17 Burst results for "Pontins"

"pontins" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

08:23 min | 5 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on Table Manners with Jessie Ware

"The biggest refugee camp in the world is struggling to even get clean water so anyway I'm sure we'll talk about this with Michael Changed. Michael Sheen Tuning in from South Wales. I think I can't wait. Michael! Thank you for joining us. It's a pleasure, and how are Ya? How's the slate? Okay. Yeah the sleep is were. Bit Tricky at the moment, babies just two teeth simultaneously teeth there Bugah I know if only we didn't use them. Yeah, yeah, we just give everything a nasty suck instead, both that would be good. So she's a bit. Yeah, she's a bit disturbed by Silopi. It's very hot. It's very hot as particularly. North or South? I'm in south Wales on the edge of poise known as the BRECON beacons Brechin should national park? It's beautiful gorge. Yes so I'm from so I'm still at. This is technically neath. Talbot and I'm from Patel originally my family's dilemma MME on my. My sister's just a bit further up the road with her family so I'm back in Talbot essentially, but I'm just a little bit into the country I. When I grew up in Patel, I didn't even know. There was countryside anywhere near the top was just the steelworks, and and and you know the beach but there is a so you get closer to Brechin. Scher and so I'm just that surrounded by sheep llamas, their alarms in the field next door. I noticed how amazing they've really odd looking. Wow, unit albuque- Vani by each on. No I'm not near I. Mean No West that far away in Wales, but I'm not near any. No I hit. That's really foodie wealth, a big old food face all. There's a law of very foodie places in Wales Yeah. If you go like if you're driving across Wales and you go get out of the industrial south. Mean there's some nice restaurants in the industrial south, but once you. You Get out into West, Wales and mid Wales and North West. You come across these amazing places. Yeah, it's gorgeous food. He places, and I think you're right I. Think of any is quite fruity. I've heard I. Don't know how much you know about this podcast, but we talk about food and a bit about kind of growing up and food memories, and firstly a we're both UNICEF ambassadors. That I met you. A Halloween ball I just got off. Of Stage where and that nobody has listened to me because you don't do an acoustic gig at a very well, it's worth every penny, but you know it's a pricey ball and nobody wants to hear an acoustic song. They WanNa hear like thumping music, but the way that when you went onstage and command on the audience with your speech I was like Oh you're you're actually the best? And it was really inspiring, and it was a pleasure to meet you, but yes, we are both Steph FM buses. Dot Night. You're bringing back real terrible like NAM flashbacks now. That was the worst gig I've ever had to do because nobody wants to. If you think nobody wants to hear an acoustic song. Nobody certainly wants to hear someone. Come out and talk about the work that UNICEF is doing. You know people are out for a night out that you know quite well to do people not you start to shut up for for others. And I had to walk out there thinking no one is GonNa. Listen and I'm about to put my heart out there like I'm talking about my my my daughter, and and seeing children going through terrible things, and it was just her and I went and I had to muster every single bit of whatever I've got in me. That tries to make people listen to me and people. People shut up. I couldn't believe it. They actually listened I was amazed. It was the performance of your life I think it was. Only those people saw it. I saw. Thank you. How did you get involved with? originally it was through a soccer aid I took part in soccer aid as the captain of the rest of the world team for for many years. I think I started in two thousand and ten I think it was and I was. I was a huge football fan. I wanted to play football professionally when I was a kid scouted, didn't you? I saw it did yeah. I, was on a family holiday at pontins on the Isle of wight. And Tony Adams is dad was also on holiday with a very young Tony Adams and. Long Story Short I ended up being offered to go and play for the youth team. Tony kickabout or skimmed him. Skin is amazing. You Dodge the bullet you wanted to play for. Did you give him his bad bath? That's all other story Jesse. No, I, The chances of ever making it to the first team of a club La. Remote. Ten the atoms, didn't you? Well the dull I'm saying I was twelve, and he was. He was fifteen or sixteen. Not I think he let me run rings around him a little bit. Yeah, he was off season. It's a holiday. You just had a big lunch, but I didn't go down that route. Because my mom said no, you can't go and live in London. You're only twelve a win on moving and at that makes him sound like they weren't supportive. They were very supportive, but there was just no way it up, and then so I didn't go down the football. But I was still very into football and when I got to about I guess when I go to about fourteen, thirteen fourteen, I started to get into acting and do theater and plays, and and so he kind of switched at my obsession switched by early on I was very full so years later when I'm asked. Do you want to be the captain of the rest of the world? And play with people exhibiting. And you know. I mean incredible at Old Trafford from two. Eighty thousand people, whatever it was an amazing experience, so i. Jumped at it. and to be honest I badly noticed unified anything to do with it. To be honest, but then once you're there and you're part of that the people from UNICEF coming so to talk to you about you know what the money's GonNa go towards, and all that kind of thing, and I was sort of fascinated by, and they show you a little films and things that other ambassadors of done. And, so through that then they asked if I would be interested in getting more involved and may go on a on a visit a trip somewhere so I it off going into the first by Chad in Africa and it was They were sort of let me an easy a bit just to see sort of wasn't stressing. Yeah, yeah, and but even so that was kind of mind-blowing really when I went. went to that that was really opened my eyes, and all kinds of ways about things, and then I then I went on from there then and unvisited places like The Syrian refugee camp in Lebanon eventually I went to the battery company Jordan as well as the Syrian refugee camps I went to Guatemala and the last time I went on a trip was to Bangladesh to the top along camp. In Cox's Bazar with all the Rohingya refugees which I think you've been to as well. You've seen to that one. Yeah, so I went in two thousand seventeen in December when they're hangar, people had fled from Myanmar and that was in August, the big influx of refugees, the entered into Bangladesh, and so I went four months after that and it was, it was really harrowing, and really I mean just so upsetting and they would. Would just kind of setting up the camp even though it was already the biggest refugee camp in the world. Yeah, and has got bigger. So when did you while I was there in two thousand, eighteen as well in April, so I was there just before the monsoon was about to start in around SORTA. They thought in about June time, but it's kind of you know anytime. We're on their march to I think July is. One period of time, and then I think September to. December is another cyclone seasons, but. The big fear was that they were here. Was this huge camp that had been kind of deforested hillsides.

