18 Burst results for "Postdoctoral Research"

Translucent Frog Optics Dial In Camo Color

60-Second Science

02:53 min | 4 months ago

Translucent Frog Optics Dial In Camo Color

"Ocean animals have a clever form of camouflage transparent, but being through as far less common on land and was a few reasons why that might be Jim Barnett is a postdoctoral research fellow at McMaster University in Ontario Canada differences between air and walters. Surrounding media means life interacts differently with a transparent organisms body tissues. Any Ocean light is always coming from above and the background is less variable, but in jungle. CANOPIES light is coming from all over the place and the background is far more variable. Enter a little critter called the glass frog. It's not actually transparent. It's translucent that means it's skin in some places is thin enough that you can actually see its internal or hard at work most of the time when you see photograph of these folks, they're taking onto quite controlled conditions with either strong lighting like powerful flash. Photograph underneath on a piece of glass, and it's really the the bellies which are transparent and these folks are pretty small and thin and quite delicate Sarah. If you have a powerful flash on your camera, you can tell just lost light through them and they look pretty transparent. Barnett says the frogs translucent skin is actually a novel camouflage strategy that no one's ever really studied. Until now we're thinks is happening is that light is traveling through the frog interacting with the pigmentation about a lot of it does pass through the frog and bounces off the background Some of that light will be absorbed by the background underneath Roque. This'll some reflected of that becker a come back through the frog. So if a glass frog is sitting on a break greenleaf. In the jungle canopy, the light passing through its thin skin and onto the leaf, make the frog appear Brenner and color matching more closely with the leaf. The jungle canopy is filled with leaves, but it's also filled with predators, birds, snakes, mammals, and even invertebrates in search of their next meal these animals acquaint. Visual Systems are pretty cute into finding differences luminance brightness between different patches. So the quite good at finding prey based on differences between the background on the animals brightness and by being translucent sees folks are able to have an adaptive camouflage. So regardless of whether the leaf is dark or bright if the glass frog is sitting on it, it will appear to change to more closely matches background the study by Barnett and calling is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. With around one hundred, fifty known species of glass frogs in the World Barnett says the next project is to find out if the franc's translucence may differ based on their individual habitats. One thing is certain. It'll be hard to see what they find.

Jim Barnett Mcmaster University Postdoctoral Research Canada Walters Ontario Becker National Academy Of Sciences Brenner
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Had sexual contact on school property last week with eighteen year old who was mentally is mentally disabled in the letter to parents school officials say they are shocked by the allegations they say they are they were the first to report it to police and have been assisting in the investigation. a new university of Michigan study finds that most of us would protect our loved ones from law enforcement if they committed illegal or immoral act this study analyzed the responses from more than twenty eight hundred people asking if they are more likely to protect those close to them versus strangers if they commit an immoral act such as theft or sexual harassment the vast majority said yes university of Michigan postdoctoral research fellow Aaron white man explains how respondents justified their decision they might think to themselves a plausible reason why they're close other commit committee moral act and they might try to tell themselves that the close other would never do this kind of thing again because they themselves know that the clothes so there is a good person we men says respondents would go as far to lie to law enforcement officers to protect their loved ones especially if the crime was of a more serious nature. west Bloomfield township is the least rob city in Michigan that according to a new report for city of nearly sixty five thousand people there was only one robbery reported last year that means that for every ten thousand people there were point fifteen robberies that according to the report Detroit was the most rob city with two thousand six hundred and thirty nine robberies which is thirty nine robberies per ten thousand ten thirteen is our time how did the wings do up north we'll check sports straight. discount.

theft Michigan robbery Detroit university of Michigan harassment postdoctoral research Aaron white eighteen year
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

13:38 min | 1 year ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Bad Science

