20 Episode results for "Pratt Institute"

The Voice Den Session 8

Voice in Canada

02:33 min | 4 months ago

The Voice Den Session 8

"Hey there it's wednesday december sixteenth. And i love these wednesdays when they are the wednesdays of the voice. Dan this has become my Another one of my passion projects. I should say Hosting voiced voice bringing together a lot of the Really influential personalities voice base and having the opportunity to speak with them an meaning. When i say having the opportunity to speak with them i mean you have the opportunity to speak with them. It's kind of like a reality show where you get to come on. Ask questions and pick their brains and all that sort of stuff. So today is Session number eight of the voice. Dan again a shout out to our headliner sponsor amazon lexi as well as two partners. Attention live and audio brain. Let me tell you just briefly about the five very special guests that are going to be on the show today. We have rebecca. Evan who otherwise known as professor you x who is a conversation designer at pratt institute. She teaches conversation design. And so if you have any questions about this area of voice technology then definitely definitely check it out your opportunity to ask some questions. We have ashman howdy otherwise known as ask. He is the head of global product partnerships for google assistant. And he's actually one of the main guys behind the very successful voice talks. He is so knowledgeable about Voicing and in particular. What google's doing so if that interests you as well the definitely come on. We've also got emily leoneto. She's known as amplify and she is head of growth at voice flow voice. A fantastic platform that allows you to simply drag and drop fields to create your own of voice skills and actions. We have michelle stanislaw quick. And i hope i said you name right. And he is the co founder for utter one and voice lunch. He's otherwise known as the other man and then we have jenny. Stenhouse the builder. She's a developer advocate for new sensory as well as the coo for women in voice. This is a real powerhouse lineup of voice attack leaders and like i encourage you to join us for this very special and final voiced an episode of the year so the voice dot com is where you need to be at five o'clock bring some beverages bring some snacks. Sit down enjoy yourself and join in the discussion will all be there right. I hope to see you there to take care. Recast dot fm.

Dan ashman howdy emily leoneto pratt institute michelle stanislaw Evan rebecca amazon google Stenhouse jenny
The BF+DA Is Closing?! And Other Updates

American Fashion Podcast

10:23 min | 2 years ago

The BF+DA Is Closing?! And Other Updates

"This is American fashion podcast. I'm Charles Beckwith. And I've got a couple of updates here. Some pretty bad news and some optimistic in may I will be at the Copenhagen fashions summit in Denmark. If anybody listening knows somebody that I should talk to over there. I'm looking to interview interesting sustainability leaders and people were kind of changing the game globally. It's the tenth anniversary of the Copenhagen fashion summit, but I've never gone. And so I'm pretty excited to to be over there and meeting all these people that we hear about quite a bit in that realm of ethical responsible sustainable fashion, but I don't get to connect with because they're in London or they're in Paris for their Italy. Or they're in China. Lot of people are flying into Copenhagen for this. Also if anybody's interested in adv. Touching on this program where we're offering a big discount. If you're going to help us sponsor the trip in either case whether y connect with me about doing interviews over there, or if you're interested in sponsoring, we are info at American fashion podcast dot com. I will also be probably in Paris and definitely in Florence during the same trip. So I'm looking connect with people who wanna talk about things we usually talk about on this show. And if that's use NS, nemo info at American fashion, podcast dot com. I am here. In shock. Reading announcement on the front page of the Brooklyn fashion design accelerators website. This is a says print institute's five year experiment in changing an industry moves on. This is a bizarre announcement. Nobody nobody is talked about the be FDA closing at the end of a five-year run. Run the nouncement says after five years of experimentation, and leadership in sustainable fashion, practices, research and entrepreneurship, the Brooklyn fashion and design accelerator be FDA will be shutting its doors on June thirtieth Pratt institute plans to integrate many of the lessons learned from the BF TA into the curriculum and student experience at Pratt. Wow. So this is just ate a major shock because the FDA has been a big part of the independent fashion community here in New York City, and it's been a huge part of it's been a center for people's efforts in driving ethical, responsible, sustainable fashion, and it's loss will be definitely felt there. They're going to be major repercussions for this. They just got grants that just got new equipment. I'm not sure that anybody at the FDA. A new this was coming at least not up until maybe the last couple of weeks. I I was certainly shocked by I know, quite a few people who work over there. And yeah, this is bizarre. I know they had an administration change in the last year, and maybe some support for this went away inside of Pratt. I don't know. I I don't know who's going to step up. How the the slack will be picked up here because that's been Brealey a big center. A big big driver of things getting done in terms of ethical fashion here in New York City. Another kind of Downer news the accessories council put out this bulletin, this is from excessive council presidency. Oh, Karen guy Merson, there's a lot going on right now, politically that could impact our businesses. Please note the falling updates, and there's this possible sudden ban in New York City on. Hair on leather and been rabbit skin and sheer Ling, and this would impact things like makeup brushes or paint, rollers and all the fashion items. There's also similar propose legislation in New York state and. As current points out. You're in this thing. Whatever your moral stance is on using animals as products to suddenly shut down. What businesses run on without some sort of transition period is not a good idea is nurses are built on predictability? And and you can't just will you can but not without destruction. You can't just take away the material that a business relies on some businesses rely entirely on these things, hopefully, the city and the state take breath year, and and make sure that there's a good transition period. San Francisco already passed a law banning the sale of for Los Angeles, a going into place in twenty twenty one China looks like it's influx from from what she has written here. They they just don't know what's going on with the trade. Discussions with China right now. So really a lot of manufacturing questions for a lot of people here. Whether you're bringing in finished goods or you're bringing raw materials to work with here in New York City. Yep. Big question marks also Turkey and India there is proposed terrorists. And both the accessories. Council and the American apparel and footwear association long with twenty five other organizations have submitted an appeal for a delay on the tariffs with India because India just had a changing government, and they're not prepared to come to negotiating table there. They're still figuring out. What office they're going to be in? So that's a pretty big concern. There's also proposed terrace on things coming from the EU. So if these things are going to impact you you may want to be on the accessories councils newsletter accessories, council dot ORG is their website and all have all of the website link. Wchs in the show notes for this episode on a slightly more positive note, the New York City fair trade coalition is having their global fast on April twenty six that six PM that's going to be at L IM college on forty fifth street, and why C fair trade coalition dot org is their website. The New York say fair trade coalition. It's all on tier it's aggressive towards organization, and they promote Fairtrade businesses and retailers in New York City, and it's a really good organization to be involved with because you you meet people who are doing things like ethical fashion, or, you know, there are people there who build websites, and they do all this stuff. And I it's good to go and kind of be part of that community because it connects you to a lot of things I think it's only one hundred dollars to be a member for a year, and you get a little profile on the NYC, fair trade coalition dot org website. For you and your business as part of that. So they're global fast is. It's going to open bar live music order VHS, and it's gonna have a little fashion presentation Arden's delay Shen, and they're giving out some awards. So it's gonna be a fun little community event. Again, April twenty sixth at six PM and the website. For more information is NYC fair trade coalition dot org in once again, I will be in Copenhagen on Maeve fifteenth and sixteenth, and then I will be in Paris and Florence. So if you want to connect with American fashion podcast about doing their view or maybe showing the factory or something info at American fashion, podcast dot com is our Email address. This episode has been a little bit of departure from our usual, interviews and. If you like it, let us know if you don't like it. Let us know again, info at American fashion podcast dot com. Our Email worlds on Twitter at AFP OD and on Instagram at American fashion show. Also, if you're listening to an episode and loving it take a screen shot posted on Instagram tag us. We like to know, and we like to have more people aware that we exist. Thanks. To get on the guest list for our live events. Go to American fashion podcast dot com and look for the live shows link. Eight P O D pod is our Twitter handle. And I personally am fashion tech guru on just about everything on Instagram. We are at in American fashion show, if you'd like to be a guest on the show, there's a be a guest form on the American fashion podcast dot com. Website for comments our voicemail line is six four six nine seven nine eight seven zero nine or Email info at American fashion podcast dot com. American fashion podcast is produced by mouth media network, which holds the copyright to this and other episodes of the series allred's reserved subsist friends, keep making things beautiful. I'm Charles Beckwith. And we'll talk to you again next week.

New York City Copenhagen China FDA Charles Beckwith Paris Pratt Brooklyn Florence Twitter Instagram New York Pratt institute London Denmark Karen guy Merson Italy EU San Francisco
From Euphoria Makeup to Applying Pubic Hair, Donni Davy Pulls Back the Curtain on Set Life For a Makeup Artist

Gloss Angeles?

56:34 min | Last month

From Euphoria Makeup to Applying Pubic Hair, Donni Davy Pulls Back the Curtain on Set Life For a Makeup Artist

"I look bad. That's really firm. Something a little softer than that rest. Easy with the sleep number three sixty smart bet you can both adjust your comfort with sleep number setting. It really helped me fall asleep faster. Yes by gently warming your feet. Okay but can it help keep us asleep. It senses your movements and automatically adjust to keep you ever comfortable sleepnumber proven quality. Sleep is life changing. Sleep don't miss our president's day weekend special save fifty percent on the sleep number three sixty limited smart bet plus special financing and free premium delivery when you add a base ends monday special financing subject to credit approval minimum payments required. See store for details. Y'all know by now. A silk pillowcase is in assessing from keeping your hair from frizz to being gentler on your skin it's an effortless accessory to incorporate into your routine if you wake up with those harsh creases on your face. Good for you. You're probably getting much needed deep sleep but a silk pillow case may also be a good option. We've talked about night's sleep on the podcast in the past because they made these awesome silk face coverings that help keep mask. Me from running rampant. All over your face night has now launched the skin-care pillowcase which offers two options. Depending on your skin type or skin fluctuations on one side it's made of one hundred percent mulberry. Silk and the other is one hundred percent rayon from bamboo. Silk hypoallergenic and non absorbent which is great for normal or dry skin. The sarah if you will rayon from bambu is moisture wyking and great for an acne. Prone skin aka the kirby. I have the gun metal shade. Which is beautiful. But let me tell you. Even my little diva doggy. Quinn loves sleeping on it. Hashtag rough life. It comes in three colors in two sizes both small queen and king and for a limited time. Glam jelena's can get twenty percent off the pillow case using code gloss just visit discover night dot com and get ready for some beauty. Rest one thing. I think the general public doesn't know that the department had on a film or tv show is responsible for the entire body. So whenever you're seeing naked bodies. I have laid pubic hair on people twice. I'm kirby and i'm sarah well to los angeles. Every week. we break down the most important beauty news launches interview your favorite beauty experts influencers and celebrity guests and review our favorite beauty products of the moment as your beauty editor. Bff's from the beautiful and great city of los angeles. Glam julia knows we. Will you stay awhile manno man. This is a fun episode. I am ready for everybody to hear it. And so excited. I feel like kirby we have been manifesting this guest ever since we started the podcast back in two thousand nineteen. Yes yes so. In case you're you didn't read the title. That's the thing about podcasting. It's like they know they think people do that like they're like leone. Nellie with the guest is. I'm not gonna read the show. Now i'm just gonna plus press play. Do we have any diehard fans like. I mean i don't know. Yeah well. I guess that's the thing about podcast. Everything spoiler d- it's like spoiled immediately. That's why i came here. Yes so donny. Davie is our guest today. Who is incredible. Sarah's going to go into her amazing career and resume but you guys know her because she is the woman behind the euphoria makeup craze. So if you have seen any type of euphoria. Makeup inspired by the show. It's because of her work and what she did on. That show was just so cool. So different. She was given the groundbreaking. Yes the freedom to do. It is also like very very rare that especially in film or tv that people get to play with makeup in a way that feels really modern. Enroll avante Because oftentimes people think it detracts from what's actually going on and in this case i think it just totally made everybody more excited to watch the show absolutely and it's cheese just so sweet and so humble. We were obviously seeing her praises for such big fans but she liked totally just brushed it off. it was just. This is her job and she truly truly loves what she does. So donny is a true glam toledo born and raised in venice california by two artists. So she's i think always had that true artistry in her blood she went to pratt institute in brooklyn studied photography. And you know if she thought she would she tells kirby that she thought she was going to pursue that but instead she decided she wanted to do. She wanted to be a makeup artist in the film industry. Not like red carpet celebrity makeup. She wanted to work on movies which we thought was really interesting. And she's going to go into that so you know. Obviously we all know her. Because kirby said that euphoria. She went on to win an emmy for it but she has had her resume is stacked did the make. Up for moonlight if beale street could talk. She did this film an eight. Two thousand four film called under the silver lake. Which is the reason why she got the call to to euphoria so we are so excited to have her on the podcasts and the timing is perfect because she just collaborated with faceless to create a limited edition collection of little face details that are little. Clouds were made famous by the msci on hunter. Schafer's character on you for ya jewels. So the collection is called head in the clouds. And they're so fun so easy use her. Were wearing them during our interview with her. Ten percent of the prophets will be donated to trans lifeline. And we will include all the links of for where you can purchase them for me personally. I love learning more about the film and tv industry. And how kind of works. So if that's something that you've never really thought about you have always been curious how that works especially in makeup department on a tv show. She's going to go into that and to me. It's just the most fascinating thing. I i love it. I i feel like a tourist. I have lived in la for twelve years. But anytime i hear anything like very insider hollywood he. I just get so so excited. It just makes me giddy. I mean that's the reason that our podcast exists. Is it not so that we can discuss that stuff. Because i mean i had no idea. I knew that her job was hard as the head of the makeup department for a show. But i did not know everything that it entailed and it just blew my mind like you said it was just so exciting to hear all of the details of what her job is also like makes me just have so much respect for what she does totally all right everyone. We hope that. You love this episode with donnie. We wanted to give a quick heads up a trigger warning. There is a discussion about sexual assault. And it's not even a discussion. It's just a brief mention of sexual assaults. In relation to one of the characters and euphoria one of the looks dot She wears was inspired by a specific piece Of film that includes sexual assault if that is triggering to you. What we're going to do is put the exact time code in our show notes so that you know once you approach that time that you probably should turn off the podcast. We just wanted to give everybody a heads up on that but this is a very fun. Informative episode. I think it's probably we say. Why do we say this every episode. This is going to be one of your favorites okay. They can't all be favorites. They can't all be favorites sarah. We're speaking to specific people. You know if if none of our episodes have been your favorite. Maybe this one will be. It's one of mine the end of every episode. We're just gonna go. This is going to be one of your favorites and just see how many people on the opening poll up a little bit of poll up on. Instagram is one of your favorites. Yes or no. I think it's a good thing we're just excited about every episode every guest that we have and we honestly think that you guys will be excited about it too. I don't think it's bad thing okay. It's fine to have multiple favorites for our enjoy. Y'all y'all debut here. Are you kidding me. We've talked about this woman. At length i feel like we should be writing a dissertation about the impact of her makeup. Because we love her. So much thank you so much. I'm so happy to be here. This is not a question that we have on the list. Sorry sarah but i have to know how old are you. You're in your twenties right. no. I'm thirty to shut the front door okay. This is incredible front door. Ferdie to-ing right now. Okay so sarah thirty four. So i feel a lot better about my life. Thirties are the best right. Yes yes or my god. I mean we're going to get into this but we can talk about the trials and tribulations of being in your twenties and really thinking like you were a failure in your twenties for not accomplishing everything that you thought you were going to accomplish right before we get into all of that. We're going to kick things off with the segment that we call. What's your face Okay so i have a lot of things on my face right now but let's start with these fun little things that are also on y'all's faces so i collaborated with this awesome artists. Uk artists phyllis cohen and she is the woman behind faceless. So face lace makes these stick on makeup so these basti cows they come in all different finishes. The ones i'm wearing right now are your doesn't holographic finish and i found out about phaselis during season. One of euphoria was like totally obsessed with this concept of stick on makeup Going past gems and glitter and sort of little things. I would find at like joanne's fabric and like glue on the face like maddie's gold chain these items from faceless are like made to fit universally around your eyes shapes so i got some and putting them on jools. The character of jewels on euphoria and from like a makeup artist on set point of view. It's amazing to have something that you can up the drama of a look instantaneously so these little clouds that i'm wearing were all wearing right now. Are this recent collaboration that i did with safely. Some me in phyllis got together remotely are virtually and we designed these little clouds and for me. This was like a fun. Thing to offer the euphoria makeup community. You know it's been a long time. Since season one aired and season two keeps getting close. So i wanted to do something cool and easy and fun you know that. Looks good with a covid mass to just offer the make fans of euphoria. Yeah it looks amazing and it was so easy to apply. Like i had so much fun and i love that. They're reusable. exactly. The adhesive on the back will wear after like a couple of times. So what you wanna do. Make them super usable. Lay them down on clean skin. That doesn't have a ton of foundation on. Because when you lay them down on top of like a lot of powder or fundation that'll sort of get a little like gunky on the he said the best ways to just put them on on clean skin and then you can read them a couple of times. That's very in line with your makeup aesthetic as well. It's not a ton of foundation all over the face like you still see the natural skin showing through like even on you forget. I wanna talk about making makeup for tv verses like what. We're seeing a lot online right now because when you four you make up. Both the thing you created became a thing people were like. Oh i don't have to paint my entire face this one shade and then do all this other stuff to my face. I can actually have poor showing you know like i'm not going to edit my photos to filth anymore. Yeah i'm so happy you brought up not a lot of people. Do that's my aesthetic. It's like clean skin that were there can be a little bit of like imperfections so to speak showing through which is not to say that this is something. I realized early on that i was like okay. This is important for me to for me to like. Just check myself on if we're talking about makeup as self expression it's not fair for me to also say that like covering your face up with a ton of opaque foundation does not equal self expression. That was just something. I had to check myself on earlier on like last year. Okay yeah it's all self expression but yes. I love the idea of normalizing skin texture. I loved the idea of working for director. Sam levinson who wants to go really hard with cool fund. Makeup looks but once the skin to look real. Because it's like exactly that you don't need the occasion you don't need to be on stage and you don't need to half perfect skin to wear like bright green eye shadow or at least that's what i believe. And that's the belief system that i want to push forward. Yeah okay before. We jump into our next question. Can you explain this beautiful icy blue will. That's what it looks like on zoom. I that you're wearing and what is it. What are you wearing okay. So i'm wearing brand called black moon. This is really cute. It's got a little moon on it in little stars it's creamy almost like a lip gloss but it like sets in and it's got like teeny little little bitty glitters in super shimmery super reflective. I just put it on. My naked is just spread it everywhere over my eyelids the i love blue rely shot in anything reflective in super easy to when you put it on it you can just kind of blend it out with your finger. Is that what you you're saying my nails kind of long right now except for this guy. So it's hunt. Hearts need to blend with my fingers. Although i'd love blended with I'm like all about the casual like use your fingers. Use your hands but i was using. I shadow brush like a real makeup artist today. Just any small brushes to sort of blend it everywhere in sort of pull it out on the outer quarters of is a little bit donny. Have you tried about-face yet from halsey. I haven't tried it yet. The whole line was sent to me. Thank you housi- and your team and i'm dying to just get into it and try to have you guys. Yes love it. All the products are bomb. I think also donnie. They're the perfect size lips for me. Personally they can be too large. And it's like. I'm never going to get through all of it and i think that this is just the perfect size to put in your bag. Put in your purse your pocket. I think especially for makeup artists there so compact. It would be really easy to pack in a kit and i love the lip. Liners lip liners. I think are just stand out. Because i i really like a nude lip. Most of the time. Long wear liners as well are they. More creamy liquid lip is like a long right. Yeah the liquid. It's matt and it's long where the lip liners or more creamy. And i think actually. That's why love the lip liners because all does wear them straight up his lipstick because they just feel so good and they're easily blended do that all the time. I just wear look liner like all over and just chopstick or something on top. When you set out to become a makeup artist you specifically wanted to work in film and tv and not red carpet and celebrity. Which i think a lot of people may think we aren't those synonymous with each other. Like should they all be in the same category and they're very different. So why did you want to focus on that. Category versus the celebrity looks in the red carpet looks. I didn't know a lot about the film industry at all. I like really went of lively intuit based on like an instinct elim and the advice of a dear friends mother suggesting that i should pursue makeup performing tv one. I started kind of looking into that. More i realized the whole storytelling aspect of it was so interesting. I was a photo major. I went to art school. Pratt institute in brooklyn and i studied photography so i loved like you know taking photos of people in their worlds and sort of observing almost like documentary americana vibes like style and so the whole storytelling and like unspoken stories shown through imagery aka photography rate was just a natural interest of mine so a makeup job. I could use my hands and be creative paint sales of a visual art background to use color and paint but also be really focused on the character's story and their back stories like reading in between the lines scripts and sort of figuring out. Why inputting rely shadow on them for this particular moment. That was really intriguing to me. It sounded challenging. It sounded fun and it sounded more. D cle- intellectually challenging and the work that red carpet celebrity makeup artists do is in credible. I learned so much like technique wise from them. Just shout out to them. I mean there are different mediums right. Sarah like that's when you're figuring out how you're going to do. Somebody's face for the red carpet. It's completely different than the vibe that you're trying to get when somebody's about to. Let's say like have an argument in a scene or is trying to express their sexuality for the first time in a show. You know what i mean. It's completely different. So i love the emotion behind it so many interesting conversations with like directors and actors. I've worked with just about like stuff that the audience would never know like why the same lipstick shade year that her mom was wearing their. It's like oh because this character is wearing makeup for the first time in used her mom's lipstick but no one would know that unless they explain it. I'm actually talking about this film. I did called if beale street could talk directed very gains. That was just something that came to mind about like these conversations. I have with past members about like just these backstories. They're like no one will know about but it just adds a little bit more meaning into the scene and it helps the actor get more into their character which is literally the service. I'm providing that was such a beautiful movie. I was just saying that we'd be destroyed me when you were starting out. You were applying for jobs on craigslist. Can you share like maybe one of the most memorable gigs. You found through craigslist. Like could be good. Could be bad. Good bad and ugly. So i did everything from like office headshots for like employees at random corporate company to zombie makeup for like young actors or making short film. And they're like apartment complex in burbank so like typical l. a. young actors seen so. I had never done zombie makeup. Before and i was like but you know i need to learn these things i need to learn. I really wanted to be a department head. I want to run makeup departments in film and tv. And i had learned up until this point. My skills need to be very wide. I need to know how to do everything not that i am. The one who is doing everything on set. But i need to know. Can i do this doing to outsource it. I'm just like what the work entails how it holds up any challenges associated with like zombie makeup for example so this was like my training ground like working on student films unlike just him actors thumbs so i did a test. Run on my boyfriend at the time is not my husband. I just figured out use the silicon stuff. You mix the two mediums together. I need form this silicon. I use it for sculpting wounds and stuff actually use it on every single project ever but you can also do. Zombie faces out of it. And i just totally winged it and had no idea what i was doing but i took a stab at it and it was all right. Wasn't the best makeup ever and that was one of those jobs were like your payment is in like they give you twenty bucks for gas and they give you food which was hamburger helper in a giant bowl that everybody shared. Yeah copy and credit. I'm very familiar with the copy and credit. Definitely not getting paid for this gig. But i'll get a free meal and something to show for it at the time. It was working at a wine bar in la. So i was like you know just always trying to move my schedule around to accommodate these little like three gigs. It's funny because whenever. I have a challenge doing something on set. Unlike i've done this before i'd i know that this is going to be challenging. I've learned from this mistake before. I learned on these like craigslist jobs. There were so many of them. I applied every single craigslist job. That was seeking a makeup artist. So i love that. You talked about the makeup department heads job and i think that if you listen to los angeles you know we're based in l. a. We like to focus on the entertainment world celebrity. All those things. But i feel like that's a job that's just not talked about a lot. Can you explain what the job looks like what it entails and what something that most people probably don't realize about that title and job. It's a challenging job. Because you're actively using i believe equal parts of like your left brain and you're right brain. I forget which side is which but it's like the creative side and then the like super like analytical like management adleman accounting budgeting. So you're really using those both the same time which is really exhausting. It's like you're just a hamster on two wheels at once. Pair of arms legs unwieldy wheel and the other on the other. It's like everything from like counting every single sponge every single setting spray or anything that's purchased for the department goes through me every single. Look on every background. Actor goes through me so i am responsible. The like positive functioning of my team and setting up my team in a way where. I'm setting them up for success so that they can then support me because everything at the end of the day any issue that arises. Any mistakes that are made comes back to me. Because i'm the leader of my team so this balance that's kind of challenging is like staying in that like empathetic Creative artistic kind of fun had space. Where i'm really thinking about. An makeup looks all that fun stuff. But then i'm simultaneously troubleshooting and preparing for chaos. Any just challenges come up. There are a lot of challenges that eucheuma schedule change is all of a sudden. We're doing a scene we weren't prepared for. We don't have makeup tests going on actors of figuring stuff out on the fly certain products performing like we want you know so there's just a lot that can go wrong does go wrong and a lot of preparation troubleshooting and then for me. The hardest thing that. I'm sort of learning how to do right now. I tend to be a people pleaser which is great because my job is to collaborate with the director the cast even the producers. I need to satisfy a lot of people including my own. Artistic sensibility right. But i'm not at the top of that list. I am more at the bottom. So there's a lot of people to satisfy but then there's my team in managing my team and striking that balance between being creative energy and actually having like leadership boss energy so that to me is always the hardest to sort of like have difficult conversations. And really what i need from my team and really know how to ask for the us because i sort of tend to just be a little bit less direct out stuff as people pleasers. So that's working on right now. I had no idea that that's entailed in a maker department heads job and anybody listening. There's so many people that don't understand it. And i think the reason why we ask that question. Obviously sarah was curious but also like i think sometimes especially when it comes to career choices. People liked to put you in a box. So they like to say. Are you creative. Okay then you need to have a creative job. You need to focus on that element of your personality okay. You don't really have like a strong creative. I have ideas great. But you're you're better in an analytical sense. You're a better manager you're better businesswoman. They loved to especially for women. Put us in these boxes. What i love about your explanation that you're explaining. You are scratching that issue of creativity. But you're also being a boss bitch and you're telling people okay. guess what. This was not the scene that we were planning on doing right now. So get rid of the gold chains. Eyeballs were moving to something. I mean you can mold things that you're good at or even things that maybe you're not that strong at but you can bring them together and become better at them and ask career like that. So that's the coolest part to me. Yeah it's great to talk about like you said. It is a little bit unknown when i described the department head position to people. The general response is like. Oh my god thought you just a makeup artist and it's like yeah. There is a lot that goes into it. Honestly it stressful. It's challenging. i'm in this position now. Where i'm getting a little bit of a spotlight on me and the four yet. Makeup hashtag trend and everything. But like i don't consider myself an expert. I truly don't like i m learning i've been in this industry for like eight years or so in the union which is like to work in film and tv. You're part of a union have to become eligible to join been in for around six years. And there's so much to learn you think you nail something like after euphoria. I was like okay. I know how to run. Tv show now. And then i went into this insane. Lee hard mini series for amazon called. The underground railroad also directed by the amazing barry jenkins who i am blessed to be able to work with and this is sad project with him. It was so hard. I was like god. I thought i knew what i was doing. That is that imposter syndrome. Like you guys mentioned earlier. And it's like i do know what i'm doing. I do have the confidence to do this. But now it's like. I'm at this place where all the sudden i'm department heading these much bigger shows than i'm used to. And it's like the growing pains of stepping into that role. And letting like more bostitch part of myself come out and like be heard. It's like catching up to where. I am a bit donnie. Can you tell everyone when you're talking about your team. How many makeup artists are you working with. And then how long per se do you get to work on a makeup book on someone. The time challenge is the biggest and most annoying challenge of the every day job of being a makeup artist on set. it depends. We're able if we know there's the director and the cast member let we know okay. This look is a big look. It's a big. It's gonna take ninety minutes if we know that's the case. I can fight for to have the time i can go to. The assistant directors begs the time which is sometimes tricky because there's all these different like financial constraints. It's like well no. We can't bring the actor in early because we have to bring transport in early and then you and then you're supposed to. We can't afford that so it's like you can have sixty minutes and i'm like okay but i know this look it's gonna take ninety minutes so then it's like okay. Let me see if i can help double team my assistance and work on this actor to try and make it fit into sixty minutes and then they only need to bring in me early so it's just like this constantly puzzle of you wanna do this amazing work in. You're expected to do this. Amazing work right but then you're always fighting time so it's just like getting creative with those time constraints do everything and then we'll do finishing touches on set which is like last looks which really isn't supposed to be finishing touches. That's just like seeing. If anything got messed up between them being at base camp and going to set but let you know we're scrambling to put more rhinestones on and like lipstick on onset like the actors of leaves the makeup and hair chairs at a certain time but we don't hold upset so that is the constant anxiety. It's like what time is it. How many minutes oh the. Pa came in and asked us how many minutes s at seven minutes. It's been eleven minutes so that's the kind of chaos that is like very high anxiety. It's time what you're describing is is is exactly what you said with the left brain and the right brain. This job requires both and obviously a lot of it is like management of time like you said and managing your team a lot of it too. Was you touch on how you have to be apathetic and managing a lot of personalities. Probably you don't wanna offend makeup artist on your teams you give them the freedom to be creative but you also have to be like doesn't align with what we're doing. Can you talk a little bit about that. Yeah that's a big part of the dealing with personalities and making everybody feel comfortable and happy and like they're in a safe space to create while also keeping the actors all their various needs having them feel heard and taking care of and that their needs are being met or if they have like skin concerns taking the time to make sure. Everybody feels comfortable. Because the last thing i want. Is somebody feeling uncomfortable. Somebody not getting the full time or treatment that they need and having to compromise on. The work is something. I will fiercely protect. So that's always my biggest concern. I'm like you know what it's all about. What ends up on screen because that is connected to my name and my livelihood so whatever decisions i need to make last minute to make the end result of how the person looks on screen. Be the best. It can be the most appropriate for the story. And so is my goal. The empathy that i mentioned before. It's definitely that was like managing all the interpersonal relationships of my team members and the cast members. I think that helps me read between the lines of the script and like really put myself in the shoes of the characters sink especially on you for yet. I'm a woman. My teenager hood was like not that long ago. I mean really feeling those scripts like reading them and being like i know that feeling like i literally no exactly feeling i have such a good understanding of what this person safe is gonna look like in the scene that heightened sensitivity for me is something i've learned to view as actually a cool skill rather than something that's always. Oh god like a burden so before you book you for you. You worked on a little movie called moonlight. This movie was just absolutely stunning. Large part because of your work if you read any review of the movie. They always talking about the character. Skin the attention to detail and even down to like the grill that the characters were wearing. Can you talk to us about what it was like to work on that movie and like how you developed the look for the characters. Yes oh that movie. I was just a one person. Department was really small are it was like a very small film completely. Different skill that you for uso makeup needed to be invisible one hundred percent invisible but did use a lot of makeup and berry jenkins director. He really wanted like luminous glowing natural skin on all of the actors when you could feel the miami heat and the sweat. But he didn't want the actors like just the sweating in every scene so it was like capturing that glow not knoxville. Glow used a lot of like skin oils and stuff and then there was a lot of aging and of portraying drug addiction in naomie harris who played the main characters mom so that was again just using a lot of makeup but having it look like no makeup that is one kind of challenge Before he is like the opposite it was like exercising completely different skills and then you did under the silver lake. Which had a lot of bold beauty looks betray glitter and rhinestones and color. I get the vibe that you love that type of makeup especially now but as a true and be was that always the case or did it take you a minute to really like lean into that part of makeup. Okay oh i love these questions. Yes that is the case. I have always loved bright bold makeup. I've never worn it on myself. I was linked to shy growing up. I've just. I've always aspired to these. Boulder looks and under the lake. I got to really play with color and rhinestones in glitter for the first time. Because i was kind of like known more for like these gritty ultra realism films. Were like the makeup is part of the story. But like you don't realize it's makeup so under the silver like that job actually landed me you for you so it was my work and my teams were on under the silver lake. That's why i got called in to interview for you for yet. But to get to the point where i was hired under the silverlake. There was a point early on where i was looking at my portfolio and unlike it's literally all just like people with bruises and mike special effects than like natural western cowboy looking steph. Weathered skin and like there wasn't any like fashion sunday cup and this is advice. I give to aspiring makeup artist. If you want something in your portfolio and you don't have it you need to just go and make that happen. Grab a family member or a friend. Do a cool look on them and then put it in your portfolio. No one will ever know you know like it's no one will know that your sister or whatever so. I actually would connect with photographers on craigslist. My best craigslist instagram now. Instagram was just becoming a thing back. Then when i was like twenty three twenty four twenty five so yeah i would just do like free photo shoots and i'm like okay. Can they make it be really cool because this is what. I'm thinking. photographer be like. Yeah whatever. I just want to make up artist and i'll grab a model who's a new model who needs test shooting so i did a bunch of shoots like that and was able to get some color into my portfolio which i think ben made me eligible to come in an interview for silver lake. Let's talk about you for you. Where do we even begin. One of the things that we love most about your work was just how playful and inventive. You were with the characters. Makeup kurban i have been beauty editors for so long and it was so refreshing to watch you for ya. I think we've talked about this. When we have daniel martin on the podcast about just how you were creating. These looks even though they were really whimsical. We're like a high. Schooler would wear that kind of makeup. We've just been inundated with all of these super quote unquote perfect instagram brow. And like a lot of contouring and all that stuff and so when we watched you for you it was like this is what we want to see and we felt so inspired by it and obviously everyone who watches shows inspired by it. You know you started this movement. Why do you think your work resonated with so many people and inspired everyone to be bold with their makeup seeing fun makeup. that's sort of reminiscent of fashion or runway up seeing that kind of makeup on these characters who are portraying like real human beings characters going through ups and downs and really real life situations. I think that is what made the makeup exciting unaccessible. It's like bridging. The gap between the fantasy of like runway or like onstage make-up's like singers where or whatever our models coming down the runway and bridging that everyday life you know there's this tendency in the beauty industry in society to label everything like you're saying earlier about putting people in certain boxes like creative urine intellectual. You have this job. That's not appropriate. That's a daytime nighttime. Look i'm really sick of magazines. This is for daytime. This is for nighttime. This is for if you have a yellow undertone. Mrs for if you have dark skin. I just don't like rules. I don't like limitations. i let you ignore them all. And that's just what's fun for me. And i think people were into it because it's just offering different perspective really one of my favorite digital internet pieces. I think it was on vox. Maybe four or five years ago. It talks about tv hair and donnie. If you haven't seen it i'll send it to you sarah. Do you know what i'm talking about. Don't know if i do there. Is this video. It basically is like why do tv actresses all have the same hair style. And you don't ever notice set but when they break it down you're like holy shit. Why do they have the same hair. Style. it's not how people would normally wear their hair. It's very straight at the top with a little bit of a curl at the bottom and that's it it's like new girl like every sitcom and it's because they don't want to detract from like what's going on in the show they don't want people to say like oh my god. Her hair was crazier. It was out of place focused supposed to be on the storyline right. But i think the reason why so many people have gravitated towards you for you is. That show is sat in a moment in time. It's supposed to be right now when you're watching it. You feel like you know the characters more because of the choices that they make with their makeup or with their hair or with their clothing they identify themselves as individuals in that way. And i think it just adds to the story versus being little cutouts of each other. That's my personal take on. It totally agree with you. I think there is this assumption that the audience is not smart enough or something until able to handle interesting hair makeup. The thing that's cool about sam levenson. The director writer creator of euphoria is that he likes to trust the audience and he's also like if some people think it's weird he's like i don't really care he's like i'm not here to keep everything in the box for everyone. I think the audience will understand. I think they'll get it. Okay if you set the tone early on in the season right and it's like yep that these kids have cool hair makeup you just you just know that watching the show and then you know to expect it so it doesn't freak you out. All of a sudden someone has a pink ponytail or something. So yeah i think they'll makers or make up and hair folks or directors thinking about makeup and hair should trust their audience. A little bit you know. It helps them connect the characters more when they're more real. Y'all know by now a silk. Pillowcase isn't a subsidy from keeping your hair from frizz to being gentler on your skin it's an effortless accessory to incorporate into your routine if you wake up with those harsh creases on your face. Good for you. You're probably getting much needed deep. Sleep but a silk. Pillowcase may also be a good option. We've talked about night's sleep on the podcast in the past because they made these awesome silk face coverings that help keep mask. Me from running rampant. All over your face night has now launched the skin-care pillow case which offers two options depending on your skin type or skin fluctuations on one side. It's made one hundred percent mulberry. Silk and the other is one hundred percent rayon from bamboo. Silk is hypoallergenic and non absorbent which is great for normal or dry skin. The sarah if you will rayon from bamboo is moisture wyking and great for oily an acne prone skin aka the kirby. I have the gun metal shade. Which is beautiful. But let me tell you. Even my little diva doggy. Quinn loves sleeping on it. Hashtag rough life. It comes in three colors in two sizes both small queen and king and for a limited time. Glam jelena's can get twenty percent off the pillowcase. Using code gloss just visit discover night dot com and get ready for some beauty rest. This episode is brought to you by apostrophe. We sing apostrophes praises on glossy angeles because we feel out of all the options for dermatologist prescribes. 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S. t. r. o. p. h. e. dot com apostrophe dot com and use code gloss angeles to get fifteen dollars off your first visit and this is a loaded question and i. We do not expect you to go down the line of every single character but can you tell us how you developed the specific makeup styles for a few of the characters yosso each character. We learn their back stories right like in each of the episodes. And there's a lot there is a lot that said and there's a lot it's unsaid. I'll start simply in the beginning so when i i get on a job offer. Talk to the director. I have the sense of a k which characters he wants to release the kind of more. Snazzy looks on which ones are going to be more just still figuring out their comfort level so from the beginning with mattie for example he was like i want matty's makeup to be like a youtubers drink. You wanted people to pause the show and like look at the makeup and be like. Oh okay that's something we're familiar with. Its black wing. But it's different. It's got a lot of color behind it. It's lined with gems. He wasn't saying those specific things but like he wanted to be recognizable and sort of like existing a bit like in the conventional world already but just like taking it further and making it more exciting and then it's like okay. Well color vibe like need to know more. So then i go to costumes. The costume department is always a higher earlier in the makeup department. 'cause they have to like get all these clothes such incredibly challenging job. It's wild so i'm like okay. Let's see the grass ramadi and it's like getting to know those colors than that informs my color decisions like shadows and stuff and then something really cool i love to do is go to the production design office and start looking at what they have imagery wise for the different characters bedrooms because you can learn a lot about a character. Their color palette their vibe from like their teenage bedroom. As i'm sure you both would agree with so. That's like a super cool like insider info for me to like snoop around in production design and just like see what's going on. Some of are built summer. Just like inspiration boards for bedrooms down the line so that really helps me with my color. Palette between costumes and production design i have my palate Down i'm to be a fly on the wall onset. I just want to spend a day shadowing you which i'm sure you get a lot. Being on site is not something i grew up with. I grew up in la. But i wasn't going to film stetson stuff. I just didn't really care or know about that world. That much behind the scenes aspect is strange being on a studio lot and you see like the morning shows filming right. They are you for is here and you go in big fake high. School built on his set inside another barbies bedroom. Right next to the inside of rue. Her family's house is right there. But then we go and still twenty minutes away to get all the exterior stuff. And the whole production design thing is fascinating and replicating these hunks of these random people whose houses we've filmed in and replicating. Those onstage. excel trippy. So euphoria does film here in la right. Yeah i love being on set. I love it. I just get all giddy and i. I'm like oh there's magic happening here. If i had my way in the world. I would just literally be like an intern and follow all the different departments around. Just learn every single part of making a television show. Because i think it is so fascinating one thing that i think. The general public doesn't know that the make up department had on a film or tv show is responsible for the entire body. So like whenever you're seeing naked bodies we've airbrushed these bodies we've covered tattoos or we've applied fake tattoos nails everything. We are responsible for like the entire body. It is a lot. There's a wop. It just comes up on the to deal with intimate especially when there's a lot of sex scenes in a project not really want our cast members to feel good and confident on. We want them to feel comfortable being nude onscreen. So there's just there's a lot of care that goes into the process. I have laid pubic hair on people twice. But that's what. I'm saying as a makeup artist. I mean you are seeing in doing things with people that the director is not doing that. Santa's not laying pubic hair on somebody. You know what i mean. It's a trust. It's like a confidence that you have in each other it's a vulnerability to be like all right. This is what the character needs. I don't have it so we've got to figure this out. What you are doing is art. Like kirby said people don't appreciate that enough they just don't know. Have you been working on set in the covert world a little bit. I dip into it. So were those two bridge episodes of euphoria one aired in october and one in december or january. That was sort of like brief time on set. And then i did another smaller film back in december made your job even more challenging actually really like wearing a mask. What i'm doing makeup. I think it's good. It's a good thing to have my mouth covered when i'm working so close to someone because out pink people's teeth will work inside their mouths like really close on there is. It makes total sense to wear a little. You like make bars. You're just gonna always do that now at these i am. I think it's just it feels right. It is hard wearing the other p p. e. stuff we have this shield lower onset and then a mouse underneath and it gets all up and then for people who wear glasses. Also you wear this over your glasses masks and then imagine yourself being on a dark set and you're just being into everything. Your mask is fogging. You like run up to climb up into a bedroom onset. it's not always ground level. You climb up ladders and stuff for staircases. You get up to seven. Oh god i forgot shield. You run back down. Get your shield. You're running back. It complicates things for sure. But it's kind of amazing that we've been able to do it. You get to set cova tested so. I'm incredibly grateful to have had a little bit of work during this time. All right donny. We have reached the rapid fire portion of this interview were curious what is the first makeup product you fell in love with first makeup product I don't know who makes this but it was in sixth grade. There was this creamy highlighter. Thing that i got probably at lake afterthoughts rally went into limited to after after. that was my mall routine. There's a lot of products now. Are these periwinkle. Lavender iridescence shimmery highlanders. This was that but in nineteen ninety seven. Totally know what you're talking about. You know what. I'm talking about on my eyelids. It was so cool and there was also this wild nail polish. The still exists. That was her lesson. White with that doer tone. Shimmer of the periwinkle and those two things were really on my radar show or movie you wish you were involved in or a part of the movie goldmine. Today's no that one. No no. I feel so uninformed christian bale jonathan rhys meyers. It's like a glam rock. It's amazing oh and ewan mcgregor and he plays like an iggy pop type character and jonathan. Rhys meyers plays like david bowie type character. It's incredible it's one of my favorite movies. The soundtrack is brilliant and the makeup is very cool. I would have died to get in there and go hard. Oh this sounds right at my alley. I'm definitely watching this. Hey what's the one must have products that as a makeup artist. You always have in your kit. The first thing that comes to mind is this product called nano blurred. It is a anti shine cream. I don't love using powder the directors. I tend to work with also. Don't like powder to the extent or if i pull out like a fluffy brush that looks like it might have powder on it. They have been like. Hey hey i don't want powder so this is a cream that kind of does powders do right. They take down the sheen a little bit and you apply with beauty bunder directors. Don't even know you're using an anti shine. So it's like a powder but not a powder and i use it looking t zones in stocks because i love having glowing skin. I just don't want the t zone to be like greasy looking. Because that can be distracting. And i feel like as a as a viewer. You're like god. I just wanna powder that person so control where it's genie. I like to keep the sheen in the glow. More like on the cheekbones eyebrow bones. Maybe a little on the nose and less so on the forehead between the eyes and stuff who makes it it's called nano blur. It's called nanometer. It's by indeed laboratories. Like i don't even know. Oh yeah okay indeed laboratories yes. Didn't they just come to the states this past year. Sarah i think that sounds familiar. It's just like my secret little weapon not using powder to keep makeup shiny in the right places. I guess. I always have it on me if i go to set and i don't have it. I sent them in back to the trailer to get it. Or i like run back. It's like my security blanket. Okay this is probably going to be super difficult for you to answer. So if you have more than one answer. That's fine too favorite euphoria makeup. Look ever it's cats. Halloween makeup luck with upside down crosses. That was my favorite. Because i felt so naughty doing that. Look i was like an idiot. Website crosses and put it on tv but she was dressed as the character from this film. Miss forty five and in the film which admittedly have still not seen yet. But i want to the person that cat is dressed up as like this person. Who's avenging her. Abusers dresses of the nine goes to a party and kills her sexual abusers. Seeing pat in this none outfit. I just immediately was like were doing. Upside down. crosses repainting them on. But they're gonna look like they're hanging. And then i wanted to do this. Lack lip liner just very wild and shocking makeup looks it would make an impression so that was my favorite one. It's just edgy. Feel bad like. I was being bad in all the right. What's your favorite skin care product or brand. That's really tough. Because i have really struggled with my skin for awhile i wanna make on right now but i had so many acne scars in active zits on lower face. I think they're hormonal. I've gone through so much skin care. I've used kerala. Judy law with some success. Although my acne is just like so persistent. Don't really know what to do. So i can't really fairly answer that question to be honest because i'm really figuring it out and i'm still confused and i need someone to just tell me what to do. There's so many incredible skin care lines. It's ridiculous again. All these skincare stuff sent to me. I'm so excited to use it all. Then i get too excited. I start putting it on like. Oh this is great. This is great and then like the breakouts just continuing. 'cause i don't know how to properly treat my stand at this point. I've tried so much. I think i prefer lines. That are not all all natural. Look sort of lines that sort of meet in the middle of like science and natural. I also know that with my skin. A bit problematic. I do need some scientific ingredients. I have tried all natural lions. They did not help my acne. Sadly but then you hear from people were using oil in. hobart cheered them of their acne. So i just don't know at this point. who is your beauty. News or icon. O okay honestly. It's just literally gen z. I mean here's the thing it's like. Every generation does cool stuff. That's based on all the stuff that came before them and their interpretation of trends and makeup and fashion and gen z is just doing a particularly cool job of that right now taking everything. That's come before them as sort of like putting it through their systems and putting out Interesting fearless makeup looks that are all about just crossing boundaries tearing boundaries down going against the grain and all the while doing it looks. We're doing it in this hind way. I've been spending a lot of time on tiktok. Yeah there's a lot of like trolls on their do a lot of mean comments with there's so much support that happens on tiktok. There's so many interesting experimental makeup. Looks that happen. I just i love the experimentation. Love the support and like the up list so dot is what inspires me. That is literally my muse. Just watching how these kids are doing what they're doing. And then it's been cool to see people get inspired by floria and they're like thanking me for inspiring mob and i'm like i was inspired by you guys and now i'm inspired by you guys being inspired by me so my do for season two. It's just like this circle of inspiration of just an infinite circle it all kinda comes from them. What they're doing. This is the last question. Mulder we asked to every guest on gloss angeles. So you live in la but guess what you've become a major movie star. So who is your dream co star in this movie. Oh my god can i change. The question can be someone who i would love to do makeup on. Yes david bowie. Oh my god yeah. Of course you guys would be best friends for sure. I just think his career what it has meant to his fans and what it has done for people. I would love to express dot in a colorful insane. Glittery beautiful unicorn. Ask makeup. Look on him. Thank you so much for spending some time with us. Today you're incredible. We adore you. You're welcome back literally anytime you have the time. Because i feel like we could just pick your brain for hours on end. Tell everybody where they can find you online and maybe do you know any details about euphoria season to like. Is that going into production anytime soon. I will share. What i now you for us to is slated to begin filming in april. So i'm really looking forward to being back on set and finally getting back to it. Of course that's always subject change. But i think we're gonna be starting april and you can find me on donny. Davey that's my handle on tiktok an instagram and then my website that we were selling these face decals on is danni. Davey dot com. So if you want to be in the know about when we will bring those back because they are sold out or just about any future collapse partnerships with face loose or anyone else you can sign up for email. Updates dining dot com. Thank you donnie. Thank you so much. Thanks so much for having me. This is so fun. You know what i really miss the spa delicious body scrub a soothing massage. And don't even get me started on facials. Luckily i've been able to bring this box variance home. Thanks to milk and honey's luxurious bath body and skin care products for those who don't know milk and honey is a renowned spa in texas and fun fact. They're opening their first. La location in brentwood in march. What i love about milk and honey spot inspired goodies are that they're made with organic ingredients in small batches in austin texas home. Great kirby johnson. If i had to pick. I'd recommend the gel cleanser looks face oil and hydrating rose missed. If you are also missing the spa like me and give us a little self care at home be sure to stock up on some of milk and honey products at milk and honey dot com. If you use our code gloss fifteen you'll get fifteen percent off your next order that's gloss fifteen at milk and honey dot com.

sarah kirby Glam jelena silver lake pratt institute donny Glam julia manno donnie los angeles Ferdie phyllis cohen Sam levinson brooklyn Instagram adleman Sarah la
#9  Dirty Laundry with Georgi Annenberg

Really Adam?

