35 Burst results for "Popular Music"

Reggae Legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry Dies at 85

BBC World Service

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Reggae Legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry Dies at 85

"A living legend of the musical world who has passed away the Jamaican reggae and dub style. Perry Lee Scratch. Perry has died on the island aged 85 public response from Jamaica's Prime minister Andrew Holmes, who called him a legendary record producer and singer and a great pioneer. He's one of his earliest releases people, funny people. One of the first acknowledge reggae songs from 1968. Mhm. David Katz wrote the biography people, funny people. The genius of Lee Scratch Perry and I'm delighted to say he joins us now on the program. Just just tell our listeners Lee Scratch Perry. Why was he called Scratch and you turned it shopping. I I don't think we have David. Their bit of sound. Yeah, so sonic invention there. It was the man himself the way to pay tribute to the man himself, actually, because I didn't interview on that a little bit earlier Scratch private. He did a song called Chicken Scratch, And so they produced a record called Chicken Scratch. You could have asked me It's a shame we couldn't get David to talk about it. I think that's the the The line has gone down. But what we can do is there again. Hello, David. Join us Go, and I've answered the first question. Hello? Give us another quick going role. Um You know he was he was He was a collective figure wasn't he Wasn't Keith Richards, who described him as the Salvador Dali of music. Yes, indeed. I mean, he was a multifaceted character. He began his career as a singer and then moved into record production where he really excelled. And of course, his innovative techniques really changed the way that popular music has been recorded and disseminated. In what way In what way? Well, he really stimulated remix culture. What we take for granted. Now, you know, he reused his rhythm tracks for songs he'd recorded originally as vocal recordings and overdubbed new instruments on them and mix them down. And really help to dub come into being as a genre and an art form. And that

Lee Scratch Perry Perry Lee Scratch Prime Minister Andrew Holmes David Katz David Jamaica Perry Keith Richards Salvador
The 1960s Pirates: The Fight to Keep Pop Music Alive

HISTORY This Week

02:07 min | Last month

The 1960s Pirates: The Fight to Keep Pop Music Alive

"Gale-force winds off the coast of england choppy waves phone blowing and streaks across the water and a small group of pirate ships that have been fighting to stay afloat and are about to lose radio london present their one hour these are pirates of a particular kind less sword fighting and treasure hunting more spinning records and dancing late into the night for the past few years a handful of votes have made it their mission to broadcast popular music from international waters. Because the bbc won't play much pop. And this is the sixties. The people wanna hear it you. This was always just barely legal and now the government has put its foot down tonight at the stroke of midnight. These pirate radio deejays will become criminals. Several boats have already given up and today the last possible day. The first to stop broadcasting is radio london. Time is three of talk radio. London is now closing down. The next to drop is radio. Two seven oh so named for the frequency that at amazon in their final hours. They have a rough go of it. The bad weather prevents most of the. Dj's for making it out to the boat so they have to record their farewell messages from the shore. Helicopter pilot agrees to drop a package of tapes on board the ship. So the dj's who are on board can play them but he misses and the tapes plunge into the water plus two seven has some technical difficulties after jellyfish get sucked in with the water. That's supposed to cool the generators but their final broadcast is poignant nonetheless role we have exactly exactly sixty seconds left. So i haven't said migrant boys yes well. You already know my sentiments. I'm gonna miss you one hell of a lot right before midnight. Real truth is now closing down.

Gale London England BBC Amazon
Top Five Music Documentaries and Woodstock 99

The Big Picture

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Top Five Music Documentaries and Woodstock 99

"You like i are a connoisseur of music docks i imagine. How many do you think you've watched in your lifetime. Let's say let's try and put a number on this showy might be a hundred. Yeah that's that's aspirational. But i'd say anywhere seventy to a hundred feels like the sweet spot. I don't know what that says. If that's a good thing is that as good thing sean. It's chilling robbing. It's definitely yelling. It's concern you. And i've spent a lot a lot a lot of time in our lives. Digging it in your hand of music musicians musical genres the history of the form. The feuds the fights the love and it's an interesting kind of a subcategory. Why do you think music in particular has been so ripe for the documentary form especially nowadays. It feels like we're getting a new one every week including some that. The ringer ourselves are producing. It is true that the star documentary is a necessary function of a rollout. You know taylor swift if you count like a netflix concert movie. That she did. She's put out three movies like three feature length movies in like three or four years. It's just you have to do it now. You know you got the billy. Irish one It's lady gaga katy. Perry beyond says down a couple. It's just it's a natural part. I think it all goes back to two behind the music to vh one's behind the music arc the rise and fall arc like we love to watch rosters become rockstars. We loved a lot watch rockstars crash and burn you know and reliably. We get both ends of that in your typical rock documentary. Well let me psychoanalyze you a little bit. Why do we that. Why do we wanna see. These majestic figures of popular. Music hit their peaks and then crashed so painfully right. It's it's a celebrity worship thing. I think ultimately we love to build people up and we love to watch them break down if not break them down ourselves. We're sort of seeing this arc with britney spears right now which is a very moving target is a news story. But it's just

Gaga Katy Sean Taylor Swift Netflix Perry Britney Spears
NFTs and the music business

Talking Tech

01:41 min | 6 months ago

NFTs and the music business

"Listeners. Mike snyder here. And i'm brett molina. Welcome back to talking tech. Recently you may have heard us talk about. Nfc's and they are still going strong bread. I think in a ps are here to stay as you reported two weeks ago. We've had all kinds of teas after you just hearing about them enough. Tease stanford non fungible tokens. That's a fancy way of saying something that is unique and irreplaceable digital ledgers. Or blockchain are used to authenticate whatever the nf is or whatever the collectible it is time to now. Some of the wild things we've seen purchased are nba video. Highlights jack door. She's i tweet. A piece of digital art for seventy million dollars and the rock band kings of leon did an nf t special vinyl copies of its latest album now other artists are getting into into the to lindsay lohan. Who i have to admit i forgot. She had put out some pretty popular music in the past is oxygen in often. New single called lullaby snoop dogg in the weekend of tweeted up there looking at music in peace but i just did a story on an artist named shantelle. She hails from barbados. She might remember her. R&b pop hits impossible t shirt while she's making a comeback after her record label contract expired and she's hoping us enough t as a way to maintain some power and control over her music. For her new single has party she's auctioning off the ability to have your name included in a special recording of the song and you could be one of three bidders to have your likeness included in special versions of the cover art of the single which will be signed an authenticated in

Mike Snyder Brett Molina Jack Door NFC Shantelle NBA Lindsay Lohan Barbados
Spotify goes HiFi

Talking Tech

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

Spotify goes HiFi

"Spotify the most popular music streaming service says it plans to launch a higher fidelity level of service later this year. It's going to be called spotify. Hi fi so for a bit of background most standard levels of streaming of music it's equivalent to mp3 quality to better than mp three quality. So that's the range you've got and a lot of people pretty much pooh-poohing mp three now back in the day it was. It was great because you could get can email and download files at our whatever but in these cases the song files are compressed and some dads lost in the process. So that's kinda why. Mp threes pooh-poohed. You know they sound good but likely not as good as if you played the same song on a compact disc but several services have sought to improve sand cloudy with compression that saves all the

Spotify
Why Olivia Rodrigos Debut Single, Drivers License, Is Making Music History

Direct from Hollywood

00:51 sec | 8 months ago

Why Olivia Rodrigos Debut Single, Drivers License, Is Making Music History

"If you follow popular music by now. You've probably heard olivia rodriguez driver's license. It's transformed her into a mainstream pop star almost overnight. It's debuted at number one billboard hot one hundred only forty seven songs in chart history have started at number one but what makes her achievement even more impressive is that it's very first major release olivia also multiple streaming records an amazon revealed. It's now the most requested song on alexa ever for a single day. Rancid olivia does already have a media presence and fan base from her time as a disney star but this debut is unprecedented and olivia is everywhere. Her life is forever changed sort of she tells billboard. I've always amazing opportunities now. And so many people that i look up to have reached out and express their love. The song which is absolutely surreal. But i'm truly just the same seventeen year old girl. Doing statistics homework in my bedroom. Driver's license is out. Now

Olivia Rodriguez Rancid Olivia Olivia Alexa Amazon Disney
Grammy-winning music producer Phil Spector dies of natural causes

News, Traffic and Weather

00:49 sec | 8 months ago

Grammy-winning music producer Phil Spector dies of natural causes

"The way popular music is made. California State prison officials say eccentric producer Phil Specter died in the hospital of Natural Causes. At the age of 81. ABC is Kristopher Watson. With Phil Spector's story, one of the most influential producers in pop music history. Phil Spector's unmistakable wall of sound studio mastery revolutionized recording. Produced hits for the Righteous Brothers, the run at Psych and Tina Turner and more in the sixties that it be 70 saw Specter working with John Lennon and George Harrison of the Beatles After producing the band's final studio album, Let it be Dropping Out of sight For decades, Specter resurfaced in 2003 accused and then convicted after two trials of murdering actress Lana Clarkson and sentenced to 19 years to life in prison in California. Kristopher Watson ABC News This is

Phil Specter California State Prison Hospital Of Natural Causes Kristopher Watson Specter ABC Tina Turner George Harrison John Lennon Lana Clarkson California Abc News
Phil Spector, music producer and murderer, dies at 81

BBC Newshour

00:33 sec | 8 months ago

Phil Spector, music producer and murderer, dies at 81

"Convicted murderer with a long history of physically and mentally abusing his partners and colleagues, a man who transformed the sound of popular music rarely if ever, in the contrast between the person and the artist had been more pronounced than in the case of Phil Specter, the American producer who's died at the age of 81. His death was confirmed not by family friends or a publicist, but by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. That's because the man who invented the wall of sound died inside the walls of a prison where he was serving his sentence for shooting dead the actress Lana Clarkson shortly after meeting her in

Phil Specter California Department Of Corre Lana Clarkson
"popular music" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"popular music" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Coming up just about the biggest holiday popular music hit of the early fifties. Unlike Jimmy Boy And then we'll take a trip to Christmas Island with the Brian Setzer Orchestra. I saw Mommy kissing close many mistletoe last night. She didn't see me cream down the day to have a baby. He thought that I watch packed up in my bedroom bastard! Asleep Then I saw Mommy Take us close under honey bee. It's off! No! Woz. What happened? If Daddy had only seen Mommy kissing Santa Claus. No, I saw Mommy kissing. So any mistletoe. He didn't see me Cream down the stand to have a baby. She dog that I was tucked up in my.