Wales South Wales football UNICEF Michael Sheen Patel Tony Adams soccer Talbot Bangladesh BRECON beacons Brechin pontins Brechin Myanmar Scher Tony kickabout La
"pontins" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:37 min | 5 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And look at it today look at the rights look at Pontins given on television almost twenty four hours claiming that white people have been roaming black people can don't cook on a continuous basis even as of twenty twenty you have athletes who make hundreds of millions of dollars complaining about oppression wow all white people buy their jerseys and sell out tickets to their games it probably eighty percent of the revenue is probably coming from white people in why people love these football players love these basketball players they support them they honestly acknowledge them as leaders or even as role models and yet the same people are complaining that black people are getting treated her unfairly in this country mind you somebody like myself as a radio show okay T. A. R. and worst oppression and these are the things that we talk about in the movie what we bring to light is that I personally think that I'm not much of what's going on much of the oppression as claimed the white privilege all of it is mental brainwashing image source of mental slavery that has been perpetuated some politicians and activists came can make money off of your pain and suffering black people are not person in the United States of America I will say that and put my name my reputation and my life behind it overall black people are not interested in the United States of America there's no oppressive laws against African Americans in this country for instance what's your restaurant earlier walk in a restaurant lady told me you need to wear a mask I say fine we now sigh I'm not wearing a mask I didn't feel it but I'm like I'm either side because I'm not gonna wear a mask in here I was big businesses so if I'm going to your business you wanna mass I'm wearing a mask but since the patio was open I said I'm going to patio and not wearing a mask and then when we were leaving we saw a white couple sitting at a table two women another couple there together you're sitting at a table they have a mask on nobody said anything to him as far as I know now if my mind was totally in the gear of white people against black people a personal personal personal racism I would have taken that opportunity to say look here's an example of racism here's an example of prejudice because they expect us to have a mass on the maxima have a mask on it in the flood zone is a news station KTA are on air ninety two three FM online at KTAR dot com and streaming live on the KTAR news app your breaking news and traffic KTAR news time is six thirty I'm Jim Brinson it appears now that the metro center mall is closing for good several reports indicating that a letter from mall general manager Kim Ramirez states the ball will officially close its doors for good on June thirtieth the mall has operated for forty seven years however according to remember his letter it has struggled to regain shoppers since the covert nineteen pandemic and quoting a portion of that letter despite the best efforts to bring value back to the wall complete maintenance projects and increase foot traffic the drop in our occupancy levels due to the corona virus can no longer sustain the operation of this large property in the meantime KTAR news spoke to the manager of the Walmart at the mall Duane Morrison he says the Walmart is not part of the mall will not close and will remain open well in the summer heat Tucson sector border patrol reports a true third spike in rescues over last year smugglers don't prepare border crossers for the rough desert terrain they succumb to heat related illnesses to dehydration and they can't keep up with the group so what that smuggler usually does is they leave that person behind agent Joe current also says border patrol rushes to American citizens who get stuck while hiking in the wilderness at that point it's about human life it's not about if that person's illegal border crosser it's not about if they are United States citizen there's somebody in need of help Tucson sector has rescued more than eight hundred people this year current is still learning what's behind the spike Peter say more KTAR news all right let's head to the roadways.

Pontins
"pontins" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:40 min | 6 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on KTOK

"Point yeah I mean if you really were concerned about black lives you've read what black lives to be better protected by the police which means more policing and yes some police reforms but in general you want more police on the beat in poor and minority communities and that's not that that's not happening in fact in fact a Garcetti wants to take two hundred fifty million away New York City the blouse you take away a billion dollars Minneapolis nine of the thirteen council members voted to get just disband the place completely what impact without having the black community I will have a devastating effect on the black community in the pathetic thing is that the Bosnian Garcetti won't you know they won't suffer the consequences sitting in there well we a white neighborhoods are their second homes where they don't have to call the police because they live in safe places and they have their personal security guard so they won't be impacted at all but the people they govern well and it won't be for the better no not for the better right we gotta run Jennifer percenters director independent women's law center former commissioner U. S. commission on civil rights the thing to do is more police it means less crime but your other point is that unions protect bad cops and that's a problem it certainly have Jennifer you're a great American and thank you for coming on the bill Cunningham show we'll do it again and god bless you thank you let's continue with more I think about that more police means less crime so liberals know this black lives matter no this because they're familiar with the studies as much as anyone else's that that as a consequence by advocating a policy that hurts the black community we'll call us more chaos and more outrage and more angst and more separation of the races all of which is terribly negative impacts in our society let's continue with more bill Cunningham here the great American life with you every Sunday night one thousand Katie okay bill o'reilly here with a big announcement I am back on television please watch me week knights eight PM eastern on a brand new free that work called thought first the first is available on your smart TV computer even your mobile phone let's face it two thousand twenty will go down as one of those bizarre years in American history the pandemic impeachment the upcoming election our leaders are struggling the media totally out of control Pontins parade from channel to channel with nothing but speculation and B. S. Americans need facts now.

New York City Minneapolis director commissioner bill Cunningham Pontins Jennifer percenters U. S. Katie bill o'reilly
"pontins" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:15 min | 6 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Hey it's back here to tell you once again about my new friends had done for you real estate USA and the timing of my relationship with this incredible company is nothing short of amazing done for your real estate has come into our lives at precisely the right moment the bull market has disappeared much of our normal lives are shifting quickly and drastically with everything that's happening in the world but through it all there is one industry that may be better than ever to consider investing in simple and conservative single family investment real estate maybe the saving grace for your retirement and your financial sanity interest rates are at rock bottom rental demand remains high and that means that returns and cash flow on rental properties will be better than most investments right now don't wait another second sitting on the sidelines visit done for you Bach dot com and see how done for you real estate maybe precisely the answer you need right now visit John for you Bach dot com to learn more again go check it out for yourself visit John for you Bach dot com bill o'reilly here with a big announcement I am back on television please watch me weeknights at eight PM eastern on a brand new free that work call the first the first is available on your smart TV computer even your mobile phone let's face it two thousand twenty will go down as one of those bizarre years in American history the pandemic impeachment the upcoming election our leaders are struggling the media totally out of control Pontins parade from channel to channel with nothing but speculation and B. S. Americans need facts now more than ever no span the nonsense stops with me so please go to the first TV dot com find out how you can watch also download the first TV app in the app store that's the first TV dot com to catch me bill o'reilly weeknights at eight PM eastern the first TV dot com K. E. X. traffic the Papa Murphy's traffic center.

"pontins" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

02:41 min | 6 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on KNSS

"Hawaii this is your night also covered nineteen continues to rage or is the big time liberal city our mayors and some Republicans impose stricter coronavirus lockdowns now say George Floyd riders you can flout the rules protesters fought the rules now the words you would lock up somebody going to church but not a lock up somebody ten thousand strong marching in front of the White House is incredible hypocrisy to watch the mayor of Atlanta Keisha lance bottoms told one of the politicians that if you go out I'm gonna put you in jail for ninety days now she says you have the right to protest credible thing to watch ninety nine percent the cops are good and the truths not being told of course Sir you read the Wall Street journal commentary in the article by heather McDonald for everyone wrong killing of a black man by a cop in each one is special unique and different the facts are different their seven hundred black men who kill other black men for every one person killed so what is the media focus course something it has political consequences at some point had a guest on last Sunday he said about thirty five percent of the black vote in this country is going to go to trump because so many black folks have figured out they've been used by Liberal Democrats because the policies don't work the schools don't work like a job creation doesn't work job creation doesn't work the police department doesn't work the schools don't work and there's no way out and so many black folks are figuring out look at our lives look what the Liberal Democrats have done to us if you want to continue this for decades to come let's let's continue the fight line becomes available eight six six six four seven seven three three seven eight six six six four seven seven three three seven bill Cunningham the great American with you every Sunday night we talk ninety eight seven and thirteen thirty K. and SS bill o'reilly here with a big announcement I am back on television please watch me weeknights at eight PM eastern on a brand new free that work called the first the first is available on your smart TV computer even your mobile phone let's face it two thousand twenty will go down as one of those bizarre years in American history the pandemic impeachment the upcoming election our leaders are struggling the media totally out of control Pontins parade from channel to channel with nothing but speculation and B. S. Americans need facts now.

