17 Burst results for "Postmaster General Ron Stroman"

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Infusion would be as a band-aid on agency's longer term financial problems in two thousand six congress passed by voice. Vote legislation requiring the usps to prefund. Its employees retirement healthcare benefits a requirement that other entity public or private must meet and that costs the agency more than five billion dollars per year and twenty nineteen. The progressive institute for policy studies. Noted that without this mandate the usps would have been profitable for six years in february. The democrat led house passed a bill. Eliminating the requirement bought. the republican led. Senate did not follow up. Fixing the agency's endemic structural problems requires congressional action but with a hobbled economy and the challenging logistics of vaccination distributions. It is difficult to imagine. Reform of the usps clearing the top of the legislative agenda but postal advocates. See reasons for optimism. The postal service remains overwhelmingly popular with the american public. So a reform agenda could attract. Bipartisan support the. Usps is the one thing in america. We seem to agree on says. Jim sauber the chief of staff of the national association of letter carriers. It strikes me that if you want to build trust and momentum the postal service will be a great place to start. Biden's transition team has also already assembled a postal service review committee that has reached out to usps senior management the leaders of the postal unions and trade associations and later staffers on capitol hill sauber. Who is a member of biden's review team recalled trump assembling a similar committee for years ago. But said they never reached out to his union. The review team is being led by former deputy postmaster general ron stroman who resigned shortly after two. Joyce appointment the biden administration can help set a very different political tone. Says diamonstein the head of a p w it's.

Usps progressive institute for poli Jim sauber congress national association of letter Senate postal unions and trade associ Biden america biden ron stroman biden administration Joyce diamonstein
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:15 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

"A glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I gotta one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then they said the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point I'm reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company appears to lead the pack for getting a green light for its covert 19 vaccine. Pfizer, the company CEO, has hinted that preliminary results from its vaccine trial could be available as soon as the end of this month. NPR's Joe Palka looks at how the Pfizer vaccine made it to the front of the line. The race to find a vaccine for covert 19 started in mid January. That's when Chinese scientists published the genetic sequence of the Corona virus, causing the disease. At the time. No one even knew if it was possible to make a vaccine against this new viral invader. When I spoke to Pfizer's chief scientific officer for viral vaccines at the start of May this year, he was sounding confident, I think is a very good chance. We'll have Alexey Phil. Dormant, sir says Pfizer's advantage came from a strategic partnership it made with the German biotech company by on Tech. The two companies had been working on a flu vaccine. Using a new kind of technology based on the virus is Gene's dormant, sir says Buy on Tech was able to quickly refocus its research from flew to the Corona virus, literally a matter of swapping out of the jail and swapping in A carnivorous hygiene. The SARS corona virus. Spike gene is the key to making a covert 19 vaccine. Dormant, sir says Buy on Tech quickly came up with vaccine candidates and then what requires a much greater resource and infrastructure. We could come in and really start to pitching their Fizer organized initial safety testing of several different versions of the vaccine. In May, We started with four different agents at three different doses, each first, unlike is one of the scientists who tested the Pfizer vaccine candidates. She's at the University of Maryland Centre for vaccine development, she says. Normally testing all those different versions, and all those different doses would have taken years but for the covert vaccine, they did it in four months, so we're just moving very quickly. Part of the reason they were able to finish so fast was a new technique for measuring how well a volunteer's immune system responded to the vaccine. A young She at the University of Texas Medical branch at Galveston developed the technique. He found a way to tag genes in the virus, so they light up when they infected cells in the lab. You don't have to wait for 45 days, and the computer calculates the data You wish it just like a very rapid by the end of July fighter was ready to start large scale testing in humans. The company has now enrolled some 44,000 volunteers in a trial to show that the vaccine can prevent disease in someone exposed to the Corona virus and isn't likely to cause any rare health problems. It's a huge logistical undertaking. But one Edward Walsh from the University of Rochester, says Fizer is quite capable of they've got a well oiled system for testing vaccines at various stages of their development, even though other companies started large efficacy studies around the same time University of Maryland's Kirsten like says it's not surprising fighter may get results first. Visor's incredibly organized and is always like a couple steps ahead. Planning where they want to go developing vaccine during a pandemic is tough and like, says it's impossible to ignore the politics that have been swirling around the effort. President Trump has accused regulators of trying to slow down the approval process to thwart his re election bid. Like, says politics hasn't invaded the actual research from boots on the ground. Getting these studies done. It's 100% science, and that's been super rewarding. It's possible that Pfizer may have enough evidence that their vaccine works before the end of the month. At which point the company could go to the FDA and asked for permission to distribute it to the public. FDA has said its review could take weeks. But for his part visors Phil Dormant, sir says That's time well spent. Having an external review of the data Pfizer has collected is essential for the public to be convinced that the vaccine is safe and actually works. I work for a pharmaceutical company. I'm also consumer, So I'm picking myself. On the other hand, I would want someone else to verify that as well. And just to provide a little perspective. Everything about developing a vaccine for covert 19 is moving faster than usual from creating the vaccine candidates to testing them. Getting them ready for FDA is regulatory review a review that will also likely go much faster than usual. It still may not seem fast enough to sum, But for the people used to working in this field, it's been nothing short of remarkable. Show Palka NPR news. In the late.

