28 Burst results for "Pollick"

Dodgers' Bellinger has hairline fracture in left leg

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Dodgers' Bellinger has hairline fracture in left leg

"L. a. times the beat writer for the dodgers is reporting the dave roberts said that a recent test showed a hairline fracture in cody. Bellinger's leg and roberts says it's not a day to day thing. He said it's a fractured his left. Fibula show cody is not in the lineup. Obviously today no gavin lex today or aj pollick as well today tonight. Excuse me and this bellinger thing now that the dodgers have a lot of depth right. That guy's an mvp candidate right the last several years for the most part outside of a weird wacky season last year l. i. That is not the news you want to hear of your dodger fan.

Dodgers Dave Roberts Gavin Lex Aj Pollick Bellinger Cody Roberts
The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

20 Minute Fitness

06:11 min | 3 months ago

The Concept Of Metabolic Flexibility With Robb Wolf

"Let's dive a bit deeper into metabolic health in general. I would say the us stephanie. Facing metabolic health. Dem's it's become so so tough that you know. Diabetes is on the rise diabetes type two and obesity is on the rise and aloft. It can be let back to metabolic flexibility or the lack of it. Maybe can talk about more about the concept actually pollick expolit the actually means and why it is important. Yeah being metabolic flexible in in kind of a textbook definition really speaks to the ability to use a variety of different fuel sources that mainly really carbohydrate and fat though although by extension ketone very seamlessly with with little drama little difficulty really not a big change in in performance or perception. My wife is an example of somebody who's very metabolic flexible. She can go kito goes in. She goes out no headache. Lethargy no problems She can eat a fair amount of carbs and doesn't suffer. You know a really crazy blood. Sugar excursion she doesn't get like blood. Sugar crashes unless she really you know if she a ghost for the extra large mexican meal of beans and rice and tortillas and you know and right and then she can feel kinda rough from that like she can overdo it but she needs to really try to do that and in researching some material for my second book wired to eat. We did some side by side. Comparisons where i would eat say fifty grams of carbohydrate from white rice. She would eat the same amount. She's a good thirty or forty pounds lighter than i am but she would still her blood. Sugar would over a two hour period of time. Never really get above about one hundred and fifteen hundred twenty you know. Throughout the course of that whole experience was mind would top off round one. Ninety one ninety five. I would then suffer. Really cloud rafic crash blurred vision cognitive problems. I mean i was. I was kind of a disaster on that. And so this was you know it was cool in that it gave a little bit more concrete explanation for what i'd seen clinically. Which is that. This person seems to run great on carbs. This person doesn't and you know here's there's kind of like an actual yeah and just to be clear. You're not diabetic. North korea pre-diabetic new. But i think if i ate carbs pretty consistently i would get there rather rather rapidly. Yeah or or the minimum. I would suffer a lot of deleterious health effects. Light like a a vision problems and and whatnot. Yeah yeah so. How do you explain now. Like metabolic flexibility. Like how does it cure or is it just something that some people have in some. Don't i not entirely sure. I think that there's multiple factors at play here for sure. Genetics is a piece of this. People who have more of the emily's gene more frequency of the emily's gene seemed to do better with carbohydrates. They seem to digest them better but they also have a more favourable insulin response. It seems to keep the insulin. Or the blood glucose levels within tighter parameters and. Here's an interesting thing that i For me it was kind of this. This pretty deep inside. I don't know if it is for other people but an individual like myself to have good blood glucose levels after he reasonably low carb like probably below fifty grams of total carbs. Day sometimes more. Like if i'm really active or whatnot but it in that situation. Abbott pretty consistent blood glucose response throughout the day. People were very metabolic flexible or very insulin. Sensitive they looked like i look like eating significant amounts of carbs. And that's really the big difference there in the people who eat significant amounts of carbs and don't suffer the blood sugar crashes which then lead into the over over consumption of food writ. Large i think is where we kind of see the distinction between folks Twenty years ago. I was definitely a bit indie. Insulin hypothesis camp. I think over the over the course of time. I've i've come to the conclusion to. Yeah chronically elevated. Insulin levels are definitely a problem but insulin. In and of itself is not the primary driver of of Say type two diabetes and insulin resistance and whatnot you kind of a classic gary tops approach I don't buy into that but at the same time ni- fully on board with say like it fits your macrophages crowd. That will just say so. Long as composition doesn't really matter you just need to keep control of your portions and a free living world free living population. How you keep control of portions is really important. Not that many people have the discipline or the neuroses to do basically like a figure competitors lifestyle like that. That's a big lift for a lot of folks and so finding a way that people can spontaneously match caloric intake and output. I think is kind of where the ticket is. And that's where people kind of find own their their metabolic flexibility optimum belay yet. He asked a really good question. I did a poor job of answering it at you. Know what is metabolic flexibility. What goes into a defining it genetic so definitely a big piece. The gut microbiome appears to be a big piece. The caveat to that is we know it's important. I don't think very many people have any idea what to do to improve that. Like probiotics works for some people pre baddeck fiber work for others and for some people all of those absolute disaster and do nothing. So i think there's a lot of Charlatanism that goes around the gut microbiome. We know absolutely that. It's important. But i think the only thing that we can really hang our hat on is if we do something and has a clinical outcome of improving gut else and improving metabolic flexibility. That's great but we're not really at a great predictive place with that like i. I think there's a lot of goofiness that on the testing and whatnot. There is some lesser known or considered things like iron overload particularly in in men or postmenopausal women excess iron accumulation in the body is a pro oxidant in that pro oxidative status can increase inflammation and increased inflammatory state Degrades insulin sensitivity and by extension the Metabolic flexibility so. There's some big picture things that we know. Feed into metabolic flexibility and again. I think that we have burying degrees of control over those different lever.