Hawaii White House Keisha lance bottoms heather McDonald bill Cunningham Pontins George Floyd Atlanta Wall Street journal bill o'reilly PM
"pontins" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:27 min | 6 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Riley update this is happening across our nation president trump threatens to deploy the military on American soil to quell the protests Joe Biden promises to end racism if he's elected the founder of the black entertainment television network calls for fourteen trillion dollars in reparations gun sales nearly double in may George Floyd had narcotics in his system when he was killed at the hands of the police also ahead what about those reparations fair but first the president demanding governors stop violent protesters saying quote they must deploy the National Guard in sufficient numbers that we dominate the streets of the city or state refuses to take actions necessary to defend life then I will deploy the United States military and quickly solve the problem on quote but some say using troops domestically is on constitutional Joe Biden vowing to abolish institutional racism if he wins the election in November the former vice president calling for the creation of a new oversight body at the department of justice to investigate police brutality about one thousand people are killed by law enforcement each year nearly all of them during the commission of a crime thirty one percent are African American of course Mr Biden was vice president for eight years with little to show on race black and businessman Robert Johnson asking for fourteen trillion dollars in racial reparations the seventy four year old believes quote now is the time to go big and create the biggest affirmative action program of all time unquote full show about sixty percent of the public polls cash payments based on race less than a third support the idea more on this in my upcoming message of the day firearm sales up eighty percent in may compared to the same period last year half of all Americans not report living in a home with a gun the FBI conducted more than ten million background checks since the virus outbreak began in March the highest numbers since the nine eleven terror attack The New York Times reporting George Floyd had fence and all and methamphetamine in his system when he died in Minneapolis I do not expect that will change the third degree murder charge against police officer Derek schaffen in a moment should the taxpayer give trillions to African Americans right back with it bill O. Reilly here with a big announcement I am back on television please join me weeknights at eight PM eastern for the No spin news on the first TV two thousand twenty will go down as one of the most important years in American history our leaders are struggling the media totally out of control Pontins parade from channel to channel with nothing but speculation and B. S. now more than ever you need facts not spent change the channel on the fake news please join me bill Riley over.

FBI bill Riley bill O. Reilly third degree murder methamphetamine The New York Times department of justice Pontins Derek schaffen officer Minneapolis trump Robert Johnson vice president United States National Guard president
"pontins" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:58 min | 8 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Weather on the two sponsored by Gary Barberis touchless curbside pick up pace Sam Hey Carol a cold conditions but the roads are drying out that we had that severe storms yesterday especially hard hit in New Jersey and we're still dealing with the here's your update in Haddon heights white horse pike is blocked between kings highway into ninety five the downed tree and wires our team and that is on the scene so he's checking out the Haddon heights and Barrington area which was hard hit so a lot of tree branches down in the neighborhoods and downed wires also powers out so the team will have a full update coming up the top of the hour now in the meantime at the black horse pike with the closure of the white horse pike is going to be your alternate art were staying in New Jersey there's construction crews in north and south on the forty two freeway below two ninety five the various lane restrictions they should be out of their round six AM across any of the Delaware River bridges were good P. A. side not so bad we're traveling on the Schuylkill expressway king of pressure on it not too bad it looks great west on the Schuylkill expressway at some earlier construction of thirty street that since has cleared ninety five is also looking good Bucks county into center city but there are construction crews on two nine on ninety five south bound basically between double decker drypoint bridge and Philadelphia International Airport so watch out for lane restrictions there again in the next half hour everything should be cleared out of the way beyond that we're looking good New Jersey as we said looking good including Delaware River bridges all mass transit operating with dramatically scaled back its service across the board encouraging essential travel only by your car like Gary Barbera buys is Caesar salad call or click one eight hundred barberry dot com then pick up your car tug the touchless curbside Akbar bear is on the Boulevard plus bar bear will make a generous donation in your name to fill the Pontins dot org please stay safe and stay healthy the cable W. twenty four hour traffic center I'm Sam clover exam now the forecast with NBC ten first alert meteorologist Krystal klei warning it's a cold start out there and we're looking at a cool day as.

New Jersey Haddon heights Bucks county Delaware River Gary Barbera Pontins Gary Barberis Sam Barrington P. A. drypoint bridge Philadelphia International Air NBC Krystal klei
"pontins" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on KQED Radio

"World service Lawrence Pontins cama doble on the way New York is at the heart of the corona virus outbreak in the U. S. but it's not the only big city badly affected will speak about the misery being brought to people in Detroit also Africa's biggest city and looked down to we have a report from Laos and no country has seen more dies in Italy so how does anyone think about football BBC news with Justin green and a corona virus briefing president trump has told Americans there's a rough two week period lies ahead the United States walls he said in the midst of a great national trial unlike any interface before he spoke after official figures showed the US it overtaking China and the number of deaths U. S. navy leaders have been announced to stop an outbreak of the virus on a warship off the territory of Guam the captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt said his ship lap times solution facilitates the Dutch prime minister mark Ritter has extended his country's lockdown until April the twenty eighth he reiterated the call for the Netherlands to continue to practice social distancing unusual quarantine measures being introduced in Panama will separate citizens by gender to hope the spread of the virus man will be committed to go out shopping for two hours on three days of the week women will be allowed out the other three Panamanians must be indoors on Sunday Brazil's president John Abell scenario has given another television address in which he promised to shore up the economy during the pandemic Mr Bolsonaro who said he wanted to make sure Brazilians could work during the crisis a group of wealthy creditor countries known as the Paris club has agreed to council woman forty four billion dollars of debt owed by Somalia the decision should enable the country to recover from civil conflict an earthquake of a magnitude of six point five is struck the American state of Idaho the quake is estimated to have had a depth of ten kilometers residents in neighboring states also reported being shaken scientists say climate change may be having a physical impact on nightingales Spanish researchers found that over a twenty year pay rent the bus involved in response to Europe's rising summer temperatures they had smaller broods which had shorter wingspans BBC news well if you're listening to Newsday from the BBC world service Klamath Donnell and Lawrence followed with you thank you so much for joining us we'll be hearing from anti choice in the next half hour as it struggles with corona virus from the CEO also who's cut his salary to zero to save her workers jobs we have doctors singing as well and a remarkable story about eight from refugees yes from refugees not for refugees the Syrians in Switzerland's helping the elderly all along the way here on Easter let's begin in the U. S. president trump promising a very painful two weeks to the people of the United States when we've been covering the pandemic we've often focused and began by talking about New York but a little bit further to the west is the city of Detroit often a by word for urban deprivation and the coronavirus is taking a very significant toll on hold that as well but we be speaking to the Sudanese editor at W. P. E. T. public radio in Detroit Quinn Klinefelter meals team to fit in a bit of a postcard from the city first off why is it being hit so hard Detroit this every criteria for the worst case scenario a large percentage of the population lives in poverty they don't have health insurance so they don't seek medical attention until they're they're very really sick which is often too late and many Detroiters have underlying health issues so be study diabetes breathing problems that make them especially susceptible of many use public transportation where social distancing goes out the window because they're sitting next to each other and the result is nearly everyone here now knows someone who's either diagnosed with the virus or who has sadly died from it other viruses even burn through the Detroit police department itself a top official in a dispatcher there died from it many many other members of the Forrester quarantine with the virus including the chief of police it's something that city officials are still trying to come to grips with especially Detroit mayor Mike Duggan this is the world that we live.

