35 Burst results for "President And Ceo"

Washington, DC is expecting about 11 million domestic visitors this year

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 2 weeks ago

Washington, DC is expecting about 11 million domestic visitors this year

"In the nation's capital has stuffer during covert and now There are plans to bring it back. According to tourism economics, we can expect nearly 11 million domestic visitors in the city this year. Destination DC. President CEO Elliot Ferguson acknowledges that the far cry from the 22 million visitors last year, however, of a vaccine is found by early next year. That number could continue to rise by the year. 2022. The push now, says Ferguson is to encourage visitors within a four hour drive, and he notes Washington D C will always be the place where people come Exercise their first Amendment right to free speech. Barbara Brit

Ceo Elliot Ferguson Barbara Brit President Trump DC Washington
Weekly food drive continues Saturday, August 8 in Atlanta

Too Much Truth With Derrick Boazman

01:10 min | Last month

Weekly food drive continues Saturday, August 8 in Atlanta

"Serious crisis. That's US representative Davis Scott on how the Cove it 19. Pandemic has impacted so many Georgians to help those in need. During these difficult times. The congressman has partner with the U. S. Secretary of Agricultural Sonny Perdue, Clayton County Fire and Emergency Services, the family Health Centers of Georgia, the Atlanta Community Food Bank, George Association of Broadcasters and the the Urban Urban League League of of Greater Greater Atlanta Atlanta for for a a free free drive drive through through covert covert 19 19 testing. testing. And And full full distribution distribution thiss thiss Saturday Saturday from from 9 9 a.m. a.m. to to 1 1 p.m. p.m. at Monday's Mill High School With a record high of unemployment rate for George's. During the Koven 19 pandemic, many families have struggled to keep food on their tables. Calloway, president, CEO of Atlanta Food Bank, says the need for food is ongoing. There will be elevated levels of need around Atlanta and really around the country. For many months to come and maybe years Theat Lana Community Food Bank and U S Department of Agriculture will provide free fresh food to 1500 families on a first come first serve basis that their drive through event this Saturday. That's what's

Atlanta Community Food Bank Theat Lana Community Food Bank Atlanta United States Clayton County Fire And Emerge Urban Urban League League Pandemic U S Department Of Agriculture Sonny Perdue Mill High School Davis Scott George Association Of Broadcas Representative Congressman George Calloway Secretary Family Health Centers Of Georg Partner
Visit Philadelphia launches new online platform for tourism, hospitality jobs

KYW 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 2 months ago

Visit Philadelphia launches new online platform for tourism, hospitality jobs

"Available to help those who lost their jobs in the tourism and hospitality industries during the pandemic table. W's John McDevitt report visit Philadelphia has launched a job section on its website for tourism and hospitality jobseekers to go. It is a one stop shop. That's Jeff Guaracy. No, the president, CEO of Visit Philadelphia. The hospitality industry is a major industry in this region and employees. More than 103,000 Family sustaining jobs and then covert hit and immediately we lost 44,000 jobs in the industry as we were staying at home. Now, as the tourism industry begins its flow re open to welcome back visitors to come and explore a region People are hiring. They're wide variety of job opportunities of places like hotels, restaurants and other businesses throughout the region, And he says, there will soon be pulls for jobs of museums and other attractions. The services free more information that visit Philly Duck comes last Dobbs. John McDevitt came one ofyou. NewsRadio. We

John Mcdevitt Philadelphia Jeff Guaracy Dobbs President Trump CEO
"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

02:12 min | 2 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

06:04 min | 2 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Are rain. I mean like that is that's the core of a freedom right? It is like I I know. Why am I know what freedom looks like? I have a vision around in, and once once you get that taste. You are not going back. You're going to continue to fight for what it means for you to live your life on your own terms, and I think that intersection of these movements and having these conversations and lifting up is incredibly powerful. Powerful. Yeah, yeah, you know Alexis. I WANNA. Tell you and if you don't have this already, you can take this idea. I want a t shirt that says abortion equals healthcare. Yes, right because that's that's missing. I want everyone to understand that that abortion healthcare you know it is abortion and I don't want to. As people to not shrink away from abortion in the way that sometimes happens in these debates, and that it is healthcare, so if you are not voting for people who are in favor of abortion access for all, you are voting against healthcare. That's just my comment. Present I, am you I take it I will I will send you a T shirt. It is happening I mean just last week in the middle of night. You know what happened Tennessee these politicians? Lake created a one of the craziest bills to ban abortion at nearly every stage of pregnancy including before he believe in know that they're pregnant, right? It's like the most restrictive in the country. It will be the first worship band to be enacted this year, and you look at something like that and like. If people understood, it is healthcare, they may have a different a different reaction to it rather than letting something like this craziness. Pass in the dark of. Of night. Right exactly, and that's why I wanted on a t shirt. Right because I have these conversations, but they're. They're conscious between people like you and I. You who kind of understand that we read the books and you know we're lead. You're leading an organization right, but the average person I think you know even on the Progressive Democratic Side I. Don't know if everyone can say that. They believe that abortion is healthcare. They view it that way I. Think they still think of them as two separate things healthcare, and then there's abortion, right and I think it would help. If. We started talking about them. As if they're the same thing I think you're absolutely right and I think that you know what planned. Parenthood is again first and foremost a healthcare provider and receive abortion as as part of sexual reproductive healthcare, and that's what we provide everything from CI screenings to cancer screenings to out to birth control to abortion and an olive. Those are tools to as healthcare is right tools to help you live a fully free life, and so I. I am one hundred percent. Abortion is healthcare I think it's very simple. I think it is you know. I think it will make a great shirt. I think. So. So at this point what I know, this is the thing that keeps you up at night, but you know. How do we begin to turn things around? I know that there's multiple things to do you know, but what's the most pressing thing and the most pressing three things is that you know electing people at the local level who are champions for reproductive rights? You know obviously it's voting, but the average person like what should they be doing to help? You know if there if this is a concern of theirs. I mean it is vote vote vote, I think you know it is. It is absolutely vote vote vote. I think we're heading into an election. That is, we've been saying. Is. Unprecedented is the most important election of our lifetime and I think that making sure that are focused on that educating ourselves about what is happening to access to reproductive healthcare specifically abortion I think is GonNa, be really important. And you know I think lifting up champions and and being it for the long game I think part of the challenge here is that it's taken us a while to get to this point where where access to reproductive health care is is literally on the verge of being lost, and it's going to take a long time to to restore right. This is a fight that will be. As been relentless, it has been unyielding, and we have to prepare ourselves for what it will take to not only to restore democracy, but also to ensure that that people people's access to healthcare doesn't depend on their on their zip code, and so you know voting is a key piece of that. Having a long game is a key piece of that and staying focused and strategic and relentless back and I think making sure we're lifting up our our champions and you know and focus on the on the real momentum. We saw it just in in twenty, twenty, eighteen, twenty, nineteen in in state legislatures twenty eighteen. We got a pro-choice. pro-choice Congress, that was the largest pro-choice majority that we've ever seen. Because we stayed vigilant from to sixteen in Twenty Nineteen We got governorships in Kentucky and in Virginia and that state legislature in Virginia flipped back rats, and we're able to undo a lot of horrible legislation that was done around access to abortion healthcare. So you know it is a long road on politics, you know these are these are moments in inside of movements, and that elections are critical, but we you know if you have a movement Lens. That means that you were involved for for the long game and I think it's really important for folks to gauge. So it sounds like we need to t shirts. We need you know. Abortion is healthcare, and we need you know vote for your state legislators it indeed yes, and. I'm just GONNA add another line. which is basically, movements are never settled. Movements are never settled. We have to stay engaged. We have to stay vigilant and had had we known you know at I know in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three when I was coming up. This was going to be the fight that I was having forty seven years later. I wouldn't have ever said I thought that was settled. You know. Now? That's really profound now. That's a really good thing to end on while. Well Alexis Me Johnson. Thank you so much for all the work you're doing and I truly appreciate you and thank you for joining me today. Thanks for having me down so Dr..

Alexis Me Johnson Virginia Congress Tennessee Kentucky
"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

07:28 min | 2 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"Makeup, the legislatures changed because of the way that the districts were gerrymandered. You actually have people with a minority view who now have more power. Prior ten fifteen years ago, the electorate was more reflective of communities. I think that's the fundamental shift in. In change that we have to look at and that's what we have to look at at restoring, and it will take you know it will take another decade right? I think we're. We're at halftime now at twenty twenty and we're already. You really have to go back in the locker room and get ready for the next fight after this election because it's GonNa take a while to undo a lot of the damage that we've seen through the last decade. Yeah, you know I think for me and again you can correct me if I'm wrong. There seems to be a missing piece in the way that people I'm speaking specifically about people who don't vote consistently for Democrats. Because would be Republicans in that. If they do support access to abortion. They aren't necessarily making the connection that they're. They're voting decisions at the state level local level. It's counter to what they actually believe. And that seems to be the missing piece, but Yup, look I. I think that that traditionally folks who have been not progressives have not actually voted on the courts as consistently and I think that that is also what's missing. Missing, it's the local level, but it's also kind of with very clear eyed view of what the court makeup should be, and that's really where our you know our big. Our big battles are right now I. Mean I'm if we if Rogan's overturn their twenty five million women who were living in states right now, who would not have access to abortion that in itself if you think of. Women of Reproductive Age would also overlap with a universe of voters. That's a huge impact that we have really consider how we awaken and make sure that they understand what's at stake right now. We're talking to someone. Recently about the number of changes since Roe v Wade was was passed, right? hasn't been forty years. Actually forty. forty-seven like thousands and thousands of restrictions right and it feels like. Maybe I'm not being fair. It feels like it's taken us a really long time to wake up. Yes. The reason I say forty seven is because I I'm forty seven years old. I'm told his row. I didn't grow up with. This was ever going to be a thing. Right? I mean I of course there's always there's always more that we can do to support real meaningful access right because you can have the have the right, but not actually have the ability to execute on the right, and that's know has a lot to do with our healthcare system and other other intersections, but like the fact that that wouldn't have. if they were seeking abortion just was not something that you know I. think my generation really was was growing up. You know worrying about and quite frankly we were taking advantage of all of the fates that had. been had before us, and and I think that's why it feels like this guy is falling like I, WanNa say this guy's roaming really happening and there are a lot of people who are who are you know are realizing how it actually on the line when they see all of these structural pieces. Come together now you're exactly right. We're in the same boat. I mean I am thinking back. You know when I was in college. Or you know when these things should have been really important to me. I just took them for granted and thought that they would always. Always be there and things were happening. That were really important. That should have been paid attention to by myself. You know back, then you know in the same is true for planned parenthood. Mean I just a bit of a personal story. My mom was a nurse and I remember. You know she'd sometimes she would work planned. Parenthood clinics right and I was ages ago by remember that and it just you know kind of not really thinking about it. It was something that planned parenthood. It had been around forever. It would always be here and you're still here thankfully, right? But you know. Going anywhere. You've been a first century, but you know just thinking that these attacks would not be effective right one of the things that I have noticed recently about planned parenthood under the trump administration specifically in around the role that you have in the community is how intersectional your work is right. I mean because you know going back to the story about my growing up I made the connection of planned parenthood to abortion which A. A lot of people to make that connection right, but looking at you now see just how intersectional it is I. Mean You've been partnering with the Movement for Black lives I saw something about that. And you know with you know activists from the DACA movement and lgbt community his name a few, so am assuming that's been strategic, but have partnering with these organizations. Has It helped? Make your coalition stronger going forward. You think absolutely it. It has been strategic work, but it is been on very intentional heart. Work Right when you actually when parenthood centers the patient right, we are first and foremost a healthcare provider affiliate health centers are providing actual caring communities and the people for whom they're providing care are living at the intersection of all these issues that were providing care for you know undocumented immigrants for black communities for for workers for folks who may not have access. Access. may not even have the ability to pay an planned parenthood. Health centers provide that CARE regardless of immigration status regardless of ability to pay, and you know I think the the decision to to align with organizations, like Movement for black lives or to be involved in the duck fight, or you know to fight for Trans Lives. You know has a lot to do with the fact that you know all of these issues are. Interconnected right there in our. In our workplaces in our schools in our public institutions, it's in our healthcare system, and we have I think a big platform to to really think through the through line. which is that you know we, we fundamentally believe in freedom, and we believe that you know you should not be criminalized for seeking access to abortion for determining your own life. Course you should not. Not Be criminalized for seeking access to freedom through immigration. You should not be criminalized. You know just as we were talking earlier around some of the the crazy microaggressions that people are just living wild black, and we won't be able to ever achieve access to justice if people don't have the right to bodily autonomy and definitely won't be able to achieve freedom and so. Thinking about how we imagine them and fight for freedom. I think that's actually what we're seeing now and it's been you know again. It's been very intentional work. It's been very hard work inside of our organization inside of of bringing movements together, but what we're seeing right now is still real like the grassroots momentum that is taken the country by storm that has led by young people that is led by Black Brown people by Queer people. People really requires not just us as an organization, but as as movement leaders to to align and make sure that we are fighting and standing on the same page. Yeah, it's really beautiful. It's in the midst of all of this. All these terrible things that are happening. You know people in the street scene, even though it's, it's hard because you think like. Are they risking their health? You know, but it is really beautiful to see. Is. Very Liber Tori when I watch it. I have to be honest. I think that it is I. Keep saying like people are like how journal like. Just have this laboratory vibrate now because I'm seeing these folks who were just so unapologetic about they.

twenty twenty DACA Rogan Black Brown Roe Wade
"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