"Out west pesticides things like that we thing uncalled integrated pest management where you can collect a bunch of spires release them out into a agricultural area of having to put out a bunch of chemicals so yeah they're they're helping us out for sure so there's some direct benefits but i think the real reason you appreciate it just because they're cool you know karadzic i'll keep trying on that one but i don't know kenny i mean cool but more frightening than cool for me maybe that's why they're maybe did you say you spend some time watching their behavior and watch you know eat we had more experiences where we were getting into spider world instead the spiders coming into our world you know maybe we would see him a little bit different life i mean that's a good point seeing it in action like do its thing i was fascinated i thought that was like the the closest i've come to being a spider expert yeah my fear of bugs does not necessarily come from seeing them in the wild or in their natural habitats it really comes from you're in my space bitch i need you out now yeah it's intrusion of you you know there's a lack of control happening in my own home that freaks me out it has very little to do with the actual bug yeah we got to be more like kenny and get out to these tropical rainforests and check out these spiders i'm sure we're both just down to do well i hear the amazon's nice right now sorry dark turns in this podcast look out guys okay so i had a couple of things that this movie just i don't know sparked my interest in so one thing there's this really funny any scene were there in the van and meryl streep is asking chris cooper's character about just dropping stuff that he loves because she's trying to like look for a passion that's like her jermaine drive in the movie her passion is to be passionate about something and he's super passionate about orchids and so she's asking him like but what about these other passions that you've had didn't you love fish or something that he gets into a story about fish and he's like i was obsessed with fish i would go deep diving the ocean i love the ocean and then one morning i woke up and i said fuck fish and now now i never went to the ocean again i'm just over it and so i was just curious because it made me think about my own life if you guys have had a passion before that you were just all in on and you know either as a kid or teenage years then just one day decided like nope i'm done with this now onto the next thing i i off meryl's whole arc of like i want to be passionate about anything i'm just again i'm like curl get yourself to therapy clearly you're suppressing oppressing something so much i think what we actually like i mean i bet i'm going to wage a gas here that kenny's love of insects comes from a very young time like when he was a little little little kid he got really into this shit and was like spiders are cool and then he followed that throughout his adulthood adulthood and thus became scientists cities today but i look at maryland i'm like gee surely either something happened something like very dark happened for you to just like shutdown eddie memories of anything passionate or you're just the most boring person alive like you have no pasha nothing like you're just stopping yourself like little oh yes she seems to be just like caught up in this weird elite is a job i don't know where a brighter color try try writing for differ magazine company new york or go to the go to the hamptons anything that gets you out of your right lane jump into this very strange field of orchid hunting at orchid drugs which i also wanted to ask about like what the hell is that are there other orchid drugs yeah so kenny answer we both if you ever dropped something a passion of yours that you were just like i'm done with this now and we're gonna get these orca drugs okay so hashemi's now that i've just like you know sort of cold turkey meryl don't be american so don't be america and maybe john laroche's main point is that it doesn't matter what you're passionate about is just finding somebody you can be passionate about it and what it is less important john rochon is kind of saying and why he says fuck fish is it it's not that he loved best is that he loved being obsessed with fish what was your other question the other question was orchid drugs bro yeah so where can we snort some powdered orchid kelly green cocaine was was working drug steph was not re-offend right kind of the point of the movie is is that the protagonist was kind of forced to to make up stories to make his movies exciting but there are flowers we can snort right well they're flowers have certainly provided a medicines that's for sure i mean poppies come to mind right what's your experience with that my streets poppies i wrote it but there are a lot ton of other drugs there are a lot of drugs that come out of the amazon that were still discovering all the time okay an off-the-record which ones are you experiment you gotta get it before the damn thing burns down you gotta get in there kenny take the trip trip of your life before jody percent of the world's oxygen just evaporates yeah and tell us which wants to do because i don't want to do the wrong drugs and then you know be tripping for four four years sounds like a good project for a student out there i'm just imagining the what student that's like no this we'll work i can make this a thesis i can spend seven years just being really fucking yeah and so you never like we're into a goth the the clothes and music and then decided like oh no i'm not a kid anymore i don't think i had like a big i don't know i guess i would probably went through some we're faces like that big thing for a while and then words that's absolutely accurate pokemon hoping uh-huh oh that's a good point mongo okay great then there was a writer's block so of huge part of the film is him suffering from writer's block he can't can't he doesn't know how to make the movie doesn't know how to write it out and so i wanted to know if you know if you had writer's block nadia ever and how do you deal with it and kenny i don't know if there's like science blocker walker research blocks or something but but i just wanted your both of your takes a perfect writer i'm just kidding now i think i've had it definitely had blocked but i think really what it is that i think the idea of writer's block is very romanticized and the notion of it is again a great way to sort of self sabotage tauch if you really think about it procrastination is essentially we procrastinate because we're afraid of dying because the minute we actually set forth and do a thing we have to to face our fear whether that's a fear of failure whether it's a fear of acceptance of fear of achievement whatever that thing is so you put off stuff because you don't want to face that fear just yet so i feel like when i've had i'm gonna put it in quotes writer's block it's really more just this long-term procrastinating where it's not so much oh i can't solve this thing it's that either for whatever reason i don't have the mental or physical energy to face that thing in the back of my head that charlie are nick cage one i should say really you hear his veto or as the film and you hear him just being like i'm fat stupid you but i'm bald i'm a mess and i think that's a that's many people it's a very a relatable identifiable things they hear that voice in your head telling you not to do things because society and your peers and your family and all these people that put those voices in your head when you're really little they start to come out when you're an adult trying to do a creative endeavor so i really say that like as far as writer's block goes i think i've got there's been times where i've gone maybe a few weeks or months without picking up something i've have definitely had moments where i go i know that whatever that thing i'm working on isn't ready yet and i don't know that i can fix it this second which which is like another thing that's driving me nuts about the film that i was watching charlie just like i'm like go take a shower go do a vacation anything like you need to get out of your comfort zone not that a shower is out of your comfort but like you need to do just walk the dog like so many people if they say like how do you break you know how do you how do you solve a story or whatever it's like just do anything else in like your brain will naturally start to giving you're giving your brain a break from staring at the page will give yourself the opportunity community to like let it come through and filter it and then you go there it is yeah yeah i love that that's just i think a great classic remedy for being stuck and problem solving is just take your focus away from the problem he had to go to new york and then the minute he goes to new york that's when he starts solving things and i'm like you should have just taken a trip to the desert is an hour away you know you wanna take a trip you always talk about it he has to go to santa barbara to go to that or confessed that he keeps trying to bring women too and i'm like look i get that though i get that it's a horny plant but also like you don't need to be horny on your work expedition just go take yourself to see like the mission go hi it's like a nice little john right away from santa barbara just get put yourself in a different situation because it does does force your brain to problem solve when you're not in that or just like give yourself a break why was he always thinking about work he's just that's the kind of guy he is probably a subdued passive dude got caught down a little bit i also love ohi by the way great oh hi tourism board is gonna love this that's a good just to take take a break go to ohio it's like nobody touched it since like nineteen eighteen what's this money from the ohio tourism board i'll just put that on my chest we'll edit at at that part out so they don't know that we're getting paid and kenny what about you how do you solve when you're stuck yeah i mean i think we all have writers blocker curb you know what we're gonna use it a lot i think all points you guys are are spot on you're you're doing these projects is research don't work out some of them do and you really need to write that up and make it public public so it's a common phrase that research really doesn't exist unless it's disseminated at knowing can read about it you know it's like tree fell in the woods so you can do that and then we do this thing called peer review so i write up this this research i have and i wanna submitted to a journal so i sent it to the journal they look at it if they think it's good enough if they send it out to anonymous other scientists who then essentially read it and territory shreds and trying to poke holes in it and find everything that's wrong i'm going to revise it and if they like it and they don't reject you eventually gets published so from you can expect like a year or two like is people spend many years from submission to getting published so regarding writer's block getting those responses back especially a you know some people are really kind of polite and nice and have good comments other people just like you know a rip your science apart that can be pretty daunting so i think a big challenge especially for younger folks in science is to kind of maintain that self-motivation kinda have it within you to keep the persistent even if even if you're down in the dumps about your work i can't imagine having to send off script and then having to wait a full year ear and then a bunch of people have come back and ripped it apart that is excruciating so sorry yeah he's gotta be sure right it makes science it also prevents junk science from being published usually but yeah it as far as having this is a career there are there are better parts jolly thing will thank god that at least once the science is published that becomes legislation immediately ah right there's no red tape or loopholes or people that have to vote depending on if it's an election year it's just like oh the scientific community has all aw decided on this they've gone through peer review and so now that's the law that's how it works great so on that note people i should check out your podcast nadia why do you know that tell us about the podcast yeah check out my podcast why do you know that i co host steve schlage also very funny i hi we basically want to know why you know so much about an incredibly specific topics so we interview all walks of life about something that they really really are into not just obsessed with but like as hyper-specific as we can possibly get whether that isn't offend a person a cultural movement et cetera great okay that sounds fun and it's available wherever you get your.

