18 Burst results for "Polly Class"

"polly class" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:41 min | 8 months ago

"polly class" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Was a good day for criminal justice reformers. In California statewide voters resoundingly defeated a ballot measure that would have rolled back some reforms. And voted to give people on parole the right to vote in the Bay Area. Six police Accountability measures enjoyed strong support, and San Francisco's former district attorney, George Gascon, appears to be winning in his challenge to the more conservative sitting Los Angeles D A. But voters did reject an attempt to end money bail. Here to sort out what All this means is cake politics correspondent Marissa Lagos. Marissa, You have been covering criminal justice reform efforts in California for over a decade now, were you surprised by these results? You know, I wasn't surprised Hera. But I do think that it is a huge win for the reform side of things. I mean, we've heard for years ever since some of these changes started coming through both legislatively and at the ballot box. A lot of pushback from law enforcement and other folks who saw them is going to far and I think that voters weighing in s O decisively on both proposition 20 rejecting some of these rollbacks of reforms and also on some of these police oversight measures really does show a shift an opinion. I spoke to Kate Chatfield, she's policy director at the Justice Collaborative, which is a national pro reform group. She knows that proposition. 20 wasn't even close. Even though law enforcement worked really hard to make the case to voters standing is all the usual cards in the deck. You know the Willie Horton playbook, crime is increasing the fear based mailers in the voter saw through them. And Kate, of course, is referring to that. 1988 Presidential Willie Horton ad The really helped Republicans win and I think that you know, while the No 1 20 side spend a lot more money than the outside, and I think some folks see that is, you know, money talks. I do think that Given how much we've heard talked about these issues that voters it seems like they knew what they were weighing in on and just didn't want, Teo turn the tide back the other direction. Yeah, you know, proposition 25 that was aimed at Indian cash. Bail was pretty suddenly defeated. What happened there? Yeah, This is a really interesting one. I mean, I think there's a couple things happening. One is that you didn't have the same coalition on the left really backing this reform. There's a schism with a lot of people kind of on the more progressive wing of The Democratic Party. The bail industry also spent a lot of money on this, and I think that the combination of them targeting folks in places like Riverside County and more conservative counties with some of the doubt that was cast by progressives probably was the reason they were able to build this coalition against prop 25. But it does feel like if you look at the kind of universe of all these that that is a bit of an outlier. It was a very complicated questions, so that may have been part of it. So do you think these results could actually encourage state lawmakers to go even further in the future? I do. Although I don't expect to see any dramatic huge reforms come out of the Legislature. I think we'll see what we've seen in years past, which is piecemeal attempts to kind of dismantle some of the harsher sentencing laws. I do think from the outside that we're going to see more pressure from advocacy groups to push the Legislature further. It's worth noting that just before the election The Sisters of Polly class who was one of the crime victims who has really helped spur the three strikes movement in California, came out to say that they want to see reforms and that they are unhappy with the way three strikes when the way their sister's name was used. So lawmakers may not go as far as voters, but they're going to get some pressure. Well, thanks

Marissa Lagos Kate Chatfield California Willie Horton Siler Legislature Bay Area George Gascon Tara Siler Hera Riverside County Los Angeles Justice Collaborative Teo Polly Democratic Party San Francisco
California Votes To Keep Criminal Justice Changes

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 8 months ago

California Votes To Keep Criminal Justice Changes

"Was a good day for criminal justice reformers. In California statewide voters resoundingly defeated a ballot measure that would have rolled back some reforms. And voted to give people on parole the right to vote in the Bay Area. Six police Accountability measures enjoyed strong support, and San Francisco's former district attorney, George Gascon, appears to be winning in his challenge to the more conservative sitting Los Angeles D A. But voters did reject an attempt to end money bail. Here to sort out what All this means is cake politics correspondent Marissa Lagos. Marissa, You have been covering criminal justice reform efforts in California for over a decade now, were you surprised by these results? You know, I wasn't surprised Hera. But I do think that it is a huge win for the reform side of things. I mean, we've heard for years ever since some of these changes started coming through both legislatively and at the ballot box. A lot of pushback from law enforcement and other folks who saw them is going to far and I think that voters weighing in s O decisively on both proposition 20 rejecting some of these rollbacks of reforms and also on some of these police oversight measures really does show a shift an opinion. I spoke to Kate Chatfield, she's policy director at the Justice Collaborative, which is a national pro reform group. She knows that proposition. 20 wasn't even close. Even though law enforcement worked really hard to make the case to voters standing is all the usual cards in the deck. You know the Willie Horton playbook, crime is increasing the fear based mailers in the voter saw through them. And Kate, of course, is referring to that. 1988 Presidential Willie Horton ad The really helped Republicans win and I think that you know, while the No 1 20 side spend a lot more money than the outside, and I think some folks see that is, you know, money talks. I do think that Given how much we've heard talked about these issues that voters it seems like they knew what they were weighing in on and just didn't want, Teo turn the tide back the other direction. Yeah, you know, proposition 25 that was aimed at Indian cash. Bail was pretty suddenly defeated. What happened there? Yeah, This is a really interesting one. I mean, I think there's a couple things happening. One is that you didn't have the same coalition on the left really backing this reform. There's a schism with a lot of people kind of on the more progressive wing of The Democratic Party. The bail industry also spent a lot of money on this, and I think that the combination of them targeting folks in places like Riverside County and more conservative counties with some of the doubt that was cast by progressives probably was the reason they were able to build this coalition against prop 25. But it does feel like if you look at the kind of universe of all these that that is a bit of an outlier. It was a very complicated questions, so that may have been part of it. So do you think these results could actually encourage state lawmakers to go even further in the future? I do. Although I don't expect to see any dramatic huge reforms come out of the Legislature. I think we'll see what we've seen in years past, which is piecemeal attempts to kind of dismantle some of the harsher sentencing laws. I do think from the outside that we're going to see more pressure from advocacy groups to push the Legislature further. It's worth noting that just before the election The Sisters of Polly class who was one of the crime victims who has really helped spur the three strikes movement in California, came out to say that they want to see reforms and that they are unhappy with the way three strikes when the way their sister's name was used. So lawmakers may not go as far as voters, but they're going to get some pressure. Well, thanks

George Gascon Marissa Lagos Kate Chatfield Justice Collaborative California Marissa Bay Area Willie Horton San Francisco Los Angeles TEO Kate Riverside County Democratic Party Legislature Polly Class
"polly class" Discussed on A TRUE SIDE OF CRIME

A TRUE SIDE OF CRIME

03:22 min | 10 months ago

"polly class" Discussed on A TRUE SIDE OF CRIME

"So he goes outside to checking while he's out there he hears a noise and he comes back in. The. House it turns out is his mom screaming because she found herself in his own not to mention she had threatened Scott's life and Michelle he didn't have his word though he had a recording he was being threatened so often. So severely budget sale that he felt like he needed to record what she was saying and he let the detectives here. So in this recording. to sell can be heard telling sky that she asked him to be honest about everything we will show. He's like, no, that's now we talked about and why don't you believe me and she tells him like you lie so much about Michelle I can't believe you. She goes on to tell him that he needs to be honest with and if they don't if he's not. Honest about anything to do with Michelle that both of their lives and she says Ikwo, you can take that to the great. This audio can be heard on dateline special vanished Michelle. Ley when Detective Richie heard this audio, he realized that was not the one he thought she was she definitely had dark in her emotions were so extreme shifting. So dramatically in such a short. Period of time, this audio is maybe only a minute long, and if she had been the person to kill Machel, Scott could be She had threatened both of them after aw anonymous Shell is missing presumed to be dead by the police. But how could they prove legislative harm Michelle and how hard would it be defined? Michelle's body why would she kill Michelle because something? Like that is obviously not worth taking somebody's life, right? Maybe not to us but to sell, it could be a very different store. Now, the answer to these questions will come with a little bit more work and a little bit more time, and there will be two people that come into this case and they would not realize how much impact they have on this case. Are on the lay family as a whole I. The family was able to get in contact with Carey, mcgonigal's now does her name sound familiar to you? If it does it's because she's a mother of a girl who went missing in eventually was murdered. If not, I'll let you know exactly who carries carries the mom of Amber Dubois amber was a fourteen year old girl. From San Diego County area in February two, thousand nine on her way to school she was kidnapped and later murdered by a man named John Albert Gardner, who would also go to rape and murder a seventeen year old girl named Chelsea king a year after ambers death for over a year Kerry and her husband and searchers looked for her daughter but it wasn't until after. was kidnapped that police were able to get real leads release ended up connecting Kelsey case to ambers case, and they ultimately found embers body on. March. Sixteenth of two thousand eighteen. Kerry would go on to start a search organization to help families that were in the same situation as her. When the late family reached out to carry she put them in touch with mark class because mark was in the northern area of California. So he was closer and could help. Now. That last name should sound familiar march daughter polly class she was murdered and.

Michelle Scott Kerry John Albert Gardner mcgonigal Detective Richie San Diego County California Machel Carey Ikwo Kelsey rape murder
"polly class" Discussed on The First Degree