07:47 min | 2 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"August, I'm the impact, Evatt the resources on particularly for an organization like planned parenthood that Sir forty percent of titled Ten patients. The impact was very tangible. Right, it was. It was people who oftentimes don't even know that they were getting public assistance for their for their birth control. All of a sudden had to. To start paying in ways that they weren't expecting to her. Anticipating and I think it's just a great example. This this gag rule that was asking providers to give a full range of options for patients If they found out, they were pregnant. It's it was asking our providers to give substandard care, and that was just completely unacceptable, which is why we were forced out of the program. Also we'll emphasis curious I was thinking about that. And if about what that looks like practically you know, someone comes in and to healthcare provider, and they say you know I need help, and you know following this gag rule. The provider does what and says what? Well I mean I. If you come to a planned parenthood. You get the full range of information because we we decided we weren't going to comply with a a gag rule that asks us to provide substandard care, but it would have looked like you know we can't. You know if you if you came in? And your pride in you asked with our termination. The provider would have to say if they were accepting titled ten money. I cannot give you information on that or go try Google or You know I mean it was. Ridiculous rate in a and I think like the heart of agenda honestly is is the relationship between a patient and provider is a very intimate. It has to be based on trust. Right on getting the right information to take care of your healthcare needs, and if you are a provider and you all, Seddon cannot give the full range of information that someone is asking for in seeking, it is compromising that that level of trust between the patient and the doctor, and so I think it's really important to understand that this isn't just about cutting off access because because people don't. Don't want to support access to abortion. It is also undermining the basic tenants that should be guiding a a relationship between a patient and the provider and I think that's really where planned parenthood in particular, stepped an on side of our providers enter patients to make sure that as a trusted messenger as a trusted resource, particularly around on sexual and reproductive health care. We would not be compromised. Yeah, one of the things that I hear more people talking about or beginning to talk about is the appointment of these conservative antiabortion judges and I like to call them anti healthcare. Just because abortion is healthcare. And you know the important thing about it. Is that all of the other changes? We've talked about the changes to title tanner the closing of clinics. You know those can be undone with majorities in Congress or the Senate, or with the White House, but this can't write these wife time judges. Trump himself said that you know I. Think he made a comment about overturning Roe v Wade would happen automatically because he's putting in pro-life judges right like He. He's aware of this. So, what does the picture look like now? How many judges have been appointed? Who have these views? I mean we're almost looking at almost two hundred judges that have been appointed head during the trump. Trump administration. It is I as you say I mean. When you layer on the number of restrictions that we have seen over just last year, we saw three hundred and three abortion ban restrictions introduced in forty seven states and state legislatures. So like let's like let's like pull the picture together and why these judges are so important. You've got three hundred restrictions in forty-seven state. State you have almost two hundred judges now that have been confirmed and you know as as organization quite frankly as a movement, we've relied on courts as our stopgap when when very harmful bans and restrictions to healthcare come out, we are able to to actually use the court to stay to have it be considered. Now we have these two hundred judges have up incredibly restrictive thoughts. Thoughts on access to healthcare abortion healthcare out somebody like Corey Wilson who's about to get confirmed he actually holds a record that demonstrates incredible hostility towards not just health care, but also voting rates racial justice. You know I mean we have Sarah Pit Lick, who doesn't even believe an Ivy f you know we have like Berry Conservative judges on access to reproductive health care that will. Will now be adjudicating as to whether or not these bands should be upheld or not, and so when you think about the impact, obviously, we oftentimes have a conversation about the Supreme Court. which is also critical on crucial may have a case before the court right now, but when you think about the the pipeline from the the the bands through these circuit federal judges to the. The Supreme Court where there are already I. Think Eighteen cases now winding their way up in addition to the one that was hurt in March. You know the the the world of row the for. Road to remain the Lai land is not only subject to potentially being overturned. It also just gutted to the point where it's a name only and that's that's what I think we. We really have like tell the the big picture of the stories in how strategic those who've been anti healthcare have been in and trying to push their agenda while so correct me from wrong, but it feels like ten fifteen years ago. Even considering judge with these kind of archaic views wouldn't have been considered even. Is that fair to say I absolutely? I think it's fair. Fair to say and I also think I mean ten fifteen years ago. you know I started working as a volunteer with Planned Parenthood in twenty ten right right at the beginning of the twenty ten congress, and it was in that moment during the redistricting during the obviously the census redistricting odd the tea party that came in into play and the this alliance around. Pushing, bands in restrict restrictions targeted restrictions just for abortion providers really started to escalate. You know this is the reason why. Matter. This is why you taking the census matters. This is why are really focusing on restoring core tenets around how democracy functions in the checks and balances matter because we've had now these excessive of elections that have completely transformed our state legislatures created the opportunity for these these bands to be put out, and then we're also. You know having to unwind so much right? I mean it like that is that that's what keeps me up at quite frankly just thinking about the massive damage. It's already been done and what we will need to do if we get a women's champion in office. Come November right, right, yeah! Yeah. Sorry I was so stressed out listening to that. Already now it's crazy. Good. Okay, well so I guess my point was. Is that even ten or fifteen years ago? I mean it's obvious that Democrats considered a judge. Some judges with these us, but I think a lot of Republicans would have rejected such extreme views. Maybe, Look I think that I think then what we have now. Is that small a vocal minority who has the levers of power? And you know when you consider the fact that the majority of Americans actually do believe that rose should be the law of land when you when you consider the fact that there is no state in the union that the leaves that abortion should be banned and yet because of these technical changes right because of the.

Supreme Court Google Trump Seddon Corey Wilson Supreme Court. congress Berry Congress White House Roe Senate Wade
"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

06:37 min | 2 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode I have a conversation with Alexis McGill Johnson the president and CEO of planned parenthood. I'm so excited to bring you this episode because I put a longtime supporter of planned. Parenthood Alexis and I discuss planned. Parenthood is broaden their coalition to include organizations and activists from a variety of different movements, making their work, truly intersectional and inclusive. We also talk about planned. Parenthood will continue to move the Movement for reproductive healthcare forward, and how they plan to counter the attacks on reproductive rights, including those put into place during the pandemic, so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Alexis McGill Johnson. Johnson welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much for having me is planned. Parenthood has been around for a century over one hundred years, but it feels like it's been under attack at least from conservatives since forever at least that long right. Yeah originally long time, but you know under the trump administration is like there's been a steep rectory upwards with the attached. They've been really emboldened with these attempts at abortion bans complete abortion bands. You know clinic closures, but I think the thing that I'm most appalled about lately is the use of the pandemic to accelerate the attacks right? What are the ways that they've exploited the coronavirus outbreak to further restrict access to reproductive care? Care I mean. Can you believe that? Yes, they that we are all in the midst of sheltering in place we are all in the midst of worrying about our own healthcare, and really kind of looking at how healthcare system, generally the the disparity within that the healthcare system is laid bare and the trump administration and many folks who have been aligned with the trump administration in states like Texas and a High Oh and decided to use the pandemic as a cover to push executive orders around access to abortion, and so in several states are. Keeping in mind, we're supposed to be staying at home. We are supposed to be limiting our travel out of out of state in order to to flatten the curve, governors in several states decided that. Now is the time to basically push a political agenda, and they created executive orders limiting access to abortion care saying that it was in some. Cases Outright banning it saying that it was elected, it was non essential and what we saw with you know people leaving state going from states like Texas to Colorado Texas to California, driving in many cases, dozens of hours to just to get access to medication abortion because they weren't able to access it in their own zip code, so look since day one we know the trump administration has been pushing policies to undermine access to sexual and reproductive health care, but just in the last. Last three months particularly at the height and sheltering plays you know many who I think had cover from the trump administration were so focused on using this time to push a political agenda, and it was really just unconscionable, saying that abortions were essential. What actually happened was and I? Think and you can confirm this for me as a love. The clinics had to cancel active appointments is is that true and when it happened? What people actually do? Yes, absolutely I mean look. Look, we had just heartbreaking conversations with providers that are limited health centers across states in need in some states where abortion hadn't been banned because there had been a lot of confusion, so providers are getting on the phone. They're calling their patients. They're saying you know either. You have twenty four hours to get in here or your appointment has actually been canceled We can no longer serve you and we'll have to refer you to a place out of state. We've had patients calling. Calling into the health centers in the call center is trying to really just so much confusion that was being sown during the executive orders as the orders came down. You know planned parenthood along with Aclu ends and reproductive rights. Organizations are fighting each ban in in each state that was putting them down because we wanted to ensure that those clarity and to ensure that our our patients had access to the care, so there's just a lot of confusion that was happening and you now. Abortion is essential healthcare, right? It is time sensitive, and so you know so. The choices that patients were faced with were were essentially to travel out of state to secure access, and you know I mean putting themselves more at risk rate, both for coronavirus or spreading coronavirus throughout the through the areas where they were traveling, and then also through stairs, the story of a woman that was in one of the briefs. who had to put her children in the car with her elderly mom drive across state lines I think twelve hours to Colorado and back, and those are the those are the people behind these orders right? Those are the people who are experiencing you know on the on the other end of the political agenda that you know it's just so so unbelievable. It is, and you know what's interesting is that this isn't much different from what it was before like people in. In certain communities had to travel across state lines to get an abortion. So this just exacerbate those obstacles. Yeah I mean we take for granted that that is still the La La land, and the majority of Americans believe that Roche's wildland land, but there are, there are states where there are you know no abortion providers and there are states were access is so limited because of the multiple restrictions that have been put in place that it makes it. Extremely difficult particularly for low income families, particularly for people, of color he asked. Can we talk about a few? The restrictions are put into place before the pandemic and I think one of the big ones was titletown gag rule right in band providers from telling patients about how they can you know safely and legally get access to abortion and just a comment. This isn't necessarily a question, but I think that. It should be legal and all forms of healthcare to withhold information. That's useful to patient for the purposes of manipulating their decision. Right I. Just think that should be illegal. You'd never do that to person with a heart condition, right? Do that right now. You told me. You totally wouldn't. It's right so first of all like for for for listeners who don't title ten program it is a program that is the nation's oldest and first family planning grant that provides access to birth control, and particularly in low income communities, rural areas. And when they came out with the decided to enforce the gag role in last.

Alexis McGill Johnson executive Texas Colorado Jim Taylor skinner president and CEO Aclu La La California Roche
Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

Outcomes Rocket

04:50 min | 3 months ago

Leveraging the Quadruple Aim in Healthcare Innovation with Jeroen Tas

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket today I have the privilege of hosting Garin Tass. He's a chief innovation and Strategy Officer of Royal Philips a position. He's held since February two thousand seventeen year experienced global executive and entrepreneur with the track record of leading innovation in healthcare, information, technology and financial services industries. He clearly sees the tremendous value that information technology and data can add to managing health, leading the company's Global Innovation and Strategy Organization he's responsible for emanate strategy planning RND Solution Design Medical Affairs Sustainability. Technology, platforms ventures. Ventures and emerging businesses, he's in charge of creating a pipeline of innovation in their various businesses that Phillips covers within healthcare. They are focused on delivering on quadruple aim, which is improving health outcomes, improving patient, experience, staff, satisfaction and lowering the cost of care, and in my interview with urine. He dives deep into how they're doing that with some great examples that you will enjoy. He's a respected thought leader and was responsible for turning around. Philips healthcare it business and has been instrumental in establishing health sweet as a new. New Open Industry Standard for the healthcare. Internet of things cloud platform year and joined Phillips in twenty eleven, leading it worldwide as group chief information officer in two thousand fourteen. He became CEO of Phillips Healthcare. Informatics solutions and services, overseeing digital health and clinical informatics from two thousand sixteen. He led the company's connected care and informatics business, demonstrating passion to create new models of people centric healthcare based on the power of information technology before joining Phillips Urine Co founded and served as president. CEO and Vice Chairman of the board. Board for emphasis and it and business process outsourcing company, which was acquired by HP in two, thousand, six, prior to emphasise. He was head of Transaction Technology Citigroup's tech lab. Who's responsible for innovation and development of the banks customer facing systems, including Internet, banking and self service devices from two thousand seven to eight. He was VPN general manager at EDS responsible for the company's global competency centers. He has been a winner of the Eny entrepreneur of the year award, and many more but in two days after. We're going to dive into how it's important to focus on the quadruple aim, but also how diverse mindset such as Mr is diverse mindset and experience across different industries can help us in healthcare and looking at different perspectives to drive the most value for our healthcare dollar, and to provide the best care for patients, so such a privilege to have Mr task on the podcast today. Yaron thanks so much for joining me. really pleasure to be there so so. What an incredible Just work that you do. you know had a chance to to really. Connect with you a little bit further when we were in Vegas. Together offer the health meeting. Bud what what happens in Vegas Stays Vegas. All right so there we go. Let's change topics. I'd love if you could just share what inspires your your work in healthcare? Well, I think like all of us. We have personal stories. have personal stories. It's related the to health and You know what really motivated me to to get into. Healthcare is when my daughter was diagnosed with type, one diabetes and She was rushed to the hospital and spend a couple of days in the ICU. And I think confronted me with. The Way Healthcare is organized confronted knee wits how technology is used. My reaction was wow this. This can be so much better you know in my daughter regularly says I'm I'm actually the the care coordinator because? Diabetes is a complex disease with complications and their mental aspects to it as well, and she says I I kind of have to coordinate between cared disciplines, and I'm also data aggregate, or because every time I go somewhere. I need to carry my files and explain what the what has happened,

Phillips Healthcare Chief Innovation And Strategy Phillips Global Innovation And Strategy Way Healthcare Diabetes General Manager Garin Tass Vegas Phillips Urine Co Philips Head Of Transaction Technology Executive Chief Information Officer HP EDS Coordinator
Billion-dollar investment firm leaving Seattle amid 'unrest'

Michael Berry

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Billion-dollar investment firm leaving Seattle amid 'unrest'

"A $1,000,000,000 investment firm says they're leaving Seattle. Due to the unrest and inaction by city leaders. Smead Capital Management President CEO Cole's Meade says, quote the unrest that has taken place in the city of Seattle. There's really not a downtown business community today. Smead says that although taxes in Seattle are lower Candidate recruitment is harder and the cost of living within the city is more expensive than Phoenix. So where this company is moving, Smead says. My biggest concern for Seattle Was what the business community is going to come to, and what kind of businesses are going to come back for customers? That firm currently manages about $1.58 billion.

Seattle Smead Capital Management Smead President Ceo Meade Cole
Tech's free speech debate is about Zuckerberg vs. Dorsey