Brian Setzer Orchestra Jimmy Boy Christmas Island Daddy
Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

Business Wars Daily

01:53 min | 9 months ago

Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

"Dylan sold his entire back catalogue of music to universal music group earlier. This month price wasn't made public but estimates range from three to four hundred million dollars. The catalog contains about six hundred songs composed over sixty years over the years. Dillon has sold more than one hundred. Twenty five million records and at seventy nine years old. He's still performing globally for the last several decades until the pandemic he performed more than one hundred concerts per year. Not surprisingly the ceo made su nami sized waves the new york times called it a blockbuster deal and said it may be the largest sale. In history of a single songwriters music dylan status is unlike that of any other musician in the twenty first century in two thousand eight. He won a pulitzer prize for quote his profound impact on popular music in american culture marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power in two thousand sixteen. He won the nobel prize in literature for quote having created new poetic expressions within the great american song tradition at the time. The nobels permanent secretary. The late sarah donahue's compared dylan to greek poets. Homer and sappho dylan is also the recipient of numerous grammy awards and the presidential medal of freedom. Moreover dylan is seen not just as a cultural icon but also as one who has kept the copyrights to his songs even while allowing many other musicians to cover them. He's also allowed his music to be used for some surprising commercial undertakings like twenty nineteen super bowl budweiser ad in two thousand four. Victoria's secret out. According to the wall street journal copyrights to the compositions themselves are distinct from recording and performing rights among the songs in the catalog at universal acquired or some that have gone down in history indeed changed history like blowing in the wind like a rolling stone and yes the times they are a and

Dylan Su Nami Universal Music Group Sarah Donahue Dillon Sappho Dylan Pulitzer Prize The New York Times Grammy Awards Homer The Wall Street Journal Victoria
David Byrne on Turning 'American Utopia' Into a Book

The Book Review

04:21 min | 11 months ago

David Byrne on Turning 'American Utopia' Into a Book

"David byrne joins us now. He is of course the musician. The filmmaker visual artist and here primarily as an author of a new book. American utopia. he wrote it. And it's illustrated together with myra common david thank you so much for being here. Thank you this is obviously tied to a larger project began as a concert. Tour than a broadway show now. A film directed by spike lee and simultaneously a book. Can you talk to us a little bit for those who aren't familiar with american utopia which i feel like. I don't know who those people are at this point. But tell us about how you conceived of the project and the various forms in which it's appeared and was it all like known from the beginning that would be in these multiple formats going backwards. No it was not conceived from the beginning that would be all these multiple formats. I didn't imagine. In the beginning. That it would end up on broadway that that would be filmed serve one thing leads into another okay so in the beginning i imagined wanted to see if i could do a show where all the band members were mobile taught. The technology might have arrived where that would be possible. And it also required that i would have a sufficient budget because that would mean i would have to turn say drummer into six different players. All playing drum and percussion instruments like a drumline or a samba. School of something. Like got and i realized okay. That's more personnel. Can afford that a could. I went ahead with this. Which opened up opportunities for staging and choreography and movement and then lighting and everything else just follow. Once one thing was kinda complicated or decided then door would open. And you go okay. That means it then we can do this. And now i can do this except etcetera so some point during the tour. I kind of got wind that broadway producers had seen the show and thought probably i'm going to guess in response to the success of bruce springsteen's show people thought. Oh this can go to broadway. This could go to broadway in broadway. Audiences are ready for this kind of thing now. This is a thing that can be done very very different than bruce springsteen's show. But i think the idea was that whatever popular music contemporary music could work on broadway thing just didn't have to be all broadway music. I wrote additional things for the broadway version extended it reshaped it unused broadway. Audience would kind of come with different sets of expectations but also kind of opportunity for me to talk more to kind of shape the show in a different way kind of address things that you may not addressing a concert tour where people basically just wanna dance and have a lot of fun. The director alex timbers was helping out and he said david you know you could maybe have a a drop curtain here and that in a certain kind of way when the audience is coming in and staring at the stage and the curtain is down in some ways you can have an image that sort of prepares them and in a little bit in a way for what's coming and tear. Myra coleman yes and alex showed me kind of an old graphic. Did he probably got off the internet. That was sort of like the fifty states and what each state is known for and this may be done like in the forties or fifties or something like that. It's a school thing. What were your favorite states. Because you're laughing. I'm laughing laughing because you know you can imagine the some corn and some of them mining or of them are cattle. Oh yes and so. It was also folklore folklore from each state. So the be paul bunyan or casey jones. John henry all these american kind of bits and legends were in there. And i thought okay in wanna do that exactly but i thought that's a nice direction. Thank you alex. So i went to myra who i'd worked with before many many many years ago and said would you be interested in doing drawings and paintings for this curtain.

Myra Common David Thank David Byrne Spike Lee Bruce Springsteen Alex Timbers Myra Coleman Alex David Paul Bunyan Casey Jones John Henry Myra
Fun Trivia with Hilary Swank, Andy Richter and Yvette Nicole Brown

Ask Me Another

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Fun Trivia with Hilary Swank, Andy Richter and Yvette Nicole Brown

"Joining us right now we have Andy Richter and Yvette Nicole Brown hello. Hello, hi Oh vera. Out of the So Hey, you know it's amazing to have you both on and also both of you are really have done. A lot of game shows Andy. You have even done the top echelon of what our listeners love jeopardy celebrity jeopardy I was on twice. Yeah. The second time I was on was part of a celebrity tournament of champions. The winners from that were supposed to come back and we ended up Conan and I were on the tonight show, and then we weren't on the tonight show. then. Went on a tour and the day of the remainder or the next step of the tournament was our opening night of the tour. So I was in. Eugene. Oregon while Isaac Mizrahi filled in for me apparently not my I mean I'm perfectly happy to. Fill in for me. Is If. He made most of his career based on your cancellations. I believe he does exactly exactly my womenswear line I just couldn't finish. Right head. And, Yvette you have been on a loads of game shows. Yeah. What is your favorite game show appearance as a contestant been? Oh Gosh. You're so hard I really love Hollywood game night the Jane Lynch because you never know what game it's going to be I can I can also speak to Hollywood game night they pour the booze down there they do. You. Listen I'm very competitive. So every time I do the show I don't drink because. I nothing makes me happier than winning someone else money, and so I'm there to help those people about how To propose it everybody I'm Michael be tossing back. Whiskey sours and being the reason why? I know Andy. This yes. September thirteenth you are bringing back. The live streaming event from the Sitcom yelled Andy Richter controls the universe. Yes and so what prompted this event? I mean people have been doing this cast reunion table Ridi thing for charity online because you know there's a lot of attention starved people. Get some attention and they tell you get entities that need our help. No, that's secondary. Today virtual reunion of the community cast. Recently when we did it for community, it was from the kindness of our hearts, Andy Richter. All right. All right. Right. You did that in May right we do now do you keep in contact with the your other cast mates? We've always had a group chat or two going I found out during that charity event that Donald Glover wasn't in our current. Routes. Something funny. Happened in. Somebody had some further information about the joke and I said put in the group Jen. Donaldson. Put it into what? Is it the thing nobody would since ever exclude Donald Glover for any other reason besides being respectful of Donald Glover's time We let him know like listen man, you are a lion king. On Somali. Music and stuff. So He's in the group chat. Now at least once a week he goes why did I ask to be here because? We text each other. So I WANNA talk about your new project on audible room room. But let's play a game right and this game is called hooked on lyrics. What we've done is we've asked some kids to read lyrics to popular music that was popular before they were born. They probably have never heard any of these songs before, but we haven't to read the lyrics and your job is just to guests the songs. So we're GONNA start with you in gets aric. My name is Jane. I'm nine years old and I'm from new. York. The faith thousand day use so to ask they had to feel. That future boom boom Ah. Okay. Can I say that I missed most of it because I was I, think oscillating listening to her. Yet black-eyed peas black eyed peas boom boom POW, is the name of the song. Oh Are In anti. This one is for you. This is Jane again, and this time she's got some lyrics from a Nobel prize winning folksinger still laugh about everybody that was hanging out now you don't talk. So out now you don't seem so proud about having to me scratching next meal. That is like a rolling stone by Bob Dylan. Absolutely, correct that's right. I'm pretty sure as a nine year old, she does not have a Bob Dylan poster in her room. Not yet not yet not she's a fan of Nobel Prize winner she might. That's

Andy Richter Jane Lynch Donald Glover Isaac Mizrahi Yvette Nicole Brown Bob Dylan Nobel Prize Conan Hollywood Eugene Oregon Donaldson JEN Jane Michael York
Microsoft In Talks To Buy Teen Fave TikTok

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Microsoft In Talks To Buy Teen Fave TikTok

"Microsoft is reported in talks to acquire popular music streaming. APP TIKTOK as NPR's Bobby Allen explains the discussions come as the trump administration ramps up its pressure campaign to force Tiktok to cut ties with its Chinese owners. Tech giant Microsoft is in talks about possibly purchasing Tiktok a favourite among teens and twenty somethings that has become a target in Washington that's according to A. Person Familiar with the discussions tiktok owned by Beijing based Bite Dance Federal. Officials have warned the Chinese Communist Party could be using TIKTOK as a way to spy on American citizens even though there's no hard evidence, that's happening. The acquisition would give Microsoft already a one point six, trillion dollar company access to a base of tens of millions of young users in audience coveted. By every major Silicon Valley company TIKTOK. One of the most popular APPs in the world has been downloaded one hundred eighty million times in the US

Microsoft Tiktok Chinese Communist Party Bobby Allen NPR United States Beijing Washington
"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

"Mouse Phil Spector producing I turner's version of River Deep Mountain high the song that infamously broke Specter's back in the American marketplace, and showed spectrum lost his command of American dance floors. It's a big hit in England, big influence, Harem and other art groups, but a failure on its own terms as a piece of our be popular dance music so. You're a last point we're GONNA have time to hit in any depth. What what are your thoughts on walls analysis of this by -cation between White Rock and black RB FUNK and soul. Well I. You know I'm sort of torn on. I see what he's talking about and it's. It's certainly the case that the African Americans largely advocate not withstanding living color and a few A few other sort of exception that rock and roll was abandoned by African Americans. and. That's the. As this rock and roll grows past you know the Beatles and the white album, and all the and and those type of recording. There's a an emphasis on. Artistry etc. that leaves the dance, floor. And that begins to look at African, American music and its crowd, pleasing tendencies. In varying way, so you have you have James Brown and and a lot of. About was that was enjoyed by plenty of of white individuals. And I don't think that. In in that instance, the fact that rock and roll began to look wise. and foreign soil, because the with black met that there were some crossovers although I. Think More White People Listen to music and more white people, listening to soul, music and black people listen to like led Zeppelin Black Sabbath or metal etcetera right? Yeah, so, but they're still plenty of black fans of those honors. Minority Yeah, there were there were. In but I also think it's important to keep in mind. That that there were other That sort of That were involved with this in one of those undercurrent I think. Is that You know with with the arrival of recordings in this ability for people to listen to recordings. that. Offered a sort of verite that had blocked existed before. And certainly for for African Americans one of the. Issues aside from the. There's two major issues on. Access to. Fool markets. You know if you're African. American businessman and Early Twentieth Century for instance. It was very hard to get your product into white markets. This was especially true of cultural products. You know African American filmmakers, etc. They just could not get their movies and into white distribution. Or to why film houses that sort of thing, there's also the need to correct what some have referred to as a sort of counterfeit counterfeited view of of blackness African American. And just sort of. show what the real is. What the Real African Americans live with the real negroes life. Hands you have these mass media? Forms especially film, and as recordings become more and more controlled by high civility standards. musical recordings that allowed. African American artists. To more and more present to the public what they were about what they were experiencing and sends the wall talks. At various points in the book. He writes about African. Ours trying.