Pfizer flu vaccine NPR FDA Ron Stroman Allegheny County SARS Gwinnett County Alexey Phil Joe Palka University of Maryland Centre Pennsylvania Galveston President Trump chief scientific officer CEO
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:19 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think is a form of voter suppression. There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I go to one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the front. Then this is the main system. I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker. Today. When you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, We've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point. I'm reasonably well, Sherman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election liken Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company appears to lead the pack for getting a green light for its covert 19 vaccine. Pfizer, the company CEO, has hinted the preliminary results from its vaccine trial could be available as soon as the end of this month. NPR's Joe Palka looks at how the Pfizer vaccine made it to the front of the line. The race to find a vaccine for covert 19 started in mid January. That's when Chinese scientists published the genetic sequence of the Corona virus, causing the disease. At the time. No one even knew if it was possible to make a vaccine against this new viral invader. When I spoke to Pfizer's chief scientific officer for viral vaccines at the start of May this year, he was sounding confident, I think is a very good chance we'll have of Phil. Dormant, sir says fighters advantage came from a strategic partnership it made with the German biotech company Buy on Tick. The two companies had been working on a flu vaccine. Using a new kind of technology based on the virus is Gene's dormant, sir says Buy on Tech was able to quickly refocus its research from flew to the Corona virus, literally a matter of swapping out of the game and swapping in A carnivorous Peggy, The star's Corona virus. Spike Gene is the key to making a covert 19 vaccine. Dormant, sir says Buy on Tech quickly came up with vaccine candidates and then what requires a much greater resource and infrastructure. We could come in and really start to pitching their Fizer organized initial safety testing of several different versions of the vaccine. In May, We started with four different agents at three different Justin's, each first, unlike is one of the scientists who tested the Pfizer vaccine candidates. She's at the University of Maryland Centre for vaccine development, she says. Normally testing all those different versions, and all those different doses would have taken years but for the covert vaccine, they did it in four months, so we're just moving very quickly. Part of the reason they were able to finish so fast was a new technique for measuring how well a volunteer's immune system responded to the vaccine. Hey, young. She at the University of Texas Medical branch at Galveston developed the technique. He found a way to tag genes in the virus, So they light up when they infected cells in the lab. You don't have to wait for 45 days, and the computer calculates the data. You wish it just like a very rapid by the end of July fighter was ready to start large scale testing in humans. The company has now enrolled some 44,000 volunteers in a trial to show that the vaccine can prevent disease and someone exposed to the Corona virus and isn't likely to cause any rare health problems. It's a huge logistical undertaking. But one Edward Walsh from the University of Rochester, says Fizer is quite capable of they've got a well oiled system for testing vaccines at various stages of their development, even though other companies started large efficacy studies around the same time University of Maryland's Kirsten like says it's not surprising fighter may get results first. Visor's incredibly organized and is always like a couple steps ahead. Planning where they want to go developing vaccine during a pandemic is tough and like, says it's impossible to ignore the politics that have been swirling around the effort. President Trump has accused regulators of trying to slow down the approval process to thwart his reelection bid. But like says politics hasn't invaded the actual research from boots on the ground. Getting these studies done. It's 100% science, and that's being super rewarding. It's possible that Pfizer may have enough evidence that their vaccine works before the end of the month. At which point the company could go to the FDA and asked for permission to distribute it to the public. FDA has said its review could take weeks. But for his part, Pfizer's Phil Dormant sir says that's time well spent. Having an external review of the data Pfizer has collected is essential for the public to be convinced that the vaccine is safe and actually works. I worked for pharmaceutical company. I'm also consumer. So until you pick it myself on the other end, I would want someone else to verify that as well. And just to provide a little perspective. Everything about developing a vaccine for covert 19 is moving faster than usual. From creating the vaccine candidates to testing them to getting them ready for FDA is regulatory review a review that will also likely go much faster than usual. It still may not seem fast enough to sum, But for the people used to working in this field, it's been nothing short of remarkable. Show Palka NPR news. In.

Pfizer flu vaccine FDA NPR Allegheny County Gwinnett County Ron Stroman Joe Palka University of Maryland Centre Pennsylvania Galveston Sherman Gene President Trump CEO
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:41 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

"Early than ever before, way more at 2.5 weeks before Election Day, Some states are already up to a third of their total turnouts from 2016. That's being driven by absentee ballot expansion all over the country because of the pandemic and a surge of in person early voting, But not everything has gone smoothly. We've seen long lines in Georgia and Texas and tens of thousands of mistakes with mail ballots. Joining us now to talk about all of this is NPR's Miles parks who covers voting. Hey, miles high there. So just how big has the early voting this year? It's been huge, more than 17. Million people have voted already, according to this database compiled by University of Florida professor Michael McDonald, and it's hard to really overstate how unprecedented that is. You know, it's about five times as many people who had voted at the same time in the 2016 cycle. Target smart. This data firm that works with Democrats has done some analysis on the initial numbers has been significantly more Democrats than Republicans, which isn't that surprising when you consider you know the sort of rhetoric President Trump specifically is used about vote by mail, But there are also some other interesting trends. You know, we're seeing more than seven times as many African American voters at this point now, as opposed to 2016 Which seems to be driven by this increase in early voting access in states with higher black populations like North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia. That's interesting. Well, we have been seeing pictures of these long lines at many of these early polling places. Can you talk about how smoothly the vote has been going so far? Yeah, There's clearly been some hiccups with in person and with vote by mail options, it seems like computer problems have contributed to a lot of the in person delays that people have seen photos off in Georgia. The database used to check people in was slowed down because of all of this traffic on the website. There were similar stories in Texas Houston Public Media's Elizabeth Tro Vel spoke to a voter named Renee, who spent nearly four hours in line going to three different precincts. I cry. I frankly think it's a form of voter suppression. There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I gotta one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then they said the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point I'm reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company

Georgia Elizabeth Tro Vel NPR Michael McDonald Texas Texas Houston University of Florida President North Carolina professor Renee Virginia
Absentee-Ballot Expansion Promotes Early Voting This Year

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 4 months ago

Absentee-Ballot Expansion Promotes Early Voting This Year

"Early than ever before, way more at 2.5 weeks before Election Day, Some states are already up to a third of their total turnouts from 2016. That's being driven by absentee ballot expansion all over the country because of the pandemic and a surge of in person early voting, But not everything has gone smoothly. We've seen long lines in Georgia and Texas and tens of thousands of mistakes with mail ballots. Joining us now to talk about all of this is NPR's Miles parks who covers voting. Hey, miles high there. So just how big has the early voting this year? It's been huge, more than 17. Million people have voted already, according to this database compiled by University of Florida professor Michael McDonald, and it's hard to really overstate how unprecedented that is. You know, it's about five times as many people who had voted at the same time in the 2016 cycle. Target smart. This data firm that works with Democrats has done some analysis on the initial numbers has been significantly more Democrats than Republicans, which isn't that surprising when you consider you know the sort of rhetoric President Trump specifically is used about vote by mail, But there are also some other interesting trends. You know, we're seeing more than seven times as many African American voters at this point now, as opposed to 2016 Which seems to be driven by this increase in early voting access in states with higher black populations like North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia. That's interesting. Well, we have been seeing pictures of these long lines at many of these early polling places. Can you talk about how smoothly the vote has been going so far? Yeah, There's clearly been some hiccups with in person and with vote by mail options, it seems like computer problems have contributed to a lot of the in person delays that people have seen photos off in Georgia. The database used to check people in was slowed down because of all of this traffic on the website. There were similar stories in Texas Houston Public Media's Elizabeth Tro Vel spoke to a voter named Renee, who spent nearly four hours in line going to three different precincts. I cry. I frankly think it's a form of voter suppression. There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I gotta one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then they said the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point I'm reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company