kenny four four years seven years one day
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"The one of the question is, what's your claim to fame and they for some reason, change it to what is your proudest accomplishment? And those like my your answer can be completely inappropriate to that question. If you put like, 'cause claim to fame can be something quirky or like, that's not. It's so not my proudest accomplishment. You know what? I would whatever they'll just aren't the same question. Those aren't synonyms. And so. I definitely like restructured that answer because it didn't even make sense anymore. Yeah. So there is like a claim to fame question, but it's not technically published. I don't think ever. All right. Well, let's get into some people's played defames or proudest accomplishment, or what have you. I'll start with the great wolf America. Just highlight in here. He said, my claim to fame on survivor would be writing the BNB theme song, which. Oh, no. Shit use. Let's let's go to Caleb might survivor claim to fame would be accidentally starting a rumor that Sirri fields would appear on big brother nineteen after game changers, aired Liana. Do you remember this? Because I think I do. I think I know what kills talking about. I'm not sure. I definitely remember there was a rumor that some of the survivor people were going to be on. I'm trying to remember who was one of them though. I think she was that. I just I just because I think it was like right off the heels of advantage getting everyone was looking to give recent sort of fair chance maybe in a different game. But I know idea that we found the deep throat of this Sirri conspiracy 2017. This is where it all began. Let's go to Eric VJ. Rubinstein who said my survivor claim to fame likely on a. I was a postdoctoral researcher in New Haven. Two of my biggest achievements in life came up in my first two years there. One, I saw a piece of pizza from a Nobel winning scientists to. I was two time department of molecular biophysics and biochemistry, competitive eating champion. I've won the Taco Bell draft and the mystery kin challenge to stay moving. These are items on my CV that I am proudest of side to say. I lost them the McDonald's survivor competition and epic, triple thick. Milkshake hashtag blindside, and he also showed us a traveling, yelled department of MB and be eating championship trophy. So I think we have found the the John Cochran of the of the Yale pasta pasta, postdoctoral research facility, Liana, man, I got to go find that trophy. That's not my department again. Maybe I'll see if we can start our own trophy. Although I did picture when I saw like red, I stole a piece of pizza from an oboe winning scientists. I pictured pizza rat. For some reason, stealing pizza from a Nobel laureate. But that's just my brain to wrap for Halloween that year if you want to. Okay, I got it for next time prices work. That's the costume that all kinds. Did you buy pizza, right, costume or did you buy.