All Things Considered

09:02 min | 4 months ago

Tech's free speech debate is about Zuckerberg vs. Dorsey

"Many Americans are facing different realities disparities in covert nineteen deaths for one and right now they're expressing outrage over different things for some stay at home orders have moved them to protest for others it's police violence against unarmed citizens it can feel as though we're living in two different countries so we're talking about that today and one of the places where you can feel America's divide is social media we're divisions are also stoked by trolls and disinformation social media companies try to monitor that to varying degrees and with varying success but even that is divisive as we've seen this week when president trump expressed fury after some of his tweets were flagged by Twitter for potentially misleading information about mail in balloting then yesterday the company flag one of his tweets about the Minneapolis protest for quote unquote glorifying violence president trump signed an executive order aiming to weaken legal protections tech companies have had for years it's unclear whether he has the authority to do that but given all the events of recent days we want to talk more about this so we've called three prominent figures in this debate Karen Swisher is the co founder of Rico that's a site focused on tech news and New York times contributing writer has been pushing Twitter in particular to take far more aggressive steps in policing false information Swisher welcome back thanks for joining us once again thanks so much financial or is the executive director of aspen digital that's a non partisan organization that researches issues related to tech and digital media and she has a long resume in both digital and traditional media including as a president and CEO of NPR so we very much welcome back to you via thanks Michelle glad to be here Matthew Feeney is the director of the project on emerging technologies at the Cato Institute that's a libertarian research and advocacy group here in Washington DC Matthew Feeney welcome to you thank you for joining us as well no thanks for having me the cast which I'm going to start with you because on Wednesday you wrote an op ed in The New York Times this is after Twitter label to the president's tweets regarding mail in ballots as potentially misleading and they added some contextual information and you called this move a baby step why well it's the first thing they can do I mean a lot of they could have banned them they could have taken down the tweet they could have a lot of things but this is the first time Twitter is ever done any kind of I don't want to use the word punishment this is the wrong thing they've ever taken any action against president trump when he violates their rules which he does all the time you know we could spend a whole program talking about this will tell us more broadly what's your point of view about this well I think they are like publishers and so they have some responsibility instead they allow all district to wash over their platforms and in fact get taken advantage of by malevolent forces and so I think they should do more monitoring of it to fit first of all I love them just to get rid of some of the stuff that's obviously used for propaganda but they just let anybody do anything and what it does is create this sort of giant mass of humanity which nobody knows what is true or not and then other players take advantage of it Alex Jones was the most famous obviously he got tossed off all the platforms so you usually what I want to say you are here and your own capacity as a media executive as a person with a deep background in addition to working at NPR as a president CEO you also work for Twitter but I'm going to ask you on your own hook to tell us what you think about this week's news look I think Twitter has been slow on this I think they should have taken action some time ago that said these are really tricky decisions Twitter now that they've taken an action with the president it's going to be really difficult for them to keep up you know there are five hundred million tweets roughly that are sent every day and there are already calls across the board of what about this tweet what about that tweet and it's going to be very very tricky for them I'm glad they took the move but now the camel's nose in the tent Mr anywhere your thoughts I think this puts on not just with about other social media comes into a tough spot here which is that they are trying to figure out how to moderate this kind of content while remaining in the eyes of the uses the gentleman and it's not a surprise to me at all that in the wake of a good decision to fact check that they have been allegations of inconsistency but anyone looking for inconsistency and this debate is is short to find its there are hundreds of hours of footage uploaded to YouTube every minute there are hundreds of millions of tweets posted every day Hey the system won't be perfect and in fact the way that these phones tree contents depends not oftentimes on the Afrin content itself but what's being said about this and and that is something I wish more people understood in the debate which is a really really hard decisions and unfortunately causing a lot of people on the political rights in the United States of feeling bad somehow agencies would be better at this than private companies and while I think will will never be completely happy with how these private firms navigate these difficult content moderation decisions I would much prefer a private family of public failure in this film while some are because I think of the history of government regulation of speech reveals lessons namely that we should be wary office the fact is that social media is much more than Silicon Valley and their alternatives out there of course the the interesting thing about all of this is that in this debate many people on the Merican conservative space seem to forget that competition is is valuable there all of the social media networks out there well Mister you raised the issue that is it's you know we raising it kind of as a back drop here but it is actually a very big part of this whole discussion which is that there is this argument on the right which is certainly embraced by president trump that these companies social media companies are silencing conservative voices but Democrats and progressives have their own criticisms which is that these platforms have no standards and allow people to be libeled and slandered and somebody's very painful and in some cases dangerous ways I mean the data on the fact that women how women in particular women of color treated on these platforms and targeted particularly public figures who are women there's a great deal of data about the fact that and how they are targeted so she took care of so so the question then becomes you know how to do these things get address of care you want to jump in please do yeah I think let's be clear these are private companies they're not public squares and that's the one thing that seems to happen with the writer like my free speech rights be able to specifically you can't these are private companies owned by billionaires they can set whatever standards they want number one number two there's no evidence that there's any bias in anyway but there is evidence of his abuse of people of people getting abused by by the way on all sides and that's really the problem here is the ability to allow toxicity in lies to continue and that's something a private company should be dealing with but not legislated by the government there is there are certain things you can do and liabilities and things like that that media companies have had dealt with for for a very long time and so there's all kinds of solutions that are possible but I think the really problematic thing is considering these places to be the public square did you can do anything on me what do you think should happen here well I completely agree that there is no place for government regulation here that is a path to a very dangerous place but social media companies must take responsibility I applaud Twitter for actually making an effort here even though I think the path they're choosing is very difficult I was very disappointed in mark Zuckerberg's statements on fox news of all places saying that they don't want to be quote unquote the arbiters of truth they already are algorithms serve certain truths even if they're not human intervention involved they are going to have to I think eventually take some action the oversight board is a step but it's it's not enough we are in a moment now where these divisions have come to the fore we know for a fact that sometimes these mechanisms are used to kind of organize protest organized too really it globally certainly it is the case that they've been used both by people who are trying to find ways to resist government oppression but they've also been used by governments to advance oppressive mechanisms right so do they have a role here to play right now that you think would be constructive and I guess I'll start with you Kerr Swisher yeah absolutely they've been doing a very good job on cove in nineteen information they've been stamping out all kinds of bad health information except for president trump's they took down a bowl scenario they took down Maduro they took down a lot of stuff there and a lot of other stuff so during cove and it shows all of them Facebook Twitter all of them can do it and they can do it well and there was no controversy about that so they're totally capable but they're also capable of creating commonality look at all of the really wonderful stuff from Sarah Cooper to comics to people making jokes that can be used for commonality in a really positive way it's just they're designed towards in rage meant and that's the engagement is designed towards arrangement and that's

Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

Dan Proft

05:04 min | 4 months ago

Declassified Susan Rice email shows Obama team discussed Russian dealings

"Well on the occasion last week of the first tranche of the classifications by acting deny Richard Grinnell that provided some detail on all of the unmasking requests that were made by all of the various Obama administration personnel as it pertains to Michael Flynn and perhaps others Ron Johnson and Chuck Grassley the two centers in Wisconsin and Iowa respectively want more details more a documents declassified because they have more concern that perhaps the surveillance that was being conducted by Obama administration officials predates operation crossfire hurricane on that occasion last week John Brennan former CIA director took to his safe space and M. S. N. B. C. and had this reaction this is also going out and saying give me everything about Michael Flynn absolutely not and quite interestingly the number of reports so we're in December sixteen and January seventeen that were declassified by Richard Grinnell I was surprised at how many dates and reports that were there then what was the ground should do is to declassify and release the contents of those reports in terms of what's the individuals were involved with but what he's doing now is just releasing the names of individuals who again were carrying out their authorized responsibilities shin director Brennan he's getting there yesterday to classifying a email from Susan rice that seems to run counter to things Susan rice was saying in public from a national security perspective president Obama said he wants to be sure that as we engage with the incoming team are mindful to ascertain if there is any reason we cannot share information fully as it relates to Russia rice wrote call me said he does have some concerns that incoming NSA Flanaess speaking frequently with Russian ambassador Kislyak Comey said that could be an issue as it relates to sharing sensitive information president Obama asked of Comey was saying the NSC should not pass sensitive information related to Russia to flan Comey replied potentially adding that there's no indication thus far that Flynn has passed classified information to kids they act but he noted the level of communication is unusual potentially we should not pass sense of information to the incoming president incoming national security adviser is that properly or or fairly Radisson body trying to insinuate his way into a counterintelligence operation against general Flynn well that's what Susan rice memorialized in an email here's Susan rice back on March twenty second of twenty seventeen just a couple months into the trump administration in a sit down on PBS with Judy Woodruff what she had to say about what she knew do you know anything about this I know nothing about this I was surprised to see reports from chairman Nunes on that count today fresh off her performance in the Benghazi a misdirection cover up however you want to describe it we get this from Susan rice I really don't know what to what chairman Nunez was referring but he said that whatever he was referring to was a legal lawful surveillance and that it was potentially incidental collection on American citizens and I think it's important for people to understand what incidental means that means that the target was a either a foreign entity D. or somebody under criminal investigation and that the Americans who were talking to those targets may have been picked up well Devin newness has since revised and extended his remarks so perhaps is in rice would like to do the same for more on this we're pleased to be joined by Fred flights he's a former CIA analyst now president CEO at center for security policy former Deputy Assistant to the president into the chief of staff of the National Security Council thanks for joining us again forget it good to be here about what Susan rice said in twenty seventeen verses what Susan rice memorialized about this January fifth twenty seventeen meeting well wishers lined clearly she knew that there was electronic surveillance of general Flynn what this comes down to what is the intention of B. bomber stretching from the top from president Obama not to honor the very important principle of our democracy and that's called the peaceful transfer of power under that principle the outgoing administration cooperates fully with the incumbent won eight daughters the the will of the people turned over the keys to the officers tells all about farm policy mission underway gives them all the intelligence operations and intelligence they collected they don't withhold information from the incoming president and Tucker offices to use this information to investigate the next administration to undermine it it's really very serious violation of our whole system of government if they had concerns about general Flynn they had to tell the next administration about it cook told president trump and vice president pence and call me if needed later said he was held information twelve Attorney General sessions about Russia also this is an effort by an outgoing administration to undermine and destroy any incoming

Dallas - Texas Motor Speedway To Host 2020 Graduation Ceremonies For All Denton County Schools

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

02:09 min | 5 months ago

Dallas - Texas Motor Speedway To Host 2020 Graduation Ceremonies For All Denton County Schools

"Eighty schools in Denton county going to have graduation ceremonies after all thanks to Texas motor speedway Andrew Greenstein got to talk to TMS president Eddie Gossage county judge eating reached out to us and with with the formal school districts in Denton county where the upon about what do we do how can we hold graduation ceremonies at Texas motor speedway and still you know be able to socially distant defense people and things like that and so I am using big all the world's biggest television that we have and the the the the students will be on pit road and forcing the deployments that are a lot of parents families and friends in their cars like a drive in movie theater I get to watch in here the ceremony on big calls through their car radio so it's a it's a great way to give the students a special bank which they deserve when you get to be a graduating thing here so Mr Gossage are these graduation ceremony is going to be the full ceremonies with speeches from commencement speakers in the valedictorian and so forth I don't think so but it could school districts have small classes some have huge classes and the one downside is exposed to the he knew about coming at the end of may and what not so two I think they're trying to appreciate the ceremonies so when the possible absence of the speeches what will the graduation ceremonies and tail okay most schools about all schools are making arrangements for everything to be photographed as they get their diploma so that the family will have that moment captured and that's just don't it I think it's making the best of a tough situation important factors both big enough where we can accommodate students and some classes over a thousand students graduating but also their families and they can see it live and be there and you know I think it's the best of all situation considering the contract now hi it's Eddie Gossage the president CEO at T.

Denton County Andrew Greenstein County Judge Eddie Gossage President Ceo Texas TMS President Trump
"president ceo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:04 min | 5 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"General manager president CEO Greg Bibb so what do you guys have have so many picks in this draft I made a decision sometime ago looking at the twenty twenty draft and thinking that it would be a talent laden traffic tickets to top and to go ahead and really strategically try to aggregate as many assets relatively drop was possible I had a hunch that a relatively talented junior class may have some early entries as part of the twenty twenty draft and that kind of reinforced my thinking in terms of trying to make deals that brought us back assets relative to the draft rather than making deals that brought bad assets relative to players who currently in the lead now we will be young there's no doubt about that eighty painfully younger but he will be talented and will have an opportunity if we so choose to do so to keep this core group of players together now for relatively long amount of time when you think about it in terms of of teams and rosters in the arctic building a roster do you get a sense of I I mean this is our pivotal moment for this franchise we better not screw this up or how how do you think about it because it really is going to be a a huge talent acquisition died for the Dallas wings yeah it's there's no doubt about it this is a really important draft the really important night for us and we need to have it and this is not an exact science process this work is you put in as much film as you watch as much life possible issue I'll watch you're not quite sure until you can see that player how they translate into our league against the world's best we've been fortunate I believe in our recent draft history to do fairly well interact and I believe that in two thousand twenty while the opportunity to do it again as sports starved as we are right now as a nation as needy as we are for some sort of distraction from just the the horrible nature of of this virus that's this ripping through the country how good is this for women's basketball to be on the center stage is the first major events here in April in the last you know almost two months that the W. N. B. A. draft gets that that center stage billing well yeah hopefully this is a little bit of a silver lining into a terrible situation and that the lack of activity across the general sports landscape is really prevalent right now and your point I think we all would love to have the distraction of sport whether you're working in an industry or not yeah I think we're all fans first thing we would love to have support to help us through this tough time you know our partners are eager to have content you provide to us all I hope that there's a silver lining here in terms of the coverage leading up to during and after the trend and the awareness and attention that our league can get in and I believe deserves hopefully everyone both those folks who have followed the league for a long time and those folks perhaps you haven't given us a chance will tune in on the seventeenth to see what our league is all about and to be introduced Cinemax class of WNBA stars yeah and that is wings general manager president CEO Greg did begin to draft is tonight lots of local talent going to be selected six o'clock on ESPN it's eleven fifty four now at KRLD and it's time to check your money as stocks continue to climb it this afternoon so the bad news the oil down another eight and eight point three percent dollar sixty five a barrel yeah it's down and now eighteen dollars twenty two cents a barrel okay but good news Dow is up by two percent four hundred seventy eight points now over twenty four thousand for the first time in a while S. and P. five hundred up one point nine percent or fifty two points and the nasdaq is up by sixty eight points right.

Greg Bibb General manager president CEO
Chicago - Employees at Haymarket Center say COVID-19 concerns being swept under the rug

Nick Digilio

02:18 min | 5 months ago

Chicago - Employees at Haymarket Center say COVID-19 concerns being swept under the rug

"Treatment treatment facility facility in in Chicago Chicago sick sick an an outbreak outbreak of of cover cover nineteen nineteen which which has has led led to to two two deaths deaths forty forty Goodman joins us live with more good morning Courtney well good morning to you lord and then you know some employees came forward expressing grave concerns about a cool bit nineteen outbreak at the Haymarket center two employees have already died and we have learned that a total of forty one people affiliated with the treatment center have already tested positive for covert nineteen Haymarket center's been around for forty five years as the mental health and substance abuse treatment facility that has both in an outpatient plants its house in the nine hundred block of west Washington in the west loop and so far at least twenty nine patients and twelve employees have contracted Kobe nineteen employees came to WGNO tells the fear of this treatment facility is sweeping this outbreak under the rug and they are scared for their own health especially after seeing two other coworkers died as for those twenty nine patients who were diagnosed with Kobe nineteen we're told they're being isolated on the third floor of the facility while the employees are quarantined at home workers say back in March they were deemed essential by management and were offered an additional three hundred dollars per pay period if they did not call off during this pandemic at three hundred dollars comments it's substitute shock and like the humor it knows that and I think they're taking advantage of to respond to a lot of people to come to work when they're feeling under the weather order the only state in our class working back so we did talk with a markets president CEO and a public relations firm representing that facility they told us this in a statement we have repeatedly asked staff to stay at home if they have symptoms we are screening employees twice a day and many health care providers are offering bonuses to thank employees were doing a difficult job and to help pay for childcare transportation market is not unique nor trying to incentivize employees to come to work if they are ill or worried about being there now the employee that we spoke to tells us they feel as if this population of patients who often overlooked is now being neglected we know that the city of Chicago and the state are now working with the Haymarket center to address this outbreak

Chicago Goodman Haymarket Center Washington Wgno Kobe President Ceo Courtney
"president ceo" Discussed on The Playbook

The Playbook

03:29 min | 5 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on The Playbook

"Perspective. Is that Is Quite in quite daunting. And at the same time you really realize the importance of life and how you live your life and for me. Sleep was an incredible healer in natural. He'll I never took a signal hill through the entire experience. It was just a little over two ago for me and I did. Focus on. Sleeping in sleep is a natural recovery. And how it's restorative and it does help you heels and so it's it's a it's a tool it's in a shared fundamental need that we all need to pay more attention to and realize its value. you know. I often say now you know you have today. You don't know your future. People spend so much time agonizing about the future. You know what you have now so live your life for today. Make your choices. You choose who you spend it with who choose who you work for. Be Happy love everything you do. Every day find joy every single day. I mean Gosh I think happiness is different for different. People I think they look for fulfillment and different things. But I think for if I did save for me and perhaps something that might be Universal is I think relationships are so important I think sometimes they get put on the back or made a low priority. Because everybody's working so hard you know getting sucked into you know their phones and you know which is such a time suck and then they get caught in the fortex of staff and I think that You know keeping technology in its proper place and really focusing on human relationships and understanding that. They require nurturing I have to remind myself with this all the time but nothing gives me more happiness personally than my relationships with my family and my friends and they're sort of my touchstone every day and so I think that's a really important thing at least that's the key to my happiness and I think for a lot of people they just need to remind themselves how important they are. This has been such a blessing. I am so appreciative of both of you will back myself and studying not only sleep. But I'm studying this interview because very rarely do I get around such wisdom and I am grateful and also inspired by both of you. I appreciate your time. Thank you for leading sleep bag. We're GONNA lead the way sleep. Well and dream big here was sally. I Bach and Katie Court. This is Dave meltzer entrepreneurs the playbook hey everybody this is Josh. I hope you enjoy that episode of the playbook. If you haven't already make sure to go over to David's YouTube channel and check out the new film we created. I'm telling you this is one of my absolute favorite films that I've created yet working for David and you need to go check it out. Go to the search Bar Youtube type in David. Meltzer and mixture to subscribe..