Georgia NPR Allegheny County Ron Stroman Renee Texas Michael Mcdonald Elizabeth Tro Vel Gwinnett County Texas Houston University Of Florida President Trump North Carolina Professor Pennsylvania Virginia
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:12 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

"Voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I go to one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here, they say is the printer. Then he says, the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this the tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker. Today. When you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point I'm reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company appears to lead the pack for getting a green light for its covert 19 vaccine. Pfizer, the company CEO, has hinted that preliminary results from its vaccine trial could be available as soon as the end of this month. NPR's Joe Palka looks at how the Pfizer vaccine made it to the front of the line. The race to find a vaccine for covert 19 started in mid January. That's when Chinese scientists published the genetic sequence of the Corona virus, causing the disease. At the time. No one even knew if it was possible to make a vaccine against this new viral invader. When I spoke to Pfizer's chief scientific officer for viral vaccines at the start of May this year, he was sounding confident, I think is a very good chance we'll have of Phil. Dormant, sir says Pfizer's advantage came from a strategic partnership it made with the German biotech company by on Tech. The two companies had been working on a flu vaccine. Using a new kind of technology based on the virus is Gene's dormant, sir says Buy on Tech was able to quickly refocus its research from flew to the Corona virus, literally a matter of swapping out the jeans and swapping in A carnivorous G. The star's Corona virus. Spike Gene is the key to making a covert 19 vaccine. Dormant, sir says Buy on Tech quickly came up with vaccine candidates and then what requires a much greater resource and infrastructure. We could come in and really start to pitching their Fizer organized initial safety testing of several different versions of the vaccine. In May, We started with four different agents at three different doses, each first, unlike is one of the scientists who tested the Pfizer vaccine candidates. She's at the University of Maryland Centre for vaccine development, she says. Normally testing all those different versions, and all those different doses would have taken years but for the covert vaccine, they did it in four months, so we're just moving very quickly. Part of the reason they were able to finish so fast was a new technique for measuring how well a volunteer's immune system responded to the vaccine. Hey, young. She at the University of Texas Medical branch at Galveston developed the technique. He found a way to tag genes in the virus, So they light up when they infected cells in the lab. You don't have to wait for 45 days, and the computer calculates the data. You wish it just like a very rapid by the end of July fighter was ready to start large scale testing in humans. The company has now enrolled some 44,000 volunteers in a trial to show that the vaccine can prevent disease and someone exposed to the Corona virus and isn't likely to cause any rare health problems. It's a huge logistical undertaking. But one Edward Walsh from the University of Rochester, says Fizer is quite capable of they've got a well oiled system for testing vaccines at various stages of their development, even though other companies started large efficacy studies around the same time University of Maryland's Kirsten like says it's not surprising fighter may get results first. Visor's incredibly organized and is always like a couple steps ahead. Planning where they want to go developing vaccine during a pandemic is tough and like, says it's impossible to ignore the politics that have been swirling around the effort. President Trump has accused regulators are trying to slow down the approval process to thwart his re election bid. Like, says politics hasn't invaded the actual research from boots on the ground. Getting these studies done. It's 100% science, and that's been super rewarding. It's possible that Pfizer may have enough evidence that their vaccine works before the end of the month. At which point the company could go to the FDA and asked for permission to distribute it to the public. FDA has said its review could take weeks. But for his part visors Phil Dormant, sir says That's time well spent. Having an external review of the data Pfizer has collected is essential for the public to be convinced that the vaccine is safe and actually works. I work for a pharmaceutical company. I'm also consumer. So you have taken myself on the other end. I would want someone else to verify that as well. And just to provide a little perspective. Everything about developing a vaccine for covert 19 is moving faster than usual from creating the vaccine candidates to testing them. To getting them ready for FDA is regulatory review a review that will also likely go much faster than usual. It still may not seem fast enough to sum, But for the people used to working in this field, it's been nothing short of remarkable. Show Palka NPR news. In.

Pfizer flu vaccine NPR FDA Ron Stroman Allegheny County Gwinnett County Joe Palka University of Maryland Centre Pennsylvania Galveston Gene Georgia President Trump CEO University of Maryland
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"There's no way there should be a glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I go to one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then he says, the main system I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company appears to lead the pack for getting a green light for its covert 19 vaccine. Pfizer, the company CEO, has hinted the preliminary results from its vaccine trial could be available as soon as the end of this month. NPR's Joe Palka looks at how the Pfizer vaccine made it to the front of the line. The race to find a vaccine for covert 19 started in mid January. That's when Chinese scientists published the genetic sequence of the Corona virus, causing the disease. At the time. No one even knew if it was possible to make a vaccine against this new viral invader. When I spoke to Pfizer's chief scientific officer for viral vaccines at the start of Nay this year, he was sounding confident, I think is a very good chance we'll have of Phil. Dormant, sir says Pfizer's advantage came from a strategic partnership it made with the German biotech company by on Tech. The two companies had been working on a flu vaccine. Using a new kind of technology based on the virus is Gene's dormant, sir says Buy on Tech was able to quickly refocus its research from flew to the Corona virus, literally a matter of swapping out the jeans and swapping in A carnivorous Peggy, the SARS Corona virus. Spike Gene is the key to making a covert 19 vaccine. Dormant, sir says Buy on Tech quickly came up with vaccine candidates and then what requires a much greater resource and infrastructure. We could come in and really start to pitching their Fizer organized initial safety testing of several different versions of the vaccine. In May, We started with four different agents at three different Justin's each fears then like is one of the scientists who tested the Pfizer vaccine candidates. She's at the University of Maryland Centre for vaccine development, she says. Normally testing all those different versions, and all those different doses would have taken years but for the covert vaccine, they did it in four months, so we're just moving very quickly. Part of the reason they were able to finish so fast was a new technique for measuring how well a volunteer's immune system responded to the vaccine. Hey, young. She at the University of Texas Medical branch at Galveston developed the technique. He found a way to tag genes in the virus, so they light up when they infected cells in the lab. You don't have to wait for 45 days, and the computer calculates the data You wish it's just like a very rapid by the end of July fighter was ready to start large scale testing in humans. The company has now enrolled some 44,000 volunteers and a trial to show that the vaccine can prevent disease in someone exposed to the Corona virus and isn't likely to cause any rare health problems. It's a huge logistical undertaking. But one Edward Walsh from the University of Rochester, says Fizer is quite capable of they've got a well oiled system for testing vaccines at various stages of their development, even though other companies started large efficacy studies around the same time University of Maryland's Kirsten like says it's not surprising fighter may get results first. Visor's incredibly organized and is always like a couple steps ahead. Planning where they want to go developing a vaccine during a pandemic is tough and like, says it's impossible to ignore the politics that have been swirling around the effort. President Trump has accused regulators are trying to slow down the approval process to thwart his re election bid. Like, says politics hasn't invaded the actual research from boots on the ground. Getting these studies done. It's 100% science, and that's been super rewarding. It's possible that Pfizer may have enough evidence that their vaccine works before the end of the month. At which point the company could go to the FDA and asked for permission to distribute it to the public. FDA has said its review could take weeks. But for his part, Pfizer's Phil Dormant sir says That's time well spent. Having an external review of the data Pfizer has collected is essential for the public to be convinced that the vaccine is safe and actually works. I work for a pharmaceutical company, but I'm also consumer, so I think of myself. On the other hand, I would want someone else to verify that as well. And just to provide a little perspective. Everything about developing a vaccine for covert 19 is moving faster than usual from creating the vaccine candidates to testing them. To getting them ready for FDA is regulatory review a review that will also likely go much faster than usual..