Phil Spector River Deep Mountain Beatles England Specter James Brown
"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

"To. Make me, know you care. Of And that was Frank Sinatra aiming for the teenage market in nineteen, fifty, five with two hearts two kisses. Sound. I thought it was a fun listen, but it goes back ties into wild point about how artists abandoned the dance for Gopher. Bigger statements, aimed at adult audiences and kind of leave the pop, or at least the teen market behind, and it's a process of the Beatles are going to repeat in the sixties to some extent and I think. That his arguments about. An mentioning resins quarter out when things are gained, things are lost. Another thing that that was interesting I hadn't thought about. Is that one of the reasons? It's difficult for older people to appreciate new forms of music is that? When you learn to listen to music you, you learn to listen for certain qualities, and whenever there's a new form of music, not only are there new sounds that you're not trying to listen to, but some of the things that you've you is the most important bulwarks of musical appreciation are missing, and that to me is like explained so much like why buddy, rich response to Elvis Roger Square in the air, because buddy rich's keyed in too complicated harmonic patterns, and here's this Yoko plan. Three Chord songs just completely writes off and and I think that. Is a good and useful explanation I've the difficulty of older generations. Percentage of the music of their followers. Definitely the case that you you almost have to become practice. At. accepting quote, unquote the New Right. and. I the way. Wall discusses. Generation after generation happening to. Hey you know, establish what they each generation considers their own, and then having to deal with. The popularization of some new form that leaves their preferred. You know artistic expressions sort of into dust. It dovetails really nicely with the fact that artists are always trying to like find new audiences, an always trying to keep audiences. They're always worried about you know. My my two older I skew to an older demographic. Is Is my period of growth over? and. Some of that does come out as you were saying with these kind of cross genre expressions got. You know Frank Sinatra. To team market. You've got jazz. Artists brought to be considered serious, but they also want to record, and so some of them have you know? Scantily clad women with their shoes off sitting on a on a on a candlelit. You Know Living Room and listening to blue note records in in in you know. High, cultural expression, but still. For, ten being know a make out session. You have the Beatles wanting to play various types of music cramming it all into two. They're sort of March of artistic development CETERA. All the way through to where room they become like this sort of chamber pop ban. It's very adult. It's still the case that at that very calm. They're also the the. The. SORT, of inspiration. For bubblegum pop. In and lots of Teeny bopper type music, you know, and and you have an interesting sort of cascade that comes down. From the Beatles and Psychedelia and all of these these kind of. More more difficult and challenging cultural events. That's still of goes. From yesterday and today and Lover Solan resolve or say down to the monkees. Who are known as kinds of? You. Know boy boy. Ban was put together by. TV executives center, but they would part of something was also very challenging and subversive, even and artistically vary in ways that are also overlooked, and then cast came down from the monkees you have. Song writers who were kind of just. You Know Kinda struggling to get noticed, and then receiving notice is the result of providing songs for bands like the monkeys and I'm thinking of like voice, heart or even diamond. Neil diamond or or Harry Nelson. All the you know. One of the strengths of this book is kind of kind of demonstrates. That that. Again! There's what you see which looks like Oh you know. The monkeys are a sort of prefab group. That's a prefab four. But beneath that, there's a lot of of of artistic energy and effort. That simply wants to be creative and to have an audience. And to make statements that are both cultural, and and in Courtney's in some ways than another instances that are just fun. And easy to listen to. Many artists WANNA. WanNa sort of dip their beacon to both of those those glasses so to speak. And one of the strengths of this book. Is that gives you the opportunity to sort of exercise a flexibility? With your own observation of culture, mass, cultural production and mass cultural. Consumption. Right yeah and. That's something that often to other elements of life. You know what it's politics or religion or have you. A lot of the book is about flexibility. The ability that artists have to adapt things to change to audiences, the chance to technologies the change. And to quickly find ways to use those technologies so that they can keep making music and keep making a living. By by doing it, you know, and that's an issue that was faced. By musicians back in the twenties or It goes all the way up the very present day. I'm reminded. This probably rock and roll nerdiness. You want to run. But I'm reminded of like you know the nineties you had this explosion of music based on. Underground. Musical ideas and and sort of commercial practices when you have all these. Underground clubs and all these underground labels that had ten fifteen years than creating sort of audience suddenly burst through the major labels figured out a way to sell to these people. And so all these indie rock. Alternative, rock, underground rock clothes were kind of elevated by the arrive with Nirvana, et Cetera. Within that you had. Banned, str- There's there's the Jesus Lizard. Who Is this very confrontational darts? Aggressive band led by a lead singer. Whose gimmicks you know? The wall talks about bands using gimmicks. Crowd reasons. And the question of whether that's.

Frank Sinatra Beatles monkees Elvis Roger Square Wall Neil diamond Nirvana Lover Solan rich Yoko Courtney Harry Nelson
"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

"Obviously had dancing prior to that, but it would typically be in private homes and sort of like Jane Austen said in or Country Barn Dance, and in all circumstances, the parents of the young women in particular, who dancing would know exactly who? Who their daughter was dancing with at all times, and in the twentieth century with it's anonymous, modern atomised society, suddenly young women were moving to the city, getting jobs and going out dancing on their own with complete strangers, and that's other we take for granted as a given, but it was brand new and scandalous in the teens when the castles are dancing, Ca Jane, Injury Reserve and introducing things like the Foxtrot Trot and the tango to popular culture. And I think that's important. I think walled emphasis on music as a dance medium that throughout most of the twentieth century at least up into the late nineteen sixties. Musicians bread and butter was playing for dancers so therefore they had to play a wide variety of songs, because people just wanted to dance, and they didn't want to focus on the music. And then it's a very different experience to dance music versus sitting down at home, and listening closely to music or or sitting down in a concert hall and listen to a symphony as as an art piece that demands full attention dance music mostly focused on a beat in your partner and your expression that be, and so he's kind of aligned with the populism movement which I didn't know enough about the history of that when I interviewed him, so I was Kinda. When I when I was? Incorrectly. Credited him with starting at and I'm glad he corrected me on that night i. have read the Selene Dion Book. That kicked off the optimism movement, and anyway I think it's. One of his virtues that walled. Although he's a berm, her his criticism I, think is more aligned with Jack's I was actually surprised when I found out his age because I think thinking and other things, a little bit advanced from must of his contemporaries, but let secure up our second song, and here a little bit of Paul Whiteman and this is a tune one to net that wall did name is Paul. Whiteman tune that he thought had staying power was still While we're hearing on the twenty th century, and this is Paul Whiteman or the couple ringers has got bing crosby on lead vocals and the legendary Cornet player spider back, and this is from Monday on..

Paul Whiteman Country Barn Dance Jane Austen Injury Reserve bing crosby partner Paul Jack
"popular music" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Obviously had dancing prior to that, but it would typically be in private homes and sort of like Jane. Austen said in or Country Barn Dance, and in all circumstances, the parents of the young women in particular, who dancing would know exactly. Exactly, who their daughter was dancing with at all times, and in the twentieth century with its anonymous modern atomised society, suddenly young women were moving to the city, getting jobs, and going out dancing on their own with strangers, and that's other we take for granted as a given, but it was brand new and scandalous in the teens when the castles are dancing, Ca Jane James Reserve and introducing things like the Foxtrot Trot and the tango to popular culture. And I think that's important. I think walled emphasis on music as a dance medium that throughout most of the twentieth century at least up into the late nineteen sixties. Musicians bread and butter was playing for dancers so therefore they had to play a wide variety of songs, because people just wanted to dance, and they didn't want to focus on the music. And then it's a very different experience to dance to music versus sitting down at home, and listening closely to music or or sitting down in a concert hall and listen to a symphony as as an art piece that demands full attention dance music mostly focused on a beat in your partner and your expression that be, and so he's kind of aligned with the populism movement which I didn't know enough about the history of that when I interviewed him so I was Kinda. When I when I was. Incorrectly. Credited him with starting at and I'm glad he corrected me on that night. I have read the Selene Dion Book that kicked off the optimism movement, and anyway I think it's. One of his virtues that walled. Although he's a berm her his criticism I think is more aligned with Jack's I was actually surprised when I found out his age, because I think thinking and other things a little bit advanced from most of his contemporaries, but let secure up our second song, and here a little bit of Paul Whiteman and this is a tune. One to net that wall did name is Paul Whiteman tune that he thought had staying power was still while we're hearing on the twenty th century, and this is Paul Whiteman or the couple ringers has got bing crosby on lead vocals, and the legendary Cornet, player brick spider back, and this is from Monday on..