New York Lawrence Pontins
"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

07:30 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"That's the most fun the most fun APP use the sounds like New York. Times says Crossword puzzle that I I love a lot least fun APP if I wasn't professionally bound to be on some of these social networks. I wouldn't use them anymore. It's absolutely toxic atmosphere. What is the thing that you do for fun? I am so unfounded because I am a young kids. So for me. Honest to God fund is hanging out with my My children I still love to read. I guess the only strength I can bring to my current job is the breadth of education And the breadth of the insights. I work with other partners and executives who are as overtrained as racehorses you know they They have done a not just molecular biology but a particular type of molecular biology. So if I can say you know what I saw something in a quantum computer paper or I read a novel from the Nineteenth Century which you should that is enormously fun for me and is probably the biggest value I bring to the people I work with is the breadth of my my access to information and now this is the lightning round but one of the things I recently read through like up at midnight or something and I read through symbolizes entire paper and it was one of those moments where you're like to go back in time and imagine the like courage that he had to be able to like you know. Discover this whole thing and I think there's so much value in things that have been around a long time because like the human condition is such that like you know it's so important to read things that are old It's just there's so much knowledge there but I digress any Favorite thing to cook her favorite thing to cook or eat chicken in a pot. One of those kind of putting dishes away. You Cook the chicken for a long time with carrots wine and I like making that some inst- pod action. What are you most excited about for the future technology? I think a black swan event had occurred earlier this year. An uneven know what it means yet some talking about quantum computing. So for as long as I've been around the joke was quantum computing is the technology of the future and always will be. Yeah and this year. A paper was published by Google. Were achieved was called quantum supremacy quantum supremacy is when a analog quantum computer can perform a calculation using a known algorithm in a couple of seconds. That would take more time in the entire universe for conventional computer solve oil at least tens of thousands of years and we did that this year and we did it in kind of a very specialized away. The calculation just demonstrated that it could be done. But that's really weird and I think that I think that office the opportunity for some really disrupt stuff to happen. Not Probably where your audience is thinking so in anyone era the we we we like him complexity to the most complicated machine on the planet so Newton the universe was like a watch and he said God was the blind watchmaker because the watch was the most complicated thing he knew. And when we began thinking about quantum computing. We call them computers because the most complicated things we have on the planet the amendment of these lodge data centers on supercomputers I didn't think Quantum computing is for atoll. I think these are machines. That can simulate analyze manipulate the subatomic world. The this inside goes right back to the very first proposition or quantum computer by the Noble laureate. Richard Feynman where he said the universe itself reality said is quantum mechanical and we're going to need a quantum mechanical system to understand it. We are then now or we will be Nexgen. I was at a presentation. Righetti computing a few months ago. And they showed me a slide of the molecules. They can model now the pretty complex and in a few years to model or called macromolecules proteins. If you can do that you can create quantum drugs. You can create new batteries. That could make advanced. Renewables reality you could. You could do really profound things. You could solve the water problem so the thing. I'm most excited about and by May Be Tightening. All my attention not to make news is to think about could we create a investment vehicle that could have eventually labs function that would create businesses could never do except through quantum informational systems? And could you also use these quantum systems to rescue undervalued projects that failed nope because they had bad ip because they ran out of time and money? So as I am who are running out of runway so thing. I'm most excited about is adjusting to that diminishing runway by attaching to the back of my plane this super powered rocket and lots of superpower rockets that will allow us to solve some of these big social problems that I didn't think we're going to sell by the middle of the century and must be profoundly different different approach. So that's why most excited about the moment is thinking. Is there a completely different way to approach the really really hard problems chasing the rescuer? Final question what question do you never get asked that you wish you asked more often? I don't think I get Austin. Anyone technology gets enough. Why would doing the first place? Why are you doing well as I said? I think we face extraordinary problems and I think people who have talent should use them in full for the greater good. We spent a lot of time talking about money or using jargon like disruption even Tokyo a building companies and I think we get away from six. We get away from. Why would doing it from the fast pace so I never get asked that question? Normally when I'm hiring people that's the question I always ask because otherwise they can get burnt out you. Will these products you working twelve fourteen hours a day? If you have a family is incredibly tough you stop doing tons of stuff that you really care about your life boils down to the Providence. You're working on your obligation still family. And that is absolutely unsustainable. If you don't have a mission driven sense of gravity inside you I think people would be happier in their work if bosses asked that question. Why do you want to come to work in the first place I love it? I couldn't agree more. Fire me up in. I love it. thanks so much for hanging out. Thanks for chatting. We have you back. We'll talk more quantum because I'm super excited to see what would what comes next for you all. Are we ready to talk about.

Richard Feynman Nineteenth Century New York Google Nexgen Austin Tokyo Providence
"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