47:39 min | 1 year ago

#9 Dirty Laundry with Georgi Annenberg

"And welcome to the Radio Adam. podcast join me as we take a deep dive into the passion skills and Interests Jarvis in life and everything that we do. I'm your host Adam. Lipschitz Hey everyone and welcome to the first episode of season two. It's been a good couple months since of recorded an episode And it just happens to be that. This is exactly a year since I started the show Today I'm not alone. I'm joined by my future. Wife my fiance on say Georgina. Annenberg say hi obviously. There's a lot talk about. I'm sure we'll do a few episodes in the future Today we're going to be specifically covering old things wrong with fashion and specifically micro-plastics topic that Joji covered Dune Master's degree which you will expand on shortly But let's maybe start with a little bit of background like how did did you get to New York. What did you study? What was your journey so far to where you are today? Well I moved to New York in the beginning of twenty fourteen and I went to the Fashion Institute of Technology and I was in their fashion business. Management Program and specialized in product development and product development is really cool because you're kind of the middleman between the manufacturing side and the design side. So it really gives you the window to kind of see the entire assemblage judge of a garment from start to finish and all the little pieces in between the transportation and yes all the details that go into who making a comment and you know studying in that field and working as a development and production intern At Marc Jacobs and Calvin Klein really opened my eyes to the general wastefulness of the industry. And I just knew that this wasn't sitting right with me and I wanted to really dive deeper into the environmental protection side of the fashion industry so of August twenty eighteen. I enrolled in the sustainable environmental systems program at Pratt Institute's and it really had nothing to do with fashion. It kind of took more of like urban sustainability stance and there are a lot of architects environmental science Lyon students and then there were a couple of people like me coming for more creative backgrounds like fine arts fashion to start a school that has not a fashion to take a leap into a different area. Entirely I mean practice have a fashion design program the grabbing they are an off school so like the is at creative side to them. But I was worried going in that I would find the material very dry eh. or it wouldn't relate enough to my interests but I realized that the fashion industry is so big and you can really find so many ways that it can relate so for example for learning about renewable energy that can be translated into an factories. And how close get transported If you're talking about waste management's you're learning about you're thinking about about the end of life of a garment recyclability its potential biodegradability or if even thinking about environmental law. Then you're thinking about how maybe how dying comments is affecting communities and what is is the where's the justice around that so I always found ways to link it up and I was luckily lucky enough to take some sustainable production action classes actually outside of my program with industrial design students. I took a life cycle analysis class which was also very helpful so at the end of the day like just worked todd ready on. I'm so happy. It wasn't from through Fashion Lens because it just it allowed needs to be more open to different perspectives and industries. I would never know about if it was like a sustainable fashion degree so yes I finished that last December. So that's kind of thank you. So what is what is the official title. What degree again looking away with? It's a master of science degree. You hear that. She's more qualified than all of us. I'm curious as to you know you mentioned that. Oh you had to think about these subjects and things of to learn from a prospect from the perspective of Fashion because that was your background initially is that something that continues to be had to convert in your own head to like take what you learn because it wasn't being taught in a fashion sense as far as understood it's like someone teacher and then you have to think a cake. This is how can apply it to the industry that I sort of you know started with and potentially walk into is at the goal. Now Yeah I mean there. There was. I didn't necessarily go in being like all of my projects going to be fashioned related. It kind of just happened like that. Not just because it just showed that I'm interested in that area So it's just organically unfolded and it felt really good in it ready. Yeah at toward me a lot but at the end of at the same time as I said like you know I learned about a lot of architecture. Urban planning theory very e SAR it at the end of the day. It was very well rounded overall so knowing what you know now you know through your experience at fit which was obviously very fashion forward in three internships and now sort of taking the leap into a more desolate general degree that covers multitude of areas as they pertain to sustainability? Do you find that your interests has changed. Your natural desires of what you WANNA pursue have changed. Is that something that you've learned hypothetic as you said like architects oil supply chain management. Like as something else that sort of picked true interest to to now focus on. Yeah well I got really interested in water. And how our production action practice practices can affect water in various ways Water is scarily abundance like to abundant in some places like New York or drying out in Cape talent but we all need it to live and a lot of our daily practices and the brands that we buy from are killing our voters through drilling fracking working and in just creating products that have chemical wastewater especially the fashion industry and clean. Water is is like a hot commodity. We have the Hudson River like right by us. And it is so polluted Ed's Ed's It's disgusting but we live right by it so I got interested in in that and I interested in how different industries St Affect. What's up but fashion was definitely like a big focus for me there and the dying industry and also when you producing producing close? You have to especially with Denham for example wash it multiple times to get the right wear and tear look and every time that results in more chemicals chemicals being polluted in the water and and also I mean building like that also building big Establishments you know this also a lot of pollution that ends up allegations at the same time speaking about pollution. I'm the and it's pertains to the Hudson River valley like around the world Did that knowing what you know about toward the scarcity of it and the quantity of it and knowing what you know about fashion did those elements combined drive you to focus. At least you're damn efforts and we'll get to the shortly but in terms of you want to analyze the interaction between the two. Yeah and that's what drew me to do. My a thesis on the microphone pollution issue because ready is at the intersection between fashion and the environment and how fashion can affect it at you know. We're often thinking about fashion affecting environment on the production level but not necessarily early on in the consumer use phase. So I wanted to dive into a topic that people didn't know As much about and sort of it's almost like a little secret that you know the fact industry knows about but the consumer doesn't and they're the ones who you are sort of like blindly doing polluting micro plastics and unaware unaware of it so. I wanted to open people's eyes to how clothing and our daddy maintenance is affecting the environment. So let's the use this episode has a chance to unpack that. It's not maybe not necessarily like secret. But the stuff that people generally know about so Nissan micro-plastics micro Fibers what is it exactly. Can you explain briefly. So I'll close are made up of Yawn. And when we wash clothes whether they are made from natural fibers or synthetic fibres tiny little flecks of of these fibers will Get released during washing in the washing machine now. The reason why micro-plastics are you know was my focus was because it is a lot more ubiquitous more people are wearing synthetic clothing that includes polyester nylon acrylic. You can check your care labels. I'm sure you have plenty of the plastic clothing in covered. And that's also what I wanted to add is that you don't always necessarily equate plastic nick and your clothes. You see plastic bags. You See. Just plastic on an everyday basis basis. But you don't necessarily thing t shirts you wearing is made from plastic. It doesn't feel like what we know plastic to be. Yes I mean we can see Plastic bottles plastic bag Parisian Russia's wine it's visible and to. It's it's what we appreciate plastic to look like in feel like But the plastics. You're referring to not that intuitive. It doesn't some maybe. Could you give us some examples of like you mentioned to synthetic material but like what are some. Some of the examples of people can go out full that is essentially plastics or plastic derive including your. Yes says I said. It's it's polyester acrylic a nylon those your plastic clothing and the reason reason why we don't associated with plastic is because they mimic natural fibers so acrylic wall mimic a wool and a polyester often mimics cotton Also SPANDEX is a big one in gym where you know plastic fiber and that is field derived like all plastics. So it's it's you know it's derived from oil and through various scientific processes ends up being the sort of Hoti nodal as they call it and not get sort of extruded into a fiber and yon and in the textile and including a lot of prices to teach extremely simplified version. Of course I'm not explaining everything. But that's just sort of for the very basic part of it so that well all the fact that it's fossil fuel derived is super bad for the environment because such just putting more carbon dioxide and atmosphere and needing to global a woman as a starting point and then when we wear the clothes and washed the clothes these small little plastic fibers will come off the clothing and go into environments. I am but particularly end up in the water bodies allegations all rivers lakes and and plastic itself is a lot more harmful in the environment in a natural fibre. Like cotton And that's because uh plastic is man made and made from chemicals at all costs an agenda and also extremely adherence to two other free-floating pollutants in the environment like mercury so when they come into contact with aquatic life humans or terrestrial life. They're a lot more toxic because they have all of these harmful chemicals Kohl's that can cause kidney failure cancer specifically yeah mutations It also blocks up the guts and digestive tract of aquatic life. It leads to slow a predation and low birth rates in general. And you know it's kind of slowly. Killing natural ecosystems so another another big factor is that they move up the food chain and so if you are ingesting fish seafood you're most likely ingesting micro fibers having said that though it's also not drinking water. It's it's also in it's been found in honey been found insults. So it's extremely hard to avoid so that's why it's very problematic. We don't really know the extent to which it's affecting humans that isn't enough studies to really see because it's unethical to make a human eat plastic so we can really see out affecting us but there have been studies on how it affecting animals and you know you can kind of assume that if it's slowly killing certain species it's maybe slowly killing us. Yeah I mean you can make some predictions based on what you can observe so far. But I'm you know it could very much be need these cases Similar to like smoking back in the fifties sixties like no one knew the long-term effect of the thing. Because then you're you're noise you KINDA gotta have to wait until it happens. Had To wait like twenty thirty years to see the smokers in the latest in their life and then conclude that. Oh wait this thing that you did twenty years ago and have been doing for twenty years later this so I think you know maybe a similar case lives with my complex. Even if they do. These studies know there might not find anything alarming now but who knows that if you followed this if nothing's changing in front of the Consumption Habits that in twenty years time they realized there's a mysterious mysterious disease associated with Mica Plastics. And by then it's almost like I won't. I don't want to sound cynical and say it's too late but it could have been preventable. If you made made some assumptions no Something that a obviously not having spoken to you. I didn't think others realize much. When you say micro-plastics micro-plastics how micros like smaller sustain if it's managed talk into all these organisms so Micra are plastics are defined as anything that smaller than five millimeters But that means they can be extremely amy tiny and most of them are basically invisible to the naked eye to reconsider. Sometimes we even the US most of the time we can't even see them And that's why they so easily you know can slip through washing machines and as well as into the water throwaway would a treatment plans because most of them are so tiny and really hard to capture and the technology is just not there yet to capture these fibers one hundred percent some waste will achieve. Implants can capture the bigger fibers. But at the end of the day. You know even if they do capture it. It will end up in the sewage sludge. which is kind of like the sludgy lift over part of some some of the solid waste stats court at wastewater treatment plants and so that sludge is often applied to you land as fertilizer or goes to landfill so either way these fibers are re entering the environments and I also just wanted to add? I didn't say early area was that we're talking about like a few fibers per wash like we're talking about hundreds and thousands of fibers per wash so one one one fleece sweater can this is a mean. Fleece is one of the biggest polluting Garments textiles I should say sorry can release about one thousand seven hundred fibers per wash nets. Just one piece. Imagine how many pieces you watch in cycles maybe Using what you've just said. Can you give us a bit of context on the level level of impact because like I update devil's advocate forsaken. I'm here in the woods micro-plastics I'm hearing that they Nick I mean not visible to to the naked eye that makes me think I understand the problem that you're referring to and they picked him. I'd have water quantity in marine life. But it sounds literally like a micro problem when I compare it to somebody that I know I can see like bottles of plastic in the oceans and plastic bags and all kinds of that. So what does it mean in terms of scale neck. What are we talking about it talking about yes? One one major city in Vancouver can There was a steady. I don't have the reference off the top of my head it's in my paper It talks about how one wastewater treatment plant in Vancouver releases like trillions of fibers per year record. So that's just one and and waist which you can plant in one city so these micro-plastics that in the trillions eventually amount to a massive scale all Microsoft plastics in the ocean. There is solid plastic and interestingly enough like solid did plastic in the ocean that it could literally border like the whole world. Almost like that's how much there is right now. Also just think about how many micro-plastics actually are so I just want to fast forward a bit because I'm so we can spend hours hours talking about Michael Tactics and why they're bad and would live an would love to but I think what People might be interested in and myself included as a senator problem. We understand how it into his environment in different forms and potential but probable implications of that. What is pretty so this is what you pay for Ferguson? But like what do we do. How do how how do you give somebody that? You can't see unlike a plastic bottle in that case yes sir. That's was what my paper mostly focused on because you know the so many articles about the issue. No one's really talking about what you can do and windy. Aw articles about what you can do. It's really sort of put on the consumer to sort. Oh to figure it out like oh like stop buying synthetic clothing and get this filter and y'all like that's great but you have to be in a very privileged position to be able to do that. Let's I mean most synthetic clothes are the ones that most people can afford. Natural fibers tend to be a lot more expensive. We connoisseur -sarily all have filters and another thing to lessen fiber shade is to hand. Wash your clothes but not everybody has the luxury of time you know. So I didn't want my paper to put that pressure on the General Cosima so I wouldn't look at mitigating microphone pollution on more governmental level and so I started looking king at how laundry mats in New York could potentially be regulated to have Filtration and at their establishments are the filters that exist that can catch micro fibers smallest. Yes most of the filters are actually actually for consumer and elect small but one company. I know of Cour- planet has made an industrial full to add. Is it's kind of still in development I'm not sure one hundred percent ready for market And they have designed one for laundry mats so uh it has about a eighty or so percent capture rates so not all the fibers would be caught a wash And your I mean. They're an interesting company because they really don't want the fibers to we enter the environment again. So they kind of plan to have those take back program where you know when when the fibers are connected. They will when all the fives are collected at the filters they will then take back the fibers I birth and sort of collective and over time. Turn it into insulation panels. So it's really creating this zero waste business model which I think is very cool closed loop of salt. Yes Sir you know. That's just one of the ways that we can start lessening micro fibers on a big level. And I was looking at you know incentives of Hollandi Matt's what would motivate laundromats to have them or will it just be like a bill that kind of says that they have to have it. Would they get grants to install them because it's obviously an expensive endeavour laundromat in New York. Thirty five thousand more around that tens of thousands of Muggy Matt's because most people will I mean nowadays Aug- days people are getting washing machines and buildings but I think back in the day like people went and took laundry Minnesota people were allowed to replaces. Yeah so that's why I I mean my. My paper was mostly focused on solutions for New York. Which is why I looked at laundromats the next level level that I looked at was at the ways to treatment plant level and I was a bit of a complicated one because as I mentioned before away towards implant actually can capture almost all of the fibers? If it's if it's like a quite a developed plant it really depends if it's like a primary secondary tertiary treatment plants And so you know those definitely positive but then again they go to the sludge and then can re enter the environment so because of that issue I was looking at the potential of adding plastic eating bacteria or fungi into the way toward a treatment plant process because bacteria actually already ACT WASTEWATER treatment plants. They they bake basically breaking down I'll puke and so even not necessarily able to break down. Plastic maybe maybe you could add plastic. Eating bacteria to the treatment process of course would be expensive and it take time so to figure out if this would really work and what alterations. You'd have to make to the process to actually make a to do what but she wanted to do so. Yeah that was another area that I looked at What about the of the freshman? Brian themselves mm so so so basically like Ni- looking at laundromats and wastewater treatment plants were kind of like temporary short term fixes but really really what we need is like a fool textile involvements. We can't keep producing what we are producing saying. It's just too damaging when I say that I mean plastic clothing but it's hard you know like the fos- fashion atten industry. That's how they make money. That's how they've always you know kept business. Going is produce the cheap most cheap cheap clothing that they can they can achieve that with these synthetic textiles so that the main might have do thankful fetch manufacturers so it specifically those in the fast fashion side of things. Yeah keeps costs down and you can also manufacture these tech's faster than you can natural. Is it a quantity question mission as well is it. Some some synthetic material is just better quality than what we can derive naturally wall. Sometimes you can like men do a natural with listen to create a release superior feel or and athletic wear is a good example. Because you need you need Lycra for that stretch Innis so it really just depends on what you making some. Thanks can often. Maybe a BUD light says sometimes cotton cotton hemp and linen can sometimes feel but thicker on the visit. No definitely but I feel like you know we. It's something that we've been making since the industrial revolution and now we need to change again. You know like we've been making the same fabrics since then. You know making improvements along the way. Okay but it's still derived from the same concert saw. What do we have to cut your? Do we have now now. It's twenty twenty feels like pretty late in the future relative to the industrial age. Do we have alternatives that that have the same properties is synthetic fibres That we can make out of no from a variety of new things that we've discovered of a time well In my paper you know I couldn't talk about everything but I'm mostly focused on the potential of Bacteria and There's a company in San Francisco cold mango materials. And they're really interesting a creating a close loop system where they are breeding bacteria at wastewater treatment plants and feeding them the waste methane that produce the and you know when the bacteria sort of fattened up they are converted into a and then from there turned and into a plastic bottle caps or textiles. And apparently you know it the field the properties. Aw very similar to a polyester so it's almost like a semi synthetic but if something can also buy degrade because it's made from bacteria uh-huh and made a wastewater treatment plant made from bacteria it's actually quite cheap textile to produce. So that's something definitely look at this company called Bolt threads creating spider free silk through Reno Bio like y'all just like bioengineered textiles something to look at So Yeah Yeah I think there's so much innovation out there It's really about getting the investment so that we can scale up and whoa where do you think that investment is coming from. I'm trying to basically decipher obviously a lot of parties involved. You know there's a consumer that Tis the the obviously the fashion brand Government layover wastewater treatment Brown's legislation and else there's probably businesses Is probably the manufacturers of washing machines filters and take some manufacturers themselves. Where do you think who needs to lead the charge? Seventy speaking about investment like who needs to say okay. Let's take the seriously scale. Give their attention to deserves. Probably need yes it definitely. The fashion brands You know the big agree tail. Giants like Zara H Nem. I mean they are investing in some sustainability. But they really you need like a fool textile overhaul and really get these small businesses. That are doing really great stuff like off the ground and and sought using their inventions. Because y'all as I said so much innovation I think they should take responsibility because they are the ones who who are making the choices at the end of the day and you know they have a model muddle that they've been following for so long and I understand that they will need to keep their prices down but it's up to them to figure out how they going to to do that. And if you're producing such a big scale you know it's very possible that you are still able to keep the prices down for your consumer. I think that's the and again. I'm playing devil's advocate. Because just to keep like a realist perspective. The the challenge that I see with anything to drive us to be more environmentally Indian Indian sustainable across fashion but across like each and different things and eating healthier and pigeon seeing from local supplies do things using the right materials all the things that we should be doing currently tend to come at a high cost than the general industry the majority of the population worldwide relies. John which is why it always succeeded. Which is why model exists so the has to be this one? Unfortunately that's why these things take time but also the idea that that h name needs to change. I agree false. Fashion needs to change the reason why I survived because people rely on it now. People Rely Alana certain. Yeah they were allowing the price of clothing and but the industry sort of promotes it's the consumerism. And they produced way too much more. We need more than we need. We don't need to be buying closes often and they always bring these new styles. And it's like I mean czars got the lead time of two weeks about basically every two weeks at bringing out new styles awesome. Yeah so I mean it's like I mean it's it's hard to say this but like the fos- fashion industry or the fought fashion model sort of needs to crumble because we don't need to be consuming and producing as much as we are as a society and there's something else I wanted to add them. What else would even ask me you sort of onto? This is a middle ground that I'm trying to look for other other part that I wanted to add. Is the education piece like I feel like brands. They do not tell the customers everything because obviously have a hidden motive. They want you to keep buying So I think you know what what needs to happen is we need to have brands producing less potentially thinking that prices a bird because textiles Zain Production prices are going to be Grena and most likely more expensive at the moment. And an as we're seeing now is like the slashing of the Secondhand Industry the way you can get close like pretty cheap and fall bit aquatic. And you know I mean I I almost by almost exclusively vintage secondhand these days and of its own. But you know it's a more affordable and it's way less environmentally impactful and we're very lucky to be living in a time where anything anything goes you know like there's no lack specific Not really like specific style of the decade. Everyone's just doing whatever and so luckily at a point where you just expressing yourself with how you feel and that's why secondhand and so exciting and like it's actually it's It's been predicted to overtake the Fast Action Industry by twenty twenty eight's so that's very exciting and it just shows you at the fos. Fashion Muddle is kind of slowly. Slowly coming down. Yeah but is it GONNA crumble change quickly enough to. That's really that that's what we all trying to figure. Yes we'll see. Hopefully it will h and m just appointed this. EEO and you see who's a woman and she comes from a sustainability. She comes from like the head of sustainability at nation 'em so she's not from like finance operations. She's like from sustainability. So let's see what happens but also very very very wary very of these brands who are going green because DNA at the end of the day. They have their public company. And they haven't festus yet so so we have to be very very wary of greenwashing and just just because they have someone at the head who's from sustainability. He does not mean that they're still doing pretty awful things to the environmental in a daily basis. I think that's kind of what scares me as a let's use. ATM example while we still at it. But like it's one thing to have a sustainability department or range in that sense and to do these talks and social media that we're doing the same because in that sense they are covered. And I'm Kinda like quote here. But if that's contained percent of your operation the nineties soul during the old way using the old material kind of offsets yes that's definitely a problem like ATM has their sustainable line. Made from these indies. So called you know renewable fibers responsibly sourced fibers etc.. But then everything else today producing is just like fossil fuel derived and a lot of it gets wasted ends up being banned or landfilled so You know we're going to be very skeptical. I mean even their take back program where they say you can just go and recycle your clothing and you'll get a discount at H.. Name which is making you buy more from them but you know the majority of clothing that we drop off doesn't get recycled into new clothing. It's it's often will be sent to different African nations where excellent off again. It might be. Yeah so you don't actually donating. It's anyone in need noise. Your fab noise. Your clothing. Being recycled into nuclear in Nevada. One percent of your clothing is being recycled into new clothing. Yes it's that low and so the majority of it would be shipped to developing places aces mostly in Africa and be sold in markets there so that whole process has completely killed the in textile moles and fashion brands at all locally based because everyone's just relying on closed from the West and a lot of the clothing actually doesn't get bored in in these African nations either so then they have to deal with the waste and you know. The infrastructure isn't as developed so often gets burnt there and causes more pollution. So you know you really have to be careful of you know he. Trusting and content is being put out there and I think thing that comes back to the education element is like. Don't just believe what you're told by. These brands is often more from the non unfortunately like a hidden story. Oh hidden agenda what. Actually she happens behind the scenes and I want to. I think there's There's a couple things that you start touching on each one of them is probably with you. have an episode of West Devon I into But I would like to wrap up this specific episode with knowing what you took three around Mike Pollution and also the snippets of the The false fashion industry and and some of the pitfalls of it as a consumer as a standard individual. Who's someone educated not as educated as someone who's done courses and research into this? What do I need to know? What are some quick tips things that I should be aware of? That can help curb some of these issues. In the meantime in the meantime in the meantime by less service that is one of the most notable things you can do is just using what you have swapping with your friends and if you need to buying secondhand not everybody has the luxury of having good secondhand stores in the areas that are affordable some of them on the the more pricier one so so. I'm not saying that everybody can do this. But then again clothing swaps with your friends is a is a good one and then Choosing natural fibers Abbas. Where Possible Matsen? Everybody can but that is a good one hand washing. Maybe not all of your clothes does but handwashing the closer to shed more or the ones that are Synthetic based so for example fleece his hand washing fleece as opposed to putting it in the washing machine or other plastic fibers like plus like polyester Washing your clothes on a cold cycle also better because the heat increases more shedding. If you are going to use a washing machine it was also interesting in my studies. It showed me that I found. I should say that washing teaching your clothes in the delicate cycle actually increases shedding. Who which is a tough one because you want to audio clothing But the the delicate cycle uses more water which actually causes more shedding And you know using a lot of detergents and softeners furnace increases shedding too. You can also get Some filters Get add on filtration tenant. CARE is a good example simple there's also this company called full troll. You can attach to your machines. I would say panic carrots. Probably a better bet. It's a lot the easy to install and they better program have a take back program and they recycle their cartridges. And it's like a whole thing so I would definitely say support put a company like planet care And then you can also use a garment. Wash bag the guppy friend is a good example. They absorb old fibers when you the material absorbs fibers when you put your clothes in for washing and then there's the core bowl which is those Nanno bowl all that you saw in with your clothing it's captures a few fibers. But I mean only about twenty five percent of the time I have one. I haven't seen a ton of fibers Abbas But those are some of the small things you can do but also remember that you can. You can do what you can but it's also not necessarily really your fault and just like do your best because at the end of the day like it really is like a something that needs to be regulated regulated and spearheaded by. The fashion industry's so don't feel guilty. If you can't do any of these things because you know it's it's it's extremely hard to avoid. Yeah and I mean I I would like to add one more which is really recapping do you mentioned. Is that the a case in perspective it in like. I'm a firm believer that in whenever there's a situation where the solutions are not that clear or still pending the mere trade of education in an awareness and just spreading that between people especially around the topic like micro plastic which is not that spike in about. And it's not that obvious Taking what you heard here allred elsewhere and just talking about other people just make another people away of it and my not change their ways but at the very least is it. It makes you aware of something that exists and I do think they'll be like subtle changes in your life when you buy two you look at the label and I also the thing is developing a little bit like wash. Didn't mention this earlier. But like washing machine producers assaulting to make they washing machines jeans with Bolton filters so you're drives have those photos at catch capture the Lynch and that was created also Ron Industrial Revolution. Time because it's people's homes were going on fire from the Lens so had the full too so like now it's a new problem with micro-plastics and so it it will be easier. Hopefully when we start buying new machines and hopefully textiles away from fossil fuel derived Things so yeah things are coming things are coming. But but in the meantime in the meantime put pressure on your brands you know it. Tell them ask them why. They're still using these plastic fibers. Ask for better and if you have First of all thank you for taking us through that and myself included like yeah. I knew nothing about these things before she did a paper. I'm getting include links and the show notes about everything. We mentioned the different brands beard planet. Kale the washing machine manufacturers as well as some of the products you can buy like the coral ball and the guppy friend so you can find all of that in the show notes Soon enough to believe that you have access to the full paper. That Georgia has written sir. I'm going to have a okay whip site where you can download the full report if you WANNA learn more and also just the enemy at George Annenberg on instagram. If a few just want to chat about it and about other fashion related things it really is a passion of mine and protecting the environment from these prices is is kind of what I want to do. So so be short. Include the link to the sites paper in the show notes as well we will be able to download it as well as make contact with Georgio. Yeah but the paper or anything else as you mentioned I. Do you know the whole point of this show was to explore the passion skills interests not any of myself but of other people and see where the overlap Joji now often talk about these things because it's something that I care about an assuming that she only the kids about but she actually devoted to skill and is not qualified and I can imagine there'll be a few more episodes with us together in the future but for now thank you for listening and we'll see you soon. Thank you for having me that brings us to the end of the episode. If you enjoyed what you heard today would like to read about it you can go to. WWW DOT ADAMS DOT com. You can subscribe to my podcast for future episodes on spotted defined I choose and you can find social media with the handle at twitter Adam to see all time.

New York Fashion Institute of Technolog George Annenberg Adam Pratt Institute fos- fashion industry Jarvis product development Joji todd official Hudson River Marc Jacobs intern Vancouver US Matt
Pillow Talk

Decoder Ring

29:10 min | 1 year ago

Pillow Talk

"<music> pillows can make you feel a little bit like you're underwater. You're underwater and you feel like the water sort of supporting you and there's no gravity. I like pillows to recreate that feeling susie lions. It's a brand strategist but that's not why I'm speaking with her. I am a pillow enthusiast. I wanted Suzy's help understanding something that I've been wondering about for a long long time I would say my pillow collection is vast. I have eleven pillows on my bed but it's a big bed a few years ago in my capacity slates TV critic. I watched hours hours of H._G._T._V. Cable Channel that specializes in reality shows about real estate chose what people looking for homes flipping homes redecorating homes shows like house hunters and fixer upper not to mention the shorter videos published on their site on Youtube job. All of these series are slightly different but on every single one I was totally distracted by the same thing whenever they got to the part of the show where the House was finished when you've been fixed or flipped or redecorated there would be so many many pillows on the beds start with the pillows and Shams Standard or European like I'm using here now add pillows and Standard Shans. If you WANNA use both lastly you're sleeping pillows and for an extra special touch at a decorative pillow. This really gives her bed a luxurious look by the end of this video there are eight pillows at the top of the bed and an additional two at the foot decorative pillows which for the purposes of this episode I'm defining as any pillow you don't sleep on bring a lot of people pleasure and they can really snazzy up a room. They do not seem like the kind of thing a reasonable person. It should have strong feelings about one way or another but watching H._d._t._v. I discovered when it comes to pillows I am I'm not a reasonable person. You want to villas. I have my bed yeah for regular pillows that are all or you know to each what and I am not alone my sister closet Mount Rushmore then and she finds a pill as oppressive if she ever has to say at my house dog set an oppressive that those are her words when I see a bed hiding beneath an avalanche of pillows beneath sleeping pillows and square pillows and pillow shaped like hard candies beneath bolsters and wedges and Shams and Euro Shams beneath pillows that are not for sleeping on. I just wonder what are all those things four Mrs Dakota during a show about cracking cultural mysteries. I'm willing Paskhin every month we take on a cultural question habit or idea crack open and try to figure out what it means and why it matters the decorative pillow Oh has been around for a long time but in the last decade or to his come to colonize furniture across the country like never before the rise of the decorative pillow is due to a host of forces including designers manufacturers retailers catalogs social media globalism ECOMMERCE and also television which is done more than anything to boost Americans desire for pillows on home decor shows. The pillow is a symbol of luxury comfort decadence coziness and self care with others. It's just another example of consumerist access and I wanNA say upfront the going into this episode that was me the consumerist excess person decorative pillows always seemed kind of silly to me talking to people about pillow's begin anew respect for them. The decorative pillow may be a colorful bit of replaceable fluff that ends up on the floor a lot but it's also a rabbit hole into the enormous question of how we form our taste of the way that intensive marketing a cheap global supply chain and personal preference influenced the thousands upon thousands of small choices we make about the stuff that literally lives with us so today. I'm Dakota Ring Lille doozy. How did decorative pillows take over our homes to get a sense of just how big pillows those are as a commercial phenomenon you just have to turn on your TV and they look beautiful the combinations of the Moon together that's the Oscar winning actress Catherine Zeta Jones who has her own line pillows which she sells regularly on Q._V._C. Gene the pillow she sells around and rushed and come in washed out pastels names like sea glass and ashes of rose? They look like Fussy pincushions on one side. They have a large plastic fo- jam at their center. A pair cost between twenty. I am thirty dollars. Just this glamorous we really do you can Nixon with other pillows that you have they just and what I love about them is that you know the pillow shaped the wreck zeta-jones cells thousands thousands of pillows in each of these segments and there's a tiny part of the decorative pillow economy which I'm distinguishing from the crowded marketplace the sprung up around sleeping pillows which I'm not really going to touch on in this episode decorative pillow purveyors include Q._v._C. Q._V._C. Boutiques upscale chains big-box providers of increasingly stylish fast home decor like target an online emporiums like Amazon which all provide pillows to customers who have been primed by experts pinterest instagram and reality shows on channels like H._d._t._v. t._l._C. and Bravo to think of the throw pillow as the perfect finishing touch. They're definitely more of a thing I think than they ever have been dozen Adler as a designer of many things including adding pillows susie has pillows and the shape of an ass on her bed. I would like to think that I actually something of a pillow pioneer. <hes> about I think at least twenty one years ago I came out with my first line. They became a sensation station. I sold a ton of them since I became a pillow prepare <hes> pillow to definitely definitely multiplied taken off and they're just William of them as a businessman who has made money on pillows and as a designer diner who puts a lot of thought and care into them that first line of pillows he mentioned was hand-loomed in Paki arm by Peruvian artisans. You might think Adler of all people would be all about fitting as many pillows on a bad as he possibly could do you have a prescriptive scripted feeling when it comes to billows like about the amount number of pillows. A person should actually have on their bed. If I'm being honest the like the march of pillows down the bed. <hes> does seem extremely. Serenely contrived if I'm being honest. I don't WanNa be so I actually have usually I have like <hes> four sleeping pillows and maybe one pillow in front of them that kind. It's the punctuation mark other maybe abashed but he has company in reporting the story. I spoke with a number of people with similarly conflicted feelings about pillows. I have become so allergic to throw pillow decorative pillows. You get a little fringy. I think I do get anxiety about where to put them. I want to be clear here that all of these people have at least one decorative pillow in their house if not more their ubiquitous even among people who kind of role there is about them in fact there ubiquitous among people who feel far more strongly about them than that for the hundreds of thousands of videos and instagram post and pinterest pages that celebrate pillows there are smattering of people with the decidedly anti decorative pillows stance typically men carping about their female partners pillow us. This sort of gender conflict about the pillow has been going on for years. What is this? It's a cushion right. This is the scene from the British Sitcom coupling which aired in early two thousand. I just need to know on behalf of all men everywhere. I just need to ask please what are they full. Chubby Lil Boston just sitting around everywhere all day. Pets such says this character ridiculous anger his resentment his sexist argument that logical men like function well silly women like superfluous pillows stems from the fact that though he does not understand cushions he has to live with them anyway and that's even more today than it was when coupling was on T._v.. The decorative pillow in other words has conquered. Even it's haters. How did that happen understand? How the decorative pillow concord contemporary pulse rate? We have to go back in time you might assume the decorative pillow is a descendant of the sleeping pillow but though they are both soft squishy objects often found on beds they are distantly related springing from different print sources and coming to resemble each other only over a period of thousands of years. The first sleeping pillows appeared around five thousand B._C.. In Mesopotamia and shortly after an agent Egypt they were practical objects made it hard substances rock would ceramic the used by the very rich to keep their heads off of floors and free of insects and they are not really the antecedent of the decorative pillow which and said descends from the cushion which began appearing in Egypt on twenty seven hundred B._C.. Cushion comes from kings had chairs and everybody else out before and this sort of was to intermediate step between slower and being king any coggin is a principal designer chairs and building studio in Brooklyn and an associate professor at Pratt Institute School of design for Millennia the cushion remained status object of the very wealthy found largely in royal courts and this didn't begin to change until well the industrial revolution because the bulk of television and movies are about the very upper classes and because we the middle classes have so much stuff we just assume everybody all listed due to Flanders is a Socialist Story and author whose work focuses mostly on the nineteenth century lives of the British middle classes were almost empty. They wouldn't have had all this stuff. According to Judith we know that in Pennsylvania and Delaware and the seventeen ninety he's just eight percent eight percent of household even had sleeping pillows and that was typical for the time but as mass produced textiles became available for the first time decorative pillows flooded into Victorian era homes on a larger tide of home furnishings the home decor of that period is known for being intricate think lots of upholstery and doilies and tassels and embroidering pillows with mottos and flowers even became popular hobby a kind of Victorian D._I._Y.. Project heading into the twentieth century though there was a backlash to all of this the pendulum began to swing away from maximalism and towards minimalism or to put it in design terms towards modernism and though it would swing back and forth a number of times throughout the twentieth century by the Depression era decades leading up to the Second World War the decorative pillow had decidedly gone out of style so now I wanna turn how it came back in there there are a lot of factors that changed everything for the pillow in the post World War Two era rising economic prosperity the availability of cheap synthetic fabrics and fills the polyesters of the world and television photos especially like in magazines photos of living rooms in the nineteen thirties and forties. You just see brocade couches Victorian style couches kind of that like Depression Era Sofa Rebecca Avoi- is the host of H._G._T._v.. The end me a podcast about watching H._d._T._v.. She's also the CO host of slates. Mom and dad are fighting among other podcasts. She's always been very interested in design and attentive to pillows in particular and what you don't see a lot of throw pillows and those couches in in many cases you don't see any if you look at back issues of architectural digest which was founded in one thousand nine hundred eighty usually that well into the nineteen fifties homes had very few decorative pillows in them so I occasionally have one or two on them and beds are even spare. Rebecca Brecca has a theory about why this changed for my unifying theory of throw pillows is that television set design has influenced the American culture into believing that you cannot have a sofa without throw throw pillows on it on a classic Sitcom couches are front and center the focal point of the SAT. Rebecca thinks the sitcoms office of the late nineteen sixties seventies eighties the couches on shows like I dream of Jeanie and the Jeffersons Mary Tyler Moore and growing pains taught Americans that a couch without throw pillows on it was incomplete. The couch really is a central character in a lot of television shows and those couches all have throw pillows on them with notable exception of the cosby show continues today. Modern family is basically a showcase of throw pillory if you look at the sets on that show as TV critic needless to say I loved this theory and very much wanted it to be true so I called up. Some Sitcom set designers to check it out. John Shattner is a production designer for multi camera sitcoms who has worked fifty two series including golden girls friends and two and a half men one cook made its way onto a television show. It probably got there because other people had him in their living room. SITCOMS are supposed to look more or less real homes in other words. They did not start to include throw pillows until real people had throw pillows so in this sense Rebecca's theory is not quite right. T._V. didn't introduce people to the decorative couch pillow. They were already spreading as designers. Diners Manufacturers Advertisers Magazines Department stores and other entertainments like the movie pillow talk which does have a lot of decorative pillows in it push us away from the Mid Century minimalism of the nineteen fifties early sixties into the maximalism of the seventies seventies and eighties but if it comes weren't the first movers of cash pillows and they didn't start the trend I think rebecca is right and thinking that they both amplified and solidified it. I think a lot of times people in the entertainment business even though we start the story and character we're and then we're in the game of aspirational decoration and design so we take something and then at one more to it you know Sitcom couches creative kind of pillow feedback loop with set inspired by how real people lived going onto inspire those same real people to buy more throw pillows but as influential as a Sitcom Sofa escape was it would be mistake to think of it as the only influence rather it was one one of many one part of the feedback loop and you can see that in well Sitcom set design itself from we're in the late nineties we went into a whole style. We used to call restoration hardware or it would be cadillac furniture. We call it to Dobrusky is also production designer. He now works feature films but he worked on eight hundred episodes of multi camera sitcoms like Allen and growing pains. U._T._V.'s come along and you know shows are designed to show you how where to get this stuff. You know what I mean. It basically three theirselves tool. That's what those shows are. The sitcoms were we didn't think of it like that in the beginning sitcoms or trying to show viewers a realistic if aspirational home not to sell them stuff but it turns out the displaying aspirational homes to millions of T._v.. Viewers is a great way to do just that so you can guess what happened when T._V.. Started trying to make us by pillows on purpose show is brought to you by luminary. Luminary is a new podcast subscription service with some of the best original content around is the only place where you can listen to the seaward a new podcast from Lena Dunham Annalisa Bennett every week. Lena analysts GONNA historical historical deep dive into the lives of women who society has dismissed to explore what exactly it means when we call a woman quote crazy along with the seaward luminary gives you access to a number of other dynamic original shows that you can't find anywhere else. Luminary APP is free to download and if you use it to listen to thousands of podcasts including the ones you already love like this one whether you're into news politics comedy business and tech or more luminary has the right show for you. We'll get your first two months of access to luminaries premium content for free when you sign up at luminary dot link Slash Dakota. That's luminary dot link slash decoder after that it's only seven ninety nine per month. That's it's luminary dot link slash decoder for two months a free access luminary dot link slash decoder cancel anytime term limits apply so we're now entering the modern age of pillow consumption which has been made possible by a lot of factors globalism ecommerce cheat materials and labor that have made affordable and reasonably well designed homegoods more accessible than ever before when it comes to what is driving our taste in pillows what most influences what we want and what we want to look like. I don't think anything matches the power of home decorating TV the first home decor show P._B._S.. Says this old house premiered in Nineteen seventy-nine Bob. What's the condition of that roof up? They're not too good. It's an old metal roof has just been covered over with tar paper Robbie half the REP it off. I don't like that metal with the tire our over at this genre didn't really take off until the early ox when reality T._v.. Itself became television staple at this time the turn of the Millennia before print and retail had been destabilized by the Internet home decor or magazines and catalog based furnishing companies or flourishing consumers were already very interested in interior design and getting their houses just so and reality TV tapped into this the breakout show in this first wave home decor series away waved included house hunters and extreme makeover home addition with T._l._C.'s trading spaces all right. Let's recap the rules A._R.. Thousand Dollars Two days share carpenter. You spend the night you don't see the room until the end of the day to when you switch back Lada a Lotta Yada Yada all right so we're GonNa keys as with all home decor shows trading spaces was meant to give you ideas and inspiration about things you could do to and by for your own space. We're having more pillows out of this too and this goes on top of the white so it's white what I learned from watching that show that was very much in my formative home-buying ears. I bought my first house in one thousand nine hundred nine Rebecca Lavoix again. You know what I learned from that back. In the day when I was living on a shoestring and are tiny first house was that was the way to make a room pop hilly and Laurie and burn and genevieve toby so so by the couch I can afford and then go to crate and barrel by the really nice pillow to make it seeing you know I totally learned that from that. Show trading spaces was just the beginning for pillows. Its message was reinforced on show after show or pillow serve both a clear design function and play more emotional role as the accessory that pulls a room together the cozy aspirational item. You need to make a house a home home and this message it has traveled. I do feel like with client. It is talked about way too often and for way too long. genevieve border is an interior designer who was at a number of shows on H._D._t._v. and was also one of the original designers trading spaces people who aren't designers feel like they understand decorative pillow and that like something they need to scoff at nine o'clock at night when I spoke with people about about decorative pillows I was struck by the kind of shared vocabulary they had for them. Everyone seemed to know exactly what they are. Four an easy way care transform the look of a room for not a lot of money room should have like accent moments pants and I think pillows decorative pillows on the couch are like the prime way of doing that yeah and of course the nights cheap easy way of bringing a little sort of designer early or thinking about pillows like this inmates them from the charge of being useless because it gives them a function. They're the easy relatively affordable way to elevate a room but with its focus on price point and utility. This language isn't just designed speak. It's it's a sales pitch. You put this and it just mixing the better you know it. Just the dimensions of it just makes it look so finished H._G._T._v. and other home decor shows have boosted the average Americans. Africans design literacy enormously made regular people more attentive to and familiar with interior design but it's also turned us into salesman selling stuff to ourselves. The decorative pillow has more going for it than attractiveness ease and price point though real. There's nothing softer. There's nothing more luxurious than having down against your body mm-hmm luxury as a word you hear a lot talking about decorative pillows particularly bed pillows. You know a super affordable pillow can make you feel luxurious or a road susie lions again right. There's no one actually like physically needs a row but there's something that feel sort of Nice chiefs and like you're taking an extra stepper you know a little bit more care and you feel uncomfortable as you're going through getting ready for work the bed pillow even more than the couch pillow is associated with a kind of decadence. This is one of the reasons why hotels ten completely overdue them. They want you to know that they are trying to pamper you. Even if it's the point of over pampering another reason for this kind of ostentatious pillow display the more pillows you can see the more you are likely to buy in private homes though were even pillow lovers tend to be more restrained pillow use feels a little more wholesome taking the time to get your bed pillows just so is something that you're doing for yourself at a cultural moment when time mm-hmm feels like the thing we never have enough of when time feels like the ultimate luxury taking a few minutes out of your day to make your bed might feel the some people less like a chore and more like an extravagance but the luxurious alias decorative pillow exists in a larger context to the context of the luxurious everything when I was growing up rich people had pretty Spartan Home Jonathan Adler again you know like kitchen counters tomato FORMICA batching counter Mehta formica there wasn't there just wasn't sort of the fetishes ation of luxury in every element of one's home. A lot of this focus on luxury has to do with accessibility with a proliferation of retail choices. If historically the luxury item was something it was hard to get because it was unavailable or prohibitively expensive now. It's just about finding the thing you like most at your price point affordable luxury which is often often the same as disposible luxury. Having lots of beautiful soft things on your bed is genuinely kind of luxurious but the pillow is also just another piece of trendy consumer to try to us made with who knows what labor practices and materials it's very selling point is that it's replaceable. You're not stuck with a pillow forever or even for very long is another item in the stream of stuff going into and out of our homes a purely aesthetic object that we don't need but it has come to feel like we do if we don't want our couch to look weirdly naked working on this piece. I kept thinking about pineapples specifically this pineapple blanket that I have on my bed. It's a quilted white coverlet let with the outline of pineapples embroidered into it in pink thread a few years ago I saw it on anthropology is website and I thought oh I like that and then I started noticing that pineapple print stuff was everywhere on shirts on kids clothes loads on homegoods notebooks lamps and honestly I liked most of it and the creeped me out how did they whoever they is no that I would like pineapple so much. How did they know before I did? Did they make me like bike pineapples. I don't know what you're equivalent of. This is some other fruit print succulents gallery walls mason jars pillows but you probably have won this feeling that market forces taste makers trendsetters companies designers instagram Graham television are not just influencing your most personal aesthetic choices but almost conjuring them. It is a very weird feeling but it has become a common one. The pineapples reminded me that though I may be relatively immune the charm arm throw pillow. I am not immune to the larger phenomenon of wanting stuff because someone has made you want it. The pineapples also reminded me that I am not immune to our larger cultural fixation on nesting this is not the only moment in in time that we've been fixated on getting our surroundings just so often with the help of lots and lots of stuff. I WanNa return momentarily to that historical group of pillow lovers. The victorians Victorian design may look overdone and Fussy to the the modern I but there was an intensity to it that might feel familiar giving everything right where you live is just as phonetic as the Victorian and housewife who was oh could enjoy lease on everything any coggin again a designer and associate professor at Pratt a need to control your space to craft or space is probably at the same level and yeah and um urgency as the nineteenth century whenever there's a big kind of wellspring uncontrollable ideas going on the so the natural inclination is to make your home more attractive when faced with huge changes in the world the Telegraph the Railroad Factories Victorians nested when the world outside your home is wild and scary and crazy you can at the very least control your immediate surroundings you can cope with lots of pillows or you can cope with just one two three exactingly chosen ones if the home into core craze is about exerting control over one of the very few things that we can that solves when it came to think of as the real mystery of the pillow which isn't why so many people are putting them on their beds but why so many people have strong feelings about pillows one way or another the pillow champion and pillow skeptic the pillow maximalist and the pillow minimalist or more like than they are different because they both care very much about the look of their space hating pillows after all is just another way of caring caring about them. Okay what if one of your children developed a real love of pillows I would I would support her but also find it very alienating. This is Dakota rang. I will pass can you can find me on twitter at Willa Paskhin. have any cultural mysteries wants to code you can email us at decoder ring at slate dot com you haven't yet subscribe in our feet in Apple podcasts or ever get your podcasts and even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by Willa Paskhin was produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every episode. Cleo Levin is our research assistant.

Jonathan Adler Willa Paskhin. Rebecca homegoods TV critic H._G._T._V maximalism associate professor first house Egypt Youtube brand strategist Suzy Mount Rushmore architectural digest Dakota Ring Lille Catherine Zeta Jones Mrs Dakota
Bumperpodcast #372  Sick Natty and Football

The Natty Bumpercar Bumperpodcast

14:26 min | 1 year ago

Bumperpodcast #372 Sick Natty and Football

"Hi everybody it's mean Eddie Bumper and this is how I sound now because I got sick and who is who got me sick. Was it you know. Are you sure interesting because I feel like you might have been sick a couple of weeks ago with a stomach bug? There's a long time ago Ali. He had to wait a minute. That's right you had the stomach plug blow stomach bug. And then all he had the flu and then ever since then. I've had a cold yet. Did you know though I got tested for the flu? I've been tested twice so far and both times no flew me to get tested. No you didn't get tested at all right now. I'm not sure of anything. Are you sure? Question Mark Oh a question. Mark is in the air. Let's see I'm going to walk over to that question block and I'm going to tap it and what comes out of that question block? No-one knows is a mystery. Well I don't know if I get. I think I did quite the flu. Shot are no you definitely add. Flu Shot on a second. You just said you didn't remember if you had it and now you're saying it definitively hurt. I don't understand that doesn't make any sense. Forgot but now you remember Panton Beer Year Panther bear. What the Panther Bear. Oh a panda bear. You are a little panda bear. This this is not a video podcast. This is just an audio podcast. Audio means audio sound. Yeah sound waves. Yeah art audio is made up of sound waves. What was that? Did you just take a drink? And then you choked a little fish. Oh what are you drinking today? Is I only drink homemade natural the name that's made by Lemons? Did you know that in no in Georgia Georgia the only kind of lemonade? We'd drink is made by lemons. No did you know that limit. Sorry for the cough. Did you know that lemonade? So it's like if it's two words it's lemon and it's aid and eighties help. What help lemon help gator aid? Gator helped his that crazy. Yeah so lemon. D- drink lemon help. That's awesome gator. Which is your favorite gator. Preliminary don't can't choose. You can't shoot. They're both your. It's kind of like my children. You're both my favorite short. I'm positive thank you. Who Do you think's my? Who Do you think might? Izzo is my most favorite. Mommy or popcorn. And who do you think is my most favorite? Which has me? We know. You're my favorite Oliver. I'm confused you and all over. My favorite popcorn is my most favorite. And Mommy is my most favorite aside wife Pumpkin moisture. 'cause she's still just a baby. I know you're old. You're seven In March thirty first. That's birthday. Can you believe that we're like we're in? She's almost a year old can you? It's right now seven so eight Chevy as old as Oliver. Oh that's crazy. So they'll be two seven year olds in our house next actually fourteen. And how old were you be eleven? That's so she's GonNa be the old. She's going to be the oldest care now. She won't be my most disfavors anymore. Because won't be my baby. Allie will all I'll that's right. Yeah and you'll be eleven and she'll be fourteen. Yeah that's kind of bananas Frank. I don't know I always see Jim. Do you know your friend Peter so I was talking to him and he had a really interesting concept. He said It was about dog years and I can't remember I can't believe it but he said something about dog years and then he You know it stinks. I just call. I had to make a phone call because I couldn't remember what he said. And in the person that I talk to who I told it to also couldn't remember so we have lost an integral part of knowledge a very special bit of knowledge about dog years and now I'm sad. Are you just going to crunch on ice? Is that good for you? Good for your teeth. I I've heard it's not but I don't really know it seems like it's ice. Is it going to hurt him? I don't think it will maybe it could. I don't I don't shoelace except for the so the ice you have in your mouth is kind of. It's hard ice right but it but they make this ice that there's little pellets and they're softer and they're like wonderful that you on like amazing and that's where you ate today. Did you like it? Good it hurt my stomach. Everything hurts my stomach. These days all I can eat anymore is remember when I was hurt my stomach every e every time you ate anything yet you say what would you say Jaggi my tummy fire? My jumped My rummy Tom Tom has I don't know it was making a facility. Where HE I? I do remember that and now daddy's tummy hurts. Every time he eats scribble. You know that is so emerson just found a basketball this in our basement where we record and it's got the word scribble on it because when I used to live in Brooklyn New York when I went to Pratt institute I would go and play basketball on the courts and my name was scribble because every time I dribbled I would scribble around the core and I would miss the basket. I I love basketball but I'm not very good at it because I didn't. I didn't play it growing up and so I don't have all those skills you might need to have any hurt yourself. No I played soccer growing up my whole life. I played soccer until I was a sophomore in high school. So I was probably Fourteen fifteen sixteen. No probably fifteen and I stopped playing. I didn't make the team so I couldn't play soccer anymore. I know sat and then I played senior year. I played football and then he hurt his knee me. Yeah now my high knee but my knee and then he almost died. No that didn't happen but what did happen. I it was before St. No the story so the play I didn't junior year I was playing in pe. We're outside playing flag football and no no no so we were playing flag. Football like in you have Jim. Yeah and so we were outside. We're playing it and our. Pe Coach was the football coach for the next year. He was new and you came up to being a real southern accent. He said son. You've never played football before that and I was just like you know because I was I was really skinny and I was really small. Birds really fast and I was like no. I didn't played football. I do that and he's like next year. You're going to play on the Varsity team. That and I was like okay and then I had to start going to practice and practice for high school. Football was like five six times. A week was all the time. The school bought my equipment like my pads and my helmet everything they bought it for me and then there were football camps over the summer. How do you still have the stuff out now so long ago? I don't have any of it sad. I know you had the Georgia sign. No that was before I went to George. This was in high school when it looked like it was blue and gold and I went to a place called Saint Pious and we were the saints pious. I don't even remember Golden Lions. We were cold in. Lyons the gold and and so Played winning poop play. Yeah E. OR is honey brook. Oh so sad that lose the game. Yeah always falls off always fall off. I don't know that feels like they should find a solution for that. Just jumping around but as you say tax. Uh whatever link about Tigers is tigers are wonderful things. They're top swimming proper Springs there one of the most wonderful thing about tickets designed the only one who I the only one. No he got tackled and got cussin' who did take. Oh no the doctors take care of him. No no was piglet. He wasn't on the field was he. He's two tiny. He joked every really. Yeah what about Canada and routed they play now? Kengo is watching and rue is routing and we don't want to do something awful happened Al. So do you have so I went through. We had summer practice and then we had something called two a days in two days. Our you have a practice in the morning and then another practice in the afternoon now. So you're practicing for like six hours eight hours a day and this is two weeks before school starts here at school everyday. Eight hours boom practice practice practice practice practice practice practice because they want you to be ready for the season and that's in rain. That's an hot. It's everything and I in the first week Iran Straight and then I cut to my right and then I went back to the left and when I did that. My knee went couple. That club and I was like Oh that hurts but I was young. I was kind of. I didn't know I was like well. I hurt my knee but I still played on it for a day or two and then the team doctor came in and I said Hey. My knee feels funding. And he did this little test and he was like. Oh No. Oh no did your Nego Blobel Dicko Coupla bill and so then I had to go They they took me to a hospital. You know how to get an MRI which you know the cat scan that you live in so it's like that but it was for my knee so I didn't have to my head didn't have to go but it was like this is a super x ray is we'll call it. Mri stands for. I think magnetic resonance imaging and it's so scary but then they found out the my My knee was busted and so they They did surgery on it. Worth a skop where they put tiny tiny tiny little things in my knee and tried to fix it. Didn't work now. Did Not and then physical therapy and I was on crutches for the whole season and so I get good at pep rallies. Pep Rally is so pep rallies. All the students gathered around in one room and they cheer on the team with a go golden lions that and I was out in the middle of the floor like Golden Lion. Get me and then the last game of the season. The coach asked me wanted me to dress up in uniform. Get getting address out getting uniform. It's like okay and I stand on the sideline and then with just I mean twenty seconds to go in the game. He goes bump car get in there and I was like what do what does it get in the game. I was like Oh no no what I didn't know what to do so I went in on the in the Huddle. We were on offense. I was a wide receiver and I was terrified and the quarter but I said to the quarterback. I don't know what to do. I don't know where to stand. I don't know anything. He's just go over there. Stand when I say hot run I was like can do I can do that. I know how to do that. So he goes and he gets the ball and I run and as a wide receiver. You're the guy who catches the ball and there's a guy called a defensive back and he's the one who tries to stop you from catching the ball and so I was supposed to run out and bounce off that guy and then cut to the inside. That was my plan but when I went I bounced bounced off of them. He grabbed me with both hands and picked me up off the ground because he was a really big guy and then he said get off me and he threw me down and then the time of the clock ran off the referee whistle and the game was over. That was my football experience. A we lost by a lot. They cheated didn't she? They just better than us off me. I don't know I think he didn't like that. I'd bounce off of them. That's what I I was supposed to do. So that's what I did.

Football flu Mark Oh soccer Jim basketball Eddie Bumper Chevy Gator Oliver Golden Lions Georgia Georgia Varsity Tigers Izzo Allie Tom Tom Peter Golden Lion
Vito Bruno 9-27-20

CATS Roundtable

06:08 min | 7 months ago

Vito Bruno 9-27-20

"Create your story with Pandora and receive a free bracelet. The choice is yours Explorer over 80 bracelet Styles. It's our gift to you when you spend $125 or more than a September 24th through the 28th at Pandora Jewelry free bracelet up to $65 value upgrades available. No substitutions restrictions apply see store for details get your free bracelet from the Pandora store at Town Center. Boston Street or Jackson Heights from September 24th through September 28th. Good morning, New York. This is the catchment table trunk at some keys here Sunday morning and Thursday is a gentleman running for the Brooklyn Senate State Senate. His name is Rita Bruno and he went to Brooklyn Tech one of my favorite schools and I always would promote and protect people use a music promoter a small business man. He's a republican independence party and good morning video. How are you this morning? Good morning, sir. How are you? Thank you so much for having me. It's an honor to be on with you. Well, you're Brooklyn Tech graduate. I always love Brooklyn Tech graduates check was the Brooklyn Tech was the best school ever bought and they're trying to ruin it. Unbelievable. Can you imagine that they trying to dumb down Brooklyn Tech, you know people I remember when I had to go take that test. I studied so hard and you're kept my grades up so I could be in in that school. It was a badge of honor for us me and you were to get in that school would want to ruin the school. You know what I tell people why don't you build another one instead of trying to ruin the school that has the problems right now? That's what I exactly absolutely. I always tell everybody everything I learned in Brooklyn tax it wound up like changing my life. I got a quick story when I was in tech. I got the kid. Yep. Next to he got accepted to the architecture program at Cooper Union, which was the number one school in the world and I got accepted to Pratt Institute, which was quite a number to Cox architectural School in the world and Marcel Breuer, which was one of the top architectural firms in the world. When we finished College, they would go and recruit out of the best schools. So I showed my first day I got recruited, you know, excellent in design. I showed my first day in school and high school at that myself Broiler associate and who they picked from Cooper Union Decatur sit next to me and Tech. That's how great that school was. Wow. Well, let me tell you something things are messy happening. Are you going to fix it right now read it? Well Bernie has allowed bail reform and thrown all the criminals onto the streets of New York instead of in jails. Tell us what you age. Well, I got to tell you that's the number one issue with people out here in Brooklyn is Public Safety? They're afraid to leave the house. I'm afraid to go to to the store. It's unbelievable crime is through the roof murders rapes shooting cards cards cards. Could you believe in this area in Brooklyn? We had three shootings in two weeks out here. It's unheard of unbelievable. This bail reform law is ridiculous guys suck and there is nothing to do with anything. We don't I said two people two things. I said two people number one. I said you wondered Rudy Giuliani under underneath lumbergh, if you carry a gun in the streets, you go to jail a minimum for one year. So, you know what that meant. None of the Crux carried guns, cuz that nobody wants to go to jail for a year of minimum wage. Minimum and you know where the Deputy Commissioner was on my show last week and we've had twelve hundred arrests for gun possession in the last four months off. You know, how many are in jail 000? So that's what the nuclear scientists in Albany are doing and you gotta change that video off totally. The bail reform needs to go needs to be completely, you know, redone, you know to make sure that people that deserve to be behind bars are behind bars. This thing keeps our communities our families safe. Listen, I don't even know who you're running against and I don't want to know but you know what you're telling the people you're just saying off my opponent voted for those criminals to be on the street one hundred percent. He backed out of a hundred percent, you know, he's also the right-hand guy of its dead. Devoted for putting the criminals on the streets. That's what you're saying. Now the other thing I don't see any sense for this whole defunding NYPD. We got a fund the the police upon. We need to respect our Police Department puts on the police empty on Rikers. No wonder crime is through the roof out of their minds these people go out there and you tell them and you know what you tell them. I am mad as hell and we're not going to take it anymore. That's right. We know Bruno Brooklyn Tech graduate common-sense person. Thank you for running for the state senate. I bring some common sense to Albany and outs. I'll tell my whole audience Vita Bruno running for the Albany State Senate vote for him. Thank you. John Ketchum TVs and Vino go out and work hard. Thank you so much. I appreciate everything. This is the test Round Table will be right back.