Liana postdoctoral researcher Eric VJ Caleb Rubinstein McDonald postdoctoral research John Cochran New Haven two years
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"And so that was that was why we increase the densities of the spider. So to find out, okay, what are these spiders doing in these Arctic ecosystems? And if you have more spiders than what's going to happen. So is the idea there that if they have a longer feeding period because it's warmer and that habitat then explore -able for a longer duration and their bodies get bigger and thereby they can just have more babies that climate change warming things that means more spiders in general because they've got these. Bigger bodies with more food in them. Right? So that's that's the idea. And you know, we're still trying to figure out whether that's really going to happen or not because these wolf spiders are what's called density dependent cannibals. And so if you increase their densities, they may also self regulate their populations because of competition. So maybe if you put too many competitive predators in an area, they will end up killing each other and you'll end up with the same number of spiders as you had from the beginning. So what's next for the three search? So in this study, you know is really neat because we found that wolf spiders can influence rates of decomposition on the tundra. That's really cool and that that affect changes under warming. And so that really highlights that we need to look at these food web level interactions under warming and look at the higher trophic levels. We, we need to understand how these predators are responding to warming and how the interactions within the food web can cascade down to fact, these ecosystem level processes carbon cycling. That we're really interested in in northern ecosystems while thank you so much for telling us about what you found Dr colts. Yeah, I'll thank you so much for having me Dr. Amanda colts is a postdoctoral research fellow at Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri..

Dr. Amanda colts -able postdoctoral research Saint Louis Washington University Missouri
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

Freedom 95 Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Freedom 95 Radio

"Of the world's most commonly prescribed medications may day the average american consumes twenty two teaspoons sugar say they should not be forced to get this shot not by the government for today's news from cnn want increase fertility try dropping fast food so talk about a healthy diet is just as important before pregnancy as during it women who eat more fast food and those who eat very little fruit take longer to get pregnant than women who include several portions of fruit in their daily diets according to a study published this last friday and the journal of human reproduction those who ate fruit less than three times a month those who ate fruit less than three times a month took half a month longer to become pregnant than those who ate fruit three or more times a day in a month before conception similarly those who consumed fast food four more times a week took nearly a month longer than women who ate several portions of fruit a day small modifications in dietary intake may have benefits for improving tilleke said author of a postdoctoral research program she said our data shows that frequent consumption of fast food delays time to get pregnant she added that further research is needed to assess the profitable impact of broad range of food on pregnancy so they looked at about fifty six hundred pregnant women in australia new zealand uk and ireland none of the women had previous babies during each women's first prenatal visit occurring during the.

