage on the house and go open up a pie bakery. It might not be the right move. And it might end up with, you know, Sally hates baking pies in lost everything. And so I feel like, you know, entrepreneurship I don't know if you're born with it if you're not born with it what I really feel like the intrinsic.

Sally Moore Cup Groza grand valley fifty sixty year
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And I, and I totally agree with, you know, the whole listener podcast. And I love the, you know, not just leave it how you found better than you found it, you know, specifically, though, I find oftentimes I hear a lot of people talk about that. And you know, and you see these really successful people, and you know, and they doing this, and they've got these charitable organizations and that kinda stuff, but oftentimes what I look at it. And they say, oh, they work sixty hours a week. I what's the relationship with their kids. Look like, you know, how significant are they in their kids lives? Now, how significant other kids to them and to me, that's that's an incredibly important component of of significance and success. Is you know, I want I want it all, you know, who am I to demand the world? Give me everything I want and live on my own terms. But that's what I'm trying to do. And what led me to the course round going as I want to be a good father. I want to be. Leader when I'm sick success. And I wanna have significance, which I totally agree with you. I think really comes to legacy. We live leave our kids with how did it start for you? Let's go back. I mean was the dream. Let's say high school for you was what was the dream. Then. Oh, that's a tough question. Because I not only didn't have figured out. I was lost. I think in high school. You know, I I was the youngest three boys. And I I always I need to give thanks to my older brothers because they really there. They were really tough on me in many ways in. I think that formed the person who I am. And it really kinda gave me an extra level. An extra gear today that I don't think I would have without them. And so I think it my whole journey starts at having those two older brothers. My dad was an entrepreneur by nature, which means by nature things were up and down. Sometimes we had Hammy down shoes. Sometimes we had new shoes things were always up and down growing up. But in high school are really didn't know what I wanted to do with my life. I know for the for while I had this this desire to to be my own boss and create. But I think luckily for me. I didn't start that young. When it comes to entrepreneurship in general. I don't suggest that people at sixteen or eighteen go and follow your dream into that sounds a little silly. And I might have kind of a unique take a little bit different take than most entrepreneurs entrepeneurship in general. But I feel like it. It's incredibly important to get out in the workforce work for people understand how the world works grows a person..

sixty hours
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And we also need to get our butts and gear and make priority for our families, and our business and everything else that's tied into that started thinking in the mindset shift for me since we're talking about mindsets is in I noticed this when I started coaching guys on life and leadership and even for myself because when I had kind of my, you know, when they call them dark nights of the soul of whatever, you know, like that. And like, what am I going to do with my life type things twelve years ago, and it was wrapped up with this idea of being successful. I wanna be success to be a success. And I hear guy saying that when I'm coaching guys that are in their thirties in their forties in their hitting that kind of. Okay, I was going to be a lawyer. And I realize this kinda sucks and what I do get a corvette or having a fair. What do I do? And they start asking these guys will what they just wanted to be successful in to me. It's like not about success, but it's about significance. What is? Significant life, look like versus a successful life. And when you and you seem like a guy that's kinda wrapped around. I wanna have a significant significant life does that resonate with you. Absolutely. I think that that resonates to the core because success is different for everybody. Right. And we all put our pants on one leg at a time. Just dis- success or significance is defined differently by perspective. You know, I was in Canada. On a business trip. A couple months back, and we went white water rafting, and I saw one of our whitewater rafting guides. You know as you ask him. He's probably feeling pretty successful. He's got a pretty awesome life at pretty carefree gets to take people down the river. Every once in a while, he really enjoys life has some really good conversation really connected with the sky. And it made me think, you know, who's who's definition of successor. We changing, you know, to me, I want to be successful father and a successful business person. But ultimately that doesn't mean that any more successful than that guy that will take people down the river once or twice a day. And, you know, maybe sit on the Bank and barbecue, you know, I it's to each his own I'll myself too, high standard simply because I feel like going back to Ziglar who's a big big fan of you know, he said something if you hold yourself if your hard on yourself the world becomes easier. And you know, I'm hard on myself because I have. A big ambition and big dreams, and I want to accomplish a lot of different things. But that doesn't make it any better or any my success any better than the next person. Success? We'll kind of define what what happiness really looks like Enron and our own family or in our own lives as far as the significance goes. You know, that's different. Everybody's as well. I wanna make a lasting impact. You know? I think that oftentimes we feel good about what we do. Even though we're a business just because we do make an impact in the lives of animals, but is that any more significant than the guy that's bringing happiness to people as bringing him down the river. Give them a little scare, you know. It's it's all relative which. Yeah. But you hit something. And I think that and I agree. You know, success insignificance -is is relative to one's perspective. I do think though, there's more commonality when I if you and I say, what does significant life look like in when I asked that question of folks, it always tends to go towards I wanna be kids to, you know, at le- lasting legs from kids, and what my wife to be proud of me. I want you know, it's always about family almost right? And it's always leaving is leaving the campsite better than you found it. Whereas when we're talking about success, it really does become more about position title of financial number. A status or right, right? It's a little more cotton candy show most rate where absolutely..