Brooklyn Brooklyn Senate State Senate Brooklyn Tech Bruno Brooklyn Tech Pandora New York senate Rita Bruno Albany Cox architectural School Cooper Union Town Center Vita Bruno Cooper Union Decatur Marcel Breuer Police Department Deputy Commissioner Rudy Giuliani NYPD Albany
Naturel

Prudential Presents Leaders Create Leaders Hosted by Gerard Adams

27:22 min | 2 years ago

Naturel

"Every celebrates those moments with stories to help you face your own challenges subscribe to everyday bravery now wherever podcasts are available this podcast was support for this podcast and the following message comes from Prudential Prudential believes life is filled with moments that test our courage their podcasts everyday for tickets to visit the museum please visit www dot grammy museum e. x. p. Dot Org Black Americans it's an amazing place it brought me up in a in a particular way I guess it gave me a lot of soul gave me a Lotta purpose I gave me a lot of rhythm and unique visiting for things if anybody's familiar with Gogo music he they offer you their mentorship because leaders create leaders and leaders are the ones that are impacting our world I've gotten comfortable with wearing the title of creative Stewart to my community and like minded individuals around world can even read the word trendsetter without thinking of Natural Natural has mastered the craft of making art his every grand endeavor began as a creative thought and took not only time but worked bring into the world anyone can dream associate creating the best possible with vision with hustle and showing up world class they offer advice they offer lessons most important dug deep into the dichotomy that within that the meeting point between his iconic part style world with the most important question who it takes a truly creative entrepreneur to realize a dream from something within our heads into a real tangible thing he can touch way and cherish business his talent in work are sought after by celebrities such as Jay z abroad James Yana and speech just in a few natural also. Ac born and raised in a county Prince George's county it is home to the most concentrated population of athletes and that's a big big title to say because we're all students and we're all learning and I'm probably at the most humble as moment in my life but I do Everett's with a conic sneaky brands such as Nike and Puma to design special edition sneaker lines a father daughter A. Son of my parents friends all my friends in recently that leadership role pretty seriously talking about what it was like growing up in Prince George's County Maryland so I grew up on the east side hoods and everything and it's all live music it's all the moment and creating moments is my new forte I believe what's interesting is in this is leaders create leaders and I'm your host Gerard Adams this is a podcast showcase in two days change makers who dedicate them that's a big big part of our culture you know a a bunch of guys maybe thirteen guys playing drums in the sat out breath considerate about how he uses his platform and his art to discuss the topics happening in the world today when we got him to the stage your career actually started within the fashion industry you work with a Lotta great designers talking about what it was like to kind of start there and what were some of the -portant lessons that you've learned this so I have about like maybe eleven years in the fashion industry lived in Brooklyn EPA time went to Pratt Institute tame relinquished the brains Jay Z. and so I got to work with both parties in that tumultuous time around the whole group and got the first internship possibly could bring called triple five soul from narrow moved on pretty quickly to rockaway and the exchange was just tremendous and I learned so much about patients so much about observation in how your knowledge taught me everything in that industry but one of the most remarkable experiences was win Jay got the brain he came in and individually greedy his natural mark I I'm a fiance to my fiancee every single person in the building and he knew that he didn't know anything about the industry so we sat and shadowed about six learned a lot from Dane from j directly and out through that process not in any other of my older brothers and sisters months and so you imagine having Jay Z.. Shadow you for like you know six months or whatever the things that you learn in elevator in the break room in the conference room and around the town dating myself but is around the time rockaway was still around is pretty hot rap you know is around from everywhere can apply to the thing that you're focused on at the time and so I mean we were just talking about jeans and t-shirts we went through all these experiences that you had before the music industry after the music in Sri his trips to Africa in all around the world with the beyond you good celebratory it's a moment it's interesting about jerk so yeah I learned a lot imagine I met cheesy one time he grabbed my wrist I said a and what they've learned together and it was my job to kind of take this type of knowledge in these inspirational cues and then boil them down and so like a collection up to him he grabbed my whiskey's hot like that bracelet he's like he used to always while I was an art student exploring all sorts of creative ventures and that started off because of my father my father was a musician growing up I think you've merged the you know the the fine art world with hip hop so what was the experience that led you to believe first visual memories are these albums the Cameo albums Ohio players commodores the real highly illustrated and he turned our living rooms studio and so every time that I would have a chance I would go into the equipment and stuff where we are he'll bring everybody in a room up and that's like a really really unique trait now when you walk into a room and you could bring in give value and make everybody feel mine don't they're not separated by category like music is artful and art is very musical and those things knows crowds and industries they all playing together and you have a very unique fine how did you find that signature type of artistic so in art school me and my friends would often like fantasize about life from the age of five six something like that I had this it was true it was kind of like Oh yeah I want to be the versions of that and they never really came in Celeste stop looking it's usually the thing they find you or creeps up you know it becomes at this can be done so nobody Google this at all would I spend my time trying to be a rapper for a long time and when a buyer like those types of illustrations and I always thought that the person that you heard on the record was the person that made that are in that defied my whole something that I gotta make a million triangles to make this one image it's a mark in every artist is known for their mark they have a similar feel hand field things and it's interesting when you have that much money and power it was like you know like what type of thing is it does and then you know you're thing in our member like with this style as is mainly primarily made up triangles like I don't look at it like it's Sipe of nature thome and that's what I'm trying to learn and emulate is the fact that he's humble but in his own way like he'll never come down to L. Finding our own style as like that's how you gain an identity and it'd be cool for people to come to you and be like I want that between these emails or whatever trying to make the least moves possible to find something visually with the latest news possible and besides the circle would experience led to that realization I wish I remember the interview in the mind space that was in I mean I think that's true tomorrow he's wearing jeans he's wearing that it's like crazy years the whole collection but yeah like he has a unique there's one client wanted some minimal and I was like oh man I gotta do these warm ups I gotta you know try to find out what they really want so I spent these fifteen minutes I was found through the records and I would try to like play the records and I'm talking about maybe a toddler and so I would like take toothpicks to the record or take certain things he's like my mom's sewing needles records and stuff like totally Maxima isolating like what I thought I saw but my zero idol they're seeing you from their perspective and you can never live for their expectations because they expect you to be how to mix the record and designs album this out is gonNA look and a walk that path for longtime all the way up and so maybe thousands well nothing the worst thing you can do is allow trends people in even your heroes to dictate who you are and what you bring to the table emails between you know these clients juggler as a freelancer and I was studying the ideas of minimalism because I'm a maximalist right how and through exercises and through personal time I tried to find that like for the life of me try to find it not try it on everybody else's style and breastroke or yeah and like this just made sense for me you know they started off fifteen minutes between dial so I know a lot of artists out there you know they struggled like figuring out that signature and you know there's there's graffiti artist and you have people that are just doing art on snakes you can't leave your confidence in yourself in somebody else's hands no matter who they are going to be a Mom Dad sister lover teacher he we give so much value in confidence and wait to our heroes are are you know just the they see you'll never like ever be able to be that you can only be what you can control in front of you and a show that you're working on that you're talking about how you WanNa make it an experience and I want to talk about in a recent interview you mentioned like that fifteen minutes starting to thirty thirty times an hour an hour like days and figured out how to make my my my reality I love where you've taken it is so much I mean you guys I can't wait for you to see some of that outside and which you probably have coming because you have aw and then I found out like you know what was behind the curtain in in the music industry knows just like me just try to be the world's it's very important and one thing that separates me from being up here on this stage only difference from me to an aspiring artists is a creatively bull in our lives that we kind of go to for a compass boils down to this right I think it's extremely important as a visual artist too emerging artists as aspiring artist is the fact that oh it's not good enough oh I can't I can't show this it's not ready yet oh it's not this but as soon as you take that have the most confidence in you and you can't leave that up to somebody else notch arouse history is filled with success as we heard his creative process and his trajectory is a May by sheer numbers somebody in their own fifty years from now is going to be selling hundred million dollar art pieces somebody so but at the same time it's like I'm worth right somebody in how many how many artists are in this room wow okay all right somebody in his room probably him but imagine that imagine if you knew if you knew in fifty years uh-huh everywhere but he became her signature and that's just one of most sought after you have this unique style digital art which many many years ago it wasn't even looked at as his and that's only issued by yourself like there's no difference I have more opportunities I've more options I have more triangle as is that is just lie and so I found that exercise and I was like oh I just kept on and after a while would you treat that what type of pedestal would you put that on and so when you finally discover that about yourself and understand that the weight this ambition but with success comes negatively comes criticism so we asked them what do you do how do you confront criticism and easy to be in a room filled with a namic entrepreneurs creatives especially the ones that are considered to be the face generational wealth Jay Z. it's hard not to be impressed with same artwork and you give it your all confidence wise everything I'm not saying be full of be grounded in realistic in your gestures your piece of art that you're working on right now in your studio is going to be worth one hundred million dollars how much would you give it how much would you feel about how there's there's so many different I interviewed shots how Martin in this last season you know when she talked about drawing he's The draw under her bed curtains you know our family was like why are you drawn the gravity and the seriousness that you give your work that's the difference between somebody who's professional and somebody who's just learning how to take those steps you leave behind not what they said about you and if you look at anybody in those history books anybody in those museums they had their share of haters you know what I'm saying it's tough to deal with I've dealt with it with my family with my friends over the last five years ever since things started falling my way you have to eh void like a plague may not like so your eyes on me because I gave myself the creative license because I gave myself that change you know and like that's the thing that holds us back as Sabih an influencer right you have to be able to influence and if you influence they're gonNA start looking at like you acting like you joined the things that you do take the people that you have given the right to criticize you your friends your family the people that you respect their opinion let them in and so you got to learn to live with that you gotta learn half the skin and have really really good people to cry on event and shut the door like everybody's going to have an opinion everything is not for everybody it's just a given and it comes with the territory how has he been impacted by this construct between artists and survivor that breaks so many other people natural is a successful artist there's no question he's cultivated his background and creativity and dedicated himself to the lifestyle that comes with however that's the light the light that everybody wants is you I want more followers I want more is I want more fans I want more of these things job and I was fed up I didn't have the perspective of walking into this entrepreneurship opportunity as man I'm going to be broke for like you know have a long until I get my thanks right right it was freedom it was like okay if I get a job I know

Prudential Prudential Natural Natural Jay Z Stewart Gerard Adams James Yana Prince George Jay Z. Brooklyn Jay Nike County Maryland Prince George Puma Everett A. Son Pratt Institute Dane EPA fifteen minutes
Decoder Ring: Pillow Talk

Slate's Culture Gabfest

29:10 min | 1 year ago

Decoder Ring: Pillow Talk

"<music> pillows can make you feel a little bit like you're underwater. You're underwater and you feel like the water sort of supporting you and there's no gravity. I like pillows to sort of recreate that feeling suzy lions. It's a brand strategist but that's not why I'm speaking with her. I am a pillow enthusiast. I wanted Suzy's help understanding something that I've been wondering about for a long long time I would say my pillow collection is vast. I have eleven pillows on my bed but it's a big bed a few years ago in my capacity slates TV critic. I watched hours hours of H._G._T._v.. A cable channel that specializes in reality shows about real estate chose what people looking for homes flipping homes redecorating homes shows like house hunters and fixer upper not to mention the shorter videos published on their site and on Youtube. Keep all of these series are slightly different but on every single one I was totally distracted by the same thing whenever they got to the part of the show where the House was finished when you've been fixed or flipped or redecorated there would be so many many pillows on the beds start with the pillow shams standard or European like I'm using here now add pillows and Standard Shans. If you WANNA use both lastly you're sleeping pillows and for an extra special touch at a decorative pillow. This really gives you a luxurious look. By the end of this video there are eight pillows at the top of the bed and an additional two at the fut- decorative pillows which for the purposes of this episode. I'm defining as any pillow you don't sleep on bring a lot of people pleasure and they can really snazzy up a room. They do not seem like the kind of thing a reasonable person. It should have strong feelings about one way or another but watching H._d._t._v. I discovered when it comes to pillows I am I'm not a reasonable person. You want to have my bed yeah for regular pillows that are all or you know to each what and I am not alone my sister closet Mount Rushmore then and she finds a pill as oppressive if she ever has to say at my house dog set an oppressive that those are her words when I see a bed hiding beneath an avalanche of pillows beneath sleeping pillows and square pillows and pillow shaped like hard candies beneath bolsters and wedges and Shams and Euro Shams beneath pillows that are not for sleeping on. I just wonder what are all those things for Mrs Dakota during a show about cracking cultural mysteries. I'm Willa Paskhin every month we take on a cultural question habit or idea crack open and try to figure out what it means and why it matters the decorative pillow Oh has been around for a long time but in the last decade or two it has come to colonize furniture across the country like never before the rise of the decorative pillow is due to a host of forces including designers manufacturers retailers cadillacs social media globalism ECOMMERCE and also television which has done more than anything to boost Americans desire for pillows on home decor shows. The pillow is a symbol of luxury comfort decadence coziness and self care with others. It's just another example of consumerist access and I want to say up front that going into this episode. That was me the consumerist excess person decorative pillows always seem kind of silly to me but talking to people about pillow's begin a new respect for them. The decorative pillow may be a colorful bit of replaceable fluff that ends up on the floor a lot but it's also a rabbit hole into the enormous question of how we form our taste of the way that intensive marketing a cheap global supply chain and personal preference influenced the thousands upon thousands of small choices we make about the stuff that literally lives with us so today. I'm Dakota ring a real doozy. How did decorative pillows take over our homes to get a sense of just how big pillows those are as a commercial phenomenon you just have to turn on your TV and they look beautiful the combinations of the Moon together that's the Oscar winning actress Catherine Zeta Jones who has her own line pillows which she sells regularly on Q._V._C.? Gene the pillow she sells around and rushed and come and washed out pastels names like sea glass and ashes of rose. They look like Fussy pincushions and on one side they have a large plastic fo- jam at their centre. A pair cost between twenty and thirty dollars to lend this just this glamorous we really do you can Nixon with other pillows that you have. They just and what I love about them is that you know the pillow shaped the wreck zeta-jones sells thousands pillows and each of these segments and that is a tiny part of the decorative pillow economy which I'm distinguishing from the crowded marketplace the sprung up around sleeping pillows which I'm not really going to touch on in this episode decorative pillow purveyors include Q._V._C. Q._v._C. boutiques upscale chains big-box providers of increasingly stylish fast home decor like target an online emporiums like Amazon which all provide pillows to customers who have been primed by experts pinterest instagram and reality shows on channels like H._d._t._v. t._l._C. and Bravo to think of the throw pillow as the perfect finishing touch. They're definitely more of a thing I think than they ever have been doesn't Adler as a designer of many things including pillows Susie has pillows and the shape of an ass on her bed. I would like to think that I actually something of a pillow pioneer. <hes> about I think at least twenty one years ago I came out with my first line until they became a sensation station. I sold a ton of them since I became a pillow. Prepare pillow too definitely definitely multiplied taken off and they're just willing of them as a businessman who has made money on pillows and as a designer diner who puts a lot of thought and care into them that first line of pillows he mentioned was hand loomed in Paki arm by Peruvian artisans. You might think Adler of all people will be all about fitting as many pillows on a bed as he possibly could do you have a prescriptive scripted feeling when it comes to billows like about the amount number of pillows. A person should actually have on their bed. If I'm being honest the like the march of pillows down the bed. <hes> does seem extremely serenely contrived to me if I'm being honest. I don't WanNa be so I actually have usually I have like four sleeping pillows and maybe one pillow in front of them that kind. It's a punctuation mark other maybe abashed but he has company in reporting the story. I spoke with a number of people with similarly conflicted feelings about pillows. I have become so allergic to throw pillow decorative pillows. You get a little crazy. I think I do get anxiety about where to put them. I want to be clear here that all of these people have at least one decorative pillow in their house if not more they're ubiquitous even among people who kind of role there is about them in fact they're ubiquitous among people people who feel far more strongly about them than that for the hundreds of thousands of videos and instagram post in pinterest pages that celebrate pillows there are smattering of people with a decidedly anti decorative pillow stance typically men carping about their female partners pillow use. This sort of gender conflict about the pillow has been going on for years. What is this? It's a cushion right. This is the scene from the British Sitcom coupling which aired in the early two thousands. I just need to know on behalf of all men everywhere. I just need to ask please. What are they full Chubby Little Boston just sitting around everywhere all day? Pets such is this character ridiculous anger his resentment his sexist argument that logical men like function well silly women like superfluous pillows stems from the fact that though he does not understand cushions he has to live with them anyway anyway and that's even more true today than it was when coupling was on T._v.. The decorative pillow in other words has conquered. Even it's haters. How did that happen to understand how the decorative pillow concord contemporary pulse rate? We have to go back in time you might assume the decorative pillow is a descendant of the sleeping pillow but though they are both soft squishy objects often found on beds they are distantly related springing from different sources and coming to resemble each other only over a period of thousands of years. The first sleeping pillows appeared around five thousand B._C.. In Mesopotamia and shortly after an agent Egypt. They were practical objects made of hard substances. Rock would ceramic the used by the very rich to keep their heads off a floors and free of insects and they are not really the antecedent of the decorative pillow which said descends from the cushion which began appearing in Egypt on twenty seven hundred B._C.. Cushion comes from kings had chairs and everybody else out before and this sort of was the intermediate step between slower and being a king any coggin is a principal designer chairs and building studio in Brooklyn and an associate professor at Pratt Institute School of design for Millennia. The cushion remained status object of the very wealthy found largely in royal courts and this didn't begin to change until all the industrial revolution because the bulk of television and movies are about the very upper classes and because we the middle classes have so much stuff. We just assume everybody all listed due to Flanders is a social historian author whose work focuses mostly on the nineteenth century lives of the British middle classes were almost empty. They wouldn't have had all this stuff. According to Judith we know that in Pennsylvania and Delaware and the seventeen ninety he's just eight percent eight percent of household even had sleeping pillows and that was typical for the time but as mass produced textiles became available for the first time decorative pillows flooded into Victorian era homes on a larger tide of home furnishings the home decor of that period is known for being intricate think lots of upholstery and doilies and tassels and embroidering pillows with mottos and flowers even became a popular hobby a kind of Victorian D._i._y.. Project heading into the twentieth century though there was a backlash to all of this the pendulum began to swing away from maximalism and towards minimalism or to put it in design terms towards modernism and though it would swing back and forth a number of times throughout the twentieth century by the Depression era decades leading up to the Second World War the decorative pillow had decidedly gone out of style so now I want to turn to how it came back in there there are a lot of factors that changed everything for the pillow in the post World War Two era rising economic prosperity the availability of cheap synthetic fabrics and fills the polyesters of the world and television photos especially like in magazines photos of living rooms in the nineteen thirties and forties. You just see brocade couches Victorian style couches kind of that like Depression Era Sofa Rebecca Avoi- is the host of H._G._T._v.. The end me a podcast about watching H._d._T._v.. She's also the CO host of slates. Mom and dad are fighting among other podcasts. She's always been very interested in design and attentive to pillows in particular and what you don't see a lot of throw pillows and those couches and in many cases you don't see any if you look at back issues of architectural digest which was founded in one thousand nine hundred eighty usually that well into the nineteen fifties homes had very few decorative pillows in them so I occasionally have one or two on them and beds are even spare. Rebecca Brecca has a theory about why this changed for my unifying theory of throw pillows is that television set design has influenced the American culture into believing that you cannot have a sofa without throw throw pillows on it on a classic Sitcom couches are front and center the focal point of the SAT. Rebecca thinks the sitcoms of the late nineteen sixties seventies eighties the couches on shows like I dream of Jeannie and the Jeffersons Mary Tyler Moore and growing pains taught Americans. Is that a couch without throw pillows on it was incomplete. The couch really is a central character in a lot of television shows and those couches all have throw pillows on them with the notable exception of the cosby show and it continues today. Modern family is basically a showcase of throw pillory if you look at the stats on that show as TV critic needless to say I loved this theory and very much wanted it to be true so I called up. Some Sitcom set designers to check it out. John Hafner is a production designer for multi camera sitcoms who has worked fifty two series including golden girls friends and two and a half men one cook made its way onto a television show. It'd probably got there because other people had them in their living room. SITCOMS are supposed to look more or less like real homes in other words. They did not start to include throw pillows until real people had throw pillows so in this sense Rebecca's theory is not quite right. T._V. didn't introduce people to the decorative couch pillow. They were already spreading as designers. Diners Manufacturers Advertisers Magazines Department stores and other entertainments like the movie pillow talk which does have a lot of decorative pillows in it push away from the mid century minimalism of the nineteen fifties early sixties into the maximalism of the seventies seventies and eighties but if it comes weren't the first movers of cash pillows and they didn't start the trend I think rebecca is right and thinking that they both amplified and solidified it. You know I think a lot of times people in the entertainment business. Even though we start the story and character we're and then we're in the game of aspirational decoration and design so we take something and then add one more to it you know Sitcom couches creative kind of pillow feedback loop with sets inspired by how real people lived going onto inspire those same real people to buy more throw pillows but as influential as a Sitcom Sofa escape was it would be a mistake to think of it as the only influence rather it was one one of many one part of the feedback loop and you can see that in well Sitcom set design itself from we're in the late nineties we went into a whole style. We used to call restoration hardware or it would be cadillac furniture. We call it to they'll. Brzezinski is also production designer. He now works feature films but he worked on eight hundred episodes of multi camera sitcoms like Allen and growing pains. U._T._V.'s come along and you know shows are designed to show you how where to get this stuff. You know what I mean. It basically three theirselves tool. That's what those shows are. The sitcoms were we didn't think of it like that in the beginning sitcoms or trying to show viewers a realistic and aspirational home not to sell them stuff but it turns the displaying aspirational home to millions of TV. Viewers is a great way to do just that so you can guess what happened when T._V. started trying to make us by pillows on purpose show is brought to you by luminary. Luminary is a new podcast subscription service with some of the best original content around is the only place where you can listen to the seaward a new podcast from Lena Dunham and Eliza Bennett every week. Lena analysts GONNA historical historical deep dive into the lives of women who society has dismissed to explore what exactly it means when we call a woman quote crazy along with the c word luminary gives you access to a number of other dynamic original shows that you can't find anywhere else. The luminary APP is free to download and if you use it to listen to thousands of podcasts including the ones you already love like this one whether you're into news politics comedy business and tech or more luminary has the right show for you. We'll get your first two months of access to luminaries premium content for free when you sign up at luminary dot link Slash Dakota. That's luminary dot link slash decoder after that it's only seven ninety nine per month. That's it's luminary dot link slash decoder for two months of free access luminary dot link slash decoder cancel anytime term limits apply so we're now entering the modern age of pillow consumption which has been made possible by a lot of factors globalism ecommerce cheat materials and Labor that have made affordable and reasonably well designed homegoods more accessible than ever before when it comes to what is driving our taste in pillows what most influences what we want and what we want to look like. I don't think anything matches the power of home decorating TV the first home decor show P._B._S.. Says this old house premiered in Nineteen seventy-nine Bob. What's the condition of that roof up there not too good? It's an old metal roof has just been covered over with tar paper Robbie half the rip it off. I don't like that metal with the tire era over at this genre didn't really take off until the early ox when reality T._v.. Itself became television staple at this time the turn of the Millennia before print and retail had been destabilized by the Internet home decor magazines and catalogs based furnishing companies or flourishing consumers were already very interested in interior design and getting their houses just so and reality TV tapped into this the breakout show in this first wave of home decor series away waved included house hunters and extreme makeover home edition with T._l._C.'s trading spaces all right. Let's recap the rules A._R.. Thousand Dollars Two days share carpenter. You spend the night you don't see the room until the end of day two when you switch back Lada. A Lotta Yada Yada all right so we're GONNA keys as with all home decor shows trading spaces was meant to give you ideas and inspiration about things you could do to and by for your own space. We're having more pillows out of this too and this goes on top of the white so it's quite what I learned from watching that show that was very much in my formative home-buying ears. I bought my first house in one thousand nine hundred nine Rebecca Lavoix again. You know what I learned from that back in the day when I was living on a shoe string and are tiny I house was that was the way to make a room pop hilly and Laurie and burn and genevieve toby so so by the couch I can afford and then go to crate and barrel by the really nice pillow to make it seem you know I totally learned that from that. Show trading spaces was just the beginning for pillows. Its message was reinforced on show after show or pillow serve both a clear design function and play a more emotional role as the accessory that pulls a room together the cozy aspirational item. You need to make a house a home home and this message it has travelled. I do feel like with client. It is talked about way too often and for way too long. Genevieve gorder is an interior designer who was at a number of shows on H._D._t._v. and was also one of the original designers trading spaces. Oh people who aren't designers feel like they understand decorative pillow and that like something they need to scoff at nine o'clock at night when I spoke with people about about decorative pillows I was struck by the kind of shared vocabulary they had for them. Everyone seemed to know exactly what they are for an easy way care transform the look of a room for not a lot of money room should have like accent moments chance and I think pillows decorative pillows on the couch are like the prime way of doing that yeah and of course the nights cheap easy way of bringing a little sort of designer early or thinking about pillows like this insulates them from the charge of being useless because it gives them a function. They're the easy relatively affordable way to elevate a room but with its focus on price point and utility. This language isn't just designed speak. It's it's a sales pitch. You put this and it just mixing the better you know it just the dimensions of it just makes it look so finished H._G._t._v. and other home decor shows have boosted the average Americans Birkin's design literacy enormously made regular people more attentive to and familiar with interior design but it's also turned us into salesman selling stuff to ourselves. The decorative pillow has more going for it than attractiveness es and price point though real. There's nothing softer. There's nothing more luxurious than having down against your body mm-hmm luxury as a word you hear a lot talking about decorative pillows particularly bed pillows. You know a super affordable pillow can make you feel luxurious or a robe suzy lions again right. There's no one actually like physically needs a row but there's something that feels sort of Nice chiefs and like you're taking an extra stepper you know a little bit more care and you feel uncomfortable as you're going through getting ready for work the bed pillow even more than the couch pillow is associated with a kind of decadence. This is one of the reasons why hotels ten completely overdo them. They want you to know that they are trying to pamper you. Even if it's the point of over pampering another reason for this kind of ostentatious display so the more pillows you can see the more you're likely to buy in private homes though were even pillow lovers tend to be more restrained pillow US feels a little more wholesome taking the time to get your bed pillows just so is something that you're doing for yourself at a cultural moment when time mm-hmm feels like the thing we never have enough of when time feels like the ultimate luxury taking a few minutes out of your day to make your bed might feel the some people less like a chore and more like an extravagance but the luxurious various decorative pillow exists in a larger context to the context of the luxurious everything when I was growing up <hes> rich people had pretty Spartan Home Jonathan Adler again you know like kitchen counters tomato FORMICA batching counter Mehta formica there wasn't there just wasn't sort of the fetish ization of luxury in every element of one's home. A lot of this focus on luxury has to do with accessibility. With the proliferation of retail choices if historically the luxury item was something it was hard to get because it was unavailable or prohibitively expensive now. It's just about finding the thing you like most at your price point affordable luxury which is often often the same as disposable luxury. Having lots of beautiful soft things on your bed is genuinely kind of luxurious but the pillow is also just another piece of trendy consumer to try US made with who knows what labor practices and materials it's very selling point is that it's replaceable. You're not stuck with the pillow forever or even for very long is another item in the stream of stuff going into and out of our homes a purely aesthetic object that we don't need but it has come to feel like we do if we don't want our couch to look weirdly naked working on this piece. I kept thinking about pineapples specifically this pineapple blanket that I have on my bed. It's a quilted white coverlet let with the outline of pineapples embroidered into it in pink thread a few years ago I saw it on anthropology is website and I thought oh I like that and then I started noticing that pineapple print stuff was everywhere on shirts on kids clothes loads on homegoods notebooks lamps and honestly I liked most of it and that creeped me out how did they whoever they is no that I would like pineapple so much. How did they know before I did? Did they make me like hike pineapples. I don't know what your equivalent of this is some other fruit print succulents gallery walls mason jars pillows but you probably have won this feeling that market forces taste makers trendsetters companies designers instagram Graham television are not just influencing your most personal aesthetic choices but almost conjuring them. It is a very weird feeling but it has become a common one. The pineapples reminded me that though I may be relatively immune the charm arm throw pillow. I am not immune to the larger phenomenon of wanting stuff because someone has made you want it. The pineapples also reminded me that I am not immune to our larger cultural fixation on nesting this is not the only moment in in time that we've been fixated on getting our surroundings just so often with the help of lots and lots of stuff. I want to return momentarily that historical group of pillow lovers the Victorians Victorian design may look overdone and Fussy to the the modern I but there was an intensity to it that might feel familiar giving everything right where you live is just as phonetic as the Victorian and housewife who was oh could enjoy lease on everything any coggin again a designer and associate professor at Pratt a need to control your space to craft or space is probably at the same level and yeah and um urgency as the nineteenth century whenever there's a big kind of wellspring uncontrollable ideas going on the so the natural inclination is to make your home more attractive when faced with huge changes in the world the telegraph the railroad factories the Victorians nested when the world outside your home is wild and scary and crazy you can at the very least control your immediate surroundings you can cope with lots of pillows or you can cope with just one two three exactingly chosen ones if the home the core craze is about exerting control over one of the very few things that we can that solves what it came to think of as the real mystery of the pillow which isn't why so many people are putting them on their beds but why so many people have strong feelings about pillows one way or another the pillow champion and pillow skeptic the pillow maximalist and the pillow minimalist or more like than they are different because they both care very much about the look of their space hating pillows after all is just another way of caring caring about them. Okay what if one of your children developed a real love of pillows I would I would support her but also find it very alienating. This is Dakota rang. I will pass can you can find me on twitter at Willa Paskhin. have any cultural mysteries wants to code you can email us at decoder ring at slate dot com you haven't yet subscribe Eh our feet and apple podcasts or ever get your podcasts and even better tell your friends. This podcast was written by Willa Paskhin was produced an edited by Benjamin fresh who also does illustrations for every episode. Cleo Levin is our research assistant.

Willa Paskhin Jonathan Adler TV critic homegoods maximalism T._V. Rebecca associate professor Egypt Suzy Youtube brand strategist Mount Rushmore US architectural digest Catherine Zeta Jones Mrs Dakota Oscar
In your Shoes with Ayse Birsel

In Your Shoes With Mauro Porcini

54:03 min | 4 months ago

In your Shoes with Ayse Birsel

"Hi i've for chini pepsico's chief design officer. Join me for our new series where we dive into the minds of the greatest innovators over time. We finding what drives them in the professional journey and in their personal lives trying to uncover the universal truth. United anyone attempting to have a meaningful impact in the world. These is your shoes. I think differently. Because i think like a designer. We think that no matter how hard the problem we're going to come up with a better solution. We put ourselves in other people's shoes. We see the peach. The emotion the physical the intellect disputed of things. We like to work together in this. Would if questions. it's all about having an open mind. I'm quoting our guest today. From two thousand and seventeen extol name the most creative person by us company. She's the author of designer life. You love a step by step guide to building a meaningful future. She designs award winning products. We fortune one hundred and five hundred companies including amazon colgate-palmolive amelia meal g. I s staples toyota many more. She writes weekly. Post on innovation for inc the com. She's born in turkey and she came to the united states on a fulbright scholarship and as master from the institutes she's the recipient of numerous awards including interior design. Best of the year award in two thousand thousand and eighteen moves people idea amvest of neocon gold awards young designer award from the brooklyn museum of art and yet fina ward of accidents in furniture design from a war can be found in the permanent collections of the momma hooper national design museum and philadelphia. Museum of art. I shape yourself white. Come to in your shoes. Mara thanks lights. It's great to be here so you are from turkey. I've been a few times in just instanbul. I didn't explore all the country. But i've been fascinated by the different culture that conversion the cd and you can see. The architecture in the are everywhere. I mean is really fascinating country. But you don't come from instable. You come from northern city. That i'm not familiar with it called. Its mere an pronouncing it right. And isn't there is mere. Tell us a little bit of. I'm very cool. Your audio arrive from there. All the way to the united states to new york. Tell us a little bit about your journey. It's a long story but yes. I was born in izmir. Turkey and isn't isn't mediterranean aegean. Actually see it's by the agency and it's a beautiful little city. When i was growing up it was a sleepy seaside city and it's grown since then but that's where my heart heartbeats from and i grew up in a family lawyers. Almost everybody in my family is or was a lawyer and my brother. And i took a different route. So he became a journalist than i became an industrial designer and And that happened literally because you. We have this teach for this in turkey. We loved drinking tea. And when i was graduating from high school a family friend came to and i had already decided i to become a lawyer. I wanted to become an architect. And he asked me if i knew anything about industrial design and i had never heard of industrial design before and he said actually can use a teacup I wish i had cup to show you but he basically said look this teacup the edges curved so that it can fit our mouths better and it has a handle so that we can hold hop liquid in our hands without burning ourselves and it has a saucer so that if you spill your team you're not going to ruin your mother's beautiful tablecloth and in that moment. Oh i fell in love with a human scale of industrial design. And i thought this is for me. No more architecture and luckily at the time there was one industrial design school that had just started in on coda at the middle east technical university and my grandma lived in on coda in my my parents. Were like okay. Well go to on crowds live with your grandma and so i went to school there and as i was graduating i really wanted to come to new york and my parents were kinda doubtful. Always been incredible champions me and they had always told me you. You should do like your masters in the states. But when i said new york they got really really nervous and this is like in the eighties rights towards the end of and i was like almost like an if this is gonna be a problem and i applied for the full right. Scholarship got the fulbright. Scholarship told my parents. I'm going and all of us came to new york together. They wanted to see where i was going to live in a. I started at pratt institute. And at the time pride institute well practice is still in brooklyn in bedford stye. At the time it was probably one of the worst places. Lean near zero year old daughter. And i remember my father the first day when they were leaving he disappeared and then he came back like twenty minutes later with like this rookie of flowers in his hand. He wants to leave me with in my room with with flowers and his face was all like upside down because he had seen the neighborhood and he realized that this is not a good idea. But anyways that's how. I started in new york. And of course it's now you know bedford size. One of the chicago's nicest neighborhoods. But at the time. It was not safe. You know but anyways. That's my kind of roy is from new york. You say something very interesting. So true is not just your case. It was mike as well and they one of so many people in high school. Many people don't know what designees we've lou still. Today is a problem because then when you realize what it is you got along with it. I mean many people get in love with that happen to you in a pen to me but there is not awareness about design. So what can we do. Be more awareness. There are so many people there could be amazing designers amazing problem solvers. They could add so much value to the society. We live in and they don't become designers because they have no clue or designees what we do what the society should we person should do to increase awareness about design in the world. What you're saying is so true to this day. If somebody asked me what i do and i'm sure it's a similar thing with you even though you're mauro pechiney like everybody should know what you're doing you tell people i design stuff and they don't understand they have this blank kind of look in their face and a lot of people. Tell me oh so you style things or like you draw things or maybe you engineer things. I'm like no no no but here's the interesting thing is You know that. I started Teaching people how to design their lives using design process and tools. And as soon as i say in that's now my trick to kind of short circuit. The the conversation i just say oh by the way i also teach people how to design their lives and in that moment they understand that. There's really crazy organic link between design and our life. Everybody gets and the next thing. I know they're like when is your next workshop. Like how can i design my life and we have a great conversation. So i think maybe that that is the way to teach people in in fact. That's one of my Kind of secrets. Thrills is being able to teach people how to design basically design process using a product that we all have our life. And i feel like. That's my secret. Mission is to teach everyone in anyone how to think like a designer. But i don't tell them that i'm like you wanna design your life in that. He's not even. I mean he's not a secret because you wrote a book about this dog. Love love the title of the book. There are three key words. I always used really really love. I have it in front of me design their life. You love step by step guide to building a meaningful future. There are three wars everyday. Obviously designed the other. You can leave me. Dream creates your life the second one the really law is the war love and that often he's not used in inc starting the business but at the elliott is what moves everything you know is really what most everything and then meaningful the idea of meaning of purpose that today's a trendy war that these eagles instead of marketing and branding but but the combination of design love a meaning is so powerful. So can you tell us more about this book. Did you decide to write a book like this and then as you said you're teaching these you do classes you. You're really evangelizing about this. I love that you say that. I am truly event evangelizing. A design and thinking like designer. Because what's i've learned through the process. Is that people are extraordinarily creative. And it's it's almost like our whole education this creative. I got interrupted because everybody's creative or there are different levels or look. I taught people across the globe. How to design their lives using this process the same process we use with our fortune. Five hundred clients. It's it's a design process and people out as young as thirteen and as young as ninety plus like people in their nineties ninety two ninety three year old and everybody in between. I've never come across somebody. Who stalled or said. I can't do this and i've always again again amazed by the quality of the thinking and i think they're things to it. One is giving yourself permission often. We don't give ourselves permission. I see so many people who think just because they haven't drawn since first grade that they can't think visually and of course design is thinking visually and but once they start using the tools they realize it doesn't matter whether you draw beautifully or not it's simply being able to translate your ideas into maps and geometry in lines and shapes. You know. I had this court the other day from a four year old that this crime drawing that i loved and it says having an idea and throwing a line around it. Isn't that beautiful that that's the first piece of it. That giving your Yourself permission and to. You can't leave people just you by saying you go imagine like you and i have a process. Every creative person has a process whether they do within intuitively or the follow a process into able to design and think creatively. You need that process. So all i'm doing is showing people accessible process. And just i just sit back and enjoy how they think you know and and can you tell us a little bit more about the process for since i've been reading about this construction and the construction is can you tell us more about what these that process a process cold deconstruction reconstruction. And it's it's something. That i did intuitively that i've learned over time. I guess but at one point and really the the reason that we're here is because of there's a point in two thousand and eight. When the economy crashed of. I had no work and i had a lot of time in my hands and i have to tell you. I had never been in that situation before sentencing. I don't want to be in that situation. But there was this kind of like a time window oakland in my life and i didn't know what to do with it until a vaidya friend of mine Kaplan who's one of my oldest collaborators told me you wanted to use this time to think about how you think because you think differently and which she said that all heard was like you think differently. And i i was flattered. I wanted to really take her up on that and spent about almost a year kind of going into myself into my head. Trying to understand like i had at that. Time or eighty designs office systems and You a concept cars name. It computer is. And i. But i didn't have a process in so i use that time to go back on this project in thinking. Where did i start. How did i go from what i know to what i can imagine. In that developed construction construction so it has four steps in nutshell and the first his utica struck. And you see what something is made up of. This is really a step to simplify the complex. The of any problem but also when you put something in a break something into its pieces you breaking your Sections about how things go together and once you do that. It's almost like if you were a making food. It's kind of like making an ingredients lists rather than thinking about the end results. You think of the ingredients so anyways. All i'm going into too much detail. This is the second step is points of view. Once you have the ingredients you try and look at them from different perspectives. And think about these things. I want to us. Where can i gather inspiration from you know. Should i use french ingredients or chinese ingredients. Turkish ingredients and then that's points of view and you can be very flexible in their very creative and then the third step is reconstruction putting it back together and there. You really need to recognize that. You can't have everything you're going to make choices which design most of the time is about making the right choices that together creates something more valuable. You make your choices so you might say okay. You might choose chicken or if you're vegetarian you might leave the chicken out and use another protein. Search that kind of thing you reconstructive annan. We the last is expression. So you put together your your new ingredients have to come together to represent a form and the form can be a in our work. It could be a prototype. It could be a strategy document. It could be an idea sketch. It could be end result and fewer making soup. It's will be the hot soup or you know the cold soup or how you put it in a bowl with the experience drinking it. How it makes you think of your family or how you can share with your friends. So that that's the expression. I love it. I love it. And so and people are out. Are people reacting when they engage reunion this methodology. Do they understand. It is easy for them to understand how to apply to their life and their work was a jew. Absolutely like i said the the idea of designing your life comes natural to people and and i in the design principles of optimism an empathy. You like when you enter the space when you want to design your life you started by thinking positively because our life is conflicts. Most design problems are complex but we have as designers the optimism that no matter how hard the problem. We're going to come up with a better solution. And i'm your work is all about that you yourself mara are the embodiment of that. But that that's really important for people especially when they have hardship in their life setting the the baseline at that. Optimism is really important on an entity. So you go ahead. And i'll tell you about empathy is glad i i agree so much. I mean i think optimism is so important so powerful is really a beautiful work to define. What innovators do in general designers for screwed by the innovators in china and i met in my life people. There were strategic. They had betty. Hi empathy there were the amazing aesthetic sands. They understood the business they added all but they were not up to mistake and they were missing that drive energy to change the war and to really leverage all the other kathy sixty they add so i really love the fact that you emphasize that characteristics so much and then you are going to empathy some of them. I just want to come back to to optimism for a second. Only i live this with my family is selling you. Everyone of them are lawyers. Lawyers are not optimistic. Very quite pessimistic. Think of the worst case scenario all the time so in a way i think part of the reason that i chose design is i was so drawn to the optimism and it's important to recognize. You can't design something if there are no problem so we are very much about solving problems with you. Want to see the problem in deconstruction is in a way acknowledging the problem and its parts and pieces but then when you get into points of view all the tools are there to inspire you towards solutions and there is a mark Both in the design process that we have with our clients but also with individuals the the temperature of the room as you move from deconstruction where people recognize their challenges. To point of view. it's intentional. I set it up so that after points of view. You're just energized. By the possibility of your ideas and that it takes off but it i goes out because -struction this kind of a downer. I have to admit it's like and with our team. We're always like okay. That's that was the deconstruction and then it takes off after that so the empathy is well. It's the the name of your. It's being able to stand in other people's shoes and this is really important and in designing your life. You have to have empathy for yourself. That often i find. We don't have practice said that's most you have to kind of like me kind yourself and acknowledged license conflicts and you work as complex in our life and work are all parts of design and have empathy for yourself and feel those feelings connects with your emotions and then think about well. How can i turn this towards something. I love and that's where the word loves love comes in because it's about going towards something that you will enjoy more earlier you talking about two thousand and eight and the er in which. You're the time to think we are in the middle of a a probably. The biggest cries is that this generation has been witnessing with. We call it first and then also the cv undress connected to racist like matter. Did you have time to think in this month's and what did you think about the show. The time to think like he. That penn back danny to date now. That's an excellent connection. And i often think of that that this is similar but harder. And what's interesting. You know mara for me now. This time i'm living through the crisis with other people not by myself. So if the two thousand eight th was truly a journey alone into myself. I'm living the covert crisis intentionally in collaboration with so many other people Part of it is. And i'm finding that incredibly helpful and i think one thing that is that will be different for me. Coming out of the this period is how much more. I believe in the power of collaboration. The reason for that again. I mean one is today. I have a process people more than any other time are interested in need to design their lives because we know has been broken down. I mean it's like the virus has deconstructed our life whether we want to do not write it so now we have to reconstruct it into do it with optimism. Empathy collaboration is key and these are like the foundational elements of design to they. Maybe there's never been a better time for designing your life and work because you can't escape it you know and it's not just like in my neighborhood it's across the globe so And in a way we do need that optimism because there are so many things that if we let that can just bring us down and when you're done it's really hard to think with imagination and hope so definitely That's what i've been doing. I have of so as soon as almost as soon as we started. Sheltering in place is set up a virtual team designed the life. You love virtual Which is every wednesday at five o'clock and reached out to my community of people who have shown interest in designing their life at night. So that i'm doing this would you. would you be interested. And would you like for us to do together and people showed up. And i think we started with like thirty people and i was like. Do you want to just talk and share or so. We use an exercise every time we need from the book so we can like together design our lives and they decide basically decided together that we should design our lives together. That's what we've been doing every wednesday end. It's i have to tell you. It's the best thing i've done. I love this idea of connecting collaborating in in moments of crisis in general i. It's a very inspiring. Then you are. By the way design of the works allots have been working a lot. Over the years on they wave people collaborate in offices in gorky spaces with your work with our meal for instance. And and you've been investigating this tange on if you want between being altogether in an open space and collaborate connect him but then also the neither of a foxing concentrating on having personal space. And and the your your design. You singing the solution to the tension and lucien of those solutions over the years. I'll you think they work is working space. We change after coffee so the space itself the furniture and then they way a working people are three different questions in one but you may have three different answers but working space and then the the furniture itself and then the way walking up people is a very relevant question for us. We have androids of thousands of people in pepsico that we go back are starting to go back to the offices and we are really literally right now every day trying to figure out exactly what will be new way of working back in the office or that i breed. We're working between the office home digital world. What's your point yet. It isn't it incredible Like who would have thought that our notion of work with change so radically and it has i think There's no going back. Work is hybrids. We're going to work from home and we're going to work from the office for different reasons and one of the things that Trends that we were seeing the office was the office was becoming like your living room and has been going on for the last ten fifteen years and you walk into any corporate environment you see sofas and proofs and soft materials until lows of kitson's and so that that's that was already happening what's happening now is the That was the office becoming the living room now. Our living rooms are becoming the office. And so is this union yang. That's happening and with that. I think it's going to be important for corporations to provide lou rights environments for people in their home environments. But at the same time. Give them the flexibility of their choices. Because in the office all my work with herman miller We've been collaborating for twenty years. One of the interesting things about designing office systems is as a designer. You always think of the end user but when you design office system it's not the end user who makes the choice it's the corporation the architect the facility manager who makes the choice and One of my friends. Either miller jim long. Who is the head of research would always tell me. I remember when you design an office system. it's one person who chooses for thousands and that's an interesting distinction because you want to make sure that no matter who that person is that they make the right choice the honorable choice for the news that they take good care of the news. Now it's different because at home. We make our own choices. One person makes a choice for two three family for example but we soon needs. There is an urban component to work. You still want to be able to sit in a good share. Have good posture. Have a good table have sound so the experience of how to be productive at home needs to be designed and that's both the experience and the furniture of it so that i think is going to be the i'm trying to find the right words for it. It's like the office solicitation of your home and even the school side of it. I mean it's it's also it's not just the office right for your kids. It's your living room is the school and so that that i think is the that balance. Where the design of both is going to be really important. And when we say design i you know it's not just the design of the product. It's also the design of the experience. we need a lot of guys stay. I think also many people don't have the space is where we leaving new york for instance. You don't have a lot of space in your apartment so also the same environment can change during the day. You know your your living room may be the office in times of the day and become a space to entertain people in another time and then to another time is is is dedicated to your family shutting time with your family. So that's another thing that i think is very interesting. I during covid you you you go eventually houses and you see all these office. Equipments and tools in cheech in bedrooms everywhere and it is what it is. I mean. that's the space that you have. So can we think of a bedroom that change shape to become offices the second time of the day and the same eventually a kitchen. Is it something you've been investigating or or or not yet. The i've been absolutely investigating that piece of it again with i'm really drawn to is two things i think they're two hybrids. One is the hybrid between life and work in like you said to be able to go from having a work environment to having dinner with your kids and family and many things in between like a exercising and doing zoom call working four people in the house in our house for example. My husband partner bb working on side. I'm working on the other side kids. We're all on zoom so managing all that that's one hybrid is the balance of and work. But i'm really excited events and i think it gives us opportunities that we didn't have before to have much more original in organic lines and the other the other hybrid is the hybrid between you know analog and digital and this constant back and forth ov- i'm here in my physical environment and now i'm in zoom environments. I'm out to the zoom environment. I'm in my physical environment and you know a. How'd you manage those. Duality is is really. And i don't think we have an answer yet. It will probably take a couple of years for the the right solutions to emerge is going to be very interesting to see how the different furniture companies are gonna move. The different brands are going to move in the space. Because you have the office furniture companies that could come into the home space and then you have the home furniture. Companies that eventually can lead. Think the space with a office approach so the the two industries or the two sisters in the industry some are gonna stuck overlapping in meat. Yeah it's it's going to. You know the home office notion is not new but most corporations really didn't invest in the home in the home office. And that's going to change and then the other thing that's going to change is how we use our time in this notion of again. Nine to five was already. The technology companies disrupted them but the notion that we work side by side with our family for example. That never happened. Know the the notion that you could in the middle of your day like this morning. I worked in a nice stop. I exercise with a chain with my trainer over zoom and then i came back to work but it was all in the same city space this afternoon. I might take a net and then worked till ten in the evening that you you mentioned exercising. Recently i started to exercise With quest with the reality. So i do exercise in virtual reality. They will be interesting as well in the future. Imagine you're in space eventually and you're going to start working with people in this reality and then you can design your space as you want. You can war work. Eventually out of the forest in the amazon. Your views reality ward is going to be very interesting. That's another territory that investigate thinking the near future look during the this crisis during these months there was called the one side and then as we all know very well especially in the us but we repercussion manifestations all around the world there was the black lives matter situation and in general over the years if you think oh of metoo before these new attention to a more diverse society or these new needs to have a more equal inclusive and diverse society. You've been spending many years your life in designing lives and designing we love eh. What is the role of zayn in in in this changing moment it. What is the role of designing design in designing a more equal society. They're all design in these diversity. Opportunity that we it's such a great question. I feel like my own design of my own. Life has been a design of diversity in a way because Bbc is french senegalese. i'm turkish. We fell in love. And now we're living in new york. Bb was living in paris and designing automobiles for renault. When i met him and i was designing concept car for renault when he became my mentor and then we fell in love and then we had our kids who are biracial and two daughters and to see those daughters. Grow up in this in new york in mulch multicultural environments coming from all these different cultures and And then now live through together with them. They are fifteen in black lives matter. It took our life to in our dinner conversations to visit a place. I never saw. We would go in now. When i think of it i look back in. I feel naive. I was you know. I thought that nubian my love for each other and for our children as to human human beings was going to be the. That's how everybody was that today in our in our world today. That was totally possible in understood in to feel today that it doesn't so we have so much progress to make so anyways One thing that. I have Started doing with that. You my viewpoints in. I think you're is to is to look at almost everything through the lens of design. Because that's how i see the world. That's how i solve problems whether it's working with a corporation or working with individuals or working with my family so i'll kind of sit and deconstruct things and so one of the things that i've been doing his deconstructing diversity and two. We created a new program designed the diversity and inclusion you love and it's about Deconstructing racism in which is one of the most difficult things i have ever done because there there is no love in it but from that restricting love and looking at how can we get people to all opinions to reconnect with their values around loves inclusion and and community in from that you know equality equity and kindness and generosity in from that builds a new point of view. And you've been the constructing races. Mu you say something. Very important is not loving. It's what drives racism is fear is is. What's what zeke neurons is. What is driving races. I think all those things that the they Maybe at the base of it. It's forgetting that we're all human beings. It's as simple as that and so when people think that they're different because of their color or gender it we're forgetting where we're humans we're people. I am bleeding. I'm leading for the second time recently. Am sapiens book. I don shula at it and there are many books on the topic on the fact that we are all coming from one area of africa. And then you know over hundreds of thousands of year we just spread everywhere but we are coming from one legion one individual a few individuals that then gave The human race you know started to spread and all around the war then. We need to have some differences. But where all as you say you might even the idea of countries. I'm bored there's and everything is all our to feature something. We created to organize ourselves better to be more productive to defend ourself to to to make sure we cool progressing grow as a as a speeches. But you know right now probably too many times we forget where we come from and we really are and yes is I love that in by the way sapiens. I only read like one third of the way. I just need to get but you making me think i was listening to a podcast about ruth baylor ginsburg Heard notion of gender was the same thing equality between women and men mattered. Only because we're we're we're humans and that was her very simple definition of like if we're all people regardless of our sex we should have equal rights and It's the same thing regardless of race regardless of our country where we're people you'd think that something so simple would be ingrained in us and it's not. It's really mind boggling to me. I thought that well this is a beautiful design. Project unnecessary beautiful. I wish we didn't need to have that kind design project by the necessary design project. I think we all need to invest on more and more and more in the coming months and years to to to find a solution at there is another big project or mehta project that For shu we. Are you know driving here in pepsico especially and there are new. Ceo were But but any designer of the war somehow should be censored to this. And i'm talking about sustainability and and the fact that the moments we designers design something and the companies produce that something will i have an impact on you environments no matter what we designed aeko friendly products avenue impact on the environment. Just this of the materials. The production shipping logistics. Consumption did mission. So the moment we create something. We have a negative impact on the environment. So and obviously then you think about big corporations like ours. We the volumes of products that we have and the fact that we consume them daily the impact as a. You can have a very huge cave. What is the role of design in the world of sustainability. We have just. You know a component of the equation. You know we work with companies and then there is the society that is the users need to be a certain way that our government is education. There are so many different actors but for sure we designers have a role we have a very important role. So what's your point of view on sustainability and the role of design on sustainability in. Anything we do. I i was like where is mara going with this question. And i thought you were going to land in aging which is my other favorite subject. But let's talk about sustainability. I but Many answers they'll tell you. i guess. Maybe because you got started with where i come from. You know my childhood intriguing. My head immediately went to their. I mean sustainable sustainability as designers especially working with herman miller for so many years. Now i mean. Herman miller was one of the first companies to create the cradle to cradle on system for manufacturing and so it's ingrained in me to think sustainable sustainable materials How can you deconstruct a product and break into its parts so that it can go back to where it came from spreads. Just want to tell you where my heart is going. And that is my childhood. Because when i was growing up in turkey in the seventies many things were scarce. We weren't rich nation and a in the world wasn't into so much on consumers. So if you drank a pepsi then take the ball back to the bodega or the grocery store in or in turkish. It's called buckle the corner store right And there would be a deposit money they would give you like five cents bank. You would recycle the bottle. The glass bottle. You wouldn't throw anything away when we use like when when you use of foil. Okay we win that. I didn't have that once. We had that We would watch the aluminum foil and aluminum. Foil would get me used like five or six times before it broke down but better yet with What you do is you would use shower caps. Close your bowl with a shower cap. And then you would wash that and to this day when i go to my mom's house in istanbul. There's like a whole paco. Shower caps or things like that. That's been there forever. Things like that. That i think Examples could go on. And on. And i'm sure you saw some of this growing up in italy is that it's not just about manufacturing. It's a whole different way of life and we've become so lazy in our ways. Some of it's for good reason. We want practicality and we want to not spend so much time doing this thing so we can do that thing. But i really think that. The mentioned answer to sustainability yes. We need solar power. Yes we need to recycle but we also have to live differently and one thing with covid. We saw how quickly we can change how we live and adapt to situations. Might i wanna keep my optimism. My only concern is like it takes a horrible disaster crisis for us to change our ways. And i can't imagine i can unfortunately marriage i think you what what could what's with hughes is going to happen with nature is going to be much more difficult to handle and it's going to teach us some really hard lessons and and so i wanna bring it to an optimistic place in that we are capable and i think we are capable of change. It will require designing difference Daily lives and habits experiences for us to really make a dent in sustainability. Is my long answer to your i. I completely agree with you. One side we need to change behaviors and we need to make sure that these communicated from schools the media governments corporations send. Brian's we need to make sure you know that we raise awareness there. There are some behaviors to change on the other side. I think the challenge we have is designer says out to create something that has the as the impact on the environment. Combine with convenience because when you lose convenience when people don't buy your products anymore don't use the Don't change behavior so in some form away. They will need to compromise convenience if i speed up the change because there is no solution there yet in many many industries that is you can maintain the same level of convenience and really changed the game. So i think we need to strive. We need to keep pushing as innovators for the balance between convenience and and the right solution for the mind but then as user citizens people human beings we need to really understand what is our role and we can change our habits every day. What he's fires you what you search for union speculation every day selling things so it every everything inspires me in the sense that when i have a design project right now for example. We're working on the beautiful project about women's health and so everything that i see whether it's a netflix. Show or cairo. Read or something that my kids says. I relate back to women's health. I knew when. I say everything you know. I don't mean everything but it's kind of like a as a designer. You're like a sponge taking in information. And what. I take in changes depending on the project that i'm working on and and so when i say everything is far as i say that with pride because i think that's one of the beauties of being a designer is how much you need to learn with every project and every project is different and with that a whole kind of learning experience opens up like a window opens up and in your curious in in your you know it's the best excuse to be a constant continuous learners. So i i love that. And then I'll just add one more thing. But in general with inspires me like in in the active design with inspires. Me is other creative people. Like i love to listen to a live orchestra of because i have so much admiration for how they're designing in they're creating in the moments and they're not afraid of performing in front of other people and that always gives me courage like a creative courage when i'm alone with my notebook ipad and i have to think of something. I tried to bring in that courage of the other creators. Who who do it so well and tried to emulate them. I love the notion of creative courage at on this we could go on and on and on for hours but we wrap up of. We touched so many beautiful topics. Diversity sustainability to work in keywords collaboration and optimism leading the most of your approach in general. Not just of what we discussed today. Is this idea of the meta project of designing your life at the end of the design was all about these always. It was about creating something objects expediencies Even brands that cooled add value to the life of people. And you're taking it to the next level. Well let's design completely our live and really really love what you're doing so thank you so much not just for being with us today before while you're doing to evangelize use the world. He's awesome. Thank you laura. Thank you in. Actually i want end of this beautifully. But i can't help but at the signing your life is probably the most sustainable design you can imagine because you your life and the design process. And you don't need anything else you know. I love the clothes. I thank you so much. Thank you thank you. This was lovely was my pleasure thank you.