cnn tilleke ireland journal of human postdoctoral research australia twenty two teaspoons
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on BrainStuff

"For making proteins or other molecules luck it who is a postdoctoral research fellow in the faculty of medicine at england's university of southampton says that researchers have long known that your birth season as well as certain environmental exposures like smoking famine or even your social environment are societas with certain epa genetic marks and can alter gene expression they just didn't know why she said epa genetic marks were a good candidate for the connecting mechanism between birth season and allergies because they can be altered by environmental exposures can influence gene expression and can last many years lock in her team scanned dna samples from three hundred and sixty seven eighteen year olds who were born on the isle of white in england they pay particular attention to certain markers called dna methylation in the samples dna methylation is one type of genetic mark methyl groups help cells reproduce normally and they can literally turn genes on or off when you're methyl groups are depleted bad genes like those the cause cancer are turned on researchers wanted to know whether certain markers could be linked to the time of year a person was born and whether those people experience allergies like exmoor asthma luck it said we found that yes dna beth elation at certain places in the genome is consistently associated with season of birth we went on to discover that these birth seasonal epa genetic marks are so seated with gene expression and could potentially provide a link to allergic disease luck it says her team found similar results when they do blockaded the study with a group of eight year olds from holland but the markers were not present when the team tested a group of newborns lock it says this suggests that epa genetic markers arise after birth or maybe even as a result of one's environment the link between birth month and allergy risk applies to all kinds of allergies lock it said for decades studies have shown that people born in autumn and winter are at an increased risk of not only rhinitis hay fever but also food allergy asthma and eggs.

allergies england holland postdoctoral research england's university of southa epa sixty seven eighteen year eight year
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Of trying to put it into crime on that corner the city officially takes ownership of the parcel in a little over a weekend militia the golden arches will begin shortly after that early morning classes have been disliked by college students forever and kcbs is bob butler reports a new report suggests that grades would improve if colleges and universities change their schedules to map students biological clocks admitted you're up late studying doing homework on social media the stereotype of the teenager who wants to sleep in it's just i'm expressing their biology it's not like teenagers all suddenly become lazy they they really are trying to live later in the uc berkeley postdoctoral research fellow at thirty co author ben smarr finds it really is hard to get too early morning classes to the extent that lectures become more and more either nukes these huge online classes or accessible content at anytime like a wikipedia or khan academy and then finding people that are in your temporal niche that are active when you want to be active with whom you can interact cal state east bay student paris product sees it all the time by starting the day and then i have classes from about seven two eight eight thirty so i'm personally more of a morning person so when it comes to those night some kind of tuning out and i can't my my i'm just not as on task it should be far would love it if colleges offered more flexibility as for the late nights would have helped to keep the cellphone out of the bed your body's not falling asleep fast as you can because of the electron ix so i would say in berkeley but butler kcbs cbs news time nine thirty banks and other lenders are happy to make mortgages for ordinary people people with ordinary jobs ordinary pay stubs ordinary tax returns but what if your extraordinary self employed or an independent contractor what did you have a strong bank account aggressive tax return write offs won a three million dollar loan or want to refinance and take out hundreds of thousands in cash too often good candidates like you are turned down because you took a different path well that's all changed with the extraordinary mortgage program from cashcall mortgage where we look at your cash flow not your tax returns make the cash call at eight three three four three.

berkeley bob butler uc berkeley postdoctoral research ben smarr paris self employed cashcall three million dollar
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Science for the People