Pfizer flu vaccine FDA Ron Stroman Allegheny County Gwinnett County NPR University of Maryland Centre Pennsylvania Galveston Gene Joe Palka Justin President Trump CEO University of Maryland
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:38 min | 4 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Glitch on the first day of early voting. No way and then you're gonna tell me I go to one place and they say it's the printer. Come over here. This is the printer. Then this is the main system. I've just never seen anything like this ever. You know this is a tough problem for election officials. Obviously, no one should have to wait that long to vote. But we also knew the pandemic, combined with potentially historic turnout would be in some problems for in person. Voting and lines do usually get better, I should say after the first couple days of early voting the wait times in Gwinnett County, Georgia, for instance, which was showing waits at 234 hours earlier this week on its online tracker today, when you look it was mostly under an hour. Well, what about voting by mail? I mean, a lot of people have been worried about the post office handling so many ballots are those concerns justified so far. Yeah, I mean, we've seen a lot of administrative errors, reports of administrative errors with the absentee balloting. Just yesterday in Pennsylvania, Allegheny County announced that 28,000 voters got mailed the wrong ballots, but it's also important to realize scale. We're talking about thousands of ballots, but 80 million ballots have been requested nationwide. Here's former deputy Postmaster general Ron Stroman. Despite some of those concerns, things were going at this point reasonably well, Stroman said. It's important to remember that if you're hearing about a mistake at this point in the election, like in Allegheny County, for instance, officials realized their errors early enough to send out new ballots and fix the problems. That is NPR's miles. Parks. Thank you, Miles. Thank you. One company appears to lead the pack for getting a green light for its covert 19 vaccine. Pfizer, the company CEO, has hinted the preliminary results from its vaccine trial could be available as soon as the end of this month. NPR's Joe Palka looks at how the Pfizer vaccine made it to the front of the line. The race to find a vaccine for covert 19 started in mid January. That's when Chinese scientists published the genetic sequence of the Corona virus, causing the disease. At the time. No one even knew if it was possible to make a vaccine against this new viral invader. When I spoke to Pfizer's chief scientific officer for viral vaccines at the start of May this year, he was sounding confident, I think is a very good chance we'll have of Phil. Dormant, sir says Pfizer's advantage came from a strategic partnership it made with the German biotech company by on Tech. The two companies had been working on a flu vaccine. Using a new kind of technology based on the virus is Gene's dormant, sir says Buy on Tech was able to quickly refocus its research from flew to the Corona virus, literally a matter of swapping out the jeans and swapping in A carnivorous Peggy, the SARS Corona virus. Spike Gene is the key to making a covert 19 vaccine. Dormant, sir says Buy on Tech quickly came up with vaccine candidates and then what requires a much greater resource in infrastructure. We could come in and really start to pitching their Fizer organized initial safety testing of several different versions of the vaccine. In May, We started with four different agents at three different doses, each first, unlike is one of the scientists who tested the Pfizer vaccine candidates. She's at the University of Maryland Centre for vaccine development, she says. Normally testing all those different versions, and all those different doses would have taken years but for the covert vaccine, they did it in four months, so we're just moving very quickly. Part of the reason they were able to finish so fast was a new technique for measuring how well a volunteer's immune system responded to the vaccine. Hey, young. She at the University of Texas Medical branch at Galveston developed the technique. He found a way to tag genes in the virus, So they light up when they infected cells in the lab. You don't have to wait for 45 days, and the computer calculates the data. You wish it just like a very rapid by the end of July fighter was ready to start large scale testing in humans. The company has now enrolled some 44,000 volunteers in a trial to show that the vaccine can prevent disease in someone exposed to the Corona virus and isn't likely to cause any rare health problems. It's a huge logistical undertaking. But one Edward Walsh from the University of Rochester, says Fizer is quite capable of they've got a well oiled system for testing vaccines at various stages of their development, even though other companies started large efficacy studies around the same time University of Maryland's Kirsten like says it's not surprising fighter may get results first. Visor's incredibly organized and is always like a couple steps ahead. Planning where they want to go developing vaccine during a pandemic is tough and like, says it's impossible to ignore the politics that have been swirling around the effort. President Trump has accused regulators of trying to slow down the approval process to thwart his reelection bid. But like says politics hasn't invaded the actual research from boots on the ground. Getting these studies done. It's 100% science, and that's been super rewarding. It's possible that Pfizer may have enough evidence that their vaccine works before the end of the month, at which point the company could go to the FDA and asked for permission to distributed to the public. FDA has said its review could take weeks. But for his part, Pfizer's Phil Dormant sir says that's time well spent. Having an external review of the data Pfizer has collected is essential for the public to be convinced that the vaccine is safe and actually works. I work for a pharmaceutical company. I'm also consumer..

