22 Burst results for "Poynter Institute"

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

Wisconsin's Afternoon News with John Mercure

00:44 sec | 4 months ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio host, dies at 70

"Of Rush Limbaugh a day after cancer claimed the life of the country's preeminent conservative radio talk show host He came along at a time when am radio is in real trouble. Poynter Institute cell, Tompkins says Limbaugh saved the frequency FM radio became the choice for music. But am Radio ended up not really having the purpose. FCC rules Changes and Bill Clinton giving rise to limbo Conservative angled talk radio survived. But liberal talk radio died and and never came back again says they're just too all talk stations in America in 1960, the late eighties changes and Limbaugh payment. The way for the 1100 on the air. Come. 1995, G Miller. WTMJ news.

Poynter Institute Rush Limbaugh Limbaugh Tompkins Cancer FCC Bill Clinton America Miller Wtmj News
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 1 year ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
COVID-19 Misinformation Remains Difficult To Stop

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:11 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19 Misinformation Remains Difficult To Stop

"Fact checking organizations have performed heroics the corona virus facts alliance database now runs to more than five thousand entries. But who is actually reading it? Robin Listrik joins US now. He is a broadcast journalist. Former present of the world tonight on Radio Four Robin that five thousand debunking milestone by the corona virus facts alliance. It's organized by the POYNTER Institute. That's the reason we're talking today. They've learned something from scrolling through garbage belt. What coins stories are gaining? Traction what did we learn from that? I think we learned a couple of things I think. First of all we learn the people are desperate for explanations for something which frightens them. And that's something that goes back a very long time. I mean since the beginning of time up people have searched full an explanation things which come out of the blue. I mean you're the ancient Greeks believed in God's people later believed in witches spirits. Ghosts whatever you like. We learned people no longer believe experts quote unquote. Perhaps in the way that they used to there is a lot more skepticism out there. There's a lot most cynicism out that you yourself just mentioned president trump. I mean he has to best saga responsibility for this because he ever since she began to be active in the political arena. Talked about fake news. He talked about the lying press. He encouraged people deliberately and for his own political benefit not to believe facts but rather to believe his theories that has been dangerous. It strikes me though that some of the stories that the Poynter Institute survey has identified. Actually kind of go step beyond. I mean you know to each their own. Whatever gets you through the night I am not personally somebody who spends a lot of time concerned with what any given pope says things about anything but one of the most popular pieces of disinformation is one suggesting that. Pope Francis asked believe is to put a white handkerchief on their doorsteps to protect them from the plague. Now even someone as myself who would identify himself as pope skeptic. I can see that there is no way in a million years. Pope Francis is going to say that the people who believe that presumably big fans of Pope Francis. Why do they believe he would say something? So we'll beasley absurd. Well because he is somebody whom they respect more than they respect other sources of information they think the media light them they think politicians light of them if they are practicing loyal Catholics. They don't to believe the pope would lie to them. If you're somebody who wants to promulgate a ridiculous theory or ridiculous myth then you put it into the mouth of the pope do know that there will be some people who will believe it and there's one other thing here that's relevant Andrew. A lot of us believe things that come to us from people we regard as friends so if we are on social media we look at something that's been re tweeted by somebody who we know entrust we look at something on facebook that is being shed by somebody we know entrust we believe it. We don't often go back to the source so if you send me a tweet saying the pope said X. I'll believe it because I trust you more fool. You it might be said but is is the problem. Though beyond the disinformation itself in its beyond even people susceptibility to it's that it's that people want to believe disinformation. I'm reminded not for the first time Over quote by H L Mencken where he said the curse of man in the coals of his worst woes is his stupendous capacity for believing the incredible people. Actually want to think this stuff. How do you address that? Yeah well that is a hugely difficult issue. I mean I have an immense admiration for these fact checking organizations. I fear however that the work that they do doesn't actually have much of an impact because you've put your finger on it. People will believe what we want to believe. People believe what sort of fits into their view of how the world works and if they take the view the politicians lie to them. Look newspapers light to them. The journalist make things up then they will believe all of that and they would prefer to believe other people and now in the midst of a pandemic it is hugely dangerous. Because if people don't believe what the scientists say they then won't take the kind of actions that the scientists say we need to take to try to combat this virus and we will get us into a pretty bad place so it's dangerous. How TO COMBAT IT? I I the answer

Pope Francis United States Poynter Institute Pope Robin Listrik President Trump Facebook H L Mencken Beasley Andrew
The Loss of Local News - A Good Story