new york turkey chini pepsico innovation for inc neocon gold awards young desig brooklyn museum of art momma hooper national design m Museum of art mediterranean aegean middle east technical universi mauro pechiney bedford us mara northern city lou pratt institute izmir amazon Mara
Audrey Arbeeny of Audiobrain Talks Sonic Branding and the Rise of Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep. 100

The Voicebot Podcast

1:19:19 hr | 2 years ago

Audrey Arbeeny of Audiobrain Talks Sonic Branding and the Rise of Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep. 100

"This is episode number one hundred of the four podcast, today's guests is Audrey are being CEO and founder of audio brain our topic is sonic branding. Foist nation. Listen up. We have another awesome cast for this week for those of you that are new around these parts. Welcome to episode one hundred you are lucky because there are a lot of great episodes, you can binge listen to this weekend. I'm Brett can sell your host for the voice by podcast each week. We interview people that are making a difference in the voice in a industries and we do in depth interviews. This allows us to get past the surface information. So you can learn the story behind the innovation in this industry and take away some insights, you can use today. We have a guest that is sure to help expand the way you think about the voice industry, Audrey are beanie is a sonic branding expert. She did the X box sonic. Branding has won an EMMY award for her work with NBC on the Olympics and a whole lot more voice comes along. With audio into few brands and other organizations have. Ever considered what they should sound like that is oddly, and her team at audio brain do everyday, and today's interview we breakdown, sonic branding elements, share some examples of audio brains work, and tell you how true voice innovator went from a musician's life performing a hairband to one of the leading sonic branding executives working today before we get started. I want to do a quick listener shadow, Google user gave us a five star review for our Google action saying quote, the industry's hottest in most inciteful podcast, thumbs up. Exclamation point. What we thank you. We will use her. We appreciate the rating and the comment. I just wish we knew who you were. But thanks again. Well, never fear. I also have a five star review an apple apple podcasts from Jamie Lee, which, I James FEC. Oh, she said, quote, Brent always has the best guess in his truly on the cutting edge of the trend. In the voice space, and quote, thank you Jamie much-appreciated voice about podcast listeners if you get a chance, leave us a review and apple podcasts or Google podcasts, and you just might get a showed out, shout out right here. Thanks again, for all of you. The do that it does make a difference with people trying to discover us also. I wanna thank our sponsor of the voice podcast Samsung. Yes. A big logo brand. Once you all know that they support independent media like voice about podcast and that they are focused on serving the voice developer community. So Samsung sells a lot of smartphones. It's typically their first or second globally, in the number of smartphones sold. It is number one in smart TVs, and many plans categories. It is in the top two or three and it has the spark things I t who system. So all this translates into about five hundred million devices, the company sells annually that will be smart starting in twenty twenty it will ship hundreds of millions of smart devices this year. But. One half a billion in twenty twenty and beyond and all of them will have BIC speed voice assistant onboard. So Bixby Samsung's rival to election Google system. And after they updated technology last summer, it's starting to get a lot of positive consumer momentum next up for them is supporting a new developer ecosystem Samsung recently announced the Bixby premier developer program. If you have experience in developing voice apps apply, and I'm told you will have access to complimentary devices and direct support from the big teams over his labs in prominent positioning in for your Bixby voice app. They're called capsules in the forthcoming marketplace. I think you're also going to get help potentially directly from Adam chyers, the founder of both Siri and labs, which became Bixby. So check out the show notes today and apply. It's the Bixby premier developer program. There is an application prop process. I know many people wish now they'd gotten in on early Alexa. Google assistant, but miss the formative days on those platforms. Bixby has a big platform, and you can get in early because they're really just building their developer community. So check that out. Many thanks to Samsung for supporting independent media like voice about podcast. Also, if you ought to become a sponsor of podcast, semi tweet, apper can Sela Twitter or you can reach out directly Brett voiced by that we are looking for people who want to support the work that we do here, so that we can bring you these great informative interviews every week. All right now to this week show it's all about sounded branding, listen up. Okay. Voice about nation. I have a special guest today. Audrey are beanie is an EMMY award winning executive producer and creative director that also happens to be the founder of audio brain a leading sonic branding agency. I think I'll call deleting sonic branding agency and, and challenge. Anybody to come up with a competitor that matches what they've done? I think you'll be clear to you after we get through today's discussion. How much background and experiences group has so sonic branding. That's brand strategy and production based on sound. And for those of you not familiar with his territory something around the long lines of sonic branding audio brain does is strategy original compositions sound design, audio identities on the look music supervision, licensing research, and usability voice casting. There's a lot of services associated with sonic branding, and many people are familiar with visual branding, signing branding is the audio side of that, and really important to the industry. We all work in Audrey founded. The company sixteen years ago, after many years as senior producer at allies arts, where she started the sound branding division since two thousand eight Audrey has also been visiting professor at Pratt institute in teaches to my knowledge, the only sonic branding, course in the country. And Audrey has been the music supervisor for the past nine Olympic broadcast by NBC Audrey are beanie. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thank you, Brett, and thank compliment. Listen well, we'll see. We'll see the next hour will tell the story, right? Will I really wanna start back how you got into this in your background and music and sound? But we should probably just allow you to define sonic branding, for the audience to give them some context as we start. Sure. And thank you for having so sonic burning is the art and the science that surrounds strategic development and deployment of a consistent authentic sound experience of a brand, and everything is a brand including you me, and sound identity is the strategic and creative, alignment of this experience, and it creates the narrative that delivers unified memorable in differentiating communications, so sonic branding consists of music voice in sound design and sound waves vibration coming into it. If you look at the Samsung galaxy S tens, new fingerprint sensor, and it has lots of names, sound branding, sonic branding, audio branding. They all mean the same thing we call it sonic branding. So it is the art and science of intentional strategic audio for a bit of brand experience. So I think of like common examples and we'll talk about some of the ones you worked, but common examples would be like the Intel chimes for Intel inside which was really popular fifteen twenty years ago or United for a long time, I think they use rhapsody in blue to introduce all of their commercials. So those might be true, but also could be like a spokesperson, like the voice of the most interesting man in the world for dosekun as could be part of the sonic Brandon. Correct. Yeah, that's correct. And that's what I wanted, if everybody take something away today is that when you stop and think. About all the places that music sound invoice are heard that we are not really putting the intent to the way visual identity would there's so many places that a brand is heard when you have those disconnected you create disconnected experience. Whether it be apps and voice branding, product, social media, and executive walk on room warming. Ambiance, it could go on and on. And that's what we want to talk about today. Excellent. But before we get to that share we should talk about your story. So, you know, you've been doing this a long time, but you haven't always been doing this. So let's talk about how you got into this initially. I mean we can talk about allies hearts. But I think you've been around music, most of your life. I think I've been around music all my life. I started playing piano, when I was like three or three and a half or so, because it was going to enable me to sit still. Behave better. My sister was taking less than she's a little older than me. So I took the less than after her. And then when I was aid started flute my mother was very, very musical. So she made sure that we had, what she couldn't have as a kid, which was all of us had music lessons than some of us excelled in some of us didn't. And I was I was really good at it. I practiced all the time you didn't have to tell me to practice. I felt things when I played music I loved when I could finish. You know, one of my lessons Dumai recitals as a pretty hyper kid. So it was very good for me from a discipline perspective. Then when I was about sixteen or seventeen I think it was, I started studying voice at Carnegie Hall, who's my brother and I had hairband and it was about. So now I'm dating myself where you're where I am at, but we had this rock band, and we would play club. Till four in the morning and my parents never had a basement. So music was always a part of my life music, was always my house. We had a lot of kids played musical instruments. And I always knew that I would do something with music. Okay. So, so we, we need to we need to explain for some of the listeners what a hairband is I know because I grew up with their band. Okay. So if you think of vans that had big puffy hair and really cute guys. And in some cases like my van of female, we had really big hair, and I guess bands, it would fall in that category would be like a upon Jovi, or def Leppard whitesnake, exactly warrant tons of them. And then we will one of them that was our era. And it was a fantastic era to be an in aband-. Did you play covers? We. Played covers at first at it was really great. Because at that time, it wasn't like it is now you could make I mean, if you are really good cover band. You could make a few thousand dollars a night, and if you mid level, like mine, you can make a thousand dollars a night, and you would go to clubs where thousand people and this would be seven nights a week. It was a very different kind of music scene. And then it changed to being original bans, and at that time, you a pretty much either making nothing or, you know, playing much small venues. And that's when we started writing our own material as did everyone else at the time. Right. Right in so Carnegie Hall voice, lessons, hairband, not often fought of together, but classically trained hair hair band singer ago. No known. Not classically trained singer, because my vocal instructor. Silence Angouleme I was his only rock student. He was training me to be a rock singer, because I was losing my voice trying to sing, you know, iron maiden and things like that. So I really needed to get voice lessons and someone had mentioned him to me and he was totally into it. And he was great. He was really teaching technique. Oh, that's wonderful. That's wonderful. That's great. Yeah. That's a under appreciated aspect of singing. I know my, my daughter, talks me about this a lot because she's into performing arts, my, my brother was a singer for many years. So yes, you need there's a certain way to saying to save your voice, otherwise, you will destroy it, exactly. Which I was doing. Particularly singing every saying here banned songs. Exactly. David Lee, Roth four nights a week. It's kinda rough on the vocal cords. All right. Well, he'll appreciate that we're gonna jump. So somewhere in there you decided that life on the road, a rockstar wasn't going to be for you, and you wind up in basically brand agency, correct. Well, what land have happening was when we changed from doing a cover music to original music I was playing. We weren't play Madison Square Garden. Let's put it that way, and I found that I really enjoyed being in the studio. And at the same time, I also was working with kids that were in some program that were institutionalized in a state hospital that were deaf and blind, and I would do like music with them by putting their feet on speakers, and giving them instruments to play, and they would be able to play them, and then I would track their behavior when they went back to the ward. So I was teetering at that point being a music. Therapist. But I really liked being in the studio in doing production way more than I like performing, which surprises a lot of people because I'm not exactly very introverted, but performing just was not really for me. I liked taking nothing in turning it into something. And I thought I had a really good neck in the studio. I liked mixing. I liked producing. I liked having ideas I like the emotional when you when you nailed it, you knew you nailed it. So I wanted to work at a record company, and they wouldn't take me said, I had no musical background in business. So just go someplace for six months and get that on my resume. And I wound up going to ally sorts. And I went in there in through their accounting department because that's where there was a job opening. But my my goal was to get up in the studios pretty quickly and it was for a music production company. It was pretty big at. Fetched twenty five people, but it wasn't a going to Warner Brothers. So the opportunities that I got there, and it was a, it was a really well known company at the time and still is, and it was crazy crazy, busy and lots of stuff going on. And that's where I pretty much learned a lot of how to produce and I worked my way from the downstairs accounting department to studio director than I'll open the LA studios with Jonathan, then I became a senior producer at that time, Scott started getting this interest in sonic identities. He was going to lot of conferences, Brandon conferences, and Elias at the time predominantly did music for advertising. So he and I started this two person kind of division doing sonic. Pentiti work. And that's where I really, really started to feel that everything that I knew viscerally in everything I knew that I couldn't articulate what I wanted to be a wanted to do. I found in that sonic identity work because it took together, my love of music my love of production, my understanding of psychology and psycho acoustics, and by Musicology in all the things that were were my interests. And it was it was very very, very challenging. And at the same time, I was given tremendous opportunities that I don't think I would got had one of the label's taken me I can imagine, I think about that. You too said that you couldn't articulate all the things you wanted to put together. And yet, that's what sonic branding, does it articulates the. Rand identity without words. So there's nice parallelism there. So can you remember the first sonic branding, sonic logo? Whatever the first brand strategy execution project. You worked on. The first one I I'm not really sure the order of appearance, I'll have to think for second. I would probably say it was either the network identity for ESPN two or the IBM ThinkPad. So brand names. Yeah. And it was one of those two one I really think maybe the thing pet came first, but I'm not positive. It was one of those, too. But that's the kind of work that they would they would doing in the identity world when, when you think about identity like sonic branding. I'm guessing like you and I've talked about this. In fact, you article voiced by not long ago. You've got it down. You've playbook for how to do this now. But back then I'm assuming you're kind of making it up is you're going along L. Absolutely. And it was not easy end to tell you the truth. Brett in certain ways, we're, we're still figuring things out as we go along. So we're doing robotics now. Anytime someone says to me, can you do this? I say, of course, and then we get off the call. And we say, okay, guess what? We're gonna do now. So we're always figuring it out. And that's the great part about it is that I didn't really know how to do the right methodology for something like the ThinkPad where you're doing products on vacation, that's going to go on millions of products. And you're doing something. It's so subjective as audio but you're not sitting there and someone say, I have this commercial this is my vision for it. I needed thirty seconds score. I wanted to sound kinda like you too. But kinda like this, this, what I have in mind, it really wasn't like that. It really had to articulate what the IBM brand stood for and getting people to focus objectively through a brand lens on something. That is so subjective music, and sound didn't really have tools in place. So we had to really build them at as we went along and each of our offerings them. When I started audio brain, that got even more intense, a lot of the things that we do now as part of our everyday deliverables for a sonic branding initiative were were create. Needed out of necessity, because we need to find a solution to something that was challenging someone. And sometimes that someone was us. So we built a lot of the methodologies that a lot of companies, a lot of companies now use because we had to it wasn't like, okay, I'm going to, you know, I'm gonna count in. I'm going to study this, and I'll come out my end result is this, and I may be tax laws change. But my basic skill set and my basic deliverables will pretty much remain intact. It kind of isn't like that in this world. So we had put together methodology that works across the board for any industry for any type of Sinek touch point that we work with we had to formulate a methodology that paralleled of visual identity system, branding system. We just, you know, converted it. It to apply to music and sound. So it was very formal. It needed to talk about the, the visual identity. So when you go into research jumping ahead, but I'm just going to jump ahead. Anyway, when you go into a brand a sonic branding, how much influence does the visual identity, which is always already established? I presume, how much does that influence your work while I it's not always already established in our case close. We will often get calls from most of the work we get comes from the brand itself. So brands call us directly and we get often called in, when the visuals are in development as opposed to when a commercial is finished if we were music production company, so often, we see the iterative design and that often. Influences our sound. But if the visuals are in place in the visual static is in place, which sometimes it is it does play into it because they have chosen certain colors and fonts, but it's more in. The branding guidelines, the language that they use to describe the brand their mission statement, their brand positioning, their brand book, all of those things, I think have the most significant influence on us. Right. Because you're trying to figure out what emotion what reaction you need to elicit in a listener. Yes. And we often bridge the two because certain of our method holidays like sonic mood board when we're concept ING, we've over time learned to use the brands visuals on those sonic mood boards as opposed to our own because people would get caught up on the visuals instead of the attributes were trying to articulate so they do go hand in hand. We are influenced by them, but it's more what the brand feels. Like and more with the brand is saying that they are. It's more the brand's story and the visuals apart of that. I could see the there's some visuals that lead you directly into a certain direction say, for, for example, if something has a post modern look or you know. You know, something that's more indicative of antique or something like that certain types of fonts would probably lead you down one direction versus another. In general, it's probably you probably pretty wide latitude, I would guess, with the visual it's just you have to make sure it doesn't clash. It complements doesn't clash. Yeah. If if something is super the visualises is were polished and, and very modern like you said, we're not going, you know, it has to have an influence of ready created this visual aesthetic, and they've already, they'll come up with, like photo comps and they'll have their brand book, and then we have to align with that, but that remember is being derived from the story, as well. So yes, it all it all ties together, for example, when we did unify, which is formerly Siemens enterprise, as soon as we looked at that sound logo. It, it looked like a keyboard kind of and unify had five letters and all kinds of things come into play or the curve of the XBox. Way it wasn't a straight product. Everything comes into play. So the visual does often have have a lot of people have spent a lot of time getting the font. Just right in getting the imagery, just right. And getting the, you know, the whole aesthetic down, so we do have to compliment that if they're Asanovic brand that would complement comic sans. Font probably mine. All right. People in the design or marketing world. We'll get that joke. Everyone people. Okay. So, so you working allies arts, you did dozens hundreds of sonic branding projects while you were there. Alley did tremendous amount of work, and I was given. It was very challenging. They were incredibly difficult projects, but I learned so much. I was given up -tunities I would never have gotten where someone says, okay, would you like to produce the music for the Olympics embassy? And you know, unless you're in, in the right place at the right time, and you put yourself out there saying, I can do this. I do that all do this all do that. You get those opportunities. So I like to think I are in them, but also very grateful for the opportunities that were given to me for off. Okay. So at some point you decided that you want to set out on your own. What was the motivation there? The motivation. There was three things. One was that we at that point, that was the LA studio in New York studio. And a lot of the work was well, it was it was a little bit different at that point, 'cause it was two separate spaces. And I felt that I had at that point my own vision, which I believed would be strictly doing sonic branding. There are a lot of companies that do sonic branding, that don't only do sonic branding, so they happen to do predominantly music for advertising, which I did. Didn't do. And I felt at that point that I had my own vision for bringing more of more method different methodologies different approach to doing it. I had been there a long time. I didn't see where I could go up any further than I was 'cause they were just two owners above me that ghetto. So that was really room for me to go higher. But I had my own really keen vision on what a one hundred percent dedicated, immersed sonic branding company would look like. And number two was that I wanted to try and see how far I could push myself, and what I what I could create for myself in as my own business model and certainly there were risks that I was taking. And I had a write them down into took me about four years before, from when I wanted to do it, too. I actually did it for. He is of going back and forth, if it was the right thing if it wasn't, and I eventually decided it was my, my mother, who said, why not what do you have to lose? You've got good credentials you'll get another job. You'll rent out your -partment. You can move back in with us. It doesn't work out. That was a pleasant thought. But, but. But all all kidding aside. I just didn't want to have to wonder for the rest of my life. If I had taken this chance, what would have happened. I just didn't want to be one of those people, and so trying it and failing was a better option for me than not trying it at all. And regretting that so off. I went. Who was your first customer? I believe it was scholastic men. I believe it was through electric fund stuff and their company that does interactive educational games run. And that's what I think was the first project that we did. Because I think I remember taking a picture of the check. But like most entrepreneurs, you didn't have time to like, do anything with that picture. You were on to your next project at the time. I didn't start audio brain by myself. I had worked with Michael sweet who now. Teaches interactive audio up at Berkeley, college of music and is incredibly prominent in that area. He had worked with mate Elias, and he was in the sound identity division with me. And he had left before me and was on his own. And when I was thinking about doing this, I had always said there was, there's nobody 'cause he did the Olympics with me, and he did all of the, the identity work with me, and I always said that they would be nobody, I'd wanna part with. But Michael fantastic composer, technically savvy beyond anyone's comprehension. You should pick up his, his book, which is probably about nine hundred pages and just brilliant. And he was on his own. I was going out on my own. And he was my bridge to the other side. I really think that, that the two of us together, were it was kind of meant to be because we are. Very different in a lot of ways, but extremely complementary in others, and he was the most technically savvy person that I knew which gave us a huge advantage as technology began to evolve. So we will partners from started audio brain together in two thousand and three till two thousand eight when he was offered to start that division of it, Berkeley got him, and we still work together talk all the time. That's nice. That's a great story. Okay. So I know a lot of your clients. Don't want you talking about the work, right? Because it's all mystery. Right. They just birth it without help. But of the client, you can talk about which project, are you? Most proud of. Oh, wow. You know, it's really funny because somebody asked me that the week before last we found to the fuse conference, and it was pretty amazing because the day before we went in, and we did a workshop for project us Moses which is a design program for inner city youth of Chicago. And they asked me the same question, and it was the first time anybody ever asked me that. And this is the second time I'm being asked it. And I'm kind of stumped as I was then but I'll kinda give you the way goes, I think when I did. My first Olympics, I remember sitting there as we went on the air, and I was just, like, I honestly, don't think it could ever get better than this. I really don't. Until we did the sonic branding for Major League Soccer at on sitting improv with an eighty piece orchestra. And we are sonically branding, every team to this day in MLS, walks out to our processional anthem. And I'm in Prague in like this is unbelievable. But the XBox three sixty was the game changer of the mall because we will only I think, you know, we were only had our company a few years when that came about. So I'd say of, of our projects those would be the, the real key ones that the Olympics, the XBox a Major League Soccer were for different reasons. Really, really special. Let's bear probably like many people talk about, like how do you choose your favorite of among your children? Right. I mean, they're all important in different ways. Right. So you mentioned XBox three sixty. I have that in front of me right now. Let me play two different things. You've got the sonic logo in the sonic fingerprints, I'll play both of those, and you can explain a little bit more about that project in what the differences between sonic logo sonic fingerprint, share. I gotta play that once more. That's the sonic logo. Okay. That'll be very recognizable to anybody. Who'd watch television in the last decade. And now the sonic fingerprint for XBox exte-. Played that a couple times, so Audrey what's going on there? Okay. So we had already bring for, for a few years, and we got a call from Microsoft, and asking us if we wanted to be involved in a sonic branding project that they had. They had gotten our information from a colleague of mine, Michael Jaeger, who had JD K branding firm and it turned out to be for the XBox through sixty. So we're like okay so what we needed to do was, we did the sonic branding strategy, and the full products on a fixation. Not just the sound signature in the fingerprint, but the full product Saana fixation, and then the peripheral events, e three the executive wealth on's when it debuted on TV different events that they had. So it was pretty fantastic. That kind of call, but the goal for them was to differentiate themselves as a global leader in, I won't say the gaming world. Because they felt that they were living entertainment system, and they knew as these companies do know that in a few years that we're going to be more than a gaming console, but they were futuristic a modern. They were optimistic. They were very, very technical, but they had these human organic qualities and very multi layered in very dimensional. So we worked in it was fantastic. If you could ever work this way is they are such an empowered organization that we worked with the branding team we work with the product development team. And we were brought in when they were many different Xboxes sitting around the room and two hundred attributes all over the walls. So you can't get a better experience than that because any decision maker is involved in the process, and that's really important for successful initiative. So after. Many, many rounds of iterating first assessing the competitive landscape trying to find we call it the top of the pyramid. What made the XBox three sixty different than, than the PlayStation different than Sega different than anybody. And we weren't looking at the table stakes that they were in the game industry, we looking for what the top of the pyramid was for XBox through sixty at that time, it was XBox live, because you could play live with anybody around the world. So we try to create various concepts was cold symphony because an orchestra could play with different people and not speak the same language. We create the stories in these metaphors and the result. If many, many interational and testing sounds refined. We have created that. That sound that you hear there, which in within it, you could hear that futuristic modern. It's global you can feel the movement, it's multi dimensional, but that XBox breath is the Uman energy, and there isn't anything within that sound that isn't intentional. That doesn't tell a part of the brand's story. And that's probably why it's so unbelievably successful and a favorite sound signature to this day for a lot of people, and I remember when it was down to the last two sonic logos, and they would determining it was determined that was going to be this one, and I remember someone really, really, really, really high up saying to me, but is it I Kana enough. It didn't say to me, I take that back. He said it to everybody, and everybody looked at me to answer the question, of course. So. Bert. Yeah. Yeah. So I said, nothing comes out Connick. Nothing is I- conic as soon as it's created, if we've done our job, all of us collective, as a team a really great team if we've done our job, and we understand the personality. And we understand the desire to shift, the demographic from a hard core male gamer to a broader demographic, 'cause this is not gonna just play games. You're gonna you're gonna be sharing photos in. You're gonna doing other things. Broaden the demographic, and all of the strategic things, and that the sound feels authentic in doesn't alienate the original fan base. And if we've done our job, and we've articulated, the core characteristics that makes XBox three sixty what it is that nobody else can concerned like it will become icon ick. If you use it consistently if you support it if. Gauges in if the user, u I founds, we've developed make the experience better for the person using it, it will become a conic organically, it will become or I can't even talk it will become a conic. And that's what happened if XBox three sixty been done, it probably would have gone away, but it also happened to be pretty good product, and they did support and Aztec supported tremendously. Both with our dated for product features but also through advertising. Yes, they did. And to this day, there various iterations derived from the three six s XBox through sixty logo. So we're very, very proud of that. What is that? How would you describe that sound played again? So you hear a lot of technology in there. But you also hear a lot of human organic sound. It's futuristic it's going from like the dark to the light. It's bringing you it moves around, like a globe, mid sound. If if when you listen to it moves around, it's very multi dimensional and layered, and it culminates in a human breath. So it's a living entertainment system. Was that again, so people can hear it? So that thing at the end where it's like her shadows. That's the breath. Yes. And the X FOX breath. Is really the icon of the whole tonic logo. And at the time we needed to make a very short version because XBox three sixty at the time was often co branded in so many different environments. For example, there would be an ad for EA games sports. It's in the game. Did you hear that sound and only you only have a split second? So that was the first project, we developed a sonic fingerprint for. And so in, in once. Right there. Yeah. So at the end of a sports it's in the game. In that one split second. You know, it's XBox through sixty and that's how we came to deliver for our clients. A sonic fingerprint in on almost every project. We do right now. We try to create a sonic fingerprint, because the so much small real estate now where it can launch an app this, so many different places. There's so much co branding going on that it really is a very, very useful asset to have. But that's how it started. Okay. So we have some other examples here. Let's talk appliances. So I've got world pool and kitchen eight year and you've done just power on power off sound. So we've got appliances in the homeless, people don't think of those adding annoys necessarily, but this is not pretend to extend the branding beyond marketing campaign. Yes. N. We've actually done way more than power on power off for both of these brands. I just wanted to keep it simple. So we've done full product son, if occasions many sounds for both of these brands, I just wanted to give you a little tavis XBox, you did the logo, which we play. But you also did like the answer to the blade. Santho navigational sound down, though, here, it was originally, a land sound after the blade. But if you play the XBox once the blade moves it's landed. So we work on ours. Architecture of the sounds, and we're sounds are needed a not so we did. I don't know how many sounds in the XBox three sixty. And then we also did sound scape for the event when it launched it, he three that just moved around the room for an hour to set up. You know, the unveiling of the XBox three sixty we add executive walk on. So each of the executives Addy, three had executive welcome music that was in the tone and feel of the three sixty so tons of touch points. So prove let's go back to the appliances. So for them like so we'll, we'll play the power on power often. You can give me a sense of shy play. Baltimore one at a time. Power play them in pairs. That's what I mean. So power on power off for whirlpool. I. Power on power off. So what's going on there? Right. So they're really beautiful sounds. They're fantastic team to work with because they understood the value of sound for their consumer. They want their consumers. Always have a wonderful experience with their products. And we were at a point technology where we didn't just have to resort to just little PA's Zo buzzers way appliances, always did. And, you know for for world full it's about, you know, being pure and delightful and. Sensitive and every day care. So care was really important to put into the sounds and without going too much into their their strategy. And all that's really what we, we had a sonic brenick filter created with them, and all of the sounds are created through that lens. Let's, let's do kitchen. Then you can give sort of the same rundown on that power on power off for that as well. So power on I. Power off. So now there's some similarities between the I it's more of a chime sound in both of them, but they're very distinct. Yes. In kitchenaid kitchenaid is a lot of things we learned about working with them as kitchenaid over our chain, modern contemporary, simple well-crafted precision attention to details makers. You know, they have different different personalities but they still part of the same family to degree. So we try to give each their unique personality and worked on a lot of a lot of strategy lottery. Search a lot of technical testing making sure the sounds hold up because when you deal with any kind of technology, as, you know, you have to make sure what we hear when we create them is what comes out the other end and often there's a lot of fine tuning that goes on there. But again, another fantastic client, mainly because they value adding intentional audio to the, the experience. Okay. So I have another one here to for an automotive brand Kia. I think you call this the rise of surprise. That's in. This is in audio logo correct? Yes, it is. So very short. Right. So. Kia was very interesting project because they had. Their own tagline and rise of surprise kind of played off of that. So. They called us, and they wanted us to do the sonic branding for them, and they had tried I guess a few different times, and then Kia coldest directly. So they're sonic branding is about, you know, their their, their tagline was the power to surprise. So it was about being vibrant and distinctive 'em reliable. And if you, you know, those were the core elements of this brand, and has the strong kick drum that places unexpected pattern and as five no melody in this Steinem rush of air. You know that that's the rise in sense of driving motion in four thinking brand. So that was a really nice project to do. Against people can hear it. Right. And so one of the things I think is interesting about that is obviously, it's a big global brand is a full logo, and it's much shorter than the full logo for XBox. Correct. So for someone like this. You might not even need the fingerprint, but you could do it. I guess the last couple of notes, you might not do it for a brand like this. Although there are other forms that we've done that are longer a lot of the Brantley work with we do longer form way, too short a form because they have different environments that things are going into, but this is their, the length of their, their low. The okay so I think like a really good thing. Now that we've seen we've heard some examples of audio branding. We've talked a little bit about how you got here. Let's talk about what the key elements of an audio branding strategy are like, if I want to do an audio branding strategy. How do I know? I'm compr-. Sensitive. Okay. I think that there are different companies that do things different ways. I know the process that we have works for us. And we follow a branding strategy, very formal very specific. So we'll have a discovery phase strategy phase design phase testing implementation in maintenance. So in the discovery phase, we're gonna do Brando audit, we're going to immerse ourselves in the competitive landscape, not just near field competitors. But also mindshare competitors and mine chair competitors came about more recently than from when I started. And that's somebody that may be completely out of the industry that you're in but has the same demographic the same target audience and you, you like to look at what they're doing because they're they have these same demographic, or psychographic audience that, you, you wanna have, or you do. You have. And then we're going to look at. The customer experience path. So we have a series of methodologies that we do. Is there anything inherent in the branded self that lends itself to be incorporated into the sound? I want to back up because I don't want a otherwise forget, so you talk about mindshare people in the same mindshare category. Are you thinking about something like X games in red bull have a very similar demographic in so understanding how to be distinct? Sure. You know, you can even think about something like. Where everybody would look at apple even if they weren't doing the same things that apple was doing. They weren't in the same industries apple they will look at what apple was doing because apple had Vangelis and maybe the same age demographic, and the same type of contemporary must have almost cold life following, so they would look at that okay through so that's really interesting. So I understand the idea of looking at competitors, wannabe be distinct, but this idea that being distinct understanding what matters to anybody with same target demographic is you is, is, is helpful. I can see how that would be something that eventually would become important as you as you move through the evolution of this of this industry. Yes, definitely because at the end of the day, if somebody's giving somebody a great experience, I mean, especially as we evolve more products, and people only. Have so many hours in the day. So who's taking up that time who's, who's getting that time from people and people spending time with that brand and talking about that brand and loving it. You might wanna take a look at why whether they're a direct competitor of yours. Not. Okay. So, so you're about to talk about some of the other elements of brand strategy that you walked and thinking about this if I'm a brand, and, and I really haven't done a lot in space. And maybe it's because. I'm thinking about Alexa, some of the other voice interactions. But I'm just saying, you know, I need a comprehensive industry. So I want to keep going on that. Okay. So I we're gonna look at anything that we could learn about the brand. So what? Voices brand using what sounds of the brand is the brand currently using what are they touch points? Now, what are the touch points in the future? What's coming up? Why now why did somebody call us at that particular time what's going on? Do they suddenly just have an interest, or is this something specific that they're calling us for our they rebranding to, they are they now adding, you know, Alexis skills, or are they now doing a product that needs Santa Fe -cation that needs, both sounds voice, so we do gather every bit of information that we can to come up with the next step, which is the strategy? So okay, we've looked at the user profiles done some scenario map. Opportunity mapping, with sound and now we have an idea of an own -able space, a what the this brand's personality and benefits positioning attributes are, and they often have their brand attributes and sometimes they don't you'd be surprised, but a brand normally has what they brand personality is. But that could be different from one burnt brand to the other. They can have a certain word like dependable, and that could mean two different things. So we then have now start the strategy of helping them with tools that we've built, so we could find out what that what that attribute that personality trait means to that brand, and we work them through series of tools. So it makes it fun. And it makes it we'll do the heavy lifting with compass. That's what was really important to me is that we take stuff that can get really, really heady on our end and not over-complicated for our clients, but educate them involve them, gradually get them into the game of what this is. And I'm not kidding by the time that we're done with our first initiative. They really get it. And I'm really proud to say that we have a hundred percent pliant return rate. So this process does work because you have to kind of really take the subjectivity out of it before we write any sound. We are ready understand the personality of the brand that we're writing for. So from there, it's a matter of concept, Ingham, working with them to find tune that lens who psych having something hand crafted for you. Nobody. Has just one dimension to their personality. We have to take the core characteristics and blend them to create the persona. Okay. So let me ask you a question. I want to I want to make this really tangible to for people listening. So let's say I've got bought and I have a website, we have a lot of written content, but we do have some audio properties as well. We've got this podcast. We have a couple of Alexis skills Google action. There's other things that we could do, we could do like facts on voice, or voice stats or something like that. There's a lot of different things that we could do we could do mobile app. If you started thinking about someone like voice spot in your to give me a checklist and say, hey, these are the things you need. You need an audio logo needed audio fingerprint. You need it or sonic, hanger print, you need to intro music in out music for your podcast. Maybe you need some accent. Sounds that you can use in your podcast. If necessary for your Lexus skill. Maybe you want some sort of intro, which might be the same as your audio logo might be different, pending on, if people, ask questions, and then you respond, I'm just wondering, like, is there a certain set of checklists, or the we've been talking about, like music, like right in terms of? We, we have this whole music interlude or could play on the website when people come there could be like a standard soundscape behind it. How do you think about that? In terms of when people say, hey, you know what I've never done audio branding. What do I need? Well as part of our process in our discovery phase where looking at everything about this brand. And when we create sonic branding initiative, we start off with what we call a foundational brand theme. Don't think of it as a jingle think of it like a box of criolla, crayons customize colors for you, and it's long form. It's a minute, two minutes long and then from there will create a sound logo usually, but what would doing is putting in place, the tone in feel of this brand the foundation is in place in a long form. So from there, we look at the brand, and they can evolve once that foundation is in place. We can do. Executive walk on a when you walk up to the podium to speak. It's your brand sound when you open your podcast, we do opportunity, mapping, and we do we look at the touch points and we make recommendations. And we look at the ones that are really near field, and then we'll, we'll map it out for the clients of like hit this, where you could go and some of them will do it. You know, twenty five touch points at one time and others will do a couple and then a couple more a couple more a couple more. But the foundation is in place in, that's the difference because we're not one offing anything where leading one thing lead to the next to tell the next chapter tell the next chapter to create this story this narrative, that's not just an Intel inside but much much bigger and richer. And connected than that. So there's a certain tone in feel and feeling to the brand. So they're different ones that roll out for different brands depending on what industry they're in and depending on what their core touch points. Are you have a podcast? You have events, you have speaking engagements, you have different things, we would focus on them whereas somebody's corporation. We'd focus on video book ins we'd focus on what they have on their on their YouTube channel. We'd focus on their advertising. We'd focus on, you know, their apps. So for each friend, we make the recommendation recommendations we show them like the whole world of opportunity that's out there for them growing. So I didn't really fought about that. So, like we were talking about voice summit which you've been selected as speaker for speaking there as well. When I come out on stand I could have my own intro music. But then. Yes, we could we could create that together. That's a great idea. I love that. But that's you know, this is a great example of the fact that a lot of people say, okay, well, I know the Intel inside chimes, and so therefore, I know what audio branding is. Or maybe they say I know about music soundscape and therefore, I know there's so much more than that. You just talking about this idea that there's just so much sound around us. And there's so many different ways we interact with brands that it's really unfulfilled opportunity. Most instances for brands. Yes. And I say this in people tell us have don't say that because she kind of trivializing it, but I you're gonna use it anyway so you don't want to be like this executive of this very important corporation. Many is ago who walked to the podium and the av guy played yellow submarine and the whole audience laughed. And when he got off from giving his speech. He said to me, I would like you to create an executive walk on. So when our keynotes go. Up to to speak. They don't have to be embarrassed like I was, and it's nothing against the piece of music. It said it didn't fit the event that they were at the seriousness of his speech. And that's how we started doing. The executive walk ons. Every brand does them. Now, you have events you have interactive, you of room, warming soundtrack. So when people awaiting on hold to join what are they listening to silence? Nothing arbiters stuff or stuff that makes them feel your brand in advance, so we call them room warming the best. Hold music is Uber conference. I love that disgrace, though. Though. Most people have probably been over conference, once if you haven't to sign up just so you can hear the whole music. It's so funny and then that is really unique. Like everybody knows what that is, is once you've experienced it, you know. So I'd love to know like tell me, one thing that you think people usually get right about sonic, branding, and one thing they usually get wrong people or people in their minds or people in their execution. I might need both. You pick you tell me which one you wanna do. Okay. I think one thing that they get right? Is that it's a sound logo or jingle and one thing that they get wrong is that it's only a sound logo or jingle? Right. Right. Okay. So those part of it, but that's the first thing, people think of they certainly don't think of, you know. A soundtrack playing the background of a room to keep the room warm and set up the tone of the brand, they wouldn't be thinking of that they wouldn't be thinking of the voice casting, and what we go through when we cast a voice for brand, and that, I think I oh, you another guest blog on. It's really, really extremely diligent and so in their minds that's the one thing they get right? In the one thing that they need to expand on it's everything. It's every place that your brand is heard, whether it's a voice a sound music is an opportunity to connect for better experience. And so as far as on execution goes, it's probably very similar thing is that I think a lot of people will get a sound logo. A lot of people will do a sound logo. And stop there. And I'm really pleased lately that everyone thinks this is whole new frontier of voice. I sound I but it's really not new. It's really not new at all. I mean long, I'm doing it right. And, and doing it at a pretty high level for pretty long time. It's just that now two things, I think driving it tremendously. So that's the part, I think that they don't get. Right. Is that? It's not new. It's just a new need a bigger need a need. The need has eclipsed people's ability to be on aware of it. So do you feel like the rise of Alexa, Google assistant Siri have increased people's awareness that this is a gap. I think that's they are certainly part of it. I think would voice absolutely. I think other products like. Smart TV's, and the devices that we create like the different types of bluetooth, speakers and home appliances and self checkout kiosks and everything that these brands now have and podcasts. And there's all these opportunities where people need sound at voice. So I think technology is driving this tremendous awareness because it's, it's right in front of everyone now it's not something. Hey, okay. I'm gonna spend millions of dollars on visual identity, but you know what my next door neighbor's son has garage van. So I think he put some sound behind this, that those days along gone. They really are an now. That's why you're seeing so much about this at I do think it has a tremendous a lot to do with Alexa, Google at all. All the other brands at doing a lot of innovative stuff. It has a lot to do with industries, like the health and wearables in science and just technology. In general, one of the things that I think about Alexa skills Google actions. The very few developers are doing is using any sound of than a synthetic voice. And so there's two things that is want to ask you about in just in terms of these your experience because I know you've done a lot of were you've done your Miller with this space, obviously, it voice systems, but you've done a lot of work also in video games in the past. And I, I wonder if you. You know, if you have a piece of advice for people around the use of music, or sonic accents, different based on different activities that people have done or using voice over as opposed to a synthetic speech engine, what would your what would you normally tell people to start thinking about if they haven't Alexa skill Google action and what they can do to make it a richer experience. Take advantage of that audio first invoice first experience. I think it really depends on what the individual skill or action is I think, in some cases, end, it also has to do it budgets, too. So I think that. You know, people should realize that sound in the use of it, and use of sound an intentional way can make everything better, it heightens all the senses. So if you could create sound or a, a musical signal that makes it more unique. I think that, that adds a lot of experiential design when it comes to voice. Offensive voice versus synthetic. This is one area that is got me kind of really. Really intrigued to see where we're going to go because I do think there's a big gap in that area. So you have synthetic voices. You have, you know, people using things like poly nuance, and you have people spending millions of dollars to create their own proprietary voice. Bank of America Erica. And and yet you can hear about. People that are now making fake phone calls because they take a few samples of someone's voice that they can grab off the internet and create a whole dialogue. So that area is like a big fa- me gap, most of the brands I work with are on either ends of those spectrums. So they're either gonna do how small the way you know, or they're going to do it synthetic all the way. And I think that, that's a landscape. I see changing really. Soon. Because when I talked to people like. Like Rupa tell who you put me in touch with from vocal, ID, and the fantastic Burke that she's doing in that area of creating. Human sounding voices. Is is unbelievable with a couple of hours of recording. You know what I mean? That's a big difference since spending millions of dollars. So a fascinated in that particular area to see with that evolves and how that affects everything. When we talk about human voices and voice actors, what's a common mistake, people make around casting their human voice. Okay. Here we go. All right. So we do a lot of voice friend ING tremendous amount of branding, and we have created of voice branding evaluator, and it has all these different three levels of characteristics that we look for one all the brand characteristics. So we hold the voice through the same lens that we create the sound. So is it articulating the same personality? Whatever we use as the filter to create the music and the sound at his exact same filter. We use on the voice, the next thing we look at is what technology is going into. Is it going into something that's digital product? Texas speech is going directly into the. Product like the boom where the voices saying, exactly what the voice is gonna say directly for more recordings, and then we look at the sound characteristics, it self. And if it's going in something that is going to be a tremendous amount of recording to create this voice for a brand. Does the voice have any kind of oddities to it? Do they pop their peas? Do they drop off? Some people like drop their pitch down at the end, is the accent authentic. That is absolutely. Number one. I think the other thing people make often make a mistake on is that they've believed that they could do their own translations, and translations should be left to experts and voice talents should be localized. Because if you are going to do a casting of somebody who speaking tie, and they've been in the United States for X amount of years, and you're gonna sell that project product in Thailand, they're going to pick up on it in a second. So the this so many different things that go into making a great voice, and some of them, believe it or not, we look at. We'll look at what other is the voice a spokesperson for any other brand. What kind of contract are we gonna do with the with the talent because the last thing you want is not to have that all very nice and neatly resolved for your client, and the next thing, you know, the product in the voice, or a hit, and now, you're in a predicament with talent. So knowing the right things to do in doing those castings. There are ones that really pertain to the voice itself. And I know that, you know, we use expert companies we also do our own talent searches, but will use a company like one of our great collaborative partners is voices dot com. They understand what we're doing the discreet, on our initiatives, and they will stick to exactly the parameters where putting out there, then not gonna send us a twenty eight year old woman for a casting of a nine year old kid, you know, we've. We can't we can't, we're so beyond that we can't go in those waters, and it's knowing who to go to for those resources. And it's also knowing what to listen for and looking at the voice, and understanding of the voices, going to hold up making sure it's legally correct to use that voice making sure the talent knows where it's gonna go and undestanding the different voice characteristics will even Google them. And see what they're like. Okay, so odd, I cut you off there. I asked you for one mistake, people make, I think you I wa. Wow. So, but that is, but that itself is like, sort of the key takeaway for me. Like, I think about this idea of, like I've selected voices, for voice overs, number different times in mostly. You say I want these type of characteristics. You listen that sounds right? Fine. But it's not necessarily fully strategy driven. It's not not taking into account all these other things. But you're talking about like it's a much more comprehensive discussion that people need to have a head of selecting their voice talent. Because there's so many variables that can come into play. Yes. Yeah. I think I think that's wonderful. Okay. So tell me warm thing that you think, has changed over the last twenty years in sonic branding, that, you think is most important, I think that people are bringing it to the table. It's got a seat at the table. It's important now. It was an afterthought in the past annulled a very smart brands or ones that really needed it thought it was worth being alive. An item to pay for. In the way that it is now. So it's come very far Wilson will said. So let me ask you one other thing. So you've used voices Alexa, Google system. Siri whatever. What's one thing that you cannot do voices today that you hope you'll be able to do with it one year from now that's a hard question. Believe it or not. I would probably have to give that some thought. I would like to have it sound like a voice of somebody that I wanna hear my parent my father to be to that level of customization. We've definitely people working on that. So you might I don't know if you'll see that next year and then you type of mass rollout, but I think you'll see that before too long Audrey are being this has been wonderful. I'm sure we we, we did run long. I would I told you, we wouldn't go wrong, and then I just wanted to. Tell the voice podcast listeners, how they can learn more about audio bring keep track of what you guys doing in the world is sonic branding. Just visit our website audio brain dot com. Follow us on, on Twitter, Instagram audio brain onto score and why hook up with us on Lincoln. Listen to everything on voice fought standing, gotta listen to voice about all the time and go to the different events. And we'll see there and you will be at voice nineteen this summer in Newark. So we'll make sure that people know about that. And I should do a shout out for you. You are a voice insider superhero. So we definitely. Right. The voice insider supporter reader every week. And you heard it from Audrey unprompted voice by twenty four seven that's what everybody here should be thinking about. Of course. You're listening right now. So you probably are already on top of that. And thank you once again, for listening all the way to the end, I'm Brett can sell a your host each week for the voice podcast. You can find me on the Twitter at Brett consulta. You can also find at voice pot, a on Twitter, and voiced by that, you know, we're everywhere. Check out our daily. Alexa, flash briefing voice daily update. And let's voice about says, on election, Google actions. You guys know it. All thank you so much, Audrey. I learned a lot today. I know the audience did appreciate you sharing some of your hard earned wisdom. And thank you, Brent. And thank you for everything that you do to make people really aware of how powerful sand and. Voice are great.

executive Audrey Samsung Google Brett Olympics apple Intel developer Carnegie Hall Alexa Michael Jaeger IBM EMMY award Bixby Elias Berkeley producer director LA studios
Audrey Arbeeny of Audiobrain Talks Sonic Branding and the Rise of Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep. 100

The Voicebot Podcast

1:19:19 hr | 2 years ago

Audrey Arbeeny of Audiobrain Talks Sonic Branding and the Rise of Voice - Voicebot Podcast Ep. 100