"The views expressed on signs for the people are not necessarily the views of this station it's affiliates sponsors or advertisers this week on science for the people we're discussing glue from two very different times first up dr t annually tells us about his research into a new type of medical adhesive then dr highskill lagging yawns explains her work making an investigating stone each glues welcome to signs for the people i'm your host marion kilgour joining me as dr genuinely assistant professor in the department of mechanical engineering at mcgill university he completed his phd in mechanical engineering at harvard university and his postdoctoral research at the institute for biological inspired engineering at harvard he was the recipient of a vis technology development award for enabling translational research at his work has been published in high impact journal's such as science nature communications and nature reviews materials his research interests include biomaterials mechanics soft machines drug delivery at cellular entities tissue engineering so thanks for speaking to us today okay thank you just saw by grip pressure to be vijit's you i would just like to start off with some background on how adhesives are currently used in medicine before we get into some of the newer research that you've been doing i would normally think stitches or staples to seal up a wound but where do adhesives currently get used yes so this a really good guy crushes so actually are you so as being craissati use you'd be clinical saturday up jusen your right so that very used to close at one all grew separate polish off to shoot together officer like a surgery and but however due to the limit of chemical helped betty off the he said using nowadays steal the most common practice is using suture staples in the clean and they are a very research going on youth divide up afafter emails are reach out to make the base suture all staples so what are some of the difficulties in using it he since on biological tissues so i think they all shoumei difficulty uber help fall when using the user interface.

marion kilgour assistant professor mcgill university harvard university postdoctoral research high impact journal officer dr highskill
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Ching the course what einstein got wrong it's a really interesting way to approach this topic is obviously einstein made in tremendous contributions to concepts like space time gravity energy matter their whole relativity thing but obviously there were limits to his ability to understand the universe knowing the where he went to the end of what he then got wrong is a fascinating weight is to learn about what we now know about physics that goes even beyond einstein are really interesting approach and as if you're interested in learning more about einstein you can watch these courses from any tv laptop tablet or smartphone or my favorite is that you can listen along with the great courses plus app as one of our listeners you're going to get a free trial to enjoy it all but you need to go to our special you are l start your free trial today sign up at the great courses plus dot com slash skeptics remember that's the great courses plus dot com slash rush skeptics all right guys let's get back to the show all right bob this would have been a great science fiction if you didn't come on it you can't miss this first extra galactic planet yes so hold onto your hat this is a cool one scientists have indirectly found xl planets in another galaxy and not a close galaxy this went to almost wait for it 4 billion light years away is that were holy crap or what a third of the universe and so this was announced in probing planets an extra glacto galaxies using quasar microlending which recently appeared in the extra physical journal letters and the research was done by you die and eduardo get us a postdoctoral research n professor respectively at university of oklahoma so how is this even possible without a tartus or something well as a recently we file yes i've been watching lots of dr who lately yes i well as recently as i think early december we put detected over three three thousand seven hundred ten planets in two.

einstein bob professor eduardo postdoctoral research university of oklahoma 4 billion light years
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

The Infinite Monkey Cage

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Infinite Monkey Cage

"Well yeah schizophrenia is the reason i became interested in adolescent brains and vague because i was doing pa she in the postal postdoctoral research on schizophrenia and i got interested in the fact that all these patients i was testing in hospitals in the uk and in france where i did my post dog when i asked them what age did you start experiencing your symptoms which was things like hearing voices inside their heads and being paranoid there wasn't a single exception every single one of the hundreds of patients i saw said some aged between eighteen and twenty five so i became interested in what is it in the teenage brain that is that developed differently in teenagers who go on to develop schizophrenia and back then that was about seventeen sixteen seventeen years ago that i became just in that question very little was known about even how the typically developing brain changes let alone in the in teenagers who go on to develop schizophrenia so that's when i decided to work on that last question the answer is we don't really know yet does that that kind of question is starting to be asked in big largescale studies that are scanning the brains of teenagers for example who are at high risk from developing schizophrenia or indeed another mental illness and what that so the the the the jury's out we don't really know the the the precise answers but what these studies tend to show is that the way the brain gets to it and points the way it developed seems to be really critical in all of these different mental illnesses and also developmental conditions even like adhd and autism it's not about the end point but it's about how they got there they analogy i like to use is whether you take to get to your point you whether you drive the motorways of the river road you might get the same point even in the same month time sometimes but wayne you the roots you take is really important and that seems to be the case for mental illnesses so is the the suggestion.