The First Degree

11:14 min | 1 year ago

"polly class" Discussed on The First Degree

"And here's a reaction action from Marc Klaas. POLLY's father after hearing the statement that Richard. Alan Davis made in court where he made that sort of wild accusation publicly and following mark. Loss is his father who also talks to the reporters to which this individual will go to continue to inflict pain rain and suffering and agony in the continued victimization of my family. I don't for a moment. Regret my response. I only regret my words. He's a toxic pollutant oaten pawn our society and the sooner he leaves this world the better off we all will be mm-hmm. Are you ready to do what I don't really know. I could no longer be in the same room. I'm with him. I might have let it pass until I heard my mother's grown of agony and it snapped something within me. Aw which I just couldn't hold back. I thought this man has spent his entire. This man has spent spent his entire time in jail trying to think of another way to inflict terrible pain because he is a continual tinu endless sadist. Because this this man succeeded in what he was trying to do in which was pierce my son through the heart and pierced the rest of the family. It was just plane despicable despicable and it shows the kind of people child molesters are there was a point in trial where she was asked. Ask because obviously or I mean when they found her about me they weren't able to tell if she had been sexually abused or not During trial when I was asked he said he didn't and he said he did into because she had said to him. Please don't do what my daddy did to me. which became very Interesting conversation Most people people think that he was doing that just to get another day at the family so because seems like he just seems like a terrible person who was doing things and and you know what he said in court that it seems like he was just trying to hurt as many people as possible which just seems very strange since he didn't seem to have any any motive which is why all of it just has always seems very bizarre to me because there seems to be no motive for why he picked her and no understanding standing for why he then was continuously trying to hurt these people That were close to her. Anyone hurts parts and child specifically based just missing something in their brains for someone to walk into a the house that they don't know on a girl's birthday kidnap her and then murder her you have to be at just a whole `nother level of human being that you just can't I mean I don't know how he related in society at all because if that's something that you can do I don't know how you Extension in life Richard. Alan Davis was sentenced to the death for kidnapping and murdering polly close. In Walla. There was some semblance of justice in this case in that Richard. Alan Davis was was sentenced to death. We must understand that not all cases not all murdered little girls families do get justice so while Elizabeth is is our first degree connection to the story of polly KLAAS. She wanted to come onto our show to also talk about another murder little girl and it was important that this case was brought up wind wind talking about pauline. So I'm going to read an excerpt of an article written by David Templeton for the argus. Corier staff will give you a little summary. The case her name was George Lee Mos but no one knew that yet when her body was found in a grove of trees in South Petaluma on August. Twenty second nineteen ninety-seven almost no one. Even even knew she'd been missing. She was twelve year old African American Santa Rosa girl who disappeared from her Santa Rosa on August eighteenth but no mention ever absence appeared in local tapers until after the body had been tentatively identified by the time we all learned her name. She was already long dead her presumed kidnapping and subsequent murder a crime that remains remains unsolved to this day. Twenty years later many questions remain. Would Georgia Moses still be alive. Had News of her disappearance been widely disseminated as polly Klaas had God was law enforcement slow to act because the victim was black a middle school dropout and living with her disabled mother and poverty. Why hasn't her murder have been solved after all these years? Why hasn't her killer been brought to justice before I sort of fully comprehend? I didn't understand why one had to be talked about with the other because I had such a connection into the Paulie and I didn't know Georgia and it felt like I kept feeling like people were blaming polly for the attention that she got when she he was dead and had no control over it and then as I was able to do more research and as you grow up and you learn more things and I sort of saw the injustice that was was done to Georgia Georgia was Kidnapped and killed. I think three or four five years after Paulie in Petaluma Her mother had reported that she was missing Because she was a young black girl they that she had run away or she she was whatever and they ignored it 'cause some degree and her body was found in a dick and her killer has never been found. And I'd just people very much no the name polly class and people don't know the name George Moses and so for me. It's always been important now now. I think Eva Giovanni talks about it in the thirteenth in her documentary She talks about Paulie. I believe she talks about Georgia And I think that it. It is now an important thing for me if people are going to talk about polly. I think it's always important to then talk about Georgia because mm-hmm so many black girls Were found in his or having been kidnapped or murdered and they it didn't get public attention. They didn't get the media frenzy that happens when a Q.. White girl goes missing. And I think it's incredibly we said And I think that for me it was important that if I was GonNa talk about my friend. polly is now come to her Embrace the fact that if we talk about poly then also got to talk about Georgia right and they see that. It's it's it's not that Paulie didn't deserve the attention. It's the Georgia. Georgia did also deserve the same attention and Elizabeth still holds on to her memories of Paulie anytime. Someone doesn't get the chance to at least eighteen. The the attempt at their dreams Always Really God. I don't know how to describe it properly but I think you feel lucky that so you have the days that you have when you know that there's people that didn't get close to the number of days you've had I think that and losing polly Ali you just get a different renewed sense of how lucky you are and then I think I just try to be as kind as I can be as helpful as I can be because there's so much hate and negativity in the world and get caught up in two and I think that sometimes you have things happen and allows you to take a step back and be grateful for what you have in the moment and what you get to do today and you. You'd get to do tomorrow and the fact that you have tomorrow I will say and Mrs. It's funny because it's something that I always had a memory and my dad I there's recently said no you weren't there. It was just me but the last time that came to my house she knocked on the door and my dad is is the only one that was home and she was explaining that they were moving to Petaluma and she'd left her skate at our house and she needed to take them with her and so my dad helped her look for them and they found them in the garage and that when they were leaving he said to her. I'm still starring that you're moving away. Yeah you've been such a good friend to Elizabeth and she said and she said Yeah but everything. Everything works Out The way that it's supposed to. And she smiled at him and she sort of skip down the stairs and he kept the door. And that was the last lifetime Becky saw her and I always thought of that to me. Is is the memory that I even though I wasn't there. That's the memory that I sort of. Keep a for the the image of her sort of happily skipping away with her skates that we loved though yeah sort of vaccinated. I remember polly. She gets to live on in different ways ways than than anyone would want To be remembered but at least there is a sense that people do remember her and people. Did you talk about her and People get to share their memories of her big. Thank you to Elizabeth for being are first degree connection this week. If you're listening and you have a first degree store you'd like to tell us you can email us at hello at the first I re- PODCAST DOT COM also. Please follow us on instagram. At the first degree Alexis linkletter at Bill Johnson. Abject Panik join our facebook group we are talking talking all things true crime and having discussions about each of our cases every week. It's scrape group to be a part of go by submerge. Lincoln are bio on Instagram. and Dan stick around for killing time because we are weird pushes we share remember. Only you can prevent serial.

POLLY Georgia Marc Klaas Paulie murder Elizabeth Alan Davis Petaluma Richard polly class polly Ali kidnapping Mrs. It Santa Rosa Georgia Georgia David Templeton facebook George Moses George Lee Mos
"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

"Friday. It's a Kelly day. You're going to be nice this weekend. And San Francisco and the bay area very much the center of attention in allow different ways. Of course, the lift IPO we mentioned, but also a presidential candidate rolling through town and making some big splashes here. Carla Marinucci who has forgotten more about politics and most of us will ever know. She does the California playbook for politico either. Carla mark. This is quite a splash this Pete Buddha. Judge made and is continuing to make. Yes, I mean this guy came out of nowhere, you know, a couple of weeks ago when he hit CNN townhall, a lot of people said, oh, what chance does a midwestern mayor who. The gay guy. Get get national traction. I thought that was a long shot at best. But boy, he has gotten rave reviews, maybe in part because of his background is just pretty impressive a Rhodes scholar. You know, PHI beta Kappa from Harvard. An Afghanistan veteran war veteran in very much like the president of the United States. We have now. Seven languages. He I so people are showing up in droves to see the guy and last night in San Francisco, you know, full house thing was sold out at the Commonwealth club for a week. And boy, he really bold them over there. He seems to have that sort of Kennedy esque, you know, young he's thirty seventy youngest candidate in the race. He's the first openly gay major presidential candidate. And he seems to have this policy chops down Marquis answers just about every question with a thoughtful. You know, a very pragmatic approach doesn't want to go on the attack on Trump. You know, nonstop says, basically, the Democrats have got to get a message that appeals to mid western folk, and this sort of is a boy it's making waves in the race. He he he definitely has a lot of buzz. And what's really interesting? I thought is that Susie Tompkins Buell who's a major democratic donor who supported Kamla Harris came out and endorsed her has announced she's doing a fundraiser for P, boo. Well, yeah, I saw that in your piece and that really jumped out at me as well. Now is that just covering a couple of different spots on the roulette wheel. Or what is that about a very unusual move for somebody who's who has already endorsed one candidate to basically say, you know, what I'm taking a second. Look. That's that is raising eyebrows. I think at this point we talked to last night in in San Francisco, he is coming up on a big fundraising deadline on March thirty first to see the kind of money he raises, but he's also looking at the formal launch of his campaign in Indiana. This is sort of a guy who has that midwestern outlook, but at the same time, he's a progressive democrat. And you know, as a gay married, man. This is too. I mean, he has your husband on the campaign trail with them. And that is. Is something I think we'd obviously we'd never seen before in a in a presidential race. So far live reasons Pete is somebody to watch. And he's going to be on that debate stage in June with the rest of the democratic candidates. He's raised that much money and that sort of a time. Yeah. By the way, it's weird that that Indiana birth to both both Mike Pence and Pete Buddha. Judge right? Yes. In fact, he said it last night. You know, I asked him what what? Progressive Democrats think much that they like him that a that a gay married man is not somebody who's going to be in the top of the list for me when you come to American voters. Are they ready for is it a bridge too far? And he said, look, I was elected reelected in Indiana with eighty percent of the vote with Mike Pence being in that state. So he's been very very successful estimator of south bend, and he is extremely popular there, and it is a conservative state. So may. Voters may be ready. We'll see the it's still so early, but it is remarkable to see him shine this way, as you say with all these things that could be looked at as deficits. But apparently, they're being looked at his assets in some ways. Absolutely. I think you know, in talking to the interesting thing is he appeared in San Francisco last night when he made his on the same day when he made his first really big showing you the national poll the Quinnipiac poll, which really highly ranked all put him rank right up with Elizabeth Warren in the poll, and he is now outpacing Cory Booker, Amy klobuchar char, and I mean, this is a very big development and Kristen gillibrand. I mean, those are three people who have a lot more money and a lot more prominence than him. But the pollsters are telling me, look, it's this combination of of youth his energy. He's any comes off as very often. Panic when he's and and super knowledgeable on policy stuff. So it could be that he's gonna there's gonna be some comparisons to work in that, you know, he's not a guy who's on the attack always tearing into the administration. He's kind of a forward-looking candidate who's talking about like, what's the next step to get jobs and talk about and not backwards. But look forward at what American needs to do to create new jobs of. So I think that is a fascinating development in this race. And we'll see how it goes things can change fast as you know. Oh, yeah. Especially at this stage with such a crowded field. But I wanted to also ask about well. Let's let's talk about Gavin Newsom and him going after PGE a bit. What was your take on that? Yeah. I mean, he he sent this letter yesterday that certainly got a notice to John Simon the interim CEO basically saying he's very troubled to learn that PG as he put it is. Primed to sort of bring us board together with hedge fund financiers without a state executives and with folks who have little or no experience in California. And he basically says this this is the wrong message that did sending the message that PG is out for the buck in quick profits over public safety and a California consumer so Newson was very tough in this letter saying that PG has broken the public trust repeatedly in California. And now it's more of the same. And he says that California deserves better. I mean, I think this is you know, yet another move by Newsom to set kind of a throw down to PG knee in the wake of these fire disasters. And you know, he wants to make sure that the PTA board is comprised of by majority of Californians who have experience as regulators who are. You know, who are folks that that have the consumer in mind and not the shareholder. We're going to see how this plays out more. But I mean dramas. And it's gone on for a while. And of course, people in the fire zones are very very concerned. Whether what's going to happen with the PG and E, bankruptcy and weather. They're going to be able to get you know, compensated for a lot of the damages and that there's billions of dollars at stake here. Yeah. There may be some changes to the way PG and even structure we're talking to Carla Marinucci, she writes, the California playbook for politico and just knows politics like like, no one I've ever met. And I wanna I wanna ask you about what what's also happening with Devon Nunez. Another California politician who seems more concerned with things going on in Washington and things going on in California. What really gone on the on the offensive? Absolutely. I mean, especially in the last day or so when President Trump has just really taken off after Adam Schiff who is now chairman of the house intelligence committee. Of course, newness was the chairman until the Democrats flip the house. Nunez is was praised yesterday by Trump as a national hero and seminal go down in history as being a hero. I think a lot of Democrats here would would beg to differ on that. But Nunez is basically saying it calling the mullahs report a joke from the beginning and saying now, the real work begins. He wants to go on offense as he said and track down all the dirty cops and bad players, which means, you know, the Republicans are calling for Moore investigations into the Obama team. What they think we're criminal efforts to undermine President Trump. The Pfizer Morris. We're going to go back to the Steele dossier et cetera. And so on this could be a a run of investigations on both sides of the house and Nunez wants to be that guy on the Republican side who. Charge certainly carrying the charge and the torch for Donald Trump question. Absolutely. And you know, Trump is coming next week to California to Los Angeles to do fundraisers. We don't know the exact location, but you can expect Devin Nunes to be somewhere in the I would assume always astounded Devin Nunes has you know, because he does pay so much attention to Trump and Washington, and it seems to not really pay a lot of attention to his district. He doesn't do those public forums. He goes on the radio once in a while and takes a couple of calls and yet he he carries that district. You know? Oh, yeah. It's a it's a very solidly Republican district. He and his family have been well known there for a long time. But the Democrats are targeting him for we for the next time around. He knows that and President Trump just gave him big fundraising boosts this week by citing him as a hero. So. This. He's getting money from all over the country from Republican donors that's gonna be another big of come come twenty twenty in the house before I let you go Carla. I wanna ask you. I'm going to double back to Gavin Newsom for a moment because he's been so active so early in his tenure, and he leaned in on abandoning executions, for example, in and you've written about this politico, and and his latest poll numbers are so very impressive. Yet. You could argue that that execution thing was out of step with what voters had said that they wanted. I true. Yeah. It's to Mark. But the posters are telling me that California's consistently basically at when they're asked a. Approve of life in prison without parole over the death penalty, except when some of these ballot measures come up in the reminded of some of the more heinous crimes out there Polly class and so forth. Then then they'll then they'll want to keep the death penalty. The thing is what I think what we're watching. Here is is is Gavin Newsom ahead of the curve on this in terms of of public polling as he wasn't gay marriage. It looks like around the country. People are coming to sorta the conclusion that it is a very expensive processes legal challenges that go on for years and years, and that is the point that Gavin Newsom is making the cost and the the inequality on the Justice side are very strong reasons to let go the death penalty other states, I think about twelve states now have done. So so at this point it could be that. Gavin Newsom is a head of the of the public opinion on this. But it's catching up to to where he's at..