Paul Whiteman Country Barn Dance Jane James Reserve Austen bing crosby partner Jack
"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Pantheon

"It's. Time to other role I'm your host Wilcox and once again I'm joined for a very special episode of have we learned on? Let it roll with my interlocutor doctor. You're a Campbell Yuri welcome. Doing well and we are here to discuss. Elijah Wald's book had a Beatles destroyed rock and roll in our last installment of What have we learned? We discussed Wald's book escaping the Delta. which was about Robert Johnson and the sort of revisionist? Take on the Mississippi Delta Blues. This book attempts to expand that revisionist take. Away basically history of recorded music from John Phillips Sousa to essentially. Nineteen sixty seven the sixties Beatles Dillon Beach Boys Rock era so first question and I ask Elijah this. And he admitted he was trolling with the title the title how the Beatles Destroyed Rock and roll is that too over the top for the book? It's definitely a pilot looks you know if you read the book like it's just out there to Just spoke interest you know to make people pick the book up and and angrily search through trying to figure out how the Beatles destroyed rock and roll rather than how the Beatles. Sort of a p demise, the greatest thing to do with rock and roll which I think is probably most people. have in mind as a way of describing the Beatles. but if read the book. It's not really about how the Beatles destroyed rock and roll or how any? Anything, distorted rock and roll rockabilly does not end up getting destroyed. In the book as far as like. Now it's more about the process that resulted in the creation of rock and roll, and how it came to an end around the time the Beatles were peaking, and the Beatles did play a role in changing things by being a self contained. Collective. That did not have to cover the latest dance hits and moved rock and roll from a t bopper medium on singles to. A medium for young adults, eventually all adults on albums along formed thing, but it's yeah I dunno Comparing it with Peter Dog. It's electric shock, which I've had dog it on this show several times, and it's a very similar history of recorded music that goes even further it goes from the first recordings in eighteen seventies all the way into the twenty first century I think it's a comparably sound scholarly book, but it doesn't have the contentious angle and it's gotten a lot less attention so I think we have to credit walled with the minimum of marketing shrewdness with the title. I bothered by the title, but I. You know as you get to the end of the book. That's Worthy Beatles. I show up. It's. Also, not altogether unlike. Awards book on the History Rock'n'roll at at the very end is the first time. Popular Music outside of the United States starts to show up really. And and So, you know, but the only at that moment that you start to to remember what the final of the book is that it's obviously they're just sort of shake your cage a little bit. And get you to pay attention. I think the only the only negative thing I would say about. It is kind of obscure some of the. Some of the interesting points been making some of the. More nuance. Observations that. Presents. Yeah absolutely and. It's always difficult to present a nuanced. You know Just forgot the word to use that ends with Ti win. Nuanced. Information, it's always difficult to present nuance in any kind of argument and like when I spoke to Robert Chris Cow, the great rock critic. He was dismissive of this book. Because essentially his argument was. Nobody listens to Paul Whiteman Anymore. Which is completely missing? That that you know in the nineteen twenties Paul, Whiteman had a position analogous to what the Beatles had in the nineteen sixties, and played a very similar role in popularizing legitimizing what was then called Jazz in the way the Beatles did with rock, but that is not waltz. Point at all that we're missing this treasure trove of great art from Paul Whiteman although he does acknowledge, made some pretty good record. So when somebody smart and well informed as Chris Cow Misses the point you know that ninety readers the book completely with. The point, but. Get back to escape in the Delta a little bit because I think that this is an appropriate sequel to escape in the delta. And he summed up escaping the Delta in this book and away he did not in that book and he's. He called it an attempt to place the early blues singers like Robert Johnson in the broader context of black popular music, rather than treating them as folk artists, and then this is a similar attempt to. Analyze. Rock and roll as a platform rather than a folk form, and I think it contrasts pretty nicely with words, history of rock and roll, which deliberately focuses on it as a folk form. He talks. You know the the I R B records. He talks about the first country records. He talks about muddy waters. He skips ever count Basie, and I'm talking about Edward here in other words, a wall and then goes into rock and roll in the fifties. Sort of ignoring its history. You know the way jump blues emerged out of swing. He mentions it, but he doesn't mention how central it is, and I think to send me like Louis Jordan who's definitively the grandfather of our be the way Hank Williams is the grandfather modern country Louis Jordan what a told you count basie was his antecedent that he was coming straight out of swing, and he was just choosing. Turn right rather than laughed at the BEBOP divide like I'm not GonNa Make Art Music I'm GonNa, Make Dance? Music and I'M GONNA get real popular anyhow so I've felt that walled was a good additive and or corrective to what? taught us and not to dismiss Ed's teachings of look at music as a cultural history, look at the business forces the cultural, his the forces, the technological forces and wild also focuses on technology, and the big technology focuses on the beginning and I think it's key to the whole thing. Is this transition. From live music to recorded music. How do you think he made that argument that that was the big change. That's really written the history of music in our entire era. Yeah I mean I think that that's. The walls book. To a large extent revolves around. the switch from the culture. That stems from going to hear music. In the live setting with other people. To play music in a live setting with other people learning about innovations learning about new ideas Idiosyncratic musical expressions that said are all that happening in the live setting, and then when recordings come along, it creates it, it doesn't. Necessarily a clued or or or a suffocating? Belie setting, but what it does is, it offers a new. format for listening to music in it starts to to build a new culture. That is exists next door to the live set so that you have the people who wanna out dancing, but you also have the people who want to begin collecting and who wanted to begin You know talking about an experiencing the music in a more personal. Private wet. You know and. And a large? I shouldn't large, but a to a great extent. The Wall this wall book about this. You know the Beatles destroying rock and roll, or whatever is sort of a story of recordings..

Beatles Robert Johnson Elijah Wald Paul Whiteman Mississippi Delta Blues John Phillips Sousa Elijah Wilcox Yuri United States Robert Chris Cow Louis Jordan Delta. Peter Dog Chris Cow Beatles. Basie Hank Williams Ed basie
"popular music" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Wilcox and once again I'm joined for a very special episode of what have we learned on? Let it roll with my interlocutor doctor. You're a Campbell Yuri welcome. Doing well and we are here to discuss Elijah Wald's book had a Beatles destroyed rock and roll in our last installment of What have we learned? We discussed Wald's book escaping the Delta. which was about Robert Johnson and the sort of revisionist take on the Mississippi Delta Blues. This book attempts to expand that revisionist take. Away basically history of recorded music from John Phillips, Sousa to essentially. Nineteen, sixty seven delight sixties Beatles Dillon Beach. Boys Rock Era so first question and I ask Elijah this. And he admitted he was trolling with the title the title how the Beatles Destroyed Rock and roll. Is that too over the top for the book? It's definitely a pilot. Looks you know if you read the book? It seems like it's just out there to Just took interest you know to make people pick the book up and and angrily search through trying to figure out how the Beatles destroyed rock and roll rather than how the Beatles. Sort of a p demise, the greatest thing to do with rock and roll which I think is probably most people. have in mind as a way of describing the Beatles. but if read the book. It's not really about how the Beatles destroyed rock and roll or how any? Anything distorted rock and roll. ROCKABILLY does not end up getting destroyed. In the book as far as like. Now it's more about the process that resulted in the creation of rock and roll, and how it came to an end around the time the Beatles were peaking, and the Beatles did play a role in changing things by being a self contained. Collective that did not have to cover the latest dance hits and moved rock and roll from a t bopper medium on singles to. A medium for young adults, and eventually all adults on albums along formed thing, but it's yeah, I. DunNo Comparing, it with Peter Dog. It's electric shock which I've had dog it on this show several times, and it's a very similar history of recorded music that goes even further. It goes from the first recordings in eighteen seventies all the way into the twenty first century. Comparably sound scholarly book, but it doesn't have the contentious angle and it's gotten a lot less attention so I think we have to credit walled with the minimum of marketing shrewdness with the title. Yeah, I have I bothered by the title, but I you know as you get to the end of the book. That's Worthy Beatles I show up. It's also not altogether unlike. Awards book on the History Rock'n'roll at at the very end is the first time. Popular Music outside of the United. States starts to show up really. And and So you know, but the only at that moment that you start to to remember what the final of the book is that it's obviously they're just sort of shake your cage a little bit. And get you to pay attention. I think the only the only negative thing I would say about. It is kind of obscure some of the. Some of the interesting points been making some of the. More nuance. Observations that. Presents. Yeah absolutely and. It's always difficult to present a nuance. You know Just forgot the word to use that ends with Ti win. Nuanced information, it's always difficult to present nuance in any kind of argument, and like when I spoke to Robert Chris cow the great rock critic. He was dismissive of this book because essentially his argument was. Nobody listens to Paul Whiteman Anymore, which is completely missing? That that you know in the nineteen twenties, Paul Whiteman had a position analogous to what the Beatles had in the nineteen sixties implanted very similar role in popularizing legitimizing what was then called Jazz in the way the Beatles did with rock, but that is not waltz. Point at all that we're missing this treasure trove of great art from Paul Whiteman, although he does acknowledge in pretty good record. So when somebody smart and well informed as Chris cow misses the point. You know that ninety readers the book completely with. Point but. Get back to escape in the Delta a little bit because I think that this is an appropriate sequel to escape in the Delta, and he summed up escaping the Delta in this book and away he did not in that book and he's. He called it an attempt to place the early blues singers like Robert Johnson in the broader context of black popular music, rather than treating them as folk artists, and then this is a similar attempt to. Analyze, rock and roll as a platform rather than a folk form and I think it contrasts pretty nicely with Edwards history of rock and roll, which deliberately focuses on it as a folk form, he talks. You know the the I. R B records he talks about the first country records. He talks about muddy waters. He skips ever count basie and I'm talking about Edward here in other words, a wall and then goes into rock and roll in the fifties. Sort of ignoring its history. You know the way jump blues emerged out of swing. He mentions it, but he doesn't mention how central it is, and I think to send me like Louis Jordan, who's definitively the grandfather of our be the way Hank Williams is the grandfather modern country Louis Jordan. What a told you count! Basie was his antecedent that he was coming straight out of swing, and he was just choosing. Turn right rather than laughed at the BEBOP divide like I'm not GonNa Make Art Music I'm GonNa Make Dance Music, and I'm GonNa. Get Real Popular Anyhow so I've felt that walled was a good additive and or corrective to what? taught us and not to dismiss Ed's teachings of look at music as a cultural history, look at the business forces the cultural, his the forces, the technological forces and wild also focuses on technology, and the big technology focuses on the beginning and I think it's key to the whole thing. Is this transition. From live music to recorded music. How do you think he made that argument that that was the big change. That's really written the history of music in our entire era. Yeah. I mean I think that that's. The walls book. To a large extent revolves around. the switch from the culture. That stems from going to hear music. In the live setting with other people. To play music in a live setting with other people learning about innovations learning about new ideas Idiosyncratic musical expressions that said are all that happening in the live setting, and then when recordings come along, it creates it, it doesn't. necessarily. or or or a suffocating? Belie setting, but what it does is it offers a new. format for listening to music in it starts to to build a new culture. That is exists next door to the live set so that you have the people who wanna out dancing, but you also have the people who want to begin collecting and who wanted to begin You know talking about an experiencing the music in a more personal. Private wet. You, know and And a large. I shouldn't largo but a to a great extent. The Wall, this wall book about this. You know the Beatles destroying rock and roll, or whatever is sort of a story of recording..