Kito Diabetes DEM Stephanie Obesity Headache North Korea Emily Abbott United States
Show 41 "Two Funny Guys" Tim Jones/BobSaget - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

01:50 min | 7 months ago

Show 41 "Two Funny Guys" Tim Jones/BobSaget - burst 2

"I'm happy now. Native st it'd be be apart really creativity at work right here man. I'm going home. My daughter's going to be some weird. We got this This to side to a baby mobile. That's voice activated. Somebody gave us a gift. Which means you put it in the crib at the baby cries or maxine sound burnt order gas trigger views. It this is kinda weird. He's like addition and she's three years old concert. Thanks thanks the funny thing is maybe one of these big one part of it. they're cool. it really happening revenue. You're looking at another room. If you're slicing dicing with your best dramatic. Play with you mr microlending. You're i don't know overdose attitude right now not just me people because now i so part of the art anywhere you want to be your dead here. Sprinkle one nine shirt and crack lows. Please you got a dollar decided griffin. I hundred kids audience walking around with the communistic room. All my best friend.

Griffin
How HHS’s new hospital data reporting system will actually affect the U.S. Covid-19 response

Up First

03:29 min | 1 year ago

How HHS’s new hospital data reporting system will actually affect the U.S. Covid-19 response

"So hospitals around the country are scrambling to figure out a new data reporting requirement from the trump administration. There were told this week to send critical information about covid nineteen directly to the Department of Health and Human Services, which bypasses the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The move created confusion at hospitals and alarmed public health experts who worry about public access to this important data. We're joined now to talk about this with the NPR's Ping Pong. Thanks so much for being with US warning. Scott H here. This new reporting change has been affections wins day. Can we tell how it's going? Yes, so it's been a mixed bag I've heard from a few hospitals around the country. Some say it's been really hard. Some say it's been really confusing and other states been okay, but they're still sorting out the details of the change, but according to hhs more hospitals have been reporting this week that have in the recent past and they say that was one of the reasons. They wanted to implement this new system. Stripper Ping which changed for a hospital. Okay, well for a couple of months since the beginning of the pandemic hospitals have been reporting this daily data about the number of covid patients, they have the number of beds and ventilators. They have available to the CDC and the CDC has been gathering this data they've been. They've been putting up on their website to give updates on hospital capacity, which is you know whether hospitals have enough resources and protective gear to take care of the covid nineteen patients that are coming in, but under this new rule, hospitals are now supposed to report the state up either to their state health departments or to a different system called talent tracking, which has been set up by a private company, and which provides data directly to HHS, shall hospital still report the data just somewhere else What has some experts and officials so concerned? Yes so hospitals are still required to report the data, but they say it's been a big burden to change things up right now. Especially for those facing certain coronavirus, cases and doctors have also pointed out that the administration seems to be saying. Hospitals have to use this new reporting system to gain access to federal supply from decifit here, which is one of the only drugs known to work against covid nineteen. Top scientists at the CDC says these new reporting methods ignore valuable experience at the CDC has gathering this data? Here's Dr Daniel! POLLICK! We have a long standing working relationship with the hospitals. We have means of being able to quality checks over the incoming data. He's not sure that the information coming in from these other methods will be as good as the data CDC was collecting and public health experts have also been raising concerns basie this in the context of the administration fighting federal scientists over Corona Virus Advice, and they say this could be part of a pattern in which the administration is trying to sideline the CDC The nation's public health agency in the middle of a pandemic. And this week CDC website that the chaired that hospital data with the public went dark for dare to do. We know what happened. Yes, oh. This is the website that was getting updated three times a week, and it went down briefly, and then it came online again, but it's using old data and reporting from Alex Smith at member station K. C. You are in Missouri, says hospitals there are currently without access to critical data. They've been using for their daily and weekly reports. They hope the issues will be sorted out in the next days or even weeks, but in the meantime the Missouri Hospital Association says they'll be very much in the dark

CDC HHS Department Of Health And Human Missouri Hospital Association Ping Pong NPR Scott H Alex Smith Missouri Dr Daniel Basie
The Walmart Haul Episode

Hungry Girl: Chew The Right Thing!