California Gavin Newsom President Trump San Francisco politico Carla Marinucci Devon Nunez Pete Buddha Indiana Donald Trump Carla mark CNN president Susie Tompkins Buell Mike Pence Harvard Devin Nunes Kennedy esque
"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Five o'clock. I'm Liz Warner in what's now, the nation's largest college admissions bribery scandal. Actress Lori Laughlin appeared before a federal judge in downtown LA today. Here's Jim Roope with the latest Laughlin best known for her role as aunt Becky on full house, surrendered to federal authorities on Wednesday morning after arriving back in Los Angeles. From filming in Vancouver Laughlin has been released on a one million dollars bond the same amount. Her husband designer mossy emoji newly posted Tuesday. The judge is allowing the actress to continue to travel to Canada for work, but she will have to surrender her passport by mid December. Nearly fifty people were charged in the scandal. Including actress, Felicity Huffman, several coaches at local universities were arrested in connection with the alleged twenty five million dollar scheme. Federal prosecutors said wealthy parents would pay thousands of dollars to get their children admitted to prestigious universities by passing them off as recruit -able athletes, regardless of their athletic ability, or by helping them cheat on. College entrance exams. Governor Newsome is suspending the death penalty. And he's granting a reprieve to more than seven hundred inmates on death row. The nation's largest Mark class is the father of Polly class in nineteen Ninety-three twelve year old Polly was objected and murdered her killer, Richard. Alan Davis confessed to the murder and has been on death row at San Quentin since nineteen Ninety-six class is now a victims rights advocate, and he was stunned by the government's announcement when he said in effect that there would be no executions under his watch a little bit of me died. Really did I was so taken aback? I was so angered the people that he seems to be advocating for all the worst drugs of our society. Mark class was a guest on the Larry O'Connor show today on AM seven ninety KABC days after the plane crash of an Ethiopian Airlines flight, the president has announced the US will now ground all Boeing seven thirty seven max eight and nine. Planes. Here's Clayton Neville, the president said the safety of the American people is of paramount concern, these travelers think the order was the right decision bearing on the side of caution. And I'll have a problem with that. And they need to do a thorough check out bones going to have to react. Yeah. I think it was a safe move more than fifty other countries have also grounded the planes American southwest. And United Airlines will be the most affected in the US and all say, they're working with the FAA to do. What's necessary to safely get the planes back in the air? Clayton Neville, Dallas. Tonight's Powerball jackpot has climbed to four hundred and forty eight million dollars. That's the biggest prize in some seven months. Talk radio. Seven ninety KABC.

Lori Laughlin Clayton Neville Alan Davis Governor Newsome Los Angeles Vancouver Laughlin president US Felicity Huffman Liz Warner bribery Mark class Polly Ethiopian Airlines Canada Jim Roope San Quentin FAA
"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

"Four one five eighty eighty eight ten follow me on Twitter, some of your tweets at Ethan Bearman. So this Jamie Kloss kidnapping is absolutely amazing on so many levels. And joining me to give us the latest on what we know. And what's happening and unfolding about this case Westwood One. Correspondent Steve Kastenbaum. Steve. Thanks so much for coming on the show today. Thanks for having me. So what what do we know? Right now is as I understand the suspect is actually being arraigned in Wisconsin court is that right? It'll be making his first appearance in court shortly he facing charges of homicide homicide charges and kidnapping, but we don't know a whole lot about this guy. Still to this to this moment died there's still a lot to be learned about him a very low profile type of person really not much of a presence online family. Isn't speaking doesn't seem like being out a lot of friends. He's quite the mystery. He also, according to the barren county sheriff's office did not know, Jamie clauses. Family didn't have any interaction with the parents that he's accused of killing before ducking their thirteen year old daughter and kidnapping, you're holding her captive for almost a full three months. I mean, this is one of those miracle stories, you know, I was I was just talking a little bit about Elizabeth smart and the tragic murder of Polly Klaas here in the bay area twenty five years ago. Kind of where they're similar in different from this case. But you know, her parents were just shot and murder. I mean, the part that such a weird mystery of and just all of it. There's always the the why did she get kidnapped? Why did whatever somebody get murdered? He went and killed her parents first, and then kidnapped her in through her in the trunk of his car sheriff said that he planning to this that she was definitely isn't his target. And that that shotgun. Get it to the house and to murder the parents, according to the charges against him. So this is definitely something. That was premeditated. As far as the detectives are concerned. Even though he didn't appear to have any regular interaction with this family. And and how he came to know that the girl remains to be seen. And what I saw one other little bit of evidence that I find utterly fascinating. Steve Kastenbaum, Westwood One. Correspondent joining me on the phone. We're talking about the Jamie Kloss kidnapping and murder of her parents case where she has reappeared and seems to be okay. And is is safe now away from the alleged murderer and kidnapper. But I heard Steve I don't know if you've heard this too. He shaved all of his hair. So he wouldn't leave that kind of forensic evidence behind at the scene of the crime. Did you hear that? Yeah. That's right. That's according to the barren county sheriff he said that he took steps to conceal himself from police and those steps included shaving his hair. So he wouldn't leave behind any sort of a evidence. So where do we where do we what do we know now then so at this point? So she reappeared there was a woman out walking her dog. And then all of a sudden, there was Jamie lightly clothed for Wisconsin winter day saying, I I don't know. Where I am. And I'm Jamie is that right? Basically it and she's extremely fortunate that this woman was walking her dog at the time that she was on that on that street because very very sparsely populated rural area. And this was a collection of just a few homes in this one location, and that's one development, I have very heavily wooded area. And she got out of the house while Patterson was away. According to police and started walking looking for help and came across this neighbor who just happened to be walking her dog at the time. And and then they were actually afraid that the alleged kidnapper was looking for her. And that's alternately how the police caught him. Wasn't it that he was out looking for her? That's right. The thirteen year old was able to give sheriffs and information, including a name, the color of a car, which was read and they were able to use the information. She gave them to make an arrest of the suspect. It's such a bizarre case. Steve kastenbaum. Western one. Correspondence joining me on the phone right now. Jamie close again, we know so little about the alleged this suspect in this case and for him to commit what is a very heinous series of crimes. I mean, the murder of her parents the kidnapping the abduction. We don't know yet. If if it will turn out that what happened her with similar to Elizabeth smart, for example, where she's been very forthcoming about what was done to her on a daily basis. There's no evidence this this individual had any contact with police, according to the sheriff's department. That's right. He apparently lived at this house, Gordon, Wisconsin at some point with his father or was owned by his father at some point. But it had been signed over to a Bank or a little bit around the time, but this kidnapping took place and yet he was still living there. The house is kind of. Shambles. If you look on the inside, there's some photos that have appeared that show that the only been partially finished on the inside. The outside that neighbor said it was screwing with all sorts of green garbage and broken vehicles. So bizarre. Now as I understand it. So I saw actually just moments ago. I saw go across the ticker that he's apparently going to reveal something about why he did this have you heard anything about that yet? I have not seen that update a short while ago. They were still trying to find out the why behind this. They said they were going to be taking their time and doing that because their priority was to do what was best for Jamie clause. They didn't wanna press her too, much and. And. What is already an extremely difficult situation for her and she tries to become reacclimated to life at home in the wake of peak kidnapped that our parents being murdered. Yeah. It's just it's such a again horrific story with a with a happy, you know, outcome here that Jamie was found and she's safe and she's in a safe place now with her extended family as her parents are no longer with her here on on this planet and their their bodies as they were murdered by allegedly by this suspect. Steve kastenbaum. Westwood one. Correspondent wet Steve. Thanks for giving us the latest on what's happening with Jamie clause. My pleasure. Take care. Yeah. Really? Appreciate it is such a devastating story. Who are these people? I still I need to go back and read like, psychological profiles. You know, the. May mail. I don't even wanna say man, the male. Who is who kidnapped Elizabeth smart? For example. I'm still trying to understand why you pick up some you kidnap some teenage girl, you know, some early early teenage girl, and and I don't understand this at all. I don't understand what happened. With Polly class. I don't understand what these I mean. I don't know a better word than monster. These men who've committed these acts, and I sincerely hope that everybody, you know. They're just re tweeted out I saw from Jake tapper official. Go fund me for Jamie Kloss started by Jamie's cousin Sergey tweeted out. So I just re tweeted it, and I just hope she gets all the help she needs. Elizabeth smart very forthcoming and saying look the best way to get back at these people is to be happy and to live a healthy life. That's what Elizabeth smart is saying. About what's the best way to recover from this? So the.

Jamie Kloss Steve Kastenbaum kidnapping Elizabeth smart murder Wisconsin barren county Westwood Polly Klaas Twitter Ethan Bearman Jake tapper Family official Patterson Gordon Sergey thirteen year twenty five years
"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

"This was so upsetting to remember. There's a couple of months ago, nearly three months ago. Now, there was that story out of Wisconsin. These two parents were murdered for no apparent reason and their daughter disappeared. We didn't know what happened to the daughter. Jamie Kloss is her name. And when that story broke nearly three months ago. Most of us are old enough to remember the murder of Polly clause here Petaluma now that was twenty over twenty five years ago. Now that story just absolutely struck me, you know, kidnapped during a slumber party that was Polly Klaas kidnapped at knifepoint during a slumber party in Petaluma, Richard Alan Davis was the murderer and since the death. Of course, he hasn't died yet here in California, but he entered there. So horrible that story Paula costs. Remember that? So when I heard the story of Jamie clus spelled totally differently. Just hearing it though, I was like what what's going on. Oh my gosh. This is so horrible. You hear stories like this? And it's just the good news about Jamie Kloss, and this is maybe a little bit more. Like, Elizabeth smart this way, by the way, you just have to say these names, and you wonder why parents are helicopter parents. Yeah. Polly kloss. Elizabeth smart, Jamie. We protect your kids. There are horrible human beings in the world. And we want to protect them our children from these. Oh. Horrible horrible man that are I don't know. What's wrong with them? So Polly Kloss last Thursday was found. She was wondering seventy miles away from home. Lightly clothed, in Wisconsin, winter mind you. And this woman Sar and she said, I'm Jamie close. I don't know where I am. And this woman. So wonderful that she took her back to her house. Walking her dog. Kristen Kassian skiffs is her name in rural Gordon Wisconsin, founder in the street. Went back to her house mmediately said get a weapon because they assume that the kidnapper was still after her they call nine one one right away passing the phone back and forth between them while Kosinski is husband stood at the front door with the gun in case, the alleged of doctor came into the are before police arrived cops call ten minutes later because he was out searching for the suspect is Jake Thomas Paterson twenty one year old there have no idea yet. Why he targeted Jamie Kloss L O S S her family murdered her parents kidnapped her through her in the trunk of a car drove away eighty seven days later, she shows up wondering trying to figure out where. She was I am beyond thankful again. This also reminded me of Elizabeth smart. Remember her June fifth two thousand to fourteen year old Elizabeth smart abducted at knife point from her bedroom in her family's house. That was a lot like Polycom. In Salt Lake City, Utah. She was rescued by police officers nine months later, March twelfth two thousand three eighteen miles from her home. So they make it very far Lisbeth smart while that was such a tragic scary so thankful that she's alive so thankful Jimmy clauses alive. So sad. Polly classes, not and all the others who've been kidnapped and have disappeared. So sad for all of them and their families happy for Jamie Kloss. The murderer alleged of her parents has been charged with kidnapping two counts of first degree intentional homicide armed burglary. I'm just curious though. When these stories keep coming out and again, thank whomever. You wanna thank thank God. Nobody think lock whatever you wanna thank thank the strength of Jamie Kloss. Doesn't that be? I mean, am I I can't be alone that that's part of our helicopter parenting. Is we hear these stories and we're like, yeah. You know, what kids are sleeping close to me? I guess what? You don't sleep with your windows. Open at night. Sorry. We're gonna run air conditioning. If it gets hot. I mean, really isn't is that an overreaction on our parts that we're so protective of our children that we go. You know, I heard about poly Kloss. I'm uncomfortable. Oh, I heard about Elizabeth marketing kit. Yeah, we're locking the windows at night. Dammit. I'm not taking that risk. I don't want some creep crawling in at night kidnapping, one of my kids. Yeah. You. Yeah. I don't know.