Beatles Beatles Dillon Beach Robert Johnson Elijah Wald Paul Whiteman Basie Mississippi Delta Blues Elijah Wilcox Yuri Louis Jordan John Phillips Robert Chris Peter Dog Delta. Chris cow Beatles. Sousa Edward Hank Williams
What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:02 min | 1 year ago

What Have We Learned From Elijah Wald's Escaping The Delta

"It's time to let it roll. This is your host Nate Wilcox and we're doing a special. What have we learned episode once again with my friend and colleague Dr? Larry Campbell Yuri welcome back. Good to be here can't get good so today. We're GONNA. Look back on. Elijah Wald's book escaping the Delta and my interview that we did with him. and. We picked us up this book in that episode because. Other than Ed. Ward who basically taught me everything I. Know about analyzing music is a cultural history. Elijah Wald's books, this one and how Beatles destroyed rock and roll, which we'll talk about the next episode of what have we learned. Really expanded my mind because it took. It's a revisionist take on what has been disagree romanticized history of Robert Johnson, and the Delta Blues and found walls attempts to reevaluate Johnson. From the perspective of his peers and contemporaries, basically the black African that African American Blues Fan of the Nineteen Thirties and. Rather than from the perspective of generally white blues, fans of the nineteen sixties to now so it just totally blew my mind I tried to capture that to great interview. But the main point that the book put across that Robert Johnson was just a human being who sang and played beautifully. He wasn't a mythical figure. That probably wasn't really devil at the crossroads he wasn't. A country Bumpkin? He was a sophisticated sharp-dressed cat who travelled widely who listen to all kinds of music, not just what he heard live in the delta, but listen to the radio listener guards and learn so having said all that. How do you think we did did did I get that across in the interview with walled? Yeah, I think the book and the interview with Wall. You know Really, helps a flesh out. You know the the basic ideas that you were just talking about. And really helps to make it clear. that you know the blues artists of the late Twenties and early thirties in the early twenties really. Physically people that they were professionals. That they were participating in You know the creation of. New Cultural forms new sort of musical expressions. While at the same time. trying to freeze their audiences. Who had know? Fairly sophisticated demand and varying labs. Right so that the artists themselves as you suggested had to have A. Wide ranging set of skills, they had to have been aware of those sort of traditional musical expressions, and you know like in the case of the blues, things like Hollers and loans, and that sort of thing well also being aware of of popular music. Which by the nineteen thirties you're talking about. Artists like Duke. Ellington and Louis Armstrong and and People that are appearing in films on the radio, etc.. And so the picture of Blues. As this sort of backwater expression. Rural Culture Coming from people who were simply oppressed and trapped and you know on some level were expected to the ignorance. And poverty stricken just didn't hold you know I mean. You couldn't can be successful blues artists if you travel the country and rags. showed up at. Various venues unable to relate to modernizing audiences. And I think I think the book captures that really well. and. I thought your interview with Wall. Made that clear.

Robert Johnson Nineteen Thirties Elijah Wald Wall Larry Campbell Yuri Nate Wilcox Ward A. Wide Louis Armstrong Ellington
A message from Willy

Back To Back

04:06 min | 1 year ago

A message from Willy

"Show every single week. We've never missed an episode every single. Tuesday I've had something new for you guys it. It just didn't feel right this week. I think it would be insensitive to carry on like everything is normal. It's not normal ray now, and there's a reason for that any of us. Who Loved Dance Music and let's be honest, most popular music. Let alone any of us like me and like a lot of the people you here on this show who get to participate in it. all of us, and and that goes for me. That goes for the people on this show. That goes for anyone. The listeners everybody who loves this music. All of us are, and will forever be indebted to the black people who created this music and this culture. Dance Music was born out of the struggles of people of color. lgbtq people and the oppressed minorities. It's inherently political music. It's it's rooted deeply at its core and look on a personal note I was born and raised in Minneapolis George. Floyd's murder at the hands of the police there I don't even know I. It's just so so sad, and it is a familiar sadness and a familiar anger. And I think it. Is that feeling of familiarity? That goes a long way to explaining what is happening across the country right now? The completely justified protests. I want to salute the bravery of everyone out there around the country who has been out protesting and just say for my music peers for any my listeners If you're able, please donate if you can. I'M GONNA. Put some links in the description here of some good organizations to donate to more just in a general life sense If you want to help out especially if you're white, especially at a time like this, ask the people of color around you what they needed and I'm saying this last part as much for me as for anyone else. Because you can never be reminded of this enough for any of us who are. Are, white participants in this dance music culture for all of us were just fans in general We are lucky to be here. It is not a right that we are just automatically entitled to and part of that responsibility is that we have to honor and protect the people and the culture who created this and allowed us to come in and to be here historically. We haven't done a very good job of doing that and we certainly aren't doing a very good job of it right now. I do better. You could probably do better, we all. Could you know as far as this show goes? It makes me think of the conversation. I had with Kevin Saunderson. One of the founders of techno music, and hearing him talk about his experiences, and some of the struggles and prejudices that he faced, and then to see so many of those same issues still at play in America in two thousand, twenty, almost forty years later. just really was yet another example to me of how far we still have to go in this country.

Kevin Saunderson RAY Minneapolis Floyd Murder America
Little Richard dies at 87

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Little Richard dies at 87

"Little Richard this self proclaimed architect of rock and roll and one of its biggest influencers has died he was eighty seven Osterville mint and a close friend of Little Richard told the AP the performer form Richard died Saturday morning and that the family is not releasing the cause of death known for his piercing wail and pounding piano on songs like good golly miss Molly and two thirty little Richard irrevocably altered popular music while introducing black orange beach to white America he sold more than thirty million records worldwide and his influence on other musicians was equally staggering from the Beatles and noticed reading Creedence Clearwater revival and David Little Richard dead at eighty seven I'm Julie Walker

Little Richard AP Molly America Beatles Julie Walker Clearwater
Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 1 year ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Nish Kumar

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:23 min | 1 year ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Nish Kumar

"What I was about. Fifteen years old. We went on a Fourteen is just before I turned fifteen. We went on this field trip to we went to Sheffield for a history field trip because we were studying something about the industrial revolution in the Arkwright Orlando Carmel Stuff. And we stopped as a treat at a now defunct building called the Sheffield History of popular music and I was just listening to it was forums. It was not great but I was listening to like a weird. There's like a listening post and you could just listen to some albums that they deemed classic albums and actually I my cousins were big Jimi Hendrix fans and so I started listening to Electric Lady Land and I remember listening to the first three songs and I just wrote the going. Great Well Mine Tie. World was just changed on so I ball. Electorally land go really into Hendricks and then viral electric lady land. Obviously through all along the watchtower read the liner notes. In its Britain by Dylan and niece of I guess if you're I'm thirty four and when we were school used to sing blowing it was a him so I guess there's just a moment of either has a sort of David. Your mind of who Bob Dylan is roughly and I. I was a into the Beatles at the time. So I sort of knew roughly a would big dylan fans and you know blowing the wind and he sort of saying you have some vague idea and then so my friend. Andy gave me the nineteen sixty seven greatest hits the he had which is his dad had which is just a best of everything op too blonde on. Blunt. I say it doesn't include anything for the debut album but it's just a great hits a of the of the pre John Wesley Harding nineteen sixties out on. Its I mean. That's a pretty place to star. Need because you sort of realized that this is by the time that period ends. He's probably about twenty five. I think. Yeah he yeah. He's about twenty five twenty six when the motorcycle accident happens. And so that's the if you think about the style changes the happen just did not show period of time. It's a pretty exciting thing to get like a quick precede history of and so from then on I was just you know I was just I was I was getting everything and I do think there is something really interesting. Did you go see blinded by the light? I know you on the show. There's a really amazing pit in that movie. Which is a beautiful film about. Safra's monsters obsession with Bruce springsteen this amazing bitten where it's kind of in the eighties and him and his friend who both of british-asian ethnic heritage and one of them is trying to get Bruce springsteen to be played on the School Radio Tannoy system and the guy says Bruce Springsteen isn't he got going on dodger into And the two Asian kids look at me. Go No ought not only definitely think. That's a work because when I was a kid my friends he's like. Oh that's the music DODD LISTENS TO A. My parents liked the bills in the light of the music. That was big when they moved to Britain like things like yellow and stuff but they they had no specific relationship with Dylan so I didn't have association with that. It was like a dragon something that your parents enforced you to endear. When you were growing up so to me I just couldn't. I just couldn't believe it. It just absolutely blew my mind. I had no full context for it and so I just bought as much as I can possibly buy that. There's a period where pretty much all I spend my birthday money. Christmas money on was Bob Dylan CDs and also quite good period to get into Bob Dylan because it was before they released the audio remastered CDs. So they were just so. I just I got. I bought time out of mind for one pound CD copy of time out of mind for a quid. From W H Smith's in Croydon and so it was really easy and cheap for me just to buy almost

Bob Dylan John Wesley Harding Bruce Springsteen Sheffield Britain Arkwright Orlando Carmel Jimi Hendrix Electric Lady Land Beatles W H Smith Hendricks Andy Dodd Safra David Croydon British-Asian
Coronavirus containment zone implemented in New York

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus containment zone implemented in New York

"Eleven new York's governor has now ordered the nation's first containment zone since the corona virus outbreak in this country the governor deploying the National Guard to new Rochelle a suburban coronavirus hot spot north of Manhattan it is a dramatic actions this is literally a matter of life and death that zone consisting of a one mile radius around the young Israel synagogue where dozens of people were exposed by that infected attorney schools and buildings that hold large gatherings will shut down for two weeks but most businesses and grocery stores will remain open and people will be able to enter and leave the area you're not containing people its facilities according to some residents many are staying home it's empty I was there and I'm there usually every weekend running errands stores were empty and there's no one around among the new cases statewide to school bus drivers testing positive across the country the death toll rising to at least thirty and at least eighteen states declaring a state of emergency Washington state reporting at least ten nursing homes with confirmed cases infections in Massachusetts more than doubling with at least seventy of the case is connected to a Biogen employee conference held in Boston last month and in Minnesota a thirty year old patient now Inc Dickel condition after experiencing flu symptoms and visiting a health facility last week but was sent home without testing you have to start taking seriously what you can do now that if and when the infections will come and they will calm concerns of the spreading virus prompting a wave of cancellations including the New York City half marathon IV league basketball tournaments popular music festival Coachella postponed it till October to avoid crowd contamination major companies like apple and Google encouraging their employees to work from home and universities like UCLA Duke and Ohio State University or canceling in person classes Harvard University forcing students to move out of the dorms and take online classes instead many of us are international students from countries where virus has basically in the new York times launching a deep cleaning of their newsroom in New York and DC notifying employees to stay home for fourteen days after some New York times staffers attended a conference in New Orleans where an attendee at not with the paper tested positive for corona virus despite assurances from the federal government many local officials are still frustrated with the backlog and red tape when it comes to testing in fact we spoke to one infectious disease doctor in Massachusetts who says he has multiple patients showing possible symptoms and he still can't get