07:37 min | 1 year ago

The Walmart Haul Episode

"All right. We're GONNA jump right in. It's a Walmart Hall. Which means we have lots of products that are ready to be chewed and sipped and swallowed starting with the above all of the above. Not necessarily in that order. But first we have tiller and hatch pressure cooker meals chicken Tortilla Stu so basically these are frozen bags of food items that you throw a pressure cooker or these days. We know it as an instant pot and so it's already made so he just throw the what the contents of the bag into the pressure cooker and IT COOKS UP PRETTY QUICKLY. So this one says only gives you stove top directions to which is nice. I had this. Oh you add water to the pressure cooker. Then you add the sauce than the rest five minutes and then when the timer goes off wheat four minutes. This is basically a nine minute meal. But then but you do have to heat up. Depressurize your pressure cooker. So I wonder if it's really quicker than using stove-top but well I don't know but I'm interested to try it because one cup has one hundred ninety calories four grams of fat and four smartphones points. I know you've got that fast because I'm starving fun and have lunch. Mike is not eat lunch. He's about to chew on Jamie's hand but now we're going to try this. It looks very soupy but this is a chicken stew that was made in a pressure cooker. Or in a I'd like you pass Utensil. Thank you so much wonder. What the origins of the word like Stu like as far as you know what you're doing that's STU maybe names to studio originally it make sense doing it Well it's really good. All right that chicken. This tastes like homemade. Mom's chicken suit and there's corn in it. It's very mild but it's flavorful. This is really great. Comfort food totaling. I love that it's not too salty. Yeah what's sodium? Like on six sixty for a cup so it's not low but let's put that over cauliflower. Rice I love. It was like chicken tortilla soup but with corn beans. Yeah so it's really delicious. It's unexpectedly tasty. We're off to a good start. Okay next up. The product is called mighty spark all natural premium cuts of chicken PROSCIUTTO WITH TOMATO. Basil and garlic seasoned ground chicken so this is basically whereas the packaging of that. Is it a It looks like you buy it in. Like the butcher section where you would buy like genealogy so it's ground chicken smells so good smell it. That's already been flavored. We just throw it in my rankin. Who's probably with like Marinara sauce or something? Who took a big hunk of that? Yeah probably but it already has like what's in it seasoned Rochetta Wise. It's tomato Basil Garlic That's really I love that you don't like about it. It's a little different like sometimes we do the shortcut thing where we Italian seasoning. This doesn't hit you over the head in the same way. Like you really taste the basil or things. He's so good you're probably instead of making ground meat out of it you can do like a meatball or something or Turkey ball. Yeah yeah or like a really fun Burger. I love that. Like sometimes they'll name it something like Bouchette and then you taste it. And you're like they should've just called it tomato garlic. I like that really delivers on the shuttle flavor. Absolutely it does and four ounces. One hundred sixty calories eight grams of fat for smart points to for to that is excellent. All right next up. We have hunts chilly kit. Just add meat. Ready in twenty minutes. So it's brought to you by. Hunts the people make ketchup? You know the people who make the the other ketchup. And it's a chilly kit. So this is a little bit. It's a smart thing you it's ready in twenty minutes you everything you need. Except for the ground meat of choice we decided to make it with extra lean ground beef and as it is without the beef or any of the meat. Three quarters of a cup is one hundred calories no fat and three smart points as package so it has like the little tomato the sauce and the beans. So we're GONNA try it already semi seasoning. I think That everything I've rhythm Kinda tastes like catcher. I was GONNA say days like they're less good ketchup. I kind of was I. Wish hines me this. What did hunt do before they did? They just automatically become tiniest competition or they have something else besides the ketchup tomato people. Yeah think they do a lot of tomato? This is not an this is not the. It's good but it's not great. It's a little like sour acidic facing. I think it might be good for kids for effort forever not forever viral with that. Yeah I don't know anyway. Let's move on next one. I'm kind of excited about because I saw this as I went up to the kitchen. And the back. They were prepping. It see cuisine smart indulgences Tortilla crusted. Wild Alaska pollock. I would say Alaskan but it's called the Alaska pollock. I guess and the thing is I think seek was in listened to us or took our idea and ran with it but basically we have made a Tortilla in crusted chicken. This is a Tortilla incrusted. Pollock which I didn't realize anyone ever called anything pollick. I thought pollock was just like fake crab the other white meat even the other whitefish before you tasted the story with C. Cuisine. They're the ones that made the salmon that we didn't like didn't they? Make one thing we liked and one thing we know I think this is like their redemption. I love it. You know what I like about it. It's like soap crispy and crunchy so it's Each belay has two hundred and forty calories. Six grams of fat seven smartphones. That's really tasty. That's like the best fish on the planet it is. It does taste like a fish. Stick to air. Fox did we airfreight or BEGA. How do we do it? I bet we have tortilla crested wild Alaska Pollack with smart ingredients. Oh Yeah do you see all the different things that goes on the cross. Yeah we named him so they are Yellow Corn Black Bean Jalapeno Chili tomato lime cumin Cilantro. Paprika they did not dial it in. I want more of that. It's Great Roy. Wheels aren't turning when the cameras. There are no cameras but when when the audio wasn't rolling I'll be eating more about if we had cameras rolling. Do you think we would do our little dance. In the beginning of the episode with the Music Lisa kind of has like a like a ninety s like Humpty Hump kind of thing. I don't have it. I don't know what you're no. No you did this did that. Jamie Jamie Shuffle. Bought my head your head. Okay all right. We should have cameras rolling. Okay moving on. This is an exciting product for a knife. I WANNA cut these. This is fun because I grew up as a white castle fan. I'm a New Yorker. My Dad and I like if we were sometimes alone on father's Day I don't know why we would be but a couple of years I remember. We went to white castle father's day when was like seven. I don't know where my mom and my siblings were. But we were there now. They're making Vegan White Castle. Black beans sliders stats are incredible but little little side. Note here about me. Because I'm from the West Coast. I've never been to white castle. The only white castle I know of is the frozen white castle.

White Castle Jamie Jamie Shuffle Vegan White Castle Alaska STU Walmart Hall Pollock Turkey Basil Alaska Pollack Rochetta Wise Mike Bega West Coast Bouchette Hines C. Cuisine
Analyst Brandel Chamblee on all things golf