postdoctoral research uk france schizophrenia adhd seventeen sixteen seventeen ye
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Help us out with that and they're doing a fantastic job uh and so you can download the raw images and then reworked them into a interest in technical result or even interest in artistic result and there have been lots of people doing that it's all freely available on the web if people just do a search on gino on june of can they can find the archive and they can i hope be part of history make a new images from jupiter actually am on the team is really encouraging lama the amateur astronomers to look at jupiter during certain times the trade dead both the people observing here it or if can use than their own telescopes to look up into space and to see and then you can compare and contrast that with what are earthspace robot is collecting there and in orbit no every one of my guess that come i ask them a very important question in that was what was that gravity assist the propelled them into their field jared what happened with you yeah so like many of us have been fascinated by space since i was a little kid um my dad was a big science fiction fans ours enjoyed going to science fiction convention to read science fiction with them and then i realized that in order to study space you had to learn about physique sin about math and so i i i did that uh and then i've i've just been at the right place at the right time ever since i you went to graduate school to to to do a physics uh i was working with data from a nasa mission more school was surveyor that naturally led to uh working as a postdoctoral research up at goddard and they couldn't get rid of me and and i've i've been there ever since so you know it's a right place at the right time ebeen interested in space i think is is how i got to where i am joining us next time as we continue our virtual tour of the solar system i'm jim dream in this is your gravity assist.

postdoctoral research virtual tour solar system jared nasa
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Policy Scout

The Policy Scout

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on The Policy Scout

"This past year has been brutal between the return and subsequent death of otto warm beer allegations of his horrific abuse and torture at the hands of north koreans which led to his death and a summer filled with nuclear test noisy threats of devastating attacks in guam which is a us territory the pacific coast of the united states and japan incomplete intelligence emerges from satellite footage of these tests but who knows what north korea's capability really is kim jongun rules his country with an iron fist and a lockdown border all he wants to the world to see is highly sensationalized propaganda by the way if you ever want to wind up in a very interesting google rabbit whole start searching for photos of north korea and shopped kim jongun pictures i promise you won't be disappointed anyway on a mission to find some answers i was fortunate enough to talk to an expert full disclosure as many of you know am a usc trojan so of course i have a little bit of bias there but the institute for korean studies at usc remains one of these leading research institutions in the country and policy experts from around the world to recognize the expertise of the institute's fellows dr marco me lonnie is one of those experts a postdoctoral research fellow at u s sees korean studies institute the topics we discussed here i tried to organize them kind of like a pyramid i wanted to start by getting some clarity on the situation within north korea and some concrete information about kim jongun i then tried to branch out more and more asking about the possibility of an attack destabilization of the regime and the effects on the rest of asia and on the us.

guam united states north korea usc asia otto japan kim jongun google lonnie postdoctoral research korean studies institute
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"This is tech news briefing from the wall street journal hello welcome i'm tanya bustos reporting from the newsroom in new york so one of the biggest battles intact today is artificial intelligence specifically the battle for expertise and recruitment as apple looks to make big strides in this field it grapples with its famous reputation for secrecy as it aims to search for talent in a world of artificial intelligence which is known for its openness where does this leave apple in its pursuit of a success joining us with more patching in from san francisco as always is the wall street journal trip nickel welcome back triplets rome it's on it so it seems like a i is the one thing that has managed to get apple to open up first off why is transparency so essential in the world of am transparency is essential in the role of ai largely four recruiting reasons this is a feelgood still very rooted in academia a lot of the experts in the field typically do postdoctoral work and postdoctoral research as a consequence of that these are people who would typically years ago of then moved on from that roll into academia had actually can become professors to do research for the rest of their careers um what we're seeing is apple google microsoft facebook and others are so interested in ai that that the opportunity to move into industry and make so much more money is pulling these people out of the world of academia and into uh the world.

wall street journal tanya bustos new york artificial intelligence apple san francisco postdoctoral research facebook postdoctoral microsoft
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Moorer moorer arthritis at least the common form of it osteoarthritis just seems to be one of the many ordinary ailments of growing older our bodies are made to last forever so unfortunately once advanced middle age sneaks up on us we start seeing the results of a lifetime of natural wear and tear in joints like fingers backs unease that's the story were told but what if it's not entirely true arthritis is on the rise but according to a new study focusing on me osteoarthritis this may have more to do with how were living then with how long reliving dr ian wallace is a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of human evolutionary biology at harvard university in cambridge massachusetts and he led the study dr wallace walk to corks and corks thank you i'm happy does he grew thyatira what is osteoarthritis exactly well the hallmark of osteoarthritis is the breakdown of cartilage in our joints but really all of the different tissues that comprise the joint are affected by the disease and that includes the the underlined bone and the ligaments in the capsules and muscles that surround the joint but ultimately the primary thing is that the his cartilage destruction so what were you trying to understand about it well there are a couple of things about osteoarthritis that make it a very challenging and troubling disease we don't know what causes it and we don't know how to treat it and so there's a conundrum here and i thought maybe this is a disease where an evolutionary perspective might be helpful and so the question uh that i set out to address and people in in my lab who worked with me is whether or not osteoarthritis is more common today than it was in the past and if we can answer that question that might tell us something about what is causing it that we weren't able to a address before in in previous clinical research how prevalent is it today.