Ziglar Enron Canada twelve years
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"You gotta have you have to be willing to I think because consider aware of it or have the big picture of shea. Then put the priorities here. Right. Right. I agree. But you know, I always find myself in a I was I always put in a place where it's really easy for me. You know, when I'm in the middle of big project on against a deadline, or I have something that I have to get done in my son comes up, and he says, hey, dad, you know, can be play legacy. Yeah. I always I always look at it. And I think I'm fortunate to be able to have this this mindset around it that pretty soon he's not gonna ask me to play Legos anymore and pretty soon. He's gonna want to play Legos unify come and ask him to play Legos. So I I do my best than I'm I'm by. No means a perfect person. Perfect parent. Perfect parter, but I do my best I can to to take that time out even if it's five or ten minutes because I know I'm never going to regret taking that five minutes out for him versus the contrary, which you know, we we have to once again we have to set our own. Limits and hold ourselves accountable and phases of life as I love that love that answering your right? And that's why I think having that priority mine site, what's the party will right priority is the kid asking me to play that at this moment. And that goes right into you know, how I almost how I really feel about life in general. I get really frustrated when people tell me they don't have time. Yeah. Because to we all have the same time, and that's an age old thing. Everybody's said the death. But it's about priority. It's not about time. And when somebody says, they don't they don't have the time. You know to me what I really here is. We're not a priority or this is not a party. And sometimes understandably so everybody has their own things, and we'll have our own goals and our own workloads that we deal with. But really what it comes down to is. We all say twenty four hours a day. And we mean we need to make make the time for what we think is important. And that's why I'm not real good with excuses on not with the whole. I don't have time. I'll put my work ethic and my work schedule up against anybody. And I make the time for the things I need to make time for. And so I think that's incredibly important. And I just think it's a cop. I think people need to to really really look at themselves in the mirror and ask him is it about time or do. I really just need to make a priority for things. I love that as great answer. You're absolutely right in into me. When you start adopting this kind of priority mindset, you realize how much time that you do have. And or you're wasting right? I when I looked at it that way 'cause I hate it's kind of the same things like on time room, busy grow is busy. There's always something. Absolutely. So what's the Prouty right now? And it was humbling an eye opening when I started looking at life that way. Like, I am spending. A lotta time for the TV. You know, I am doing a lot of non value added stuff right now. I am making excuses, but to go back to our previous conversation about this as you do need to make a priority to make yourself a priority at you do need unplug, and you do need to maybe, you know, bench watch breaking bad or something every once in a while. I agree. But you know, there's an extent to that. Right..