David Dave meltzer YouTube Bach Josh Katie Court
Houston Rodeo cancelled over coronavirus concerns

Sean Hannity

00:29 sec | 6 months ago

Houston Rodeo cancelled over coronavirus concerns

"Coronavirus shutting down here the Houston livestock show and rodeo rodeo president CEO Joe Kelly joined city county and local health officials in making the announcement earlier today there will be no rodeo and no concert this evening nor for the remainder of the show we do have some livestock and some horror shows going on and we will wind those down today as well Kelly says information about refunds will be available in the rodeo's website both the city of Houston Harris County declared states of emergency or the local spread of the virus that state emergency lasts seven days

Houston Ceo Joe Kelly Houston Harris County President Trump
"president ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

11:13 min | 7 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"Investor Perspective really is a massive free cash flow generator. You are far less vulnerable to what the content guys on a charge. You your by network gear for many players. At relatively low prices declining prices scale benefit gala benefits Moore's law benefits learning curve benefits. All of it very positive and would that change in for cash flow. We've applied a business model. We charter which liberties endorsed of leverage share repurchase you know running forward to four and a half times leverage and using the gain in free capital the growth in free capital and the growth and etta by re levering to buy back shares for retired a lot of the stock to great benefit and the cable business has always been valued off of Ebay diametric and mullet. Sounds like we're at that moment where it could be a free cash lamentable. From here on out well. That's actually a great point. If you look the multiple has gone up you know we got in at something like nine times and it's ten and a half or eleven times you look at it but actually the free cash hasn't risen nearly as much because free cash flow has risen more quickly than the growth. I do think you're going to see these. Continue to be rerouted one of our board members. Eric Hoffer who will use to be the Chairman? Sleet independent. Says you know. Why are these not rated like tower companies because you haven't infrastructure play the tutors much more multiple so we'll see you look at companies and you mentioned earlier that you're not sacred about assets look investments that went from one hundred and five dollars per share to this high five hundred and natural view would be? Why not take profits? And that's what are you really going for here if this is not good enough for you and there are some challenges out there like five. G. IS COMING PEOPLE. Think you may think it's over hyped. If Hans Westberg was here for Verizon he would dispute that say it's here today and five g. all the time so I would ask cons really. Can I walk down and get my five g? Phone and part of Denver will at work in because I think the answer is no and no zero but okay so you just kinda threat. I think you see changes in technology. You want to be on the right side of those trends. There's many ways in which charter could be advantaged by five G. as it threatens at how it all plays out. We'll see I do think it will take longer to play out then. Certainly the market was suggesting a year ago. You're seeing a little bit of this. Luge enter reality check. Come in push out a c band however actually working attenuation all these issues. That'll probably get solved. But it's not gonNA come in and get done in a week but technology changes particularly five G. R. One of our risk there. We have a change in administration potentially around regulation every business has risked that said. I very comfortable. That we have several or goodyear's big tailwind at charter charter. Absolutely happy investor. From here happy investor we have not sold a share and is they've continued to do share. Purchase we've grown. Our percentage of the company dramatically. Yeah I WANNA turn to the travel industry for a minute because it's an area that's getting a lot of focus not just because of fundamental transfer also things like the corona virus that's affecting a lot of businesses out there that are global but certainly the travel industry is exposed to as well. Are you happy with the tripadvisor investment and the fundamentals and the Macro? Varma has changed around you given the Google exposure on the algorithm changes etc. Is it a structurally sound business? But how do you think about travel could go from here while I'm certainly not happy with our big investments have paid off this one certainly one that hasn't we are as you rightly point out and they challenged world we have an enormous amount of users? Foreign Seventy five million unique visitors a month who come to the site. Tripadvisor truly trusted brand which adds value to them. Historically we through the search process gave them hotel alternatives and got paid for that lead that businesses fundamentally been challenged that method of monetization. Because we're no longer top of the funnel Google's up above us and Google is at first advantaged paid search over free search so reduced profitability for us and all the OTA's online travel agents like booking inexpedient but in addition now put their own hotel flight experiences up above even the paid so we're competing with them to new ways and that's exacerbated because you go mobile world and the fewer fewer and fewer items on the page so he got Google's own branded stuff. You've got Google paid stuff and then free stuff. It just hurts. Our profitability challenge for us is to find new ways to monetize that four hundred and fifty two four and seventy five million unique visitors month and the brand loyalty and Diana we add to them. And we've seen that some degree in different ways growth in what? I call the native advertising growth in our business to business offerings growth in our experiences which looks a lot more like hotels did fifteen or twenty years ago when I was the chairman of Expedia when it was a Fragmented World of hotels. That's consolidate much more of their online here. You have experiences much more Fragmented Online. Us helping them get online is part of ours success? Same thing with restaurants but different ways to monetize but the reality is hotels was adorned big category. Which is fundamentally been challenged relative to what the success we had were in process of moulting our business model filling you look at your entire portfolio is travel your biggest challenge right now to overcome they focusing on. Well I think the other one would be curated feeling the decline of Linear Television and the visa. Qbc CURATE QVC. Yep The decline of Linear Television and the competition for leads there as well and the transparency around the Internet. So we've tried to get on the right side of industry trends and where they're going. Those are both on arguably on tougher. Sides challenged rights. Let me go forward now a little bit and I have interviewed in the past writer named David at Brook. From The New York Times. Who wrote Great Book of Second Mountain? And it's all about the and your life and your career after you climbed mountain and you get to the middle chapters which I would put you in generous there. We go clam your second mountain and some of the things that are important to change a little bit and you have a broader perspective. You've obviously achieve success. And you look at things a little bit differently as you started climbing. That second mountain you recently signed a new five-year deal. So you're a happy employee and CEO the portfolio companies. You have as a platform. What do you want to do next few years? What's your Second Mountain Climb? I think that's a work in process aurea and then we'd go to investor day and we outlined our theme for the year. I'm not sure I got my personal ones outlined that while. I'M GONNA have to put Shane working on that next. You only thinking one year ahead right now. There are things I'd like to get done but I'm not sure they're ready for primetime. Okay I got it I got it. Maybe you could talk a little bit now. Sort of the fun segment of our podcast on like who? Your major influences are who are mentors and he loved John Mayer from effluence perspective. But who do you count sort of people that have influenced you and continue living your life? Well I've been very lucky to have a series of great bosses. Mike Brown who was the CFO of Microsoft before me was really helpful. Gave me a lot of exposure to Bill Gates and Bill Gates was awesome to me going back earlier days. Bill Comfort Ran CITICORP venture capital. Sometimes Acerbic always fun always challenging. Always interesting boss. From whom I learned a lot obviously more recently John Malone has been a great mentor partner senior partner to me. So I've been lucky in that sense in a Lotta ways. You know other people on the way but long periods of time with those guys who's this fo Greg Buffet as their favorite tweet from the FO Greg Maffei. And maybe you tell our listeners. That what the story is here so I am very lucky. I tweet with some frequency but not massively. There is a Faux Greg Murphy. Who Many people know who? Fo- Greg Maffei is. I don't I was offered to be introduced to him or her. I think it's a him. I said no. I still believe in Santa Claus. I WANNA hold that. Hold that out. But he has been very generous to me. We don't agree on everything. But when he put stuff out generally very positive and he's very positive liberty he's very funny probably has more license to say things than I do. He uses it. Well clear he's not you not me not me a stack of bibles. It's not me. The best is when somebody commented after. I tweet out I can't tell whether that's fo Greg. Maffei a real Greg Murphy. I love that when people can't tell who it is. 'cause mine is funny enough or at least it self deprecating or amusing or whatever that they actually think might be fo-. Greg I'm lucky though because a lot of other people have folks who are not nearly so nice. Yeah and he's not on the payroll payroll if he is. He's doing on his own time because I don't know who it is. Honestly but even some of our portfolio companies have folks who are ripping them and I have been blessed. I get any recent books you really want to recommend or the book about Uber. Yeah I finished that right. After being you're reading Jill Lepore is history the United States. Oh Yeah do you listen to read. I'm reading it. I don't listen to many audiobooks if I'm GONNA listen it's probably more podcast just because I don't find it easy to listen to a book and then pick it back up. I'd find that easier when I'm reading. Podcast it's enough duration. It's not like you're gonNA listen to it from thirty something like that. Yeah favorite podcasts. Besides this one I like F. One I like beyond the grid. I listened to the business intelligence ones. Barry has the most consistent that I would do is definitely the former one one for book. Talking Book. Yeah Yeah. We like indoor cast to talk about her book okay. Fair enough favorite Democratic nomination for president not all of them even Democrats right Bloomberg goes a Republican or an independent and Bernie's Democratic Socialists. Who knows if it's not as your side of the fence? I like Mike Bloomberg. Best Deal you've worked on by wet. Measure whatever measure you like soon returns little return on Sirius. Xm In terms of IRA's is ridiculous because we got all our money back sorely invested. Four hundred million. We lent them forty million. They paid us back. After five months with fees interest. We had money off the table today. We bought some more later. But if you put the side that if you just look that's probably worth I don't know twenty three twenty four billion so I'm like that from a four hundred dollar loan and as I said. We were negative fifty. After five months we had fifty or sixty five menards in our pocket. Mom Charters approaching. That charter may pass it in terms of dollar value. I think we're up about twenty five twenty six billion on charter. So what was the favorite able to work on? They all have good things in you. Know they all have challenges. I mean formula was a great deal in terms of structuring and getting stuff done. We had overcome challenges. We were pretty thoughtful about what the sellers needs. Were and what the business needed. And so that was very gratifying to and you know it it propelled us in a new way series and charter where somebody's worn. Our wheelhouse are historical wheelhouse and formula. One was opening a new door. And that's really been great. Yeah well we've always talked about the fact that you're one of the few people in my life that encouraged me when I was at UBS to leave and to start this new chapter landry which. I'm grateful for and you would pretty adamant about it. Actually I remember going to lunch with you and UBS lost three two billion dollars in the subprime business and I said Rei when they can lose thirty. Two billion dollars down the hall from You. And you'RE NOT GONNA get paid and have freedom just got to find your own path. That was clarity. I appreciate that and more than that even appreciate being able to work alongside you on some of those deals you mentioned. Yup and also somebody portfolio companies like live nation and others etc. It's been a great ride so far and I look forward to your second mountain as you clarify that vision claimed by garland telling us about it. If you have any ideas let me know. Thank you for all the great work you've done. Thank you for letting me sit down with you today. Thanks Greg appreciate it. Congratulations..

Second Mountain Google Greg Murphy Greg Chairman Greg Maffei Eric Hoffer Ebay Bill Gates Linear Television UBS Moore Denver Greg Buffet Verizon John Mayer Mike Bloomberg Greg I
"president ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