16:48 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"You die. Do you think that these companies because you're gonNA build a typical than traditional Lena venture backed companies and seems like the teams are built? A little atypical. Does it resemble like a normal company structure. I mean does it have a tiered approach? Does it have you know? Sales and Marketing. In all these functions. Were no for the first reason because we deliberately darned higher almost all the business functions until quite late because Necessary yet and indeed if you're if you're truly building a platform for the future you'll focused on the business. In this sense there are kind of their outputs that you need when you tap the public markets. But you don't need to worry about a ton of the stuff that I'm the conventional less innovative companies are right about. You know the pretty flat because the science driven organizations everyone is allowed to talk Everyone's opinion is valid diversity matters organizations and not just because it's actually just Diversity matters because you won't really diverse points of view and you'll make mistakes if you don't have them And I guess the other thing. That's unique about these organizations is that there is a. You have to be pretty tough skinned during meetings. If you make a known falsifiable statement a you will be challenged on it and You say you have the data to go and defend your your point of view or if you don't have the data to be able to say how you get it when you're talking about folks have advanced degrees advance specialties. And all these sort of things. Obviously there's large percentage of the world's don't have access to those type of things now they do technology and the Internet and things like that. How do you look at filling those companies like that bubble up with you know young talent that doesn't have the means or access to those type of educational institutions? This this is really relevant. Full the your audience. Full salesforce customers in general a whole bunch of of specializations. That companies probably shouldn't look to fill themselves which they can rent on the cloud using salesforce products like Einstein. You do need employees who are bilingual in data science. And whatever it is they do and for us the the Bi lingual kind of expertise can be life sciences and data signs but for other organizations it might be a data sciences and design. It could be any number of things but to me. One of the the great reliefs of the loss couple of years is for the basic data. Science The basic machine learning. You can look to other people to do that for you. You still need to have enough understanding of data science to be creative sales condo. Everything for you but that period all the data scientists owned by a half dozen companies in Silicon Valley. I don't think is is the case anymore. I this cavalry out there. Who's ready to ride to the rescue and for this audience? I really urge them to Not trying reinvent the wheel when there are companies who who create machine lending platforms full for a living. Yeah I mean we we talk about this a lot with our guest because you know if you're a company that the Hospitality Company for example your access to getting a data science team and paying for that and paying premium is going to be extremely expensive and that's just one section of that and I think this CIO's in CTO's that are looking like you know these buyer build conversations are massive numbers And to be able to build those capacities what how. What would you recommend to those folks on how to structure you know looking at going to your leadership team in saying? Hey this is. I'm trying to figure out how to build this capacity. These are kind of option a option B. Like what should we do or you can serve in the military. They call these full depletion. Reports for the usually manipulate of the commander in chief presenting a really terrible state police report that would cost a fortune and already achieved the ends and then something cheaper. So I guess for the hose in the The Audience. I think that can be done Jim. Honestly so it doesn't mean that you don't have to have a cold group of data science pirates inside your organization who can design the right experiments who can build the right products and who can work with the right platforms but you can have a fairly small introductionary team. Who is doing that? Rather than building out the whole Functionality yourself and. I'm a huge fan of the salesforce platform I think salesforce is. The I said doesn't pretend to do everything. And if you mix and match the stuff that's out there. You can have as robust a product set and platform Anyone who's invented themselves and spent an enormous amount of money and that means you can actually specialize on doing what only the company can do which is whatever its core innovation is. Yeah and and focus on customer experience when we talk a ton about that and ultimately You Know Your Company is defined by that experience that your customers have you know I I don't I don't you know if you're staying in a hotel for the night. You're not sitting there like wondering what the data science team looks like you know or how much they invested in data science but it is also a critical. You know vein that needs to be you know explored for the company to be successful going forward. It's an economic observation. Rather than a general rule that new technologies always produce new and better jobs. I wish we're rule but it's not sometimes it takes longer than we'd like the lost industrial revolution wages. Jobs didn't really recover full nearly century. I think this revolution is going to happen much faster and though I'm confident that the data revolution will create more and better jobs. I didn't know a single job isn't going to be profoundly altered but by and large. I think it's GonNa return us to a a human relations. Customer focused annual your language thing about doctors so for a century as biology became more complex than we expected. doctors to have a bit of molecular biology. We made them to kind of bad. Scientists know particularly good ones We expect them to Be Able to do diagnosis and prescription. And they got away from taking care of people kind of tragic Particularly good at it. The average patient who is on a blood pressure medicine. is prescribed bluffing metro four or five times before they get it right For psychotropic drivers for people who have mental disease. It's it's even more and in the end of all. The doctor has to judge bloodworks. Some kind of gross mythologies. And then you know. The patient's own reported sater's self-satisfaction. I'm feeling better and try. It's trial and error trial Nara. Computers can do that much better than human beings The biggest company I'm working with amendment from spending two days a week I call it name it because the name's GonNa Change will massage makers not protectable name but we're trying to do systems integration across healthcare including that kind of diagnosis and prescription. So that we can much better match molecules to patients to have better outcomes and getting back to my original point if you can do that then you know. The actual professional can become customer focused. Old Patient focused again and take as she take care of why they probably entered the field in the first place which is to work with human beings so as these companies grow these companies need to have their employees empower. They need to increase their internal productivity. You know the people working on these amazing discoveries in the research lab. They have a computer that they use. They have You know all sorts of technological tools. They have communication tools. You know it's critical to get that right and a lot of our listeners. You know build companies that that help. Those people do their jobs. What your company's need. What are the things that they're crying out for to crease their own productivity? So the I'm laughing because the principal kind of misery in my life And everyone who I work with is companies like us. We have terrible meeting culture. We have the worst meeting Qiao imaginable we go on a little bit better flagship. But my very first I went to a meeting began at like eight in the morning. Iran's ran nearly twelve hours or something and it's in one of these kind of these rooms that only companies like us have with Kamal Bowl a beautiful table and these lights overhead. That make you feel like a rat. A rat maze. The end of I turned on Potus. I said is it always like this. And he said it can be West one is. I'm trying to bring to the companies. I work with is better meeting culture but I don't think we have good. It solutions to improve meetings living. Lots of really innovative products tried to create virtual workplaces. Get and slack. And I'm a big fan of ignite and I can address the CIO's New Orleans for you guys need to reach out your big vendors like sales folsom come up with a system that actually reflects how people work in as clear as I I would be an. I would be the number one of via of a really flexible. It based meeting system where I could have Super Focus meetings when I needed them I could go and visualize as much as possible outside the actual physical meeting yameen. We think obviously about future work a lot. You know here emission you know. Obviously you know. Salesforce focused focuses on future work lot but one thing that I find so fascinating is maybe the machines can help with. This is like people learn different ways. People work different ways like the idea that like you know. The early bird gets the worm sort of thing that we're just like supposed to like get up and start working and you know you wake up at six and get to work by eight zero thing that that just like is how all of society is supposed to work you know in Spain. You have a Siesta. But here you don't like these sort of things. These cultural norms like I would love to see more analysis on like how people optimized for themselves because I think that like generally speaking. We just all conform to one thing. It's like nine to five Monday through Friday. And that's how the business world works and then you know other people work other times. I is this something I know. It's not known tack here but it is deep secularity profound thing. I- A- Cup guards at Ted and Cellcom the founder Clone Academy looked out all the people the rooms every single one of you has something in common all of Your Great Bullshit as it examines. He's right every single person in the room was good at working at a certain way and taking tests Every single person he said could do maths. They could miss a class. They could kind of make later. Fake it to the next drawn to most people don't like that. I remember. I was talking about diversity by creating workplace that promotes someone. Who's done conventionally? Well at a certain type of test taking Type University and then as being particularly good At a seven hundred nine to five work would driving diversity of the workplace letting to interesting kind of database studies on this recently Google has started trying really hard recently to go and test code based upon how actually clean good Rather than on whether or not they have a computer science Ph d and The people who actually the most productive coat often of completely unconventional work habits. And don't have conventional degrees atoll living a fascinating study about who ends up being the best lawyers by a whole bunch of tests. Productivity is not the people who do the best on the low exams to get into the top thirty little skills yet. One of my One of my mentors in the army told me he was like. Why would the generals of the army change the promotion on structure? Because if it's wrong that's how they got promoted there right so it's like the folks that and it's not like an indictment of them. It's just like well. This is how I got here so clearly. Something's working right. The about a change this fall at least battalion commanders. So it's hunting commodities of They've had the ticket stamped at a very particular way at every single stage of promotion Tends to go and produced battalion modeling later. Flag offices of a very particular type occasionally. Someone like portrays or Mac Mousa squeaks through but even then constantly compensating for being you know a an intellectual warrior called Haussa. Yeah Colin Powell Sandwich. I think they're about to get the obvious is is about to go and bring someone data grounded tests including psychological tests Who GETS REMAINED BATTALION CREMONA? So you have less of these crazy martinets are ending up commanding a battalion. I think we need to do that outside. The military too. I think we are beginning to have some insights into the brain and the diversity of the human brain as well and I would love if when we chose. Ceo's it wouldn't just be based upon how they performed in the past if they stumped the ticket the based on more rigorous testing. Yeah you know. It's funny because the same mentor. He told me he's like the whole army is predicated on making battalion. Commanders Battalion Command Sergeant Majors. Right because they want you to have three stops at all these different kinds of units and all these different kinds of things so the whole structure is to get someone the two people in those roles at the expense of At Rono through these really weak teams. I mean I don't spend any time around the military sees the battalion commodities all actually incredible in a in a kind of conventional way this being massive under investment in The kinds of. Nco's that you won't I think and that's what that's where almost all the The real work is done on These really is kind of better at this They think of their senior. Nco As being as important as any investment bay. They make. Yeah I we could probably do another hour just on on the on the US military I love the but that doesn't mean that things can't get better okay for you get out of here. I know you're busy man Let's get into some lightning round question..