Pfizer flu vaccine Allegheny County Ron Stroman FDA Gwinnett County NPR University of Maryland Centre Pennsylvania Galveston Gene Joe Palka President Trump CEO University of Maryland University of Texas Medical
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Hey, I'm Sasha and Simon's Today on one, a psychedelics in America. We tend to associate turning on tuning in and dropping out with the 19 sixties. But a new study shows the number of Americans using psychedelics jumped more than 50% from 2015 to 2018. Hallucinogens are definitely a controlled substance, but they're therapeutic uses being studied in some states air looking at decriminalization. So what did these drugs do? Have they changed since the 19 sixties? And why are more Americans than ever looking for a good trip? We want to hear from you to comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at 18. Life from NPR News. I'm Shea Stevens. Democrats have formally nominated Joe Biden as their 2020 candidate for president. Former Second lady Jill Biden deliver Tuesday's keynote address from a Delaware high school where she wants taught As NPR. Susan Davis reports she made a personal appeal for the election of her husband, Joe Biden spoke to the frustration appearance across the nation confronting school closures due to the pandemic and with Joe as president. These classrooms will ring out with laughter and possibility once again. And she offered her personal life perspective on Biden as co parents shaped by tragedy, most recently the 2015 death of their son Bo to brain cancer, she said Biden will unite the country in the same way he's kept his own family together. He will do for your family. What he did for ours. Bring us together. And make us whole. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Post Master General Lewis to Joy is suspending cost saving measures at the Postal Service until after the elections in November. But critics say it's not enough. As NPR's Pam Fessler reports to Joy's cutbacks have raised concerns that mail in ballots will not be delivered on time. Mr Joyce says he's suspending Postal service cuts to avoid even the appearance of affecting the election. But former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman, who left shortly before D Joy arrived, said it wasn't clear if recent changes would be reversed. He also disputed to Joy's claim that the cuts predated his arrival. Stroman said they weren't implemented earlier because of the pandemic, the other reason that they were implement Is in fact that you don't want to reduce your flexibility ahead of a national election, especially one in which many are expected to vote by mail. Stroman said He still believes ballots will be delivered on time, but advises people to send them in as soon as possible. Pam Fessler. NPR NEWS one week after the start of its fall semester, Notre Dame University is temporarily moving its undergraduate classes online this following a spike in Corona virus cases. University president driver and John Jenkins says public spaces on campus will be closed and residents halls will be restricted. The objective of these temporary restrictions is to contain the spread of the virus so that we can get back to in person instruction. If he steps are not successful. We will have to send students home. As we did last spring. Jenkins says that contact tracing shows most of the new covert 19 cases at Notre Dame came from off campus gatherings. Meanwhile, Michigan State is moving all its classes online this fall, and students there are being encouraged to stay home. Wall Street stocks closed mixed Tuesday with the Dow Jones industrials falling 66 points. Then as that gained 81, the S and P 500 added seven points. This is NPR news. The government says home building continues to bounce back from the pandemic. US housing construction sore 22.6% in July with the biggest increases in the North East and the South. Construction of single family homes rose more than 8%, while construction of apartments and condominiums jumped nearly 57%. Ah Yuen Back court in the Netherlands has convicted one of four defendants linked to the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Career E. Teri Schultz reports that the verdict comes over 15 years after her, Riri and 21. Others were killed in a car bombing in Beirut. Judges at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon found on Ly One defendant guilty of involvement in the 2005 attack on Rafi career E. All four are members of the Iranian backed Hezbollah group designated as a terrorist organization. In the US, Their locations are unknown. Salim Ayyash was convicted largely based on mobile phone data of conspiracy to commit a terrorist act of the murders and of the attempted murders of 226 wounded. Presiding Judge David Ray thanked the victims for their testimony. We heard that in some way I can give you something out of this Hariri son Saad, also a former Lebanese prime minister. Says his family accepts the ruling. Hezbollah's leader said last week. All the suspects are innocent for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz, Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko remains defiant amid growing calls for his recognition. Lukashenko assigned a decree honoring hundreds of police officers for cracking down on protesters. Claim is.

NPR News Jill Biden Postmaster General Ron Stroman president NPR America Pam Fessler Joe Rafik Career E. Teri Schultz Joy Susan Davis John Jenkins US prime minister Hezbollah Alexander Lukashenko Notre Dame University Sasha Shea Stevens Facebook
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:10 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hey, I'm Sasha and Simon's Today on one, a psychedelics in America. We tend to associate turning on tuning in and dropping out with the 19 sixties. A new study shows the number of Americans using psychedelics jumped more than 50% from 2015 to 2018. Hallucinogens are definitely a controlled substance, but they're therapeutic uses being studied in some states air looking at decriminalization. So what do these drugs do have changed since the 19 sixties and why are more Americans than ever looking for a good trip? We want to hear from you to comment on our Facebook page or tweet us at once. Live from NPR news. I'm Shea Stevens. Democrats have formally nominated Joe Biden as their 2020 candidate for president. Former Second lady Jill Biden deliver Tuesday's keynote address from a Delaware high school where she wants taught As NPR's Susan Davis reports she made a personal appeal for the election of her husband, Joe Biden spoke to the frustration of parents across the nation confronting school closures due to the pandemic and with Joe as president. These classrooms will ring out with laughter and possibility once again. And she offered her personal life perspective on Biden as co parents shaped by tragedy, most recently the 2015 death of their son Bo to brain cancer, She said Biden will unite the country in the same way he's kept his own family together. He will do for your family what he did for ours. Bring us together. And make us whole. Susan Davis. NPR NEWS Washington Post Master General Lewis to Joy is suspending cost saving measures at the Postal Service until after the elections in November. But critics say it's not enough. As NPR's Pam Fessler reports, the joys cutbacks have raised concerns that mail in ballots will not be delivered on time. Those two Joyce says he's suspending Postal service cuts to avoid even the appearance of affecting the election. But former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman, who left shortly before D Joy arrived, said it wasn't clear if recent changes would be reversed. He also disputed to Joy's claim that the cuts predated his arrival. Stroman said they weren't implemented earlier because of the pandemic. The other reason that they were simple is in fact that you don't want to reduce your flexibility. Ahead of a national election, especially one in which many are expected to vote by mail. Stroman said he still believes ballots will be delivered on time, but advises people to send them in as soon as possible. Pam Fessler. NPR NEWS one week After the start of its fall semester, Notre Dame University is temporarily moving its undergraduate classes online. There's following a spike in Corona virus cases. University president, Reverend John Jenkins says public spaces on campus will be closed and residents halls will be restricted. The objective of these temporary restrictions is to contain the spread of the virus so that we can get back to in person instruction. If he steps are not successful. We will have to send students home. Yes, we did last spring. Jenkins says that contact tracing shows most of the new covert 19 cases at Notre Dame came from off campus gatherings. Meanwhile, Michigan State is moving all its classes online this fall, and students there are being encouraged to stay home. Wall Street stocks closed mixed Tuesday with the Dow Jones industrials falling 66 points. Then as that gained 81, the S and P 500 added seven points. This is NPR news. The government says home building continues to bounce back from the pandemic. US. Housing construction soared 22.6% in July with the biggest increases in the North East and the South. Construction of single family homes rose more than 8%, while construction of apartments and condominiums jumped nearly 57%. A U. N backed court in the Netherlands has convicted one of four defendants linked to the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik career E. Gary Schultz reports that the verdict comes over 15 years after her, Riri and 21. Others were killed in a car bombing in Beirut. Judges at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon found only one defendant guilty of involvement in the 2005 attack on Rafi career E. All four are members of the Iranian backed Hezbollah group designated as a terrorist organization. In the US, Their locations are unknown. Salim Ayyash was convicted largely based on mobile phone data of conspiracy to commit a terrorist act of the murders and of the attempted murders of 226 wounded. Presiding Judge David Ray thanked the victims for their testimony. We heard that in some way I can give you something out of this Hariri son Saad, also a former Lebanese prime minister. Says his family accepts the ruling. Hezbollah's leader said last week. All the suspects are innocent for NPR news. I'm Teri Schultz, Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko remains defiant amid growing calls for his recognition. Lukashenko assigned a decree honoring hundreds of police officers for cracking down on protesters claim his.