Fore Play

15:18 min | 1 year ago

Analyst Brandel Chamblee on all things golf

"All Right Ladies Gentlemen we are joined by a very special guest a friend of ours ars Panama on probably a handful types now. But I think it's been at least a year so he is the lead analyst for Golf Channel One of the best analysts in the game. I got a whole intro. Here wait till you see all this he is a PGA tour winner the Greater Vancouver Open in nineteen ninety eight. He is now defunct finished well about. We're not worried about that. He finished tied for Eighteenth at the nineteen ninety nine masters never made the cut of the PGA Championship. Which I want to ask you about tied for forty fourth at the two thousand and one? US Open tied for sixty second at the open championship in two thousand one. Pretty good stretch author of the anatomy of greatness. Which I've read Mr brand-new shambling? Welcome come to the show my friend. Yeah those last few terms are not defunct. They're still they're still they're still up and running And it's always a pleasure to join you guys Who's there in the studio? We've got myself guys. Would you like to introduce yourself Frankie here brandon. Trent also got lurch. That could to meet you four to it so you tell us a little bit pre show that you just came from a little shoot with rory. I wanted to address royal because I was just reading this article earlier. This week. That came out independent. Paul kimmage was going on with Rory. You know nothing's off limits a an amazing acing insightful interview and he mentioned you rory in this interview and there are some negative words that you have received leave before some positive words but I thought we would start with some very positive words from rory and what happened was I played a little clip from year guys discussion on live from from or golf central or whatever it was right after the Patrick read winning the masters a few years ago and the clip. You essentially Go through how this has to be the most disappointed. The point that rory's Ben since leaving Augusta in two thousand eleven you talk about Amnesia from his first tee shot that day which if anybody remembers he hits it a million yards right off the first tee and you talk about that had to creep into the rest of his game and rory goes on to say it hurts when you're on the receiving end and sometimes I think And sometimes all that stuff hurts but I think brandon was one of the smartest guys in Gulf. He's brilliant I like him. He's giving me a book on. Bobby Locke I have it here. So so what are your thoughts and hearing those kinds of comments from Roy a that that type of stuff you know it hurts to hear but also be that he says you're the smartest guys in the game. Yeah you know when you said that in a chair where somebody asked every two minutes. What do you think Why did he do that what you know? What reasons did he? You know made him win. Why did he lose those kinds of things? I mean you have to very often say critical things if people you really like and admire and sometimes you have very complimentary things about people that you don't particularly care for it's just the nature of the job and you know and also the nature of Of all of us that I could wax on for an hour about all the great attributes and the one thing everybody will remember just one critical comment Has All the time I'll do interviews with people and go on and on and on about a particular player for I don't know Ten minutes and then I might say one critical thing and then that'll be the headline and in the story or the podcast or whatever I get totally understand it But it's just hard of the. It's a part of the job I have it. So it's the nature of the job. I have in the analysis business. And you know if you say everything's great and when something comes along. That really is great. While you've desens- Does the whole world and they're not going to believe you so you know he set up there. At least I do I sit there and I just try to as best I can but shots in historical context and when they're great you know without being hyperbolic great when there are awful without being pollick awful so he goes on to sort of talk about how the Rangers that day. He had a left mess. Then he comes out to the first day and he hits it miles right right and your analysis was obviously that though that that shot is clearly. He's going to remember that throughout the entire day at affected the rest of his round. Like how could you tell that. Anita from that. Shot from whatever's going on with the swing was affecting the rest of his entire route. I it's informed by I years and years and years and years of struggling with those issues myself and You know I mean we all have those issues. You had a horrible horrible shot off the first tee or somewhere around the rest of the round in particular when you get to a place where that miss is now Even more vulnerable people because of a penalty. Then they're gonNA favor it and predictably miss it the opposite direction are they gonNA make nuanced changes to their offspring. So I've I've spent the last twenty years of my life watching golf. The way radiologists looks at X.. Rays you know I. I'm I'm all in I'm all allies and I am I research every detail of it and you know it's it's a it's an educated. Guess I guess if you want to call it what it really was but Roy May differ with me later on in that interview. He said he forgot about. It doesn't think about it and and and again I say you know. There is a crucial crucial role of Amnesia. The maintenance power of every athlete you have to be able to forget the inability to forget is infinitely more more devastating than an inability to remember for an athlete. You've got to be able to forget the bad stuff Years ago there was a people talk about about this interview that Jack Nicklaus gave or this speech rather than dynamics gave where he said he'd never missed a pot on the last hole that he needed to make and a man held his arm Arma said. Excuse me Mr Nicholas just last week I was watching you and a PGA tour champions event you had a four hundred or on the last. Oh you missed it and maybe you just kind how to forget that one. and Mr Jackson let me repeat at Never Mr Putt on the last hole of the tournament that I needed to make and the man in the crabbers incredulous and later on he went up and talked to Bob. Tell this man sin. Why wouldn't Jag just admit it? And and Bob said well hold on a second. That's how you think right and Manson absolutely got admit go so you're telling the greatest athlete of all time that he should think how you think you're far often the greatest athlete of all time or maybe. We should just all jacking and again. That's and Mesia. You need to have it. You need to extract. All of the good there is is to get out of every situation and then forget all the bad and then and then move on. I remember one time. One thing you told me was that you know in order to really get to that level level where you're a we're obviously talking about some of the best players of all time and Roy who's going to be the number one ranked player in the world again here very soon but like to get to that top level you you basis Jason like at some level you have to just beat almost delusional. I mean you have to have almost a blind ridiculous illogical belief in yourself at the Times that like your perfect and even better than you actually think you are and if you don't you just can't make yeah. I mean the game of golf for sport in general and he'd you're constantly attacked by not only the people that you're competing against but by the media and fans listen and then you have your own sort of Uninvited guests in your head. You know this little demons pop up and and you you have to lay waste all of those as best you can and you can do it through sort of you know arrogance you can do it to sort of self delusion but I mean it's rare that the the athletes can get to that place where they need to get through sort of rational balanced Thought and I think that's one of the things that makes rory such an appealing superstar. Superstar is that he's a lot closer to federal Along the lines to be approachable humble symbol And yet the right level of arrogance me word has a negative connotation to but I think it's important to have the right level of arrogance as an athlete but it's so often accompanied by the less poudel aspects of that word. The right level level of it is Well it's it's very present in Roy. So let's fast forward a couple years for his game now he's Mid's mm it's kind of insane has been since two thousand fourteen that he's won a major championship of course had really good years along the way really good finishes very consistent Golf. Where do you see his game? Now a specially as putting I mean I know you've you've done a ton of research on on putting feel versus technical and all that rory's biggest struggle has been the putting were you general thoughts on Roy's game going this year especially as putting. Yeah well I think you made changes in the way. He prepares works out and that has allowed his body to move better so he's less inclined to get injured. Still got this. You know. Full reg motion and lots of speed I think had to go there with the working out with rory I like it. Yeah but I mean He. I as I've when I criticize if you want to use that word his workout routine. I was watching him getting injured. Nagging injuries popping up. I was watching his Co.. PEDS BE DECLINE AT AGE win. It should have been maintaining or even going up and you know I mean he I I said what I said. I couldn't have it with anymore. Caveats and the next day he posted a video game. Self working out I think I've told you this before about a month later I was on a set of live from said that the match-play WDC AC match-play Roy. One in fulfilling an obligation on the set nice come up but I was busy. I was working. I didn't look his direction at intern around when he was walking off no effort to connect with him and I felt a tap on my back and turn around and goes you know I was just fm with you you know. That's that's what we do. I was just having fun because I didn't mean any armide and I was like I get no problem. I didn't take offence to it at all but but I think in the long run. I do believe that rory changed as the way he fares works out so his body moving better less inclined to get injured And then with the short game you know I think he made a good move going to work with the Brad Faxon I say work with. It's really just having conversations with then and Brad is given him permission if you will to be less careful on the grains to be more clinic more reactionary which is crazy because because you know the game of golf right now is just inundated with pseudo-scientists pat sells off as a pseudo scientists and then and then they have cluttered up the game with very complicated esoteric thoughts that are not doing their students any favors whatsoever and I think Roy did a good the job of divorce in himself from those thoughts those ideas and those teachers and he's on the right path and then I think mentally were whatever place he needed to find find he got there towards the end of last year to sort of play his best gall I think. You know the rivalry. They may not call it a rivalry but it certainly feels like looks like rivalry between Brooks So I think that's that's fine tuned. Whatever it was it was missing trump his game into To a great spot so it sets up I think beautifully for Roy going into twenty twenty. What's your relationship like with Brooks Kepco? He kind of tweeted. I love what may or may not have been a clown picture with your face on it. Yeah I don't have a relationship with Brooks I yeah. I don't have a relationship with mini tour players of said forever that my job is sort of incompatible with having relationships toward players to speak about I think Brooks's a heck of talent Allen but I I think Brooks comes to this game sort of a A team sport combative Sports Sports Mentality. I think that's the sort sort of sensibility that he brings to go off. It's not really consistent with the traditions of the game. And it's a gentleman sport I think his comments mints about there'd be no rivalry between him and rory and saying that Roy hadn't won a major championship since he was Plan the PGA tour. which which by the way is ludicrous because it was a professional Golfer and twenty twelve? He just wasn't good enough to play on the stage. That Roy was on. I do believe Roy's won three major championships. Pittsburgh successional dolphins so it was Just disrespectful Not only the traditions of the game. It was disrespectful to rory And I wouldn't be surprised if you know and and sort of a roundabout way Work to motivate rory. Don't know that I'm just guessing but but who wouldn't use that to To motivate them so. I don't think like that face picture. Brandel I don't think you like Brooks did that to you. I think he's had that comment that he wasn't good enough for a long time. He's back I don. I saw it. I thought it was funny. I actually posted a picture of myself with a clown shortly shortly after that in response to his clowns because I it doesn't bother me. I mean it's again it comes with the territory of what I do for a living did that. There's GonNa be some retribution or or Kickback from some of the things. I've said you know I I I said before I mean I'm kind of half joking but I have left a few shows before and thought. Wow I don't really agree with what I said You know sometimes it just comes out wrong. Aw Show true boy. Have I been there gene. How do I get there now? He's talking about that happened. That's breaking segment right there. I mean we. It's it's incredibly feature that sometimes you just start you come from a good place with it. You know you have the information and then by the time it all comes out. You're like what the fuck did I say seriously. Yeah I don't would agree with what I just said. It happens from time. TV or radio or PODCASTS. It's a little golf. I mean just get it wrong. Ties make mistakes as a book. You know You try not to try to learn from us. Try to be accurate you know. That's the goal is to be accurate. Fair it doesn't always work out that way.