Jamie Kloss Elizabeth smart Polly kloss poly Kloss Jamie clus Wisconsin Polly Klaas Kosinski Polly kidnapping Richard Alan Davis Petaluma Jamie Paula Polycom murder Salt Lake City Lisbeth California
"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

08:13 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KGO 810

"One zero four one five eighty eighty eight ten follow me on Twitter, Samir tweets at Ethan Bearman. So this Jamie Kloss kidnapping is absolutely amazing on so many levels. And joining me to give us the latest on what we know. And what's happening and unfolding about this case Westwood One. Correspondent Steve Kastenbaum. Steve. Thanks so much for coming on the show today. Thanks for having me. So what what do we know? Right now is as I understand the suspect is actually being arraigned in Wisconsin court is that right? Will be making his first appearance in court shortly. He is facing charges of homicide homicide charges and kidnapping, but we don't know a whole lot about this guy. Still to this moment. There's still a lot to be learned about him a very low profile type of person really not much of a presence online family. Isn't speaking doesn't seem like a lot of friends. He's quite the mystery. He also, according to eat, Barron county sheriff's office did not know, Jamie clauses. Family didn't have any interaction with the parents, but he's accused of killing before abducting thirteen year old daughter and kidnapping, you're holding her captive for almost a full three months. I mean, this is one of those miracle stories, you know, I was I was just talking a little bit about Elizabeth smart and the tragic murder of Polly Klaas here in the bay area twenty five years ago. In kind of where they're similar in different from this case. But you know, her parents were just shot and murder. I mean, the the part that's such a weird mystery of just all of it. There's always the the why did she get kidnapped? Why did whatever somebody get murdered? He went and killed her parents first, and then kidnapped her through her in the trunk of his car, and the sheriff said that people planning to this that she was definitely has his target and that the shotgun give it to the house and to murder, the parents, according to the charges against so this is definitely something. That was premeditated. As far as the detectives are concerned. Even though he didn't appear to have any regular interaction with this family. And and how he came to know that the girl remains to be seen. And what I saw one other little bit of evidence that I find utterly fascinating. Steve Kastenbaum, Westwood One. Correspondent joining me on the phone. We're talking about Jamie, Kloss kidnapping and murder of her parents case where she has reappeared and seems to be okay. And is is safe now away from the alleged murderer and kidnapper. But I heard Steve I don't know if you've heard this too. He shaved all of his hair. So he wouldn't leave that kind of forensic evidence behind the scene of the crime. Did you hear that? Yeah. That's right. That's according to the barren county sheriff said that he took steps to conceal himself from police and those steps included shaving his hair. So he wouldn't leave on any sort of a evidence. So where do we where do we what do we know now then so at this point? So she reappeared there was a woman out walking her dog. And then all of a sudden, there was Jamie lightly clothed for Wisconsin winter day saying, I don't know. Where I am. And I'm Jamie is that right? Basically. And she's extremely fortunate that this woman was walking her dog at the time that she was on that on that screen because it's a very very sparsely populated rural area. And this was a collection of just a few homes in this one location, and it's one development, I have very heavily wooded area. And as she got out of the house while Patterson was away, according to police and started walking looking for help and came across this neighbor who just happened to be walking her dog at the time. And and then they were actually afraid that the alleged kidnapper was looking for her. And that's ultimately how the police caught him. Wasn't it that he was out looking for her? That's right. The thirteen year old was able to give sheriffs and information, including name, the color of a car, which was read and they were able to use the information. She gave them to make an arrest of this suspect. It's such a bizarre case. Steve Kastenbaum, western one. Correspondent joining me on the phone right now. Jamie close again, we know so little about the alleged suspect in this case for him to commit what is a very heinous series of crimes. I mean, the murder of her parents the kidnapping the abduction. We don't know yet. If if it will turn out that what happened to her with similar to Elizabeth smart, for example, where she's been very forthcoming about what was done to her on a daily basis. There's no evidence that this this individual had any contact with police, according to the sheriff's department. That's right. He apparently lived at this house in Gordon Wisconsin at some point with his father or was owned by his father at some point. But it had recently been signed over to a Bank or a little bit around the time that this kidnapping took place and yet he was still living there. The house is kind of it samples if you look on the inside there's some photos that have appeared that show that only been partially finished on the inside feeling the outside that neighbor said it was with all sorts of the breed garbage and broken vehicles. So bizarre. Now as I understand it. So I saw actually just moments ago. I saw go across the ticker that he's apparently going to reveal something about why he did this have you heard anything about that yet? I have not seen that update shortwhile ago. They were still trying to find out the why behind this. And they said they were going to be taking their time and doing that because their priority was to do what was best for Jamie clause. They didn't wanna press her too much and complicate what is already an extremely difficult situation for her and she tries to become reacclimated to life at home in the wake of he kidnapped that her parents being murdered. Yeah. It's just it's such a I mean again horrific story with a with a happy, you know, outcome here that Jamie was found and she's safe and she's in a safe place now with her extended family as her parents are no longer with her. Here on on this planet and they're in their bodies as they were murdered by allegedly by this suspects. Steve Kastenbaum, Westwood One. Correspondent Steve thanks for giving us the latest on what's happening with Jamie clause. Yeah. Really appreciate it is such a devastating story. Who are these? People still I need to go back and read like, psychological profiles. You know? The. May mail. I don't even wanna say man, the male. Who is who kidnapped Elizabeth smart? For example. I'm still trying to understand why you pick up some you kidnap some teenage girl some Earl early teenage girl. And and I don't understand this at all. I don't understand what happened. Whoa. With Polly class. I don't understand what these I mean. I don't know a better word than monster. These men who've committed these acts, and I sincerely hope that everybody. I just re tweeted out I saw from Jake tapper the official go fund me for Jamie Kloss. Started by Jamie's cousin. Sergey tweeted out. So I just retweeted it, and I just hope she gets all the help. She needs. Elizabeth smart is very forthcoming and saying look the best way to get back at these people is to be happy and to live a healthy life. That's what Elizabeth smart is saying..

Jamie Kloss Steve Kastenbaum kidnapping Elizabeth smart murder Wisconsin Polly Klaas Twitter Westwood Barron county barren county Jake tapper Samir Ethan Bearman Family Sergey Gordon Wisconsin official Patterson
"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

11:19 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Free. We've got lots to talk about the promo said, yes, we will deal with the headlines. I I wanted to start with the insane story of the kidnapped kidnap thirteen year old Jimmy closet and get an update because it's such an unusual story that had a happy ending in the sense that they found her. I think she's okay. But Steve Kastenbaum. ABC news contributor has more of the details. How you doing Steve do? Well, she, you know, all things considered appears to be you know, Kane now she was reunited with family soon after she was reunited with an ad that aunt posted a picture of her smiling with her face cheek-to-cheek while holding a small dog and the sheriff in Barron county. Wisconsin. Sadness. She was doing as good as could be expected all things considered. But what an incredible story, you know, had a woman not been out walking her dog, it just the right time role, Gordon, Wisconsin in in the northwest part of the state who knows what would have happened to this young girl to Jimmy cloths because she escaped from the house where she was held captive for three months and Dowd herself in an unfamiliar place in an area in a very small development with just a few homes in a sparsely populated part of the state. Pretty interesting story. Now Jake Thomas Peterson who they're claiming twenty one was arrested in her kidnapping her parents murders. What do we know about him? I'd seen that he had maybe worked at Genio store retail store with her parents, apparently he had targeted her. Do we know why long targeted her why he called the parents? We don't do. He had been hired this place where the parents work, but it may go nuts shores. We don't know yet. Just a coincidence. He was there for just one day, and it did more for for some reason. But the sheriff said that he had planned this study targeted the girl that she was his intended target, and that he shot and killed allegedly shot and killed her parents with a shotgun, and she was home when the murders took place, and then kilos, we took her captive back to homework, Gordon, and he's a twenty one year old was his home, his parent's home. I believe aides house where he's lived. But it might have been families own home. I'm not one hundred percent sure right now. But the sheriff said anytime anyone came over the home he would hide the girl. But he didn't give details about how she was hidden. You said they have a lot of questions that they still want to ask and and aren't taking their time doing that. Because they, you know, they don't want to make things worse for this young girl who tragically lost her parents to killer. And then suffered a tremendous truck traumatic experience for three months, we say, she was also malnourished and dehydrated. But okay. And again, of course, they re noted with remaining family, and I'm sure there's going to be intensive counseling, and how to integrate her back into society because we can't imagine what went on. Or do. We have a sense of what went on in that house for the three months. We don't at this point. Again, that's something that detectives a want to piece together they obviously want to see it there if they can figure out why this twenty one year old. Focused in on this girl. And and what what else went on in his life prior to this one. The FBI is now involved. There are also I'm guessing at the house and getting getting into a social media any friends family of on his side coming forward to explain his behavior who he is what his background is. All day. Announcer was meet identified him a local media been trying to find that out. But again, he he lives in an area. That's very sparsely populated very rural. So it's you know, it's not something that. That something that requires a, you know, time to piece all that together. And so far seem very little about him. The sheriff has said that he tried to disguise his offer. Hide himself really are asking himself one of the steps he took was shaving off his hair. And there's pictures of him. With his head shaved than someone might suspected something something personally shaves on their fair off. But I I guess it didn't raise suspicion at the time. It is unusual too. Because with timeframe since it was announced that she was she escaped and got away safely, usually. I mean, I've been doing this a long time a profile starts to come out dribs and droughts pretty quickly of the doctor or the shooter or whatever it is unusual that I've seen nothing on this guy. I mean, I've been searching around trying to find background on him. They are not sure where he worked in that store may be briefly or college or parents or family friends, the only way she was able to identify him was describing the car, correct? He had his name, and she was able to describe the car police later found him driving that car they the sheriff's deputies found him in the sheriff said did appear that he was searching for her. It is in today's world with all the cameras with with the social media and posting nobody know in three months that nobody was able to first off copter his behavior that something's weird. I mean when friends come over your house people come over the house. It's it's just odd. You have somebody locked up. Nobody would know. Although we've seen this before with actually social services come to Polly class where they didn't know, you know, so, wow, it's gonna be fascinating scenes backend of it. Guy in. What was it Cleveland? I believe right where to was holding women captive in the house, right? And he had people over the house and the he kept him captive for years, and they were scared and one gave birth. Situation. So again, Jake Thomas Paterson, we don't know much about him. Who is she staying with what relatives that they reunited with the first person she was reunited with Cam. Well, and I know that the person who found her was walking the dog was involved in social services. Right. Wasn't. She somebody who's who's worked in that field. So she was kind of lucky that she's the person who found her child protection services. The map of this one. Oh, do men, and you see how few houses there are surrounded by dense woods beyond this one little community. It's it's I it. It's nothing before you get to the town itself. But it's a town that that covers a large area. It's only one thousand people spread out over this town. It's incredibly fortunate that this woman was walking her dog at that specific time with this girl was looking for help. And she lost her dad James fifty-six, her mom, Denise forty six years old any other siblings or no. Not that I'm aware of haven't heard any mention of any siblings. So it doesn't seem what she has any point. I saw the press conference the retard is related because this was a huge manhunt thousands of people looking at I think the FBI had the reward up to fifty thousand bucks. Does this woman who found her get the reward, by the way, she qualifies don't know the answer that I haven't heard that question asked yet? I know, but I. It's it's you know with each passing day. The sheriff said the the white result of this having a positive outcome. Went down. So they were elated to to get word that she'd been discovered absolutely thrilled that they got her. But what what kind of world is she returning to and how long will she or should be forever traumatized, but a horrific situation. But thank God it ended well for her. And I thank you. Thanks for the update ABC news contributor, Steve castenbaum, the Twitter's at s castenbaum we'll talk against actually my Fisher. Yeah. I can't even I mean, I can't even process. That's how this guy targeted her and managed to planet that he could get in the house blow these people away. I know there was a strange nine one one call at that time, which was how the authorities were alerted to the fact that the parents were killed, but she was gone by the time they showed up and she was in that house in the middle of nowhere seventy miles away for maybe I'm saying in that house, but I'm guessing three for three months. I don't know if he moved from location location, but insane, and you know, a lot of times this and plan and part of the rush to doing this is is the planning and the execution but how he had the mud. Money. The time. And went undetected by family friends. I mean anyone of us if we did something strange or out of the ordinary your detected pretty quickly. So fascinating story again. Thank goodness. It ended well for her. And I wish her luck in recovery. 'cause it's gonna take a while talked about the LA USD last night started talking about it. And I wanted to spend some time today because Monday Coban ski it looks like there's going to be a striking strikes organized in talking to Austin Butin, I replayed his interview the other night, you know, he feels that they were gonna strike anyway that they had made comments on that. We're ready to strike ages ago, even before so they're negotiating here's what the latest offer as new proposal that he put forward would provide full-time nursing every elementary school and also lower class sizes at middle schools by about two students the offer bills on a proposal from earlier in the week in which the district also proposed lower class. I'd teacher's union. President Alex Caputo Pearl was not immediately available for comment today about that. And they were in session all day today. I saw the computer per was unhappy that wasn't there to negotiate yesterday. But he was up in Sacramento trying to get money from the governor and his tact. Was why don't we work together to get money from the governor? Because again, and I say this everything you're probably sick of it the Gazeta's to into four the math. It's the same for everybody. Everybody has the same goes into. Okay. So the two sides apparently got closer, but they don't appear to have a settlement. And they got strike army ready. So it's one article said, it's unlikely that they would disarm without turning it loose for at least a few days. In other words, we're ready to strike. We got the shirts. We got the signs. Let's write for a little bit Newson. Our governor didn't pledge anything specific to help with the local local school issue right now. But his first proposed state budget does include increased funding for all California school districts, and I think Austin beaten who did get to talk to him you also propose putting additional money into the states. Pension funds which could provide that would provide a bunch a lot of relief LA unified another school district the. Superintendent said repeatedly he supports some of the teachers demands, but the district can't afford to meet the Mckee. Here's again, the amazing part of this is Austin comes in there. A couple of months ago to a school district that has promised off since the sixties. I mean, this has been a long time in the making sixties they started granting eligible employees and retirees and their dependents free lifetime health benefits, including full medical.