"This is episode number one hundred of the four podcast, today's guests is Audrey are being CEO and founder of audio brain our topic is sonic branding. Voiced by nation. Listen up. We have another awesome cast for this week for those of you that are new around these parts. Welcome to episode one hundred you are lucky because there are a lot of great episodes, you can binge listen to this weekend. I'm Brett can sell your host for the voice podcast each week. We interview people that are making a difference in the voice in a industries and we do in depth interviews. This allows us to get past the surface information. So you can learn the story behind the innovation in this industry and take away some insights, you can use today. We have a guest that is sure to help expand the way you think about the voice industry, Audrey are beanie is a sonic branding expert. She did the X box sonic. Branding has won an EMMY award for her work with NBC on the Olympics and a whole lot more voice comes along. With audio into few brands and other organizations have. Ever considered what they should sound like that is Audrey and her team at audio brain do everyday, and today's interview we breakdown, sonic branding elements, share some examples of audio brains work, and tell you how it true voice innovator went from a musician's life performing a hairband to one of the leading sonic branding executives working today before we get started. I want to do a quick listener shadow, Google user gave us a five star review for our Google action saying quote, the industry's hottest in most inciteful podcast, thumbs up. Exclamation point. What we thank you will use her. We appreciate the rating and the comment. I just wish we knew who you were. But thanks again. Well, never fear. I also have a five star review an apple apple podcasts from Jamie Lee, which, I James FEC. Oh, she said, quote, Brent always has the best guess in his truly on the cutting edge of the trend. In the voice space, and quote, thank you Jamie much-appreciated voice about podcast listeners if you get a chance, leave us a review in apple podcasts or Google podcasts. And you just might get a showed out shout out right here. Thanks again, for all of you. The do that it does make a difference with people trying to discover us also I wanna thank our sponsor of the voice podcast Samsung. Yes. A big logo brand once you all to know that they support independent media like voice about podcast, and that they're focused on serving the voice developer community. So Samsung sells a lot of smartphones. It's typically their first or second globally, in the number of smartphones sold. It is number one in smart TVs, and many plants categories. It is in the top two or three and it has the spark things I t who system. So all this translates into about five hundred million devices, the company sells annually that will be smart starting at twenty twenty it will ship hundreds of millions of smart devices this year, but. One half a billion in twenty twenty and beyond and all of them will have BIC speed voice assistant onboard. So Bixby Samsung's rival to election Google system. And after they updated technology last summer, it's starting to get a lot of positive consumer momentum next up for them is supporting a new developer ecosystem Samsung recently announced the Bixby premier developer program. If you have experience in developing voice apps apply, and I'm told you will have access to complimentary devices and drek support from the Bixby teams over his la- labs in prominent positioning in for your Bixby voice app. They're called capsules in the forthcoming marketplace. I think you're also going to get help potentially directly from Adam chyers, the founder of both Siri and labs, which became Bixby. So check out the show notes today and apply. It's the Bixby premier developer program. There is an application prop process. I know many people wish now they'd gotten in on early Alexa. Google assistant, but miss the formative days on those platforms. Bixby has a big platform, and you can get in early because they're really just building their developer community. So check that out. Many thanks to Samsung for supporting independent media like voice about podcast. Also, if you ought to become a sponsor of podcast, semi tweet, apper can Sela Twitter or you can reach out directly Brett voiced by that we are looking for people who want to support the work that we do here, so that we can bring you these great informative interviews every week. All right now to this week show it's all about sounded branding. Listen up. Okay. Voice nation. I have a special guest today. Audrey are beanie is an EMMY award winning executive producer and creative director that also happens to be the founder of audio brain a leading sonic branding agency. I think I'll call deleting sonic branding agency and, and challenge. Anybody to come up with a competitor that matches what they've done? I think you'll be clear to you after we get through today's discussion. How much background and experiences group has so sonic branding. That's brand strategy and production based on sound. And for those of you not familiar with his territory something around the long lines of sonic branding audio brain does is strategy original compositions sound design audio identities. Only look music supervision. Licensing research and usability voice casting. There's a lot of services associated with sonic branding, and many people are familiar with visual branding, signing branding is the audio side of that, and really important to the industry. We all work in Audrey founded. The company sixteen years ago, after many years as senior producer, it allies arts, where she started the sound branding division since two thousand eight Audrey has also been visiting professor at Pratt institute in teaches to my knowledge, the only sonic branding course in the country. And Audrey has been the music supervisor for the past nine Olympic broadcast by NBC Audrey are beanie. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thank you, Brett, and thank compliment. Listen well, we'll see. We'll see the next hour will tell the story, right? Will I really wanna start back how you got into this in your background and music and sound? But we should probably just allow you to define sonic branding, for the audience to give them some context as we start. Sure. And thank you for having so sonic burning is the art and the science that Sarande strategic development and deployment of a consistent authentic sound experience of a brand, and everything is a brand including you me, and sound identity is the strategic and creative, alignment of this experience, and it creates a narrative that delivers unified memorable in differentiating communications, so sonic branding consists of music voice in sound design and sound waves vibration coming into it. If you look at the Samsung galaxy S tens, new fingerprint sensor, and it has lots of names, sound branding, sonic branding, audio branding. They all mean the same thing we call it sonic branding. So it is the art and science of intentional strategic audio for a bit of brand experience. So I think of like common examples and we'll talk about some of the ones you worked, but common examples would be like the Intel chimes for Intel inside which was really popular fifteen twenty years ago or United for a long time, I think they use rhapsody in blue to introduce all of their commercials. So those might be true, but also could be like a spokesperson, like the voice of the most interesting man in the world for dosekun as could be part of the sonic Brandon. Correct. Yeah, that's correct. And that's what I wanted, if everybody takes something away today is that when you stop and think. About all the places that music sound invoice are heard that we are not really putting the intent to the way visual identity would there's so many places that a brand is heard when you have those disconnected you create disconnected experience. Whether it be apps and voice branding, product, social media, and executive walk on room warming. Ambiance, it could go on and on. And that's what we want to talk about today. Excellent. But before we get to that share we should talk about your story. So, you know, you've been doing this a long time, but you haven't always been doing this. So let's talk about how you got into this initially. I mean we can talk about allies hearts, but I think you've been around music, most of your life. I think I've been around is all my life, I started playing piano, when I was like three or three and a half or so, because it was going to enable me to sit still and behave better. My sister was taking less than she's a little older than me. So I took the less than after her. And then when I was eight started flute my mother was very, very musical. So she made sure that we had, what she couldn't have as a kid, which was all of us had music lessons than some of us excelled in some of us didn't. And I was I was really good at it. I practiced all the time you didn't have to tell me to pray. Actes I felt things when I played music I loved when I could finish. You know, one of my lessons Dumai recitals as a pretty hyper kid. So it was very good for me from a discipline perspective. Then when I was about sixteen or seventeen I think it was, I started studying voice at Carnegie Hall, who's my brother and I had hairband and it was about. So now I'm dating myself where you're where I am at, but we had this rock band, and we would play in clubs till four in the morning. And my parents never had a basement. So music was always a part of my life music, was always in my house. We had a lot of kids played musical instruments, and I always knew that I would do something with music. Okay. So, so we need to we need to explain for some of the listeners what a hairband is I know because I grew up with them. Okay. So if you think of vans that had big puffy hair. And really cute guys. And in some cases like my van of female, we had really big hair, and I guess bands, it would fall in that category would be like a bun, Jovi, or def Leppard whitesnake, exactly warrant tons of them. And we will one of them that was our era. And it was a fantastic era to be an in aband-. Did you play covers? We played covers at first at it was really great. Because at that time, it wasn't like it is now you could make I mean, if you are really good cover band. You could make a few thousand dollars a night, and if you mid level, like mine, you can make a thousand dollars a night, and you would go to clubs where thousands of people and this would be seven nights a week. It was a very different kind of music scene. And then it chain. To being original bans, and at that time, you a pretty much either making nothing or, you know, playing much small venues. And that's when we started writing our own material as did everyone else at the time. Right. Right in so Carnegie Hall voice, lessons, hairband, not often fought of together, but classically trained hair hair band singer ago. No no not classically trained singer, because my vocal instructor. Silence Angan I was his only rock student. He was training me to be a rock singer because I was losing my voice trying to sing, you know. Iron maiden and and things like that. So I really needed to get voice lessons and someone mentioned him to me, and he was totally into it. He was great. It was really teaching technique. Oh, that's wonderful. That's wonderful. That's great. Yeah. That's the under appreciated aspect of singing. I know my, my daughter, talks me about this a lot because she's into performing arts, my, my brother was a singer for many years. So yes, you need there's a certain way to sing to save your voice. Otherwise, you will destroy it exactly. Which I was doing. Particularly singing every saying here banned songs. Exactly. David Lee, Roth four nights a week. It's kinda rough on the vocal cords. All right. Well, he'll appreciate that. We're going to jump. So somewhere in there you decided that life on the road, a rockstar wasn't going to be for you, and you wind up in basically a brand agency, correct. Well, what land of happening was when we changed from doing a cover music, too rigid music, I was playing in weren't play Madison Square Garden. Let's put it that way. And I found that I really enjoyed being in the studio. And at the same time, I also was working with kids that were in some program that were institutionalized in a state hospital that were deaf and blind, and I would do like music with them by putting their feet on speakers, and giving them instruments to play, and they would be able to play them, and then I would track their behavior when they went back to the ward. So I was teetering at that point being a music. Therapist. But I really liked being in the studio in doing production way more than I like performing, which surprises a lot of people because I'm not exactly very introverted, but performing just was not really for me. I liked taking nothing in turning it into something. And I thought I had a really good neck in the studio. I liked mixing like producing. I liked having ideas I like the emotional when you when you nailed it, you knew you nailed it. So I wanted to work at a record company, and they wouldn't take me said, I had no musical background in business. So just go someplace for six months and get that on my resume. And I wound up going to allies arts, and I went in there in through their accounting department because that's where there was a job opening. But my my goal was to get up in the studios pretty quickly and it was for a music production company. It was pretty big at. Veteran five people, but it wasn't a like going to Warner Brothers. So the opportunities that got there, and it was a, it was a really well known company at the time and still is, and it was crazy crazy, busy and lots of stuff going on. And that's where I pretty much learned a lot of how to produce and I worked my way from the downstairs accounting department to studio director than I opened the LA studios with Jonathan, then I became a senior producer, and at that time, Scott started getting this interest in sonic identities he was going to a lot of conferences, branding conferences, and Elias at the time predominantly did music for advertising. So he and I started this two person kind of division doing sonic. Pentiti work. And that's where I really, really started to feel that everything that I knew viscerally in everything I knew that I couldn't articulate what I wanted to be a wanted to do. I found in that sonic identity work 'cause it took together, my love of music my love of production, my understanding of psychology and psycho acoustics, and by Musicology in all the things that were were my interests. And it was it was very very, very challenging. And at the same time, I was given tremendous opportunities that I don't think I would got had one of the label's taken me I can imagine. I think about that. You said that you couldn't articulate all the things you want to put together. And yet, that's what sonic branding does at articulates the. Brand identity without words. So there's nice parallelism there. So can you remember the first sonic branding, sonic logo? Whatever the first brand strategy in execution project. You worked on. The first one I I'm not really sure the order of appearance, I'll have to think for second. I would probably say it was either the network identity for ESPN two or the IBM ThinkPad. So big brand names. Yeah. And it was one of those two one I really think maybe the thing pet came first, but I'm not positive. It was one of those too, but that's the kind of work that they would they would doing in the identity world. When you think about identity like sonic branding. I'm guessing like you and I've talked about this. In fact, you article invoice by not long ago. You've got it down. You've playbook for how to do this now. But back then I'm assuming you're kind of making it up as you're going along L. Absolutely. And it was not easy and to tell you the truth. Brett in certain ways, we're, we're still figuring things out as we go along. So we're doing robotics. Now, anytime says to me can you do this? I say, of course, and then we get off the call. And we say, okay, guess what? We're gonna do now. So we're always figuring it out. And that's the great part about it is that I didn't really know how to do the right methodology for something like the ThinkPad where you are doing products on occasion that's going to go on millions of products and you're doing something. It's so subjective as audio but you're not sitting there and someone say, I have this commercial this is my vision for it. I needed thirty seconds score. I wanted to sound kinda like you too. But kinda like this, this, what I have in mind, it really wasn't like that. It really had to articulate what the IBM brand stood for and getting people to focus objectively through a brand lens on something. That is so subjective music, and sound didn't really have tools in place. So we had to really build them at as we went along and each of our offerings them. When I started audio brain, that got even more intense, a lot of the things that we do now as part of our everyday deliverables for a sonic branding initiative were were create. Needed out of necessity, because we need to find a solution to something that was challenging someone. And sometimes that someone was us. So we built a lot of the methodologies that a lot of companies, a lot of companies now use because we had to it wasn't like, okay, I'm going to, you know, I'm gonna count, and I'm going to study this and I'll come out my end result is this, and I may be tax laws change. But my basic skill set and my basic deliverables will pretty much remain intact. It kind of isn't like that in this world. So we had to put together methodology that works across the board for any industry for any type of Sinek touch point that we work with we had to formulate a methodology that paralleled of visual identity system, branding system. We just, you know, converted it. It to apply to music and sound. So it was very formal. It needed to talk about the, the visual identity. So when you go into research jumping ahead, but I, I'm just going to jump at any way, when you go into a brand a sonic branding. How much influence does the visual identity, which is always already established? I presume, how much does that influence your work while I it's not always already established in our case close. We will often get calls from most of the work we get comes from the brand itself. So brands call us directly and we get often called in, when the visuals are in development as opposed to when commercial is finished if we were music production company, so often, we see the iterative design and that often. Influences our sound. But if the visuals are in place in the visual static is in place, which sometimes it is it does play into it because they have chosen certain colors and fonts, but it's more in. The branding guidelines, the language that they use to describe the brand their mission statement, their brand positioning, their brand book, all of those things, I think have the most significant influence on us. Right. Because you're trying to figure out what emotion what reaction you need to elicit in a listener. Yes. And we often bridge the two because certain of our methodology as like a sonic mood board when we're concept ING, we've over time learned to use the brands visuals on those sonic mood boards as opposed to our own because people would get caught up on the visuals instead of the attributes trying to articulate so they do go hand in hand. We are influenced by them, but it's more what the brand feels. Like and more with the brand is saying that they are. It's more the brand's story and the visuals apart of that. John, I could see the there's some visuals that lead you directly into a certain direction say, for, for example, if something has a post modern look or. Something that's more indicative of antique or something like that certain types of funds would probably lead you down one direction versus another. In general, it's probably you probably pretty wide latitude, I would guess with visual. It's just you have to make sure it doesn't clash. It complements doesn't clash. Yeah. If if something is super, the visualises super polished and, and very modern, like you said, we're not going, you know, it has to have an influence of ready created this visual aesthetic, and they've already, they'll come up with, like photo comps, and they'll have their brand book, and that we have to align with that, but that remember is being derived from the story, as well. So yes, it all it all ties together, for example, when we did unify, which is formerly Siemens enterprise, as soon as we looked at that sound logo. It, it looked like keyboard kind of and unify had five letters and all kinds of things come into play or the curve of the XBox. Way it wasn't a straight product. Everything comes into play. So the visual does often have have a lot of people have spent a lot of time getting the font. Just right in getting the imagery, just right. And getting the, you know, the whole aesthetic down, so we do have to compliment that if there was on IQ brand that would complement comic sans. Font. Probably mine. People on the design or marketing world. We'll get that joke. Everyone people. Okay. So, so you working at allies arts, you did dozens hundreds of sonic branding projects while you were there. Alley did tremendous amount of work, and I was given. It was very challenging. They were incredibly difficult projects, but I, I learned so much. I was given up -tunities I would never have gotten where someone says, okay, would you like to produce the music for the Olympics embassy? And you know, unless you're in, in the right place at the right time, and you put yourself out there saying, I can do this. I could do that all do this all do that. You get those opportunities. So I like to think I are in them, but I also very grateful for the opportunities that were given to me for off. Okay. So at some point you decided that you want to set out on your own. What was the motivation there? The motivation. There was three things. One was that we at that point, that was the LA studio in New York studio. And a lot of the work was well, it was it was a little bit different at that point, 'cause it was two separate spaces. And I felt that I had at that point my own vision, which I believed would be strictly doing sonic branding. There are a lot of companies that do sonic branding, that don't only do sonic branding, so they happen to do predominantly music for advertising, which I did. Do. And I felt at that point that I had my own vision for bringing more of more method different methodologies different approach to doing it. I had been there a long time. I didn't see where I could go up any further than I was 'cause they were just two owners above me that ghetto. So that was really room for me to go higher. But I had my own really keen vision on what a one hundred percent dedicated immersed. Sonic branding company would look like. And number two was that I wanted to try and see how far I could push myself, and what I what I create for myself in as my own business model, and certainly they were risks that I was taking. And I had a write them down into took me about four years before, from when I wanted to do it, too. I actually did it for. He is of going back and forth, if it was the right thing if it wasn't, and I eventually decided it was my, my mother, who said, why not what do you have to lose? You've got good credentials you'll get another job. You'll rent out your -partment. You can move back in with us. It doesn't work out. That was a pleasant thought. But, but. But all kidding aside. I just didn't want to have to wonder for the rest of my life. If I had taken this chance, what would have happened. I just didn't want to be one of those people run. And so trying it failing was a better option for me than not trying it at all. Regretting that so off. I went. Who was your first customer? I believe it was scholastic men. I believe it was through electric fund stuff and their company that does interactive educational games run. And that's what I think was the first project that we did. Because I think I remember taking a picture of the check. Entrepreneurs, you didn't have time to like, do anything with that picture. You were out to your next project. But at the time I didn't start audio brain by myself. I had worked with Michael sweet who now. Teaches interactive audio up at Berkeley, college of music and is incredibly prominent in that area. He had worked with mate Elias, and he was in the sound identity division with me. And he had left before me and was on zone. And when I was thinking about doing this, I had always said there was, there's nobody 'cause he did the Olympics with me, and he did all of the, the identity work with me, and I always said that they would be nobody, I'd wanna part with. But Michael fantastic composer, technically savvy beyond anyone's comprehension. You should pick up his, his book, which is probably about nine hundred pages and just brilliant. And he was on his own. I was going out on my own. And he was my bridge to the other side. I really think that, that the two of us together, were it was kind of meant to be because we are. Different in a lot of ways, but extremely complementary in others, and he was the most technically savvy person that I knew which gave us a huge advantage as technology began to evolve. So we will partners from started audio brain together in two thousand and three till two thousand eight when he was offered to start that division of it, Berkeley got him, and we still work together talk all the time. That's nice. That's a great story. Okay. So I know a lot of your clients. Don't want you talking about the work, right? Because it's all mystery. Right. They just birth it without help. But of the client, you can talk about which project most proud of. Oh, wow. You know, it's really funny because somebody asked me that the week before last we found to the fuse conference, and it was pretty amazing because the day before we went in, and we did a workshop for project us Moses which is a design program for inner city youth of Chicago. And they asked me the same question, and it was the first time anybody ever asked me that. And this is the second time I'm being asked it. And I'm kind of stumped as I was then but I'll kind of give you the way goes, I think, when I did. My first Olympics, I remember sitting there as we went on the air, and I was just, like, I honestly, don't think it could ever get better than this. I really don't. Until we did the sonic branding for Major League Soccer at on sitting improv with an eighty piece orchestra. And we are sonically branding, every team to this day in MLS, walks out to our processional anthem, and I'm in Prague, and I'm like, this is unbelievable. But the XBox three sixty was the game changer of them all because we only I think we were only had our company a few years when that came about. So I'd say of, of our projects those would be the, the real key ones that the Olympics, the XBox a Major League Soccer were for different reasons. Really, really special. Let's bear probably like many people talk about, like how do you choose your favorite of among your children? Right. I mean, they're all important in different ways. Right. So you mentioned XBox three sixty. I have that in front of me right now. Let me play two different things. You've got the sonic logo in the sonic fingerprints, I'll play both of those, and you can explain a little bit more about that project in what the differences between sonic Logan Asana fingerprint share. I gotta play that once more. That's the sonic logo. Okay. That'll be very recognizable to anybody. Who'd watch television in the last decade. And now the sonic fingerprint for XBox exte-. Played that a couple times, so Audrey what's going on there? Okay. So we had already bring for, for a few years, and we got a call from Microsoft, and asking us if we wanted to be involved in a sonic branding project that they had. They had gotten our information from a colleague of mine, Michael Jaeger, who had JD K branding firm and it turned out to be for the XBox through sixty. So we're like okay so what we needed to do was, we did the sonic branding strategy, and the full products on a fixation. Not just the sound signature in the fingerprint, but the full product Saana fixation, and then the peripheral events, e three, the executive walk on's when it debuted on TV different events that they had. So it was pretty fantastic. That kind of call, but the goal for them was to differentiate themselves as a global leader in, I won't say the gaming world. Because they felt that they were living entertainment system, and they knew as these companies do know that in a few years that we're going to be more than a gaming console, but they were futuristic a modern. They were optimistic. They were very, very technical, but they had these human organic qualities and very multi layered in very dimensional. So we worked in it was fantastic. If you could ever work this way is they are such an empowered organization that we worked with the branding team we work with the product development team. And we were brought in when they were many different Xboxes sitting around the room and two hundred attributes all over the walls. So you can't get a better experience than that because any decision maker is involved in the process, and that's really important for successful initiative. So after. Many, many rounds of iteration. First assessing the competitive landscape trying to find we call it the top of the pyramid. What made the XBox three sixty different than, than the PlayStation different than Sega different than anybody. And we weren't looking at the table stakes that they were in the game industry, we looking for what the top of the pyramid wasn't for XBox through sixty at that time, it was XBox live, because you could play live with anybody around the world. So we try to create various concepts was cold symphony because an orchestra could play with different people and not speak the same language. We create the stories in these metaphors and the result. If too many, many iterating and testing sounds refined. We have created that. That sound that you hear there, which in within it, you could hear that at futuristic modern. It's global you can feel the movement, it's multi dimensional, but that XBox breath is the Uman energy, and there isn't anything within that sound that isn't intentional. That doesn't tell a part of the brand's story, and that's probably why it's so unbelievably successful and a favorite sound signature to this day for a lot of people, and I remember when it was down to the last two sonic logos, and they would determining it was determined that was going to be this one, and I remember someone really, really, really, really high up saying to me, but is it I con enough it didn't say to me, I take that back. He said it to everybody. And everybody looked at me to answer the question, of course. So. Yeah. Yeah. So I said, nothing comes out Connick. Nothing is I- conic soon as created if we've done our job, all of us collective, as a team a really great team if we've done our job, and we undestand the personality, and we understand the desire to shift, the demographic from a hardcore male gamer to a broader demographic, 'cause this is not gonna just play games. You're gonna you're gonna be sharing photos in. You're gonna doing other things broaden the demographic, and all of the strategic things and that the sound feels authentic, and doesn't alienate the original fan base. And if we've done our job, and we've articulated, the core characteristics that makes XBox three sixty what it is that nobody else can concerned like it will become conic, if you use it consistently. If you support it if en-. Gauges in if the user, u I found, we've developed make the experience better for the person using it, it will become a conic organically, it will become or I can't even talk it will become a conic. And that's what happened if XBox three sixty been done, it probably would have gone away, but it also happened to be pretty good product, and they did support and Aztec supported tremendously both with our in dated for product features but also through advertising. Yes, they did. And to this day, there various iterations derived from the three six s XBox through sixty logo. So we're very, very proud of that. What is that? How would you describe that sound played again? So you hear a lot of technology in there. But you also hear a lot of human organic sound. It's futuristic it's going from like the dark to the light. It's bringing you it moves around, like a globe, mid sound. If if when you listen to it moves around, it's very multi dimensional and layered, and it culminates in a human breath. So it's a living entertainment system. Was that again, so people can hear it? So that thing at the end where it's like her shadows. That's the breath. Yes. And the FOX breath. Is really the icon of the whole tonic logo. And at the time we needed to make a very short version because XBox three sixty at the time was often co branded in so many different environments. For example, there would be an ad for EA games sports. It's in the game. Did you hear that sound and only you only have a split second? So that was the first project, we developed a sonic fingerprint for. And so in, in once. Right there. Yeah. So at the end of e a sports sits in the game. In that one split second. You know, it's XBox through sixty and that's how we came to deliver for our clients a sonic fingerprint in almost every project we do right now. We try to create a sonic fingerprint, because the so much small real estate now where it can launch an app this, so many different places. There's so much co branding going on that it really is a very, very useful asset to have. But that's how it started. Okay. So we have some other examples here. Let's talk appliances. So I've got world pool and kitchen eight year and you've done just power on power off sound. So we've got appliances in the homeless, people don't think of those adding annoys necessarily, but this is not pretend to extend the branding beyond marketing campaign. Yes. N. We've actually done way more than power on power off for both of these brands. I just wanted to keep it simple. So we've done full product son, if occasions many sounds for both of these brands, I just wanted to give you a little tavis XBox, you did, the, the logo, which we play, but you also did like the blade and the blade Santho navigational sound down, though, here, it was originally, a land sound after the blade. But if you play the XBox once the blade moves it's landed. So we work on ours. Architecture of the sounds, and we're sounds are needed a not so we did. I don't know how many sounds in the XBox three sixty and that we also did sound scape for the event when it launched it, he three that just moved around the room for an hour to set up. You know, the unveiling of the XBox three sixty we had executive walk on. So each of the executives Addy, three had executive welcome music that was in the tone and feel of the three sixty so tons of touch points. So prove let's go back to the appliances. So for them like so we'll, we'll play the power on power often. You can give me a sense of shy play. Baltimore one at a time. Power play them in pairs. That's what I mean. So power on power off for whirlpool. I. Power on power off. So what's going on there? Right. So they're really beautiful sounds. They're fantastic team to work with because they understood the value of sound for their consumer. They want their consumers. Always have a wonderful experience with their products. And we were at a point technology where we didn't just have to resort to just little PA's Zo buzzers way appliances, always did. And, you know for for world full it's about, you know, being pure and delightful and. Sensitive and every day care. So care was really important to put into the sounds and without going too much into their their strategy. And all that's really what we, we had a sonic brenick filter created with them, and all of the sounds are created through that lens. Let's, let's do kitchen. Then you can give sort of the same rundown on that power on power off for that as well. So power on I. Power off. So now there's some similarities between the I it's more of a chime sound in both of them, but they're very distinct. Yes. In kitchenaid kitchenaid is a lot of things we learned about working with them as kitchenaid over our chain, modern contemporary, simple well-crafted precision attention to details makers. You know, they have different different personalities but they still part of the same family to degree. So we try to give each their unique personality and worked on a lot of a lot of strategy lottery. Search a lot of technical testing making sure the sounds hold up because when you deal with any kind of technology, as, you know, you have to make sure what we hear when we create them is what comes out the other end and often there's a lot of fine tuning that goes on there. But again, another fantastic client, mainly because they value adding intentional audio to the, the experience. Okay. So I have another one here to for an automotive brand Kia. I think you call this the rise of surprise. That's in. This is in audio logo correct? Yes, it is. So very short. Right. So. Kia was very interesting project because they had. Their own tagline and rise of surprise kind of played off of that. So. They called us, and they wanted us to do the sonic branding for them, and they had tried I guess a few different times, and then Kia coldest directly. So they're sonic branding is about, you know, their their, their tagline was the power to surprise. So it was about being vibrant distinctive 'em reliable. And if you, you know, those were the core elements of this brand, and has the strong kick drum that places unexpected pattern and as five no melody in this Steinem rush of air. You know that that's the rise in sense of driving motion in four thinking brand. So that was a really nice project to do. Against people can hear it. Right. And so one of the things I think is interesting about that is obviously, it's a big global brand is a full logo, and it's much shorter than the full logo for XBox. Correct. So for someone like this. You might not even need the fingerprint, but you could do it. I guess the last couple of notes, you might not do it for a brand like this. Although there are other forms that we've done that are longer a lot of the brands that we work with we do longer form way, too short a form because they have different environments that things are going into, but this is their, the length of their, their low. The okay so I think like a really good thing now that we've seen we've heard some examples of audio branding talked a little bit about how you got here. Let's talk about what the key elements of an audio branding strategy are like, if I want to do an audio branding strategy. How do I know? I'm compr-. Sensitive. Okay. I think that there are different companies that do things different ways. I know the process that we have works for us. And we follow a branding strategy, very formal very specific. So we'll have a discovery phase strategy phase design phase testing implementation in maintenance. So in the discovery phase, we're gonna do Brando audit, we're going to immerse ourselves in the competitive landscape, not just near field competitors. But also mindshare competitors and mine chair competitors came about more recently than from when I started. And that's somebody that may be completely out of the industry that you're in but has the same demographic the same target audience you, you like to look at what they're doing because they're they have these same demographic, or psychographic audience that, you, you wanna have, or you do. You have. And then we're going to look at. The customer experience path. So we have a series of methodologies that we do. Is there anything inherent in the branded self that lends itself to be incorporated into the sound? I want to back up because I don't want a otherwise forget, so you talk about mindshare people in the same mindshare category. Are you thinking about something like X games in red bull have a very similar demographic in so understanding how to be distinct? Sure. You know, you can even think about something like. Where everybody would look at apple even if they weren't doing the same things that apple was doing. They weren't in the same industries apple they will look at what apple was doing because apple had Vangelis and maybe the same age demographic, and the same type of contemporary must have almost cold life following, so they would look at that okay through so that's really interesting. So I understand the idea of looking at competitors. It'd be distinct, but this idea that being distinct understanding what matters to anybody with same target demographic is you is, is, is helpful. I can see how that would be something that eventually would become important as you as you move through the evolution of this of Irv this industry. Yes. Definitely. Because at the end of the day, if somebody's giving somebody a great experience, I mean, especially as we evolve more product send people only have. So many hours in the day. So who's taking up that time who's, who's getting that time from people and people spending time with that brand and talking about that brand and loving it. You might wanna take a look at why whether they're a direct competitor of yours. Not. Okay. So, so you're about to talk about some of the other elements of brand strategy that you walked and thinking about this if I'm a brand, and, and I really haven't done a lot in space. And maybe it's because. I'm thinking about Alexa, some of the other voice interactions. But I'm just saying, you know, I need a comprehensive industry. So I want to keep going on that. Okay. So I we're gonna look at anything that we could learn about the brand. So what? Voices brand using what sounds of the brand is the brand currently using what are they touch points? Now, what are the touch points in the future? What's coming up? Why now why did somebody call us at that particular time what's going on? Do they suddenly just have an interest, or is this something specific that they're calling us for our they rebranding to, they are they now adding, you know, Alexis skills, or are they now doing a product that needs Santa Fe -cation that needs, both sounds voice, so we do gather every bit of information that we can to come up with the next step, which is the strategy? So okay, we've looked at the user profiles done some scenario map. Opportunity mapping, with sound and now we have an idea of an own -able space, a what the this brand's personality and benefits positioning attributes are, and they often have their brand attributes and sometimes they don't you'd be surprised, but a brand normally has what they brand personality is. But that could be different from one burnt brand to the other. They can have a certain word like dependable, and that could mean two different things. So we then have now start the strategy of helping them with tools that we've built, so we could find out what that what that attribute that personality trait means to that brand, and we work them through series of tools. So it makes it fun. And it makes it we'll do the heavy lifting with compass. That's what was really important to me is that we take stuff that can get really, really heady on our end and not over-complicated for our clients, but educate them involve them, gradually get them into the game of what this is. And I'm not kidding by the time that we're done with our first initiative. They really get it. And I'm really proud to say that we have a hundred percent pliant return rate. So this process does work because you have to kind of really take the subjectivity out of it before we write any sound. We are ready understand the personality of the brand that we're writing for. So from there, it's a matter of concept, Ingham, working with them to find tune that lens who psych having something hand crafted for you. Nobody. Has just one dimension to their personality. We have to take the core characteristics and blend them to create the persona. Okay. So let me ask you a question. I want to I want to make this really tangible to for people listening. So let's say I've got voiced bought and I have a website. We have a lot of written content, but we do have some audio properties as well. We've got this podcast. We have a couple of Alexis skills Google action. There's other things that we could do, we could do like facts on voice, or voice stats or something like that. There's a lot of different things that we could do we could do mobile app. If you started thinking about someone like voice spot in your to give me a checklist and say, hey, these are the things you need. You need an audio logo need in audio fingerprint. You need it or sonic hanger print, you need a intro music in out, tra- music for your podcast. Maybe you need some accent. Sounds that you can use in your podcast. If necessary for your Lexus skill. Maybe you want some sort of intro, which might be the same as your audio logo might be different pending on than if people, ask questions, and then you respond. I'm just wondering, like, is there a certain set of checklists, or, and then the we've been talking about, like music, like right in terms of? We, we could have this whole music interlude or could play on the website. When people come, there could be like a standard soundscape behind it. How do you think about that? In terms of when people say, hey, you know what I've never done audio branding. What do I need? Well as part of our process in our discovery phase where looking at everything about this brand. And when we create sonic branding initiative, we start off with what we call a foundational brand theme. Don't think of it as a jingle think of it like a box of criolla, crayons customize colors for you, and it's long form. It's a minute, two minutes long and then from there will create a sound logo usually, but what would doing is putting in place, the tone in feel of this brand the foundation is in place in a long form. So from there, we look at the brand, and they can evolve once that foundation is in place. We can do. Executive walk on a when you walk up to the podium to speak. It's your brand sound when you open your podcast, we do opportunity, mapping, and we do we look at the touch points and we make recommendations. And we look at the ones that are really near field, and then we'll, we'll map it out for the clients of like hit. This is where you could go and some of them will do it. You know, twenty five touch points at one time and others will do a couple and then a couple more a couple more a couple more. But the foundation is in place in, that's the difference because we're not one offing anything where leading one thing lead to the next to tell the next chapter tell the next chapter to create this story this narrative, that's not just an Intel inside but much much bigger and richer. And connected than that. So there's a certain tone in feel and feeling to the brand. So they're different ones that roll out for different brands depending on what industry they're in and depending on what their core touch points. Are you have a podcast? You have events, you have speaking engagements, you, you have different things, we would focus on them whereas somebody's corporation, we'd focus on video book. We'd focus on what they have on their on their YouTube channel. We'd focus on their advertising. We'd focus on, you know, their apps. So for each friend, we make the recommendation recommendations we show them like the whole world of opportunity that's out there for them growing. So I didn't really thought about that. So, like we were talking about voice summit which you've been selected as speaker for speaking there as well. When I come out on stand I could have my own intro music. But then. But then I. Yes, we could we could create that together. That's a great idea. I love that. But that's you know, this is a great example of the fact that a lot of people say, okay, well, I know the Intel inside chimes, and so therefore, I know what audio branding is. Or maybe they say I know about music soundscape and therefore, I know there's so much more than that. You just talking about this idea that there's just so much sound around us. And there's so many different ways we interact with brands that it's really unfulfilled opportunity. Most instances for brands. Yes. And I say this in people tell us have don't say that because she kind of trivializing it, but I you're gonna use sound anyway, so you don't want to be like this executive of this very important corporation, many years ago, who walked to the podium, and the av guy played yellow submarine, and the whole audience laughed. And when he got off from giving his speech. He said to me, I would like you to create an executive walk on. So when our keynotes go. Up to to speak. They don't have to be embarrassed like I was, and it's nothing against the piece of music. It said it didn't fit the event that they were at the seriousness of his speech. And that's how we started doing. The executive walk ons. Every brand does them. Now, you have events you have with you of room warming. Soundtracks or when people awaiting on hold to join what are they listening to silence? Nothing arbiters stuff or stuff that makes them feel your brand in advance, so we call them room warming the best. Hold music is Uber conference. I love that grade though. Though, if most people have probably been over conference, once if you haven't to sign up just so you can hear the whole news, it's so funny and then that is really unique. Like everybody knows what that is, is once you've experienced it, you know. So I'd love to know. Like tell me, one thing that you think people usually get right about sonic, branding and one thing they usually get wrong people or people in their minds or people in their execution. I might need both. You pick you tell me which one you wanna do. Okay. I think one thing that they get right? Is that it's a sound logo or jingle and one thing that they get wrong is that it's only a sound logo or jingle wrote right? Okay. So those part of it, but that's the first thing, people think of they certainly don't think of, you know. A soundtrack playing the background of a room to keep the room warm and set up the tone of the brand, they wouldn't be thinking of that they wouldn't be thinking of the voice casting, and what we go through when we cast a voice for brand, and that I think I know you, another guest blog on. It's really, really extremely diligent and so in their minds. That's the one thing they get right in the one thing that they. Need to expand on? It's everything it's every place that your brand is heard, whether it's a voice a sound music is an opportunity to connect for better experience. And so as far as on execution goes, it's probably very similar thing is that I think a lot of people will get a sound logo. A lot of people will do a sound logo and stop there. And I'm really pleased lately that everyone thinks is whole new frontier of voice. I sound I but it's really not new. It's really not new at all. I mean long, I'm doing it right. And, and doing it at a pretty high level for pretty long time. It's just that now two things, I think driving it tremendously. So that's the part, I think that they don't get. Right. Is that it's not new? It's just a new need. A bigger need a need. The need has eclipsed people's ability to be on aware of it. So do you feel like the rise of Alexa, Google assistant Siri, if increased people's awareness that this is a gap. I think that's they are certainly part of it. I think would voice. Absolutely. I think other products like. Smart TV's, and the devices that we create like the different types of bluetooth, speakers and home appliances and self checkout kiosks and everything that these brands now have and podcasts. And there's all these opportunities where people need sound at voice. So I think technology is driving this tremendous awareness because it's, it's right in front of everyone now it's not something. Hey, okay. I'm gonna spend millions of dollars visual identity. But you know what my next door neighbor's son has garage van. So I think he put some sound behind this, that those days along gone. They really are an now. That's why you're seeing so much about this at I do think it has a tremendous a lot to do with Alexa, Google at all. All the other brands doing a lot of innovative stuff. It has a lot to do with industries, like the health and wearables in science and just technology in general. So one of the things about Alexa, skills Google actions. The very few developers are doing is using any sound of than a synthetic voice. And so there's two things that is want to ask you about just in terms of these your experience because I know you've done a lot of were you've done your Miller with this space, obviously, it voice systems, but you've done a lot of work also in video games in the past. And I, I wonder if you if you have a piece of advice for people around the use of music or. Sonic accents. You know, based on different activities of people have done or using voice over as opposed to a synthetic speech engine. What would your what would you normally tell people to start thinking about if they haven't Alexa skill Google action and what they can do to make it a richer experience. Take advantage of that audio first invoice first experience. I think it really depends on what the individual skill or action is I think, in some cases, end, it also has to do it budgets, too. So I think that, you know, people should realize that sound in the use of it and use of sound unintentional way can make everything better, it heightens all the senses. So if you could create sound or a musical signal that. Makes it more unique. I think that, that adds a lot of experiential design when it comes to voice. Offensive voice versus synthetic. This is one area that is got me kind of really. Really intrigued to see where we're going to go because I do think there's a big gap in that area. So you have synthetic voices. You have, you know, people using things like poly nuance, and you have people spending millions of dollars to create their own proprietary voice. Bank of America Erica. And and yet you can hear about. People that are now making fake phone calls because they take a few samples of someone's voice that they can grab off the internet and create a whole dialogue. So that area is like a big me gap, most of the brands I work with are on either ends of those spectrums. So they're either gonna do how small the way you know, or they're going to do it synthetic all the way. And I think that, that's a landscape. I see changing really. Soon. Because when I talked to people like. Like Rupa tell who you put me in touch with from vocal, ID, and the fantastic Burke that she's doing in that area of creating. Human sounding voices is, is unbelievable with a couple of hours of recording. You know what I mean? That's a big difference since spending millions of dollars. So a fascinated in that particular area to see whether that evolves and how that affects everything. When we talk about human voices and voice actors, what's a common mistake, people make around casting their human voice. Okay. Here we go. All right. So we do a lot of voice friend ING tremendous amount of branding, and we have created of voice branding evaluator, and it has all these different three levels of characteristics that we look for one all the brand characteristics. So we hold the voice through the same lens that we create the sound. So is it articulating the same personality? Whatever we use as the filter to create the music and the sound at his exact same filter. We use on the voice, the next thing we look at is what technology is going into. Is it going into something that's digital product? Texas speech is going directly into the. Product like the boom where the voices saying, exactly what the voice is gonna say directly for more recordings, and then we look at the sound characteristics, it self. And if it's going in something that is going to be a tremendous amount of recording to create this voice for a brand. Does the voice have any kind of oddities to it? Do they pop their peas? Do they drop off? Some people like drop their pitch down. At the end, is the accent within tick, that is absolutely. Number one. I think the other thing people make often make a mistake on is that they've believed that they could do their own translations, and translations should be left to experts and voice talents should be localized because if you're going to do a casting of somebody who speaking tie, and they've been in the United States for X amount of years, and you're gonna sell that project product in Thailand, they're going to pick up on it in a second. So the this so many different things that go into making a great voice, and some of them, believe it or not, we look at. We'll look at what other is the voice a spokesperson for any other brand. What kind of contract are we gonna do with the with the talent because the last thing you want is not to have that all very nice and neatly resolved for your client, and the next thing, you know, the product in the voice, or a hit, and now, you're in a predicament with talent. So knowing the right things to do in doing those castings. There was that really do pertain to the voice itself. And I know that, you know, we use expert companies we also do our own talent searches, but will use a company like one of our great collaborative partners is voices dot com. They understand what we're doing the discreet, on our initiatives and they will stick to exactly the parameters. We're putting out there, then not gonna send us, you know, a twenty eight year old woman for a casting of a nine year old kid, you know, we've. We can't we can't, we're so beyond that we can't go in those waters, and it's knowing who to go to for those resources. And it's also knowing what to listen for and looking at the voice, and understanding of the voices, going to hold up making sure it's legally correct to use that voice making sure the talent knows where it's going to go and understanding the different voice characteristics will even Google them and see what they're like. Okay. So I cut you off there. I asked you for one mistake people make, I think I wa. Wow. So, but that is, but that itself is like, sort of the key takeaway for me. Like, I think about this idea of, like I've selected voices, for voice overs, number different times in mostly. You say I want these type of characteristics. You listen that sounds right? Fine. But it's not necessarily fully strategy driven. It's not not taking into account all these other things. But you're talking about like it's a much more comprehensive discussion that people need to have a head of selecting their voice talent. Because there's so many variables that can come into play. Yes. Yeah. I think I think that's wonderful. Okay. So tell me warm thing that you think, has changed over the last twenty years in sonic branding, that, you think is most important, I think that people are bringing it to the table. It's got a seat at the table. It's important now. It was an afterthought in the past annulled a very smart brands or ones that really needed it thought it was worth being alive. Denied to pay for. In the way that it is now. So it's come very far while said will said so let me ask you one other thing. So you've used voices Alexa, Google assistant Siri whatever. What's one thing that you cannot do voices today that you hope you'll be able to do with it one year from now that's a hard question. Believe it or not. I would probably have to give that some thought. I would like to have it sound like a voice of somebody that I wanna hear my parent my father to be to that level of customization. We've definitely people working on that. So you might I don't know if you'll see that next year and then you type of mass rollout, but I think you'll see that before too long Audrey are being this has been wonderful. I'm sure we we, we did run long. I would I told you, we wouldn't go wrong, and then I just wanted to. Tell the voice podcast listeners, how they can learn more about audio brain keep track of what you guys doing in the world is sonic branding. Just visit our website audio brain dot com. Follow us on, on Twitter, Instagram audio brain onto score and why hook up with us on Lincoln. Listen to everything on voice fought standing, gotta listen to voice about all the time and go to the different events. And we'll see there and you will be at voice nineteen this summer in Newark. So we'll make sure that people know about that. And I should do a shout out for you. You are a voice insider superhero. So we definitely. Right. The voice insider supporter reader every week. And you heard it from Audrey unprompted voice by twenty four seven that's what everybody here should be thinking about. Of course. You're listening right now. So you probably are already on top of that. And thank you once again, for listening all the way to the end, I'm Brett can Sella your host each week for the voice Bob podcast, you can find me on the Twitter at Brett consulta. You can also find at voice pot, a on Twitter, and voiced by that, you know, we're everywhere. Check out our daily. Alexa, flash briefing voice daily update. And let's voice about says, on election, Google actions. You guys know it. All thank you so much, Audrey. I learned a lot today. I know the audience did appreciate you sharing some of your hard earned wisdom. And thank you, Brent. And thank you for everything that you do to make people really aware of how powerful sand and. Voice are great.

executive Audrey Samsung Google Brett Olympics apple Intel developer Alexa Carnegie Hall Michael Jaeger IBM EMMY award Bixby Sonic Berkeley producer LA studio Elias
Mark Smith

Revision Path

44:47 min | 5 months ago

Mark Smith

"Are you looking for a new job. Are you hiring but struggling to find diverse talented candidates. Then we have something that can help our job board head on over to revision path dot com forward jobs to browse listings or to place your own this week on the job board b. s. h. home appliances corporation is looking for a senior user interface designer in irvine california for remote work. The wicked media foundation is looking for a lead you x. designer for their product design and strategy group and design action collective is looking for elite web designer in oakland california or remotely companies. Stop making excuses on your deny efforts and post your job listings with us for just ninety nine dollars or listening on our job board for thirty days and we'll help spread the word for you about your job to art diverse audience listeners. Make sure to head over to revision path dot com forward slash jobs for more info on these listings. Apply today and tell them you heard about the job. The revision path get started with us and expand your job search today provision path dot com forward slash jobs. You're listening to the revision. Pat podcast a weekly showcase of the world's black graphic designers web designers and web developers through in-depth interviews. You'll learn about their work. Their goals and what inspires them as creative individuals. Here's your host maurice cherry. Hello everybody welcome to revision path. Thank you so much for tuning in. I'm your host mariz cherry and this week. I'm talking with mark smith and industrial designer and copenhagen denmark and the head of design studio mark smith. Let's start the show all right so tell us who you are and what you do. My name is mark. Smith and i am an industrial designer based in copenhagen denmark with studio business call studio mark. Smith here in copenhagen denmark. Nice now i've been asking everyone on the show you know because of this pandemic how they're holding up how are you doing. How is sort of the corona virus and everything being handled in denmark. Right now. it's pretty good. It's pretty good. I think except for public transportation or like maybe going into a restaurant or something like that. You really wouldn't even see people with masks. Yeah i mean. We had the same tough time. I think the world had you know especially in the spring early summer with confinement but now things are are pretty. Good okay yeah over here. It's it's the ghetto man died. It is not great. I mean i don't know how much worse it's going to devolve by the time. This interview comes out but as of this interview. There's you know over two hundred thousand americans dead. No sign of stimulus in the future. And it's still so dicey and tricky from even from city to city let alone from state to state. Just how masks and everything or being enforced so it's wild and of course the economy is just like we gotta keep going so people are out and about like it's no big deal. It's a really tricky tom over here. We feel it a bit less here in copenhagen. I mean it's a much smaller country. I think it's five point. Eight million in the entire country of denmark. But yeah i talked to my friends in states new york atlanta where you are throughout the south end. It's a horrible horrible time. In twenty twenty is definitely been the worst year of my career. So you know so. It's tough. we'll speak enough career. Let's talk about some highlights. At least then. Let's talk about studio mark smith. When did you decide to strike out on your own. I decided it was sort of the last days when i was at Roszke for eight years and we knew my wife and i we knew we wanted to sort of make a move and it had always been in the back of my mind to sort of test. My theories do some work create some products some experiences and yeah. I think it was back in two thousand nineteen. I made the decision to do it. It's been really an exciting journey. That's really fantastic. And i have a whole bunch of collections that keep getting postponed. Because of corona too in terms of launch. There was supposed to launch a twenty twenty but it looks like we. We launched them in the spring of twenty twenty one for sure. Well i want to dive more into your time at swarovski later. But let's kind of a regular day like for you now then the trial on your own a regular day for me is i would say mainly working on my collection stuff. My collection work right now. I'm doing a collection of jewelry. So i have a collection call hidden and hidden began as a collection for lighting and home products. Like a a planter would have around the home home decor type of products. And i was asked if i could bring that in. Translate that story into jewelry. And so i've done that and now we will be launching that in dubai in twenty twenty one exciting. I mean aside from kind of exhibition part. Are there any parts of your work. Third different now. Because of the pandemic different i would say it's funny because the hidden story. The story of hidden is basically beauty in a broken moment. So all of the pieces are like breaking open. An inside there is sort of in for the lighting and for the home decor products. The sort of sort geodesy of crystal and for the jewelry. It's a fine jewelry collection. So it's breaking open and you're seeing some diamonds or you're seeing gold or saying white gold in. It's this idea that when things break inside that there's treasure. If you have the is to see it and i had four wild than really i love the look of like cliffs of dover in england or the grand canyon just that ruggedness in that sort of broken edge for longtime. I've loved that. I see it as something that is beautiful because it's imperfect and i would say that working on my collection during the this pandemic has actually made it clear to me. How important story is in and how important it is to sort of see that silver lining. Yeah i would definitely say the pandemic and everything sort of slowing down has helped me really center and and that has added to the. I think the quality of the collection. How do you approach a new project. Where does the idea. I guess i come into play and how you put that into action. I would say my ideas often are combination. My inspirations always coming from nature and nature is a few see some of my work. It's i have a lot of work that's relates to water a lot of installations architectural installations that relate to water. I think that was a lot of what. I how i worked when i work with iraqi was like doing a lot of water. Things in using the crystal to reflect refracted reflect light. It's coming from nature within on the other side. There's always looking for a job to be done. You know what is something that people need that the it's not being addressed so with these works that you're doing through through the all. These are just your personal creations. You're not like taking on client work anything. Are you know no also taking on client work. Okay absolutely taking on client work discussion with or waiting for word for a client project. They're in the us which is always cool to do work for home and an actually. The jewelry actually started out as a client request Build up so large that the client was like will. Would you be a business partner in this. Because it's it's far more massive than i initially thought it was going be now one of course go more into your design career like i mentioned. I wanna talk about us. But i i wanna go back to the very beginning. You know you. And i have spoken about where you grew up. Let's let's talk about it You're from here in the states from the country absolutely as we were talking before from the country to copenhagen. But i was telling you that. I think that's a perfect title for a book or something. So where did you grow up. So i was born in columbus georgia which is right next to the chattahoochee river and part of my childhood was there in atlanta and the rest was there in alabama. We moved back to alabama. And i was living in alabama when i graduated. I have two degrees from auburn university. One bachelor environmental design and masters of industrial design from their college of architecture programs and yeah just a ghetto. Southern boy were you exposed to like designed art like this early on like do you remember that. Not per se now per se. My mom i mean both my parents were really fantastic. But my mom. She saw that. I was always into drawing and so they were always buying like the. You know those like how to draw books. I don't know if people do that. You know but it's like how to draw cartoons so how to draw horses or how to draw face and she would give me those books and i was just. I was always drawing. I was the one that the teacher in class asked to help with the posters and decorate the bulletin board. And all that kind of stuff but aside from that. I didn't have any sort of remotely formal exposure to it until i would say i think it was like my junior year in high school and then eventually from there. You ended up going i to to auburn university. Is that right like you said yes so. I went to auburn university. When i went to auburn i was a business. Major okay. yeah. It was a business major majoring in marketing and back. Then you know because they didn't of start any sort of formal work in art into my junior in high school. It was always just sort of a side thing and my parents were like. Yeah you know. That's a nice thing. And maybe you can paint on the weekends but you gotta go to school and do a real career and a real job and so back then. I thought it was going to be corporate attorney a whole plan. I was gonna major in business and minor. In pre law. And then go to law school at emory university. Because my mom she her masters at emory In atlanta in nursing. That was the master plan. And then i know it was sort of funny but Kind of the genie in the bottle is like an open. I took a class my junior year through myself into it. Our winning all this sort of art competitions and and everything and and so for my last two years of high school and i was miserable. I mean i was miserable. I tried so hard to just like buckle down and focus and and everything but before you know what i got a part time job designing t shirts at a little t shirt company called massa graphics and i started doing all sorts of artwork like getting paid for it all over campus. It was a pivotal moment. I was painting a wall. Mural restaurant in that was twenty one years old. So i should have been graduating that year. I know it was going should have been my senior year. And i basically dropped out and i got offered a job with blue cross. Blue shield in birmingham alabama to work in our communications department. At all i needed to do was to finish my year. They didn't care what my grades were. They just love the they were having lunch in the restaurant where i was doing the wall mural and they were just like just finish and calm. I realized i don't want that i just. I should've been a static. Horrible business major by gpa. Was not was was was in the toilet. I could graduate. But just you know. And so to get an offer from bluecross blueshield in birmingham and had vessel guaranteed job. And they want me to intern. That summer should have been like. Just you know a gift from god. And and in that moment and i told the recruiter the director of human resources. I said i would love to take the job. But i'm going to be going to new york at that time idea if i could actually go to new york to art school but in that moment it just. It was clear that i had to leave. And that's what i did. I went to pratt institute. winter semester. January nineteen ninety three with only enough money to be there for one semester. Wow so you really like took a leap of faith. Absolutely just pure like i just felt i mean it was just i made. I made this sort of tears in my eye. Impassioned plea to my parents and i just felt like if i didn't do that i would just regret it for the rest of my life now. I imagine it had to be a pretty big shift going from auburn alabama to new york city in the winter in ninety three. Like what are you remember about that. First year i remember being utterly unprepared in every sense of the word at never been far from home ever in my life from my were. My parents live to auburn. Had only like a forty five minute car drive. And i never forget my first night there. I realized that i didn't pack sheets. Ono thanks sheets for the bed. So i was on this bear mattress in the dormitory curled up in this winter coat. You know it was. All i had to keep with it and i didn't even know where to buy sheets. I was just completely terrified of everything. I remember putting some backup money in my deodorant can is like the add in all this crazy stuff. I got lost. I mean every like country. Hick boy goes to new york city story. You can imagine happen to me. Wow i realized that while i had the skill for drawing that art is this really complex mental ex. I mean you. You have to be extremely smart. And it's just like an engineering or any of science. The visuals science form science. All sorts of things designed is in practice like one of the top schools in the world for that. So i was completely i was in the bottom of my classes just like in business school but now i cared you now. I was like be the case. What is happening. How is it that. I'm failing this class. And i'm giving my everything to it but sort of took about a year but went from the bottom to top. I was was in the top of my classes. Nice and i really thought that i was in the right place so once you you graduated from pratt and we've actually had a few pratt. Alums here on the show once you graduated from there. Were some of those kind of first design gigs. I'm assuming you probably stuck around in new york for a while once you got the hang of it right. If i had a lot of different gigs. I worked at leather new leather jackets. I remember seeing that in like vibe magazine. Those brands yeah exactly exactly so. I was designed junior designers system. Eva rex i were just doing textile design looking back on it. I did a lot of work within the sort of fashion sector their new york round forty seventh street. But yeah and then i started being a teaching artist which is basically partnering with these sort of foundations. Where they the idea is that you have creative problem solving in creative process. And so you. They would partner a creative with the traditional teacher in underprivileged classrooms in schools like south. Bronx and i was working in East harlem and that and they were party with the teacher who might teach math or science. And you guys would get together and come up with basically more creative way to teach math or more creative way to teach science or history or whatever whatever the the subject was okay. Yeah well that is. That's so working those gigs being a teacher and everything. What changed because of from what i can tell from doing my research. Eventually you did end up going back to auburn. But then what sort of prompted that. Move to go back where you're trying to prove something to yourself. I was just lost. Like i was just lost. You know i went pratt. Mike i said on a wing and a prayer. I guess i thought that doing something like sort of climbing that mountain that on the other side it was like you know the land of milk and honey and i was lost. I mean i didn't really know what i was supposed to do. I was working going from sort of hand to mouth in regards to working in jobs in life. And i thought i was going to be. This fine artists in part of my apartment was like a studio but at a certain point i wasn't even painting or and i didn't like what i was painting and and my parents have to say the most incredible parents you know my dad came up and he had stay with me for a little while and he was just like you know. Come on. what are you doing you just. You're spinning your wheels. And just hoping that one day something's going to be different or you know some break or something or whatever and come home. And i was like what would i do. He's like i don't know teach or whatever but it's better than what you're doing so that's what i did felt i gotta say it mean it was probably the lowest point in my life like i felt like i had done the impossible which was sort of breaking the gravity of the south and going to the big city and going to win best art schools in the world and graduating in doing well and but returned to the south was like really as sort of a failure and With no plan no had all of these skills. I love comic books and i. I used to tell my my parents. My brother like when i was there at pratt. Like i'm getting all these superpowers like. I can do this now at never could have done that before it. Now i can do this. And now i felt like you know like all these superpowers. And it's like what do you remember that you see captain. America did so all he wanted to do was fighting the war right then he gets the syrup and he's like massive guy right superpowers and he's like dancing on a stage like not doing the very thing that he went through all of that to do. That's exactly where i was. So i went back and a friend of my parents had said. Yeah he should go over there and look at the industrial design program at auburn and my roommate my former roommate at pratt my i remain He'd been industrial design. Major and i just had such admiration for that work and what the industrial honors did. And so i went to check it out and thank goodness. I met the head of the program and he convinced me to go there. I would say the second best decision one of my second best decision of my life at that time to do that. The first number one best decision of my life at that time was to go back home because it was really what i needed an grounded me and it put me in the right frame of mind to turn around yeah. There's something that that you touched on here. That i want to kind of draw out a little bit because i feel i personally relate to it which is being from the south from a small town particularly in alabama going off elsewhere to a bigger city to try to make a name for yourself and then this sort of silence. I guess. Fear that motivates you to do well so you don't have to go back like the way you said that you sort of characterized going back home or you saw it. I guess as a failure but it ended up being this reset. And i mean i'm thinking to myself i guessing it's probably this for other people that are from like small towns. You wanna try to grow out of your situation and sometimes going back to that can feel like you're sort of like regressing or. You're like taking a step back absolutely. I mean i know people who are still in new york. And i think new york city i think most big cities are full of people who you know the quality of their life the quality of their careers the quality of of what they achieve is not really greater. Because they're in that city is city just becomes a great place to hide. It's like yeah you know someone. So yeah there's in new york. I don't know they're doing something. And you and. I knew people like that. Who were just there. Yeah you know. Like i said i i. I think i'm very thankful to my family. They really framed it like we need to hear we want you here and we think it's also good for you to it. Takes courage to leave. And for sure it takes equal to greater courage to come back especially when you haven't achieved what you thought you want achieve. Yeah yeah the only thing i had when i got back was my that piece of paper from pratt which not to diminish it not to say that that was a small thing but the best thing that that paper did was get me into the industrial design program at auburn. Yeah and so. You're back home here at auburn. You founded something at auburn. Call design seed. I believe yes. Yes yes what was designed seed so the concept of design seed is that you have this huge like band that goes through the center of the state of alabama through selma selma's at the heart of it called the black belt and the black belt is basically where all the sort of rich black soil geologically swept down from the mississippi river through the center. This big band through the center of the state and because of the rich black soil there. It was the the most intense center off. Agribusiness slavery plantation in alabama arguably in the entire south. So you had just this concentrated concentrated amount of slaves in this region called the black belt and when slavery ended the blacks of that region were just left to poverty and it hasn't changed at all and so the idea of design seed. Was that the problem with the regions that you really can't make money with right with farming. You can't make enough money to live and the real money is in manufacturing and industrialized employment and an industrialized products. And so the idea was to design products that could be manufactured. Profitably in this region and to cede that region or these micro manufacturing businesses back could start and create jobs and then the idea is that designed seed would use all of the leverage all of the intellectual leverage of auburn university university of alabama funding from both state and federal levels. And all of the sort of concerted effort to create these micro manufacturing businesses. That would then grow up in that area and employ more people employ more people employ more people so that was the concept of design seat. I proposed it. I think literally within the first month of my graduate school and within the first month it got funded from the college of architecture by the end of that semester was funded by the university. And by the time i graduated like a lightning rod for all sorts of federal funding for the university so i actually graduated got a job designing barbecue grills and turkey fryers in columbus georgia at a place called masterbuilt manufacturing so I had gotten that job. I was doing that work. And then i got a call back from my old thesis adviser and who is also my partner to sign do and taiwanese guy. He's now the head of design at north carolina state university and side was like. Hey can you come back. And i was like. What do you mean to visit. He was like no. We need you to come back because we got all this funding after you left and we need you to come back to to run this and so i did. That and everything was going phenomenal. Incredible in two thousand and ten we won we like the longest project to win the southern growth policies innovation award out of kentucky and everything was going great and then the financial crisis hit their two thousand nine. Two thousand ten are all the funding just dried up. We never got a chance to launch even a single business what ended up prompting the move to europe. So i'm imagine that i'm fighting the good fight. I'm driving up to washington. Dc in presenting to congressman and of this sort of stuff to keep my project alive. And i get a phone call from a recruiter from a design that i had done that they saw and they wanted me to interview for serov ski and the krystal company and the first time i said no actually and i told him all the reasons why i didn't wanna do it and i said yeah you know the money's not enough and you're not thinking about it correctly like this. This was a really interesting thing because is never happened to me before since i said all the reasons why they were thinking about the job incorrectly. I did all the things you really not supposed to do. Would you interested in job. Because i wasn't interested in the job and they call me two months later and say we fixed everything which is still be willing to interview for the job. And so i did and i got the job. And that's how it began with ski. Which is headquartered in austria and switzerland. There's two headquarters. One involves austrian. The other ones men endorse switzerland. And i started in their us office in upstate. New york in a small town called plattsburgh our south of montreal. I was there for three and a half years and then moved to europe so it sounds like you know you were like you said fighting the good fight here doing what you could you came back. You got the recent opportunity. Kind of came out of nowhere. Sounds like honestly it was. I think it's really interesting. I wish it could be one of those sort of stories where i would say you know. It was my big break and i knew it was my big break. I absolutely did not taking the job with sarraf. Ski was that was my big break. It was like was like a rocket ship just from day one it was like just absolutely transformative in the scope of the work. Sean what. I could do learning what i do at never forget. It was literally within the first week on the job. And i'd gone at six in the morning because it was so overwhelming that i thought i just need to kind of like catch up a little bit and as soon as everyone gets into the office like i don't have a chance to breathe. The general manager of the company was there by the coffee machine at six in the morning and he was like mark. Wow so great that you're in early. That's perfect come onto my office. And i was like oh come on like come in at six. I need to come in at five in the morning. Just so that i can get some peace and i go in and and all the heads of the departments are there and he said yeah we were just sitting here thinking that mark should be on this call but you just started so we just didn't think too. We had just hadn't thought to invite you but it's perfect that you're here so we're all here because this is a phone call with china jing and we're discussing designing the largest crystal dragon in the world and you're going to design that so here we go and i was like i'm sitting there like in shock designing the largest crystal dragon in the world for china and it was just. It was like that. I mean just really incredible incredible projects incredible opportunities in incredible growth. Now i know that you know you're not at swarovski anymore. But i'm curious about something particularly. I guess you know as we're hearing this pandemic because so much of consumer spending has changed right now like i don't know if people are really spending money certainly not on travel and entertainment like they used to and i would imagine that probably is the same way for luxury items to how do you see a brand like swarovski. I would even say kind of a brand of what you're doing because you're making custom jewelry. How do you sort of adapt to these times. When there's now probably a new definition around luxury items. I think i. The jury is still a bit out in regards to what's going to happen with the luxury industry as sort of we going forward so when i took the job at serov ski you have to think that i got hired november two thousand ten so it would still very much the recession that time the housing bubble had burst. And and if you had asked me is just sort of a regular person. Would it be the time to sort of build up a department dealing with luxury installations and luxury products. I would have said no. But i would have been wrong. I mean the luxury industry was booming during that period of time. So it's going to be interesting. I don't know. I mean this is a different circumstance. And there's always those who have means and and wanna buy it now with the work that you're doing even the work that you did was rosca you're you know you're designing for an international audience. What are some of the challenges with that. There's a lot of challenges designing for international audience. A lot and i think it took me a long time of development in a long time of training to be able to to design for a truly international audience. And i do say that. In a way where i mean truly international audience. A lot of that has to do. I think the great thing is that. I think once you sort of get to understanding the the difference of the process. It's a lot about understanding what we have in common and we have a lot. It's been said. And i think it always bears repeating. There's only one race in that human race period. You have different body types. Different colors different hair texture different features all of that but at the end of the day there was only one race and that's the human race is dead so designing internationally has something to do with in terms of different body types in different features physical features but i think largely it has to do with thinking more culturally in a more cultural global mindset. So for instance. When i when i draw my inspiration from nature there's not a culture on this planet that does not respond to a beautiful sunset. There's not a cultural. This planet that doesn't stare into a fire and tell stories is not a cultural on this planet. Dad doesn't love kids. Don't want wants to swim in it and play and all of that so i think you know when you think you know sort of pull back you know if we could fly into space pullback and you see this wonderful blue marble that we all share designing internationally is not as problematic as you might think i would say there's more like not over thinking it and yeah i mean they're just really seeing. Everybody is human. I really can't just can't emphasize that enough to seeing everyone. I see it at myself. Every time i traveled to a new place. I you know you go to asia and they love watermelon. And there's no stereotype. There's no stereotype like you know i would is in. Us in the south. You know all black people truth. Is everybody watermelon. Fried chicken fried chicken too and so much of this stuff is contracts. But yeah if you just think about just people who are like you culturally physically then yes than then designing internationally might be challenge so now you're in denmark. You have your family there. Your studio is there in general like what's life like for you there. Do you think there would be something that would prompt you to move back to the states one day. Just curious can hear the honest with you. I really like it wasn't like it wasn't the plan at pride myself in a man of faith and i really tried to more. Listen to what. God is telling me. In where god wants me to go than my own plan. Because i feel like when. I've made plans. That really didn't work out. But i really like living in europe if you talk to me like if you went back fifteen twenty year mark whatever and you. Ask them that he would say. Never two million years. But i love it so and in copenhagen. The people are wonderful. I mean absolutely to some of the swedish people. I've lost my phone on a city bus three times three times. I've lost my sorry once. I lost a twice of loss on a bus once. A loss it on the street i was biking and it just fell out of my pocket and each time someone returned to me. Wow it's a wonderful city and we just bought a house. So i think yeah. I think we're gonna stayed for a little while. I mean. I would imagine to even just after looking at what's happened this year. The united states probably doesn't look like a desirable destination for from overseas. I would. I would imagine because for us here. Man don't know. I tell you i tell you something. I was having a coffee with the gentleman of color. Danish and We were talking about that and he was saying the same thing what i love about living in europe i love a lot of things in terms of quality life and quality food and quality. I liked it. You don't have to fight so hard for all of that in. Us if you want the best for your family you want good education. You want to live in a nice place you want. You know you know fresh vegetables and and all of this sort of things and good health care and everything absolutely you can get it. But for i'd say the majority of americans you gotta fight for that. You had a fighting your education. You've gotta fighting your job. You gotta fight and work hard. Be the one who who stays late in all of that kind of stuff to provide that for your family and one of the things that i've deftly found that i enjoy is that they don't roll like that here they don't roll like that you know. They don't denmark is a proud welfare state. they call themselves that it blew my mind house like like. That's not you're not insulting yourself like. That's an insult and for them. They are fiercely proud about that. America is a messy country. But we've always been a messy country. What does success look like for you now. And just so you know it's been intermittently dropping out like every three or four minutes so i'm gonna be curious to see how the final product sounds making a lot of notes that i'm glad that you keep talking. 'cause my hope. Is that skype records. That even though i'm not hearing it go back and listen once. We've we've wrapped. And everything's i'll just i'll ask that again. We're kinda right near the end just so you know so with everything that you've accomplished and you know with where you're at in your life right now. What does success look like for you. Success would look like my studio business doing well. I've been blessed to do a lot of incredible work. When i was at sarraf ski and in doing design seed and other things and i would really love to have that sort of success with my my own collections. And with the work that i do for my clients. So that's definitely what success would look like for me to really build a strong studio business and have that a a studio business of someone of color and to share what i've learned and to employ a diverse team that would be amazing especially to employ a diverse team. One question that. I'm asking every guest this year and i ask you this same question is how are you using your skills to help create a more equitable future honestly. I think just try to do what. I'm doing with my studio. There's so many studios. So many creatives out there creative studios out there that i admire but very very very very very very very few from people of color and black people and for i think a lot of different reasons. We often don't get a lot of exposure. We don't get a lot of credit for the work that we've done. I think there's often a lot of cultural bias. That people are not aware of maybe even themselves or they think well. Unless i'm doing tennis shoes or something. Let's say call it. Stereotypical fits within the black or african american culture or something like that then. I don't need that voice. And so i think having a successful studio and using that success to be able to employ a diverse team and having that be successful would definitely build abby at a lot of equality and be a great symbol so to speak of of a more equitable future. Where it's possible to be a designer. I not a black designer but to be a designer and to be valued based off the body of your work and what that brings and your in how you think and i think that that day has not come yet. So where do you see yourself in the next five years hopefully do my studio business and working with coming into work and greeting my team and and everything like that would be fantastic aside from that. I try to make too many plants. Like i said before i try to listen and i try to listen to to our life is taking me and to make the most of the opportunities that i'm given and to and to honor that into to work hard. Yeah so just to kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you and about your work on line. The best place is definitely my website. Www dot studio mark smith all sort of one word no gaps studio mark smith america s t h dot com. I would say that's the best place on linked you can find me there in a few of the platforms like that but definitely say they can come to my website and just contact and send hello or something. All right. Sounds good well mark smith. I wanna thank you so much for coming on the show. Not just because of your story for the listeners. We have been plagued with technical difficulties. This is the third time we tried to record this interview. And i'm so glad that it is. It is pretty much gone off mostly without a hitch. But no i'm. I'm glad that you were able to kinda share your journey from small town in georgia slash alabama to working in europe and really kind of all the steps along the way. I think it's important to show that there is no one set discreet path to success in this industry that you can sort of bounce around and figure things out and kind of come up with your own plan. Which is what you've been able to do and what you're continuing to do through your studio so thank you so much for coming on the show. I appreciate it thank you. Maria said it was really a pleasure. I'm really glad we're able to do this. And i really appreciate the opportunity to tell my story. This is the first time i've ever done something like this. And so it's really it's really been Fantastic big big. Thanks to mark. Smith and of course. Thanks to you for listening. You can find out more about mark and his work through the links in the show notes at revision path dot com revision path is brought to you by lunch a multi disciplinary creative studio in atlanta georgia. Are you looking for some creative consulting for your next project. Then let's do lunch. Visit us at yup. It's lunch dot com up link to it in the show notes. This podcast is created hosted and produced by me. Maurice cherry with engineering and editing by rj. Basilio our intro voiceovers by music man jury with intro notre music by yellow speaker. So what did you think of this episode. Hit us up on twitter or instagram or even better by leaving us a rating and review on apple. Podcasts i'll even read your review right here on the show as always thank you so much for listening and we'll see you next time