After The Fact

05:30 min | 1 year ago

The Loss of Local News - A Good Story

"I work right around the corner and this is where I run and grab. The paper grabbed my coffee and breakfast sandwich rate over there morning. Having a paper. Melissa bears morning routine includes buying her local newspaper the Berkshire Eagle at Palmer's variety store. Just down the street from her house where she can check in with neighbors she sees there. It's just another way. A newspaper brings her community together. But as we've been learning in this series on what's happening to local around the country more and more communities are losing their newspapers and the reporters who go to city council sessions at school board meetings and take pictures at the high school sports events. The Pew Research Center reports that the number of newsroom employees at newspapers dropped by forty seven percent between two thousand eight and two thousand eighteen. And that's our data point for this episode of after the fact the basic problem for local news in the making for a number of years on a unfortunately. It's gotten that much worse. Less view is the print. Advertising is gradually shrinking. Greatly and after a while circulation has started falling to while they're digital news income from advertising that now from subscriptions doesn't really make up the difference. That's Rick Edmonds. Who analyzes the media business for the POYNTER Institute a journalism think tank in Saint Petersburg Florida in this series? We've been telling you about the more than two thousand newspapers that have closed in this country over the past fifteen years but the financial cutbacks that rick talks about our having a big impact on the papers that remained to ban the number of papers that are shrinking are a lot greater than the ones that are actually gone out of business and many the ones that have gone out of business are very small. You know you may be in a metropolitan area looking in the paper. This fifty people producing into there used to be two hundred and skinnier. But I'm not sure if it was going to notice that well people were noticing it in western Massachusetts the Berkshire Eagle the daily paper that in one form or another has covered that bucolic bid of New England almost since the founding of this nation had been purchased by corporate owners twenty five years ago in recent years. It faced budget cut after budget cuts. There were fewer reporters and less news was covered. Then in two thousand sixteen a group of local investors took over the eagle they're expanding coverage and hiring reports. It's also countered to the national trends that we had to go up there and talk to people about it and what a good local paper means to them from. My Office is rates. You hear wall. That's Melissa Baragan. You heard her at the beginning of this episode buying her local paper. She has lived in the Berkshires for eight years. She relies on the Berkshire Eagle to get the word out to drive donations and dollars so her organization conserve the poorest in that region. I helped low income individuals in our community specifically children around winter time with our warm clothing program which we serve over two thousand children every year. So you care a lot about the fabric of your community the civic life here yes I do. Our community matters and I'm blessed because what we do. Every day is help people who are vulnerable or need. It really doesn't feel like work. It's the good work. What's the role of your newspaper? And everything you've just described the work you do and the civic life of Here in the BERKSHIRES. The warm clothing program has been in the Berkshires for thirty eight years. The newspaper Berkshire Eagle has always supported the program. When that article hits the paper we see a huge increase in donations. Cash DONATIONS NEW COAT DONATIONS NEW BOOT donations. Now have people calling me on the phone saying what can I do to help? How can I help? Are you still looking for sponsors? It just goes to show you how important the local paper reaching people who might not have access to their phones and social media so yeah. It is really important to this program. If the paper wasn't here what would it mean for your work? I think we would be missing out on a huge demographic of the community. I think a lot of our older community relies on the newspaper to get the information that they need. It's important to have these Local newspapers Berkshire Eagle to get in the hands of the people that might not have access to news. Or what's going on in their community? The paper's gone through some changes here and local ownership has returned in the last few years. Have you noticed a difference? I have actually. I can see a lot more community interest stories because I think the paper has been more local. You see what other people are doing positively in the berkshires beyond your work. What does the Eagle mean for you just as a resident of this community? I was thinking about the local newspapers and I went back to Pennsylvania my hometown or one of the first things I did was good a coffee shop. Amrita local paper said slake picking up a little slice of what's happening in this little spot in the SA- beauty of the paper savell digging deeper and getting to the real stories of and the pulse of of things and I feel like sometimes that's lost on the Internet

Berkshire Eagle Melissa Baragan Rick Edmonds Pew Research Center Poynter Institute New England Massachusetts SA Saint Petersburg Florida Pennsylvania
"poynter institute" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Here have things that have been charged against the degrees trunk. Trump trump is way over way way way over one direction. What happened Bloomberg mysterious? He seems to have fostered environment. Maybe that was a you know. Body probably be his word. Maybe people's Word Right. Is that very well? Hopefully John and then Biden. There's some touching accusation that sanders as far as I know there's no one said anything but I wonder if we look in a generation whether the the people who are now in their thirties whether the men who are now in their thirties. It's going to be the same thing where a lot of them will have had. Something in their past is a little bit a little bit iffy or worse or not. I think so. I think they will. I think my question is has an answer. Which is that. I don't think it will be the same. I and I do think I've seen a fair number of The training videos and things that corporations Make their employees go through and many of them are awful and you can when you watch them. You feel the people basically doing ten other tasks and just hitting the click bar to move on and move through it. And it's not very useful but I think there are companies and institutions. That are doing a better job than that. And the POYNTER institute is has put together a sexual harassment program for newsrooms that I watched and it was fantastic about power. And how power works in workplaces and all the different ways in which it works. Not just the person who's doing the assaulting but then also how the power dynamic changes as people get involved and it was incredibly instructive and I could as I was watching it. I could imagine somebody going into thinking like oh. I'm going to sit through this thing. And then having revelations not only with respect to the specific way to handle situations but then how to create a workplace environment in which those situations. Don't arrive the proactive Things you can do to just be more aware and mindful of relationships in power and how it's distributed and that all feld incredibly useful and also putting people in the mindset of Understanding power and how it works in the workplace which is just a a larger beneficial so to the extent that that stuff is spreading out through the culture from the next generation. I think there there will be actual learning that takes place As a result of this support for the gap is brought.