FBI Austin Butin Gordon ABC Jake Thomas Peterson Wisconsin Steve Kastenbaum Barron county Steve kidnapping Kane LA Jimmy cloths Cleveland Genio Dowd California
"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:58 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"L A USD and one of the biggest stories that we're covering now. Jamie Kloss and coming up at eight o'clock out of Barron county. Police officials are holding a press conference. And we are going to carry it live. So talking about this story. Ryan burrow, ABC news. Correspondent is covering it. And Ryan, this is an extraordinary story of which is we don't get really good news stories too often under these circumstances. I saw good morning. Thanks for joining us. And let's go right into it. What is happening in this on this story here? Let's wash back to yesterday nine one one call place Romeo woman inside of a home in Gordon, Wisconsin, not a very big Douglas county Jiang that they have Jamie. She is there, and it all started. When Jerry apparently walked up to a woman in the neighborhood walking her dog. Instantly recognize? Grab JV and they went into this home and called nine one one Jamie sat on the couch. Twenty minutes for police to arrive. They say she had met at hair that she looks about durhush that she was a thinner than she had previously been in her photo what she was alive. And she was there a team healthy enough. They did ask her a few questions while they waited for police. She said she had no idea that she was imported Wisconsin. Gorka. Wisconsin was told them that she was being held by a person that you know. And that that same person kills her parents. So that's all the information. We're getting from the witnesses police themselves. So we haven't given up. Juliette found Eddie Douglas county. They said that they had found duty while I called in. So got where we stand right now. All right. No indication or identity of the suspect at this point. Correct. Now, there are some local reports and early twenties, but we'll probably gotta get confirmation about all of that information. Whether or not this man, then with the whole time, or when they had gotten to Gordon, Wisconsin. All right now. Now, it's being reported that from the time she was discovered to the time that the suspect was picked up arrested was about ten minutes is can you go into that? And explain how that works because I'm a little confused as to how this happened so quickly. Well, I think what they're talking about eight the official that police finally late. There is John J to the time when they they picked up this person who apparently was in a whole just a couple doors down Joe. You know, that that's probably why they arrived JD you wear person just down the street at that. They went bait that made that apprehension so that that's that's all understated right now. But we'll we'll have to see what thirty say. All right. As far as the murderer of her parents, do we know under what circumstances? The obviously he broke in. Where was she was she in a bedroom where she there that had happened in front of her? Do we have any information at all? But we have indicated that they believe Jamie was there at the time of Jilin, which by the way, happened late one night the door to the home had been broken in up. Both of her parents were found shock adapted. Of course, one point two by Jimmy was nowhere to be found out immediately following the burgers, at least said the finding of the body. They look at surveillance video and who had initial descriptions of two vehicles. They thought may have been in the area at the time. But we don't know if that handout and former keep it by two that it's been three months. And it wasn't until I die with one call. But they really got the break. How were the parents murdered? What was? Yeah. They were shot to death without exactly no. It's not what what type of gun used. This was a robbery this person. Do the family Jamie difficult that she didn't know I was witnesses. But maybe we'll find out a little bit more about that today. Yeah. This is when this happens, it affects us very differently than you have a family situation where you have people that know, the family, this is simply out of the blue like Polly class just someone comes in. And it's the ultimate nightmare for parents with their children to be kidnapped. And this is even worse because you have the parents murdered. And then you have Jamie picked up and without trying to sound. Well, I think the question that should be asked was she there any evidence of her being sexually assaulted being hurt in any way tied up. That's that's something that will be asked. Yeah. We don't know that points to family the remaining family members there. They're dead self. She will probably adopt eventually custody of a close family members like aunts and uncles and said that they're just glad she's alive. And obviously all this stuff to be sorted out in the future by dot. They're just happy that that she is alive is I think most of us didn't think would end this way. Right. All right. Thanks, Ryan, greatly appreciated. Ryan burrow, ABC news. Correspondent is covering this story nationally and for us, and no one ever thought that you'd see little thirteen year old girl, again, how many stories do we have where you have the Elizabeth smart. So this world where you have kids that survive this. Because of course, whenever anybody's reported missing. It's what what are the police say after twenty four forty eight hours the chances of finding someone alive under these circumstances are virtually nonexistent. So all of a sudden out of the blue is this extraordinary story, and it's very. Good news. Now, we'll see how how how banged up. She is. Because obviously the trauma is extraordinarily here. Especially for parents were killed in front of her as opposed she hears gunshots, and the intruder just takes her away. And she doesn't see, and it may be even isn't aware that her parents were killed. Although I think she did say to the police to that stranger that picture up that that neighbor saying that he killed by parents. Yeah. The trauma not just the physical trauma. Absolutely. But the emotional. I mean, he absolutely horrible horrible. Okay. Coming back, the California. Police unions are preparing for the new transparently laws that just kicked in for the police. You know, we have to know any police officer who is in involved in a shooting or has been found to be a liar and a previous case. Well, yeah, they're not very happy for sure and California's very strange when it comes to this issue. Unlike any other state L explain that and eight o'clock the press conference from Barron county regarding up Jamie, close we're going to cover that live. So we still have plenty to talk about this morning KFI AM, six forty. Let's check in with Jennifer Jones lake. Pollution regulators have put out a no burn alert for Orange County and non desert parts of LA county, and the IE the ban on wood-burning set to last all day to protect those most vulnerable to smog man, accused of trying to rape a woman at a bus stop in Santa Anna's been arrested. Police arrested at twenty seven year old man yesterday as he left his job in Irvine. Police have shared a photo. Oh, online of Dallas Cowboys jersey found in the man's closet and candidates looking to admit more than a million immigrants over the next.

Jamie Kloss Wisconsin Ryan burrow Barron county ABC California JV Orange County Douglas county Jiang Dallas Cowboys Jennifer Jones lake LA county Jerry KFI Gordon JD Jilin officer
"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

10:16 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Are listening to a nation divided. I am Brian done in studio with my producer James out, a low. Jim Hello, Brian. So today, we're going to be talking about two words that too many legal scholars are synonymous with the criminal Justice system mass incarceration, and when we talk about the concept of mass incarceration pull up a chair because I'm just going to read you some numbers. The United States of America has approximately four point four percent of the world's population. The United States of America incarcerates twenty two percent of the world's prisoners. These are just hard numbers. And when I say incarceration what I mean is your job is to be locked up. I'm not talking about someone who's on a weekend facility. I'm talking about someone who is from the moment, you get up until the moment you go to bed. You're in a prison or jail or detention facility or some custodial situation where you have absolutely no freedom to go anywhere. Now, how did this occur? Fortunately, due to our department of Justice. There are very meticulous numbers with regard to the number of individuals that are locked up when they were locked up for what they were locked up, and how long they're going to be locked up, and we can very easily determine how and when our nation began to lead the free world actually the entire world in terms of the number of incarcerated individuals, and it all started around the calendar year one thousand nine hundred and I'm just gonna read you some numbers. You can look these up if you like in nineteen eighty our nation incarcerated a little over half a million people by nineteen Ninety-three that number had risen to nine hundred forty nine thousand by nineteen ninety five. That is a short two years later. The number was just over one point five million as of two thousand the number was one point nine million it rose to two point two million in two thousand twelve and it's held at that level pretty consistently until the last time that they calendar the actual statistics, which would have been two thousand sixteen. Now, if you had tuned in last week, we talked about the war on drugs, and we talked about the impact that the war on drugs hat on the prison population. When we look at the legislation that has been passed. It's very easy for us to determine the exact mechanism of how we began to incarcerate so many individuals over three decades period which had been unprecedented in the United States history. When we talked about, for example, the nineteen Eighty-six anti-drug abuse of Mr. Reagan, and we talked about the position of mandatory minimums. Sentences that gave judges no discretion with regard to the amount of time that could be imposed that imposed a one hundred to one disparity with regard to the possession, and or possession of sale of crack cocaine versus powder, cocaine five grams would get you five years of crack five hundred grams when gets you five years of powder cocaine, and when we talked about the nineteen Ninety-four violent crime, control and law enforcement act of Mr Clinton, and we saw how that particular act created national standards for three strikes penalties and incentivize state governments to impose maximum sentences for what we're in many cases, nonviolent crimes, we see that just those two acts of legislation alone were responsible, or let's just say they were associated with massive increases in the prison population such that over a decade period, we saw it quadruple. So when we look at why this occurred, and how it occurred there. There are several things that are always associated with periods of mass incarceration, and although we talked specifically a lot about the drug crimes and about the proliferation of prisoners within our custodial system for having merely possess drugs. We also are reminded of certain laws that happened here in California. You may remember in nineteen ninety four to three strikes act. It passed overwhelmingly that was an incredibly tragic story involving the death of a little girl by the name of Polly class it received statewide headlines Governor Pete Wilson seized on this tragedy. And what happened was our state passed a law that had never been passed in any state. It basically said that if you have to crimes that are considered serious or violent felonies, the third crime, no matter whether it be serious or violent felony or misdemeanor could result in a twenty five year to life sentence. And if you have a criminal history, even if you steal a pack of gum. They can charge it as a felony because you have violated the law with a prior crime. So what? We saw in California. We saw individuals that were getting twenty five to life, and I'm not exaggerating folks for stealing pizza, stealing bottles of wine, a stealing in one instance, a bite out of a garage a bicycle out of a garage, and I actually had the misfortune of representing some of these individuals. But once again, the majority the vast majority of people that are being locked up during this period of exponential incarceration are drug offenders. And when I say drug offenders, it's not just individuals that possess drugs. Some low level individuals who sell drugs, but it's also just the cycle of drug addiction. It can cause crimes like residential burglary because individuals break into homes to steal drugs. It can cause crimes like petty theft because people steal to support their habit. Does that mean that we should legalize it? That's not what I'm saying. Does. That mean, it's a good thing. That's not what I'm saying. But what I am saying is that these types of individuals all have a common denominator is that. They are posing a threat to the public safety on. Level that a rapist would or an armed robber would or a Bank robber would or someone that is guilty of a violent crime. What yet they're getting just as long as sentence and what's happening as our prisons become filled, and they get more and more individuals in there that are not dealing with serious crimes in the context of threats to public safety. So as we move forward we start to see that over the course of this same time period and specifically beginning in one thousand nine hundred eighty s another thing started to occur. And that thing that started to occur beginning in the nineteen eighties was the institution and the incorporation of specific private corporations whose job was to incarcerate individuals, and there are two main ones in January of nineteen Eighty-three. The corrections. Corporations of America was founded it quickly became a publicly traded company, specializing in the creation of what was a new thing at the time private prisons that means prisons that are owned and run by private individuals, the corporation, gamed wealth, very quickly its stock made its owners wealthy, and there was another one you may have heard of the Wackenhut corporation it got into the business of pride private prisons as well later changed its corporate identity to the GAO group in between the and the GAO group we see as of today over a hundred and thirty private prison facilities within our nation's boundaries. So when we talk about these companies shink Jimmy done some researches to what's happening with the stock of these companies as they start to fill up with inmates. It's fascinating Bryant, you know, when you go back to if you just went back to the year two thousand which is the time when the private prison system started to take off in the United States, and you look at these two companies core civic and geo group is what's called back in two thousand they were both trading for between a dollar and a dollar fifty a share on the stock market back in those days. The Dow Jones industrial average is about ten thousand ten thousand or so correct about half of what it is today. Yeah. Yeah. A little bit less than half. Yeah. So if you run those numbers forward to the year two thousand sixteen just prior to the time that President Obama's administration had announced that the department of Justice would be a suspending the usage of or continuation of private prisons, the core civic and geo group stocks had risen anywhere between fourteen and thirty times their value from the year two thousand so in other words, it was an incredible investment to about halfway through the second term of the Obama administration was a great investment. If you put your money into any of the great stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average called a Chevron or a Microsoft or anything like that. You know, you double your money more or less between two thousand and twenty sixteen thirty two one for a core civic, or it was called CCA when it was founded and the other thing that's interesting about those companies is this tube. Ryan. And the their price to earnings ratio. So that for people that don't know what that means is is that basically, they earn a lot of money. So if you look at like any of the other companies like an IBM or a GE and usually have a PD to twenty thirty one. That's kinda just says how much money do you make per share you own, but these companies are like fifteen P E, which is like again like a Chevron like an oil company. So not only did the stock value skyrocket relatively, but they pay you a lot of money because they make a lot of money, and when we get back from the break, which we will take now we're gonna talk about exactly how they make all of that money. Those folks aren't in those prisons sitting, and we're gonna talk about all of these things when we get back. Thanks for tuning in KABC, seven ninety talk radio. You're listening to a nation divided. You just heard from Jim oats? I am Brian. We'll be right back. The natural habitats of the creepy. Doll.