denmark copenhagen alabama mark smith auburn auburn pratt new york bluecross wicked media foundation ninety nine dollars maurice cherry atlanta emory university forty five minute new york city Eva rex Smith california birmingham
[BYWG PODCAST]  How I got off of A Laundry List of Psych Meds and Defied My Diagnoses

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

36:36 min | 7 months ago

[BYWG PODCAST] How I got off of A Laundry List of Psych Meds and Defied My Diagnoses

"Marco three four. Five, five, six, seven, eight. Back. Hello be white WG tribe. Here's a quick less than one minute review of our supplement product book the month for September at the end of the podcast I will spend a few extra minutes going into finer details. So we encourage you to listen to the end. The supplement of the month for September is our potent probiotic formula called probiotic power blend the ten percent discount code for the month is gut health. So that's lower case G. U. T. H. E. A. L.. T. H. can it is case enter our book of the month? Is the Buddha and the bad ass by vision lucky onny. Great One. And, the product of the month is peak tease P. I Q. U. E. T.'s with the first time ever five percent discount on their entire line of teas using the code capital capital Y. Capital W. Capital. All the links discount codes special offers for the. Supplement in book will be listed in the show notes and Apple podcast post on social media in our weekly newsletter on our website at www dot beyond your wildest jeans dot Com at the listen now tab. Thanks for listening. Hello and welcome back to beyond your wildest jeans podcast. My name is Donna, declare nine because today our guests Dana, the Allesandro I, very lucky to have many many circles in my life. CHIROPRACTIC circle. Functional Medicine Circle Byu Circle, and my Yoga Circle to name a few several years ago I switched yoga studios and I was so fortunate to meet Jody and Dan both have been on the PODCAST and Dana today I've been so intrigued by her social media postings, our openness or story, and quite frankly the exponential growth I've seen in her over the last year or so I knew I had ever on to share. So how are You Dana Great. You I am. Trying to multitask today. Living the dream, right like the rest of us. Living You're absolutely. R So let me just say that this podcast is for informational purposes and if you are struggling with anxiety or depression or any of those types of things which will be talking about today, please seek out professional help. Dana do your bile and we'll dive right in. So Dana is a former negative bonding gossiping people hating crippled by anxiety codependent. See radically transformed her light by joining. MLM and became aligned with her purpose coach women who are where she was to no longer define themselves by their diagnosis and to reclaim their power. Her training expertise is diverse. She has be a in creative writing from Pratt. Institute is a certified Yoga Teacher and life coach. She is very close to five hundred hours of Functional Yoga Teacher Training as completed levels one into of neuro sculpting meditation training for over a decade she served thousands of incarcerated individuals in both four profit and nonprofit sectors educator in a manager during. That time to receive extensive mental health trauma related and crisis intervention training more than she is she in the trenches with you since preteens, she's been a patient experiencing trauma at an early age. He has been under the care of clinicians for as long as she can remember in his a lifelong path of self discovery and healing on top of our formal training she has. Passion for research, she read and takes all the self study courses she can fit into her life to stay current in server clients at the highest quality and informed level or other favorite title is mom she has a sweet daughter named Zoe who is the cutest ever and a husband. She loves adventuring laughing and doing life together with their family and friends. She's most reachable via the Grand Instagram Dot Com folks last Dana, underscore the allesandro which will be in the show. All right. I know that was such a mouthful was. So, here's here's a title for the PODCAST is the how off a laundry list of psych midst and defied my diagnosis. So with the title like that, let's first start off with you lashing out your bio little bit. Okay so I feel like. The most important is the in regarding to regarding be title, and our focus is today feel like the most important thing we can focus on is from. Where I say like from Oprah over a decade served. I worked in I worked in Essex, county jail for six years, and then I also worked in a drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Center in Paterson and through. Working in these spaces that was the catalyst for me to. Begin my journey of understanding that I didn't have to be. On psychiatric medications also just that I didn't have to accept. The multiple diagnosis at diagnoses I had been given since. About the age of ten. But. I feel like it's such a hodgepodge, my my my bio that if there's anything you want to ask me about other than just my training and experience. That's really it. I mean I think bio does say a lot about? You are weird come from what you're focuses been for. Sure. So then I guess, let's start here. So you've mentioned. A. Psych meds multiple diagnoses. He's I I. Mean I see this in my office all the time where. Somebody starts with? You know one. One, mid to mid and at six meds in all, then their brain chemistry is is is so so. Messed up that it's a really really really scary scary situation show. I let's start here and you could be as open and honest or not open and honest as you'd like, when were you first diagnosed with whatever diagnosis you received So my earliest, my first diagnosis was depression at the age of ten. Yeah. So I, I was my parents like and I also just feel like I need to disclaim them in case like my mom listen this or something like I. Love My parents a lot and I and I, fully aware that like everything they have done for me in regards to like mental health in all this stuff was was because they were. trying to protect me and. You know wanting to take care of me It just wasn't the case so. I started seeing a therapist of Egypt ten because I. was kind of in the of a messy divorce and I got diagnosed with depression and I went right on PROZAC. and. What? Stood out for me that is like a memory because a lot of the memories are very like Choppy. But what stood out for me like was? Being. Happy that my mom was happy that she like understood almost like Oh. This is why she's behaving this. This is why this is happening and so like I felt happy to. But looking back, I don't know if it was just like a byproduct of my mom being happy or if it was like my relief like my own relief. But I think this is where. The blame and the victim mentality like initiated right which was like my mom was like, oh. This is why she's acting like this because there's a chemical imbalance in her brain or something like that not because. Of. The traumatic experiences that I had experienced as a young child, you know what I'm saying. So my I was at ten years old and then it just and I think the comfort. In, getting that diagnosis and their reaction of my support system, it just put me in a space of being very comfortable being diagnosed and being comfortable. Taking medication. Now. It's Kinda hard. 'cause you're years old but. Do you remember do you did you think PROZAC helped you at that age or no or I don't recall I really don't recall. Like the. If there was like an Aha uh-huh she's doing great now I don't I don't ever really remember. Sustainability in. Taking a taking any of the psych meds I remember. Like, blips of time where I felt good and then it just kind of. fell apart again. Expect you to know this answer but you know I. I take care of a lot of patients and I take care a lot of kids in a lot of times. Parents put their kids on medication because their doctor tells them to start looking into the drug and there's no research at all that safe. Or even effective for kids. Do you have any idea if that's the case for PROZAC for ten year old? I honestly have no idea I I. When I started to realize. That there was potential negative side effects and stuff like that I didn't I chose actively not to look into them because I'm the type of person that if I read something, I almost would manifest that symptom into my life, right? Like if I saw that this could potentially be. A side effect, I'd be like Oh that I have that this is this is this is happening to me. So when I was young and I was taking it just blindly I didn't look at it. I never read a legal I never just took it and I did it because I was told to do it and then once I came off and you know decided to come up I, didn't dig into. The potential negative side effects of its I don't know that answer about children. So I don't think my parents do either. So now, with PROZAC PROZAC it for you for many many years or did that did that develop into a different drugs or multiple drugs? Pack it. Yeah. It was A. It was the. kind of spiraling into additions to that as I got older. So from ten to about my teenage years I was like, Oh, I'm totally add like I have to I, have to get on some drugs for add. So I can concentrate on my mom's like, yes, you totally are like. And it was. It was like almost. Whatever was like trendy? I was I had this in my mom's like, yeah you totally do and and we had I was in therapy. So I was if not every week seeing therapists biweekly and I was seeing a psychiatrist to was monitoring my medication and it's It's funny because I looked her up after I was reading these questions. Just to kind of see because I was young in her care and she. She she prescribed me. So from PROZAC, it was a couple of different add ADHD drugs. I know that I remember it was like Stra Tara an adderall, and then there was another one. That she gave me that was like A. To go with the PROZAC. Honestly I don't remember the name of it, but I was taking three to four at at a time at one points and. I looked up and I was like, wow, she has it. Now her whole tune has changed. She's talking about holistic like a holistic approach to psychiatry she's talking about mind body and soul now, they could have used that then like. There was never even A. Question about. Spirituality, about physical activity and stuff like that. It was always always just a mental game always justice these are based on your thoughts and your behaviors. You know she never never considered anything else service. Very Common I see that see that trend Austin now. Now. So you're you're you have multiple diagnosis, you're on multiple drugs that change your in therapy. You know at what age did you start unraveling all of this that you felt that this wasn't right. This wasn't a path I wanted to take didn't want be on three four medications that you know had to be constantly changed or monitored to me. I didn't have to do this that when did that when a debt come about? So for me. It was when I started working assets. As County Joe I was I was a teacher there and then I kind of evolved into what they what I when I left I was called like the education coordinators kind of developed an education program. Within the jail for the. In Meat and I started to see a different side of mental health. Like I started to see 'cause I worked in a program within the jail. So it wasn't it was with I worked with counselors therapists. Social Workers. Primary Care it was all we were all kind of a team working with These men. and. I, I saw what the difference was between. And like I I, have to. It's hard for me to say this 'cause I don't WanNa be dismissive of anybody. But I I. I'm only speaking for myself like what an actual person coup was clinically depressed and had anxiety. Look like and how they functioned in the world what a person who had. Actually, has borderline personality and what those? What those behaviors like really are like on a clinical serious level versus my style, right? What a person who really is struggling with add adhd what that looks like. Versus someone who got a diagnosis like myself. And But prior to that rewind when it started unraveling is because I felt this was my first real job rate like so I was a little older when I was I started he was like twenty, five or six. I felt more self reliant. I began to actually see like a future for myself at that point I felt more of a sense of purpose I really loved my job I loved what I was doing and I then was like, okay I want to set myself up for success. Maybe I WANNA have kids maybe I WANNA get married like and do I wanna do that like on all of these segments do I wanna get pregnant being on all of this stuff and so at that point I, think that. The multitude of those things I decided that I wanted to stop. And I told my doctor like in we I was thankfully weaned off of them. I didn't just stop rate like I just it was I was under the care the doctor and they didn't really give me any trouble either. Documented the doctor or the weaning. Dr Like it wasn't like all. No, you can't do this. Right it was it was pretty much like when I went to them I. I think the my doctor was like, okay she's she's done like she's ready. There was no like, Oh, I think it's a bad idea that even if they said to me, it was a bad idea I had decided right I decided and I said. This is it I also stopped. Doing any recreational drugs as well because I did I never would like addicted but I would like smoke Smoke Marijuana. And just dabble in other things and I. It was then that I just decided like I'm not doing this anymore. So. Do you consider that decision is the most important step. Oh. Yeah. That was that was the beginning. That was definitely the beginning. For me it wasn't like a smooth ride. But that was definitely The beginning Life after identifying with being mentally ill and relying on. The life that you have created for yourself based around being mentally ill versus. Basically, being like reborn and it was like showing up as a completely different person, it was not easy at all but it was definitely I knew what was happening so I kind of was like, okay, this is what's happening and I'm going to stick with this. I'm not GonNa let this You know resisted answer this urge to go back and and you know. At that point that decision was made no matter what. Do Do you remember do you remember? The ups and downs you remember how you dealt with them there any specific examples where? Really. Hunkered down. I'm not really proud. You know there's there's some not proud moments where it like I there was a point where I would be like binge drinking There was a point where I would like. Just do things. You know just not things that I would be proud of mom where I felt like to almost like feel right to to exist and to feel these things. Or to. Try To try and rely on something else right like so it was like. Oh I'm just going to be promiscuous for this period of time because that's like a a self-medication almost because I was really just trying to. Find something to make me feel okay and. So. Yeah. The it was there were roller coaster moments of. I became a little bit too. Reliant on drinking. There was times where I was feeling like I was being a little bit to her miscue s That's really those are those are the two fund one. Out To be right now. Do you. Do you look at those as part of your journey to healing I? Guess you could say or to conquering. The issues you had? I do I do, and that's what it is. It was like in the moment. It didn't feel like that, right? It felt like I was out of control but. I was an actor like when I was reading this question. I was like you know through it all even though it was like an on. define. I always felt supported for I. Always felt support from God from from source like from I always felt like. Okay this is happening and this God awful but I always knew. I was going to be okay. And it wasn't until more recently, I could actually start defining these things and sharing them but as it was happening. I felt like violent. But yes, in all did you'll like, okay, this is just a part of the journey. This is this is. A part of. The process. I mentioned this in in the beginning I. Felt I feel that you have really stepped up your game? So to speak, you've been much more open on the Graham as you said. Is there a reason why I'm seeing this more often or are you just more ready to share it now than ever? So. The exponential change that Yoga has had on my life and Just being at the studio, just be just learning from jody and Dan and just their way of teaching and kind of mentoring. in the past year. I have had a consistent. Yoga practice. I have. An honestly, that has that was like the missing piece. In my journey because. I would work out or I would I would do some physical activity but never for healing purposes always for aesthetic purposes always too late lose weight or fit into. Dresser. I have a wedding in a month and I WANNA lose ten like something like that right but it wasn't until I. I was really introduced to like the mind body. Spirit connection and how they all just work in this beautiful harmony. That I was able to. Take the yoga teacher training. Get Out of my own way in a sense of the stories I had been telling myself about yoga. And Gain that confidence in myself to share But Co bid. Has Really helped me also being Being away from. Church. and. Being away from the rigidity of beliefs. has also been a catalyst in me showing more authentically. Let's. Let's get displaced. Whole other podcasts. We know we can get there I religious like so how'd you you? For me. You know I think it's I can't remember fit six, seven th it's more than five years now I just I walk into a studio. Yoga. Studio because I was tired of being inflexible basically is why Why started in an actual. Studio closed and then I found my way to become one. What was your catalysts to start yoga? Okay. So I was introduced to. My catalysts is not glamorous. I was working for jody and Dan. So I was managing the studio I was actively promoting yoga. Right I was promoting yoga series yoga teacher trainings. I was Managing Yoga teachers. And I wasn't. Doing. Yoga. I still had in my mind like this isn't for me I'M GONNA do it wrong? You know all of those stories around it like my idea of like a Yogi was like a thin white contortionist rate and that just isn't me so I didn't identify with. Yoga. and. Jodi to me like why don't you just take the teacher training like? A teacher and I said, you know what? That's great. I need to be more in touch with what might with the product. Was Purely as sales and marketing strategy was for me to take the yoga teacher training to learn more about Yoga and learn how to share more authentically the products of the studio that I was managing. And it did not do that. It actually changed my entire life. Just change the trajectory of my entire life I had. Debilitating shoulder pain like I would actually be throwing up like with the pain like dry heaving. Even Zoe, would I pick her up and I? I had thrown her out a couple of times because I was in so much pain and. I don't have that pain anymore. Just learning about the anatomy learning about the root causes of physical pain learning about how to you know move my body specifically for minus alignments and Posture and just all of that stock was. It was so I opening how? Yoga. And Functional Yoga more. So than other types of Yoga. There's such a connection to mental health. And so that was my catalysts was marketing and sales, and then what it turned into, was it being just that missing piece to? Empowering myself and you just like responded to an ad from become one or something like that to start working there now. So Nina Nina. Who Used to do moon child knowns yoga in she was friends with my husband. was following on instagram and was like, Hey, I really love what you're doing like I. Love what you're posting. I think we're we are like. Super Aligned. So, we did like a an event together and then she's like I think you should meet Joni. So I want to her community class. And Jodi was Gary Uninterested at first in mate? Yeah Hey, how you doing and then I reach out to her about just helping the studio with their social media? And so we kind of took it from there. It was a very gradual at first I was helping them with social media than I quickly. Forgot quickly it was like over the course of a year became the manager left my job at the Rehab and started working with them fulltime. Those not glamorous. That's a good story you should started off with that. have. Yet you know jody and Dan both been on. The podcast and they're great. They're great friends of mine you know. We, we've helped each other. I've seen both in my office in, of course, I've consulted with them for some issues I've had an integrate people so. If. Anybody's interested in in what they do or a little bit more on Yoga or their stores. Please check out the podcast them in the last year and a half or so really. Really. Really really really really really good stuff. I think you've touched. Upon this question already several times and I'm. GonNa ask it. One more time. What makes you want to share your story? From my perspective more now than ever. I feel like. That I had to really dig. To find. A different. Perspective on my mental health. On what actually being diagnosed with mental illnesses what what you know pharmaceuticals are I felt like I had to dig for the options that I have. Now. I also. Feel like. Throughout my journey with like therapists, Kaya trysts, any type clinicians, counselors, all of them I feel like looking back they represented like what I couldn't do for myself. and. Even though it was under the guise of. Self help it wasn't self help. It was relying on someone else to do something that essentially I was sitting in front of them telling I couldn't do myself, and like I think the medication also represented my inability to south correct physically And I want to share with people that like we have. The power. and the responsibility. To, potentially, if that's what you WanNa, do do this on our own without Without releasing our power to. Really what is it's consumerism you know just consuming. Modalities of mental. Health. and consuming medication. If you WANNA, take a different route, it's there for you and I think more and more at time goes on. We have to dig less and less, but I think. I want to share my story in case someone is like holy crap I don't WanNa be miserable be IDC anymore I don't WanNa. Do like you know I don't WanNa take this I. There is another way and it may not be my way but just encouraging someone to see that the ways that are laid out in front of them. Are there's more. And it's okay if they don't work, you're not broken if they don't work if you know therapy traditional route if they don't work for you, it's not it doesn't mean there's something wrong with you. It just means we are individual we may be suffering at the collective. But. Our reasons. For feeling anxiety depression for being a add for having you know bipolar ask you know symptoms it's all different. So the cure the the the healing modality is going to be different for everyone I wanna thread that. Sounds good to me I. Hope this podcast into helps a little bit with that. So final question or basically the final question that I asked, all my guests are Dana, what is your daily routine from waking sleeping? I. I don't have one. I struggled with this for a really long time condemning myself. You're not a high. You're not a high productive person if you don't have a routine so I, don't have a routine, I do have non-negotiables right so it I don't have a set amount of time. I don't have a set time to do these things, but there are non-negotiables which is. journaling, meditating and a minimum of five minutes of Yoga. So those are things that I do every day but the Times that I do them shift like for the past twenty one or twenty five as I journaled every morning. And that wasn't working for me now that we started school. So now I'm journaling in the evening and doing my like meditating journaling in the evening as opposed to in the morning. Those are my non-negotiable. Definitely try to get more than five minutes of Yoga in but five minutes minimum. Teaching a class tonight, you'll be getting more than five minutes today. I. Yeah. Exactly and then I have I have a private. Thirties are my nights to move. Do you got private. That's cool. All right. So what's the best way for people to retail? Right. Now it is still via Instagram am and. I am pretty active on it I am available. It's Acts Dana Underscore Dallas Andro. And, that's it. Sounds. Good. Any last words? No. Thank you for. Hearing my story I hope that this could potentially help someone. To to and I know it will Dan. We really appreciate the time have unless today my name is Dr McCoy or coast you're listening to the beyond your wildest jeans podcast. If you'd like you've heard today, please share your friends at family incurred them to subscribe itunes. Thank you in my oldest son Hayden says be awesome and never. An awesome. He guys back are September supplement is our very own probiotic power blend probiotics are probably the most varied and confusing supplements available. There are over two hundred of probiotics and not are all created equal or have the same benefit. We have done the hard work for you. We spent months researching the best recomendations in reading the current literature that identify top nine strains to include in our probiotic power blend. Pro Power blend contains probiotic strains that are temperature and acid resistant. So they make it through the stomach and into the intestinal track for more effectiveness for the entire month. Of September, if you use the Code Gut Health Ten, you will receive ten percents off this incredibly potent probiotic. You can pick it up outer office or website at www dot beyond. Your wildest jeans, Dot Com, the September twenty twenty book of the month is the Buddha in the bad ass the secret spiritual art of succeed succeeding at work by Vision Lucky honor founder of mine. Valley. Both Dr Mike and I love this book and recently devoured in just a few days for me. Personally the last chapter specifically revolving around the idea lofty. With specifically empowering to me, we highly suggest you check out this book. Are highlighted product of the month is returned favorite and one of my personal favorites as well. Peak tease. PT's are the freshest in rarest plant extracted via a proprietary Colebrook crystallization certainly preserves active compounds at maximum potential. The include things like green tea's black teas, herbal teas, superfoods, and so much more. You just tear open a small sachet, mix it with either cold or hot water per directions, and you have an incredible tasting. Incredible healthy beverage ready to go and they are. Beautifully with probiotics great digestive health. Here are some benefits they support gut health for healthy digestion. They support a healthy immune system. They can provide com energy because they're usually high thinning and they support healthy weight management for our listeners. Just go to their website at www dot peak, t dot com, and use the code capital B. Capital why capital W. Capital G. for five percent off their entire site, some of my personal favorites without a doubt, our sacred long t and hibiscus. Thank you for listening and as always be awesome and never on. Awesome.

Dan Dana Jody Yoga Zoe Joe I Jodi marketing and sales Marco G. U. T. H. E. T. H. U. E. T. Pratt Donna Medicine Circle Byu Circle ADHD anxiety
Eva Zeisel born - November 13, 1906

This Day in History Class

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Eva Zeisel born - November 13, 1906

"This is Julie Rieger author of the goes photographer and Co host of insider's guide to the other side. And I'm Brenda. I may now have written a book but Julie's Book and you are the most gifted on the planet. Listen to insiders guide to the other side on the iheartradio APP Apple. PODCAST or wherever you get your podcasts. The day in history class is a production. I heart radio hi everyone. I'm eve and welcome to this day in history class. A podcast where we one day. H ship notes of history straight to your brain through your ear hole. Today is November. Thirteen th two thousand nineteen. The Day was November Thirteenth Nineteen Zero six industrial designer. Xyzal was born in Budapest hungry. She's best known for her tableware. Evil was born Eva Amalia streaker to lower Palani streaker and Alexander streaker. Her mother was a historian feminist and activist and her father owned a textile factory even enrolled in the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Lupus when she was seventeen years old with the intent of studying painting but her mother Earth Her to learn a practical trade and she decided to become a ceramicist. She dropped out of the academy after three semesters and began an apprenticeship with Yak Okada. PONTIC car pontic was a member of the Hungarian guild of chimney sweeps heaps of an makers roof tyler's well diggers and potters Iverson. Graduated as a journeyman or a train worker and started to create her own pottery on a trip to Paris in nineteen twenty five. She visited the International Exhibition of modern decor and industrial arts and became familiar with the Bowel House. The International L. style of architecture and other modernist designs eve. His work was exhibited at local trade. Fairs and Hungarian Ceramic Manufacturers took notice of art and commissioned collections in one thousand nine hundred eighty six. Her work won an honorable mention at the Philadelphia. sexton Tonio at this point EBA EVA was working as a designer in the Quiche factory in Budapest creating designs for court art objects. She wasn't in that job long before her desire to travel apple and learn new skills took to Hamburg Germany and Stromberg Germany where she worked at Schaumburg Maiolica fabric designing tableware there she honed her industrial design expertise to create art deco designs that were both beautiful and functional and were able to be mass produced. Successfully Eva's work sleek modern designs with more lyrical classic shapes in one thousand nine thirty even moves to Berlin where she worked as a freelance designer for several companies after two years of immersing herself and Berlin art themes she ended up moving again this time. To the Soviet Union she worked at the Lomonosov factory in Leningrad. Now Saint Petersburg designing tableware that was rooted in modernism and Eighteenth Century Russian designs by nineteen thirty four. She had moved to Moscow to work at the LIBA porcelain factory and soon she became the artistic director of the Russian republics China and glass industry but in nineteen thirty. Six Ego was falsely accused of plotting to kill Stalin. She was arrested in May and imprisoned where she was subjected it took brainwashing and torture. She spent most of that time in solitary confinement until she was released in September of Nineteen thirty seven. Once he got out of prison she went to Vienna only to leave in March of nineteen thirty eight. As the Nazis arrived from there she moved to England and married Hans Xyzal the couple moves to the US where EVA would spend the rest of her life as a designer and writer in nineteen thirty nine. She began teaching at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. She had two children. Jean in one thousand nine hundred eighty and John Nineteen forty four sears roebuck and company was one of the first companies to commission her work in the US. Other companies that commissioned work from Xyzal were hall China redwing China Casselton China and Western stoneware. She even designed the vessel. Resilient chair sisal continued designing ceramics furniture glassware and other objects until her death in two thousand eleven. Her work is in the permanent collections of the British Museum. The Brooklyn Museum. The Museum of Modern Art the Metropolitan Museum of art and many other institutions. I'm East Jeffcoat and hopefully a you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can keep up with us on social media on twitter facebook and Instagram at TDI. He I H C podcast. You can also email us at this day at I heart media DOT COM. Thanks again for listening. We'll see the same place tomorrow For more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows this is Julie Rieger author of the Ghost photographer in co host of insider's guide to the other side. And I'm Brenda. I may not have Britain a book. But I mean Julie's book and you are the most gifted so I could go on. The plan. Had Come on listen to insiders guide to the other side on the iheartradio radio APP apple podcast. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

Julie Rieger director Hans Xyzal China Stalin apple John Nineteen Budapest Eva Amalia US Museum of Modern Art Alexander streaker Brooklyn Museum Yak Okada Paris Royal Academy of Fine Arts Hungarian guild Palani Hungarian Ceramic Manufacturer International Exhibition of mo
Bloody Sunday in London / Eva Zeisel born - November 13

This Day in History Class

13:37 min | 5 months ago

Bloody Sunday in London / Eva Zeisel born - November 13

"Today's episode is brought to you by oxy clean so i just moved to a new home. Which means that. I just did a lot of cleaning and one of my least favorite places to clean. Is the bathroom shower. Fortunately i had oxy clean versatile stain remover which meant getting in those next in crevices and getting into that dirty grout made the job super easy. You've got to try oxy clean versatile stain remover for yourself to work your magic with oxy clean go to oxy. Clean dot com slash. Try me in order a free sample. That's oxy clean dot com slash t. r. y. m. e. for a free stain fighting sample while supplies last support for this podcast comes from. Cdw in dell technologies cdw g we get the migrating your agency to a hyper converged. Infrastructure is challenging calf. Gotta do a don't wanna do it do it slowdown friend. Cdw experts can help simplify your transition from legacy to hyper converged infrastructure with dell. Emc solutions that offer speed and agility. What have you done it. is it done yet. Why isn't it done yet. It orchestration by cdw people who get it find out more at cdw dot com slash dell emc. Everyone technically getting two days in history today. Because we're we're running two episodes from the history vault. You'll also hear to host me. And tracy wilson hope you enjoy welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com and from the desk of stuff. You missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy be wilson an it's november thirteenth. One of history's very many bloody sunday's took place on this day. In eighteen eighty seven. There are a lot of events that have been named bloody sunday and this one place in trafalgar square in london in the late nineteenth century trafalgar square had become a common gathering place for protesters in london in particular. The working poor were protesting against exploitation and financial hardship. These protesters were often supported by middle-class socialists. And then over the summer of eighteen eighty seven the square had also become home to a large number of unemployed people. Many of them with nowhere else to go some slept in the square and wash themselves in. Its fountains and newspapers drawing a lot of attention to the situation. Authorities regarded this sort of encampment in the square as an embarrassment and starting on october seventeenth of that year. Police regularly tried to clear all the people out but little was done to address the circumstances that had led to these people being there in the first place so many of these evictions from the square became violence. The people having nowhere else to go and it having become such a focal point for protests people would gather there again as attention grew to the cycle. The protest grew also and a lot was going on in these protests and demonstrations. There were a lot of different people involved. You had their own goals and objectives. There were socialists and anarchists trade unionists and some of the more specific political ideas that were brought up in these demonstrations included irish rule in england's treatment of ireland in addition to all the other things we've already been talking about so november eighth of eighteen eighty seven. A notice was posted to ban meetings in trafalgar square. It was issued by charles warren. He was the metropolitan police. Commissioner it said in part until further information no public meetings will be allowed to assemble in trafalgar square nor will speeches be allowed to be delivered therein and well disposed persons are hereby cautioned and requested to abstain from joining or attending any meeting or assemblage. This notification also made it clear that precautions we're going to be taken to prevent such assemblies and that disturbances would be suppressed. That was the actual word that was used suppressed so now in addition to the poor people and the socialists and the trade unionist and all of these other people there were now also radicals who thought the key issue at play. Here was the freedom of speech in defiance of this ban. A plan was formed to march on trafalgar square in protest and the plant also included speeches and a demonstration that was planned once they arrived. That was to happen on november thirteenth of eighteen eighty seven. But what happened said was that the police charged the protesters. They were fifteen hundred police including mounted officers and there were hundreds of volunteers there as special constables. The military was there too including infantry and cavalry and most of these people were armed with police truncheons although the military units also had things like bayonets. A few protesters were killed in this most sources. Say either two or three and at least two hundred were injured in violence that went on all day. There were also many arrests of the leaders of the demonstrations. Some of the police in the military were injured as well but there were far. Far more injuries among the protesters. A big part of the response to this event was outrage against police brutality. That had happened. And the people who were killed reviewed as martyrs the authorities though felt that the use of force had been appropriate and some more conservative papers framed. This as a much-needed cleanup of lawless agitators. A week later on november twentieth at a subsequent protest a man named alfred linnell fell and was trampled by a horse and killed. His death was similarly condemned and the same way that the police brutality had been idea. Was that an exploitive and inhumane system had caused the innocent man's death thanks to christopher osceola. His research work on. Today's podcast and to casey p grim jailer maze for all their audio work on the show. You can subscribe to the stay in history class on apple. Podcasts google podcasts and wherever else get your podcast and you can tune in tomorrow for a media milestone. It's black friday. Now at target black friday used to mean waking up early long lines in deals garnered a flash. That was black friday then. This is black friday now because this year at target black friday is not just a day or even a week. It's weekly deals all november long. You decide how to shop whether it's in store or at target dot com. Get all the black friday savings without all the black friday stress. No matter how you shop. It's black friday now. Only at target exclusions apply. Hey there it's mango hosted part genius co founder of mental floss. And like many of you. I'm one of the twenty one million people that picked up gardening in the past six months. That's why i'm hosting the brand new podcast. Humans growing stuff brought to you by iheartmedia and your friends at miracle. Gro it'll be the most human podcast about plants you'll ever listen to. I've actually been thinking about that a lot. How like in this groundhog day. These plants are tangible measure of time. I love that you're thinking about that. Too their proof of life like we're all being held hostage in these plants are like their the markings on the door frame that show that time is passing their continuing to live and probably somehow showing us how to as well if we would slow down enough to pay attention. I'm not quite there yet. Listen to humans growing stuff on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast hi everyone. I'm steve and welcome to this day in history class. Podcast where we one day shipping works of history straight to your brain through your whole day was november thirteenth nineteen zero six industrial designer. Xyzal was born and budapest hungary. She's best known for her tableware. Born eva amalia streaker to lower polanyi. Streaker and alexander streaker. Her mother was a historian feminist and activist and her father owned a textile factory. Even enrolled in the royal academy of fine arts include a pest when she was seventeen years old with the intent of studying painting but her mother urged her to learn practical trade and she decided to become a ceramicist. she dropped out of the kademi after three semesters and began apprenticeship with jacobi counterpunch. Kara pontic was a member of the hungarian guild of chimney sweeps oven makers towers well diggers and potters iverson. Graduated as a journeyman or a trained worker and started to create her own pottery on a trip to paris in nineteen twenty five. She visited the international exhibition of modern decor of industrial arts and became familiar with the bowel house. The international style of architecture and other modernist designs even work was exhibited at local trade fairs and hungarian ceramic manufacturers took notice of her art and commission collections in nineteen twenty six. Her work won an honorable. Mention at the philadelphia. Cesky centennial at this point. Eba was working as a designer in the quiche factory. Budapest creating designs for dakota. She wasn't in that job long before her desire to travel and learn new skills took our to hamburg germany and stromberg germany where she worked at schonberger maiolica fabric designing tableware. There she honed. Her industrial design expertise to create art deco designs. That were both beautiful and functional and were able to be mass. Produced successfully. Work merged sleek modern designs with more lyrical classic shapes in nineteen thirty even moves to berlin where she worked as a freelance designer for several companies after two years of immersing herself and berlin. She ended up moving again this time. To the soviet union she worked at the lomonosov factory in leningrad. Now saint petersburg designing that was rooted in modernism and eighteenth century russian designs by nineteen thirty four. She had moved to moscow to work at the delay. Gabe porcelain factory and soon. She became the artistic director of the russian republics. china and glass industry but in nineteen thirty. Six eva was falsely accused of plotting to kill stalin. She was arrested in may and imprisoned where she was subjected to brainwashing and torture. She spent most of that time in solitary confinement until she was released in september of nineteen thirty seven. Once he got out of prison she went to vienna only to leave in march of nineteen thirty eight. As the nazis from there she moved to england and married hans xyzal. The couple moves to the us. Where eva would spend the rest of her life as a designer and writer in nineteen thirty nine. She began teaching at pratt institute in brooklyn she had two children. Jean in nineteen forty and john in nineteen forty four sears roebuck and company was one of the first companies to commission her work in the us. Other companies that commissioned work from zisapel were hall china. red redwing china casselton china and western stoneware. She even designed the'vessel resilient chaplain sisal continued designing ceramics furniture glassware and until her death in two thousand and eleven. Her work is in the permanent collections of the british museum. The brooklyn museum. The museum of modern art the metropolitan museum of art and many other institutions. I'm east coast and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can keep up with us on social media on twitter. Facebook and instagram. At td hcc podcast. You can also email us at this day. At iheartmedia dot com. Thanks again for listening. We'll see you same place tomorrow. I'm shonda rhimes. he watch grey's anatomy or any of my tv shows that you know. I love to tell a good story. Well now other. Sean land audio. We've partnered iheartradio to launch a slate of great podcasts. You listen the first four right now. Katie's crib permanente leah. Go ask allie and you down and we have so much more coming your way. We can't wait for you to hear it all. Welcome to shawn land audio. Who's no all the new. Sean dillon audio shows on apple podcasts. Hello earthlings it's cash. I'm excited to be bringing you my new podcast cash and the groupies. You may know me from my party jams like dark and we are who we are. But it's my curiosity for the unexplainable and the mystical drives these conversations with exciting pop culture guests and experts in the cash and the creepiest premiers friday november twentieth with new episodes every week. Listen and follow on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts.

trafalgar square dell tracy wilson alfred linnell Cdw christopher osceola casey p charles warren london one day metropolitan police eva amalia alexander streaker tracy royal academy of fine arts two days jacobi counterpunch Kara pontic hungarian guild of chimney swe wilson
Issa Rae, Founder of Issa Rae Productions, Creator &amp; Star of HBO's "Insecure"

No Limits with Rebecca Jarvis

19:40 min | 2 years ago

Issa Rae, Founder of Issa Rae Productions, Creator &amp; Star of HBO's "Insecure"

"Are you hiring with indeed you can post job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash no limits. That's indeed dot com slash no limits. Goppel one is reimagining banking by offering accounts with no fees or minimums that can be opened from anywhere in five minutes. Capital one. What's in your wallet Capital One in a hey, everyone? It's me Rebecca, I'm currently on maternity leave. And while I'm away we picked out some of our earlier episodes from the no limits vaults that you can get caught up and enjoy while I'm off and just so, you know, I- prerecorded this. So I actually am spending time with my baby right now. I I remember getting the call that the show wasn't gonna go this this year and just feeling like where am I what I just do. And what's going to happen now? Now, I have no money, and I have no show. I've. Basically have to start all over again. Welcome to no limits. I'm Rebecca Jarvis each week. We're talking to women playing at the top of their game. So how are they doing it? Whether you're looking for answers, or you just want to hear a good story. You're in the right place. Hey, everyone it's Rebecca, and we have a special episode of no limits. Coming up today, I traveled to Los Angeles. For today's interview with ISA Ray. She is the creator co writer and star of HBO's insecure. It is now in its second season. She is also the founder of each array productions G is a New York Times bestselling author for her first book, the misadventures of awkward black girl. The creator of multiple web series, including the hugely popular misadventures of awkward black girl. Her web content has over twenty three million views. She went to Stanford, and she's awesome. He's very welcome to no limit. Thank you -gratulations. There's so much success in your life right now. Well, I tell you what I think I think there's a lot of success in your life HBO's insecure. You are the creator. You're a co writer you are the star. And it's a massive hit in its second season. Now GAM really excited just about the the fact that people are receiving the show. Yeah. I'm I'm happy. You should be. Thank you. I'm not telling you how. But I think there's a lot of good reason to be happy right now. And I think, you know, also just look back at your story. You're ten years out of college. Right. Yeah. In our reunion is an October. Yes. That's going to be interesting reunion for you. You'll probably be swarmed with people. Yeah. Right. Everybody is doing pretty well themselves like feed them all the time. It's really like a fakery in each other like last weekend, and we're getting together. But that school definitely pave the way for you know, what I'm able to do. Now. It's interesting, you studied, African and African American studies were you thinking at the time I want to translate this in some way to acting performance. I was thinking that I had the flexibility to do what I wanted. I think for me. I started off, you know, wanting to major in political science and did took all the courses. But I just didn't want to be limited to that. And African American studies, you know, giving the flexible. Ability to write to perform to direct and wasn't really thinking about whether or not my parents would approve at the time. And it really just it really just opened my mind to the possibilities of other things that I could do speaking of your parents. So your dad is a pediatric doctor originally from Senegal, your mom is a teacher originally from Louisiana you're born here in LA, you grew up in Potomac, Maryland. Yes for school, and then came back here to live to LA. What was that like for you as a kid were you were you the kind of kid who said I want to perform like put me on a stage. No, you know, my elementary school teacher was like putting on a midsummer night's dream. And just out of the blue said, oh, these are the these are the cast of finance, and they cast me as Dimitrios which was like a guy role. But I was like, okay. Whatever must. Tomboy? I can play a guy. Did you wanna be Hermione or Helene? Probably not wanna be puck hawk was a really good role. But really funny. Spark where I feel like I didn't wanna say it when you said midsummer night's dream. But immediately I was like puck then that would be such a great role for what accomplishments? We'll know this really funny boy who isn't a performer at all anymore played puck. So I really just got into the Mitri is I mean, we perform I got a lot of great feedback. And I was like, wow, I like being on stage, and you know, was primarily writing just short stories and stuff like that beforehand, and then got the acting bug and got the writing plays. But and my mom really encouraged that and so by the time, I moved to LA because I was like fifth grade, and I moved to LA in sixth grade. I was like, oh, I'm going to Hollywood land. So I can be a real writer, and maybe an actress, and that was not the case. So what happened when you got to LA? I lean I was writing I went to a live taping of Moshe, which was like the coolest thing in the world to me was like sitting in the audience trying to laugh super loud. So that you're you're the camera finds you. And I got you picked your outfit very day. I was trying to get discovered that day. I was I wanted to meet brandy, but that didn't happen. But I did get like a script about episode pinks grip. I want to say that I want it. And I was like, wow. I have a real episodic script in my hand. And this is basically like a template for me to write my own TV shows. And so I wrote like an episode of moesha I wrote an episode of like, the new Cosby show, and I wrote like my own original television show and try to submit it, you know, just like the night of being a twelve year old like looked at the end of the when you were saying this. I was thinking maybe she's eighteen twelve and trying to so I was so where were you submitting them? I looked at the addresses for like NBC ABC and his impressive just sent him to like CEO just ahead. No idea, and you know, some of the networks brought me back. Yes. They said we don't take unsolicited. And so then I was like a guy. Well, I guess I'll just go to school then I'll just go to seventh grade that. Yeah. Basically continue on this trajectory, and then forgot about it for a minute for a minute. So you're on this path you desperately want. This you go to Stanford. Your YouTube series becomes a massive hit. And I think that's an interesting thing because without YouTube without these platforms that exist now again when you were twelve you're trying to get to the CEOs in Severi different world. Now, these platforms opened up the stage, Jim in like yourself and anyone out there with a really good idea. It can catch. Yeah. I mean, it really leveled the playing field, you know, going in college. I did try to break in again to the industry through contests contests through, you know, meeting meetings with executives through networking, and there was just there was nothing that really caught on for me until I started grading content online, and I created two other web series before my third web series, you know, took off and for me, it really just show me the value in in having a specific voice and tapping into very specific audience and having an audience on my fingertips, which I was like. Was there was no middle person. There was no one I had to go through to get my work seen or to actually legitimize what I was doing the series the final one that got all of the awards awkward black Dahlia series on YouTube, which is hilarious. If you haven't for people out there who haven't seen it yet. You should check. That out addition to insecure, but I think you bring up a really good point. And it's such an important lesson and this happens now all the time, you see really successful people like yourself and people don't recognize the hustle, and the number of knows and the number of things that are really high quality with don't get attention. Don't get the critical acclaim. We'll be right back after a quick word from our sponsor. When it comes to hiring. You don't have time to waste you need help getting to your shortlist of qualified candidates fast. That's why you need indeed dot com. Get started today at indeed dot com slash no limits. That's indeed dot com slash no limits capital. One is building a better Bank one that feels and acts nothing like a typical Bank. That's why they're reimagining banking and building something completely different. They offer accounts with no fees or minimums Capital One. This is banking reimagined. What's in your wallet capital? One in a, but I think you bring up a really good point. And it's such an important lesson and this happens now all the time, you see really successful people like yourself and people don't recognize the hustle, and the number of knows and the number of things that are really high quality. But don't get attention. Don't get the critical acclaim. I mean, I think it's just it's always when. Operation meets opportunity for me like you can be working working working and do great work. But at the end of the day if you don't have. Somewhere to receive someone or somewhere to receive it. Then it's kinda offer not you can get discouraged. But I'm just all about timing. And for me, I could have given up to that second one sued because I was frustrated, and I spent a lot of time like these guys are good. Why nobody watching this? We're putting quality work into it. And it wasn't until you know, on a whim. I was like, well, let me just try this other series. And I'll put myself in it that it caught on. It was really the most personal thing to me and backs would, you know appeal to people what kept you going. I really really wanted to do this. I really wanted to be a writer. I really wanted to be you know, in the entertainment industry. I felt like you know, I was good at it. And I had ideas and I loved it. I couldn't see myself doing anything else. And. Yeah, had other jobs, and I was good at those jobs to an extent, you know, the other jobs I worked in in the nonprofit world him. I would work as a I worked for museum, you know, for for awhile. And it was just not what I wanted to do. And I just couldn't picture my life and happily living my life, not doing what I love and not having. Like actively pursued what I love. I think another thing you said that really strikes me is this idea of tapping into you like people will say this all the time really successful people. It's the moment that you stop listening to what other people outside are saying, well, you should be this way or you should do it this way because this is the way that's hot right now or selling right now. And instead you're like, no, I'm going to look at it differently. I'm going to look at it from the standpoint of what is unique about me. What is my voice, and I'm going to one hundred percent owned that and do that and speak to that community of other people who feel that voice to absolutely. And I think for a while. I was doing that. I was like, you know, what is hot right now. What do people want to see what do I feel like I can write as opposed to what do I want to see? And what do what is it about me that makes me special? What does about my voice that makes me very specific. And very unique. And once I've tapped into that thing started chain. Changing rapidly. And I think that's you know, I'll always say they individuality is such a currency because it makes you rich makes you you. And in all of my work now, I just try to tap into everything that makes me meet it reminds me. So you said like what's missing out there that I would wanna consume? It reminds me of the childish Gambino song firefly where he's like, no I want this. I love childish gave me, but he's like I was looking for this music, and it wasn't there. So I needed to create it completely. And now look at him. He out it worked out in every way in e actually was one of my earlier influences, just watching what he he did back in two thousand eight, you know, with his comedy troupe and seeing him grow online, really inspired me to to try it again, you know, and pursue it. So props Donald Glover seriously? What a talent when you look back on all of this at this moment. What's been the toughest lesson to learn? I think the toughest less than than now. I'm super cognizant of is just valuing the people around you and making sure that you're growing together. And that you know, it's not necessarily all about you. We have team members that you have to make sure that they're happy and they're being fulfilled in in the same way that you are check to make sure that no one's kind of falling behind, and you're not just using people without providing you know, some sort of service for them to she goes as well, I think that applies in so many ways people on your way up in your career that applies. No matter what your career is. If you're building a company that applies thinking about the people everybody, the people are so important. In addition to the mission that you are personally and individually on one hundred percent what's been your biggest pitfall so far. They've just been so many. I mean, this is such an industry of ups and downs. And I remember. Just investing all of my money in one particular project during a time where I thought the HBO show would would happen and. Just it was it was coming from a place of frustration. And I play impulsivity, but belief at the end of the day, and I got I remember getting the call that I didn't the show wasn't gonna go this this year, and that I was on set for this particular project that I had invested all my money in getting that call like what happened you spent all of your money. We didn't know that this is the direction that you were going in where are you going to go from here and just feeling like where am I would? I just do and what's going to happen now. Now, I have no money, and I have no show. I basically have to start all over again. But you know, things always work out and was able to really get pressed for that particular project and get people to rally behind it. And knocked out another draft. It'd be HBO show. We ultimately got picked up and things sort of just went up from there. So it almost sounds like it made the success of that project more. Imperative to use you doubled down and made sure you've got everything you could get out of that project. Yeah. I had to there was just no other option at that point. What does it take to get a show on HBO takes a lot? Mean takes pa- patients specificity, and you really just got to believe here. So you have to believe that. You're kind of meant to do this. And the exact there are so smart, and they don't take on many shows a year, you know, they might buy shows. But they don't put a lot of shows on air at all. So yeah, you just really have to be confident in what you're doing. You gave a great productivity tip about surrounding yourself with people. That's like people who have different skills on tap on that. Yeah. I always like to work with people who are better than me, and who are skilled in areas where I'm weak, you know, but then to that end, you have to know where your strengths are. So you're not just like he's going to suck all the great people. You have to offer something in return. So for me, I'm all about working with people who are smarter they Manson areas. So I can learn from them and really just building my own skillset that way final question. Worst advice you've received in your career. Oh, I mean, the worst advice that I received was. To do with the traditional way. Just do what they traditional. I know any checking for no one's checking for internet shows. No one's checking for you know, web series. Just write a traditional spec script send it to someone send it to an agent and you'll break in the industry that way. And where do you think what happened if you had gone that path? I wouldn't be where I am now. Isa right. Thank you so much for joining me. Thank you for having me. It's time for our new limits. Entrepreneur Adriana eople. Boy Levy is the founder of allay pill, a women's footwear designer brand that fuses architecture with shoot design such a cool idea. Adriana move to the US from Venezuela with her family when she was a teenager and went on to get her architecture degree from Pratt institute in Brooklyn in addition to pursuing her career as an architect working for various architecture firms. She started to pursue another lifelong dream of designing shoes. So in twenty fourteen she launched a lay pill, and since then her designs have been featured on the runways of Paris haute, couture, New York fashion week, an art Basel Adriana was nominated by her a label colleague, and friend a lean essay, thank you to both of you for being part of our no limits community, thanks for sending in your nominations. And remember if you wanna be featured as a no limits entrepreneur, send us your nominations at no limits with our. Jay podcast at g mail dot com. That's no limits with RJ podcasts at g mail dot com. Big so much for listening to another episode of no limits. If you like what you heard please make sure to leave us a review it really does help get the word out. And don't forget you can follow along with us behind the scenes on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat at Rebecca Jarvis special. Thanks to the team here at ABC that helps make this happen Taylor done. Michelle, Ben CARNOT. Josh Cohen, Andrew kelp Steve Jones anyo sock way that Elizabeth Hecht and join me next Tuesday for an all new episode of no limits with Rebecca Jarvis until then take care be. Well. Are you hiring with indeed you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash no limits. That's indeed dot com slash no limits. Gobble. 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writer Rebecca Jarvis HBO LA HBO Capital One YouTube founder CEO Los Angeles New York Times ISA Ray Adriana eople Stanford impulsivity Stanford Donald Glover school teacher Dimitrios
Raising a glass ... to glass!