Bloomberg POYNTER institute sanders Biden harassment John
How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

BrainStuff

05:23 min | 1 year ago

How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

"Brain. GRAINSTUFF Lauren Bogle bomb here in January of Twenty Twenty bestselling novelist Stephen King and Don winslow took to twitter to make a surprising pledge. They offered to donate two hundred thousand dollars to charity. If Stephanie Grisham the Press Secretary for President Donald Trump agreed to take questions from the full White House. Press Corps for one hour. You're in the White House. Press briefing room. The offer reportedly was rejected by Grisham. WHO's since taking the job in June of two thousand nineteen has yet to hold even one former former White House press briefing? Her views expressed an interview with these sinclair. Broadcast Group is that the briefings are unnecessary because reporters get opportunities to put questions to trump himself sometimes over the roar of the presidential helicopter on the White House lawn for the time being at least the trump administration has abandoned what had been in an important part of White House. Press Corps is routine dating back to the late eighteen hundreds before the official position of White House. Press Secretary even existed. That's when President William McKinley. Kenley set up a workspace in the White House for reporters and sent his first personal secretary. John Addison Porter to give the correspondence what the White House Historical Association notes. where I'm I more or less regular briefings? The White House press briefing gradually evolved into a formal event from the time of president. Herbert Hoover in the late nineteen twenties and early thirties. He's to Linden Johnson's tenure in the mid to late sixties White House press secretary's held twice a day briefing sessions in their own offices according to Martha Joint Kumar Book managing the president's message the White House Communications Operation Richard Nixon though no fan of the press still thought the briefings were important enough that he had a swimming pool torn out so that he could convert the space into a meeting room for briefings. That area is now known as the James S. Brady press briefing room in honor of president. Ronald Reagan's press secretary who was seriously wounded during the attempt. On Reagan's life in Nineteen eighty-one during Bill Clinton's time in the White House in the nineteen nineties. Press Secretary Mike. McCurry decided to allow the daily press briefings to be televised that practice continued until the trump white house began barring cameras from briefings in two thousand seventeen before discontinuing them altogether. Oh we spoke by email but former C. N. N. White House correspondent Dan Lowthian who spent five years covering the Bush and Obama administrations. He said I think the briefings were useful full for a number of reasons. First of all it was an opportunity to get the White House response or thinking on an issue on camera rather than a written statement it allowed us to gang up on them around a question they might have been trying to avoid showing them dodge. An answer is sometimes the news briefings also put statements on the record for later. Comparison finally finally every now and then there would be breaking news and as happened after Osama bin Laden was caught lots of great details even if some turned out not to be true. Lowthian Dan who went on to found little park media and to become a visiting scholar at the School of Journalism at Northeastern University recalls that the format for the briefings was fairly constant. He said there was a certain order to who got called on briefings always started with the Associated Press and ended with a thank you from the Associated Press once in a while the press secretary would mix it up a bit but it usually happened around the same time each day and questions from the first two rows came in order. We also spoke by email with Tom. Tom Jones a senior media writer for the POYNTER Institute. A journalism education organization. He said while it's true that the president and his representatives often make themselves available bowl in informal settings such as the White House lawn. It's not the same as press. Briefings the format of shouting out questions under the sound of a whirling helicopter is not conducive to asking complicated policy questions nor pertinent. Follow up questions. The frenzied free for all of these much too brief informal interviews make it much harder to get into the topics. What's that require nuance and specifics? It's so much easier for the president to brush aside or ignore questions. He doesn't like when he's walking along the White House grounds when he or one of his representatives representatives are standing behind a podium a controlled setting they must face the questions that require long substantive answers as opposed to the one or two short sentences that suffice in those informal formal settings let view essentially is shared by a group of thirteen former White House press secretary and Foreign Service and military officials who published an opinion in peace on. CNN's website in January of twenty twenty calling for trump to restore the regular briefings in their view. Having to prepare for briefings helps the government to run better letter. They wrote the sharing of information known. As official guidance among government officials and agencies helps ensure that an administration speaks with one voice telling one story however compelling it might be Lowthian also sees the apparent end the briefings as unfortunate. He said it's a valid criticism that some reporters others use briefings to showboat. However I think when covering the White House briefings aren't important function that allow the public and reporters to maintain daily connections? Sometimes it's routine information other times. An odd question from the back of the room can turn into the story of the day even so Lowthian says journalists who cover the the administration will find a way to get stories he said this new normal might be unfortunate but not paralyzing. Reporters are in the business of getting information whether it comes from the mouth of his spokesperson or sources all across the beltway.