Rory ROY Golf The Times Brooks Kepco United States Amnesia Vancouver PGA Lead Analyst Paul Kimmage Rangers Jack Nicklaus Gulf Trent Bobby Locke Mr Nicholas Brad Faxon Augusta
Looking Back at the Nissan GT-R

Past Gas

04:27 min | 1 year ago

Looking Back at the Nissan GT-R

"Arthur to GTRI's reign as the king of Drew Bay had had ended with one of the most controversial finishes in Australian Touring Car Championship history. The following rule changes heavily favored home favourite manufacturers. There's Holden and Ford over the Japanese Nissan but instead of giving up completely the GT our team. Regrouped and refocused. Would you say that they were trying to get. That's how we're going to do it. Got The team was now led by Kozo Watanabe. And is that the any relation to watanabe wheels. No idea so sorry. I'M GONNA look it up later. And Frankly James there. It wasn't a better man for the job Remember that Japanese Grand Prix back in the sixties where I mean the whole reason. This car exist okay. Well a young a young Kozo was at the very first one and saw the old prince cars get defeated by the British and Italian race cars. It was almost by destiny that he lied the. Gt Our team. The team wanted to address two main performance criteria number one understeer. That's when you know you turn your wheel and get a straight. Yeah you don't turn as well so you think it's the opposite of drifting. Exactly and to stiffness. I really wish we had that soundboard money in regards to the second. You know there's like spring thing. Yeah on the wall like that would be as ever Canaan and through the magic of technology awesome in regards to the second part. Art The stiffness engineer and test driver hero Yoshi Kato welded brace bars underneath the car. While testing an art thirty three prototype at the nurburgring to stiffen the car up. He's like the shit sucks. It's time to get her done. Get the thirty. Three's wheelbase was four inches longer. An an inch wider than the previous JEN. The bodywork was much smoother to Looking down downright slippery in comparison to the thirty two's boxy appearance. And so I mean you look at them next to each other. It's definitely a bigger car I I'd say that the R thirty three like when I think of GT ours. Obviously I think are thirty two or thirty three thirty four which we'll talk about later? The are thirty. Three I think is a little bit of the black sheep of the family and it's like a true middle child. Yeah absolutely I like when you said when I think of the GTRI. I'd never think of the are thirty three although it's one of the cool cars in the fast and furious and it's also one of the fastest. Gtri will will get into that and they're legal to import to the United States this year too. That's it's awesome. I know It turns out that this longer wheelbase was a great addition. The are thirty three was more stable at high speed and the reworked aerodynamics reduced lift in the Front by nearly half which greatly increased the grip which helped that understeer and like. I've driven Jesse's car couple times. And you drove your buddies Audi Audi of and s four like you're like yeah all wheel drive great. It's great but then we have it easy like get it. It's because you you get the oversteer from the rear wheels but then you feel this poll from their front and so fun more drive all wheel cars. The more that I get to like it becomes apparent that that's like the best settlement. It's the best way to power the G. R. had a redesigned all wheel drive system. That could better split the torque between all four wheels which saw the understood problem as well. The rear wheel steering system was also upgraded with electric Servoz instead of hydraulic pollick which could be adjusted on the fly faster and more accurately than the hold hydraulic high. Caste system. A lot of people think that the thirty three is face. Lifted Arthur to but as as we've learned not the case not the case what an IB signs team used the art. Thirty G ARTHUR TO GT are formula but improved on it in every way all said and done the thirty three was twenty seconds faster than the R thirty two round the nurburgring which is insane at seven minutes and fifty nine seconds making it the first production car to officially break into the sevens.