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

55:34 min | 1 year ago

Raising a glass ... to glass!

"I remember writing in an electric car for the first time about a decade ago and it was weird the quiet and everything else but of course around that same time. podcasts seem weird because they were new in fact they were called audio blogs back then but now people all over the world listeners. PODCASTS all the time on all kinds of devices and just like podcasts. Electric cars are normal. They've got longer ranges meaning. They're not just for commuting to work. You can take an electric vehicle on a short trip to the country on the weekend for instance or even on longer road trips they recharge recharge faster than ever. So you don't have to wait around all day. Have your car battery charged up and there are more models to choose from sedans. SUV's through these and luxury vehicles and even motorcycles so you can find one electric vehicle that fits your life with more affordable models and less routine gene maintenance. Electric cars may actually save you money as well as the planet electric cars. They're normal now. Learn more at normal now dot com today on studio three sixty most. I mean by the Glass Menagerie. It's our our hour glass Tennessee Williams glass menagerie and splendid glass buildings by architects from the bows actually feel something about being in space space which has been so well articulated that it actually moves you and composer Philip Glass on his spectacular unstuck in on the beach. The big breakthrough. He was waiting for look. I was willing to drive a taxi for the rest of my life. Oh you did into your forties forty. Yeah all that and much more ahead on studio three sixty right after this break you might WanNa studio three sixty. I'm colonels and I'm sitting on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial I level of guard this Thomas. Jefferson's Edison's Vegetable Dr. I'd like to have the chicken very well. Done editing all about timing. I tried to get a little bit away from the actual subject. Let's get sick place. They sixty with good Anderson. This month is the seventy fifth anniversary of Tennessee Williams. Great great ground breaking play. The glass menagerie Tennessee Williams was thirty three when it opened in Chicago in nineteen forty four and became this really vivid overnight right success. It turned him into a household name. That's WNYC culture editor Jennifer Vanessa. The glass menagerie is a domestic drama by Tennessee Williams. It takes place all in apartment in Saint Louis Tennessee Williams called it a memory play and what he meant by that. Is that not only. Is Tom telling it from the future future. But he's telling it out of his memory which means that maybe he doesn't get all the details right. Being memory play dimly lighted descended metal. It is not realistic in memory. Everything seems to happen to music. That explains the fiddle in the wing. So Tom is the narrator of the story. Thomas Really stand end for Tennessee Williams. I am the narrative the play and also a character in the other characters in the play on my mother mander my sister Laura and a gentleman caller who appears the battle scenes. Tom Works at a shoe factory. He's a really unhappy because really in his secret heart. He's a poet very much like Tennessee. Williams Liam's there's Amanda. She is the matriarch of the family. The single mother who is very demanding very nagy. We also have Laura. Tom Sister in amend his daughter. She's kind of emotionally fragile. Laura is most likely based on Tennessee Williams. Actual sister rose who herself was later diagnosis. No Schizophrenia Laura. Just really wants to be left alone. She has this collection of glass animals. The glass menagerie the Unicorn Horses. This is other kinds of animals. She just wants to spend the day polishing them taking care of them last collection the ornaments mostly most of them are little atoms. uh-huh made out of plastic tiny little animals in the glass menagerie. And it's a story about nobody getting what they want. The brother wants to escape his dysfunctional family. The sister wants a gentleman caller to rescue her from from her shyness and the mother keeps telling you need a job or you need a husband. What are we going to do the rest of our lives? Just stay home. Watch the parade go by hi. I'm used to this glass menagerie darling. The glass animals are really the central metaphor for the glass. menagerie one one of the glass. Animals in particular Unicorn becomes a metaphor for Laura and for her possibilities in life. When Jim Gentlemen collar comes and visits the Unicorn earn breaks God? It doesn't matter. Just imagine the add operation and the Horn was removed to make him feel Lester. Now it'd be like all the other ones don't have and we get the feeling. Oh Great. She's no longer. We're going to be a unicorn off bear south solitary almost extinct. She is going to be able to have a family and have a life just like everyone else. But by the end of the play. We understand that at this glass Unicorn. This broken Unicorn is actually a metaphor for all of Laura's broken hopes in that she's never going to be whole again. It's really heartbreaking. Breaking the play ends with Tom Running off to the merchant marines. He has not paid the light bill so his mother and his sister or left in darkness. Despair it's interesting that the play doesn't really put Tennessee Williams in a very good light. Tom Really leaves his family in really dire straits like maybe even more streets than they would have been if he hadn't even been in the family. I just reread the glass menagerie. I realized that that I've kind of identified with all the different characters at different times. That's one of the things that makes it resonant. Even though our world is so different than the nineteen eighteen forty four world when it was first written you can keep mining for experiences over and over these characters are still kind of the archetypes that we live with breath and so many of us also have of course dysfunctional families. And we know what it's like to want to escape our situation and we know what it's like to really yearn for something more. Jeffrey Vinik is culture editor at WNYC MM-HMM SO class menagerie class buildings when it comes to buildings. It wasn't that long ago. That glass had this Mary particular get her role. It formed windows this rectangle set into the wall to let some light it but a big part of what makes the modern world. Modern are perfectly rectangular buildings. That are all about glass. Glass Skins and that's due in large measure to a small art and design school that existed very briefly in a small German city in the early twentieth century. The House the House was founded in Weimar in one thousand nine thousand nine hundred years ago which is why I'm talking about it today. My idea was always we have to do something together to destroy these separations. Between Painting Sculpture Architecture and design and son is all run. That's Walter Gropius. who was the founder of the House? It stars included the artists. Kandinsky Mahalia Nagishi Albers and the architects Walter Gropius and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Both of whom ran the school as well. Even though the by house only lasted for fourteen years ears. The architecture and design faculty became so influential that the school's name became the name of a movement and is still practically synonymous with with modernism so centennial fix on the Bow House legacy especially in America. I called my friend Francis Brunette to go on a field trip to look at some. Of New York's Bow Housing and buildings and Yama or however you say that in German I guess. Francis is an architect and president of Pratt Institute institute the architecture and Design Art College in New York where I happen to serve on the board even the question of what is about how. What does that mean the the original bow house architects? It meant more than just aesthetics after the Hello World War One. They wanted to make the world a better place. When we look at the origins of Bow House it had social project this was an industrial revolution? It was a moment in time where you're building new professional class. That was going join to using new materials new techniques new processes new tools and develop a whole new world with that where more people could have access to more people could have better lives. That was the intent. The lasting big bow house idea in architecture was that modern buildings shouldn't look like decorated cakes. Hey CTS but like the sleek engineered machines they are showing off their modern construction techniques and modern materials like steel and in plate glass in grids of columns and beams and Kennedy Levers with flat roofs. So what was the house about. It was deep experiments with new materials. New Technologies new ways of thinking about Labor because they were trying to figure out the place between craft and manufacturing. They're walking into the industrial revolution. Solution they're coming out of the first revolution. What can we do now to to generate? Thanks for everybody but also what is technology reveal about the making of something. What can we do after the Nazi? Shut down the BIOS in nineteen thirty. Three the architects Gropius and Mies as he was called emigrated to America. GEICO and me's setup the important. US Bow House outpost at the Illinois Institute of Technology. He even designed the campus. Where until just a couple of years ago Francis was provost I not only taught at it and lived on a museum campus? I actually lived in East Tower on Lake Shore. You're driving along the lake in Chicago. Yeah so founder. Oh He's father was a stonemason so he grew up learning about craft very very deep awareness. Of how you make things attention to detail of course about those buildings not everybody. In America instantly love muses uses two pieces meese. Isn't your purely technical approach to architecture. Denial of aesthetics of beauty. I don't think so the dog. I think the logical approach is just the used. It means we have in our time. And the state take the question of portions of somebody said but before long. He and his influential followers hours. Help bring the House DNA. Every new post-war American big city including here in New York seventy-five our cabinet not just another New York office building but in the words of architecture leaders a singular landmark with a loop and aristocratic qualities. Not Likely to be often repeated in any city anywhere a new standard of architecture quality here we are at the Seagram building. One of the Great Buildings Certainly Park Avenue of New York of of America is still to me beautiful building. But it's probably not as extraordinary as it was when it was put up sixty years ago. Well of course one of its extraordinary features is that it's still extraordinary ordinary right that it's timeless. It's this dark black steel and glass. It's actually Coated in bronze rent. This one has a kind of Patna now. That wasn't the norm in the search for a special dignity and design age-old bronze was chosen other New York. Skyscrapers bear faces the luminaries steel glass. But this building she then. Bronze is unique. The Seagram building is thirty. Eight stories just tall enough enough to be imposing amber tinted glass dark bronze and out front this perfectly scaled stone plaza with two decorative pools. The building is as refined and serious as a bespoke business. This is also building in some ways you know expresses structure okay so you you see the basically what other people would call columns. But they're not calling the vertical elements that are handling all the way to the top as senior strips. All all the way up unrelenting right. They're not broken. You see them go so those are actually added onto the structure. They're not doing anything other than an aesthetic. Construction men speak of them as marlins these columns have to architectural tasks to perform they separate the Florida ceiling windows and also they multiply the vertical lines rising majestically from the glass walled ground floor to the top of the building. Here is accent. Unrestricted restricted cure upward movement. So when people say we'll meet didn't use any decoration. It's ridiculous you have to look at all of these details you know. Look at where any kind kind of great is placed. Everything is absolutely deliberate. There's nothing arbitrary about where things land and where the joints look like. It has a certain kind of proportion portion of rhythm and symmetry right. That's in some ways a kind of control discipline and what's interesting here is that it. has this incredible fluidity from inside to outside. It's pretty remarkable. You can see that fluidity between inside and outside Francis is talking about and when you look at the pink granite that paves the building's lobby which is the same pink granite on the surface of the plaza just outside the lobby's he's glass walls and the surface is continuous. Goes right inside. There isn't a threshold and it's the same material goes eight material goes right through. So he's basically saying as though anybody could come into the building. Everybody is welcome there. Isn't this monumental staircase and you have to sort of ask. Do I belong here. It's did you feel like you can come on here. But there are some discussions about this because he says everybody can come here but there's no place to sit then. We headed inside the bill. Here we are in the lobby of the building which is grand but not bombastic or gigantic. And it's kind of smartest smartest modest. What two stories? Maybe one hundred feet by fifty feet glass Bronson beautiful travertine marble right. Yes and it's fascinating to me to see what's here because I'm sure. These desks is not an easy aesthetic. There have too much detail there. Not Not as elegant as the building itself the the level of precision and control that he wanted now in fact. There's a lot of work in writing about a modern architects wanting to control what you were wearing. The furniture in the lobby of many of their residential Angel Towers Mondro for example would have designed the chairs. Freud right was doing that before guys slippers. Everything was taken care of that is actually the critique often of the work does it allow for people to truly inhabit the space you mean as opposed to being to austere or you have to would be controlled and so I think that the real question is what are the parameters by which we can occupy these spaces and feel okay about being in them right. So let's Sir walk across this gorgeous continuous floor slash plaza over the lever conveniently fifty yards away was another masterpiece of the Bowel House aesthetic building. I just love Labor House. Three Ninety Park Avenue was built in nineteen fifty two as headquarters for the Lever Lever Brothers. Soap company from Libra House. In New York. City comes the greatest skin-care discovery of our time dove creams. Your skin while you wash Josh. It was designed by Gordon. Ben Shaft and Natalie deploys who were American disciples of me's and worked in the bow house mode so there were architects. Could text already bringing this. What ultimately became the international style? They were explicitly influenced by all these European modernists including the house guys because this work was already being done everywhere in Europe in the end the twenties and thirties. Now what's it being built that early so it's existed on paper. Buildings like this well was doing drawings of glass towers that were very very sophisticated in the twenties and thirties so it is very slender blender last lab and this mirrored blue green window glass which is a very distinct part of the building right. Well remember the context in which they're operating. The streets was a set of buildings that were brick and stone right and all of a sudden. There's this very very light. Almost a Africanus project that challenges the heaviness of these other impenetrable building holding right and this building is thinking about opening up space or you could actually see it and I think what's really important about this particular building is is it's play with openings and solids and light and void. Were very very central to the way. The Bow House experimented kid and looked at projects. So you have an open space on the ground that anybody can go into. So you're on the street and then you're in this beautiful covered space ace and then you're in this courtyard that's completely open to the sky. So I think that's what's extraordinary again. The play of inside outside inside outside side. This building is actually. I think if you go back to its social agenda if you want. It's giving back to the streets. It's saying to the people. Yeah you can come in here because we don't have anything marking marking. The edge of the sidewalk goes right into the plaza. People are cutting right diagonally across it. They feel that they're welcome to just answer. Enter fundamentally private property. The Lieber House architects worked for Skidmore owings and Merrill which was the modern American firm. When I first heard architects as a kid among other things get more designed the former sears tower in Chicago? The Herschel Museum in Washington and skyscrapers burs and banks and corporate buildings almost everywhere Frank Lloyd Wright referred to Skidmore owings and Merrill as the three blind niece many people will say skidmore owings. Merril were the firm that understood meese and that work and we're able to develop it into a very very corporate model very sophisticated and became the firm to do the most eminent corporations right which is another way. The House had this was immortal. Earliest out this life in in the United States and the rest of the world beyond the actual dudes from the house right but it was also about can the building itself be part of the brand so the Lever House was part of the brand. You know think about it It was transparent transparent. They're selling soap. The building is the headquarters of a soap manufacturer who has a natural interest in keeping things clean it becomes an advertisement for Unilever Unilever right. So you're saying it's just a big bottle of Scotch basically. There's the bronze there you go but one of the other things things to be aware of is that there seems to be a small irony right in the fact that the bow started off as a social proposition and then the first I buildings to emerge are corporate entities So so these modern buildings in the mid fifty s in America seem like the very expression of love sophisticated and modern and new which America was so trying to own and be at that time. The difficulty of course is that in some ways to do this as well required an incredible discipline and not everybody had it and it was also easy to copy so by being easy to copy some of the very sophisticated nuances get lost and then of course how do you do this without doing thousand iterations. Losing money on the job so I think that people started to shortcut. That's not understanding the values of the proportions of how people move through the building. The relationship of the scale itself. How big can you go before? In fact there's failure failure aesthetic failure so if you look across the street at whatever building that is the streets cares nineteen ninety wherever there's a kind of value engineering engineering there right. We're GONNA phrase right. The value engineering is architecture phrase for making cheap for taking out things that might cost too much right and so much smaller panes of glass so much less expensive much less difficult to install again. We're trying to figure out ways to make things faster faster better cheaper and sometimes the design was one of the things that got forfeited. Remember some of the most extraordinary designs have a poetry to them. And that when you go in there not just about oh I get it. You actually feel something you feel something about being in a space which has been so well articulated that it actually moves you and there are a few of those spaces and sometimes you have to be there for a while before it becomes a part of how you experience it. It's not going to happen in a moment. Beautifully said and that is true. These two buildings each of which I have hung around a couple of dozen times in my life I feel that with both of them. Francis Madam President Ah Francis Brunette is an architect and the president of Pratt Institute. You can see pictures from our field trip. In the buildings we visited at studio three sixty dot org by the way if you're going to be around Chicago or in Germany during the next couple of months there are a few bow how centennial exhibits. That will still be up early. Twenty twenty you can find out the details at studio three sixty dot. Org Coming up some more glass and unbroken glass ceiling dear Bunny Burson. This letter is to confirm you have received the actual actual confetti that was loaded and ready to drop from the ceiling at the Javits Center on election night an artist's quest to make something positive out of the Confetti that never flu for Hillary Clinton. That's ahead on studio three sixty right after this. I remember writing in an electric car for the first first time about a decade ago and it was weird the quiet and everything else but of course around that same time. podcasts seem weird because because they were new fact they were called audio blogs back then but now people all over the world. Listen to podcasts. All the time on all kinds of devices and just like podcasts. Electric cars are normal. They've got longer ranges meaning. They're not just for commuting to work. You can take can electric vehicle on a short trip to the country on the weekend for instance or even on longer road trips they recharge faster than ever. So you don't have to wait around all all day to have your car battery charged up and there are more models to choose from sedans and SUV's and luxury vehicles and even motorcycles recycles. So you can find one electric vehicle that fits your life with more affordable models and less routine maintenance. Electric cars may actually save you money as well as the planet electric cars. They're normal now. Learn more at normal now dot com. This episode of Studio Three Sixty is brought brought to you by the relentless a new podcast from sleet studios and century. Twenty one real estate. Have you ever wondered what makes somebody exceptional in business. A million million professional development books events and programs claim to have the answer though. Everybody knows there's no one size fits all magic path figuring out how ought to be an effective salesperson or entrepreneur is always an individual project one involving a lot of trial and error and willingness to change the relentless. There's about those journeys and what we can learn from them. It is hosted by doctor of psychology. Julie Gerner who goes one on one with extraordinary people about the mindsets sets and behaviors that drive them to do great things. You'll get to hear from successful people about how they've dealt with rejection. But they've learned along the way and how they're they're continuing to move forward whether you work in sales or are simply interested in what it takes to close a deal. The relentless might inspire you to think about success differently listening subscribe to the relentless today. Wherever you get your podcasts studio three six? Today's show is all about glass. Mirrors were originally favored because they attracted the light design critic Vian explains how pieces of reflective glass in France a few hundred years ago launched the modern culture of narcissism these. This is how we the fourteen anchorage French craftsmen to make slightly bigger mirrors. Because he wants to line the ballroom in Versailles with mirrors to reflect flecked. The window that we're on the other side people to this day had never looked at themselves in a mirror from head to toe. They're sort of fell in love with their reflection. Shen and capitalizing this Louis. The fourteen invented fashion people became prisoner of their vanity. Prisoner of the Eagle Imagine now a world without mirrors imagine how liberating it would be. If we didn't have to know what we look like I I would love. I love it because it's we are enslaved to our image Nada in human is is very forgiving. Then when we look at each other we edit a lot of things and just and the mirror does not edit which is why we can be trapped. You know thinking Oh my God while really look that bad but I know that a good mirror I mean. They are are mirrors in which Muslims the one that had a little bit of Hayes on it where you look really pretty even if a little foggy because of age and the edge is it makes you look a lot more present to reassure each other that we actually are not exactly the creature. REC- in the mirrors. There's a lot more charm to offers analogy the where we move to light a move in and out of shadows and so and so on so fucked. He's really possible. We are as much as stalk portrait Bernie. Yen is the author of books about design including putting something to be desired and citizen designer in in two thousand sixteen. Most people figured that Hillary Clinton would break the glass ceiling and become the first woman president of the United States instead. A A lot of broken hearts an artist named Bunny Burson from Missouri used that disappointment as a source of inspiration specifically. She imagined what it might have been unlike on election night three years ago. If things had turned out the way she had been counting on producer. Schuyler Swinson has the story which which begins with the artist going to the javits center on election. Night people were walking. They're very excited. The buildings were lit red white and blue. Everybody was in a fantastic mood. It was a beautiful night in here. We Go Ladies and Gentlemen Welcome to decision night in voters head to the polls to choose between the first woman president and businessman running for his first elected acted office. Clinton Headquarters is Jacob Davits Convention Center in New York City with its symbolic glass ceiling. And we get there here and see people we know. And the whole place was festooned with flags and banners and I've never seen so many smiles for artists. Bunny Burson walking into the javits center on election night. Felt like approaching the finish line victoriously. She and her husband worked on the Clinton Campaign for months making phone calls going state to state door to door. They both had roles in Bill Clinton's administration and now here they were for Hillary looking forward and up when you looked up at the JAB at center ceiling the way it was lit that blue that royal blue was so intense and the lighting was so perfect the ceiling. Is You know broad piece of blast. They're all these little pieces of glass that make up the whole ceiling kept looking up thinking that this was going to be something incredible then it was going to be quite something when Hillary was elected president. But the evening of course didn't go exactly as planned borderline panic and Democrat. Has that significant lead. Well over one hundred thousand votes not enough folks out there county which all of a sudden the announcers were saying Hillary's only passed. The presidency is these states and that was a shock because we certainly never expected even to be close. CNN projects. Donald Trump will carry the state of Wisconsin. He's cracked the so-called Blue Wall Hillary Clinton in some real jitter setting in and Clinton headquarters right now. We looked around and there were so many faces that looked distressed including our own. Hillary never appeared that night yet. Another disappointment everybody was sent home at two in the morning. So everybody that he left it was like a funeral. DIRGE and We left and by the time we got to our hotel and turned on the television. I've just received a call from Secretary Clinton so it was sad devastating unbelievable rest of the night until the next day. I know I know we have still not shatter that highest hardest glass ceiling but someday someday someone will and hopefully sooner than we might think right now on the way home to Saint Louis Bunny got a call from her daughter. You're who has a friend WHO's a journalist and he knew of my prior work and He said you ought to tell your mom that they're packing backing up unloading the air cannons and packing up the Confetti and I thought I have no idea where they're taking it. I'd have no idea what I'm going to do with with it but I want it. Bunny spent two weeks trying to track down the confetti. She called dozens of people who had worked on the campaign. Nobody seemed to know where it ended up. And some people said it's been destroyed others said. I think it went to Connecticut or I think it went to Washington and then finally a fellow artists connected her to the Clinton campaign's director of production. Who helped her find the company who made the Confetti Bunny contacted a few people there and when she finally found the right guy he said yes? I've got it and I said the actual confetti that had been loaded into the air silence. I don't want any other confetti. He said No. I've got that Confetti and I said how much do you have. And he said two hundred pounds and I said I'd like to have it and could he sent it to me and he said sure boxes and boxes of bags filled with confetti arrived at bunnies doorstep. You know I could tell that it was was the actual confetti because it wasn't pristine some of it was bent the bags had masking tape on them. MM-HMM IT came with a letter verifying authenticity. Dear Bunny Burson. This letter is to confirm you have received the actual confetti. That was loaded good and ready to drop from the ceiling at the javits center on election night. When bunny opened the first box she could tell? This wasn't just any confetti the plastic. It's not paper and it's luminescent bits paralyzed and it's much bigger than what I thought it would be in other words. It looks like glass and bunny suddenly understood two things. I the way that Confetti would likely been used on election night. Clinton would have had had some line in her victory speech about the glass ceiling being broken and the Confetti would have symbolized the shattering of the glass ceiling and the second. The thing that came to bunny was an inkling of how she would turn her disappointments into art when I saw what the confetti looked like. I panin idea of what I wanted to do. I wanted to feel and I wanted the viewer to feel what it would've been like to have been in the midst of all this confetti and I thought about a giant Snow Globe and which I would be in the middle the Bruno David Gallery in Saint Louis gave but on either front window where she could construct this giant snow globe. It was five feet tall by five feet wide and three feet deep generators and a fan blow the confetti around around the space continuously and lighting and a mirror were installed in the back so that when people walk up to the window they'd see the reflection contained in the globe and in the mirror. When you see yourself being showered by a glass ceiling that has just been broken? You can read the words of Poet Maya Angelou and still I rise. Confetti usually is a medium we associate with happy times and celebrations. And I'll be honest a lot of people who came to see the installation who are definitely on the same page. I'm on they said. Oh this is so sad but for me using it in the way that I'm using it. I feel like it still has that same resonance that it's about the future and that we all need to be hopeful about the future and doing our part for the future bunnies heard from people all over the country. Who have seen pictures of the installation but wish they could see it in person so so she decided to create a thousand smaller Snow Globes using the same confetti and plans to send them to people and it turns out that the person who wanted more than anyone to be showered showered by that Confetti will soon be getting some we happen to see President Clinton at an event and my husband showed him an image of the the peace and he says Hillary seen this? We didn't know whether she had not but he took a photograph home with him. And within the week I got a letter from Hillary and it was beautiful thoughtful and she felt that this was a wonderful way to we use the unused confetti and that she was glad that I had kept the flame alive. I'm sending her. It's not about that story was produced by Schuyler Swinson. You can find out more about bunny. Bruce's his art and Snow Globe project on her website. Bunny Burson Dot Com. You may write me down in history With your visit twisted lines. You may try me in the very dirt but still like dust Algebra. Ask coming up next on hourglass our Philip Philip Glass he's written operas about Einstein and Gandhi and Walt Disney. He's fifty years from now which is now young people. May We know that there was a Guy Name Walt Disney. That's all I think it's just a company. One of the big themes is about the mortality of the mortality illness. The composer Philip a blast here on studio three sixty right after this. Hi this is Anderson and I'm the host of studio three sixty. If if you've ever wanted to start your own podcast you might think you need all kinds of equipment to set it up. Turns out all you need is anchor. Anchor is an all in one free tool from spotify spotify that lets you create your own podcast and get heard everywhere with anchor you can record edit be heard on all listening platforms and they'll even impair you with sponsors to help you try to get paid for your show. It all works in your web browser or right from anchors mobile APP and best of all. It's totally free. You Start Your podcast with anchor today by going to anchor dot. FM Slash Studio that's Anchor Dot FM slash studio the studio three sixty and to round out our class our our today. We go non literal to a glass. I've been a fan of for decades long. Not J. D. Salinger's Franny Zoe or Seymour. Glass a real person but not my pal IRA either no his cousin. The world other other famous living glass for a half century. Now the composer Philip Glass has been creating operas infamies chamber music and very influential film scores like this one for the hours. I spoke with glass in two thousand twelve. Well when he was in the middle of celebrating his seventy fifth birthday with a year of nonstop concerts and lectures turns out. It's exhausting being a high art superstar. The and the thing is that I mistakenly or cleverly whatever might have been. I can't the same writing schedule as if it was a normal year. Yeah which meant that. I had a hell of a full year. Yeah but on the other hand I was thinking just as is nice to be. I had to work so far this year. That didn't have any time to think about the slowing down one. Yeah I've been a fan of Philip Glass's music for my entire adulthood ever since I first heard Einstein on the beach the opera that made him a household name in one. Yeah I asked glass. If he remembers the first time he became interested in Albert Einstein. God yes I do Because it was a momentous event in my life it was I was wondering in thirty seven so in nineteen forty five. It was eight years old. And you're basically growing up during World War Two at was coming along conscious. Oh we saw When you went to the movies on Saturday for maybe twenty twenty five cents? You saw the newsreels and after the After the war Suddenly the the huge interest in ice time began about just about then forty-six because people are getting wondering. How did this happen? What does it mean and suddenly there was a tremendous interest in science and in the rope? A AH in Baltimore which had a wonderful public library called the Enoch Pratt Library my mother oh by the way was a librarian by profession. Was a teacher librarian so so that we all had library cards when we were kids and every Friday we went to the library got her books out for the week and at the library they had talks and presentations in guest speakers about Einstein and then as you were growing up and becoming a teenager he was in the United States and becoming more and more we would we call we would would come to their rockstar. Let's listen to a little bit of Einstein on the beach. It wasn't uh-huh they wanted. They wanted Komo weather now. If any of our listeners are wondering what the words there's simply saying in that section one-two-three one-two-three one-two-three one-two-three before yeah that's right and I was just listening to it curtain thinking that if someone had in Britain thirty five years ago someone turned up with that piece of it would sell absolutely no Sir You which speaks to the fact that not much has advanced in thirty five years. Well let's put it this way. I think in fact that the that that spirit of of experimental work still around generation of card music that preceded my generation had kind kind of they were satisfied with obscurity in a way that none of us could imagine. That's interesting so you feel that it was. I mean I think of well a wider world. Pluck you Oven Garda's out of obscurity. But but you're suggesting that it was you of unguarded who wanted we were this. We wanted to be big time and we were the third or fourth generation then And security was was was not something you were willing to look. I wasn't willing to drive a taxi for the rest of my life. Would you didn't into your forties until my forties. Yeah well and you were you essentially. Are you and Robert Wilson and others are the last avant garde our generation for whom that's possible. I mean it seems as though the the idea of the avant-garde became a a null set at a certain point. I think that's true. There's another odd thing Ab- about there's a peculiar thing of which I've just noticed just recently when I was talking with a toddler from India about this and we're talking about the structure of music I studied I worked for Ravi Shankar for a long sometime and started with them because to work with them is to study with them. There's no difference really and That had a big impact on my music. I would think the biggest no. I'm not even sure who was also was with whom he studied piano. I studied composition and in Parma counterpoint. I was with them at the same time. Actually this was in. Ah Sixty and to give listeners a flavor of that crucible. Let's play a little bit of Nadia Balloon Jay on piano followed by Ravi Shankar on the Tar In in but the point is that the structure of of Indian music is basically idea of binary music. It's like one zero Zeros. Instead of one sensors that use twos and threes. But it's basically the same idea of of of you can have an endless. To remove of information is to introduce really so Einstein came essay that was written ten years after I completed my studies with with them. I spent ten years developing a language which integrated this kind of binary way of thinking with West traditional harmony. No when you're listening listening to that piece what you're hearing this binary music. So is it possible that I'm I. I was anticipated not I did. But the digital revolution that I would say wasn't me. I would say that the the global music had anticipate. Yeah Yeah that I. I learned it from India An but that could have learned it from Africa also. Well it's interesting now that you say oh not you'll engine and Ravi. Shankar were migrate influences. It's almost like a a an equation. Not a plus. Rob Schenck are equals Philip Glass. Right in fact I often described that those that the rest of that year. I said it was like having to angels on my shoulder. One on the right one of the radio on the left ear and one taught through love and one fear you fear everyone doesn't actually thus correct and and And yet in the end of the methodology modern not as much as the content. You want said that you quote had the ability taught music that was so radical that I could be mistaken for an idiot and it absolutely didn't bother me. What did people find idiotic fifty years ago? Oh there's a lot of repetition. Yeah well well we know that either. You couldn't what is like when I remember when I walked into the Museum of Modern Art and saw opinion of Frank Frank Stella's I didn't know what the hell was I it was used to abstract expressionist that was used to pollock and Houston and all these guys season. Suddenly there was someone working in a different way and I was totally shocked and I think the shock of new language and that can that can paralyze paralyze you at first at first hour. I learned from my father actually that that familiarity can breed love love that contemporary And I started listening to your music in my twenty s on my Walkman and fell in love with it and then one of the things that kept me interested during the nineteen eighties and the nineties was that you change. You weren't just doing the same thing over and over and the music became more lyrical. Romantic melodic accessible Thanks for instance. I WANNA play a little bit of your symphony. Heroes House from Nineteen ninety-six How conscious was that? Transformation mation from one to Phillip last conscious. Because when I had my I had Roy check on Boone's yet at the same time and that was the beginning of a of experimental musical language that produce finally Einstein Einstein was actually the end of that ten year period. It wasn't the beginning the beginning of the next the central hall which doesn't at all sound like I'm Scott So I said okay that I did that and now that means it didn't exactly go away it. It became part of my My musical resource but it wasn't something only felt compelled to try to change. You think was motivated by. Oh I just want to do something new or people like this curiosity. Yeah my public. Didn't knowsley changed for a long time. Though there are a lot of people that came to them that and but it was hardly an overnight success after that it was another ten years before While these days the concept but it was a long time before that was a fatal. We talk complete Is it true you are now engaged in a writing an opera about Walt Disney. It is true and do you. What's your what's your big idea about? Mister Disney is a very interesting guy. He's a man who division that became global. I mean there's there's no to think of a more influential person very event but the thing that's really interesting I was about the death of Disney really is about the last three months of his life and the the conflicts that he has about dying and thinking the and one point. He says you know what he said. Fifty Years From now which is now actually Young people may not know that there was a guy named Walter Disney I think it's just a company so that the one that paint at the same time he would also say well the thing that will last. We'll be Disney so in a way it's it's kind of the is the one of the main one of the big themes is about the mortality of art in the mortality of the artist. Will you make skinny musical references to Disney using so no. I can't make any visual ones. I mean the property of the artistic property belongs to the Disney Company. There's no question about that. The the man I think he was an an amazing American. And it's not a whitewash either. The more you find out about a person the more the humanness of it becomes very moving to me. That's what the story is when we elevator. Our artisan are geniuses beyond the human and level. We lose something. This is the work of fiction. This is not a documentary. I mean it's not. The opera is above all poetry when and people go to Einstein. They're not going to walk away understanding the biography of no. They wanted the biography of nature. Physics they won't know but what they will see. Aw whether they They will see some of the things that I thought about which Bob Lawson was able to translate into images. I look forward and Philip lost. I thank you very much for coming in today. Very be recurred that Opera Out Walt Disney. He called the perfect American premiered in two thousand thirteen. And that is just about it for this week. Show studio sixty production of PRI Public Radio International Channel in association with slate the production team is Jocelyn Gonzalez. Andrew Adam Newman Sandra Lopez. Evan Charm Lauren Hanson Sham. Kim's theory saunders. Tommy Zaria Morgan flannery and I am Kurt Andersen. Thanks for listening the R. I.. Public Radio International next time on studio three sixty. The building was all music people. How a group of young songwriters ended up in a Manhattan office building and reshape pop music? There was such an excitement going on all the time that you often. I mean you were writing in the elevators. You're writing a check. Dempsey's ABC's next door you. It didn't matter. The atmosphere was just so conducive to writing songs. The real building our next studio sixty New York icon.

Philip Philip Glass New York City Hillary Clinton Glass Menagerie Francis Madam President Ah Fra Einstein Einstein Tennessee Williams United States president Bunny Burson America Chicago Mister Disney Laura Confetti Tom President Clinton
Fashion Nostalgia

Pop Fashion

52:05 min | 2 years ago

Fashion Nostalgia

"Hi guys, kiss Lisa. And this is Kara. And this is pop fashion. Are you doing today? Karn. Girl up caffeinated motivated, this is alarming. No, it's fantastic. It's going to be fantastic until about ten thirty tonight when I just cannot sleep, but I'm in good spirits, because caffeine is rotating through my body. I drank a diet coke at about two o'clock this afternoon. So my, my peepers are going to be wide open to tonight. It's the way of journalists. It's always been the way of our people. Look, I do have that. Sign up in my kitchen that says, I believe in two, things coffee and deadlines. Amen to that. It's true. Look why, why chitchat when we can chitchat about the toys Evert. Let's do it. A round of applause for cancelling yourself to Victoria's Secret. It's a cell phone already. It must be in case you weren't aware. The Victoria's Secret fashion show that airs before the holidays had record low ratings in two thousand eighteen on CBS, and therefore Victoria secret has announced that the runway show will no longer air on network. Television CEO, Leslie Wexler, said to the New York Times quote. We have decided to rethink the traditional Victoria secret fashion show going forward. We don't believe never television is the right fit unquote. He noted that the brand was looking into developing a new kind of events for different platforms in the future. Is this going to end up on Hulu? I don't think lose that dumb is going to be on HBO HP as dumb either. I can anticipate this being like who's that dumb, then TBS? I don't think it's going to end up on TBS it wouldn't surprise me if it was something streaming related, if even if it was on their own platform, I mean can considering that a bad year for ratings was, like three million people. I mean that's still a concern big audience. That's a large audience. There's also nothing saying that the Tory secret can just stream it on their own website, or stream it on YouTube, or do something totally different. I would love for this fashion show to dine fire, but I don't know if it's going to happen. But like because of the fact that they don't say what their plans are for moving forward. Like, that's what gives me hope for it going away, and never coming back, I wish and a perfect world. I wish they would reformulate it and some way. But I think in order to give me the product that I would want to see it or the placement that I'd wanna see it would really have to be about internal culture change about body, positively, with lots of different women sizing, I, I don't know if they can give me really what I want, which is a sense of, like, yeah, you could sell your product but let's have an awakening of who you are. Yeah. I think reformulating the runway show comes pretty low on the list after like reformulating your entire business. Plan your ethos of your entire corporation. Yeah. Like you need to have a long talk with yourself. You gotta go on a retreat you gotta do some trust falls. Go figure it out. But, like no. Thank you do the meditation. Right. I like cheese at dust on my microphone. Nope. That's not it. But that's what I thought it was touching. It now. Geez. It's dinner the American dream next story. Betsy Johnson's nineteen Ninety-seven runway collection is coming to urban outfitters urban is creating a collection inspired by Betsy Johnson's nineteen ninety seven summer collection, ten pieces will be available online starting may thirteenth is that today house yesterday. It's out now. Now, people go get it. It will also be and select stores and the United States and Canada starting may twentieth. Prices ranged from seventy nine dollars to three hundred fifty dollars. But Johnson said that the collection was about rock and roll, and ruffles, it's being updated a little bit with a modern color palette. But this is really the nineties style that you love from Betsy Johnson. It's cute. It's fun. It's about good times. That's why I love Betsy Johnson. It's. Always like an injection of sugar. This is really fun. I think the, the price point may come as a shock to some urban outfitters shoppers who may not be expecting a collaboration like this. But I think for a brand like Betsy Johnson at this. It's pretty par. For the course it's gonna be really cool to see the stuff because, look, if the nineties are back in right now in these cyclical nature fashion than, like let's Lena. No, it was something like this. I also think it was smart to only do ten pieces. This is not a huge collection. They kept it really tight. And I think that's going to benefit them to see if it works to see if there's a consumer there, and I think it'll find its audience, for sure. I might walk in on urban outfitters to see this one with my own eyeballs. Well, it's in select store. So I don't really know how that translates into if it's going to be near you. I don't know. Consi-. Ordering I don't even know where there is one in Tampa. Whatever I'm going to New York next week. I'm just gonna you'll find it in New York. Definitely, I'm going to have an fine. Speaking of blast from the past a bit of nostalgia is coming to some military uniforms. So if you keep up with the US army, which I think currently dozens. What we both used to you may have heard by now that the military branch is rolling out, new service uniforms. So these are known as army greens, they will be the military equivalent of a business suit, which the army really stopped using during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, you know, troops became very comfortable with wearing their camouflage fatigues in like regular business situations. Even the New York Times reported that, you know, if you worked at the Pentagon, I'm where a member of the US army, you'd be walking around in fatigues, all day, you wouldn't be wearing a dressier uniform, but that is going to change because civilians have been dressing more casually. But the army has decided it is time to step up, and that is because fewer troops are in combat operations. So the army's going back to a more formal look and the design that it based its new look from is, is. Taken from the World War, Two uniforms, that was the last very obvious victory for the US a time when military support was through the roof. So the army looked to that style in his testing the new design was a military bands before it rolls it out. Army widened twenty twenty so the World War, Two uniforms, that inspired, these new uniforms are actually how olive drab became part of our everyday attire this surprising to me. Yes. So when the war ended in nineteen forty five all the guys came home the troops were largely demobilized and so guys gave away. They're all of uniforms, that they did need anymore. And the army also sold off a ton of surplus. So that all of colored wool was so durable. It was so sheep. And it was so ubiquitous that it became as the mirror times called it the defacto uniform for field hands road, gangs, and trash collectors. So some of that. Initial pride of those conic uniforms, got lost in the ubiquity. So the army during the fifties did away with those olive, drab uniforms and rolled out a gray green uniform that looked a little bit more like a civilian business suit. And it was, of course, because of the time a polyester blend, so the new uniforms, have an olive belted jacket, and it has pants that are a little bit rose colored these uniforms. Yes. Back in the forties. And now these firms are referred to as pinxton greens pink, for like the khaki rosy, hue on the pants greens for the jackets. The army says that while the new uniform will cost more than past models to make it will also last longer. Soldiers will also be given the opportunity to buy a retro styled leather bomber jacket to go with the uniform. All right. That's just sexy. How cute is that? Sign me up. So I also looked at an article on military dot com or fischel explained that the cost of the uniform is higher because it's a higher quality. It also has the belt add some costs there, which, of course, is what Donald Trump was like excited about, and he was talking about these uniforms, but the army rep said that they can easily make the same. They could make the uniform for the same cost, but that wasn't their intent the intent was to increase the quality to extend the life of the uniform, the service, life of the new army greens is anticipated to be six years compared to four years for the what's called the ASU, which is their current dress uniform, that has a navy blue jacket. You know, like we're looking at technology for making something more durable like Terio costs, and we're looking at style to a little bit will. They be made in. China. Oh, that's not allowed you can't make military uniforms overseas. Oh, that's a good rule. They have to be made at home. Yeah. Yeah. They have to be made at home in less. So I learned about this. When I was in grad school, the only way that they can that our military uniforms can be made overseas. Is if it is an item that there are no resources. Wanna make it here. So I can't think of any examples off the top of my head. But, you know, the, the military could make the case to the government when the doing budgeting things to say nobody makes this type of hat here. So we have to I see we have to bring it in from somewhere else. So it's in some cases but for the most part it all gets made here. That's fantastic. First of all, my first thought was as these are rolling out. Are they going to get hit with tariffs because we're in the middle of just a mess with that? Would that not be like the worst kerfuffle ever off? It would just be awful. So I'm glad that we don't even have to worry about that. Yeah. Putting that aside I love this history. I knew some of it, but not all of it. I didn't realize that the BIC witty of the color, that's when it entered into becoming fashionable or Dopp dot color. More totally make sense. And I love how military fashion has influenced current fashion you and I saw it through an exhibit at the Mets. And I can't remember which one it was was it the China one? Or was it wasn't McQueen? I don't remember honestly, but remember discussing it with you of being like oh, you can say, there's a straight line between dot jacket that we saw and this trench coat that we wear. It was just a fascinating look at just seeing how fashion history can bump up against this. One subject matter is really interesting to me. Yeah. And it's interesting how we've seen a little bit more militaristic looks in fashion of late. I think maybe maybe it was two years ago. We had like a run of this, where you saw camouflage again on the runway. And very and then we also have some very military ask tailoring that has come up recently. So it's really funny to see how they influence one another. But also how huge organization like the army can go back into its archives and look and say, like, wow, like when will be the most proud of. Of how we looked what we were doing. And, and let's go back to something that looks like that fascinating. So you, you look good. You feel good. Right. I don't know. I can't wait to, to look at these uniforms. I can't wait to see a picture Iago look real cute. Seen some pictures Yalo grow cute. Transition sentence. Laura Ashley isn't doing so. Well, I we're talking about Laura Ashley the company, not the person because the person did the company is struggling Laura. Ashley is a British textile design company was founded in the nineteen fifties grew and became an international retail chain. It's height was maybe the seventies early eighties where a lot of Laura, Ashley prints really entered into the market and became very popular. It's very floral and feminine. The company is now owned by a conglomerate out of Malaysia, Laura Ashley, the person was a Welsh fashion designer who originally made furnishing materials, and then expanded into clothing design. So here's what's going on with Laura. Ashley right now. Their stock prices fell over twenty percents. They have not been having great earnings as of late. They've been hit by store closures and the termination of a license agreement with a Japanese partner. The company also pushed away an unsolicited takeover offer from an investment firm back in February. So I'm a little concerned about where Laura Ashley may be headed. And if this company is gonna survive. This does not look good. And honestly, I had forgotten that Laura actually still existed. Yeah. It's one of those brands that when you see it. It's so recognizable. Yeah. Oh, yeah, we've been talking about it in my family a lot. Actually, because when I thirteen I guess, a repaint my room and decorate and I had a head to toe lar- Ashley room ceiling, the floor side to side and the curtains still exist from that room. And I know this because my mother got them out the other day. What was the color story of those curtains, purple, the whole, the whole room was lavender, a walls, relavent her the bed sat was lavender. The with that floral print that is so recognizable. The curtains were lavender sheers that went all the way down on the floor. The only problem was, we weren't going to replace the carpet because that's a pretty big expenditure. So I had all that lavender and some pink carpet. I wasn't up pink combat team. So it was rough going for a couple of years. I do love how feminine it is. I do. I hope they're able to pull something out. I really do. So if I'm remembering correctly, Laura. Ashley, the company does not currently still make clothes. I think they ju just furnishings. I was on there. I was on the dockside recently. Because I was looking I was just trying to remember what they were doing. They, they do clothing. Yeah. I'm looking at some floral print dresses right now. Do they look modern? I think the cuts are modern. I'm looking at a very beautiful yellow and white sheath, dress right now it's one hundred fifty eight dollars. It's made from linen blend. It's something I definitely would wear. I just have this time capsule image of Laura Ashley dresses in my head. Probably because whenever I find them through stores. It's like that early eighties. Prairie dress kind of vibe. I think that's part of it too. There's so much that can be thrift it from this company that is vintage that some of it works, and some of it is very much feels like of the time, but all the fabric seems to have held up like a champ for some reason flowers. Don't die those curtains, those curtains, are still kicking are actually, you know, that's along the same the same theme here of missed out. I wonder why everybody's so. Oh nostalgic. All the sudden because everything is terrible and going up in flames. That would do it that there's comfort and thinking back and being like, oh wasn't it? So great. I don't really know if it really was great. But maybe there's some solace in it somewhere. Probably just felt great because we weren't on the internet all day. To watch it all burn out the next day. Anyway, I'll take those problems to be. Nope. Don't really have a transition away from the nostalgia, but I have this blunt Siaga is going to offer full for your scholarships to two students at the Pratt institute. The awards will be granted through the black alumni of Pratt a group established in nineteen ninety to provide mentorship opportunities for students of African and Latino descent. The announcement comes as creative director for Balenciaga DNA. The solu- was given the creative spirit award at an annual scholarship benefit held for the Pratt institute, according to women's wear, daily African Americans make up about eight percent of art and design jobs and Hispanic people make up only four percent of art and design jobs. And I do believe it is worth noting that tuition and fees for an academic year. At Pratt is currently fifty one thousand. Nd seven hundred and fifty four dollars. Wow. Yeah. So earlier today when I dropped a hint about this to car. And she said, only two. In my head. I'm like Idaho much this costs. But it's Balenciaga. You can't tell me that one hundred thousand dollars. It's nothing to sneeze at for normal people like you may but they are freaking huge corporation. Yeah. I think dig into cushions a little bit more. You know what I'm saying? There's more money there. I feel like they could maybe find some additional sons. It's a good start. Yeah. But also, I worry that this is a PR band-aid for not hiring more men and women of color, it very well could be. I don't know the university numbers for Balenciaga. I'm off they've been talked about in the news. I have a good. Guess what? They could probably zero percent. I made luxury fashion has a problem with diversity. It's not great. And it keeps popping to the surface because corporations are making decisions that reflect that there is no diversity on staff. Now, Bellizzi AGA in particular, who knows. But I think I could give a good educated. Guess and land in the ballpark. Yeah. In the meantime, y'all a planet Pratt. Yeah. Right. And try to get one of these guys shit. Yeah. To something expensive. Let's keep going with the thoughtfulness behind how to build pipeline, education programs allowing people in the door. It's, it's sort of like the yes, and concept for improv, except this time, it's yes, and please more money. And more scholarships. Thank you. Yes, m more diversity. Yes. More hiring. Yes. Yes. Ams we just want it all. I don't know if it's even wanting at all, or just wanting a start wanting a start. You know this is a start. But this particular start at the end of the day will only benefit to people and their families. You know so if we can grow it exponentially over time. That's where the change will come. Speaking of a sea change to come. Can't believe it. Took this long to get to the story. Riana starting a fashion house. Hello. That's the angels singing. It was a rumor we knew for a while. But came officially down word came down that it is happening. She's getting a fashion house under LVMH. She is the first woman of color to have a label under LVMH and the first woman to start an original brand for the luxury conglomerate, she will join brands like Giovanni fifty and your she already had a beauty company under the LVMH umbrella, which started in twenty seventeen as we all know that went off, like gangbusters. I read recently that they made one hundred million dollars in the first forty days of that company on bull eveb oil for today's that's the same amount of foundation shades. She made available so a lot of number y'all. Oh. This venture will include ready to wear clothing, shoes, and accessories, and is reportedly going to have products out on the market in just a couple of weeks. If I remember, remembering correctly that it's coming out and may twenty second that that's around the date. So I think they had everything lined up. They were like we're gonna announce it, and then we're going to drop product immediately, people have been keeping secrets. I know it's so great. So I'm really really excited about this news between this, which I feel like is going to be out of my price range, but nice to look at swin this news about riana and beyond. Save relaunching Ivy park with Dita's. It is a very good time to spend money on clothing and shoes. Also, when I when we were preparing for the show, I may have referred to KARN as chief riana correspondent for the show, and I really like it, and I'm thinking about making her little press Babs says that I will gladly accept that role. I would like to know when I've is researching this story, I went back to our archives to see what we've what else we've set about Ryota, we've had so many episodes where we talk about her because she's changing things she's changing multiple industries as we talked about last week. So it feels good to be the Riyadh. Correspondent I will gladly accept that. It's a good. It's a good title who I'm ready emotionally ready financially. I'm not ready. I'm into fashion week news near fashion week is only going to be five days this fall. Thank god. It will run Friday September sixth through Wednesday September eleventh. This effort is not only for US industry talent. But will also serve as the change needed to further globalize, New York fashion week. The CFDA also tweeted that it's incoming president Tom Ford played a role in the decision. The CFDA said, CFDA remains committed to promoting it supporting homegrown talent while positioning New York as a destination for diversity, and discovery Tom four officially takes over for Amazon first Berg, chair of thirteen years on June first KARN. What do you think I think they repackage something that was struggling, which is okay? It's okay that they're doing this New York fashion week has been bleeding out for a while. And they needed to make decisions one way or the other last fashion week. They were having trouble keeping. People because everybody was going to Paris people were just dropping New York, designers designers were going to Paris it. And then on top of the fact that when you fashion week that lasts a week, and then people have to go oversee reporters and buyers have to go overseas to London to Paris Milan, all that you got to keep a tight organized. It's a tactical move that I think will be beneficial in the long run, how it may hurt in other ways is that there is a whole economy around New York fashion week. The has to do with restaurants taxi drivers hotels, makeup artists, like and losing, just two days may not sound like a big deal, but that's income, that's receipts. New York fashion. We generates a ton of revenue for the city, it makes me a little sad. But I also know if they're going to save New York, fashion week and build it back up. They probably need to bring it in a little bit and put. A little bit more of a boundary around it before they can expand again. Yeah, I think it's a really smart move. I think the change as far as receipts go may not be as bad as you may fear. You know, there's always a bit on the fringes of that fashion. Week shows that happened on the front or back end a day or beyond the schedule. There's also a lot of prep that goes into it, that's still going to happen, even though it's a shorter. Run schedule for the facility at cetera. So I think it's not going to be, I think in the long run. It's going to be a smart move. It may be a little bit lower of a revenue generator for a lot of businesses. But I don't think it's going to kill him fingers crossed. We'll see this is strategic and I love anything that strategic and thoughtful business decisions. I'm very interested to see what other decisions. Tom Ford is gonna make me to hopefully. It involves sequence. You want to have some real talk about fashion companies hold onto your butts. I guess, fashion has shockingly few female CEOs. This is an article from courts bay said that there are plenty of women and middle management at fashion companies, but only twelve point five percent of clothing companies, and the fortune, one thousand have female CEOs butts less than the following industries, aerospace, defense industries and financial services all have more been fashion. Ooh. Wow. And here's the kicker of those clothing companies that are female lead. They are twice as profitable as companies with male CEOs. Well, what does that tell you folks? Also, this is in spite of the fact that eighty percent of women make all fashioned related purchasing decisions, not just for themselves, but for their wider circles, including friends and family also eighty percent of students at Fash. School are women. The study that this is based on also stated that, although companies are spending money on to Bursa training, and promoting the need for diversity CEO's are failing to make concrete commitments regarding staff, diversity and aren't establishing metrics by which they can measure success. I think it's safe to say this is going across the board with gender and with race. I'm saying that as me Carin I'm guessing that. Yeah. I think that's speculation is pretty on point. Also company pipelines aren't working only twenty five percent of female CEOs got there by rising up and the ranks of a company compared to fifty four percent of male CEOs. Here are some suggested answers on how to address this number one aboard that has gender balance. That means the board of the company has genders represented number two. There needs to be a way to measure progress. Not just a bunch of talk about, oh, we're going to be diverse. Oh, any diversity know how you gonna do it? What are you gonna measure targets third bias training for staff, who is getting promoted at what rate why who is leaving the company, those things need to be examined? And finally, flexible work arrangements, and family friendly policies for men and women. It helps everybody this study. I intuitively I could see it. I knew it, but seeing the numbers really blew me away. He and his numbers aren't great. And the solution seems so simple like metrics, of course, if you're going to make progress with anything you have to have something to measure it against, and you have to have like a guidance place. Look. Here's figure this out. I've got it figured out right here tells Lisa. So when I was a young skipper, who just got to DC, and all that shit. I join a kickball team because it's what you do. And we have this rule on the kickball league that every team had to have five women present for the team to be able to play this prevented your team from being loaded up with broS, who just like kicked the ball straight into the capital lawn and, you know, like major that you had a diverse field out there. So if the kickball league can do it. We were never. So Bor could handle that? You fashioned industry can handle this. How else can it be said? That was beautiful, Lisa. I'm done. Good night answers, your fun and answers on pop fashion. So when you pay your first consulting fee to this show figure out your business problems get ready for some kickball analogies. I mean I can't top that lease. I figured it out. Thank you. End of story, I'm gonna, I'm gonna end my set of stories on real weird note. Amazon is offering its employees a chance to quit and start delivery, driving services businesses that they run instead of working for the company it's a trance Amazon says it is a trap the trap, I'm gonna have car until you wine, a minute. Amazon says it will cover up to ten thousand dollars in start up costs for employees who are accepted into Amazon's delivery service business program and leave their jobs. The company says it will also pay them three months worth of their salary. The offers open to most part time and fulltime Amazon employees including warehouse workers who pack and ship orders, start up costs for this delivery service business start at ten thousand dollars and contractors that participate are able to lease Loovens with the Amazon logo. On the side, Carin. Why is this a trap, because you're getting your from the same people that you're serving you have your own business, completely attached to the well being of another company, so it's not truly yours? Yes. I want to turn this weekend, and I feel like this is when the when the priests was asking kids the questions during the sermon. And none of them got it quite right. But he was. He was like, yes. So essentially Amazon is offering employees the chance to leave and become contractors. Right. So they don't have to pay them stuff. Like health insurance thing. Of course, my actually, I didn't get there before you said that I really didn't because my initial thought was, this is solving their last mile problem and a very cheap way. They have a huge last mile problem. And if they have a bunch of people and different sections of the country who are doing it for them. They're actually getting away cheaper. Instinctively know that like the return on investment is going to be good. I just know for sorry. Go ahead. Lost it. It's gone. And you know that for every person who leaves to go to this program. There's going to be another person behind them to sign up for one of their warehouse jobs. And in the next couple of years, Amazon just going to ramp up their automation. The warehouses anyway. Yeah. My guess is that there will be people who can make this work figure it out. They'll be successful at it, and they'll make a nice living. But it just my Spidey sense says be careful be careful. Yeah. Mine too. I have a bad feeling about it. Yeah. The ten thousand dollars to get you started. Sounds good ten thousand dollars plus three months salary, but that goes fast. You know, like getting something off the ground at three months is hard hard. But at least you have your client set up that you're going to be delivering Trevor, you know it's not like you have to go hunting for business. Yeah, some people I think we'll be okay. But just be careful if we have anyone out there is thinking of doing this. Please write to us. Yeah. Just a note because I don't think a lot of people know this. But I wanna make sure you do when you go to our. Site to submit a listener letter. It asks for your name, and Email address, but your Email, addresses and have to be real for it to go through. It could be anonymous at anonymous dot com. If you want it to be just I am the option is there. I didn't know that until somebody used that option when they sent us a letter and I was like, oh, that's really smart. I like that. Speak of which let's move on to listener letters. Let's see what we got. Not one. This no is from Emily who says, hey, ladies. I'm listening to talk about kids shopping at the malls, these days, and how they're crediting the kids and I agree with you. I read the article on had the same thoughts. It's not jen's e that saving the malls. It's gen-x the parents of gen Z my kids are nine and six and a half a jen's e and a question, Mark, and the malls are just so convenient, they're necessary the kids in this generation, except the oldest of the cohort or all having growth spurts every twenty seconds and it makes shopping online, infuriating. I did not think about angle that makes sense example in the span of less than a month both my kids outgrew all of their shoes, and they are, in many sports, which require specific shoes, sock leads cycling shoes street shoes for skateboarding. So then he's specific styles. They all have different sizing. And I can't just say the nine year old needs size to across the board. It's much easier to drag him to the mall where we can DSW dick sporting goods at cetera and have a snack and get whatever else we need the bonus is that a lot of the stores will order what they don't have in stock, and ship it to your house for free. And since I've already tried on the comparable styles or sizes, the chance of that item not working out. And you having a schlep to the post office is very low. I also suspect that this isn't generational. All I think that this happens after the shine has worn off the penny of online shopping Amazon is getting shadier by the day shipping to my door environmentally questionable. And as I mentioned before it's almost. More of a hassle to return shipment than it is just good at the store in the first place, if the mall started filling their empty anchors with indoor entertainment, again, like arcades ace rings mini golf cetera. They would be positively booming. One more thought will make its Littler and the weather was not great. I would meet other mom friends, and we let the kids climb all over the indoor playground at the mall where we sat on the benches and chatted eight mall. Pretzels, the habits are formed young. I just thought I'd give you an oldie locks perspective, especially since my money is being hounded as gem Z money show. Thanks for putting it out there every week. What a great perspective. What if entask letter thank you so much for sharing with us genius? The moms and dads. No, they know because it's their money. You gotta listen to those parents, 'cause they're the ones spending it. My dad handed money to my nephew the other day. And I was just like and also. Yes, and me too. I did not get a dollar. Do we have this letter is from Cindy now Cindy's are designated library science correspondent, I'm just gonna start handing out titles now? And she says highly car, and thanks for getting my weekend off to a great start with your podcast. I heard the listener question about getting data on the size of the leggings market. And so she has some advice for people who are looking for business information linked this, like the size of a particular market for it type of clothing or an idea. You have her product. She says, for some basic information, you can look at an overview on St. STA, it's S T A T. I S T A dot com. You may have heard of it. For example. She says that leggings count as part of the hosiery category and statistics some of their reports free. And if you can't get a particular report for free ons to Teesta the library near you might have access to the paid version. So look online, I try to. What category your product idea is in then go from there? And see if you can get access. There's another option to if you live near a university library. He can find out which librarians work with the schools college of business and ask if they make appointments to assist members of the public. Oh, this is so smart. She said somewhat berries. We'll do this some have preset costs for providing selected services to non students, but they're usually reasonable. And she said it could be a great way to get a lay of the land in terms of the sources of data available about your industry, and really the stronger. The business program at a school near you. The more likely that they'll have access to more of the market research staff, because their students are going to be using it. She says, if there's an expensive report, you're thinking about purchasing a business librarian can help you figure out if the organization selling, it is reputable, and if there's a less expensive way to access some of that information. She's at another option is to contact your local public library to see if they have a reference librarian who specializes in assisting patrons with business research, a lot of libraries, have someone who does this role. They may also do things like work with the local chamber of commerce and local small business groups, and those libraries, usually. Have less funds than the academic libraries, but they may be able to point towards resources to fill, you know, your business needs. And she says, if your area has any sort of innovation hub or a business incubator you should also reach out to them to see if it can help provide you with market research, data best of luck with your leggings. We knew that the librarians when no they always know bless you. Seriously is a group, always know. Thank you so much. Great information. Right. They always know I hadn't even thought about going to your local college university library in calling them up and being like what's available for someone in the public come in. I mean the resource that keeps on giving. We have one more today, and it is from an anonymous listener who says, hi guys. I'm an assistant designer right now for women's denim in New York City. I'm really wanna make the shift into sustainability However I just started in the industry, and denim and active wear the only experience I have. At the moment. My real question is if we're all trying to focus on sustainability. Then why when I look for sustainability fashion jobs, they just don't show up. That's the question you found it. Try to use all the different types of terms in the search bar. But nothing wouldn't I missing. Are they all in the startup phase and can't pay? It's like solving a rubik's cube to find these companies. I want so desperately to be a part of the sustainable movement. But I don't know where to start. I can so make patterns create illustrations, by hand and digitally know how to speak to manufacturers sourcing branding logos tech packs, and more just want in on where these sustainable brands are hiding. Thanks for all the do you guys helped me every week, it over my Monday blues, you crack me up, keep it, real, always make it so entertaining, to be apart of the fashion world. I love y'all. You know, this is a great question that I don't exactly know the answer to, but it's so worth asking. And I think it goes back to our earlier conversation of like a lot of companies have verbiage around this right now. But what it comes down to it. Are you hiring? Like, are you hiring somebody to, to do sustainability within your company? Now, I have hope that things are headed in this direction and a very real concrete way, for example, PV H today laid out a plan that had fifteen points about sustainability practices throughout their tire corporation. They own Calvin Klein, Tommy hilfiger, and if they could figure it out, it is going to spread like wildfire to other corporations. Also companies like target WalMart are really digging deep to further sustain a stable practices. It doesn't surprise me that you're running into problems, right, this second, but I think it's on the horizon is just what are you going to do in in-between time, I've talked to? People before about having a secret, sustainable mission, and your company where like they don't have to have something formal. But you as a person who is really digging in on this issue can start talking to people in meetings about what can we do? This more sustainably. Is there a way we can bring a practice can something can we do another method you may have be limited in your position about how far you can push it. But you could start introducing that talk to your company, you don't need a formal title to be able to start sustainable practices in your company. You just have to have a passionate heart to do it. And it can also be a little discouraging because you can move things just inches at a time, but moving these inches at a time is still moving things like there's still a lot to be done there. A lot to be said for that. So anyway, I've been rambling, Lisa. What do you think? It's, it's one of those things where you kind of have to figure out what department has up sustainability for brands because it could be in marketing could be in supply chain. You know. So formal that there's an established place that it lands now and so you're not gonna find for the most part jobs that are specifically in sustainability instead, you're going to find sustainability elements rolled into different tasks that are included in various jobs. Whether it be designed, whether it be sourcing and supply chain, or whether it be marketing, so they are tricky to find. I feel like our audience may have some tips. So sent him along, if you work in corporate fashion and have an inkling of how sustainability minded jobs might be coded and job descriptions. Let us know seriously keep the faith because we're headed in that direction because we have no other choice. Right either. We're going to have the right direction or Rog in burst in the flames. Which seems to be the blames on the side of my face. They not movie clue, of course. Thank you, one of the best movies ever. This week. If you wanna find us, you can go to pop fashion, podcast dot com. There you could listen to pass a persona. So you can leave us a letter you can find us on Twitter at just pop fashion. And as degrom at pop fashion podcast, Lisa, what's your one good thing this week? Why haven't enjoyed my one good thing yet because it's a new season of one of my favorite TV shows, and I don't know, when I'm going to have time to watch it, but I know it will be there for me when I am ready and it is season. Three of the net flicks baking show, nailed it. It's so cute. It's so cute. It is hosted by Nicole buyer for the most part. It's fairly family friendly. It's got a little bit of innuendo, but basically, the premise is that three home bakers compete for a prize, but they're not good home bakers, and they have really crazy baking challenges to do, and it's really a contest of who makes the most like fucked up thing. And it is such a delight in a world and a time that has so much darkness I often go back and watch this one particular episode from season, one over and over again. It season one episode of three in case you need it, but to give you an example last week. I watched the new net flicks. Movie starring Zach Ephron about Ted Bundy very dark, very girl suspenseful really kinda stressful well done, but stressful. And I couldn't go to bed right after that, I needed a pallet cleanser. And so I put on nailed it season one episode three laugh my ass off, as I do every time I slept easy. The show is just a delight after a long day when you just have forty minutes at you wanna just zone out and have a good time. So I'm really glad to have the show back. So what happens in the episode that, so hilarious on that particular? Road. One of the contestants is a man named Sal, who was a former Boston transit cop, and so has a hard time following directions. And I don't want to give it away, but you know how flames is kind of the theme of this up this of our show. Flames are maybe the theme of that as well. Lanes happen flames happen. And it just and self deprecating humor is my favorite he and sound knows his limitations. And he it's him. He adjusts, I would watch an episode that it's only sow a love that Lisa. What a great thing hol show. Gimme this. Gimme the Sal baking show. Please net flex putting it out there into the world. Carne was your one good thing. My one good thing is throwing in the towel. When you know you have to. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Like Sal on the baking show, he did not know one of them. This past weekend. I was scheduled with nevi to go to Atlanta to see some family. We were at the airport are playing kept getting delayed and getting delayed and getting delays. And so when they said we were taking off at eleven thirty at night. Yeah, I just said, no, I'm not not doing that. And we were supposed to see my family that live in Atlanta, and I really wanted to see them and I hate that it didn't happen. But I just got to the point where I was like, no I can't tonight by the time travel. There travel back, we would have been there twenty four hours. So I asked if we could get a credit, and we could we packed up everything. And what how and we found out later that that flight landed in Atlanta at three thirty in the morning. I know we absolutely made the right choice. And I think if this would have happened a few years ago, I would have stuck it out and said, no we're doing this thing, but there's something to be said of just hitting a point and being like this is as far as I'm willing to go. And I wish I would have been learned that lesson earlier on in my life. But I'm glad I'm learning it now even with something simple like a flight. It's not gonna be awful, if it doesn't happen. It's okay to say this is much as I can give and then letting go and it worked out fine. And I'm here to say that I do miss my family. I really wish I could see them, but it was the right decision. Now, I know why you asked me, what airline I traveled on yesterday and had terrible delays with. But yeah, it's I was thinking about that. They are yesterday. I was like, wow. The worst part is getting delayed. And delayed delayed is that I can't leave like I can't go see my family and come back when it's time to go now and I also don't know if it's ever going to be time to go and I'm here in limbo. And in this case, I was coming home from where I was. So I kinda just needed to wait it out. But in your case, wow, it takes a lot of gumption to say to an airline that has taken gobs of your money. Hello. I would like to leave. Now can I have my money back? And that worked out. Yeah. I didn't realize that like you could just ask you can ask and say, can I have my money back? You can ask and say, can I have credit because we know we're gonna go down there. We know that we're gonna get tickets and other times. So it's not lost, or just to be like, what are my options? I don't have sitting here is not just my only option. I think that's a life lesson that I need to learn. I don't have to accept the giving circumstances that I can find another way around, and this was a small version of that, that I hope to apply to other areas of my life. Gosh. I really want to embrace that lifestyle of throwing in the towel more Bright's it can be very brave. Yeah. And I think I've always thought that, like, no completing the thing is the most important, but sometimes it isn't really isn't because what are you giving up? Instead, I know you've already gotten through TSA. You have taken off your belt. You have put it back on again. You have shown them all of your liquids, and you want to complete the quest, but it is not always prudent deduce out. So friends sometimes just throw in the towel. It's okay. It's okay. Gosh doesn't car in. Always 'em Apso with the best advice. That's very sweet. I don't know if that's true. But it's very sweet. Thank you. She never fails, she always leaves us with something a mole over, you know. Oh, is it like the end of a full house episode? Now it's more like the end of Jerry. Springer episode houses to take care of one another Lisa pop fashioned, family. Care of yourself and other.