New York Times Ohio State University Ucla Google New York City Washington Attorney New Orleans DC New York Harvard University Apple Minnesota Boston Massachusetts Young Israel Synagogue Manhattan Rochelle National Guard
"popular music" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Support for this podcast comes comes from NBC. If you're not watching. NBC's chilling New Crime Drama Lincoln. Rhyme hunt for the bone collector. It's well a crime. This show has a seriously twisted bad guy and one of the most brilliant detectives on TV. There's a reason. Millions of people have made this their new crime obsession and it streaming so you you can watch anytime. The bone collector is a sophisticated gentleman and the world's most elusive serial killer hiding in plain sight. Creepy catching him. We'll take the the world's best detective Lincoln rhyme a forensic genius and human encyclopedia. And this is personal. Last time these two met Lincoln was left. Paralysed based on the best selling book by Jeffery Deaver. This show is too good not to share and so creepy. You won't want to watch alone. Don't Miss Lincoln rhyme hunt for the bone collector now streaming and Fridays on NBC. I'm Songwriter Charlie. Hurting and I'm musicologist. Made Sloan or the host of switched on pop podcasts about the making and meaning of Popular Music Music every week Charlie and I breakdown the most interesting hits trends and artists understand what they're doing what they're saying and why these songs are so infectious. We recently broken down music with her brother and collaborator dissecting chance the rapper with super producer felder and covered everything from Dolly. Pardon to try to Scott if you love music. You're going to discover something ear opening in switched on pop so join US search for switched on pop in your favorite podcast APP and listen to an episode about your artist and subscribe for free on Apple podcasts. spotify or wherever you're listening to get new music explainers every week and after after listening you might want to check out. Our new book switched on Pop. How Popular Music Works and why it matters at your favorite bookseller? Thanks.

Miss Lincoln NBC Popular Music Music Charlie Lincoln Jeffery Deaver US Sloan felder spotify Scott producer Apple
"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

ODDDIO Podcast

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

"He releases his number number <Speech_Female> one debut album <Speech_Female> titled. It's <Speech_Female> dark and hell <Speech_Female> is hot. The follow <Speech_Female> up is called flesh <Speech_Female> of my flesh <Speech_Female> based on another biblical <Speech_Female> reference <Speech_Female> involving Jesus Christ <Speech_Female> in the Last Supper Burger <Speech_Female> and it featured <Speech_Female> on the <Speech_Female> album cover naked <Speech_Female> and drenched <Speech_Female> in blood. It also <Speech_Female> includes a track <Speech_Female> called Omen <Speech_Female> Damian to <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> which features a guest <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> appearance from <hes> <Speech_Female> our friend <Silence> Marilyn Manson <Speech_Female> today <Speech_Female> younger artists. <Speech_Female> Such as Tyler. The <Speech_Female> Creator tap into <Speech_Female> the same formula <Speech_Female> for record sales <Speech_Female> in his early <Speech_Female> career before his <Speech_Female> alternative hip <Speech_Female> hop collective <Speech_Female> future gained <Speech_Female> in popularity. <Speech_Female> His lyrics drew <Speech_Female> heavily from horror <Speech_Female> core. Tyler's <Speech_Female> embrace of so-called <Speech_Female> Satanic <Speech_Female> iconography such such <Speech_Female> as inverted crosses <Speech_Female> also <Speech_Female> fueled rumors. That <Speech_Female> he was a devil worshipper <Speech_Female> but his work <Speech_Female> quickly evolved <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> more creative <Speech_Female> expression that <Speech_Female> crossed boundaries into <Speech_Female> multimedia <Speech_Female> art merchandising <Speech_Female> and Television <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Tyler was a huge <Speech_Female> influence on <Speech_Female> billy Bush who <Speech_Female> in turn has embraced <Speech_Female> hellish and demonic <Speech_Female> vibes in her <Speech_Female> videos for <Speech_Female> songs. Like all <Speech_Female> the good girls go to hell. <Speech_Female> A two thousand <Speech_Female> nineteen video <Speech_Female> which shows her as a <Speech_Female> winged demon from <Speech_Female> Hell but is actually <Speech_Female> a commentary <Speech_Female> on climate change range <Speech_Female> like so many <Speech_Female> of the rap artists. She <Speech_Female> was inspired by <Speech_Female> eyelash understands <Speech_Female> that. Demonic <Speech_Female> imagery is a <Speech_Female> surefire way <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to capture the attention <Speech_Female> of the public and <Silence> get a message across us. <Speech_Female> Also <Speech_Female> offering a <Speech_Female> unique message is a <Speech_Female> twenty one year old. Rapper <Speech_Female> called saw <Speech_Female> baby who embraces <Speech_Female> inverted crosses <Speech_Female> and the mark <Speech_Female> of the beast six <Speech_Female> six six sore all <Speech_Female> baby started a <Speech_Female> movement called <Speech_Female> unknown ISM which <Speech_Female> is a life philosophy <Speech_Female> he claims <Speech_Female> is not about Satan <Speech_Female> but about empowerment. <Speech_Female> Ironically <Speech_Female> the thinking <Speech_Female> behind unknown own <Speech_Female> ISM echoes <Speech_Female> strangely <Speech_Female> of the Church of Satan <Speech_Female> philosophy <Speech_Female> penned by Anton <Speech_Female> levay <Speech_Female> believe in Satan <Speech_Female> as anything more <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> than a symbol <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of quote pride individualism <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Enlightenment <Silence> Unquote. <Speech_Female> It would seem <Speech_Female> that the concept <Speech_Female> of Satanism <Speech_Female> and the utilization <Speech_Female> of Satanic ICONOGRAPHY <Speech_Female> has <Speech_Female> come full circle the <Speech_Female> American mainstream <Speech_Female> music. <Speech_Female> What started out <Speech_Female> as a marketing adventure? <Speech_Female> morphed into <Speech_Female> extreme messaging <Speech_Female> and quickly <Speech_Female> took on a life of <Silence> its own <Speech_Female> today it <Speech_Female> is very much alive <Speech_Female> firmly rooted <Speech_Female> in multiple genres <Speech_Female> and represents <Speech_Female> the very <SpeakerChange> thing <Speech_Female> that it claims. It's not about <Speech_Music_Female> Satan. <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> The antithesis basis <Speech_Music_Female> of that <Speech_Music_Female> which is regarded <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as the norm. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The other <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the darkness <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that lurks behind <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the door <Speech_Female> underneath the <Speech_Music_Female> bed and beyond <Speech_Music_Female> the stair <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> expansive freedom <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and consequences <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of unbridled <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> expression <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the brutal communication <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> experiences is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

Tyler Marilyn Manson billy Bush Damian Anton
"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