dr ian wallace harvard university massachusetts postdoctoral research cambridge dr wallace
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Toys and food along the way and we saw how long did it take them to eventually get to me so the dogs who had more attentive mothers were worse it puzzles and more destructible so there any broader implications we can draw from this for humans and other working dogs yes so i think that it's very tempting to apply it to humans but obviously there are different species in terms of applying at t two other working dogs i think that's also a question that we need to answer empirically and i think we'll be important um some hoping to for example look at this in the population of assistance dogs uh that i am currently working with and see if we if we find similar effects dr break thanks so much for your time thank you dr emily bray is a postdoctoral research associate at the university of arizona's canine cognition center about ten thousand years ago the last ice age came to an end and the huge ice sheets that covered canada and most of the northern hemisphere to a depth of a couple of kilometres melted away long warm period on earth began the one were enjoying now in fact this 3's and thaw cycle between ice ages and warm interglacial periods has repeated many times about every hundred thousand years our planet goes through a period of cooling and massive glaciers build up and then shifts to a warmer regime and the ice melts scientists are still working out some of the details of what causes the climate to move between hot and cold like this.

postdoctoral research associat canada dr emily bray university of arizona hundred thousand years ten thousand years
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"The here here's where i wanted to kind of differentiate between investing money immediately into products which can make money like the space program private into uh in invest as are coming in to india's launching shuttle a luncheon shuttles after shuttles taking in huge money from private investors in the us in japan in russia so dose kind of programmes are definitely funded stem cell research yes but a longterm education policy which will pay off in the next twenty thirty s and this lag would start to show in the next and at what i'm talking about is that a longterm vision is me missing there is definitely enough encouragement to get rake in money in the in this kind of neoliberal scientific world you know where a quick monies available in it's the long term were is is word we will field is and this is what the scientists are saying that in a research induce money for schools a colleges phd research postdoctoral research this is vanishing aren't the whoa returned to talk about education in a moment but firstly that the let's let's go back to the standoff between india and china among upholstery is resisting being dragged into this and at this is very worrying that the reason i i wanted to bring in what police say about this endeavor china standoff is india suddenly and very scary feeling very isolated in asia in of the historical problems with pakistan is that we notice india has had a longterm problem with bangladesh it at many different levels one is the river and water disputes bangladesh and the training of supposedly training of hull troas air for us in a sam especially the ulfa that has been a long dispute sri lanka we have made a mess through the ipk of through the 90s as never we've never managed to repair dna odds baton at we have a very heavy big brother attitude and nepal which has been a very close ally and an end india has taken very active interest in nepal suddenly ulcers it says hey we don't want to be a part of this.

space program india us japan russia postdoctoral research asia pakistan ulfa sri lanka nepal stem cell research china bangladesh
"postdoctoral research" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"postdoctoral research" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And we were using the kept telescope which had just been commissioned in fact made visor built one of the premier instruments on the kept telescope and i use that to study these star spots on young sons and then went to brazil for a short postdoctoral research fellowship there n n and doing as i was doing my postdoctoral research i became aware of this idea that bill baru kiet nasa aimed the hada which was to use the transit method to find planets and i knew also that he wanted to find not just giant planets but earth size planets which was something that hadn't been done and so i was really interested in that because head from my perspective of studying spots i my first thought was while you're seeing spots rotated in and out of view that changes the total brightness of a star in and of itself how can you to some tangle the signal of the planet a spot right so i i sent an email to bill and asked him about that yeah i'm like i'm really interested in this i steady spots on on sonlike starzen i'm curious to know if that's an issue for you as you're planning out this search thinking about this new technique santacruz so i'm guessing did you grow up in california whose head was looking at the stars of the product of public education in california kindergarten all the way through knives e ha grew up in the east bay uh did my underground at berkeley and my gratitude santacruz so in so it added also imagine that when you went down to brazil that's a whole different set a stars what your underneath rather none of my doubt reactions backwards a house that lie very strange a you know here in the northern hemisphere when we want to look at the zodiac for example or find the moon you generally turn south.

postdoctoral research california berkeley brazil