09:16 min | 7 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"Greg thank you for being here today and I've been wanted us for a long time. So thank you for being on kindred cast and you seem like you were getting a little bit tired and exhausted just hearing all these titles and responsibilities but imbedded within all of us is superior shareholder returns along the way across the portfolio definitely. You're proud of I think. That's why stills getting to sit in the chair by reference that we met during your three sixty networks days a long time ago when I used to cover the bonds and ran that company which was in fiber company generally speaking like the old days but even with Microsoft. I remember when you made the investment in comcast in one thousand nine hundred seven which was a billion dollar investment in the cable business. You were sort of the first to bring the technology industry together with the media industry and the cable industry in that respect a very long time ago. When I was at Microsoft we were very interested. In what the cable industry was doing to build out high speed data build out the high speed Internet Bill Gates and I spent a bunch of time with a lot of people in the cable. Business including Brian Roberts comcast including John Malone thrilling. When I first met him back in ninety three we tried to sell them set top boxes. We tried to drive a lot of things. We were very instant what they were doing with at home. Which was the primary vehicle. Another one road runner which are the primary consortium vehicles to build up that high speed data and eventually Ryan Roberts is the one I said. Look if you want to help us. You should put money and all the cable companies but the only one who really stepped up and wanted our money. Initially we did a bunch more Brian. So then we ended up buying seven percent of comcast and I was on observer on the board so that was my first exposure to cable. Yeah it was a real catalyst. I remember for evaluation starting to rise again people's concerns being alleviated about what the future of cable could be seen as perpetual petrol theme right when you have these traditional media businesses that are always count out in the age of Technology and innovation disruption. And all of a sudden you have real endorsement and it sustains itself and brought Bannon's everything else obviously there are examples that went the other way like newspapers and other things you know. We were lucky twice or I've been lucky twice to catch the right cycle. We did very well in that comcast investment road at up on the growth of high speed data. And then really again when we did charter in two thousand thirteen sort of caught if not a bottom of near bottom on the industry's accelerated since yeah. Is that the way that you think about? Investing and think about buying companies is that you're somewhat countercyclical because obviously given your perch and your history in the industry you could have expertise in any number of areas. So how do you prioritize it? What do you think about? What drives your successes your approach? I wish we were that systematic or organized. Yeah you definitely have to have a thesis and oftentimes. It's gotTa be tacking against conventional wisdom because conventional wisdom gets valued to the Max. And if you're following along that's a really hard place to be. It may work for a while and it kind of momentum play but it's hard to sustain so finding things are out of favor is certainly a good place to start and doesn't mean it'll nestle get back into favor but it's a good place to look. I can also speak to. The other side doesn't matter how clever you were in emerging telecom in the early two thousands when I was running sixty when the capital goes away and when the trend blows up on you you're GONNA have a lot of problems all the emerging telecom companies. But when you think about the career and it is a unique path right. And obviously we'll get to the liberty part of your career now but when you think back at your evolution as an executive and as an investor what do you point to to be sort of like those key moments where you've got to be really good at your craft and obviously it's a humbling experience every single day. But how do you think back at your path and wise unique and differentiated versus others again? I'm not sure there's a systematic thing. I've tried to keep my doors open but I know I've also gone just incredibly lucky to be at Microsoft of the right time and place to move. When I was really from Dillon Reed over to CITICORP venture capital eventually get out to Seattle to get an John Malone and for him decide. I was the right person to come here where there was a lot of things that were available to fix. Initially we got some early wins and to have the perch so Microsoft needed my skill set at the time. They really didn't have it. Liberty could use my skill set but I could have end up someplace where a lot of smart people could have filled that role or I could have been someplace where your skill set wasn't necessarily so highly valued so there's a lot of selling yourself short by saying it's all lack. I look back at my business school class. A lot of smart men and women smarter than I am or accomplished who didn't necessarily ended up. Lisa metrics having same mobile success some degree. That's the luck of. Where do they end up? Where did I end up? What was needed at the time when we ended up at that spot right? Well let's talk about how you got the liberty then so Dr John Malone needed a CEO of liberty media. How did that come about? And what came to be where it was attractive to you? I'd known John. Since ninety three and he actually been on the board of three sixty networks investor and three six networks. I've lost all his money there. But he's still talk to me. He said I was good at generating tax losses in early two thousand five or mid two thousand five. I got a call from mutual friend of ours. Who said John Malone wants you to come liberty? Do you want to talk to and you. At Oracle the time Oracle. I only been three. I said sure like to talk to John. I mean I'd known him for twelve years. That Point Pete served on a board company Iran so I knew reasonably well. We'd actually talked about various ways we might work together so John Calls Me and says who could run liberty and I thought he was going to call about me. I said nothing comes right to mind. I think about some names so I called the mutual friend back and said well. He got me but he didn't want my name. He was asking for other names so and the friend said he wants to. He wants. He's just playing with you. Then he called back and said you know maybe you'll be the guy that's pretty funny. Well played so will happen so I joined in November of two thousand five as I there was. I think a bunch of relatively low hanging fruit of things to fix clean up and you know in any job. It's always get some early wins because it gives you credibility to make bigger bets. Yeah did you have a an understanding with John when he became? Ceo of how you both would divide the responsibilities already just all in it together. You were giving us a lot more credit than I think. The only thing I remember John Offer. Let me send something like the future is what you make it or something like that. It was a pretty open canvas and if you look nobody would have predicted enormous change when I joined in five today. What liberty looks like and nobody would predicted where we would go right now in the John. Ri- nobody but was there a mandate was there a vision or an objective or again with more of a two smart people getting together and try and make the right investments. Look I think John Appreciate? I'd come out of the technology side and had some familiarity with that in. Oh five if you WANNA look like a relatively. Technically strong person. Coming out of Microsoft helped compared to being traditional media players. I certainly wouldn't put myself up as a technology expert on a relative basis. That was helped. Yeah we'll plus you understood. I feel like capital structure and CFO like dynamics which would help with tax and shareholder value. And not just strategic deal making. When I was at Microsoft we did all these Put ones we were buying our stock back and we were selling against it and it was sort of a we knew we had big tailwind that we made up a bunch of money on this porn. And it's because it's in your own stock it's tax free. John loved that it was fascinated with that so Chinese doughy say the put warrant guy or something like that he was always happy because that's John Malone kind of play. Yeah well how do we think about liberty media because from the outside looking in just taking a eagle in the sky perspective for a second is unclear whether liberty media is a public private equity firm? That just happens to invest in media assets or Obscene Media Operating Company or to leveraged bet on the industry what is Liberty Media and hatchery benchmark or is it just a unique animal altogether book. I think you could say it's all three of those things in various times. It's malted when I first got here. We really owned very few assets in total on. Qvc was the only one we have any scale. We had a bunch of minority positions. And we've actually swapped for control or more influential positions. Barwane more positions over time. We'd like to think we try to do it. In this parts of the industry with our history as a company with John's vision John's expertise and contacts. We've had some insights into perhaps where we thought things would do. Better and where we thought we'd get worse and been able to trade our way out of those hopefully not inefficient or trade. Are we in to the good ones? And so that's been somewhat of a bet on the best parts of media. We'd like to think from where we could actually make progress. You'd love to be some of these places but you can't get in any smart way so it's not like it's an obvious bad to buy the stock but we've tried to promote the thing to a more operating assets being happy also being places where we have a influential position but on the right side of where the trends are and it's effectively like a fund where you're entrusted to make investments from the public and see for yourselves transferring capital into operating assets generated strong return and then not being sacred about them in the sense of. It's time to sell. You'll also exit building an empire so to speak. Is that right. Yeah I think that's fair. We've been willing to.

John John Malone Microsoft comcast Brian Roberts Bill Gates Liberty Media CEO Ryan Roberts Greg John Offer Obscene Media Operating Compan Bannon Seattle Max Qvc executive Ri
Talking Liberty With President & CEO Greg Maffei

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

08:55 min | 7 months ago

Talking Liberty With President & CEO Greg Maffei

"Greg thank you for being here today and I've been wanted us for a long time. So thank you for being on kindred cast and you seem like you were getting a little bit tired and exhausted just hearing all these titles and responsibilities but imbedded within all of us is superior shareholder returns along the way across the portfolio definitely. You're proud of I think. That's why stills getting to sit in the chair by reference that we met during your three sixty networks days a long time ago when I used to cover the bonds and ran that company which was in fiber company generally speaking like the old days but even with Microsoft. I remember when you made the investment in comcast in one thousand nine hundred seven which was a billion dollar investment in the cable business. You were sort of the first to bring the technology industry together with the media industry and the cable industry in that respect a very long time ago. When I was at Microsoft we were very interested. In what the cable industry was doing to build out high speed data build out the high speed Internet Bill Gates and I spent a bunch of time with a lot of people in the cable. Business including Brian Roberts comcast including John Malone thrilling. When I first met him back in ninety three we tried to sell them set top boxes. We tried to drive a lot of things. We were very instant what they were doing with at home. Which was the primary vehicle. Another one road runner which are the primary consortium vehicles to build up that high speed data and eventually Ryan Roberts is the one I said. Look if you want to help us. You should put money and all the cable companies but the only one who really stepped up and wanted our money. Initially we did a bunch more Brian. So then we ended up buying seven percent of comcast and I was on observer on the board so that was my first exposure to cable. Yeah it was a real catalyst. I remember for evaluation starting to rise again people's concerns being alleviated about what the future of cable could be seen as perpetual petrol theme right when you have these traditional media businesses that are always count out in the age of Technology and innovation disruption. And all of a sudden you have real endorsement and it sustains itself and brought Bannon's everything else obviously there are examples that went the other way like newspapers and other things you know. We were lucky twice or I've been lucky twice to catch the right cycle. We did very well in that comcast investment road at up on the growth of high speed data. And then really again when we did charter in two thousand thirteen sort of caught if not a bottom of near bottom on the industry's accelerated since yeah. Is that the way that you think about? Investing and think about buying companies is that you're somewhat countercyclical because obviously given your perch and your history in the industry you could have expertise in any number of areas. So how do you prioritize it? What do you think about? What drives your successes your approach? I wish we were that systematic or organized. Yeah you definitely have to have a thesis and oftentimes. It's gotTa be tacking against conventional wisdom because conventional wisdom gets valued to the Max. And if you're following along that's a really hard place to be. It may work for a while and it kind of momentum play but it's hard to sustain so finding things are out of favor is certainly a good place to start and doesn't mean it'll nestle get back into favor but it's a good place to look. I can also speak to. The other side doesn't matter how clever you were in emerging telecom in the early two thousands when I was running sixty when the capital goes away and when the trend blows up on you you're GONNA have a lot of problems all the emerging telecom companies. But when you think about the career and it is a unique path right. And obviously we'll get to the liberty part of your career now but when you think back at your evolution as an executive and as an investor what do you point to to be sort of like those key moments where you've got to be really good at your craft and obviously it's a humbling experience every single day. But how do you think back at your path and wise unique and differentiated versus others again? I'm not sure there's a systematic thing. I've tried to keep my doors open but I know I've also gone just incredibly lucky to be at Microsoft of the right time and place to move. When I was really from Dillon Reed over to CITICORP venture capital eventually get out to Seattle to get an John Malone and for him decide. I was the right person to come here where there was a lot of things that were available to fix. Initially we got some early wins and to have the perch so Microsoft needed my skill set at the time. They really didn't have it. Liberty could use my skill set but I could have end up someplace where a lot of smart people could have filled that role or I could have been someplace where your skill set wasn't necessarily so highly valued so there's a lot of selling yourself short by saying it's all lack. I look back at my business school class. A lot of smart men and women smarter than I am or accomplished who didn't necessarily ended up. Lisa metrics having same mobile success some degree. That's the luck of. Where do they end up? Where did I end up? What was needed at the time when we ended up at that spot right? Well let's talk about how you got the liberty then so Dr John Malone needed a CEO of liberty media. How did that come about? And what came to be where it was attractive to you? I'd known John. Since ninety three and he actually been on the board of three sixty networks investor and three six networks. I've lost all his money there. But he's still talk to me. He said I was good at generating tax losses in early two thousand five or mid two thousand five. I got a call from mutual friend of ours. Who said John Malone wants you to come liberty? Do you want to talk to and you. At Oracle the time Oracle. I only been three. I said sure like to talk to John. I mean I'd known him for twelve years. That Point Pete served on a board company Iran so I knew reasonably well. We'd actually talked about various ways we might work together so John Calls Me and says who could run liberty and I thought he was going to call about me. I said nothing comes right to mind. I think about some names so I called the mutual friend back and said well. He got me but he didn't want my name. He was asking for other names so and the friend said he wants to. He wants. He's just playing with you. Then he called back and said you know maybe you'll be the guy that's pretty funny. Well played so will happen so I joined in November of two thousand five as I there was. I think a bunch of relatively low hanging fruit of things to fix clean up and you know in any job. It's always get some early wins because it gives you credibility to make bigger bets. Yeah did you have a an understanding with John when he became? Ceo of how you both would divide the responsibilities already just all in it together. You were giving us a lot more credit than I think. The only thing I remember John Offer. Let me send something like the future is what you make it or something like that. It was a pretty open canvas and if you look nobody would have predicted enormous change when I joined in five today. What liberty looks like and nobody would predicted where we would go right now in the John. Ri- nobody but was there a mandate was there a vision or an objective or again with more of a two smart people getting together and try and make the right investments. Look I think John Appreciate? I'd come out of the technology side and had some familiarity with that in. Oh five if you WANNA look like a relatively. Technically strong person. Coming out of Microsoft helped compared to being traditional media players. I certainly wouldn't put myself up as a technology expert on a relative basis. That was helped. Yeah we'll plus you understood. I feel like capital structure and CFO like dynamics which would help with tax and shareholder value. And not just strategic deal making. When I was at Microsoft we did all these Put ones we were buying our stock back and we were selling against it and it was sort of a we knew we had big tailwind that we made up a bunch of money on this porn. And it's because it's in your own stock it's tax free. John loved that it was fascinated with that so Chinese doughy say the put warrant guy or something like that he was always happy because that's John Malone kind of play. Yeah well how do we think about liberty media because from the outside looking in just taking a eagle in the sky perspective for a second is unclear whether liberty media is a public private equity firm? That just happens to invest in media assets or Obscene Media Operating Company or to leveraged bet on the industry what is Liberty Media and hatchery benchmark or is it just a unique animal altogether book. I think you could say it's all three of those things in various times. It's malted when I first got here. We really owned very few assets in total on. Qvc was the only one we have any scale. We had a bunch of minority positions. And we've actually swapped for control or more influential positions. Barwane more positions over time. We'd like to think we try to do it. In this parts of the industry with our history as a company with John's vision John's expertise and contacts. We've had some insights into perhaps where we thought things would do. Better and where we thought we'd get worse and been able to trade our way out of those hopefully not inefficient or trade. Are we in to the good ones? And so that's been somewhat of a bet on the best parts of media. We'd like to think from where we could actually make progress. You'd love to be some of these places but you can't get in any smart way so it's not like it's an obvious bad to buy the stock but we've tried to promote the thing to a more operating assets being happy also being places where we have a influential position but on the right side of where the trends are

John Malone John Microsoft Comcast Brian Roberts Bill Gates Liberty Media CEO Ryan Roberts Greg John Offer QVC Obscene Media Operating Compan Bannon Seattle MAX Executive RI
"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

01:38 min | 7 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back once again to the outcomes rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health leaders today. I have the outstanding Leah binder. She's a president and CEO of the Leapfrog Group representing employers and other purchasers of healthcare calling for improved safety and quality in hospitals. She's a regular contributor to Forbes Dot com the Huffington Post and the Wall Street Journal Expert Forum. She was named on Bekker's list of the fifty most powerful people in healthcare in two thousand fourteen and consistently cited by modern healthcare among the one hundred most influential people in the top twenty five women in healthcare under her leadership. The Leapfrog Group launched from Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade. Which many of you may already be familiar with. But if not will be going into that within this podcast and in assigns letter grades assessing the safety in general hospitals across the country. This is a very important platform with which many of us can keep track of how hospitals are doing. And if they're the ones we want to go to. She's also fostered groundbreaking innovations in the annual leapfrog hospital survey including partnerships to eliminate early elective deliveries central line associated bloodstream infections and safe use of health technology. So it's a pleasure that I invite you to the podcast. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having the salsas great absolutely now did I leave anything out in that intro that you want to highlight to the listeners. I think you captured pretty much more than you should have..

Leapfrog Group Leah binder Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade president and CEO Bekker Forbes Dot Huffington Post Wall Street Journal
"president ceo" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