ODDDIO Podcast

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

"Wikipedia Satanism page states the following prior to the public practice satanism existed primarily as an accusation by various Christian groups toward perceived ideological opponents rather than a self identity religious studies scholars say that the very definition initiative the term has a history of being designation made by people against those whom they dislike. It is a term used for uttering and in the Bible Satan and the word was used as an ordinary noun. Meaning the adversary the terms satanism and Satanist I appear in English and French during the sixteenth century and Satanism didn't become an official religion until nineteen sixty six when the Church of Satan was established by Anton Levay besides being being a philosopher and occultist Levy was a musician who played multiple instruments including the Oregon in addition to his infamous satanic mass album. Other other albums would be released by levay in the nineties. This leveraging of music by the very person who established the Church of Satan made historical sense in context particularly Italy regarding art and entertainment where the concept of Satan has long been used as a symbol of expression. Many classical compositions were said to be vehicle for the the devil particularly due to the use of a specific combination of notes. A unique cord within music itself that was associated with evil. Known as the Devil's record the notes when played together has many other names including Diablo's in New Jersey. GotTa Latin for Devil and music or the devil's interval. The Tri tone the tree and the Flathead v basically. It's a combination of notes that when played together in accord become the musical equivalent of the Hebrew. GBD'S ABC's the court can be found in compositions from Beethoven and Wagner and even jazz composition such as the girl from EPA Nima and the Song Maria from West aside story fender dot com actually gives budding guitarists a tutorial on how to create the devils cord and it serves as a great description of what it is so our read it quote in simple terms tripod or yod is a fifth played. One Fret down to play of latiff with a G.. Power Cord place so your first finger on the third fred of the low e string. That's the root note or the G.. Now put your third finger to frets up on the fifth fret of with the a string. That's the fifth in this case the D. to complete the power cord placed your fourth finger next to your third finger on the next ring over the the destroying. That's the octave of the root note. Another G. strummed together. These three strings create a pleasant sounding. Chord G. D. G.. But but if you take your second finger and played a frat down as a D. Flatt instead of a d. it creates a flat. V when played after the I G or plucked slowly in a g root note G Octave d flat flat v Progression. It creates a dissonant or ugly tone especially with distortion and that that is the devils cord in their infancy. The genres of Blues and Jazz were routinely referred to as the Devil's music partially due to the innate rebellion within the sound and the lyrics themselves but also partially due to an institutionally dehumanized regard of black musicians and black people. In general neural. The devils cord first appeared in rock music when Jimi Hendrix used it in the opening of his classic Song Purple Haze it would later become a staple in the repertoire are black Sabbath. Who are cited as one of the pioneering bands of the heavy metal genre and it would be heavy metal that took the devils cord and ran like a bat out of hell? Oh with it with numerous metal bands. Such as Metallica slipknot and slayer who even named their nineteen ninety eight album. Diab Bula Sin Musica but it was black black Sabbath perhaps more than any other modern band that may the devils core part of American mainstream music the band which like every rock band at at the time was originally rooted in Blues. They first called themselves the Polka Tall Blues Band and then later they call themselves earth it was the latter name Earth Earth that presented a challenge as it was being used by another English group at the same time they were also inspired by nine hundred sixty three horror film called black Sabbath. That started the legendary Boris Karloff. They saw that a local horror movie. Theatre had a line of people waiting to buy tickets and intrigued by the appeal of this type of content. They went ahead head and wrote a song also titled Black Sabbath. The lyrics were based on a horror story and a nightmare. One of the members of the band had these horror movie lyrics combined with the foreboding introduced by the devils core helped the band create an unprecedented experience in music. According to Wikipedia the new sound was a a quote stark contrast to the popular music of the late nineteen sixties which was dominated by a flower power folk music and Hippie culture and an attempt at creating the musical equivalent of horror films and quote the commercial success of this new sound came despite being initially critically panned hand along with marketing stunts such as releasing titles on Friday the thirteen and recording music in dungeons it was clear. The dark side and music was connecting connecting with audiences it would be black Sabbath commercial embrace of the devils cord along with horror and demonic symbolism and themes that influenced every metal act that followed and laid the groundwork for every sub genre from the blackest and truly demonic to grunge to popular bands such as Nirvana van Halen soundgarden and Marilyn Manson this formula. For Commercial Success would be later replicated in another music genre Ajan that that would eventually overtake and Bypass Rock in mainstream popularity rap music fast forward to the nineties. North America is still in the throws of what was called the satanism scare a moral panic brought on by numerous claims of satanic rituals being perpetuated. Along along with murderers and child molestation it is also the time. When Anton levay drops his last two albums and inducted his friend Marilyn Manson as a Minister Minister of the Church of Satan? Shortly before Manson's nineteen ninety four debut album portrait of an American family is released and it is also the golden age of rap. Wrap in one thousand nine hundred ninety three. A young MC known as big L. Steps to the Mike with a song called devil son the lyrics go like this on my skull. The six six six six no tricks when I catch fits. My mom picks up the crucifix. And I killed chumps with the cheapest price. I'm rolling with Satan. Not Jesus Christ iced the late. Big L A brilliant exists to once put the fear of God in house and is unarguably. One of the most underrated emcees of all time talked talked about his inspiration for the lyrics. He said quote of always been a fan of horror flicks class. The things I see in Harlem are very scary so I just put it all together in a rhyme mm-hmm and quote big L.. Would later be cited as one of the pioneers of the rap sub-genre known as horror core a hybrid of Gangsta rap which incorporated horror themes Satanic iconography and shock lyrics and grew in popularity in the late nineties or core would elevate satanic marketing of music to dizzying heights. That rock never did due in part to it being a perfect vehicle for storytelling other pioneering groups included ghetto boys who raised the stakes with extreme violence psychosis and general deranged lyrics that were also based in part on social politics. They would go ahead and influence who wants a generation of rappers and rock artists Marilyn Manson to pop 'em goodie mob. Lil Wayne Rick Ross Insane Clown posse and many more. The sub-genre eventually evolved to mirror and eventually eclipse the evolution and content of heavy metal explicit and masterful lyrics. Were often inspired by horror movies. But this time performed over atmospheric dark rap beats and in the case of Detroit Mc e Sham. It was evil. All double inspired lyrics spat over heavy metal beats each jam credited. As a pioneer of horror core and acid core was heavily influenced -fluenced by death metal. He released his self produced debut album booming words from Hell in one thousand nine hundred ninety when he was only thirteen years old on the album. He depicted the city of Detroit as synonymous with Hell. He would go on to develop a cult following that was outside of the rap genre and referred to as acid rap followers included insane saying clown posse and Eminem who referred to himself as quote a mixture between Manson Isham and Ozzy and quote e Sham was also partially responsible ensemble for starting the more mainstream rap rock giana NRA and influenced groups such as corn and kid. Rock the rapper who is credited for putting the Detroit rap scene on the map APP never broke the mainstream but he did scare people. According to the Metro Times he said quote people were literally scared of my records. They'd get into an accident in and be like I got into an accident because I was playing that tape and quote. Despite his seminal influence each sham remained in the darkness of the underground while other other horror core acts such as the rap supergroup Gravediggaz and six feet deep garnered more popularity but at the apex of this genre was three six mafia afia a Texas group whose name was based on the biblical definition of the mark of the beast as told in the book of revelation they're extremely violent often satanic clearest spin tales of violence that make a clockwork orange. Read like Sesame Street according to Okay player dot com their first single and biggest hit. Stay fly was the subject of strange theory driven by rap forums. The claim was that a sample featured in the chorus of the song which was a songkold. Tommy why has our love turned cold by Willie Hutch was speeded up to sound like a woman singing. You are God you are King Lucifer. Purpose theory was eventually debunked but it illustrated how this group managed to crawl underneath the mass wraps psyche to instill literal fear of the devil with their their music. And when it came to leveraging the public's fascination with horror into sales three six mafia made black Sabbath commercial embrace of Satan to look like a peanut butter and Jelly Sandwich as okay player went on to point out. Despite the impact the music had the group members saw it all is simply characters d'ors that they were portraying with the group's founding member. Dj Paul saying quote we were into Horror Movies and serial killers. It's more like a character. I'd say like Robert Deniro playing the devil or Al Pacino and quote okay player would also go on to say that Paul was raised in a religious family who went to church every Sunday and that he still goes to church Chevy Sunday. The commercial success of three six mafia became even more incredible when they went completely mainstream dream. Something many acts both rock and rap including black Sabbath were never able to fully pull off. They eventually cleaned up their act. Ditching hyper violence and devil worship and changing their name to triple six Mafia. They became the first rap group to win an Academy Award for best original song. It's hard out here for a pimp from the film hustle and flow by now mainstream rap artists also dabbled in devilish imagery take d. m. x.. Fresh from rough riders collective..

devils Marilyn Manson Anton Levay Italy New Jersey Boris Karloff Detroit Bypass Rock official Detroit Mc e Sham Diablo Metro Times Dj Paul Levy Jimi Hendrix Robert Deniro Oregon D. Flatt
"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

ODDDIO Podcast

06:23 min | 1 year ago

"popular music" Discussed on ODDDIO Podcast

"A look into my eyes. You will see who are my name is Lucifer. Please take my hand. Those lyrics from a song called neighb- recorded by Black Sabbath in one thousand nine hundred seventy hi I'm FAO Hsun and today. We'll talk about satanism. In Popular American Music Wikipedia Satanism page states the following prior to the public practice satanism existed primarily as an accusation by various Christian groups toward perceived ideological opponents rather than a self identity religious studies scholars say that the very definition initiative the term has a history of being designation made by people against those whom they dislike. It is a term used for uttering and in the Bible Satan and the word was used as an ordinary noun. Meaning the adversary the terms satanism and Satanist I appear in English and French during the sixteenth century and Satanism didn't become an official religion until nineteen sixty six when the Church of Satan was established by Anton Levay besides being being a philosopher and occultist Levy was a musician who played multiple instruments including the Oregon in addition to his infamous satanic mass album. Other other albums would be released by levay in the nineties. This leveraging of music by the very person who established the Church of Satan made historical sense in context particularly Italy regarding art and entertainment where the concept of Satan has long been used as a symbol of expression. Many classical compositions were said to be vehicle for the the devil particularly due to the use of a specific combination of notes. A unique cord within music itself that was associated with evil. Known as the Devil's record the notes when played together has many other names including Diablo's in New Jersey. GotTa Latin for Devil and music or the devil's interval. The Tri tone the tree and the Flathead v basically. It's a combination of notes that when played together in accord become the musical equivalent of the Hebrew. GBD'S ABC's the court can be found in compositions from Beethoven and Wagner and even jazz composition such as the girl from EPA Nima and the Song Maria from West aside story fender dot com actually gives budding guitarists a tutorial on how to create the devils cord and it serves as a great description of what it is so our read it quote in simple terms tripod or yod is a fifth played. One Fret down to play of latiff with a G.. Power Cord place so your first finger on the third fred of the low e string. That's the root note or the G.. Now put your third finger to frets up on the fifth fret of with the a string. That's the fifth in this case the D. to complete the power cord placed your fourth finger next to your third finger on the next ring over the the destroying. That's the octave of the root note. Another G. strummed together. These three strings create a pleasant sounding. Chord G. D. G.. But but if you take your second finger and played a frat down as a D. Flatt instead of a d. it creates a flat. V when played after the I G or plucked slowly in a g root note G Octave d flat flat v Progression. It creates a dissonant or ugly tone especially with distortion and that that is the devils cord in their infancy. The genres of Blues and Jazz were routinely referred to as the Devil's music partially due to the innate rebellion within the sound and the lyrics themselves but also partially due to an institutionally dehumanized regard of black musicians and black people. In general neural. The devils cord first appeared in rock music when Jimi Hendrix used it in the opening of his classic Song Purple Haze it would later become a staple in the repertoire are black Sabbath. Who are cited as one of the pioneering bands of the heavy metal genre and it would be heavy metal that took the devils cord and ran like a bat out of hell? Oh with it with numerous metal bands. Such as Metallica slipknot and slayer who even named their nineteen ninety eight album. Diab Bula Sin Musica but it was black black Sabbath perhaps more than any other modern band that may the devils core part of American mainstream music the band which like every rock band at at the time was originally rooted in Blues. They first called themselves the Polka Tall Blues Band and then later they call themselves earth it was the latter name Earth Earth that presented a challenge as it was being used by another English group at the same time they were also inspired by nine hundred sixty three horror film called black Sabbath. That started the legendary Boris Karloff. They saw that a local horror movie. Theatre had a line of people waiting to buy tickets and intrigued by the appeal of this type of content. They went ahead head and wrote a song also titled Black Sabbath. The lyrics were based on a horror story and a nightmare. One of the members of the band had these horror movie lyrics combined with the foreboding introduced by the devils core helped the band create an unprecedented experience in music. According to Wikipedia the new sound was a a quote stark contrast to the popular music of the late nineteen sixties which was dominated by a flower power folk music and Hippie culture and an attempt at creating the musical equivalent of horror films and quote the commercial success of this new sound came despite being initially critically panned hand along with marketing stunts such as releasing titles on Friday the thirteen and recording music in dungeons it was clear. The dark side and music was connecting connecting with audiences it would be black Sabbath commercial embrace of the devils cord along with horror and demonic symbolism and themes that influenced every metal act that followed and laid the groundwork for every sub genre from the blackest and truly demonic to grunge to popular bands such as Nirvana van Halen soundgarden and Marilyn Manson

"popular music" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

Arrowhead Pride

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on Arrowhead Pride

"Of that no that that's how close you are too. You know a guy like Keith resort and or Rashad fit nor mark fields is to being a significant piece of this defense defense. I think it's probably reeser as well and I hope I hope he's he's ready because his opportunity is not far away because attrition happens in this league that is going to do it for our big massive training camp preview. Thank you so much for listening. We are so excited to see all training camp and hopefully hopefully there's a lot of fun for everyone. Hey It's Charlie harding from switched on pop. The podcast about the making N. meaning of Popular Music and this week we get into Cape is the thing that I just haven't known how to wrap my head around but the music is everywhere and it is now a global phenomenon. It is a part of the U._S.. Pop Market is charting on the billboard. It's playing on S._N._l.. And this week we talk about in Hall Z's boy with Love Talk to some K pop experts and really get to the bottom of how hot we listen to K pop music music genre in as a multimedia phenomenon. Check it out on switched on pop anywhere you get your podcasts. We drop episodes every Tuesday. Hey it's medically host of the eater upsell before you jump to your next podcast. I want to tell you about a new event. That's happening opening layer the summer in Brooklyn. It's called Eater Youngun summit and it's a one day celebration of upcoming talent in the world of food. The eater young end summit is a day full of talks workshops and tastings brought to you from fellow Vox media publication eater. You'll learn from some of the most inspiring.