Kozo Watanabe Gtri Arthur Drew Bay Yoshi Kato Holden Audi Nissan Grand Prix Ford Engineer G. R. United States Jesse
How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Science Talk

05:21 min | 1 year ago

How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

"The Nobel Assembly Caroline Skins that has today decided to ward the two thousand Nineteen Nobel Prize in physiology discoveries of how south sounds and adapt to oxygen availability. Thomas Perlman Secretary of the Nobel Assembly shortly after five thirty am eastern time Greg Samantha was born in Nineteen fifty six in New York he performed his prize winning studies at Johns skains university in Baltimore where is still active Sir Peter Ratcliffe was born in Nineteen fifty four in Lancashire you're in the UK he performed his prize winning studies at Oxford University and he's continuing to do his research soared university and he's also at Francis Crick Institute in London and William Calin born in Nineteen fifty seven in work he performed his price winning studies at Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston we're still active in his own lab yeah I will not turn to professor Roundell Johnson a member of the Nobel Assembly who will describe some detail and background binder works so please ramble this year's Nobel prize is awarded for determining how oxygen levels are sensed by cells oxygen is essential for life and is used by virtually all animal cells in order to convert food to usable energy however the amount of engine available to cells tissues animals themselves can vary greatly this prize is for three physician scientists who found them switch that regulates how our cells adapt when oxygen levels drop the most fundamental use of oxygen by the cell is to convert food to usable energy just as a candle needs the right amount of oxygen to burn cleanly cells need to adjust their metabolic rates based on how much oxygen they have available to them this allows each cell and indeed our bodies to efficiently and safely burn fuel so as to create heat do work and build new tissues cells and tissues are constantly experiencing changes in oxygen availability as an embryo grows develops as muscles work the oxygen available changes as the tissues themselves change cells need a way to adjust to the amount of oxygen they have while still doing their important jobs sometimes oxygen levels change across the entire body such as when we high altitudes and sometimes they change and very small parts of our bodies such as when we get a wound that interrupts the local blood supply this triggers adaptive process called the hypoxia response which in turn can induce processes in the body as diverse as new blood vessel formation or genesis new red blood cell formation or rith rope and metabolic adaptations of cells including by Colossus before things get too complicated I want to jump to an interview Randall. Johnson did after the Nobel announcements Johnson's research on the effects of low oxygen so he really knows is this stuff he spoke to an unidentified interviewer but based on the programs in past years I believe she was Swedish journalist Joanna rose this use your water in the discovery of cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. What does this mean well it's basically a price that says in your cell if you're an animal cell you have to always have some level of oxygen almost all cells use it to do there pollick processes and basically it is just like a candle burning or any other kind of furnace or engine you are burning things in order to make heats in order to make Gede and that's really what we do of course we need oxygen or do those things the problem is cells inside three-dimensional structure like the body are just getting different amounts of oxygen can depend on different levels and blood flow can depend on the fact that the the tissue itself might be using a lot of oxygen at any given time my brain is probably using fair amount right now my heart because it's eating a bit faster and so that's maybe got sort of its using oxygen and if I'm lying down and sleeping and so the because the cell has very tightly regulated little furnace in it it has to adjust to these different levels of oxygen fine-tuned way and if it does badly it can even be fatal for the cell so this is really the prizes for this sort of almost like a reestablish or a thermostat for the oxygen levels a damper that you'd have on your furnace to let in more or less oxygen at any given time so it's just right the flame

Nobel Prize Roundell Johnson Nobel Assembly Sir Peter Ratcliffe William Calin Oxford University Dana Farber Cancer Institute Francis Crick Institute Greg Samantha New York Thomas Perlman UK Baltimore Johns Skains University Boston London Lancashire Gede Secretary Colossus
Man Behind the Camera