11:08 min | 7 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"But private astronauts are very limited on orbit in terms of time. So a lot of it's about the experience In recording experience in talking about the experience in in promoting philanthropic types of events But PERSAD ASTRONAUT THEY WANNA fly and do research and and early manufacturing and Things of this nature that benefit the country and their university systems and In National Health initiatives and so those individuals not only do we fly him for sixty days on that but we also provide a research opportunities for them as well both early on on I two national lab and then later on our modules as well. So that's a long winded answer to the question but we believe and we believe the demand is there. We we show it as about two flights per year. We don't do that as a you know two flights a year because NASA said to flex year. This is what we think. Our demand is now. We circle back with NASA NASA says two flights year each fly. We have to sit down and say okay. We think we WANNA do this. Fly Nascar Nath ask you know certain things. We have two criteria we have to meet in order to hold that flight and And so we do each of those individually and then NASA look at that on the whole and. I suspect that you know if there's three flights in a year Kinda worked out. They could fit them all in that. That'll that'll be okay as well. I don't think masses cap that numbering concrete saw each of these cases are these dedicated space flights or is this like buying an extra seat or two if available on commercial crew flights or is that not really an option there in a week cure the entire flight. So it's our mission so we don't rely on the government having flown something. We don't rely on subsidies from the government we go directly to the commercial providers and we negotiate a price for that white which includes the seats and the the maximum amount of cargo that can carry. And then we we Get the crude train. The the the provider the launch provider trains and that vehicle we train them for on orbit and provide all of the logistics and everything they need on orbit including the research like I talked about. It's a it's a really turnkey mission for our crew in we. We put all the crew on the vehicle Get them taking care of and And and basically on that entire flight. It's really incredible that that is part of what this announcement is. 'cause I think either each half of this announcement would be massive piece of news if taken alone right that. There's this serious of a program to fly these private missions to the end. A second news item of also. We're building space station. This is a massive amount of work that is announced as a singular program. Obviously there's a good through line through this whole thing but I'm curious how those two pieces obviously they you know. They connect a lot of ways. But where did your head start on all of this as a roadmap was it more towards the crew's flight side and increasing the frequency of that or more towards building a space station? And therefore we need crew flights. No I I tell this story occasionally so I'll tell it to you and give you the Reader's digest version of it but the individual who owns the company with me names Dot Com ca therrien in Dr Ghaffari and started a company called S. GT and s gt until very recently was the company that train NASA astronauts and offering International Space Station for for NASA. And he just recently sold the company So when we got together about four years ago He was talking about opportunities. Maybe I'd like to come to work at GT. And you know. I I just we. We weren't finding anything that we both thought were really a good fit for me and finally he asked me one day. Will what do you want to do? I found is an interesting question. You would have thought I. Would you know if I would start that way but I wouldn't really searching for a job at the time and And so I said well that's good question and you'll think about it and I did agonize over for a while and I called him back the next day or so and I said you know Cam I think really the only thing I know how to do is build an operator space station so I think I'll just wait to you know. Eventually some commercial companies will want to do that. And then I'll you perhaps have a job with them and CAM said Okay let me think about that and I no idea what that meant but The next day called me said okay. I'm in and I said well. What do you mean? And he says. Well let's go start a company and The that you manage and let's go build the commercial space station. 'cause there needs to be one so we may as well do it so we we did start this company and we can connect a lot of dot. We both do it for the same reason really. Is it really is the benefits to humanity and up to the species are really important to to drive everything we really do. And we can. We can talk about why we think having the space station. Low-earth orbit is always GONNA be Necessary peress as a as a species really but the start with us as a country And so that's always been our drive on the we. We said we want to build the first. The world's first commercial space station and and from there. We put together a plan on the best way to do that. And and And here we are but to go back now and answer your other question Space Stations It's a platform on orbit To provide services to multiple types of users and we we identify the six different types of users and and you need to provide a platform and utilities and just because of the way it works. Crews tend to be crew. Time tends to be part of the utilities. That you that you end up having to provide because it's a lot cheaper for a researcher to fly his research than it is to fly the research and the researcher so what we always knew was that we were going to have to have the crew. We don't have to manage crew. We knew we. We knew there was a good market for crew both private and professional astronauts as we call them which is a little different than the way NASA call by the way and what we always said was since we have to provide. That's one of the quote unquote utilities that we need to provide. We need to assume that responsibility so we always knew that. In order to have space station operated correctly we'd have to have our own crew. We just thought that there's a great crossroads. Between the crew we would have to have and individuals that wanted to fly. So are the the way we look at. The whole structure is Some crew have to be trained to operate the AXIOM STATION. The majority of the crew can be there. Are there to work on everything else that needs to be done eating research and stuff so we build the station right. We could probably only have one axiom. Crew member on our vehicle any time but other work can be done by other sovereign astronauts that are flying and want to gain that kind of on-orbit experience in private astronauts apply even for short periods of time. They all want to know participate in the activities of what's going on orbit so it's a great synergistic thing and so we'd always play the have crew and it wasn't until we sat down with NASA NAFTA said. Ooh You know if you fly up to eight crude anyone time you know. There's only six or seven on the ISS and anyone time that's a major impact. We should practice that a little bit. That's what got US started thinking about it. And then as we looked into he thought you know what there's probably a market there we could serve if NASA zwilling let us why ISS. There's probably a market there. We can serve early on. So that's that's the genesis of how we ended up here and the Port Award has nothing to do with the Croup Lights. It just turned out when we start talking about why about the Port Award and what we plan doing orbit. We started talking about these squads but we will be announcing our first. Live here Imminently it's really an impressive road map overall and It it shows the seriousness that you're coming out the problem with and It's it's really got to be one of the most exciting things going on in and around the ice region right now. So it's it's cool to hear a lot more on that topic. I want to shift focus a little bit to the modules themselves. In your announcement you also referred to team axiom. As it was called there that included Boeing Tallies Elena intuitive machines. And Max are. I took a gas over on the blog. A little bit back of what they would be doing. Just kind of pulling out of past announcements of programs that they worked on. That are a little bit similar. But I'd love to hear if there's more detail on on what each of those partners will be bringing to the table for axiom station so I can tell you. what Category they fall into each one is in a different state of of Are Teaming arrangements. Some of them are written so say now. Okay once we get to go ahead we're GONNA start figuring out what the systems are specifically what kind of system we use. What kind of engineering to us. What what our criteria. And then. We're going to sit down with the companies and say okay. You know these are the things axioms GonNa do. Here's the things we think you're good at. You know what what is it gonNA cost to get this this or this and we want to build this way. Not Not the way. Bill traditionally build space things but areas where we think there's significant savings wall still maintaining safety and then we walk through those scenarios but big picture so so it it's yet to be agreed to in some cases but big picture caviar Does Austin Training For a NASA and we have a contract with Nazi utilize the facilities for the training that we have to do on side the isis trainee in particular And so We we have that agreement with with NASA and so we have arguments with so they can help us do the trainings of the same people that train NASA astronauts trained ours in the same facilities. Meanwhile they're early design of our station has always included the operators to make sure we're building a operationally a inefficient operationally efficient vehicle. And so they continue to do that job for us and in the future. They'll they'll helpful..

NASA AXIOM STATION International Space Station Nascar Nath researcher Boeing dot Dot Com Croup Lights Dr Ghaffari trainee
"president ceo" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

11:32 min | 7 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Hello and welcome to main engine cutoff. I Anthony Colangelo as always with you and I'm really excited about today's show a couple of weeks back. Nasa announced officially that's axiom space was selected to access the forward port on no two of the International Space Station. This port was designated as a spot that would see future expansion on the IRS by a commercial company in an effort to begin to shift away. Some of what the ISIS is providing to commercial companies to prepare for the future in which NASA doesn't have a giant program like the ISS To really be living and working in lower orbit and try to to initiate some commercialization of that area of space. So this has been going on for a little while now and Back in May we had Dr Mike being the chief engineer at Axiom on to talk about axioms plan for this sort of thing and now it is official. Axiom does have access to that port. And they're going to be begin. The build out of axiom station at the I assess and then eventually as a free flying station all in its own right So this is a really big piece of news and something that I'm really excited to see progress because it feels such distinctive twenty twenties program. Something that could only happen in the decade of the twenty twenties and something that you know if it pans out. It seems that it's going to is a project that we will remember in the long view of history because it does seem to be placed at such a pivotal point in time. Where the ISAS has all this inertia? But we know that it's not going to be there forever and we need to figure out what's next so if things go well this will be project. We look back on pretty fondly. I think in the way future episodes of main engine cutoff. But today we've got a really amazing guest here with us. We've got Mike Suffer Dini. Who IS THE PRESIDENT? Ceo Co founder of Axiom Space for about a decade before his time and space he was the program manager for the ISS at NASA. So he's got quite a history here With really everything that we're GONNA BE TALKING ABOUT TODAY. But today we're gonNA focus on what axioms working on. And what where things go now that they officially have been selected to access that port and to expand the Isis in quite an aggressive fashion. If you look at their road map so I can't wait to talk to him in a second but before we do that. I need to say huge. Thank you to everyone. Who makes it possible for me to get guests like Mr Suffer? Dini here on main engine cutoff. There are three hundred sixty. Five of you over at main engine cutoff dot com slash support. Who help this kind of thing happened? And this episode is produced by thirty seven executive producers brand. Chris Pat Matt George. Brad Ryan Nadeem Peter. Donald Lee Chris Warren Bob Russell John Maurice Jol Yon Grant. Mike David Mintz Eunice Rob. Tim Dodd the astronaut Frank. Julian and Lars from Agile Space Tommy Adam and six anonymous executive producers. Thank you all so much for making it possible if you like me being able to talk to people like this on the show. All of your support is critical to that. So thank you all so much for making this kind of thing. Possible and without further ADO. Let's get stuff as he's called on the line all right. Well thank you so much for joining me on the show you are alleged when it comes to the ISS here so it's pretty exciting to be able to talk with you a little bit today. Thank you very much. I appreciate that about the legend part but I spent a lot of time with the I S and I'm proud of what it's done and what it represents to the world and I'm happy to have been such a big part of it. Certainly now you know leading into the future We've got a lot of expansion to talk about today that it seems like a pretty big time over there at Axiom. Dr Mike Bain on the show back last. May I believe it was to talk a little bit about the architecture even working on and really things leading up to what we heard about just a couple of weeks ago with the selection that you are officially got access to that Ford port on no too so I would love to get a little update. You know what the team has been working on. Maybe up to that selection and then now that that selection official. How did that change? The workflow You know from that moment forward so yes My did talk about the overall architecture of course since that time A Nazi did put out a solicitation which we which we responded to Along the way we have been I'll say modifying our design a little bit not so much The systems As much as the overall layout as we've touched the ISS So you might remember the drawings of our first our first station or one of our first station views it shows US attached to the forward port. We have a node and in line with that we have module on the Nadir Port. Is this beautiful Earth Observatory? And then we had our research module Off to the left hand side is you're facing pork board. And some of our analysis can analysis We've determined that the better location is on the on the zenith port of our note to put the research manufacturer mantra. So if you look at drawings today you'll see it's a significant difference but it's really was based on kinetics and the fact that we plan to put the power tower there so we've made that move Visually that's really probably the biggest Changes see but we have been doing other things to Find Junior design where in what's called a pre preliminary design phase and Now and we've been working on that along with our proposal. Oh submit our proposal. But we're still working on our design And then Now with the award We're sitting down. We've we've negotiated our new contract with NAFTA which hopefully assigned day and We'll get on with the process of now bringing Nasa unofficially working the interfaces and the things they Need to see. And and and and the their side the interfaces they have to confirm with us And then we'll settle on what our systems requirements review. Looks like these this? This is the requirements that lead to your design. So now we're bringing nats on kind of backup. A step gathered them up with us. Make sure we both understand. Both sides of the interface and with the system requirements are and then we had to Pdr together after that. So the next little while we'll be focused on Catching NASA up to where we are And then You know building our putting our systems in place that we can work together and then moving forward with the work necessary to get NASA where we are with regards to our system requirements. So we can get towards PDR. So that's that's kind of where we are today and I wanNA talk a lot more about the modules themselves obviously but in some of the releases that you had around the announcement. There is a mention about precursor missions before that first module actually goes up which right? Now you have slated for twenty twenty four It sounds like those are pretty similar to the guidelines that NASA posted. I believe that was last year. On private astronaut missions. That could happen two times a year so based on their initial guidelines. Are there specific plans for that? Or is that more of something that Ucla as a as a good way to pave the way for you know the operational side of things once you are up on orbit What what's the deal with these precursor missions here really book the Ladder Samatha did put out their guidelines recently. We've been working on these precursor missions since well before NASA put up those guidelines and to really overall the thought process early on when we started working on our station design which was two a half years ago. I guess we got our space act agreement done with NASA summer of twenty seventeen. What's that two and a half years ago? No yeah two and a half years ago. Roughly speaking We knew from the early conversations with NASA that it looked like since we can have eight crew We kind of agreed between us that it would be really good if we started doing missions. Early on to get sort of a cadence how we operate how we operate with NASA how we're GonNa take care of our crew how that affects the ISS and so we agreed early on. That would be good for us to probably do some early missions from that Was born the idea that there's probably a demand for missions to miss s and a likelihood that NASA would be would treat that idea favorably and so now it's off to work their side of you know. Can we accept them? You know people in a fly S. as possible and we started working on the business end of it and The the advantage it had us Forgetting like I said our operational cadence in place before I simply flight or I knowed showed up. So we've been working this for some time. It works out based on what we think. Customer demand to beat will fly a couple times a year We fly short duration flights which are about Eight days docked to I S S Typically this is for a what we call private astronauts and these are also known as tourist And whenever we fly of white like that we always fly with an axiom. Professional astronaut as well so the professional astronaut is trained like the same rigor as NASA ASTRONAUTS. And they can do the same things. Nasa astronauts can do an I. S. And that way we don't put any burden on on the ISS crew when when are when are less Trained astronauts? Show up and then the other types of flights we do our sport countries who want to fly to space and that includes countries that today don't have opportunities to fly to ISS professional astronauts to spend a significant amount of time. Doing Research and other things have been good that country and also countries that fly on Ice Today. But because they don't they don't have a lot of opportunity. They WANNA invest in opportunities to fly to gain more experience And for those Those types of cases we provide the professional after not training And we fly flights catered to them. Which are today? They start off his sixty day missions. And they'll grow to two very long lengths once we have our own modules on orbit. And it's it's only in those particular lights. We only fly. With professional astronauts the whole group of individuals are are professionally trained astronauts and we not only in this case dinner we plying them to orbit like we do for private.

NASA ISS Axiom Nasa Axiom Space Mike Suffer Dini axiom station ISIS International Space Station official Anthony Colangelo IRS Dr Mike Nadir Port Mike David Mintz Eunice Rob Dr Mike Bain Brad Ryan Nadeem Peter Chris Pat Matt George Pdr chief engineer
Trump Promotes Low Unemployment and Rising Wages in State of the Union

Morning Edition

04:37 min | 8 months ago

Trump Promotes Low Unemployment and Rising Wages in State of the Union

"I'm David Brancaccio New York president trump address both houses of Congress last night into a quick can be seen as a victory lap on America's place in the world and the state of the economy tonight I said for you to share the incredible results jobs are blooming incomes asorio poverty is plummeting crime is falling confidence is surging and our country is thriving and highly respected again he said he was thrilled to report the US economy is quote the best it is ever been it does need to be said that average growth in the economy as measured by gross domestic product during this administration is much lower than it was under presidents Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan however the president headline the low unemployment rate market places Nancy Marshall ganzer joins us here from Washington with some context on that even the president said the unemployment rate is at the lowest level in half a century that's true the president also talked about what he called the blue collar Boone wages are rising fast and wonderfully they are rising fastest for low income workers who have seen a sixteen percent pay increase since my election but which is aren't rising as much as they normally would with an unemployment rate this low in the present also talked about factories he said his administration was restoring manufacturing is that right well the president said the US has gained twelve thousand new factories under his administration that number is a little off but the bigger issue is most of these factories employed five people or fewer the government has a very broad definition of a factory including things like bakeries candy stores and custom tailors also the institute for supply management's manufacturing index of more traditional factories fell for five straight months last year although there was an increase last month Nancy thank you the president's headline case that these are now with the good times has weight however this could be a risky strategy to pitch to people who have their own gauges of the economy we have our own stakes states of the union and may judge this in part on how their own household economy is doing Felicia Wong is president CEO of the liberal leaning nonpartisan think tank the Roosevelt institute thanks for joining us thank you David so it is the lowest unemployment in fifty years people on the left and right thought the trading system with China was broken and there's a phase one deal now with China wasn't the president right to show off his achievements I think the real argument it's hard to understand what's going on under the hood of the economy first of all trump inherited a recovery that's important to remember he didn't mess it up which is good they're also doesn't mean that he deserves any credit for some of that things that are happening out there that are intact better for American workers the question is whether the groceries yet there is either shared or last name and we look under the hood growth really isn't shared wages are barely rising even though they are better at the bottom adjusted for inflation we just for workers are up in less than one percent which is worse than under president Obama and more importantly wages are rising in part because we see minimum wage increases at the state level the president did refer to the fact that the lower half of incomes are improving but you're saying yeah in part because of increases in minimum wage which the ministration unlike that's right you have not seen a federal minimum wage increase because the Republicans opposed it but what you have seen in dozens and dozens of states and municipalities across the country is increases in the minimum wage pushed for by labor unions and other kinds of movement actors and this is a lot of what's actually driving wages are at the bottom where you really see growth in health care and other industries but a lot of those jobs are very precarious and a lot of that a lot of health care jobs are actually very low wage all right Felicia Wong head of the Roosevelt institute a liberal leaning nonpartisan think tank and we also spoke to conservative economist Glen Hubbard who used to be the chair of the council of economic advisers under George W. bush the marketplace morning report podcast feed has that if you missed it on the