NPR NEWS Jill Biden Postmaster General Ron Stroman US Joe president NPR America Pam Fessler Susan Davis John Jenkins Alexander Lukashenko Hezbollah Facebook Notre Dame University Sasha Shea Stevens Joy brain cancer Postal Service
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

04:37 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news I'm Shay, Stevens Democrats have formally nominated Joe Biden as their twenty twenty candidate for president former second lady Jill Biden deliver Tuesday's keynote address from Delaware high school where she wants taught as NPR Susan Davis reports she made a personal appeal for the election of her husband Jill Biden spoke to the frustration appearance across the nation confronting school closures due to the pandemic and. With Joe as president, these classrooms will ring out with laughter and possibility once again, and she offered her personal life perspective on Biden as Co parents shaped by tragedy most recently the two thousand, fifteen death of their son Bowe to brain cancer she said Biden will unite the country in the same way. He's kept his own family together he will do for your family what he did for ours. Bring us together and make us whole Susan Davis NPR news. Washington Post. Master. General. Louis Joy is suspending cost saving measures at the postal service until after the elections in November but critics say it's not enough as NPR's Pam. bessler. Reports joys, cutbacks raise concerns that mail in ballots will not be delivered on time Lewis Joy says he suspending postal service cuts to avoid the appearance of affecting the election but former deputy postmaster general Ron Stroman who left shortly before joy arrived said it wasn't clear if recent changes would be reversed he also disputed joys claim that the cuts predated his arrival stroman said they weren't implemented earlier because of the pandemic other reason that they were. is in fact that you don't WanNa, reduce your flexibility. Ahead of a national election, especially, one in which many are expected to vote by mail stroman said, he still believes ballots will be delivered on time but advises people to send them in as soon as possible. Pam Fester NPR news one week up to the start of its fall semester. Notre Dame. University is temporarily moving its undergraduate classes online this following a spike and Corona Virus Cases University President Drummer, and John Jenkins. Says public spaces on campus will be closed and residents halls will be restricted. The objective of these temporary restrictions contain the spread of the virus so that we can get back in person instruction. If these steps are not successful. We will have to send students home. As we did last spring Jenkins says that contact tracing shows most of the new covid nineteen cases at Notre Dame came from off campus gatherings meanwhile, Michigan State is moving all. It's classes online this fall and students there are being encouraged to stay home Wall Street stocks closed mixed Tuesday with the Dow Jones industrials falling sixty six points. The Nasdaq gained eighty one and the S&P five hundred at its seven points. This is NPR news. The government says homebuilding continues to bounce back from the pandemic US housing construction? Sore Twenty, two point six percent in July with the biggest increases in the northeast and the south construction of single family homes rose more than eight percent while construction of apartments and condominiums jumped nearly fifty seven percent. A UN back court in the Netherlands has convicted one of four defendants linked to the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik. Hariri. Teri Schultz reports that the verdict comes over fifteen years after Hariri and twenty one others were killed in a car bombing in Beirut. Judges at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon found only one defendant guilty of involvement in the two thousand, five attack on Rafic Hariri. All four are members of the iranian-backed Hezbollah group designated as a terrorist organization in the US. Their locations are unknown. Salima was convicted largely based on mobile phone data of conspiracy to commit a terrorist act of the murders and attempted murders of two hundred and twenty six wounded presiding judge David Ray thanked victims for their testimony. We in some way can give you something out of this Hariri son Saad. Also, a former Lebanese prime minister says his family accepts the ruling Hezbollah's leader said last week all the suspects are innocent Fr- NPR news I'm Teri, Schultz Belarus President Alexander Lukashenko. Mid growing calls for his resignation Lukashenko Hassan decree honoring hundreds of police officers were cracking down on protesters claim his August ninth re-election was rigged. This is NPR news..