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:40 min | 1 year ago

Man Behind the Camera

"All right so this is your second time with the pot getting our concern Osama veteran okay known at the table. No crunchy snacks crunchy snacks. No no shaking of the coffee ice loud. There are months where like weeks will go by. We're I'm like how am I literally. Don't know where your I will not have seen you for two weeks. Yeah that is basically the story of my life. Sometimes I don't even know where I am. I'll wake up hotel. Mike Oh yeah no. I'm in Appleton Wisconsin. Oh No oh now I'm in San Antonio Texas. Yeah I mean we talk about a few issues in your job in general but in our travel issue that came on May so you you shot almost the entire feature will yeah does may two thousand nineteen you were in Beirut with Andy Burgundy tracked and then you I'm just flip through the pages then you were in Taipei with Suli and also burgundy and Andy any wanted to tag on everything so that was a big photo portfolio of yours your shot in Allison Rome in spring break menu story that was just in New York yeah that was here in the building the buildings that was as basic recipe story and then you shot photos for our red sauce America package which brought you. Where did you go for this one? Oh man that was a lot. I think that was six cities L. A. L. A. Philly New Orleans. Oh my God. Where did I go? I mean you literally can't remember yeah I it was like four to five cities. I guess my first question is I think a lot of fans of yours. WanNa know like how do you end up as a staff dog for at a food magazine like whenever someone asked me about this is I'm the worst possible personnel asked because it's purely luck and circumstance stance and my only goal and still the only like hey just don't get fired and spend closing up on your six and I still get asked to come back every day and there were definitely moments early on we're Alex pollick grocer artificial photo department critic Blake. I'M GONNA kill Lau a huge mistake so you start off as an intern turn years ago yeah. That's my freshman year of college. I just wanted to do something with my life and not just go home for the summer to California and you know Oh bummer and my parents house so I wanted to find an internship and I've always had a fascination with the magazine world apply too much internships. Nobody got got back to me in like a week. Before summer started. I saw a posting for esquire magazine to be a fashion closet intern. Oh and I was like that sounds cool. That sounds way out of my reach. I am hugely under qualified for that but I'M GONNA shoot my shot and Michael Steph. who was the fashion assistant at the time got back to me? He's like when can you come in based on what oh it. Did you have background. It was the most underqualified letter ever. It was basically hey. Here's my resume. I was a lifeguard in high school. I was a high school tutor and I intern at the State House in Massachusetts in politics nothing related to magazines but I really love menswear and here's like my favorite menswear blogs and here's my favorite brands brand's. I like fashion. I can work hard and he got back to me. Can I just say that. I am a lot of times when I talked to young people who are just out of college in their writing you you know letters to inquire about a job and they read like they're written by a law firm. I'm always like learning be yourself. Be passionate sort of expose yourself so to speak but that's what's GonNa grab some somebody's attention one hundred. I think the way I showed her. The letter wasn't like the formerly hi my name's dogs home. Hey My name's Alex. I'm really excited about this. I know him not meant for this Gig but I will do whatever it takes gap and so forth and they took a chance on me and that kind of was my segue into the New York City magazine publishing world and it turns out having square on your resume. Just opens opens up a lot of doors but it was great. It was just my eighteen years old. I didn't get paid but I got to see how magazines work I've got to be on fashion shoots Justin Timberlake Lake and Ryan Gosling and wow poll like hold fourteen thousand dollar jackets and look it Nick Sullivan whose whose the editor in chief at the time Grainger David David David grange just like talk shop and like this is amazing. This is legendary and that made me really WANNA stick with it yeah very recall okay so internship at esquire. How then does that lead you to be a so after that? I was convinced that I wanted to stay in publishing. Look fashion. menswear ended up at Nylon guys Juku for a little bit complex four pins so I was very very much in that circuit as an intern just doing minimal intern work but after a couple of years I was just like this is not really what's my angle here. I don't WANNA be stylus. I don't WanNa be a fashion writer. The idea of being a photographer and fashion was just you know. I didn't even sit down. That's not going to happen so after this is my third yes approaching my third year of college. I A Internet a bunch of or apply uh-huh bunch of other internships again. Nobody got back to me. Despite actually this I'm being off and having a lot of magazines in Monroe oster I applied to like yeah a a couple of mags won't be noted but they're they're. They're okay. They just get back. I mean I saw a posting for bone apetite photo internship and I was like I know nothing nothing about food. I like pictures. I took photo classes in high school and college. So how active a photographer were you at this point. It's like I'm not active. I don't know I took a lot of fissures in high school. I had my own flicker account. I you were you were you were definitely interested. We're sitting at least and I took pictures of the school paper and stuff like that. I I was a you know an avid hobbyist as major so do you did you come in an interview like what God you the job ultimately so I went in again. It's always like a last minute. Call in showed up from Boston and I met with Jake. Ramoser are former photo assistant and he he gave me a talk. Hey so turn yeah. It looks like you've worked a lot of magazines. you have zero photo experience and you have zero food experience so you're pretty underqualified but honestly the only person here that's interviewed. That's worked at large publications so we're GonNa go with you. So that was basically it was it was Bazeley. Hey you're you've worked at reputable places so we'll hire yeah. I do think that's interesting interesting career wise like over the years. I've worked at James Beard Foundation in Time Out New York and the food's severe than G. Q. Got more fashion thing that came back to food. I was a sports writer in college like it is you can move around and I think one thing that editors employers look for is that you do have experience in in a particular field and that you know how to get stuff done that you know under you understand what the industry requires but within that sort of industry you can shoot food. You can shoot you know people. You can do all these things. You don't have to be in one lane. One hundred percent I think at the time I was taking some classes and I was also I was studying NPR print journalism at the time and I remember talking about that with Jake and he was like Oh. This is a plus because you kind of understand writing thing and photography on some level so we'll run with this so he didn't internship summer internship a year or so later. We ended up hiring you as a foot assistant no so I did this summer internship and I was like this is way better than working fashion. Everyone's so much nicer yeah yeah. It was a great time and I was like in order for me to WANNA stay in this world I can see I need to shift from fashion to food media so then I went back to Boston awesome for my senior year and as as I left Alex pollock the photodetectors times like hey we love your great. Just reach out when you're when you're graduating we can like. Maybe you keep you keep you happy. Come back so I would always send emails and I say hey just graduated like three months three or four months. I would love to come talk about a photo editor assistant role. Did you in the interim year. Were you working on shooting things. Decrease your portfolio to share with Alex to say hey I just want. I've been shooting a lot. Take a look at my stuff. Yes so thankfully because of my time I she went over to Boston magazine for my senior of college and I ended up being digital intern which basically means I was just doing every anything and everything for the website correct the king yeah yeah I remember being so proud and like twenty years old on my I've got years of intern experience. I haven't been paid for any of them but you we know I've seen some stuff like that really was my my pride enjoy worked a lot of places and they harden managed digital intern and they also gave me bill do photo take pictures and do have my own bylines socially once a lot of times when you get your foot in the door somewhere are the the brand or the magazine wherever they need people to do stuff go. You can go okay but we'll trust you. There's something trustworthy about you. Then people are all right. Go give this a shot. You'd have a DVD will keep doing it. I must really thankful that it was a web internship versus print because obviously no one's GonNa give any Interna print byline whereas it's much lower risk to teachers hey make something for lab and if it's really good we'll Polish and if not we won't publish in no one will ever or care about low budget so it was just gave me a lot more freedom and they knew that I worked at the food magazine before okay so you know how to take pictures of food. You were photo intern turn. I'm like yeah I guess I mean I. I saw Marcus Nelson. Do you like an overhead shot of something by a window so I can do that. How hard can it be yeah so I mean I I? I did it and they would. It was really cool. I mean they sent me there. Okay so we'll just have you do restaurants so they would send me like once a week in shoot for four restaurants a week and just shoot it for their website so who was giving you guidance about photos style at that point what kind of shots they wanted from the restaurants. It's nobody else really. They just assumed you knew what you were doing. The funny thing is I applied to Boston magazine to be a photo inter. I WANNA continue that path that track of being working for requirements it's but they they didn't want but then the digital department got back to me. I didn't really have communication with the magazine so it was just kind of me and our digital editor who just send me. I was like Oh this. Let's get this close enough to bone advocate and some overhead shots off light and like keep doing this and I would just bike around Boston Jason and go to a bunch of restaurants that are digital restaurant editor Chris Hughes covered and yeah it was it was really good training. It's really good training. I looking back it was really great just being able to go in and practice and shoot restaurants for relatively low risk and have that be an internship set eh great base so then I shot all these restaurants and as shooting what's in all this stuff to Alex pollick. I'm like hey portfolio.