Salesforce battalion The Audience Sales and Marketing CIO Commanders Battalion Command S Lena venture US At Rono Silicon Valley Nco Spain New Orleans Hospitality Company Jim Colin Powell sater
"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

13:44 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Type of innovation firm. We call ourselves a unique life. Sciences Innovation Enterprise which is a mouthful but is meant to distinguish us from what? Vc's normally do so VC's live and die by deal flow. Essentially they see twenty thirty deals week. they do a bit of pattern recognition. They give a bit of money they blew the founders and if there are any good maybe they helped grow the company. It's not how we work at flagship Atul All the signs one hundred percent of the science is generated internally by people like me every year we come up with a hundred new boss phrase unprecedented ideas an idea that no one knows how to do. With the moment of the hundred ideas we think are interesting we call them origination and a certain number would have such tremendous social value and economic value. We then off the next question which is could you design a research programme around this idea and if you can if it's an unprecedented. I dipped no one's done before if it has enormous value and you can come up with a research program we throw it the lap with no money to a no name at this point for a couple of years just validate the science. If you can validate the science then we begin to show capital on these projects because they saw incredibly expensive to guarantee and eventually begin to take on outside investors and there is a traditional some of the areas. We wept might be familiar to your audience. We created a company called Madonna which the law IPO in biotech history in December six billion dollar IPO. Madonna Hijacks Your Messenger. Are Rene the molecules in your body the construct your DNA to go and create proteins and by hijacking M. R. N. A. We make your own body make drugs. So whatever UH proteins you're not producing or your producing too much of we can fixed up at a way that it has much less toxicity. And she gets to where it's meant to work. We also create agricultural companies like indigo and a Nari that are doing crazy stuff. Indigo manipulates the microbiome. The bacteria outside seeds in order to increase yield sometimes by seventy five percent while reducing pesticides and insecticides and herbicides. Almost nothing so from a farmer's point of view they have much more profitable fields and can do so much more sustainably and all of these companies usually have a kind of social impact Adam until the so for instance indigo has created a market where if arms bio cedes fix carbon from the air in order reduce the atmospheric carbon this creating global warming. We pay them. We give the money back just to go and be more. Socially responsible thumbs so flagship is a strong places. Created around thirty billion dollars in aggregate value. ova seventeen years and it is unlike a conventional. Silicon Valley Venture capital firm. You could imagine. And so what? What's the scope of your work in the company? Are you working with every company? Are you working with trying to get the ideas into the lab after the lab? But both I do bit of everything. my background as a journalist is helpful to you. The companies as they begin to explain what they're cool value proposition in the Dragen is but absolutely work on company creation as well and I work when the company's unveil themselves and launch themselves I help with capital raising some time as well at the moment and we can get into this. I'm very much focused. On a number of companies using artificial intelligence and machine learning to do to do some novel stuff in the world yet. Let's let's get into that. You know pays off the fact that it's your number one fall out of the sky technology. That's that's going to change the world here. You know Kinda broad strokes a machine learning you said two thousand twelve is when you feel like everything changed So from then to now. What is the landscape? Look like the techniques that took off in two thousand twelve went especially new They used a technique that dated back to the nineteen eighty s code deep learning which itself was based upon an early idea called neural nets. That had been first proposed in the forty s but deep learning was a kind of backwater in artificial intelligence. It was mainly associated with a guy a single guy. UP IN TORONTO CORE Jeff. Into and if you'd ask everyone in two thousand eleven would we make real progress in? Ai Through this technique that say now we mathematically proved. Couldn't be done. There's a guide MIT. Marvin Mickey and another guy. Cosima pepper said the mathematically. You could never really scale these deep learning techniques out of the big. Ai Conference Nips in two thousand twelve. Hinton and his team presented a paper where they had a a a function change. A machine learning Where they show that could do extraordinary magical things and what really changed besides a few refinements in the In the Algorithms in the words of Andrew in the crater of Google mind were we got bigger rockets by which he meant we got GP's That were able to do more compute. And we got more feel by what she meant a lot more data and since then almost all the progress has been in fiddling a little bit with those algorithms and putting much more data into these systems so that Deep Link Systems analysis sometimes hundreds of thousands of levels deep and can do remarkable things Soon to Pichai at a Google says that it is a innovation like electricity or fire. Having said that it's doing one particular thing It's doing a form of Pattern recognition It's doing a form of classification and most of the interesting problems in life actually on classification problems and the other problem. These current techniques is that they are pretty much limited to data sets called training data that have been manually tagged by human beings who this isn't usually understood so in order to make sure that the inputs coming into a deep leading system our reliability producing predictable outputs. The training data is humanly tagged so these self-loathing systems atole. If you're teaching a artificial intelligence system to translate Mandarin to English English demanded in real time I swear to God. Every single phoning in Mandarin was manually tagged by MIT linguists. Who and that's probably not sustainable to go and solve some of the the big problems so in this interesting place where as long as we can feed these really data hungry systems and as long as the problem is basically a classification problem. It's making enormous progress. But I think in two thousand nine hundred ninety two thousand twenty would beginning to see if not a brick will will begin to see some problems that current techniques are not well suited itself. Yeah and so water. Some of those things that you're working on your companies are working on. Yes so May the highest level abstraction I. A biology is incredibly complex. Biology is a mind blowing. The complex I before the molecular biology wasn't that complex because we found these underlying rules of incredible elegance and beauty the structure of DNA. What's called the the classical dogma where DNA instructs arn a pro these beautiful systems you know when we began to poke it in the real world of say developing drugs. We found there were exceptions to everything because biology is Pasta Tony's and it's existed for hundreds of millions of years and found these packs through evolution to solve things and it became really frustrating about the inability to translate these biological insights into real usable products because biology was simply too complex for human beings during the stat. It's not too complex machines trying to stand so almost all the companies. I'm working with are using a I to do two things to generate novel hypotheses. The human beings wouldn't be able to generate themselves because of the complexity of biology so we're essentially abandoning the hope to go and come over the radio mechanistic explanations of a what biology during and then to create an generate novel molecules. Potentially that will map them to these biological insights. The machines have created we've come to cold similarity The looks at a gene expression of the level of the whole cell. New Human Mind could possibly understand that but machines can we have another company called KOGEN. Immune Science That is working on a standing the human immune system They're all the companies that are doing similar things. But in all cases we all essentially throwing up a hats a trying to understand the millions of genetic interactions. That occur every moment in your body and we're allowing the system is already good at pattern recognition to do it for us. And when you have one of those companies being incubated. How'd you develop team around that? How do you develop a company around that type of idea? I was talking to one of my partners the other day and he began to describe. Somebody wants to hire so as a data scientist who had a PhD in computer science on the most current techniques like generative adversarial networks and had worked on a particular set of biological data on Sevaka. I'm sorry how many people like that in the will to three GONNA cost us a fortune to hide a person writer so team buildings actually what we spend almost all our time during in the almost two years I worked with flagship. I don't think I've ever had discussions about what conventional disease Disease Talk about dilution free money valuations and post money. We never talk about the talk about people we would. Who can help us hire the team? We need to solve the problem trying to solve. And we talk about talk a lot about not trying to boil the ocean visiting with all these scientific projects. You're trying to tell a story. This is where my owed back. Journalist comes through so their agenda took nearly a billion dollars in funding to go and get to its idea so to go and get follow on investment. You don't have to sell the science to sell the right science the right time to go and get more more investors to follow on so we spent a lot of time. Thinking about your water will attract Britain people who could work anywhere to come and work for this company and particularly with younger folk. It usually isn't the money like me. They WANNA be paid. But it's not mamie the money there's usually a problem said they'd been unable to solve our than academia or working for a large company and we essentially do the. Steve Jobs Sugar Water Conversation but what we say like Steve said to John. Sculley do you want to sell it? Do you WanNa make sure that the rest of your life or do you actually want to. Do you want to feed the world in twenty fifty almost every single one of us. Ceo's scientific founders has a reason why they're doing what they're doing That childhood nanny died of breast cancer that the mother died of They come from Ethiopia and have witnessed multiple famines is usually a thing that led them to pursue the science they pursue and speech normally goes. You can work on that problem and.