New York Congress David Brancaccio President Trump
Recording Academy puts chief executive on leave days ahead of Grammy Awards

KNX Evening News

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

Recording Academy puts chief executive on leave days ahead of Grammy Awards

"Just ten days before the Grammys academy president and chief executive Deborah Dugan apparently has been pushed out his ready Lewis a music critic with the LA times recording academy issued a statement that said in light of concerns raised to the recording academy board of trustees including a formal allegation of misconduct by a senior female member of the recording academy team the worst place recording academy president CEO Dever do going on ministry believe affected immediately Dugan became the academy's first ever female president just months ago on August

President Trump Deborah Dugan Lewis Ceo Dever Chief Executive La Times
"president ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

12:11 min | 9 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The president CEO of the hardwood financial group and looking at the run down here I mean I'm fascinated with every aspect of what we will talk about today what are some of the challenges faced by successful professionals well I know there are a lot of successful professionals listening to the program right now and there are areas of challenges that even though these individuals are successful in their actual field they might not have a read on what the challenges all or that could kind of side swiped them we'll go over that in just a bit where our tax rates going and what you can do to protect yourself from the real possibility of higher taxes in the not so distant future also asset protection and preservation strategies how do you make sure that your assets don't get broadsided how do you make sure that you preserve what you've already built just to put this in a very easy context you work your entire life your entire career to build to build build build build this giant nest egg for the future how do you preserve what you've done so it doesn't you rolled we'll get into that coming up and also had a build your finances to whether any future financial storms and that sort of symbiotic with asset protection and preservation Bob it's great to be back with you in the studio Todd it's great to be here I think you nailed it on the intro you know the bottom line is is we worked hard to create what we have to build it and we have to make sure that we also protected so it's going to be there when we need it you know this could be protected from stock market it could be all these other things that could potentially de rail your plan and a lot of people are they they they manage your finances themselves other people have professional financial advisors helping them do it but the goal is the same for everybody I meet Todd why why would a person hire a financial adviser why do you want to put a financial adviser on your team what is the goal well for me the quick answer is that an individual is very good and there are experts in their chosen field but they might not be an expert in finances so you want to bring in somebody who deals with this every day and knows how to manage all of the the ups and downs the highs and the lows that you know we the normal late people might not be aware of from a financial aspect yeah I think that's a great way to look at it you know if I if I'm a little sick a little sick I might go to off CBS or something I'm not advertising for CBS but so it all kind of my my wall grades and I go get a Cup last for but if I'm really sick I'm going to go to a professional because my health is important to me it's very important to me and so I will give finances the same way you go to a financial professional you engage a professional one because they better be good at what they do that's their profession as you stated but not just that their job is to keep you financially healthy think about it that way you know some people say well I hired an adviser because I want to make a lot of money you know I'm going to go to the casino and put it all on red to try to make a lot of money but the reality is is is we're investing to make money that's for sure that's why you invest but a good financial advisory holistic financial adviser their job is to keep you financially healthy to help you make money and sometimes to protect you from losing money and so you've got all these things in my book I call money statues you have all these things that could affect your finances and so a good financial adviser was a quite a financial plan and a good financial plan is going to address all these things that might keep you up at night you know all these little concerned so if you think about it for a second what is the number one financial concern that most people have I mean what is it that keeps you up at night regarding your finances the number one concern across the country it changes a little bit but it's typically related to the possibility of running out of money that I don't have enough savings to either retire or support me through retire retirement or whatever it is but the number one concern across the country I think this will resonate with a lot of our listeners is do I have enough money or will I run out that's number one that you know what one of the things you just said was what keeps you up at night I got to say in the crazy world in which we live these days there's a lot of things could could potentially keep people up at night Bob yeah know for sure and and what are a waste your finances you know what's in another concern is two thousand eight was a long time ago once the next correction or all this crazy politics is going on how is that going to affect your finances you know these are things that bother people I health care costs of a if if I need I get sick in retirement I'm older I need something I don't want to be a bird to my children that might keep people up at night you see it all of these are issues that sun around your finances and if you have the right financial adviser you're going to feel comfortable that your planet dresses these this is a very very important concept your successful stay successful throughout your lifetime it's it's a very important piece what's the bottom line is you're getting attacked from all angles there are so many things happening you need a financial professional to help you navigate because this is their area of expertise this is what they're trained to do because you've got a lot to worry about in your chosen field in all of the the facets and factors in your life I agree with that do what you're good at and get professionals to help you kind of the the metaphor we use with the position earlier right if you're really sick or are you wanna make sure you stay healthy you go to a professional to help you do that and you do what you're good at and that builds your team around you I mean what we're going to talk about today this is all important stuff we're talking about some of the challenges that are faced by successful people we're gonna talk about taxes I mean what I know we're all frustrated we feel like we pay a lot of taxes but the reality is is this is a fairly well tax rate and it might be going up sometime in the future and so I want to talk about those things I also want to talk about the fact that two thousand eight was a long time ago and we have to start thinking about what would we do how would we protect ourselves if that happened again these are all really really big deals and so let's start by talking about what's going on in the markets let's talk about the markets real quick markets have been going up I hope everyone is making money but the markets are super volatile I mean it's like a roller coaster right now there's a lot more volatility I mean certainly more than we've seen and and ten years over the last years and part of that might be driven by politics other things but here's the thing about the markets companies have all tax rates that's great for companies that make some more profitable are there earning reports are good companies are doing well right now people are employed spending money so everything is really really good we would expect the market to go up why are we seeing all this volatility why why are we see the market go up and down like a yo yo well I think a lot of it is uncertainty the market doesn't like uncertainty and where's the uncertainty a lot of it revolves around politics right you mentioned that earlier what a crazy world were and you know and a lot of these decisions are going up in I happening up in DC certainly affect the stock market and the stock market's looking forward to a wall how would this affect how would that affect it what the heck is going on here and that volatility is affecting the market but it's also affecting investors and so you've got to think about how to navigate through markets like this again your successful you've made money you want to keep it but you still want to keep making money as well and so it becomes a really complicated problem and I mentioned earlier if you have a financial adviser or if you hire financial adviser their job is to keep you financially healthy and part of that is understanding what drives markets in getting through these challenging markets but also not all financial advisors are created equally folks there is a vast difference in advisors and what they bring to the table and frankly how they advise you and what assets what tools were resources what knowledge they have at their fingertips and the truth of the matter is there are many individuals that are investing they have an adviser they have a broker and they're not always getting the best most introspective advice Todd that that was I mean I was actually you know the reality is is that you know your advisor he's a watch out for your best interests and not the Roland and they've got to understand how the market works and if you're not getting a good result from your adviser if you're not happy or you don't feel like that they're really taking good care of you go find another adviser there's plenty of good advisors out there for you to work with that can create a good plan for you the reality is is there's a lot of challenges out there that we need to overcome one of all is the politics the the volatile market another one is a prospect for inflation you know what are our country always a lot of money we've got a huge national debt we printed money like crazy just to get out of the two thousand eight crisis and eventually this may cost a lot of inflation but even today we have inflation how you do your honor what gas prices were back in the nineteen seventies the just just our listeners think about that think about gas prices are twenty seven cents yeah that and I remember the gas wars that we stand in line somewhere to save two or three cents a gallon you know back then twenty seven cents a gallon right again it was you know before or after the oil embargo and yes you know I remember seeing the signs are I don't remember necessarily as a kid what the prices were but I've seen photographs and I've seen signs at the gas stations that show those unbelievably in a low numbers and then of course also you know after the crisis hit those huge long lines and I remember all right and even days for life yeah that's right because I was a kid back then I mean when the when the Arab oil embargo was on and gas prices shot up here in the country and the lines were absolutely insane I I remember that so my age would have been I I think I would have been about seven or eight years old yeah and I I just remember my parents talking about all right and even license plates and and and waiting in line I mean crazy times well gas one from about twenty seven cents a gallon out to about seventy five cents a gallon out today I'd love to see seventy five cents will back then that was a big job I mean that's almost a three hundred percent increase in gas prices we're nearing the end of the segment when we come back I want to talk about inflation what you can do to protect yourself from this because it's important it's part of a plan so what come back into the next segment let's get into this inflation just a little bit deeper I really want to introduce you to all of the Hollywood team understand the horror would weigh the Harwood method you know there's nothing better to do this then to get your copy of Robert Harwood's book investing for retirement the ultimate guide to not.

president CEO
"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:35 min | 9 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Of our government <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and then <Speech_Female> for completely sentimental <Speech_Female> reasons I'd I'd <Speech_Music_Female> love to chat with my <Speech_Music_Female> father <SpeakerChange> passed away <Silence> <Advertisement> when I was young <Speech_Music_Male> on. Love <Silence> it <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> Kim. What <Speech_Male> is your number <Silence> one? <SpeakerChange> Help <Speech_Female> habit <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> an early morning routine <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> good food <Speech_Female> reflection reading <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Telephony_Female> working out for <Speech_Music_Female> me. It's all about <Speech_Music_Female> that balance of <Speech_Music_Female> mental spiritual <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> physical. I think that <Speech_Female> if I could <Speech_Female> get my day started <Speech_Female> well then then <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> you know the <Speech_Male> rest of the day is easy <Silence> of it. <Speech_Male> What <Speech_Male> would you say is <Speech_Male> the best advice you've <Silence> ever received <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Female> as a woman in leadership <Speech_Male> one of my? My <Speech_Music_Female> mentors told <Speech_Female> me that <Speech_Female> you know early <Speech_Telephony_Female> on as I was climbing <Speech_Telephony_Female> the corporate ladder <Speech_Telephony_Female> and thinking about <Speech_Female> family <Speech_Female> in she said to me <Speech_Female> she had a very big <Speech_Telephony_Female> job at medtronic <Speech_Female> and said <Speech_Female> to me that if I <Speech_Female> plan to lead at <Speech_Music_Female> an executive level <Speech_Female> and have a family <Speech_Female> that you <Speech_Female> have to buy time <Speech_Female> in. She said <Speech_Female> that you know the <Speech_Female> only thing you can't <Speech_Female> get back as time <Speech_Female> and it's often <Speech_Female> wasted on the wrong <Speech_Female> things so <Speech_Female> you know focusing <Speech_Male> my energy on what was <Speech_Music_Female> most important <Speech_Music_Female> was key in <Speech_Music_Female> balancing <Speech_Music_Female> you know high performance governments <Speech_Music_Female> work and <Speech_Music_Female> happy <Speech_Female> life at home and <Speech_Female> news. I apply <Speech_Female> today <Speech_Female> a lot of that <Speech_Female> in my life <Speech_Music_Female> as well with <Speech_Female> my team. You know. <Speech_Female> I'm constantly challenging <Speech_Female> the team. What are <Speech_Female> the top three <Speech_Music_Female> things that are <Speech_Telephony_Female> going to impact the business <Speech_Music_Female> your department <Speech_Female> or your life <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> that focus is key <Speech_Music_Female> and so you know heard vice <Speech_Music_Female> was by time where or <Speech_Music_Male> you can <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> try to work <Speech_Male> that love it? <Speech_Male> Great Advice <Speech_Male> for anybody listening <Speech_Male> to this <Speech_Male> podcast <Speech_Male> by time where you can <Speech_Male> and as a <Speech_Male> as a female health leader <Speech_Male> or a leader <Speech_Male> in general so <Speech_Male> key to do that <Speech_Male> Kim. <Speech_Male> This is incredible. <Speech_Male> I mean the work that you <Speech_Male> guys are up to <Speech_Male> today the <Speech_Male> time. We're spending today <Speech_Male> to raise awareness around <Speech_Male> women's health. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> The opportunity is <Speech_Male> to change a standard <Speech_Male> of care. You guys <Speech_Music_Male> are doing that and <Speech_Male> Anna call <Speech_Male> out to the <Speech_Male> women listening to this <Speech_Male> to just <Speech_Male> trust your intuition. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Music_Male> don't <Speech_Male> be afraid to ask for <Speech_Male> a second opinion right. <Speech_Music_Male> There's there's more <Speech_Music_Male> procedures out there like <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Male> to help you <Speech_Male> and your health breath <Speech_Male> so that you could <Speech_Male> lead a a happier <Speech_Male> healthier life <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> Kim <Speech_Male> Sharon closing thought <Speech_Male> with us and <Speech_Male> and the best <Speech_Male> place for the listeners <Speech_Male> could continue you <Silence> conversation. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Sure <Speech_Female> so I think <Speech_Female> in terms <Speech_Female> of those out there <Speech_Female> looking to <Speech_Female> to build companies <Speech_Female> change standards <Speech_Female> of care <Speech_Female> advanced solutions <Speech_Female> like <Speech_Telephony_Female> we are at <Speech_Female> Sessa health. Be <Speech_Female> Patient be focused. <Speech_Music_Female>

Kim medtronic Sharon executive
"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:14 min | 9 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Days are FDA cleared system uses heat to destroy the fibroids in a targeted fashion Kevin. So we can treat each one individually and women are getting fantastic symptom relief and again getting back to their lives very quickly compared compared to what's been available for decades. Well I think it's great and we have to take a look at things like this. Why do an entire uterus from title or even cut the fibroids so you guys are going in and and is it radiofrequency ablation it? Is We as radiofrequency ablation which heats up the tissue to point of destroying it and it breaks down over time and then it's the fibroids are absorbed within the uterus over time and Kim. What is the thing that causes pain as it growth and impingement? Is it nerve like wh. Where's the pain coming from? And all of the above and as well well the amount of blood that it takes to kind of feed the vibrates so some of the symptoms include leading Volk abdominal pain urinary frequency. Your pain and sexual pain our pain within her course and in when I say bleeding I I like to kind of come back to that for a moment when I talk about bleeding this is bleeding to the point of where a woman at work is sitting on a trash bag like a lot of bleeding and really getting in the way of her ability ability to to function during the day. Take care of her kids or or be at work and not be embarrassed in the bathroom. You know every few minutes many of these women are admitted to the Er for blood transfusions and often have anemia so and again. They're they're doing all of this in insights. Wow Wow and that's It's terrible and you know I think it's Something that let's take the negative thoughts out of this the negative stigma and It's normal right. I mean you it happens. And and brief fifty sat right mostly correct women bef- you know they say seventy eighty percent before fifty five years of age and it's interesting. Why is you know they don't know it's you'll ask gynecologist you'll ask the societies.

abdominal pain FDA Kevin Kim Volk urinary frequency
"president ceo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

01:57 min | 10 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"What you're talking about And you don't. Economists have a reputation that they make forecast to make us rollins. Look good but the truth. Is there a science and you know what is is happening though is that with for example You know crypto currencies That's changing you know. Some of the technical aspects serval monetary policy so we need technically competent people who understand that a central bank where they don't understand Eh blockchain and and you know crypto currencies. You know how those are going to affect the economy and the economy is is reacting in different ways but basically basically what I feel is that the economics gave me a methodology. And I it You know I don't. I'm not very never was very dogmatic sort of ECLECTIC. They can in my beliefs of different theories. And if the data or the circumstances change I'll change my view and use a different model so so you're always testing that but I'm a big believer at least for me. It was very useful and I I needed that formal training to have a more discipline train of thought so I'm perhaps the recovering economist. But but I do find against against especially when you're dealing today with the sort of fluctuations and currencies and economies in trade. Rules It it's really been a for me me personally. Invaluable help you very much Andrea Goo Goo Ski. Thank you so much for taking time tech innovation. Today it's been wonderful to get your perspective on the the evolution of as Also also were going into great innovation that you brought to bear. Well thank you very much. Peter it's been a pleasure. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me next week. My guest will be Tom. Bogan the executive vice president. The Planning Business Unit workday and former chief executive officer of adaptive insights..