Prouty twenty four hours five minutes ten minutes
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Because the reality is we can't really I can't motivate you to do anything. I mean, I suppose I could take a wiffle ball bat hit you over the head with it. But that's only going to get you so far, right, right? I'm with you like, how do you find those people in in yourself? You know, how do you find, you know, I I'm going to do this? I'm going to be intentional about it this constant discipline this intention, AVI behind it. Right. I I think inherently. I'm lazy. But I'm motivated when I when I wanna go and get it go, and I want, you know, go at it. I go at it. Right. So for me, I am constantly battling can a comfort in laziness. And I think that's probably a challenge we all have, you know, something that from an entrepreneurial standpoint that I've really struggled with that. I think I've kind of come to a new reframe thought process on as you know, the grind it self. You know for years our struggle with something that I call entrepeneurship guilt. I don't know what other vernacular. He is sides that it's kind of how I feel. It's like, you know on a Saturday night. You know, you don't really feel comfortable sitting down on a couch. Watching TV when you know that your business is struggling, you know, that you could be doing something in a positive way something productive towards that business. And so for me for the for years, you know, I've really struggle with that entrepreneurial guilt, and I've kind of come to a new pre. Sheesh in that. You know, part of the entrepreneur process is reflection. It is taking the time out for yourself. It is pushing pause and being able to come back later. And and even though I have this kind of new reframe thought, and I do take more time for myself. I think that it's still a challenge deal with on a regular basis. The real challenge comes when you have your kids involved trying to have a work life balance on top of all that. And then the entrepreneurial guilt, you know, has some pretty strong conflict. And you know, I'm a obviously everybody loves their kids. But my kids are the most important thing to me. And so, you know, work like balance whole another direction, but being able to take time out and reflect pause and just give you give your mind a break. Maybe, you know, do a hobby or something that the stimulates your restores. You absolutely has to be. Process. You see so many people burned out all over the place. Just can't handle it. You know, we all have to take ourselves back step, and especially since ranch preneurs, and there's nobody over our shoulder requiring us to do this or that we need to hold ourselves accountable. And sometimes give us a break cut her some slack. It is funny in that circle of see see see everybody around it's easy to phone the comparison trap. At least is for me. You see this person working harder than you in this any right? And you're going going going, I get my wife's always pulling me back saying because I feel like I should be doing something because you give that mode all the time, and you should be doing something you ready. Get to take that time to reflect and stop comparing yourself with others and realizing what's important. I I don't even like the term work like balance anymore because that even puts a tremendous amount of pressure. Like, it has to be balanced. Sure. I don't think he can be balanced. I think it's an integration is integration rate. It's a priority list. What is the priority right now? Right. And sometimes the priority is the business in the family does have to suffer. And then..

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And always willing to apply those lessons. I think is incredibly impose. For leadership and entrepreneurship in general. It is it is issue question. I've I've talked about it mates on the show and many conversations people's like I can attribute any modicum of success that I had to this insatiable curiosity right in can you teach people that I don't know. Because I've always I feel like I always been curious. Sure. I think I I had a rowing talking about rowing coach w issue who's one of the instrumental figures in my life who kind of pivot turned me to the direction. I am now. Otherwise, I wouldn't be where I'm at right now. Head had him in. He always said he said this last weekend. He said you already had it in you. It's just it's always there, you just gotta figure out to release it. And I'm I believe that from a leadership front that you already have all the skills needed to be a great leader. You just need to release it def- fill the same way about entrepreneurship. I think that's a great question. I personally probably don't think it's that clear cut. Because for me, you know, entrepeneurship is is obviously not for everybody as far as having a growth mindset. You know, I see it every day in my day to day. Experiences to where some people are constantly hungry and want to learn and want to be better and want to do better. And then some people are fine. You know, watching reality TV all day. And and, you know, haven't read a book since they required to eighth grade or whatnot. And so for me, I'm not so sure it's something that can be brought out tot. I don't profess to know the answer either. I think having a growth mindset is an incredibly important thing to have if you do have big ambition because unfortunately, if you're not willing to learn if you're not willing to seek out the information and teacher self then it's going to be a really really tough road. Yeah. You know, I always look for employees that have that growth mindset, because you know, over years, I've noticed comes to leadership, you know. I don't want to micromanage people, and nobody wants to be Michael nobody wants you over their shoulder telling them, what's what's what you know. There might be certain people that need more direction than others might be people that that need you to hold their hand and certain. Scenarios? But what I look for is people who I can pointed direction, and they go, and and maybe they don't even have a map, but they not figure out, you know, they not look at the stars or something, you know, they need they ought to find a way to make it happen. And ultimately, that's what I look for when we when we hire. Yeah. Would so much rather rain somebody in right, right? Then can absolutely. I gotta motivate them all the time..