Vc Google Sciences Innovation Enterprise Steve Jobs Atul MIT Adam TORONTO Deep Link Systems Silicon Valley Venture Rene self-loathing Cosima pepper Marvin Mickey Ethiopia mamie Hinton Britain
"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

10:06 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"Boom where I was. The founding editor of a magazine called Red Herring which had been cooled the Bible of the boom back in the day and I rode that up from about thirty employees to nearly five hundred at one point. We were looking to have a billion dollar. Ipo implausibly for a media company. And then it all fell up really quickly and I just became a writer for a short period of time and MIT said. Would you like to go saddle up one more time to run a media company and I thought I don't WanNa do that but I'll visit? Mit and I went out. That I fell in love with what was meant to be a two year stint running a publication code. Mit Technology Review ended up being thirteen years but off. The thirteen is Tim. I began to feel a real hunger not just to write about the stuff but to make a real positive impact in the world by creating. Mit Technology Review. Like truly one of the amazing publications. That's out there. It's one of our favorites for sure. It's just a great source and I'm sure tons of our listeners. We've linked I think we've linked to almost half the episodes. Id visionaries to To some of the work that y'all have done I'm curious you know when you were thinking about trends in technology What was kind of your thought process for running that and looking at those things? That's a great question. It is the oldest technology publication in the world founded in eighteen. Ninety nine. Is that true. Holy Moly wholly owned by. Mit Its relationship to the institute is kind of like the relationship of Harvard Business Review to have it it is not the job of Tech Review to promote. Mit's technologies or innovations instead tech reviewed tries to look at really important trends emerging technologies that Augagne to disrupt business society politics and be the first report on them but in a way that isn't highly technical so technically is audience all they will have graduate degrees. They're all specialists but they offer various specialty so they're all physicians physicists and computer scientists and this full stop us not to use jogging so the mission of Tech Review was to make sure that we told the audience about a breakthrough in say quantum computing before. Anyone else did or in gene editing but to say so in a way that the people who really knew it would say that's right they may not actually be molecular biologist but that's basically right And the Peop- who'd never read about the field before we say. Oh now I get it. That's that's not difficult. Why wasn't explained that way before? So tech of US kind of virtues as an organization of priority writing about the first time and doing it in a way that's technically accurate but broadly understandable to a technologically literate audience. I love that and I think because technology is ever evolving. It's ever changing. The definitions of things are changing and new things are being created every day. Do you feel like the pace of innovation and looking and making sense of all of those innovations was something that kinda changed in the thirteen years that you're there has the pace of technological innovation increased. It's easy to think so though in any one period the PC revelation of the seventies They thought Sarah as well. I'll tell you what did happen during my time there. There were two technologies that seem to drop out of the sky as if they'd be given to us by aliens all they'd full on got like a meteorite before we are really ready to understand them socially and I think they're going to have a much broader impact of the longtime than even the the Internet did the first was the revolution and machine learning in which seemed to come out of nowhere in two thousand twelve from a real backwater in computer science. A feel cold deep learning back propagation off forty or fifty years of a winter. I didn't think you can underestimate how disruptive these techniques machine learning again to be and the second thing that took me by surprise was the gene editing which had been a difficult time consuming and expensive technology using techniques like they've named like Talibans Zinc fingers suddenly became incredibly easy and cheap someone with a undergraduate degree in biology and a ten thousand dollar machine. Could edit individual nucleotides and that is going to have a extraordinary effect. Not just on obvious things like drug discovery but who knew field so we can't even begin to imagine and you don't include blockchain in that group I so I my joke about blockchain miss that. Is that your. Bitcoin is ridiculous but blocked traded self is is sublime but. I'm not sure if the if the technology for digital alleges is to be blockchain itself the idea of having a transparent leisure on a database has enormous benefits can be really cool It could be used for a whole bunch of things didn't even occur to invest a Superficial thought you can use block trains to guarantee that Pork imported from China. Who is safe and arrives in a way that is usable edible Walmart you can create futures markets For diamonds where they never existed before. Because no one you will the providence of diamonds. Well And I think it's going to be extremely interesting. Full currency speculation on a whole bunch of other stuff as well but blockchain itself has a bunch of technical problems which make me hesitant to say that. That's the final. The final technology end. Either all these schismatic Wa- going on in blockchain at the moment the the standards splitting So I would bet all the money in my pocket against all the money in yours that there will be additional will be a A standard for manufacturing and trade within the next twenty years I just think the blockchain and bitcoin itself was invented as a kind of goofy demonstration case For a bunch of people had both an ideological and technical a row to her. They never expected it to be this. We may have to start from scratch to rebuild it. The reason why I say that is just because to me. It felt like it fell out of the sky as well. I I never believed that She was one. I don't believe anyone would have that particularly weird. Combination of CRYPTO PUNK skills on the one hand and Some really really fancy math and should also be so ideologically odd. I think it was a consortium of people but yeah they clearly pushed that thing out there And I bet you. They were slightly surprised that it had quite the impact of the dead. So you had this amazing opportunity to look at technology in the thirteen years at MIT technology review. And obviously a red herring see. The landscape changed the all sorts of companies in creation technologies. And you said I won't in. What does that look like? What does your role like it? At FIFA pioneering what he working on show but before I say why wanted maybe I should? I should volunteer that. I feel running out of runway on a whole variety of important social problems. I didn't leave journalism just to get rich. Though as a modern person I hope so investments. I work on to do well. But whether it's climate change all diseases like dementia or cancer a water. Filtration sustainable clean agriculture. We're GONNA be at at nearly seven nine. Ten billion people by the middle of the century on a planet roiled by Climate Change. And where we've plucked all the low hanging fruit for the diseases that are centrally acute accidents. There will be an America of people who have dementia by the middle of the century. And we don't even know what the disease is We will have to feed another two billion people and provide the Chinese five hundred calories a day we have enormous needs for water and I just began to feel after a session. Point that writing about this stuff with the talents idea hive and the time that that was left to us. I felt I could make more of a more contribution to directly on your question. I began interviewing at venture capital firms. A mainly on the west coast because despite the accident. I'm I'm from the bay area and I got pretty far with most of them. And then I gave a speech at the late Paul Allen's flying tropic retreat and a Guy Code New Ball Fan. Who is the founder of flagship caves? What what you're doing these days is in great. He's Armenian and I said well I'm looking for work at a conventional venture Kelly's Don't work for You'll hate coming up for us so I joined flagship. Which is very unusual.