Popular Music Charlie harding Vox media Rashad Keith Brooklyn one day
"popular music" Discussed on Z104

Z104

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on Z104

"He was born June twenty six nineteen ninety three and began her career in two thousand eight in the Broadway musical thirteen she's allergic to cats has eight dogs and is really good vocal impressions and is one hundred percent vegan. She loves horror movies and says she cannot get enough of them and also performed at the White House. She cites Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey, some of her musical influences and says the first song, she ever remember singing is somewhere over the rainbow artists in this. Spotlight is Ari on 'Grande Justin Timberlake rose to fame as the most prominent member of the group in sync. He was born in Memphis, Tennessee. And as a huge fan of sports, especially golf despite being a constant presence in the media, you released two albums in the two thousands justified, and future sex love sounds. He says he only makes music when inspiration strikes and refuses to create music on a deadline. He has a fear of spiders, and snakes, and has been a host multiple times on SNL not to mention he's married to the lovely, Jessica Biel. This week's most popular music. Number three, give me refitting. Katy Perry e t. One this week in two thousand eleven del rolling in the deep. Charles black. Let me ask you something trying.

Jessica Biel Mariah Carey Justin Timberlake Charles black Katy Perry White House Whitney Houston Memphis SNL Tennessee one hundred percent
"popular music" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"I'd be sitting in a coffee shop in running about a salt and pepper song. My inner younger self is overjoyed. Let's talk about sex is about pre intercourse discussions. It seeks to normalize conversations about sex. Let's talk about all the good things in the bad things that may be. It talks about the pros and the cons of sex. What are the good things and the bad things we should be talking about, whether it is s t is or the things you do or don't want to do in bed in order to avoid tough discussions about sex in the heat of the moment, it can be useful to negotiate all that of front so that everyone involved has an idea of the do's and the don'ts is the song stuck in your head yet I'll be mumbling under my breath for the rest of the day. Next, a kiss is not a contract by flight of the conchords. The song is an. Absolute delight. It short sweet to the point. It pleases me that this song is two men singing a kiss is not a contract. Kissing does not constitute consent for fondling for oral sex for anal or four penis vagina. Sex as the song says, just because you've been exploring my mouth doesn't mean you can explore further south. The song addresses the idea that consent is a continual process in that for each new activity. Each individual in the sexual interaction has an opportunity to affirm or withdraw consent. If focuses on how our previous actions should not endure not affect consent for future action. And next, what's your fantasy by ludicrous in Shawna? Have you started singing the song in your head yet? This song may not be explicitly about consent, but it brings up in importance sex, positive topic. I've mentioned above it can be useful to talk about your once in dislikes before being intimate with someone. This song asks, what's your fan. Assi. It is talking about that conversation of what you want for intimacy and for sex. So that's just a few songs that talk about consent here are some more for your consideration. You don't own me by Lesley gore. You can also listen to the first wives club version. You don't own me by grace. I'll make love to you by Boyz Dement want you to want me by Jason Derulo. How do you want it by two pock coming? Get it by Selena Gomez. Meet me in the red room by Immel Damian drunk girl by Christianssen. Now I'm sure there are many more songs out there. So please provide your suggestions to our feedback page or in response to this blog. I'd love to add new song to the list, be sure to subscribe in like the BBC podcast. Download our app in tune in for the next miss Loris corner..

Lesley gore Selena Gomez Shawna Boyz Dement Immel Damian BBC Christianssen Jason Derulo
"popular music" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Hi there. Everyone. It's monkey. Yes, I know I'm not miss Lawrence Laura's out and about she's either being a super spy or taking classes at something about being a super spy or killing super spice. I'm not quite sure it's one of those three things. Probably not the last one, but you know, she is pretty tough. In any case. You get me reading miss Lewis corner today. So let's get started. I have miss. Laura's notes in this is called songs about consent. This month has been all about consent in a world where the hashtag metoo movement has sparked a discussion on consent consent violations and count ability. I find it offered that the one movie called consent sounds like a thriller with a terrible plot. I have opted not to watch it, but if you want to you do fortunately, the music scene has been talking about consent negotiations related to sex sometime. Now today present you with my consent playlists. I've got a delightful that many of these songs have been around for some time in twenty fifteen. Let's. Start off with for the guys by Rachel lark. Some the lyrics are if feels a little like rape, just don't do it. I appreciate the song so much. It's really a light sounding song about a really complex in heavy topic. First off, if you haven't listened to Rachel arts, music stop now hit pause, checkout, or music on her website. I love the quirkiness of music in the sex positivity. Many results demonstrate in for the guys. She delves the discussion of women giving mixed signals in men having a hard time understanding when a woman is consenting or not. This is an narrative. We hear from some portion of the population with frequency. She sums it up nicely if you're not sure it's not rape, don't do it. She speaks to the point that if you're not sure you have consent, you probably don't have consent, and you should confirm consent before proceeding. The bottom line is consent should be confirmed early and often it's absolutely acceptable to ask for clarification of consent next. Yes. By beyond, say. This song talks about withdrawing consent. It goes through the scenes in a relationship where you may withdraw consent. It may be frustrated, but each individual has the right to say no to any activity at any time just because you've said, yes. Before doesn't mean you're obligated to say yes, every time, even if you're in an established relationship, it should be okay to be unready for steps on the relationship or sexual escalators. The lyrics include the first time I say, no, it's like I never said yes and no baby, not yet. We can't take that step. Why you getting so upset moving on permission by ROY James. This song is definitely about consent row. James requests permission to spend time be intimate into, get to know someone in the song with your permission. I just wanna spend a little time with now. I appreciate that the song brings up the idea that we are not entitled to people's time or to be people space. We don't want them there. The song asks for permission for multiple things from getting. To know someone to wanting to be sexually intimate. Next, let's talk about sex salt'n'pepa who would have thought that at the age of thirty in the year twenty eighteen..

Lawrence Laura rape Rachel arts ROY James Rachel lark Lewis
"popular music" Discussed on Sound Opinions

Sound Opinions

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on Sound Opinions

"Too. Good. That is seabreezes by Roxie music, Greg. What's the song you wanna talk about wanna play the first song on the album. Jim, I think it's a manifesto of sorts of really, you know, you mentioned that seabreezes was kind of an indication of where they were and where they're going remake remodel. This is very much a blueprint for the future of Roxy music. Here's everything. Yes, we want to try to do in once. Entire history of popular music song and sending it up of course. But at the same time tr- truly loving it at the same time. That was that was sort of the the contradiction that was inherent in every everything. Roxie music did. The chorus is an automobile registration plate number. Yeah. I mean, here we go. Basically it's the story of every Bryan ferry song. It's about the beautiful woman and she's not coming toward him. She's walking away from this. From him just out of reach. It's like a phantom, a ghost. He's haunted by this license plate that it can't get out of his head. He wants this woman. He has no idea how to find this is the only clue got, and it kind of speaks to a certain amount of frustration his part, a little stall Erie. You know, down by this license plate, no little stock up nine, three eight almost every song that's very has ever sung has got vampire Stocker thing going on. Yeah, I'm going to haunt you. I'm going to trail you. I'm gonna find you. I'm going to do so you, but of course he's failure at all of it. And I think the part that he acknowledged that he's not very good at it. Well, that's one reason the more poignant as love him because of that. But also he's, he's the consummate gentleman. Yes. I mean, the, you know, the area dight Englishman, total gentlemen. And at the same time, this really dark creepy side, right? Yeah. So the song hurling ahead, this rhythm sections, phenomenal Simpson whose only in the band for one record. Basically, the basis was a was a great bass player and Thompson. The drummer was a journeyman, but man, he could hit those things a monster. And then on top of that, you've got this crooner singing about this allusive woman, and then you've got Manzana an e, no MCI on oboe creating. All sorts of textures that sound other-worldly. So you've got all this noise with this melody, this hurling rhythm. And then you've got fairy saying, I could talk talk, talk, talk, talk, talk myself to death. Yeah, but it's not gonna do any good. So you're gonna. What is this? And meanwhile, there's like these solos in the middle of the song where they're referencing the Beatles Peter Gunn Wagner you, you know the history of music, right? The whole all in the series of healing from everything now. So you've got this mishmash. It shouldn't work this collage really know course other than that refrain of the of the license plate. And yet it's the song that is just absolutely riveting. This is remake remodel from Roxy music..

seabreezes Beatles Greg Jim Peter Gunn Wagner Erie Stocker Manzana MCI Simpson Thompson
"popular music" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"popular music" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Um i'm working with yoko ono on the john in yoko lovestory allow me ebola john's music um which is one of the greatest popular music i peace in in history just about you have done something about the fact that we have to living popes for the first time in seven hundred years and netflixing making a movie of based on a stage play mind called the pope's with anthony hopkins in jonathan pryce mum doing a vietnam war movie with the alex gibney um that would lead i masoka title uh wouldn entitled american hero okay um it's about a us helicopter pilot whose sole the mess could going on and he landed tender name sixteen on his own troops to stop the massacre yeah that's that's just a couple of things slacking you really not doing much basically while the nice thing about once you get what you get a little break and then suddenly because no one has any imagination so they go to the same people and if you can make yourself one of the same people um it's it's funny because suddenly the funds ringing in you getting razi invitations that you've waited a lifetime folded for the downside of that as you forget to say the would know and you just because you've had so many years of austerity and um that you can't believe that you're getting save you a you can overcome it here's my only thing that i'm hoping comes out of all this other possible future project i think you need to get into the apes films third they're great they're they've been awesome lately i love warfare the point of the apes the hold new trilogy i think you could do start when you're at patch in there i think you're right i think you're good good will you have been very generous with your time i cannot we all see we do next give it up again for anthony cragg it and that's how the qna went down special thanks again to screenwriter anthony mccartan for coming down and spending time chatting about his latest film darkest hour of course special thanks also to our sponsor screen craft dot org don't forget you could use exclusive coupon.

anthony hopkins jonathan pryce us anthony cragg anthony mccartan yoko ono ebola vietnam war seven hundred years