White House Press Secretary President Trump White House Historical Associa Press Corps C. N. N. White House Dan Lowthian Associated Press Stephanie Grisham Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Secretary Official Osama Bin Laden Lauren Bogle Twitter Herbert Hoover
"poynter institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"An Email last night from Michael richton wall. He is a professor at NYU. He was a guy who wrote white papers for communist for years. And then he finally woke up just recently. And he was like, whoa. Whoa. This theory for me this. No, this always ends in death squads is really bad and. He has he is woke. And he wrote me last night. He said, I saw your special any said Glen, you're right spot on the money. He said, but I've cracked the code on one thing he said, this is a different kind of socialism or authoritarianism, and I invited him to come on the show because he agrees with me. We're running out of time. Now, maybe he will be on with us. I hope early next week to explain his theory because I think he's right on the money, but time is of the essence because voices are being silenced. And I'm going to talk to you about that. With the Poynter institute did yesterday. Also what Facebook did yesterday it is bone chilling? Steven Crowder is going to be joining us here in just a few minutes because he looks like he and his four million YouTube followers are going to be banned from YouTube, Steven Crowder. All of that begins in one minute. This is the Glenn Beck program. When I talked to a little bit about.

professor Steven Crowder Michael richton wall YouTube Glen Glenn Beck NYU Poynter institute Facebook one minute
"poynter institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"LA now transmitting to south Tampa on FM. At one hundred two point nine FM. The Tampa Bay business journal had a great piece the other day on the Poynter institute, and what's happening with the Tampa Bay times, which is making some dramatic changes right now actually criteria joins us right now who had this story in the Tampa Bay business journal the other day, and actually it sounds like the Tampa Bay times is in some pretty deep trouble here. Well, we don't know the extent of the trouble. What we do know is that they defaulted over the summer on three loan payments to seventy five thousand dollars each. This is to two pointer institute. Right. It is to a trust that is controlled by the widow of the founder of the Poynter institute of Marian pointer was buried to Nelson Poynter who founded the Poynter institute, and he transferred the ownership of the times to that institute to ensure that it would always be locally owned and controlled now, we know that Tom Jones who wrote to sports for the times just left and went to the point or institute. And you've got a couple of guys that are going from the news portion and opinion over the sports section now. But there are a lot of changes in plus their layoffs should have been taking place in the newsroom, right? Yes. There we know that least around the lay offs that occurred. This year one was in April and was in November. Now, what happens here just gets wrapped up in the courts. How long could this process? Take your. Well, the times says they hope it can be resolved amicably. I mean, they they could pay their costs to balance the interests and remedy the loan and get out of the fault. So it could be it could be resolved tomorrow. It could it could take months. It just depends on their financial situation. Newspapers are hurting all across the country, and we've seen some that have folded already in in many major cities, and that's alternately going to happen because young people today don't read newspapers at all have spoken. The groups from ask young people does anybody really paper. Nah, we get everything online or get everything from social media. We read journals. Yeah. I think that really cuts to the heart of it. And I don't think it's just young people. I think baby boomers on down to their local newspaper. Unfortunately, they might look to Facebook and populated by posting a local newspaper, but they don't make that connection. I think people just aren't thinking about local news the way they used to they they literally think of their Facebook feed as their local store, I get I I get your stuff on online every day. And it's good stuff too. Picked up a lot of good information on the raise. And obviously I saw this piece that you had done in the in Tampa Bay business journal and just in in the short of it if you had to make a guess on how long the Tampa Bay times it's gonna last. What would you say? Oh, I don't have a crystal ball, Jack. I'm not I'm not gonna make a prediction on that. This is one of America's story Hughes paper that we're talking about. I think they've made some interesting business decisions over. The last couple of years when you look at the acquisition of the Tampa Tribune the previous loan by crystal financial, which was a lender of last resort. And then last summer the big re-financing that was financed by people like, Jeff finnick and Kiran Patel. So clearly they've gotten creative on the financing side before and I think it would be unwise to underestimate anyone think that this is going to end. But I I think these are dire times for all daily newspapers. Yeah. And they will be one of the last to go because they really are one of the better papers in the country. But Ashley, I certainly appreciate what you do. And what's Tampa Bay business journal does and I recommend anybody to grab it off. Online. Course, you can get the hard copy. But I just check it all out online because it's right there, and we'll be talking to you again soon. Awesome. Thank you so much Jack Chrysler for the Tampa Bay business journal. She's written some good stuff on transportation as well. So you went about it all wrong you set a day. And then you make an over under. You maker ask you ask you for an over under.