United States Brian America California department of Justice geo group Chevron Jim Hello cocaine producer Pete Wilson GAO James crack cocaine Jim oats Mr. Reagan burglary theft Wackenhut
"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The Ronald Reagan presidential library holiday lights. And by the way, pretty presumptive of them to say first annual. You know? I mean, maybe something happens that they can't pay their bills or something. How that works. What else is going on time four what's happening? By the way joke credits of lake dome. Sorry. That was his idea. Wow. I'm even less impressed. All right. So some of the trending stories th these little ones being shared most often on social media. The big one, of course is the follow up to Michael Cohen. The former fixer for Donald Trump slammed his old boss during his sentencing hearing today saying that Donald Trump made him cover up his dirty deeds. They're crying before the judge asking for leniency saying that Donald Trump caused him to follow a path of darkness rather than Satan. Donald Satan, Trump, he tempted me he says I've been living in a personal and mental incarceration ever since the day. I accepted the offer to work for a real estate mogul has business acumen that I deeply I want you to say that like like you think he actually because you're such good with Carrick Michael Cohen. Yeah. I'm in living in a personal mental incarceration. Work for real estate mogul whose is. Thank you. By the way. All you have to do is say, no he could have broken off this this contract. Whatever contract. He felt like he had with Donald Trump. They had free will Mr.. The judge did take some mercy on him. And instead of the four to five years that had been suggested he only gave him three years, but he's also going to have to pay one point four million in restitution, plus a half a million in forefeiture for the financial and campaign campaign finance crimes, and he's required to report to prison March beginning of March next year, speaking of all things Trump federal prosecutors are giving the publisher of the National Enquirer immunity. For information about the hundred and fifty thousand dollars alleged hush money payment, the supermarket tabloid gave Karen McDougal the playboy model who claims she had an affair with President Donald Trump. This is a non prosecution agreement from the feds, which I don't know. So they can give him information to try to prove that Trump illegally used campaign funds or whatever to hush up somebody to influence the election. But you can't indict a sitting president. I don't think so what do you do with this? If you why are you giving this person, immunity, so you can get information turn it over to congress who could try to send out articles of impeachment. I mean, what's the point of giving up this person, immunity, who are you going to go after they could. But it would just be to hang this on the president. Like you said they're never they're not going to indict him. So just to just to put some stink on them. I guess if you're a federal prosecutor who are you prosecuting here, the the National Enquirer, right? And yet now you're giving them an immunity degree agreement were just you could say this is why they told us right back to you possible. Theresa May should find out this hour. The results of a vote that conservative party there in Great Britain has held a no confidence vote in her leadership. This I love staying up. This is the dumbest thing I'm gonna set all day staying up late and watching some of the members of parliament and just the questions for the prime minister. By the way, are is one of the most amazing. Exercises in politics. See? Well, I think what we saw in the Oval Office yesterday with Pelosi Schumer, and the president has kicked it up to a whole new level. And I would get up at three AM to watch that because to me that is America and action, and I cannot get enough of that. By the way. Police in woodland park. Colorado have released surveillance video of missing that missing. Mom, Kelsey, beret, Berith breath breath, twenty nine years old. She was seen entering a Safeway grocery store with her baby on thanksgiving and the footage does not show her leaving. But her fiance, Patrick Swayze? Who's the father of the child he has told investigators he may met her later that day to pick up their daughter? They don't live together. The only weird thing about he's not talking to the public. But his lawyer has told ABC news that he has volunteers cooperating. He's released his phone to be searched provided DNA only thing that gets me is this whole cell phone thing of hers was detected three detected three days later, seven hundred miles away and ping her boss or texting saying she's not gonna be able to work that week. I'm assuming they knew nowhere. Patrick Frasier was two three days after I it's that's the only fly in the moment. Is that phone? You don't think that it was a suspicious that he didn't show up to the news conference? That was the other big deal. Was that her mom showed up and when they asked the police chief? Hey, where's where's the fiance and the police chief just very matter of fact says I don't know you're gonna have to ask him. Why didn't why didn't the fiancee's report her missing if she's been going, you know, that is? But then often soften when you get these guys who do show up and say, I'll do anything then they turn out to be the guilty ones. And maybe he's just like I got a good attorney. You know, what I don't know. I don't know. The only thing I remember is when Polly class was missing her dad was the first one out there saying, let's get this out of the way, take my DNA. Search me do everything get me off your list of suspects. Right. We can move onto the busy. I got work to do. I gotta find my daughter and the other one last one was that CBS news has settled its lawsuit by three female employees claim they were sexually harassed by. Charlie rose filed in may. They said that CBS management several broadcasters in studio staff witnessed Charlie rose is unlawful conduct. This is yet another guy who apparently liked touching and caressing and like fast. Lots of come up to my hotel room and opening the door and a bathrobe has done. They're still suing him. Now. This is just CBS CBS which and then they're going to have to you know, God knows what they're going to have to pay over the last moon vez stuff. Your husband even own a bathrobe. I don't think I've ever in my life owned a bathroom. It's gathering dust. Yeah. He hasn't. I mean, we know know, we're in LA. Well, how cold strong a hoodie or something like that? If you're more. Oh, I see what you're saying. I get it. All right. Hey, the love actually review when we come back. Jane saw the movie for the first Jane, and I both saw the move. I mean last week, I only because of you, and then I doubled down on it. If you want to call it that and saw the love actually live stop, Gary and Shannon will continue with Jane wells. Jo Kwon, what's up. British Prime Minister, Theresa may may be voted off the island because of Brexit members of as conservative party have called for no confidence vote today. The votes are being counted. If may lose the vote, she loses her job state and federal officials say it's going to cost at least three billion dollars to clear debris from the nineteen thousand homes destroyed by fire and Butte venture in LA county's private contractors will likely begin removing debris next month. An earthquake has hit eastern, Tennessee. The magnitude four point four quake was felt.

President Donald Trump CBS president Trump Charlie rose Theresa Ronald Reagan Jane wells the National Enquirer Donald Satan lake dome Karen McDougal Patrick Swayze Britain Michael Cohen Jo Kwon woodland park Carrick Michael Cohen
"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

09:57 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Divided. I am Brian done in studio with my producer, James low. Jim. Hello, brian. So today, we're gonna be talking about two words that too many legal scholars are synonymous with the criminal Justice system mass incarceration, and when we talk about the concept of mass incarceration pull up a chair because I'm just going to read you some numbers. The United States of America has approximately four point four percent of the world's population. The United States of America incarcerates twenty two percent of the world's prisoners. These are just hard numbers. And when I say incarceration what I mean is your job is to be locked up. I'm not talking about someone who's on a weekend facility. I'm talking about someone who is from the moment, you get up until the moment you go to bed. You're in a prison or jail or detention facility or some custodial situation where you have absolutely no freedom to go anywhere. Now, how did this occur? Fortunately, due to our department of Justice. There are very meticulous numbers with regard to the number of individuals that are locked up when they were locked up for what they were locked up, and how long they're going to be locked up, and we can very easily determine how and when our nation began to lead the free world actually the entire world in terms of the number of incarcerated individuals, and it all started around the calendar year one thousand nine hundred and I'm just gonna read you some numbers. You can look these up if you like in nineteen eighty our nation incarcerated a little over half a million people by nineteen Ninety-three that number had risen to nine hundred forty nine thousand by nineteen ninety five. That is a short two years later. The number was just over one point five million as of two thousand the number was one point nine million it rose to two point two million in two thousand twelve and it's held at that level pretty consistently until the last time that they calendar the actual statistics, which would have been two thousand sixteen. Now, if you had tuned in last week, we talked about the war on drugs, and we talked about the impact that the war on drugs hat on the prison population. When we look at the legislation that has been passed. It's very easy for us to determine the exact mechanism of how we began to incarcerate so many individuals over a three decade period which had been unprecedented in the United States history. When we talked about, for example, the nineteen Eighty-six anti-drug abuse of mister Reagan, and we talked about the position of mandatory minimums. Sentences that gave judges no discretion with regard to the amount of time that could be imposed that imposed a one hundred to one disparity with regard to the possession, and or possession of sale of crack cocaine versus powder, cocaine five grams would get you five years of cracked five hundred grams when gets you five years of powder cocaine, and when we talked about the nineteen Ninety-four violent crime, control and law enforcement act of Mr Clinton, and we saw how that particular act created national standards for three strikes penalties and incentivize state governments to impose maximum sentences for what we're in many cases, nonviolent crimes, we see that just those two acts of legislation alone were responsible, or let's just say they were associated with massive increases in the prison population such that over a decade period, we saw it quadruple. So when we look at why this occurred and how it occurred. There are several things that are always associated with periods of mass incarceration, and although we talked specifically a lot about the drug crimes in about the proliferation of prisoners within our custodial system for having merely possess drugs. We also reminded of certain laws that happened here in California. You may remember in nineteen ninety four to three strikes act. It passed overwhelmingly there was an incredibly tragic story involving the death of a little girl by the name of Polly class it received statewide headlines. Governor Pete Wilson. Seized on this tragedy. And what happened was our state passed a law that had never been passed in any state. It basically said that if you have to crimes that are considered serious or violent felonies, the third crime, no matter whether it be serious or violent felony or misdemeanor could result in a twenty five year to life sentence, and if you have a criminal history, even if you steal a pack of gum. They can charge it as a felony because you have violated the law with a prior crime. So what we saw in California. We saw individuals that were getting twenty five to life, and I'm not exaggerating folks for stealing pizza stealing bottles of wine stealing in one instance, a bike out of a garage a bicycle out of a garage, and I actually had the misfortune of representing some of these individuals. But once again, the majority the vast majority of people that are being locked up during this period of exponential incarceration are drug offenders. And when I say drug offenders, it's not just individuals that possess drugs. Some low level. Individuals who sell drugs, but it's also just a cycle of drug addiction. It can cause crimes like residential burglary because individuals break into homes to steal drugs. It can cause crimes like petty theft because people steal to support their habit. Does that mean that we should legalize it? That's not what I'm saying. Does that mean, it's a good thing? That's not what I'm saying. But what I am saying is that these types of individuals all have a common denominator is that they aren't posing a threat to the public safety on a level that a rapist would or an armed robber would or at Bank robber would or someone that is guilty of a violent crime. What yet they're getting just as long as sentence and what's happening as our prisons, become filled and more and more individuals in there that are not dealing with serious crimes in the context of threats to public safety. So as we move forward we start to see that over the course of this same time period and specifically beginning in the nineteen eighty. Yes. Another thing started to occur. And that thing that started to occur beginning in one thousand nine hundred s was the institution and the incorporation of specific private corporations whose job was to incarcerate individuals. And there are two main ones in January of nineteen Eighty-three. The corrections corporations of America CCA was founded it quickly became a publicly traded company specializing in the creation of what was a new thing at the time private prisons that means prisons that are owned and run by private individuals, the corporation, gamed wealth, very quickly its stock made its owners wealthy, and there was another one you may have heard of the Wackenhut corporation it got into the business of private prisons as well later changed its corporate identity to the GAO group in between the CCA and the GAO group we see as of today. Over one hundred and thirty private prison facilities within our nation's boundaries. So when we talk about these companies as shink Jimmy dump some researches to what's happening with the stock of these companies as they start to fill up with inmates. It's fascinating Brian. You know, when you go back to if you just went back to the year two thousand which is the time when the private prison system started to take off in the United States, and you look at these two companies core civic and geo group is what's called back in two thousand they were both trading for between a dollar and a dollar fifty a share on the stock market back in those days. The Dow Jones industrial average was at about ten thousand ten thousand or so correct about half of what it is today. Yeah. Yeah. A little bit less than half. Yeah. So if you run those numbers forward to the year two thousand sixteen just prior to the time that President Obama's administration had announced that the department of Justice would be suspending the usage of or continuation of private prisons, the core civic and geo group stocks had risen anywhere between fourteen and thirty times their value from the year two thousand so in other words, it was an incredible investment. If to about halfway through the second term of the Obama administration was a great investment, if you put your money into any of the great stocks in the Dow Jones industrial average called a Chevron or a Microsoft or anything like that. You know, you double your money more or less between two thousand twenty sixteen thirty one for a core civic, or it was called CCA when it was founded and the other thing that's interesting about this companies is this tube. Ryan. The their price to earnings ratio. So what that for people that don't know what that means is is that basically, they earn a lot of money. So if you look at like any of the other companies like an IBM or a GE and usually have a PD to twenty thirty one. That's kinda just says how much money do you make per share you own, but these companies are like a fifteen P E, which is like again like Chevron like an oil company. So not only did the stock value skyrocket relatively, but they pay you a lot of money because they make a lot of money, and when we get back from the break, which we will take now we're gonna talk about exactly how they make all of that money. Those folks aren't in those prisons sitting, and we're gonna talk about all of these things when we get back. Thanks for tuning in..