Jill Biden NPR president Susan Davis Rafic Hariri Notre Dame Teri Schultz Lewis Joy prime minister Joe US John Jenkins Ron Stroman Hezbollah brain cancer Washington Post Louis Joy Lukashenko Hassan Bowe
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:49 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

"On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leila folded in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male and the vote. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S. Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles. Hi there, so first off, what exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started, some major, fairly major mailed always across the country. But he essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. It raises war questions, Then it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we can get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly walkie to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, But it points to what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this, with some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign. A number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Joyce specifically said in the statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USPS is not equipped. Do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what Canetti you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that ballot in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's Miles. Parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house in the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me How disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters into residence halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing there. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. I guess. You know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities, some of them related to the Greek system that were flying in the face of all recommendations, and so distancing masks that type thing. Exactly. Yeah, So, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms. I was struck by a headline in the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel. They had an editorial yesterday with the headline. UNC has a disaster on its hands. Except they used a considerably more profane word that I can't say on air than disaster. Right? I saw that. Ah, from where you're sent it from the faculty perspective. Did they get it right? I think it is just I think it's more complicated than that. I mean, I I certainly understand the outrage and the anger and yes, there are many faculty members that Um, shared that outrage and anger. But it is a complicated calculus and I don't know. That the student newspaper has investigated that, quite to the extent that they might You're suggesting that intentions here were good, even if the way it all has all played out has not been away. Anyone would have wanted it too. Is there Is there a lesson learned here Or does this just underscore? How very, very difficult in person tuition is going to be in the middle of a pandemic? Um Yes. I mean, I think that you know, Human sea has some of the best public health infectious disease. Folks in the country Health communications. If we can't bring those resources to bear in the way that we did with a successful result, I think it should give every other large public university in the country pause before going forward. And in that way, I hope that our experience will be a real service to the country. And indeed how perhaps the federal government needs to think about these things and help institutions of higher learning Preserve all that they offer and the economic engine that they are, even if they have to take as what? We've called it an off ramp. Professor Mamie Chapman. She chairs the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which has just announced it is abandoning plans to have students on campus on moving to a fully online model for the rest of the semester..

Postal Service NPR News USPS Professor Chapman Chapel Hill UNC federal government Trump U. S. Postal Service UNC Chapel Hill Postmaster General Ron Stroman Um Mary Louise Kelly President Los Angeles Trump Administration North Carolina Washington
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:42 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Mahoney. This is 90.3 K a U A new wildfire that popped up in Carmel Valley this afternoon about 3.5 miles southeast of Carmel Valley Village is now 250 acres. Mandatory of actions are evacuations are underway. The Carmel Valley Library, located on West Carmel Valley Road has opened as an evacuation center. On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leila Folded in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male and the vote. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles. Hi there, so first off, what exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started, some major, fairly major mailed always across the country. But he essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. Raises war questions, Then it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we could get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly walkie to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, But it points what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this, with some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign. A number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Joyce specifically said in the statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USPS is not equipped. Do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request to with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what Canetti you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that about in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's Miles. Parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house in the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill. Where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me how disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters into residence halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing there. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. Um I guess. You know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities, some of them related to the Greek system that were flying in the face of all recommendations. And so is distancing masks. That type thing. Exactly. Yeah, so, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms. I was struck by a headline in the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel. They had an editorial yesterday with the headline. UNC has a disaster on its hands. Except they used a considerably more profane word that I can't say on air than disaster. Right? I saw that. Ah, from where you're sent it from the faculty perspective. Did they get it right? A room. I think it is just I think it's more complicated than that. I mean, I I certainly understand the outrage and the anger and yes, there are many faculty members that Share that outrage and anger, but it is a complicated calculus and I don't know..

NPR News Postal Service USPS Trump President Carmel Valley Library West Carmel Valley Carmel Valley Village Carmel Valley U. S Postal Service Postmaster General Ron Stroman Mary Louise Kelly Professor Chapman Chapel Hill UNC Chapel Hill UNC Trump Administration Los Angeles Washington
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:22 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"After five o'clock Good afternoon. On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leyla folded in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male. In the vote, Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S. Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles high there. So first up. What exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started some major, fairly major male the ways across the country. But he essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. In raises war questions, Then it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we can get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly walkie to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, but points what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this With some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign, and a number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Rejoice specifically said in a statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USGS is not equipped to do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what could get you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that about in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's Miles. Parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house. In the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill, where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me how disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters into residence halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing there. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. I guess you know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were Doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities. Some of them related to the Greek system that were flying in the face of all recommendations and social distancing masks. That type thing. Exactly, Yeah. So, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms. I was struck by a headline in the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel. They had an editorial yesterday with the headline. UNC has a disaster on its hands. Except they used a considerably more profane word that I can't say on air then disaster, right? I saw that. Ah, from where you're sent it from the faculty perspective. Did they get it right? I think it is just I think it's more complicated than that. I mean, I I certainly understand the outrage and the anger and yes, there are many faculty members that Shared that outrage and anger, but it is a complicated calculus and.

Postal Service NPR News Trump President USPS U. S. Postal Service Postmaster General Ron Stroman Postmaster General Lewis Mary Louise Kelly UNC Chapel Hill Professor Chapman Chapel Hill Los Angeles Trump Administration UNC Washington Detroit Senator Bernie Sanders Joy
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:48 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leyla folded in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male and the vote. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S. Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles. Hi there, so first off, what exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started some major, fairly major male the ways across the country. But he essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. It raises more questions than it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we could get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly wonky to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, But it points to what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this, with some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign. A number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Joyce specifically said in the statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USGS is not equipped. Do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what could get you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that about in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's miles parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house. In the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill. Where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me how disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters and two residents halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing there. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. I guess. You know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities, some of them related to the Greek system that were Flying in the face of all recommendations and so distancing masks that type thing exactly. Yeah, so, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms. I was struck by a headline in the student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel. They had an editorial yesterday with the headline. UNC has a disaster on its hands. Except they used a considerably more profane word that I can't say on air than disaster. Right? I saw that. Ah, from where you're sent it from the faculty perspective. Did they get it right? I think it is just I think it's more complicated than that. I mean, I I certainly understand the outrage and the anger and yes, there are many faculty members that Share that outrage and anger, but it is a complicated calculus and I don't know. That the student newspaper has investigated that, quite to the extent that they might You're suggesting that intentions here were good, even if the way that it all has all played out has not been away. Anyone would have wanted it too. Is there Is there a lesson learned here Or does this just underscore? How very, very difficult in person tuition is going to be in the middle of a pandemic? Um Yes. I mean, I think that you know, Human sea has some of the best public health infectious disease. Folks in the country Health communications if we can't bring those resources to bear in the way that we did with a successful result. I think it should give every other large public university in the country pause before going forward. And in that way, I hope that our experience will be a real service. To the country and indeed how Perhaps the federal government needs to think about these things and help institutions of higher learning preserve all that they offer and the economic engine that they are, even if they have to take as what we've called it an off ramp. Professor Mamie Chapman. She chairs the faculty at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which has just announced it is abandoning plans to have students on campus on moving to a fully online model for the rest of the semester..