Tampa Bay business journal Tampa Bay Poynter institute Tampa Tampa Tribune Nelson Poynter Facebook Poynter institute of Marian pointer institute Jack Chrysler LA Ashley Tom Jones founder America Jeff finnick
"poynter institute" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"I am part of the resistance inside the Trump administration. That is a pretty provocative headline, and it sits above an op-ed published in the New York Times today. All we know about its author is that he or she is a senior official in the administration of US President, Donald Trump, Kelly McBride is immediate ethicist and senior vice president of the Poynter institute. We reached her earlier today in Saint Petersburg, Florida, MS, McBride. What was your initial reaction when you saw this op-ed today? I was blown away. I could not imagine the New York Times doing this until this moment. And I just think that they probably spent hours and hours days and days trying to decide if this was the right thing to do, and it's struck me as this is a historically significant action both politically in the country, but also for journalism for. The most significant news organization in the country to run an anonymous op Ed about the president. Can you walk us through the parts that most stood out for you and why? This is. So I guess, alarming too many people? Well, I mean, alarming significant game changing. I think there's a lot of different adjectives that you could use for this, and I'm not sure how to years ten years from now will look back on this moment and if we'll think, oh, this was a really great thing for the New York Times to do, or this was really foolish thing for the New York Times to do, but but the thing that stood out to me is it is anonymous, which is like a revolutionary war kind of journalism significance. We don't see in the paper of record anonymous claims about politicians. We see them using anonymous sources, allot. But to have it the full on op Ed that I think is the most significant thing..

New York Times senior vice president Kelly McBride Donald Trump Poynter institute Saint Petersburg US official Florida ten years
"poynter institute" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KTOK

"The ACLU to help get those two state questions past which. Decriminalize Went they went from felonies to, misdemeanors lots of, drug charges so and it's. It's beginning to help save the state some. Money, it's we're not putting. People in jail for, two. Hundred dollars. Worth. Of drugs so it is working. I believe so, I think? There needs to be more data gathered there's some questions over? The, data the state released and how much. The, actual savings were but I think you can go. To people, especially those the boots on. The. Grounds group, you know people in the front lines probation officers. Judges prosecutors in public defenders and they will tell you that it is beginning to show some progress what is. The Poynter institute do, this I know they do special topic seminars around the country but why did they, choose to. Do that here and doing they're doing several of them across across the country they're all they're doing the jail study across the country I think It's one of their big subjects for this. Year I think they chose Oklahoma City? Because it was one of the first in the country, that did this big Justice reform initiative an interesting thing about? It is it wasn't done through the religious community. Or things like that it was done through the business. Community and That, I think that surprised a lot of people that. The chamber was so supportive of it you know based on what you've told me tonight it makes Brian, monster shine program of seemed like it is right on target well and I think a lot of programs like. That can plug into this and and you know. Commissioner mon- may have been ahead of his time there's there's lots of ideas and programs that that dovetail into the Justice reinvestment. Initiative and can you know I I would much rather some kid nineteen year old kid that. Gets busted for forty dollars worth of pot I'd much rather, him being working than. Picking up trash exactly even if he goes back to you,.

ACLU Poynter institute Commissioner Oklahoma City mon Brian Hundred dollars forty dollars nineteen year
"poynter institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You list justice anthony kennedy spot on the supreme court shortlist includes would you need to know to seventh sixty decision on the united states supreme court the next few days and we'll be announcing it on monday what's now saying off the island were thirty one people pronounced next michael cohen pretty clear that he's looking for a deal is the deal with the president the special counsel am seven sixty talk breaking news let's try this real quick let's talk about authoritative news sources versus authoritative news sources so here's one for you infowars really you don't think info wars is got authority in any way shape or form go ahead no no why do you say that simply based on the hosts flint you talking to you talking about alex jones jones yes yes everything you know he comes out and says the these kids in thailand these are crisis actors like come on he did not say get out of here anywhere crisis actors close okay so here's here's an example okay you know that everybody looks to journalism school journalism schools like the poynter institute in journalism schools they understand they they get what is a trusted news and information source right they get it they understand it they.

united states president special counsel thailand poynter institute anthony kennedy michael cohen alex jones
"poynter institute" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"High profile suicide especially coverage which fixate on the gratuitous details of a person's death or you can take the word gratuitous out of there if you think that you know you don't wanna use that word especially coverage which fixate on details of a person's death can lead to more suicides it's called suicide contagion here is kelly mcbride vice president of the poynter institute quoted when we cover suicide or responsibly we actually make the problem worse because there are things in suicide stories that are scientifically proven to create the contagion effect now what's the answer to that my question to you is what what do we do about that i've called for and you know who agrees with me david hog the activists we don't agree on gun policy david haagen i but we both agree that people should stop covering school shootings in a certain certain way the way that they do with a big head shot of the evil school shooter all over the news for two days and then people coming in and various profiler is talking about the all the experiences at the school shooter had and then putting their social media accounts on on tv so everybody can look at what they said and then maybe even showing there the other day we were treated to the effect it wasn't that big of a story i was glad the way the news media covered the school shooter in parkland he they released his cellphone videos the prosecutors in the.