Peter chief executive officer executive vice president Bogan
"president ceo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:59 min | 10 months ago

"president ceo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Expand your reach in innovation capabilities from perspective as well. Yeah that's a great question. I think nowadays Really going it alone is very difficult companies. it's very difficult because the digital digital transformation is really changed management to change people's mindsets and it's hard to have the technical expertise in the areas right so you really have to partner with people. Yeah so we do have Various Technology partners that we're working with and I think we'll develop much further. I think internally it's really part of this change changing the mindset to realize that this is a little bit like it's going to make your job easier because there's a great fear that we're all going to be replaced by computers like hell the make all the decisions is a little bit. I it's not. I don't see that in the medium term. We're going to have any of that. It's it's really like you're going to have have at your fingertips information. There will allow you to make better decisions so you know when we talk about Ai. The way I look very simply a is just it's basically a program which modifies itself based on results. That's all it does is continually improving itself if you're forecasting the weather it's it's wrong in one direction. It will make an adaptation But that's very different from again. You know doing all the things that you do in your job op so you know certainly in our business. It's going to be that human Computer action that if you optimize its best so so. It's very important to make your employees feel comfortable with that and not see it as a threat but actually as an aide If we think about our own jobs I mean without the connectivity that I have today My job would be very different out. Need a huge staff because you're basically connected twenty four seven with the whole world and you can read memos you can call people up. You can have visual interaction with them But it's makes it a lot easier so you know it's it's hard for me to imagine going back to the old days you know. That was an early adopter things like cellphones. It looked like a brick and they didn't have much coverage right and and thinking about how I operated. Then today's like. Wow how did how did we get places this is before. GPS right so it becomes part of your life but there is a important change management of Getting companies to accept this and getting them to accept to know that look this digital company is better than you but you're better at knowing your customer. Let's work together. And the last say is the importance of data that we have an enormous amount of data we own companies that are one hundred years old one hundred years of the data that we really aren't using you know to to the benefit of customer in and our benefit as well so that's also going to be. How are we going to mind this data to create more value? That's very interesting. One of the things that You establish really aggressive carbon reduction goals which you referenced before going from Sixteen Not Percents On on coal power to thirty percent I believe you said And you became the first publicly traded company to issue a climate report in compliance with the the task force on climate related financial disclosure and. It's interesting I obviously in some ways being virtuous become part of your strategy and documenting that version. The changes that you're making that are Sort of going more towards renewable is a big part of our conversation and so on. Talk a bit about why you wanted to be I. I Y you The advantages of being ahead on this you know there. There's certainly probably the cynics would say that there are advantages to being a late comer to that because your so taking advantage of all of the traditional means of doing things but I I think that this is a very values driven company so the founders really established like five values and it was very interesting on their first public offering it actually listed as a risk. Say We will we will I. You know think about our values therefore anything else in the it was interesting bankers. Make them put it as a risk. I don't see it. I think it actually helps avoid risks. So it's values driven so that was easy the company was in a very You know values driven and people wanted to do the right thing What was difficult? was realizing what you were very good at Is Not the future in a so. For example we were you know in some coal technologies the best in the world. And it's like well that's it's not going to take us into the future. How do you make that switch? So that was Important on some things like it was the A It's a task force on climate disclosure DC DF CD the first US publicly listed energy company. Come out with it. I think part of it is view of that risk so this really looks at in light of climate change How robust is your business? And I think that's part of this. Risk Mitigation Strategy that. You know you've got to look at risk from many angles into trey easy to simplify it and say well. It's geography or technology dodgier commodity. It's all of them so I if there's going to be climate change you know. How robust is your business to that climate change so I get the the basic entrepreneurial wants to do good DNA of this company made that easier. What was harder to say? We're not going to do what you're good at. We're GonNa do something completely different. Now what is we are also the people who feel responsible title for keeping the lights on so sometimes our messaging is more difficult because it's much easier to message if you're just one hundred.

Various Technology partner US
White House won't participate in impeachment inquiry hearing

Todd and Don

01:01 min | 10 months ago

White House won't participate in impeachment inquiry hearing

"Something impeachment inquiry continues this week the house Judiciary Committee is gearing up to hold its first hearing Wednesday but the White House will not be participating in the hearings representative Doug Collins he's a Republican from Georgia we'll have an academic hearing on Wednesday which model a game we don't even know who their witnesses are you we don't even know how to prepare we've asked for fairness we've got an answer back on land this is just another side show it trying to get in the president and the White House wrote a letter last night saying they cannot be expected to participate in the hearing when the witnesses have not even been announced not to mention the president is traveling overseas our witnesses well because we're trying to figure out if we don't get more than one witness and we because we said they were upset over over we want to make this fair this is the only time the president CEO even attempted to be able to have fairness in this process there you go that's Doug Collins from Georgia well you know I mean if if it if it's it's a sham it's a hoax and is the president is saying so why participate in something that that is not based on

House Judiciary Committee White House Doug Collins Georgia President Trump President Ceo Representative
Centene CEO Michael Neidorff Discusses the Market with Jim Cramer

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

06:41 min | 11 months ago

Centene CEO Michael Neidorff Discusses the Market with Jim Cramer

"Care stocks just aren't getting enough credit for the incredible fundamentals especially best offers like united health group seventeen she's a big administrative government sponsored health pets sure enough two days ago seventeen reported what I call a Nabokov quarter meaning not is fear while the company delivered a nice top and bottom line they also missing some key line I'm so we can over that medical cost ratio found that little niggling frankly the percent of the premiums they collect it goes to paying for healthcare but because the managed care stocks have and crushed by Elizabeth Warren worries and number was all they knew sock exploded higher than the new surging six point five percents single session teens now rallied nearly fifteen point from its lows getting month although it's still twenty seven points away from its highest stock is picking up some members so let's check in with Michael Mayer is the chairman president CEO of seventeen and my favorite healthy. are executive now that he's finally recovered from the Saint Louis Cardinals stinging defeat at the hands of the shocking Washington nationals but you're not going to make money the driver manager okay let's you so much for coming on this quarter was really what odd I think that you just get better and better when this next he'll closes right doing because you've really got a momentum enough and you also announced the by that which I think was great during sign there's a couple of I this was the ninth clean quarter we've had and the other eight we went down for Novi in my mind volatility with her this this was a very good quarter the buyback we have the optionality now that with the proceeds from the sale the socks the copies were divesting and we now have the option retired that or by backstop if we cannot like to buy back stock as a way to for the investors you do want to do well here's what I'm thinking there was a piece in the New York Times Tober eighteenth twenty nine thousand nine how pending decisional bomb care could up in twenty twenty campaign there's a very big federal appeals court decision coming very shortly could happen to this evening for I know we're going to be a lot of misunderstanding at I'm not sure of US knows which way it's going to come out but there are situations which could be very advantageous for seventeen that people nate misjudge but which is by stock when I we called WHO's our investors today we called when the Fifth District Federal Court was going to rule the way they did right now we think there's a chance that the appeals court could turtle we we know that if they don't it's going to the Supreme Court and we think Supreme Court were overturned not five four you'll be sixty or seventy two so We're hoping that the Federal Appeals Court Fifth District does reverse it they do it will just take an over here out right but you I'm presuming you're saying I'm too would be in favor of the four healthcare which absolutely it is the exchanges are shocking people right they're actually doing we're they're allowed to flourish they're flourishing in caution going down people like him and we'll retaining the individuals longer than we historically have though we're down about one point nine million we were staying longer all the time and we have eighty percent of the people each year renewing from the previous year so it's a product like it's where people want to walk in with an insurance card not for free care don't you think that there's been a miscalculation in the big broad presidential debate and lately just in the polls from CNN the other day it looks like the American people are waking up idea that maybe it will cost too much and maybe the care would be subpar on this single payer I was just looking at every other country you go to England they've had single payer forever and there's a private system equal in size for every time a politician I've said it to you before it's too much politics not policy right I tell them why don't you go practice on the postal system no you've had the postal system the private system they'll this this system is working people care they want a couple of employees in Italy and one of my employees contain costs in a single payer is withhold services I've had people in England Germany France as us to open up medical tourism spots in the former Eastern European bloc so they can go get the knee replacement of what things they can't normally get one more fast sure have to confirm this there I believe there are about ten times as many M is in Canada as find the Mayo clinic in Rochester Minnesota thing about this what that means if this four if there's seventy four in Rochester some of that nature there's only even forty two whole country I mean is there so's dynamics that's great numbers on post road now I go through this gigantic acquisition welfare I don't know how do it for instance I was okay so where are we now it's Illinois in New Jersey I mean every state do you have to make a presentation every state in why can these two states hold you up well they're not they're not going to New Jersey they seem to be last that's okay they they're going to the review right now there are some some things in Illinois it's virtually going to be resolved any time now I it's it's a clean it's very clean acquisition okay now the we're working with justice I any trust any trust is it's hard to see who's the states can decide how many players they want anytime and what the rates are okay what question do you think that people are beginning of when it was warn really raises less corn and more hell are people actually starting to get frightened about the the dollars that will cost you think it's starting to sing I hope so because the numbers I've seen that that single payer program Medicare for we'll have somewhere between twenty five and thirty eight trillion dollars over ten years here's the budget for ten years is fifty six trillion dollars they get about what that means there's the whole country would be it's it's it's I've said it many times it's politics not policy and you know it's very easy to have a soundbite medicare for all right it takes a lot of paragraphs explain bad all right that's great because you've been a source of wisdom and also whatever win what we're going to fail you told us to succeed now people want them and my family members included all right that's buckle night on Sherman President the CEO of seventeen

Nabokov Ten Years Thirty Eight Trillion Dollars Fifty Six Trillion Dollars Eighty Percent Two Days
Dodger Stadium to undergo $100 million renovation ahead of 2020 season, All-Star Game

KNX Programming

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Dodger Stadium to undergo $100 million renovation ahead of 2020 season, All-Star Game

"Dodger fans can look forward to some major renovations when they root for the team of service for the next season the president CEO Stan Kasten house one hundred million dollars of improvements that will coincide with Dodger Stadium hosting the twenty twenty all star game yes it says he's especially excited about the bridges of the plaza they're going to connect the outfield pavilion sorgen rebuilding a two acre entertainment plaza this class will have a new front door for our state in because we don't really have one now and we're going to have a lot of new of food offerings of beer garden for craft beers for the first time fans you'll be able to walk all the way around the stadium from the inside all the way around like a circle entire stadium from one of the nine entrances is where they can enter as

President Trump Dodger Stadium Ceo Stan Kasten One Hundred Million Dollars Two Acre
Larry, David O'rourke And Belmont discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Larry, David O'rourke And Belmont discussed on Sean Hannity

"Yeah their own so Simon party time was a good server toga that's track announcer Larry call miss with the traditional opening call the one hundred fifty first thoroughbred racing season began today full slate of racing iris new president CEO David o'rourke was asked about an earlier than normal start by WG wise trucking Callie the reason we're up here early is the construction and has been down to Belmont so we needed to make a decision and the decision was made to get out the way downstate as much as possible so that was the impetus for us to be up here five days a week you can attest this too dark days this season

Larry David O'rourke Belmont Simon President Ceo WG Callie Five Days
President CEO, Skol And Amazon discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

03:14 min | 1 year ago

President CEO, Skol And Amazon discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"Announcing today, it will start rolling out delivery, seven days, a week, beginning next year in order to keep up with the demands of shipping partners like Amazon, and WalMart president CEO raw super Manian, speaking of squawk alley this morning. Well, what we can say right now situation is very fluid at very dynamic. It's going to be very hard for me to talk about what the Konami is going to, you know, is going to be doing in the future. This point you know, perhaps, we'll talk a little bit more about it on June twenty fifth on the owning Skol. But I gotta tell you one thing, it doesn't matter what the economy is doing. What is growing is the ecommerce market? And like I said the parcel business is going substantially and driven by ecommerce and our investments in this space going to be the what makes a difference. Super Manian mentioned, the company reports earnings next month. So Dan says the options Marcus implying a big move for the stock between now. And then. Options, we can look out about a month and we can look at the June twenty eighth weeklies. And we can see that the Anthony Stroud. That's the call premium. And the put premium is implying about an eight percent move or about twelve dollars in either direction, and listen. It's great to get an update from president COO a few weeks out of their earnings. I think what the, the message there was that things are inflex things are fluid, and their guidance is going to be really important as we exit Q to so couple charge just to look at Mel, you said earlier. The stock is down forty percent from the two thousand eighteen all time, highs look at that right there. It's down about twenty percent just in the last six weeks alone. It's kind of getting towards that really important low from just about six months ago is about one hundred and fifty bucks. Look at five year basis, you look at one fifty one forty range is really, really big support here. Obviously getting a little overdone trading about ten times earnings. We know that those earnings growth has just ground to a halt right here. But really important, I guess, look at the price of options over the last five years, we're. Starting to get to a level where investors or at least operated are getting a little nervous here about a pretty much a potentially outsize move. I would say that amiss in a guide down for the second half of the year, and this dachshund making new lows. I mean it's going back to those lows from a few years ago. This move is interesting. And the reasoning makes sense on paper in that they have all these this network. They have facilities, etc. They get an extra day of use out of them, I think seven days a week. So they can get efficiencies out of this, and leverage them at the same time, serving the ecommerce market has been a very difficult market for them to sir. Particularly because of the last mile of shipment funny, you should say that now you typically the ones that asks the questions on this show. Yeah. Math and quick to questions is. I don't know the answer. Is it safe to say Melissa since the beginning of two thousand eighteen the ecommerce business has increased last eighteen months. Yes, fair to say, right? Is it also fair to say that the s&p five hundred's within five percent of its all time? Yes, it is. And why would FedEx, which is the B two hundred seventy five dollars? Stock in the beginning of twenty one fifty explain that one to me and to dance point, I gotta tell you. We're now trading where we traded on Christmas Eve, this is one of the few stocks, that's go back and tested that low. We don't hold one fifty five or so there folks, despite valuation, which is cheapest himse more for here would point out this sucker's headed back to the two thousand sixteen low, which is one

President Ceo Skol Amazon Walmart Fedex Anthony Stroud President Trump MEL DAN Melissa COO Marcus Seven Days Two Hundred Seventy Five Dolla Eighteen Months Twelve Dollars Twenty Percent Eight Percent