Postal Service Professor Chapman NPR News Chapel Hill UNC USPS Trump U. S. Postal Service UNC Chapel Hill Mary Louise Kelly Postmaster General Ron Stroman President Los Angeles Washington Trump Administration North Carolina Detroit Senator Bernie Sanders
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:29 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on KCRW

"One awaiting Wrench Cucamonga 104 in Pasadena. On a Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leila Fallen in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male and the vote. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S. Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles. Hi there, so first off, what exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started, some major, fairly major mailed always across the country. But he essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. It raises more questions than it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we can get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly walkie to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, But it points what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this, with some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign. A number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Joyce specifically said in the statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USPS is not equipped. Do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what Canetti you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that ballot in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's Miles. Parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house. In the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill, where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me how disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters into residence halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing there. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. I guess. You know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities, some of them related to the Greek system that were flying in the face of all recommendations. And so is distancing masks. That type thing. Exactly. Yeah, so, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms..

NPR News Postal Service USPS U. S. Postal Service Trump Postmaster General Ron Stroman President Mary Louise Kelly UNC Chapel Hill Wrench Cucamonga Chapel Hill Professor Chapman Trump Administration Los Angeles Washington Leila Fallen Senator Bernie Sanders Detroit Joy
"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:25 min | 6 months ago

"postmaster general ron stroman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tuesday. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Leila Fallen in Los Angeles today brought a sudden reversal in the story of the male and the vote. Postmaster General Lewis to Joy announced that he's suspending his controversial cost cutting plans at the U. S. Postal Service. The move comes amid bipartisan pressure and reports of slowdowns in mail delivery around the country. Those delays were particularly alarming for election officials, who are expecting an unprecedented number of Americans to cast votes by mail this year due to the pandemic. We're joined now by NPR's miles parks, her cover's voting issues. Hi, miles. Hi there, so first off, what exactly did the postmaster announced today? So if you remember D Joy came to the Postal Service earlier this summer in May after leading a private logistics company for more than 30 years, and he had promised this sort of organizational realignment aimed it saving money. Some of those changes had gone into effect already had already started some major, fairly major male the ways across the country. He essentially said today that that transformation he's planning is now on hold until after November's presidential election to avoid even the appearance of any impact on election male, he said in the statement. I am suspending these initiatives until after the election is concluded. Over the past few weeks we've heard from postal workers and others who've said the's changes made it impossible to deliver mail on time. Does today's announcement mean that service will get better? It's still a little unclear, He says sorting machines will not be removed in overtime will be approved quote as needed. But a number of watchdog groups have already released statements saying they aren't satisfied. Because a lot of these policies that Detroit implemented when he first got on board, we're not super transparent from the beginning. It's still hard to know exactly what today's announcement means. It's not clear whether the sorting machines that were already removed, for instance, are going to be returned or whether just no more sorting machines are going to be removed. Here's former deputy Postmaster General Ron Stroman. Talking about today's statement. It raises more questions than it provides answers, and it will be important in coming days to see if we could get clarity with regard Teo to those questions. Lawmakers will get a chance to get some of those answers on Friday and Monday when the joyous scheduled for congressional hearings Now this is a pretty dramatic reversal. What sort of political pressure were the joy and the Trump Administration under It was really extraordinary. How quickly lawmakers and the public took hold of this issue. You know, it's fairly wonky to be talking about the USPS just a couple months before a presidential election, But it points what we've seen in public opinion polls that the USPS is the federal government entity that people generally like the most. The entire Democratic Party was galvanised by this, with some lawmakers like Senator Bernie Sanders, even calling for the joy to resign. A number of Republicans asked him to reverse the changes. Too many of them represent rural parts of the country where even if people are skeptical of voting by mail because of what President Trump has said they still might be more dependent than urban voters on the mail for things like prescriptions. So more than half of voters were expected to cast ballots by mail this fall. How nervous should they be about returning their ballots via the Postal Service? Joyce specifically said in the statement that the Postal Service is ready to handle whatever volume of election mail received this fall. And that's obviously a very different message from what President Trump has said where he's basically said the USGS is not equipped. Do that. The biggest message coming from election officials and experts is that voters should not be scared. They just need to be early with your request with mailing it back. Don't wait until the last minute on any of this stuff. That's what Canetti you into trouble is waiting up until the deadline. You need to just get that about in the mail and give the post office timeto work. That's NPR's Miles. Parks. Thank you. Thank you. In North Carolina. They tried the state's flagship school, UNC Chapel Hill, began the school year with in person classes. Then came Cove in 19 outbreaks in three dorms and a frat house. In the first week. Yesterday, the university abandoned plans to have students on campus starting tomorrow. Classes will move online. Let's hear directly from Chapel Hill, where Mimi Chapman is chair of the faculty and joins us now, Professor Chapman. Welcome. Thanks for having me how disappointed as everybody in Chapel Hill. Well, it's a heartbreaking situation. This's not where we wanted to be. We were very hopeful that a plan could work. Although You certainly as the summer wore on, and we weren't seeing the kinds of decreases in the virus around country that we had hoped. Ah, tensions and anxieties ramped up. Even as the campus was opening walk me through. How this last week has unfolded at the first sign of trouble was word of clusters and two residents halls. Yes, that's correct. I think you know, certainly is faculty. We began hearing about this on Friday. I began hearing about it on Friday morning. I think it was on probably on Thursday Thursday night as I understand it that all of the contact tracing and that sort of thing was going on. So ascertaining exactly where these clusters were and who who needed to be. Tested in isolated and that sort of thing. Air. You surprised it unraveled so quickly. I guess. You know, I'm really sad that it unraveled so quickly. I There were an awful lot of students. If you walk around our campus, there were so many students that were doing a good job of wearing masks and doing what they needed to do from what I could see. It is also clear and we heard this from the earliest days that there were a lot of off campus activities, some of them related to the Greek system that were flying in the face of all recommendations and social distancing masks that type thing. Exactly. Yeah, So, and those were big parties, and they were hosting first year students and students that lived on campus. And so at least as I understand it, the current thinking is that that is how it got back into the dorms..

Postal Service NPR News U. S. Postal Service USPS Postmaster General Ron Stroman Trump President Mary Louise Kelly UNC Chapel Hill Chapel Hill Professor Chapman Trump Administration Los Angeles Washington Leila Fallen Senator Bernie Sanders Detroit Joy