poynter institute kelly mcbride vice president david haagen two days
"poynter institute" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"This country there are certainly places where it is really dangerous to be a journalist where you are actually risking your life you know when you go and report on his store afghanistan russia i'm thinking about the united states charitable journalists murden afghanistan the united states on on the other hand generally speaking even under the era of trump when he is re tweeting memes about body slamming cnn at the entire network as a as a wrestler or something continues to not be particularly dangerous to do it here and i this i have a strong distaste for most awards tune that are given to journalists and ives too i think i think in general that the the stuff that like the poynter institute does on a regular basis their annual list of media corrections it's like far better and the the celebrate tori selfimportant selfcongratulatory selfserving overestimation of what it is that journalists do in this country and the role that they play in the country in terms of being the personification of truth is oftentimes it it runs counter to what might actually be useful in terms of creating a perception of what on earth it is that journalists do the fact that the public who read and consume this stuff it's not just that they should be read more watch more which is this massive campaign that was operated today what's don't just watch cnn read the washington times and the and the and the washington post and the wall street journal yada yada not the washington yeah not not that mooney but but it's not so much read more and listen more i think that there is room for scrutiny and i think highlighting the places where the press has been wrong or mistaken where they've engaged in a lot of rank speculation where they've beat the drum on this russia trump collusion narrative so far as i'm concerned it in ways that don't make a great deal of sense or at least don't seem to eventually conform to the facts on ways that they've made errors in a particular direction consistently on places where they've they've echoed one another stories with these breaking news things that turn out to either not be breaking news or just turn out to be not true because we got the wrong dates there is an incurease nece about the the.

russia united states cnn poynter institute the washington times mooney afghanistan ives washington post wall street journal washington
"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The line that's interesting conversation and thanks for having me i want to talk about what has actually happened in tampa in your area and extract lessons from it because i used to live in tampa and you talk about local media disappearing tampa was one of the most vibrant news centers in the united states you have the tampa tribune creative loafing this and of course the you know the venables saint petersburg times and we have just seen a dramatic reduction there tell us a little bit about what happened in tampa yeah i was actually a participant in the early stage of this as managing editor of what was then the saint pete times now the tampa bay times and there's been a there there was a very extended competition between the two and heavy investment in in a bureau that covered tampa pretty thoroughly and ultimately the tampa bay times which is connected to pointer i should disclose yeah of crop bought a bought the tampa tribune and folded it so so essentially the tampa bay times is trying to serve this entire metro area and and you're right about creative loafing to like a lot of all weeklies it's it's had its own version of a lot of financial pressure a lot of loss of advertising so it's not what it used to be and if i remember correctly the saint petersburg times as a nonprofit that's almost right it's phone by the poynter institute which is a nonprofit for journalists but the times itself is a four prophet and they pay taxes and all that thing well as we talk about money we have seen a real dramatic decrease as far as what what reporters are paid when they when they enter we've also seen in this has been a central theme in consolidation examples like that of diane ignorance serena who she is she's the former editorial page editor for the tampa tribune she then took over the content creator position at w usf the npr station and she essentially left to start her own venture from there and it presented itself is kind of this uplifting news for the area but in many cases it was just sponsored content that she didn't disclose to her readers all the.

tampa united states managing editor poynter institute editor npr station venables saint petersburg saint petersburg diane content creator
"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of dollars in real estate benefited from the agency's loan programs news of hannity's investments first reported by the guardian newspaper troubles kelly mcbride vice president of the poynter institute mcbride says it is standard practice to disclose potential conflicts of interest and many news organizations including npr make these policies publicly available it is a good form of accountability and transparency but fox does not publish their standards and i have never seen them this comes just after revelations at hannity was a client of trump attorney michael cohen who's home office and hotel room were raided by the fbi as mcbride notes hannity rayleigh defended both men on air without disclosing that connection there seemed to be so many conflicts of interest not only his relationship with trump but his relationship with trump's attorney and now his business arrangements that actually involve backing from the federal government a fox news spokeswoman declined to comment on its newsrooms conflict of interest policies instead she referred to hannity statement on his website which reads in part i had no role in or response ability for any hud involvement in any of these investments fox also points to hannity's own radio program in march in which he discusses in general his investments with henseler financial affirm that handled his real estate investments i have used them for financial dealings all of them full disclosure and we've done some business deals together and so however fox's lack of transparency about its own rules contributes to the problem you kennedy npr news washington.