Head rowing Michael
"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Wayfair, kennels and more. He's truly results oriented entrepreneur. He's got a passion for innovation and what I really appreciate. He's got a passion and deep deep understanding of how to empower others. I love his authenticity. A love is known ability. We really get down to the dark side of entrepreneurship, the first time I've ever had a conversation with with anybody on that he really opened up and even admits for the first time he shares some stories that he's never really talked about before in public. So I appreciated his authenticity invulnerability injure going to create it to of great leadership in Auburn ship nuggets in here, as you know, many the traits to be a successful enterpreneur and leader are intertwined if you're going to be successful in significance or you're going to have to understand and put leadership in the action and Trevor fully understands that appreciates that any shares his knowledge on this show today now. This show is brought to you by equity Bank. It's been exciting to watch equity Bank become one of the fastest growing banks here in Kansas. I'm proud to have him as a sponsor. And I appreciate their support of this show in the concepts behind it. Now, I can be Bank has recently been listed on the NASDAQ exchange. They have branches all over Kansas, but they've branched out into Oklahoma, Missouri Arkansas as well in clearly this team at equity Bank. They know how to lead for growth, they fully understand what it means to be an entrepreneur, they understand the challenges in the realities of being an entrepreneur in this environment and this economy, so if you feel like you're current Bank is more of a follower than a leader. If you feel like, they don't your Bank fully doesn't understand you. Then you're gonna want to check out my friends at equity Bank. You're really gonna wanna work with him because they truly understand that your check them out at equity Bank dot com..

equity Bank Trevor Wayfair Kansas Auburn Oklahoma Missouri Arkansas
"president founder" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

AM 570 The Mission

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on AM 570 The Mission

"President founder of mission preborn morning he rejoins us and dan it's it's disheartening that even across the new york area not all of the boroughs have an evangelical witness for chrysler in in the terms of a crisis pregnancy center footprint and that's one of your future goals here as well well we would really love to remedy their kevin thanks for listening um if you will so uh uh bronx send brooklyn and queens do not help an evangelical christ preaching pregnancy clinic here's someone that i as a church leader and you'd like to help pre born remedy that we'd love to start center and in several leads bureaus and we particularly need if you're a a few no of or are a pro life obgyn that's willing to uh to help buoy that would be a tremendous uh benefit and we could to preach the gospel while dunning a cry centered alternatives here in all the bros and they can get information or requested when they call the number eight five five six young one two two two nine in friends we're talking about a couple of different things here but let me just the clarify some of them it cost one hundred forty dollars to provide twentyeight ultrasound made a five ultrasounds a twenty dollars a piece that so much that a mission preborn can secure them for if though if the woman does to a hospital or clinic or an outpatient and has to pay out of pocket for the ultrasound it's much more than that but uh but preborn is able to provide that no cost to the woman and very low cost for the for the with the service itself but if you if you can if you're of financial ability and maybe maybe you're a small business owner maybe you're somebody who got his blessed greatly in 2017 maybe you had a good run in those bull markets and if you would like to give a gift of twenty five hundred dollars eighty five seventy the mission is willing to give you a complimentary advertising package that would include dozens of spots that you.

President chrysler business owner founder new york dunning twenty five hundred dollars one hundred forty dollars twenty dollars
"president founder" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"president founder" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Likely on threes he's bloomberg markets with pimm fox and lisa abramowicz on bloomberg radio good morning came at this is such a busy tuesday not only do we have the interest rate decisions from the fed yesterday today we have them from norway from china from turkey ecb came out with their decision so of the bank of england a ton of news there also though disney making a massive move buying a assets from fox yes and shoppers they are out in force sir retail sales up more than uh estimated zero point seven percent increase for the month of november but right now let's go to greg jarrett he's in the bloomberg newsroom and has a bloomberg business flash greg the cpim stocks rise toward more records the dollar gains amid continued optimism on the economy's strength after retail sales top s too much disney agrees to that fifty two point four billion dollars deal to acquire much of a global empire the media baron rupert murdoch assembled over the last three decades for me fabled hollywood studio to europe's largest satellite tv provider to one of india's most watched channels julia coronado president founder of macropolicy perspective tells bloomberg we'll see a lot more big moves like this and it's not good for the labor force as synergies inefficiencies translate to offs so that is sort of the trend towards the top of the cycle that we tend to see lots of mergers and acquisitions acquisition slowing job growth a focus on maintaining the prophet shares that that that they have so it's not and it hasn't been globally a labour market that favours workers and that's probably not going to change we check the markets every 15 minutes throughout the trading day here on bloomberg radio.

founder bloomberg president julia coronado europe hollywood bank of england fed lisa abramowicz pimm fox india rupert murdoch greg jarrett retail sales fox disney china norway four billion dollars seven percent three decades 15 minutes