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Studio 360 Extra: American Icons: The Migration Series by Jacob Lawrence

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

1:10:43 hr | 1 year ago

Studio 360 Extra: American Icons: The Migration Series by Jacob Lawrence

"I'm curt Anderson. And this is the studio. Three Sixty podcast. Hello I'm terrance. Mcknight the host of evenings with terrance McKnight on w. Our New York and this episode as part of Studio Three Sixties American icon series. We're looking at the migration series by the artist Shakeup Lawrence. It's a familiar story and a very American story. A group of migrants flee poverty violence and repression to seek a better life willing to start over. They make trade offs between the culture. They left behind and the New World. They have to embrace number twenty five after a while. Some communities were left almost bare typically this narrative is told from the perspective of European emigrants but it applies as well to the six point six million African Americans migrated from the south to the north between nineteen ten and nineteen seventy number six. The drains were packed continually with migrants Isabel. Wilkerson described them in her book the warmth of other suns by their own actions. They did not dream the American dream they will get into being. By definition of their own choosing they did not ask to be accepted but declared themselves for the Americans that perhaps few others recognized but that they had always been deep within their hearts. The Great Migration Changed American politics and culture. The painter Jacob Lawrence was one of the few artists to chronicle it Jacob. Lawrence was a lot of things historian. A teacher humanise philosopher. Jacob Lawrence was not exactly what you might call southern Negro. Here's Lawrenson in Nineteen ninety-three interview for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Some of them said my artists social commentary or its protest. It couldn't be anything else if I grew up in the Harlem community and that was my content. The Migration Series was created in Harlem New York depicts southern blacks migrating to northern cities. However it's creator didn't venture south until after the work was completed Jacob Armstead Lawrence was born in Atlantic City New Jersey in nineteen seventeen. His mother Rosalie was a domestic worker. Who had come from Virginia New Jersey where she met? Lawrence's father also named Jacob who came from North Carolina Lawrence was the oldest of three siblings and soon after his birth the family moved to eastern Pennsylvania. We're Lawrence his sister. Geraldine was born. Morrison's father worked as a cook on the railroads. Spending large amounts of time away from his family and this prolonged absence will cause Lawrence's parents to separate with a pregnant rose Lee taking the children to Philadelphia and giving birth to Jacob's brother William in nineteen twenty four a struggling mother of three. Rosalie thought best move to New York City and build a life for young children. She will leave them a foster care. That was a common practice at the time. It would take six years before thirteen-year-old Jacob join her in Harlem. It was a place that some referred to as the spiritual center of Black America Shoemaker. In New the the ICEMAN. Here's Lawrence and conversation with historian Henry Louis Gates Nineteen ninety-five. You knew the minister. You knew these people and you knew a person liked the Probably used to run down the street throwing imaginary hand-grenades he was he was he was a shell. Shock Better World War but the community new communities are took care of them and he was a part of the community. So this is all a part of this community was a sense of longing. I belong to the community. The community belongs to me if they had been paradigm F parliament hidden. Then mouth a Mike. That's Ozzie Davis. Reading one of links and hues this essays toast to Harlem Heaven State of mind. I commented you mind that simple draining. His glass from Central Park. One hundred seventy nine river to river. Holum mind during the nineteen twenties voices like Hughes along with contemporaries county color or no Hurston. Jean toomer catapulted the Harlem community onto the national stage. It's really a a catalyst for what historians called the New Negro Movement historian and civil rights. Professor Kevin Games and the new Negro represented this militant political and social movement with the demands for equality. You had as part of the new Negro movement black nationalism and black nationalism was led by the movement organized by Marcus Garvey who is Jamaican Immigrant. That brought together. African Americans in the south with black people in the Caribbean with migrants from the Caribbean. Repealing desire all over the world kind of Canadians of America for the American of England English Soprano Rental Germany for the Germans do think unreasonably we the black by over there with the man. We represented new it back again to what we do not Black Socialism of African American Socialist and labor leaders like Hubert Harrison and a Philip Randolph. Around one hundred thousand African Americans fought in Europe in World War One or were stationed in Europe in World War. One and they're meeting folks from the French colonies in West Africa. They're meeting Senegalese blacks english-speaking African American intellectuals like Langston Hughes and Jesse Faucet are meeting French speaking black intellectuals and activists blocks who migrated to urban centers like Harlem were more readily able to unify politically and culturally so with the passage of the fifteenth amendment. In eighteen sixty eight African American men could vote and hold elective office throughout the south. There's this tremendous white southern democratic backlash with the political representatives of the former plantation slave owning class. Really trying to thwart African aspirations. It culminates in a movement from roughly eighteen ninety to the early twentieth century in which African American men are barred from voting and the great migration happens at this low point and African American politics while the country was still debating over what it owed newly freed. Slaves southern blacks were confronted with more pragmatic obstacles but Amos Spencer crew were at the National Museum of African American history and culture. And I'm the acting director of this museum. Conditions in the south are getting more difficult for agriculture. There is a flood that takes place in the south at pushes a lot of African Americans who were tenant farmers and sharecroppers off the land. There's also the attack of the Boll Weevil which is tax cut than which is the primary crop around. That is a down spin. The chance to be economically stable for Tier Cropper's get becomes more and more difficult share. Copying is a difficult situation anyway. Because it's hard to make enough to pay the in in quotation. You're having to pay. And then you add to that the rise of Segregation Jim Crow laws and lynching and things like that but with the war and with worry. The streets opening up and with many whites being recruited to fight in military positions opened up again. Not The best ones for those. That least were job. Opportunities so people were moving north to take advantage of these new opportunities but by nineteen thirty that sense of blackness of humanity equality of recognition that became the centerpiece of the Cultural Ethos of Harlem. The Term New Negro was coined by writer philosopher. Lame lock who believed an understanding of African history could unify Harlem residents regardless of origin and in Harlem Lawrence found a community standing on. Its own not being completely absorbed in the broader culture but creating culture creating meaning creating Art Volley Jacob. Lawrence actually knew what art was culturally vibrant though it may have been homeless still overwhelmingly poor. The Great Depression had nineteen twenty nine and by nineteen thirty. Three many were destitute but jobs. We had no money. Hunger dove out people to the bread. Lang's anxiously waited waited for some sign of better days then came the federal government's work programme. The works progress administration spent eleven billion dollars. Employing three million people between nineteen thirty five and nineteen forty two while most of the money went to construction and civil engineering projects the WPA also established a creative division called the federal arts project it also established more than one hundred art centers. All over the country Jacob Lawrence says mother sent him to one of those art center's was an after school arts program called Utopia Children's house. His first teacher was Charles Halston. Who is a really good painter academically trained you know got a degree at at Columbia Teachers College doctor. Patricia Hill has written several books Jacob Lawrence. He recognized that Lawrence had a genius for design and so he didn't teach him academic drawing. He just let him do what he could do. And that is wonderful design. Lawrence's interest and talent began to flourish. He experimented with line and Color by copying the patterns of hand woven rugs and he learned to see art everywhere. Here's Lawrence conducting an oral history interview for the Seattle Public Library in nineteen eighty-seven being greatly influenced by the The floor of evil in the community used to use document. Homes and these were Taken the Persian rugs and they our best designs things about saw influenced by that also mother like so many of the people over age USA decorate their homes also of colors and I didn't realize that I was greatly for Lawrence began to paint modern Harlem that immediate the intimate and the profane. I need a street corner. Artis speak about revolutions big about Tucson overture. The blocked liberator of eighty very fiery speakers. Lawrence painted street orders audience in nineteen thirty six. He was nineteen years old and the painting. A group of men and women gays upward at an order was climbing a ladder to a platform in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty four Austin became the first black director of WPA Arts Workshop located at three zero six West one hundred forty first street. The three zero six as it would come to be called help classes on sculpting and painting Lawrence worked as an apprentice to Austin also designed and oversaw mural project for the nearby Harlem Hospital Jacob Lawrence rented a corner in the studio where he would pay. The three zero six was also the meeting place for many Harlem intellectuals here's Patricia Hills sort of like almost like salons you know where it just. The conversation was about Talk Culture and poetry folks like Langston Hughes. Ralph Ellison Aaron Douglas Lane Block would engage in spirited discussions Lawrence. Sit back taking it all in during this time. His interest in epic narratives also Pete as an assistant. He would help. Charles Austin apply is completed sketches onto the bare white walls of Harlem Hospital fascinated with the scale and drum of the murals. This work would also expose Lawrence to other murless like Jose rose co and Diego Rivera. Charles Austin had watched Diego Rivera as he painted his famously. Controversial mural at Rockefeller Center which featured trait workers and it was destroyed for supposedly being to some pathetic to communism. In addition to the boat use of color Lawrence was struck by Rivera's committed engagement with social issues. Lawrence was not at the three zero six. He attended classes at the studio of fame. Sculptor Augusta. Savage her Harlem Art Center will become one of the largest in the nation and it was here the Jacob Meta's future wife Wendelin night Gwendolyn she was actually a few years older than Lawrence very beautiful woman and she had gone to Howard University but because of the depression had left on back to Harlem born in Bridgetown Barbados. Nineteen Thirteen Gwendolyn. Like Jacob became a foster child when she was seven years old. I think if you know a little bit about Jacob I think by the time he was thirteen or fourteen he. He and his mother didn't get along. He was a foster child when he went to Harlem so Gwynne was from her mother given to a family to come to the US because her mother thought that she could have a better life here so in a sense they were both orphans. Barbara Earl. Thomas is a Seattle based visual artists. She met the couple when she was a graduate student and when the couple grew old she became their caretaker. So when Gwen and Jacob finally got together they were very much on their own and I feel like people were older quicker. I mean this long childhood thing we have going on now. That's just you know that just wasn't happening you know in your fifteen years old and you're sixteen years old. You were making your way. Augusta savage also recognized. Lawrence's Talon once. You found out that he had dropped out of school to focus on painting. She made sure it wouldn't be in vain. Nineteen thirty seven thousand the officers on the project. They said I was too young but she. They advised Back next year I went back to all of Wasn't the anymore. She had not forgotten and she took me back. A sign me up. I was signed on the EASEL. The almost comically bureaucratic name easel division referred to the Group of artists who paint conventional canvas works for public throughout the city. A turning to six weeks and salary was a fabulous our at twenty. Three thousand aces. This was a major turning point. Lawrence's career here. Again is Patricia Hills. He was very involved with showing the history of African Americans in this country and also like to Saint Louis Latour in Haiti. Lawrence was twenty years ago. He was inspired to paint too sought lower from conversations. He overheard at the three. Oh six black. History had never been a major part of his formal education so he immediately immersed himself in research and it became clear that a single painting wouldn't do justice to the story he wanted to portray. I mean people don't know that that revolutionary history but the the Haitian army fought on the side of the US against the British during the revolutionary war. He wanted to bring out that history. Lawrence would choose a serial format and create work focusing on the mistreatment of patients by colonial farmers as well as low richer struggle to educate himself fight military occupation forces and achieve independence for his country completed in nineteen thirty eight. Lawrence's series the life of to Lower. -Ture consists of forty-one panels in many ways this series. What serve as a template for the more astonishing works yet to come. He was a historian as well as an artist and was very important to him to get his message and get the teachings of history across. So that's why he decided to do series so that he would have captions to each one of the pictures so that they were there almost like storyboards for a movie you know. In which you you know you go. From scene to scene and he weaves together in their rhythms really returning back to what? Elaine lock was calling artists to do in the nineteen twenties and thirties. Melanie Harby as a professor of Art History at Howard University nine that African legacy in using tools and strategies from that period to address our contemporary moment. So we see figurative representations of African Americans and powerful stances going back to New Negro Movement and Times revising African American representation. The fact that in the nineteenth century there was a whole visual program a by individuals like not only Richard Alan. The founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church the oldest African American denomination in the states but also individuals like Frederick Douglass. Either beat truth literally using their representation as a way of redefining identity. National Right so in some ways we can think about. Even what Jacob Lawrence grows to do right as a building on this kind of visual strategy of correcting misrepresentations histories of oppression. Laurence POWELL TO SALT. Literature series additional works depicting the lots of big years including Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman. But his most ambitious work was yet to come By nineteen thirty nine Jacob Lawrence had already completed two major series on black heroic figures. Toussaint L'Ouverture Frederick Douglass. He was at work on a third covered the life of Harriet Tubman and now he began contemplating a new subject. Among the many supporters of Jacob Lawrence. His latest work was professor and Pylos for Lane. Lock by this time. Lock supported already. Gotten off forty-one panels up the lower series in an exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art at just twenty one years of age Lawrence was featured in Newsweek and in a letter to lock Lawrence described his latest ambition. My proposed plan is to interpret in a sufficient number of panels eighteen by twelve the Great Negro Migration North during the World War on April Seventeenth Nineteen Forty Jacob received the news he had been selected to receive a fellowship of fifteen hundred dollars from the Rosenwasser Fund to complete his ambitious work on the great migration. I I read it I was. I think it was thirty. Three and all of the whole community was between limits and the seven thousand dollars and I pay eight dollars a month for loss and That was what I first studio. What am I work together? As what the previous three projects Lawrence didn't start with sketches but with research the great migration marked departure from his earlier. Work here's Patricia Hills. After Harriet Tubman he decided that rather than focus on the lives of unique individuals he was going to focus on the people. You know that it was a people's movement. Migration wasn't one single person who is the leader. Laura spent endless hours of Schaumburg Centre for Research Black Culture at the one hundred thirty Fifth Street Public Library. He studied the literature of W. E. Boys like historian Carter G Woodson and Emmett J Scott Whose Book Negro Migration during the war served as a backbone to the series. The final result was pretty much the inverse of how painters usually work rather than making a painting and anguishing over what to call it. Lawrence did just the opposite. He anguished over the titles for paintings before he even did. Preliminary sketches them Palo number to the world. War had caused a great shortage in northern industry and also citizens of foreign countries were returning home. Well we captions. Were very important to him. Because it was a history lesson he wanted people to look at the caption and look at the picture and see the relationship panel number four. The Negro was the largest source of labor to be found after all others had been exhausted. Panel number five. The negroes were given free passage on the railroads which was paid back by northern industry. It wasn't agreement that the people brought north on these railroads were to pay back their passage after they had received jobs and sometimes there is close relationships and sometimes there is a more tenuous relationship but basically he wanted you to think about. He wanted you to read the captions Pat on Number Forty One. The South that was interested in keeping cheap labor was making it very difficult for labor agents recruiting southern Labor for northern firms. In many instances they were put in jail and were forced to operate incognito. He wanted the pictures to be shown in order. That was very important to him. He has twenty works. That are about the south panel number thirteen due to the south losing so much of its. Labor. The crops were left to dry and spoil twenty about the north where the migrants went to panel number forty nine. They also found discrimination in the north although it was much different from that which they had known in the South and then twenty about the struggles of getting their marching of getting on the train. So waiting for the trainings of looking out the windows from the trains that number twelve the railroad stations at times so over packed with people leaving that special guards had to be called in to keep order. That's a wonderful series. If you look it from left to right you know. It goes the rhythms of Horizontal Vertical. And then another vertical and then another horizontal and there is a really rhythm there that almost be like a call and response as he's weaving together in the sixty panels so it's really a beautiful series the way it was orchestrated next. Lawrence translated his captions into studies. On paper which evolved into sketches on his final hardboard panels assisted by his then girlfriend. Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Brush several layers of rabbit. Skin Jess over hardboard panels and sand them smooth. The Jessica was notorious for leaving tiny air bubbles. Which when painted left white streaks throughout the painting Lawrence didn't paint one painting at a time he painted sixty in stages at the same time and completed the work one color at a time. I painted them. Columbine Colorado blocks through running the reds through each problem. I did this in Law to maintain unity not finish one panel. Then go to the next go to next because star might have changed. My approach might've changed panel number. Thirty seven the Negroes that have been brought north worked in large numbers and one of the principal industries which was steal by the way. I think of this as not works. What one work consistent sixty Powell's panel number nineteen there had always been discrimination so this to To maintain the unity spirit of what I was dealing panel number forty four living conditions were better in the north of the work was devout. Jacob is known as a master of temporary fast. Drying water base paint US mostly by illustrators and sign. Painters temporary is cheap and easily achieves bold pay colors through layering awhile. It's great for photographic reproduction the speed with which it dries and it's flat application makes it hard to convey nuanced effects like shadows and shading. It's a quality that highlights Lawrence's brilliant use of distorted angles and abstract compositions and see like moves lie. His moves are just great. Dirk Adams is a visual artist in New York. Like high implement certain like new color and every painting. He has his basic and very recognizable Paletta. He uses to our work but every now and then he ought throwing a certain type of pattern or color. That is just very unique to the narrative of that particular piece. One of the panels depicts a woman sitting at our kitchen table exhausted with her head. Down Panel numbers sixteen although the Negro was used to lynching he found this an opportune time for him to leave. Where one had occurred to me when I look at those paintings where the tables like pretty tilt it in perspective to almost looks like it's like leaning into your viewpoint as A person standing in front of the work. I feel like his tables invitation to be a participant. Deny even this painting. We're looking at right now. This woman leaning on the table. It almost like you can lift her up and say like girls go to bed or something. You rarely see paintings of Jacob where Jacob has done where the figure is addressing. You directly is really more about you being able to glimpse have a glimpse into a certain reality that you may or may not be necessarily connected to as a viewer and so you become a witness in some ways and so this way I like about the work. A lot is that is not really about you. The subject acknowledging you is about you acknowledging the experience of the subject do their reality so they're posturing to me always seem more about the plight. An attitude of the black subject at a time in the migration series Lawrence uses motifs such as trains crossroads ladders for example to bring depth and continuity to the series movement these symbols of movement to me loudest represent the big cities cities like New York and later when we arrived. Nineteen thirty my family. Seeing these fire escapes and seeing six story building from short. I saw these things up to but they didn't mean as much tooling. And here. I would see this pattern over and over again beautiful patterns and all to my paintings not only in the migration says louder Motif and I use it to to directly. I I use it. As part of the composition number three in every town negroes leaving by the hundreds to go north and enter into northern industry in the story of my Alicia Hall Moran and her husband Jason Moran or musicians whose work explores the legacies of the black experience. There are people there are birds. There is barren land and pure blue sky. The people have luggage under their arms and their mid stride. The TRIANGLE SHAPE. They make the pyramid sheep. The migration of birds does incorporate that first bird in the front breaking the air opening the space. And then the next to taking on some of that burden and then the air opening up for the ones in the back to rest and then they will take turns being in front and so I think the family the people being in such triangle one that reaches up towards the sky like we want more. We're going left in the country or right but this is to take a step up a vertical prayer for ourselves and to be parallel by the birds in this way but the bird is the farthest out front is so beautiful. Like we're not alone and that we are wanting the most natural fame's and that if we do like the birds doodle we cannot go wrong. We might die but we will not be wrong. This is forty five and this is one of my favorites. Because it's optimistic panel number forty five. They arrived in Pittsburgh. One of the great industrial centers of the North and large numbers. You know you have the the black family sitting in the railroad car. They're looking out the window at industry you can see industry with those big chimneys and the smoke kind of pouring out and there's a little baby their babies are also often symbolic of the new future and then they have this basket of food. You know sort of on on on that on that ledge there which You know the the basket of food is served symbolic that the there's going to be more food. You know like a Cornucopia you know and and they're looking they're smiling. You know the man on the right smiling down and his child you know the one I really like. Is that one of those stairs that are going up to kind of a sky. Panel Forty six industries attempted to board their labor in quarters that were oftentimes very unhealthy labor camps. Were numerous Barbara Earl Thomas. There's not even a person in there the stairs that start out large at the bottom and get really narrow when they go to the top and then there's just a door and the sky and I love that one because he used those same stairs near when he made the Olympic poster. That can't remember what year he did that. He has a a track that the guys are running around and it's the same stare that's wrapped around. So you know he took that design element flattened it and made it go around in this and turned into a track so I love it when I find things that are kind of reused images in his work once. The series was completed gallery. I Women Edith how to arrange to see the migration series person. She was so struck by the series that she had the panels currier to the time. Life building to Debra Calkins. The Assistant Art Director Report magazine Lawrence Received News a few weeks later that fortune intended to include twenty six of his panels and the magazine's November nineteen forty one issue so either the ranch to special feeling of the work that November third the larger scale exhibition. She plan would take place. In December a series. She was calling American Negro Art. Meanwhile Jacob Lawrence and Gwendolyn Knight were married having never even been to the south. They took a trip to New Orleans. Edith wrote to Laurence asking whether he was interested in selling the pieces individually and to set a price for the entire series Lawrence. Made it clear that he had no intention of breaking up the series and a sail. No no he. He was very resistant to having broken up and they they had to talk to say look. These are two major museums. It was conceived as a single story and Shit remain as such. They settled on two thousand dollars for the series about thirty six thousand dollars in today's value at the same time that the images were published in fortune. Magazine Edith. How her began showing the work in her gallery. Howard's plan was to stage an opening. That would be a grand event including a performance by Blues Guitarist. Josh White Harlem highlanders off all the lead in the lanes and Sun. The guest list included. Paul Robeson photographer. Carl van Becton First Lady. Eleanor Roosevelt and Dr David Levy and his wife Adele Trustees of the Museum of Modern Art Halpern. Aim to create a Negro art. Fun To give grants to black artists and exhibitions of their work in museums and elsewhere. She was also gearing up to ask New York dealers to add black artists to their rosters. The plans for the big opening were falling into place but then just a day before the opening on December. Seventh back immoral. We have with this mark a Pearl Harbor and they bombing of our by Barry Arroyo Broomhall. All of the deal is backed out of this idea of taking one. Black artist onto its roster. They weren't taking any artist time back. There were cutting back. Edith Howard was the only one who went through with the original idea and I was at artists selected. The opening was still on among those who attended. Alfred Barr the director of the Museum of Modern Art as well as Duncan Phillips. A philanthropist and collector who was beginning to assemble one of the country's first modern art collections. He had spoken about going to see the important African American art. Show that help. It was organizing in her gallery downtown. Gallery also Smith. Gall is a senior curator for the Phillips Collection. He is clearly very taken with the panels because we soon learned that he's arranging to have helper send them to the Phillips for an exhibition to open in February the very next month before the exhibition even had a chance to open however Moma had already decided that they wanted to buy half the series and so that sort of hastens the need for a decision from Duncan Phillips and so he just Howard is writing a letter furiously to Marjorie. Who is the assistant director? So the letter comes to Marjorie asking if they would like to buy the other half and so it's Bert who comes up with this idea? It's totally Halliburton. The savvy dealer but he you know she sees that when Alfred Barr the director then at Moma came to see the work. He was really excited. I said Dunkin Phillips comes and sees it. He's very excited. And there's a third player in the mix. I want to mention in that is Adele Levy Levy was the daughter of Julius Rosenberg. Law The creator of the Fund. That had actually underwritten the creation of the migration series. She was also on the sponsorship board for eat at how it's event featuring the work. Pretty Savvy move on alpers part but the long story is that she is interested in acquiring the series and being that she can afford to acquire. It chooses to buy it and gift. It the half to Moma so they have a wonderful opportunity here to have this member of their board great supporter of Lawrence. Buy It for them. So she will be a great stimulus for than the moment that I said where they come to Phillips so then the question is how do you divide this series seeking to keep the potential cell alive? Edith helper made an interesting proposition. We can do at one of two ways. We can take the series and divided down the middle so one thirty and thirty one to sixty four. We can do the odd panels for the Phillips and the even panels for Moma. They understood why that really was a better way to more authentically represent the series in that the series starts in the south to tell the story of this great migration panel number one during the World War there was a great migration north by Southern Negros. And it's only at the mid point of the series that Lawrence Shifts and we move north just as the migrants move north panel number thirty one. After arriving north the Negros had better housing conditions by the middle of the series. His story will shift and we start to see the migrants there at the train again. And they're looking at Pittsburgh through the window of the train. The smoke stacks. And so you cannot imagine telling a complete story without seeing some aspects of what was unfolding in the south and some in the north so therefore you really do need to have the Auden even split. The other would never be true to trying to capture this important story and the other little twist is that there was a panel forty six there was a particular piano. Adele apparently expressly loved above all. She loved them all but clearly. She had a favorite panel number forty. Six Industries attempted to board their Labor in Quarters. That were oftentimes very unhealthy. Labor camps were numerous. And the reason we weren't going to be given the even for example and Moma odd was very much driven by making sure the half Moma had included panel forty six. So that's another little twist in the story. Jacob Lawrence was pretty pleased at the news to have to prestigious institutions purchase. The work effectively keeping it together after the migration series was purchased. It was arranged that the entire series. We'RE GONNA two year fifteen national tour culminating in an exhibition at Moma in October. Nineteen forty four. I just twenty three years. Old Lawrence was famous. He had produced a series that over the course of his sixty plus year career will be considered a masterwork. His signature style would inspire generations of artists for years to come by the late. Nineteen fifties social issues arising from civil rights struggle had given birth to the controversial titled Black Arts Movement. What do you mean when you say black? We know what we mean when we say Asian or native American art is a picture comes with mine. It's right in certain context as long as it's understood as long as you're communicating. This is black art because it was produced by black person. Sorry but on the hand another break say well. The form is Western. So how could it be black? Lawrence was now teaching at Pratt Institute in New York and well into a decade of mainstream acceptance into the art world. Protest art became popular among emerging black artists and to them. The migration series may have seemed a bit tepid take for example panel fifteen panel number fifteen. Another cause was lynching. It was found that where there had been a lynching the people who were reluctant to leave at. I left immediately. After this and this painting Lawrence deliberately chooses to paint the effect lynching has on people left behind more than the act of lynching itself we see a lone figure hunched over in grief just having lost a loved one surrounded by barren underneath an empty news lawrence is sparse composition and tendency to veer away from depicting the harsh conditions faced by blacks. Literal terms was now suspect awhile. Lawrence's critics argue that these choices were made to make the work more palatable to white. Derek Adams argues that Lawrence has choice reflects the exact opposite that the work was explicitly made for black audience. I don't think like people are any way at Amnesia when it comes to turmoil and strife and ARA. I think that we're constantly reminded we're talking about. We talked about an elementary school. Middle School is on TV while we need see people hanging. I don't really think are necessary for us. I think it's for other people who are sympathizing with our struggle. Derek Adams I and comment the work of Jacob Lawrence. It was transformative experience. One that prompted him to follow. Lawrence to New York with hopes of becoming his student at Pratt Institute. That didn't pan out but dare continues to honor. Lawrence's legacy both in studio and in his classroom. He points out the challenge of balancing beauty and socially responsible subject matter with his black students in our practice. We are really concerned with form in content. Because that's where you have to learn at art. School is form in. If you don't have content you have to learn how to make stuff a lot of young. Black Artists Focus more on content. Because they believe that they had to talk about something like an artist told me one time and older artists said as a black person you know. America has given us a lot to talk about a lot to make work about. It's up to us. Decide what we want to pull out of that will empower us by doing it. I'm always emphasizing that when I'm teaching primarily with a black student because that's an issue that it comes up pretty often more so than any other student is about content and form but I tell them all the time. Eating make is GonNa be talking about something you know like this narrative that had been set in place in oppressive structure is one of the things that is pretty common. We look at you as a person who's been through stuff even if you have not necessarily been do stuff but your representative of that. Dirk Adams is a multidisciplinary artist but like Lawrence. Bold colors and a degree of abstraction are foundational to his work. Derek also uses the serial format to focus on the power and significance inherent in the normal lives of black people. I make what I want to see that I don't see in the world. I'm can't really making the series called style variation. You still have power again. The body to black subject is political subject and we bring politics with us and we bring with us so we don't have to own any particular day in order to be relevant and powerful. You know we are. I don't think that we have to focus as much on the oppressive structures around us as we do about the perseverance that we represent every on a daily basis. You know the fact that we're still here in the world based on all the things that happened to us it shows to me. The most supernatural thing you can think about dirk has made installation. That compiles one hundred images from Lawrence's personal archive and to a wallpaper that covers a room and includes his personal effects some images of him with celebrities patrons. Very bride very dimensional. If I was going to be a part of the exhibition that I could tackle another area of Jacob's experience that was not known it was not public. There were moments in these photographs that you can kind of see his humanity in a different way laughing and meditative images of him just sitting at a table and I also was granted permission to use his studio armchair that was tattered in very personalized to be kind of the the anchor for the environment and to me as an artist this was even more relevant than the paintings. Way Getting back to making the works that reflect who we are now. Dean Jacob was a pioneer person that kind of gave us permission to say. It's okay to make a painting of us just sitting in the living room is okay to make a painting in the classroom like he made those paintings you know. In his twenties panel number twenty three and the migration spread in two thousand fifteen mama asked me to craft a musical event about migration series the result the migration rhapsody it was a collaborative performance from a community of artists. Lawrence were committed to mining history and shaping new narratives around the black experience. Everybody Shadow was black. Shut up my collaborators. Included paneth's Jason Moran and his wife Classical Vocal Performance Alicia Hall Moran Jason. I encountered the migration series when he was nineteen. I think as a musician you jazz musician. That plays piano doesn't use lyrics at all. How do you get to storytelling? Very rarely does disgust in improvisational language. How do you tell a story but then when you go see the paintings and you see you know the captions on the sides you know and then you watch the progression and then you watch the terror and then you watch the angles and then you watch the flatness? That he's made these pieces you know. And also their intimate they're small pieces and the series is extremely long. It feels like you're listening to an opera right like you watching this unfold and you're not sure whose story is GonNa come up next the next panel. The spirit of spontaneity is something that many folks from the south brought with them to the north and it was a web survival for them. It wasn't a gimmick being clever thinking on your feet wasn't an artistic expression. That was a way of life. So when approximating Jason's experience with the work as a nineteen year old. I asked him to play in response to images from the series with no prior knowledge of what they appear a panel number fifty one in many cities in the north where the Negros had been overcrowded in their own living quarters. They attempted to spread out this resulted in many of the race. Riots and the bombing of Negro poems panel number fifty race. Riots were very numerous all over the north because of the antagonism that was caused between the Negro and white workers many of these riots occurred because the Negro was used as a strike breaker in many of the northern industries. Whether it's something that music doesn't especially the piano because it's an old instrument itself then it can really switch gears very quickly. What I like is seeing. How color of accord matches a color. The flatness of his black that he has on on the painting or are you then. Now the activity of the bird in the sky right change the perspective of where you play from recently Jason and Alicia deepen their contributions to the migration narratives with works like two wings the music of Black America and migration a concert series exhibiting both contemporary spoken word and original music which they played at Carnegie Hall in preparation for the series. Jason Lucia underwent a process echoing that of Jacob Lawrence we read we reread Isabel. Wilkerson 's profoundly explosive documentary novel the warmth of Other Suns Book that my mother handed me many years before and said. Oh this explains our family read it? Chickasaw County Mississippi late October. Nineteen thirty. Seven item May Brandon glac Ni. Tonight clouds were closing in on the Salt Lake's east of the ox bow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the yellow Bouche River and she came from an she read selections from the Book. That we all felt would highlight the music that we had chosen to share. It was very special and in a certain kind of deep career. Long way very monumental you can hear my grandparents voices and songs that I've written Literally you can hear their voice similar to Lawrence who at the south before ever going there. Jason and Alicia sometimes wrote about experiences. They've never personally lived that. Probably when you say this part about him never visiting the south which is like we also talk about curt vile never you know. Never getting to the south but loving to write about it. I love that you say that Jason Kidd reminds me also of the opera from the beginnings of Opera in America. You having an audience fill of people wild majority of whom have never been to Austria. And we'll never go. It doesn't mean they can't understand not said Figura they don't speak Italian but it doesn't mean they don't understand love and betrayal and passion and buffoonery painter. He was able to put it down. That's the art. That's the amazing part. It's so real. It's so common people walking with their bags hoping for a better life like pray and like you know going home or going somewhere hoping head dragging you know but then who can paint it so you're only going to get only so many people who when you go into museum you don't think what is it you that's me. That's my grandmother. Ooh That was me last night. Then that's what the stuff panel number fifty nine in the north. The Negro had freedom to vote in recent years. I've done a bit of research on my own migration history which brings me to this land or my parents were granted the opportunity to establish a home after being emancipated from slavery. You know we're in mid County Mississippi Which is borders Louisiana? So we're right by the Louisiana State Line. We are on the grounds of Multiple Baptist Church in a county and There's a church cemetery over there and on that side of the street. There's a family cemetery. This property that we're walking on came into my maternal family in eighteen. Seventy eight there was a homestead I guess give away of land To former enslave people My great great grandfather guy by the name of Jerry. Steptoe born in eighteen fifty three in his wife. A niece who was born in fifty five they acquired seventy nine acres of land right here. But this is for me is where started. Man This is this is the legacy piece. This is the first property that I could identify that. We own coming out of emancipation for me man on this side of the Atlantic. This is where my story begins. My great great grandfather. Jerry steptoe was emancipated in eighteen. Eighty eight got eighty acres of land years later. His land was given to his grandson. He W steptoe. Uw was literate. He owned land to requirements. That still made the right to vote elusive for many black southerners. He W was granted the right to vote but given the fact that his neighbors and relatives didn't have that same right. He made it his duty to help the people in this community to help them become landowners to help them attain that right to vote so he and my grandfather Louis acquired hundreds of acres of land by the nineteen forties and began selling the land. Nacre two acres here and there to black folks who were unable to get bank loans. So you know my earliest days of remembering coming down here. I was probably probably about five years old and I remember that because my grandfather mail such an influence on me and he was just so you know he had a bunch of acres and I would just say GRANDPA. Where's where's your property? And he says far as can see that way that way that way in that way as far as you can see and when he would leave I would try to walk. You know I just be walking through the woods. My mother be nervous. 'cause HE OVER SNAKES OUT THERE. I guess I didn't care man. It was my grandfather so I just felt safe and I thought I was him and I remember going to school as a child going to elementary school and saying that my name was Louis Stepdaughter. And my teacher call my mother. Confused said Terrence Santa. His name is Louis and she didn't understand what was going on my grandfather. We'll tell me you know. He told my mother. When this boy gras he gonNA take care displace? He's GonNa take care of the place for that. It was like he put this huge crown above my head. I'm Louis After. I didn't know all of what he had done but I knew it was important. You know I do that as far as I can. Look in all these directions. It was his property. I knew that these people around had such respect for him for having to look at me as eight-year-old. That's it at the same time both my parents migrated to Cleveland in the nineteen fifties. My father decided he wanted to go to seminary. That's where I was born while my mother's siblings followed suit to places like Cleveland family went to Chicago. My grandparents stay put he worked with the W Mastaba Stat. Cpi Chapter and they helped fight for voting rights. Right there in that community in liberty here is A. W. Greeting Bob Moses who came down there from Harlem as leader of a voter rights registration drive emit county. It's a nineteen sixty three. I do think that every and Kinda should an election and I entrust that I will have the privilege to vote lots of twice in my life. After grandfather's death. The land was passed down to my mother and fell into a bit of disrepair. Eventually we were able to convince her to pass ownership of the property down to myself and my siblings so we wrap our arms around it and take care of it as a family. This is Mount Sinai Baptist Church or as I say down here Mancini. This is where my grandfather Louis was a a deacon. This is where he's buried in the Church cemetery and my grandmother some uncles checkpoint alone this is where I come to solve all my issues talking to him out here on his grave to sitting right there looking down towards the property just commuting these people now with my grandparents asking them what they wanted me to do about school about marriage about life about the property. I would just sit and wait on the ads or even always asked me right away. Sometimes he won't say anything you know and I would just come back. My grandfather made us living in pulpwood. Pine is Mississippi's number one export and those who plant pine trees know that it's like a twenty five year investment. You cut after the first twelve years maybe six years later. But then you do the full cut twenty five years so these trees cross-strait up towards the sky that will goes to make paper paneling flooring my grandfather owned public trucks and I go out there with them. Every summer you know what the chainsaw and his crew he no hearing them Holler timber. That's real man out in those woods so as I was sitting there waiting for my grandfather give me some sign as to what I should do with the land. It occurred to me do what he was never able to do. So right now over there on that property more forty thousand trees planning on forty five acres of land I worked with the State of Mississippi who provides a percentage of the cost for planting. But they require that the trees reach maturity before being sold this. No doubt to me was an intimidating idea but always think about how difficult it must have been for them. Given the Jim Crow laws giving the clan being so rapid in this part of the state mother used to tell stories about my grandfather he w sitting out on the Porch Man. What rifles just in case? Somebody tried to run them off this property so for me given what I know now I have no excuse not to be able to come down here and work with the state and work with the community and continue that legacy that has been a part of my family since eighteen sixty five. I knew about him purchasing this land in Jim Crow. I knew that story I knew about him. Holding onto the land you know I knew about black folks losing their land so I thought any hurdle that I had to chop was significantly less than what he did so I figured I could do something and I just wanted to do what he did so I wanted to do that. The trees just seemed like something we could do as a an honor of him since he worked with trees all of his life panel number twenty seven. Many men stayed behind until they could bring their families. North panel number thirty in every home people who had not gone north met and tried to decide if they should go north or not. I don't own property in New York City. But here it's like. I know that my mother played on this property. I know she walked this land another. My parents got married right over there on those stairs over there in nineteen fifty. One you don't feel like you know I'm stuck somewhere because I can come back here. Exist looking out there and seeing all my ancestors knowing the kind of work they did kind of sacrifices they may listen to the wind smell of those trees. I mean I come out here. I just feel peace peace. I don't have to do any better man. I just WANNA do justice. Well panel number sixty and the migrants kept coming By the time Barbara. Earl Thomas met Jacob Lawrence. He was settled in Seattle. As a tenured professor. At the University of Washington this was the nineteen seventies and though he became her mentor and Graduate Advisor HIS WIFE. Wendelin became her family Jacob treasured his relationship with his wife she had helped him create the migration series and that catapulted them both onto a journey of art and discovery that span there fifty nine years of marriage. There was a really intense respect between them about their work and he would say that you know part of how I help assess. My work is having Glen. Come in look at it when I'm ready to have her look at it and they would have discussion you know. Would you like me to visit your studio? And she said Yeah. Come over. Have something I want you to see. She take it out she show it to him and he would do the same. It wasn't a free for all. She couldn't just go into the studio and just start. You know Leveling her opinion that was not gonNA happen. Jacob Lawrence died in June two thousand of lung cancer. Jake never ask me to take care of Gwen. But I felt like you know he wasn't there so I get on the phone and I made a calendar and we had people here. I said if you said you're really their friends and you always about you know how much you love them. Here's your big chance. People like our former mayor Norman rice and his wife Constance Norman would come over and I said okay. You've got Thursday evening. You can pick her up. She likes to go and be with people who are fun and exciting and I year funding cycle team. So you guys come get her so he would come get her and people stepped up. They did their jobs. Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence died five years after her husband and two thousand five Jacob and Gwen had always intended to move back to New York Luther Days in place. They both considered home. But that never happened and so just as a migration have brought them together and set the course of their lives they would end up having another migration of sorts after death just occurred to me. I said it's time for you to go back. So I got their ashes which I had their ashes. I put them in my backpack. Then I had these friends. He's really wonderful friends at that also helped me take care of quitting. Jacob the flowers Bob and Mickey Flowers and they said you can't to yourself. I should okay then this so they decided that they were gonNA come with me. And then we were. GonNa do a memorial for Gwen at Saint John. The divine so I said No. You Take Gwen. And I'll take Jacob and don't let them out of your sight don't put them down. Let's not something we can leave on the airplane so we took them back. Took them to Saint John Devine which is where they are now and Harlem less than thirty blocks from where Jacob with Gwinnett aside painted the migration series and then we had At Radley spoke and a number of people spoke at the Memorial for Glenn and Jacob. And then they were interred there in the columbarian so they made it back haul. That's where they are our American icon story on the Migration Series Paintings by Jacob Lawrence was produced by Carl's got our associate producers Roslyn towards silliness and Lauren Francis and our visor was the Darpa Mirror. Pedro Raphael Rosado was our engineer. The migration series captions were read by Karen Chilton special. Thanks to the Phillips Collection Museum of African American history. Posi Regan Lanny Burton. Dorothy Jones Mary Jones and Christopher Johnson. Andrew Newman is studio three sixties senior editor. And our technical director the Sandra Lopez Montale Bay Jocelyn. Gonzales is our executive producer studio three sixties. American icons is supported by the National Endowment of the humanities and you can find all of our icon stories at studio three sixty dot org. I'm tariffs McKnight. Thanks for listening. Thanks for and you can subscribe to studio three six t wherever you get podcasts.

Jacob Armstead Lawrence Jacob Harlem New York City Patricia Hills New Negro Movement Laurence POWELL Harlem Hospital Harlem Lawrence America Langston Hughes director Moma Los Angeles County Museum of A Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence curt Anderson Harlem New York