United States Brian California CCA department of Justice Chevron geo group America James low Jim cocaine producer Pete Wilson mister Reagan Bank robber crack cocaine IBM GAO Ryan
"polly class" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

08:34 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KSRO

"Case will be your caseworker until your child is found and one of the most important things that we do is keep that hope alive for families, especially of more long-term missing child cases. We had two cases of the three missing women in Cleveland. Amanda berry and Gina has sues in our two case workers who each have been there for twenty years. Okay. That's forty years of experience between these two remarkable women, Kathy Sanchez. Cindy, Reutemann Ken. She runs the response department. If they are your caseworker on the first day, they will be your caseworker until the end in credit. So it's just great relationships with these families when all the meat. Disappeared. Nobody thinks that there's any hope we were there to to provide that hope amazing. Let's talk a little bit also about law enforcement because twenty five years ago things changed with police case and the way missing children are found or the way that you researched this, so how do you work with law enforcement? So great question two years ago, we decided actually post which is called peace. It's an acronym for peace officers standards training. So California's division of post which really sets a tone sometimes for the for the nation. You know, we're leaders California's leaders in all kinds of ways including law enforcement, and they reached out to us to be subject matter experts on the topic of the sex trafficking of minors. And so. We ended up investing in that relationship. Just by having staff become post certified, and we offer training programs for law enforcement, very specific to you know, what are the indicators? When you're filling out that missing child report that should be a red flag that maybe they were groomed. More a part of an online abduction, and we also partner with them because they know that were there to help them, and they're very busy. And they might not have the time to do the hand holding that we can do with that family. So, you know, the officers can take the reports and then hand the case over to us just to help with investigating what led up to that into talk to the family. And then, you know, it's really a three way partnership, the family, the Polly Klaas foundation and law enforcement. And I mean, it's it's so rewarding. We had a case where a girl was Lord online. She was being traffic. She got pulled across state lines. We had a huge flyer distribution because we have thousands of volunteers across the country. That will put fires up when we say, hey, we think this girl's in your area. So it was a waitress at a Hardee's restaurant, and she was wiping down a table. Looking out the window sees a tow truck and that girl that fourteen year old girl getting into that tow truck, she immediately called us we immediately called that police department and that girl was rescued within like three hours. Oh my gosh. And yeah, I mean it works. You know, it's a flyers might sound kind of arcane, but it works, and you can do it digitally or you can print and post. Sure. Yeah. Has social media helped find children it has? But it's also been responsible for. For the disappearance of children through that whole really really yucky adult predator on the other line. So I think as much as you know, let's try to look at it. As a way that we can use it to our advantage some kids when they go missing their their family does get access to their social media. They might another passwords, and we can really look at what led up to that child's disappearance. And so, that's helpful. But on the other. That's why the child is beard. Exactly. Yeah. It's definitely a double edged sword for sure what about child safety cats you still use those. Yeah, we do actually they're very popular. And we can you can go online to Polly class dot org, and you can download it. Or if you're having a safety fair. We can send them in bulk like fifty at a time. And then wherever we are. We distribute them though, our staff is really small, so we mostly just work in cinema and Marin, but you know, one day would like to do events and Napa and surrounding counties. Yeah. Her and those safety kits allow you to you have a picture of your child's fingerprinting as well. Fingerprinting picture, you can put a little piece of hair in a baggy and put it in there because the child safety kit really has two purposes one great information on how to talk to your kids about being safe without scaring them and all age appropriate. So everything from like if you're lost at the fair, and you're five years old. What do you do to social media safety information? And then the second purpose is in the very rare event that your child does go missing you have what you need to give. The police to help look for them because they're gonna have from the hair they're going to have DNA, and they're gonna have fingerprints. And you're going to have a picture. So you're kind of all ready to go with what you need. Yeah. Yeah. Can you get those those kits by going to Polly Klaas dot work? And you can download them for free. Oh, great. Yeah. Okay. Very good. I'm talking with rainy how the executive director for the Polly Klaas foundation. And if you don't know paulie story, or you don't you're not from this area may be classes spelled K L A S. Yes, exactly. If you spelled it wrong. And we're looking online you would probably still find the Polly Klaas foundation budget still eventually eventually, you're so K L A S. And let's also talk a little bit about how you fund what you're doing. Because this is as you said, you have a small staff, but you do need for twenty five years. How have you been funding? What you do? Well, the majority of our income really does come from vehicle donation. If you have a car out there that you're not using any more, please give us a call. Because that's how we that's how we do. What we do if there's a tree trunk growing through the car, then we probably won't accept it. I hate to say it. But we do get some cars. You know? Okay. Here's something that that the internet is good for Google map. Search the car before you send the tow truck. Oh, there's a tree growing through the roof. So thank you for thinking of us. But we can't take that one right? We will take cars that need to go to pick and pull the donor will get the five hundred dollar donation, basically. That's the minimum that they get. And we get about one hundred and fifty dollars from picking Paul. So it's you know, it all adds up. Right. I I've done it before. I am donated a car to paulie clouds out you, and it's a very easy process. Just to go online Polly class dot org, and let them know that you'd like to to make that donation, and if your car is not even running that's fine yet exactly because it can be used for the parts if it's still running great even better. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. So we can accept RV's and boats motorcycles to if the RV is the size of a battleship. We might not be able to take it if it doesn't run. Yeah. Pick and pull like they have some limits. Okay. I'm trying to say, we'll take almost any almost anything. All right. Good. Well, it's it's heartening. To hear that you have been able to make such a difference. But it's not over yet. No. So supporting the Polly Klaas foundation to make sure that legislation going forward will be in the best interest of children and keep them safe. Yes. And keep doing the projects that you're doing and expands what you're able to do all of that.

Polly Klaas foundation Polly Klaas California Cleveland Kathy Sanchez Amanda berry Cindy Google Hardee partner Reutemann Ken paulie Lord RV Gina Marin executive director
"polly class" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