hannity vice president fox michael cohen fbi trump attorney washington kelly mcbride poynter institute npr fox news
"poynter institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Three one seventy three nine ninety three ninety three facebook tony cats radio speaking of facebook this is cheryl activism now sure oxen has made a name for herself from her days at cbs when she was trying to report on on on a whole host of subjects and they would keep shutting her down they didn't want her getting certain stories out it was it was rather crazy what had happened to her over there at cbs that she had to resign from from cbs stories about her computer being hacked and being compromised because the basically they didn't want her sharing certain stories on on cbs it's really unbelievable stories we're of course about president obama that's where the stories were specifically operation fast and furious and a whole bunch of other subjects she declared at the time that it was amicable she's she's had much more to say since and she went through when facebook talks about fake news who would be the judge of fake news listen to this is books new plan to help crack down on fake news included collaborating with poynter institute's politic fact abc news fat check dot org dissociated press and snaps now this audience probably already knows the possible perils of all that from an atrocity standpoints relying on some of the very organizations that have gotten caught in compromising situations or engaged in transactional journalism or reported biased and incorrect news themselves let's take abc for instance abc has been accused in the past of shelving or skewing negative stories about its corporate parent the walt disney company abc misreported that there was a possible link between the conservative tea party and the killer in.

facebook cbs obama poynter institute abc cheryl president walt disney company
"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Joining me now from saint petersburg florida is l tompkins senior faculty member for broadcasting and online at the poynter institute for media studies a nonprofit journalism school al welcomed on point before i get to you pam an ala ad liked to go back to this video because i want to make sure that our our listeners know what we're talking about we we use it a little bit earlier in the show timothy burke video editor video editor for the sports news in blob website website deadspin slice together footage of anchors at the saint clair broadcast group these television stations across the country they were reading the same statement about fake news and here's sound from that video that was posted over the weekend he'll media outlets publish the same fake stories without checking facts i the sharing of biased and false news paul to comment on i and the cacophony of voices goes on here's a little bit more from that deadspin montage of those anchors dangerous democracy this is extremely dangerous tower democracy this is extremely dangerous to our democracy this is extremely dangerous to our democracy is extremely dangerous to our democracy and al tompkins i want to go to you first extremely dangerous tour democracy the message from tv news anchors it seems almost ironic is this message dangerous tar democracy will so far you've called this a fake news message new called alarming and i think that's interesting that we would have a discussion about this in use words like that let me tell you what a top corporate official at sinclair told me this morning this message they called it an image spot basically a commercial was the product of a national survey of twenty two hundred news consumers including six and claire markets around the country and what they wanted to know is what viewers of local news are.

faculty member poynter institute editor paul official sinclair saint petersburg timothy burke saint clair claire
"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This episode of on point is supported by 23 in me now through valentine's day get 20 percent off each 23 in me dna kit plus free gift wrap go to 23 in me dot com slash on point today from wbur boston an npr i'm indira lakhshman on of the poynter institute for media studies and this is on point in the news this week before dawn cracked over washington congress passed a four hundred billion dollar temporary budget deal hours earlier republican senator and deficit hawk rand paul tried to sink it there is no oversight you realize what they are passing is all of the money glommed together and one drill no one will read the bill no one knows what's in it and there is no reform and the bill on wednesday house minority leader nancy pelosi stood tall for the dreamers in four inch heels in a so low filibuster style recordbreaking speech for the s eight hours to have had the privilege of reaching the testimony of so many dreamers is still have more but how here to cement white house damage control after a top aide resigns following reports of abuse by two exwives which his bosses allegedly knew about white house deputy press secretary rajshahi off faced the press yesterday we all could have done better over the last few days in dealing with the situation but the emerging reports were not reflective of the individual who will come to know this hour on point our weekly news roundtable with eliana johnson van newkirk and jack beatty you can join us on air or online can you believe it a second government shutdown albeit for a few hours in less than a month will the new budget avert new problems or lawmakers just kicking the can down the road till march join us any time at on point radio dot org or on twitter and facebook at on point radio joining us now from washington as eliana johnson national political reporter for politico eliana welcome great to have you hi india are great.