Mit Technology Review blockchain Tech Review Red Herring MIT Mit Harvard Business Review founding editor writer US Tim Peop FIFA Talibans Zinc
"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

IT Visionaries

02:26 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on IT Visionaries

"As a journalist during the dotcom boom and throughout more than a decade as the editor in chief of the MIT Technology Review Jason Pontoon has seen technology of all kinds emerged from its earliest stages to become the world's shifting technology that we use today after watching that evolution happened for so long Jason decided he wanted in on the action today. He is a senior adviser for flagship. Pioneering where he is focused on how technology can be used to make a larger impact on the world on today's episode of it visionaries. He talks about some of the projects and companies. He's involved with and he explains why he believes. Ai and deep learning will be huge forces in shaping. The world moving forward. Enjoy.

"pontins" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:13 min | 9 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Senator Bernie Sanders leading in the biggest states Pontins interested to see how Joe Biden does after three other moderate candidate suspended their campaigns and endorsed him and at least nine people dead after tornadoes hit the Nashville area early this morning forty pills a building's rather have collapsed the tornadoes touched down just after midnight your next update comes noon at breaking news at one star today would lend Berman and Michael Riedel in the morning six till ten tomorrow I'm the one late non seven ten W. O. R. and N. B. C. news radio station orange chances increasing here through the afternoon up to sixty four a high today the rains are going to fade away this evening the skies clearing overnight tonight low forty four abundant sunshine for tomorrow with a high of fifty four Thursday sunny skies in the forecast fifty two showers return on Friday Friday's high forty seven party cloudy this hour fifty nine E. W. O. R. local talk show for the ride box next to it weeknights six till seven point seven K. and W. O. R. if you're struggling with over ten thousand dollars in credit card debt listen up the following information could save you a lot of money the credit card companies don't want you to know this but if you can't afford to pay off all your credit card debt I've got news for you you may not have to call one eight hundred nine hundred zero one four zero I'm not talking about bankruptcy I'm not talking about debt consolidation I'm talking about credit associates experts at negotiating down credit card debt to a lot less than you owe to find out how much of your deck could be forgiven call one eight hundred nine hundred zero one four zero if you can't afford to pay off all your debt do not let the credit card companies trick you into thinking that you have to call credit associates now for free information on how to get debt free faster than you ever thought possible without bankruptcy or debt consolidation we depend on your success and offer a guarantee so there's no risk to call for free information call now one eight hundred nine hundred zero one four zero one eight hundred nine hundred zero one four zero Hey if you love your my pillow and it's help to get a better night's sleep now what you need the sheets from Mike Lindell the great my pillow inventor the Giza dream bed sheets Giza cotton it's a certain kind of Egyptian.

Senator Bernie Sanders Pontins Joe Biden Berman Michael Riedel W. O. R. Mike Lindell Nashville E. W. O. Giza
"pontins" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"pontins" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Years in prison I need to lose Rodriguez sentence to seventy five years in prison cattlemen Valentin sentenced to ninety years in prison at one end of the case it got up homa sentenced to fifty five years in prison that's just a fraction action of the terrorists Bill Clinton pardoned the people who are involved in white collar crime well who are involved in a crime that has no physical victims but real terrorist in addition to those individuals but I think the mainstream media seem not to have much of a problem with I'll just mention three more that you may have forgotten but I know the mainstream lying media I forgot we'll never Kapit harm the wine Nick a former Manhattan lawyer who helped to loan the nine team a million dollars for the Colombian calli cartel the Norco terrorists of Columbia Mel Reynolds former congressman who had been convicted of sexual assault of a child and solicitation of child **** Pontins by Bill Clinton and then this one kind of deep six into the memory hole of the mainstream media pardon by Bill Clinton Roger Clinton who is serving drugs charges do you live and so got his brother to spring him this is why the left has no standards not a leg to stand on when they criticize the present the United States before you being in his power and I Khan thing yesterday with any terrorists any terrorists who upon by president Donald J. trump no one I am Sebastian will be giving you the truth.

United States Bill Clinton solicitation Mel Reynolds Manhattan Rodriguez Sebastian Donald J. trump president Valentin Roger Clinton Pontins assault congressman Nick homa
"pontins" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"pontins" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Just just get the blue coat we've read pinched they're read beheco here's something that i found when i was working loudly holiday camps they rule owned by the same people what ties butler sold same yeah does no rivalry whatsoever but lynn's own basically butlin zone or used to own pontins and warners and haven i think it was awesome weird monopoly a bit like you know when mcdonald's zone presser malaysia you know kind of what's yeah mars own snickers or whatever is these multinationals all of these other smaller companies and kind of keep going as kind of ruse there might be some competition out there but it kind of it isn't as all goes back into the same pocket picture house in the mountains and let's have one they were owned by downtime market no it's not cine city world yeah diane picture picture house for instance to yeah just people lying to you all that is the world to see well we if i do want to say texted maybe couple years ago mb of tex bath slightly concerned that this morris men and ladies morris ladies or just let's say morris dance can be either white better women yes that cover themselves in all black face i found it slightly nerve and that done that i didn't like it so who would stunned the cultural did understand that it's all run onto point over the background to happen uncomfortable attack to taxied you yeah.

pontins morris lynn mcdonald
"pontins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"pontins" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The extent of the destruction and mungul is staggering i won't allow potential a sizeable town for the area almost all of these reduced to ashes the child stumps of what had been homes lissette with abandoned household items that not only uh he had iin our olomoucke inaugural a vicar ahmad and other the andreatta yar police lieutenant own jolma described how three groups of muslim militants had detached the town in the early hours of the 25th of august the gums homemade explosives and sold at out the authorities before warned he said and successfully repulsed them killing seventeen the attack has the town's moslem inhabitants fled shortly after that we saw no one else that aside from officials and foraging goats and cows but the ruins was still smoking suggesting parts of the town with and more recently oh oh however the government is sticking to its official line that all of the destruction has been carried out by won't be cool thing only terrorists and muslim residents torching ran homes colonel pontins is the state minister for border security he was asked to respond to allegations made by refugees in bangladesh that the military is killing and raping were hinges we waste the proof he asked could soldiers busy fighting have time to rape someone and look at the women who make these allegations do you think anyone would want to rate then the john the journey back from a tangible these official narrative upon we spotted a column of smoke rising from the trees we already seen several in the distance this was rights beside the run.

ahmad jolma colonel pontins bangladesh andreatta yar official rape