11:21 min | 2 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KSRO

"And we'll have that full interview up on the website for you. It's it was a life changer for him. And for those of us who who hear about it? It's life changing for us to life changed in. Sonoma's county as we knew it the twenty five years ago when young Petaluma resident Polly Klaas was kidnapped out of her home in Petaluma, it became a national story. But for those of us who were here and who were looking and who were volunteering to find Polly class, it became a part of our lives and remained. So what came out of that not the not we didn't find Polly alive? But as a result of that kidnapping and that murder the Polly Klaas foundation was born and amazingly enough. It's twenty five years old. Now the foundation and rainy how're how is here. And she is the grand poobah of the Polly Klaas foundation. Hi, rainy. Hi, good morning. Pat. Thanks for us to believe it's been twenty five years. Most people have the same reaction where at a lot of. Public events distributing safety kits and things like that. And yeah, people ask how long has it been? And now it's been twenty five years in the foundation has been and continues to do such amazing work, rainy. The numbers are stunning. They really are number of families helped absolutely last year. We passed the milestone of assisting over ten thousand families to find their missing children to find their missing chill. That's right. And get them home safely. We're you know, worst sonoma's county based organization, obviously, this is our home, even though we are a national organization. So if your child goes missing in Texas, you can call us, and we have thousands of volunteers across the country that will help post fliers, but snow mccown is absolutely our home. And and and frankly, if paulie had been taken from another community who knows if the foundation would exist because it's it really belongs to this county the way that everybody showed up to look for this little girl. Oh, yeah. And in in Petaluma between the police department and and fire departments and community members and everything that just really adopted, paulie and spent so many hours and days, and yeah, it was it was a very striking experience changeable experience for all of us. And to to know that that foundation in her name. Has done so much. Good is is it it it heals us somehow. Right. And I I really appreciate you putting it that way. Because I always feel like I'm walking or I should say we are walking that very fine line. We would move heaven and earth to have that tragedy of never occur. Yes. So we can never really say, you know, this horrible event occurred to this beautiful little girl. But all this good stuff came out of it. You can never know. It's a hard thing. Daily thing. Thing to try to balance. But we, but we do because we have no choice to just try to make sure that what happened to Polly doesn't happen to other children, and the parallel that we bring today is that I think one of the most. Horrific part of the Pali story is that she was taken from her very own bedroom. Yes. And we have kids that are online today using social media in their very own bedrooms. Talking to strangers who are grooming them are pretending to be their friends so were striking resemblance when you put it that way. Has changed right of the bottom line of it. Absolutely. So you have kids at home. I mean in particular marginalized kids are foster children that are just looking for love or unhappy in their homes, and then their meeting people online, and these predators are very brazen. And they will groom child for months or even up to year at a time before they then convince them to quote run away from home. Yeah. And so we have almost this new term of an online abduction from an adult predator who convinces a child to run away either. So that they can take advantage of them or that that child can be sex trafficked. And as a result of that reality much of what the Polly Klaas foundation, does is educational isn't it? Absolutely. So were in sonoma's county schools, and we reached over four thousand kids last year, we hope to reach more kids this year, it's targeted mostly to middle school. Students anybody out there that works at a middle school or has middle school child aged child. Give us a call. We will come to the school and either visit classroom by classroom or sometimes we do whole assemblies, and we have a great instructor. She's a former FBI investigator, very known Hong sense, Jenny Thompson, and she's actually going to be a incidental valley tomorrow instructing. Oh, very good. And you know, when she starts to talk about the behaviors of real life cases of kids that we case managed who were groomed. And then convinced run away from home. You just see these kids faces, you know, turn red or blanche because they can relate the verdict or they've seen it or they've done it. That's frightening. Yeah. That's right. Yeah. So it's it's you know, it does happen. And it does happen in sonoma's county, and as long as we can help to arm are. Children with that knowledge to know what those red flags are that's one less kid. That's going to be taken advantage of that way. And I'm sure it involves the education of the parents as well add does definitely so in January were actually going to have a series of public events where families can come and learn about how to keep their kids safe. There is I think parents are trying to respect their children's privacy to some extent when they reach a certain age. But where's that line? The eternal question where is that line? They need to get nosy. It's it's okay kids have lots of friends. They only have one or two parents job to to get nosy and find out who are they talking to on. I'm glad I'm not raising a kid right now because I would feel very sorry for that. Kid me too. Yeah. I think the the lack of freedom might be a little bit on the stifling side. So twenty-five years rainy. Let's talk about what the foundation. Is doing to Mark that occasion. Well, we have we're basically reaching out. And and in one way being on air with you is part of it just remind everybody that were here as a working at it. Arab. We've distributed over two hundred and fifty thousand safety kits to families across the country. We are open twenty four seven you talked about the early days of the foundation that the eight hundred number that we have now is the same eight hundred number that we had twenty five years ago. It started out as a tip line. Yeah. And that. We're open twenty four seven. We never closed that number has never stopped ringing and were here. We have case workers that have been with the foundation for over twenty years each. So we have forty years of collective expertise working with law enforcement. We're doing a lot of outreach to law enforcement. Call us on your missing child cases. And something that's been new over the last year is becoming peace officers standards of training certified instructors. So we actually work directly with law enforcement and help them to understand when they're taking a missing child report. What indicators might be in there to to learn if maybe this was an online of ducking. Wow. That's a greatest kind of collaboration. Isn't it? It's. Yeah. Awesome. Yeah. Oh, we're very fortunate to have a community of law enforcement that wants to work with us. Yeah. They're willing to learn. And that's that's one of the great things that we have here in sonoma's county. And there is some kind of an event going on. I know with the rip city writers who we've had on the air, and they're a fun bunny. Yeah. They are. They're just the nicest guys don't let the leathers and the motorcycle scare you because they're like the boy scouts of motorcycle clubs. Yeah. They're completely into community service. They are and clearly teaming up with the Polly Klaas foundation now. Yes. And they they basically invited us to apply. So they do have a grant process for nonprofits. If if you want to be the beneficiary of the money that they raise every year. And so they have been selling raffle tickets to win a brand new two thousand eighteen Harley Davidson, wow. And it's going to be raffled off on October six at the pedal Luma fairgrounds, and the tickets are only five dollars each will be selling the tickets the day of the rats a week from Saturday so week from Saturday, and it will benefit the Polly Klaas foundation. And we will be able to expand our social media safety program into Marin county. Thanks to the funds that they are donating to us. So that's fantastic. It is fantastic. And we couldn't do it without him. So can you get a hold of this can you find out more about this event through the Polly Klaas foundation website, you can either contact Polly Klaas foundation at Pauley class dot org or call me at seven six nine thirteen thirty four or go to rip city writers dot org. That's right. And that's that's writers with a why are why is that? Correct. I don't think. Okay. My information is correct as incorrect. Rip city writers and great bunch of folks. Doing a lot of great work. They on my county. There's no question about it. I'm not going to say happy anniversary because it seems feels weird to say that to the Polly Klaas foundation. But I will say, congratulations. Thank you. Such an impact in the lives of thousands and thousands of families rainy. I'm glad you're here. Thank you. Thanks for having me. And thank you snow mccown regional communities because without your support. We wouldn't be here. It's a wonderful foundation. If you have an opportunity to support something why not make it? The Polly Klaas foundation, rainy, how the executive director of that foundation. Good to see a bit. Thank you. Thanks again. It's nine forty six at K SRO. We'll be right back. The drive with Steve Jackson. Lanny davis..

Polly Klaas foundation Polly Klaas Polly Sonoma Petaluma paulie sonoma Pat snow mccown Lanny davis middle school Texas kidnapping FBI Marin county
"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:10 min | 3 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Anti trunk text messages that he was sending back in two thousand sixteen all maroshek has released a couple. Of, tapes now one with the chief, of staff, John Kelly the day that she, was fired and then a phone call that she had with. President Trump apparently the day one day later play both of those for you coming up at twelve thirty when we get into swamp watch and Aretha Franklin the singer seventy six years old said to, be very very ill right now in a hospital in Detroit coming up in the, next hour we've got an update on the Golden. State killer it looks like some new charges he'll be facing in another part of California another one of the areas that he terrorized in. The seventies but right now he wanted to tell you about a cold case from Colorado to, murder scenes, four bodies the killings haunted police officers who responded The scenes because they were so. Heinous they occurred six days apart near Denver back in one thousand nine hundred. Eighty four and on Friday officials said that they finally got. The DNA profile of a man who was already in prison in Nevada on unrelated attempted murder, charges his, DNA matched both of these crime scenes Disgusting look gruesome look at the depravity that some people are capable of these two murder scenes the mother father and his seven-year-old daughter was one of them was one murder scene the other was. A fifty year old woman at. Home eating lunch when she was attacked and killed now. In, the first scene the, father suffers sixteen blows to the top of his head with. A hammer in his throat had been cut the daughter and the mother of the seven year old daughter and the mother skulls were fractured the daughter. Had been sexually assaulted there was another girl who lived through all of this thankfully she was only, three so, we can hope. That she doesn't remember any of it but the three year old was. Also sexually assaulted and also hit in the head police officers found her clinging to life next to a teddy bear and then the second scene was this fifty year old woman sitting around eating a hamburger at home Patricia Smith a devoted grandmother she had failed to pick up Her six year. Old granddaughter amber and four year old grandson Joe that afternoon which was completely uncaring and characteristic of her this was January tenth nineteen Eighty-four six days. After that family was tortured and murdered and she failed to pick up her grandkids to take them, to a, home that she. Had shared with her daughter Sherry At six fifteen pm her daughter unlocks the front door to their home and her granddaughter amber member six year old amber she runs, into the room to find a grant wears grandma and she finds grandma lying on Winnie the, Pooh blanket about three to four feet from the entrance with a, pool of blood around her head and there was, a hammer lying on the floor beside her. Body around that same time there was yet another scene wasn't a murder but a, woman had been had been attacked in the garage of her home in Aurora Colorado and she was left in a, coma That wouldn't be the last fatal hammer attack that. Winter the next assault would be the most vicious and deadly there was a bunch of the Twenty-seven-year-old Bruce. Bennett this is the the father which was about six days earlier there. Were other killings as. Well I mean this guy was connected to a case in Henderson Nevada, in fact the one that he, was eventually put in jail for he beat a couple with a, wooden axe handle the Arizona. Case. That he was charged with the nineteen Eighty-four breaking into a man's home and beating him on the head with a twenty five pound slab of concrete was dismissed after the conviction in Nevada so he was. Sentenced to eight to forty years for the murder with the axe handle in Henderson Nevada so he's in jail at the time when, these horrific crimes were happening these hammer attacks happening every few days investigators did recognize similarities between, the murders from the start but like We here. In so many of these cases from the sixties seventies eighties technology was, very limited There. Was an investigation connected to these hammer attacks. In which more than five hundred people. Were questioned imagine that that is beating the ground there. Five hundred, people brought in for questioning they were desperate to put an end to this horror and unfortunately they were handcuffed with just no. Technology and not a lot of leads they never uncovered any leads that, could solve the case the killer seemed to be as the Denver post writes. It a phantom this is not police officers being lazy or lackadaisical and not, doing their job they were doing their job balls to the. Wall, twenty four hours a day seven days a week and still couldn't come up with anything I the only thing I can think of put myself in in a situation like that where you. Felt that that amount of fear because of an unsolved crime was when, Polly Klaas was kidnapped From out of her own bedroom During a slumber party in Petaluma and I. Was in college at the time so I, wasn't even physically in the town but being connected to people and talking with family and friends. Who were still living in. Town there was people were tariff I was the same age as Polly. Class, and lived eight miles away yeah I remember it. Being very scary because. It went it went. For weeks if I, remember correctly the timeline of it you went, for weeks without having been solved didn't know who the who this guy was talk of her being. A runaway and that didn't fit how, could it be possible because again, the stranger, entering a, home kidnapping a child so rare but that that was exactly what everything was pointing to and that, the because there was. No name there was no face there was. No murderer. Just grips the community it's unbelievable and in this, case, you're. Talking, about, multiple murders. Brutal absolutely brutal violent, disgusting murders and like you said the word the Denver The the phantom. No name nothing detective Marvin? Brandt, was, on the case as a homicide, detective from, nineteen Eighty-four, and he was on it from nineteen Eighty-four until he retired in two thousand two we'll tell you, about the investigation into. This and how they finally got this guy. And how. This year has really been the year of cold cases, if. You, if, you thought. You got away with, murder thirty, years ago Look out the clock is now ticking on YouTube all right Gary and Shannon will continue. Just a moment Amy king what's up more evacuation orders have been lifted as. Firefighters increase containment of the. Almost twenty three thousand acre fire burning in, the Cleveland national forest. Residents of lake Elsinore for site county have been allowed to go back to their homes l. Correze so blue Jay in Rancho Capistrano Rancho Capistrano rather are.

murder Denver Polly Klaas Henderson Nevada Nevada Aretha Franklin Rancho Capistrano Rancho Capis Denver post John Kelly President Detroit Colorado California Sherry Trump lake Elsinore Cleveland national forest Patricia Smith
"polly class" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"polly class" Discussed on My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

"Was going to do georgia leila moses this week because i wasn't pedala and she's the girl the twelve year old girl still cold case she was murdered left by the side of the road at the same time polly class was but polly klaas got way more attention because classes family was there there are people who they didn't know georgia moses was gone for a couple of days like it's the the difference in everything in those two stories is so stark an awful georgia moses still has friends who knew her from junior high they have a facebook page they still talk about and they moved there was a memorial next to the one freeway which was near where her body was dumped and when they did they just did a ton of reconstruction on that freeway they had to move the memorial and people were really really upset like you can't just move this as a meaningful they moved it in front of the pedal city hall which i think is so beautiful title and important and like just even doing that slight research made me happy that can be one of those cases that are finally fucking solved yet in central being a thing is it i think all in all these cases or you know like a major part of it is that there's someone somewhere that's just fighting for us still waiting people saying please test this please test which we all know in every time we do you do the way more than me of the cold cases so anyway that's what i was going to do and then i when i sat down after the all the news this morning and everything that's tough i was like maybe something less tough yeah so this this was a cool story to here on criminal and also i got a really good article in the dallas news that was reprinted from august third twenty twelve come so this starts tober twelfth nineteen eightyfour and we're in dallas texas it's a woman named angie's moda is she's a student at southern methodist university which is right there in dallas and she is you know she's described by her friend and an every article whatever and this is a thing that we come up against a lot because of course the majority of stories that we hear are about blonde beautiful women that's like that's the that's a news get if a blonde beautiful mother is killed you know that's that's a that's a story that they all everybody thinks teeth into and so this is another one of those stories she was initially she was sorta girl she was really fun invation lovely and beautiful but she also was super smart she was a double major in can in computer science and electrical engineering leash is so she clearly wanted to be like a computer person or knew that that was going to be the future only end so she that's why her friends called her triple threat man so basically the the majority of this episode of criminal they're interviewing a woman named sheila gibbons why sake and she sheila was.

georgia twelve year