"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This episode of on point is supported by 23 in me now through valentine's day get 20 percent off each 23 in me dna kit plus free gift wrap go to 23 in me dot com slash on point today from wbur boston and npr i'm indira lakhshman honor the poynter institute on the boston globe and this is on point clergy sex abuse and who turned a blind eye is shaking the catholic church again this time pope francis is at the center of the storm the pontiff who declared zero tolerance for abuse shocked catholics and chile last month when he said victims had no proof and had slandered of bishop they accused of witnessing and covering up crimes against minors now members of the pope's own commission for the protection of minors say they gave pope francis a chilean survivors letter detailing a cover up three years ago up next on point just pope francis have a blind spot on clergy sex abuse you can join us on air or online what's your take on what's unfolding in chile and at the vatican do you think the pope has done enough to root out clergy who enabled or or covered up abuse join us any time it on point radio dot org or on twitter and facebook at on point radio first reagan to talk about some of what pope francis has done in a recent trip to chile here's pope francis when he spoke at the vatican embassy in chile in january about the molestation of children by priests nobu the money for throw.

valentine wbur boston poynter institute pope francis chile twitter vatican embassy indira lakhshman boston facebook reagan three years 20 percent
"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is one a i'm joshua johnson were beginning the new year looking ahead to twenty eight team with three reporters who are covering the world very closely christian carl of washington post indira lutchman on of the boston globe and the poynter institute and you'll huge reason of vox we were talking about north korea and the potential for some kind of armed conflict are all out war between north korea and the us certainly not a scenario that i think most of the 7 billion people on the planet want some say that it is inevitable christian would what do you think well with the with the prospect of that actually be if the us got into a shooting war with north korea well it's a grim prospect i was admire life is newsweek correspondent i covered the story for about five years and nice spoke to lots of defectors people in the in the military community my also went to north korea several times i kandara and the one thing that comes through very clearly is that north korea has a tremendous capacity to respond militarily to anything that we might do and that is because that it there are several reasons for that one is that they have an enormous amount of conventional weaponry artillery tubes and rockets which are trained on seoul of the capital of north korea which is an enormous city and just about twenty miles south of the demilitarized zones her within easy range of the north koreans almost all north korean military installations are underground some of them buried deep underground during the korean war we had air superiority we bombed the hell out of them and they'd never forgotten that lesson so everything that's important is underground inside of mountain or something else so even if you hit them very very hard they will have a lot of assets they can deploy in retaliation and they don't necessarily have to target us troops they don't even necessarily have to target anything they can just throw enormous amounts of metal over the bordering kill tens of thousands of south korean civilians so any scenario you have is going to be a horrific scenario and endure i wonder if you could speak also.

joshua johnson indira lutchman poynter institute north korea us seoul korean war washington boston newsweek north korean five years
"poynter institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Walmart dot com the next morning it have been removed from t spring dot com as well you know they tshirt guy i see video for folks and were actor rallies for then candidate donald trump wearing this tshirt in sort of a brought to mind sort of this feeling in the country among some people about journalism how dangerous has a tshirt like this and a thought like this well we live unfortunately in us the society where there's been a complete breakdown of civil discourse and this tshirt is just one symptom more microcosm of that uh imagine if he will inserting any other now in place of the war journalist in that freights uh growth tree woman some somebody required growth tree teacher some assembly required there were be universal outrage so what makes it acceptable to save broke tree journalist some assembly required it's not acceptable and it's open season on journalists in america today your according to the us press freedom tracker which is the archive of record for threats on press freedom in the united states thirty five journalists so far in 2017 and then physically assaulted merely for doing their jobs so we live in an inflammatory climate to say the least and these tshirts were just unacceptable it seems like the uh the inflaming of the country continues as well just as recently as yesterday steve bannon was a is down in a ballot bama campaigning for the senate candidate the more referring to journalists again as the opposition party them the president the united states when he took office called journalist enemies of the state that kind of thing is is it resonating among the country how do you how to journalist how does the country even battle something like that well sadly it is resonating and it's resonating with a significant segment of the population uh a new study by the poynter institute in florida uh released for the past few days said forty four percent of americans they survey believe that the news media make up stories about president trump uh and that simply is not true uh so yeah it's resonating it's it's not a good time uh in in in terms of.

Walmart donald trump united states president poynter institute florida news media america steve bannon senate forty four percent
"poynter institute" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"poynter institute" Discussed on Trumpcast

"Relationship with them i do a early very early morning media newsletter that goes out as a free email by the poynter institute and goes out or roughly around 800 am eastern time and i know about a year year year and a half ago out of the blue vanity fair called and asked if they could cohost the newsletter so i add that took about one and a half second has to say yeah um and uh what would that basically means is that after i have a move that newsletter and after i've waking up uh the kids wake up the kids and goo breakfast and get him to on the school bus i'd end the circle back home and revise it slightly put it into the vanity fair system so that's five times a week i'm you know spit of unknown quantity i had dental long piece for them last summer when everybody assumed that uh hillary clinton win on um former journalist turned author and um fulltime clinton supporter sydney blumenthal that was a long long peace so they had asked about my doing other stuff i know i've got a day job five guide kids sand at one point i i just sent basically a oneline note saying you know what about alas newspaper war and the response came in about five minutes it is a great piece i i ran off a litany of major moments in the intro just in the last few weeks i forgot to mention a couple wild once the printing in full in the washington post of transcripts of phone calls between the president.

poynter institute president hillary clinton sydney blumenthal washington five minutes