Intern Boston Boston Magazine Food Magazine Mike Oh Alex Editor Esquire Magazine San Antonio Texas Writer Andy Burgundy Jake Osama Appleton Wisconsin New York California New York City Magazine Alex Pollick Beirut James Beard Foundation
A survivor of the Parkland school shooting dies by suicide

The Ray Lucia Show

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

A survivor of the Parkland school shooting dies by suicide

"Of the park land, Florida high school shootings last year, commit suicide USA's, Chris Barnes has more. A recent grad of the school nineteen year old Sydney ALO taking her own life last weekend. According to a Elena's mother says her daughter was close friends with shooting victim meadow. Pollick? Has been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and her mother says she was struggling with college. Because of her fear is being in a classroom. This is

Florida High School Chris Barnes Elena Sydney USA Nineteen Year
"pollick" Discussed on College Football Live

College Football Live

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on College Football Live

"Day two of sec kickoff here at the college football hall of fame the blue carpet i don't feel like he's in midseason four folks david pollick the blue carpet as the players walk coaches continuing to take to the podium and we are pleased to be joined here on college football live fair reba suited booted by the way that was god would look good looking good up here just make sure you keep that vest closed they'll show that stain i'll tell you what if i if i if i if i you on this jackie this going over hey about a year and a half ago that thing would have been it wasn't anything refit everything for the fifty you never know the direction things are going to go here on all live of course by curvy smart he is defending coach of the year in the sec coming up that national championship performance that means that there is a target on your back and you have said that pressure is a privilege but that you are moving on from the national championship game not thinking about it all that much where's the balance of moving forward but also learning from that game oh our kids learned a lot i mean the confidence we got from traveling to rose bowl playing in an environment that was unbelievable to come back home and plan for the national championship in your own backyard so that's a really good valuable experience for players but we can't rest on that because the target is there and you know what that's the way we want it that's the way true competitors you don't think lebron's aim suspects and he's not the favorite he's taber it when you're our the favorite good battles there what you being honest i know this is a sticky we talked about earlier we looked at the stats every after every game website that make sure i led the league it said oh how things have changed a little bit courteous knew he knew i wanted to be no i mean this guy this guy right here his his old coaching staff is basically the sec hey coach i mean he's got guys everywhere it's weird nothing wrong with being second there was nothing wrong with that during your tenure here anyway i don't know how you deal with champions thank you challenges of knowledge the name there's not a better name in college football that fits somebody better than this way swaggers that's true they actually trying to make me gene sit together all he does don't want to sit by me that's fine all these all these get like pilot right when they get them playing they wanna get tv beautiful right i was big the day i was born for your embrace that people in or embrace getting fitter and healthier living but you know it's all tomato tomato whatever you want to wiz we'll talk about football we'll talk a little bit football coming to this season your biggest question mark biggest thing the biggest thing that keeping you up right now that you have to get better on if you're going to compete in the secondary i mean we lost a lot of guys that played a lot of snaps aaron davis dom sanders mcafee they put a lot of snaps so we've got some talented young players but they haven't played and they haven't played in our system we gotta get those guys game ready really quick well you know what the narrative is carbon do it again right right and that was immediately after the national championship ended what gives you that confidence or that know that your guys can't get to that level again that they've seen it done and they've seen a standard and expectation set by these other guys in practice like it's easy for the game we know that but the karate and the competition it goes on in practice the team run period where we're going to run the ball five times in a row and you know we're gonna run the ball five times in a row and there's lineman calling out deal that's when you find out who can run the ball and who can stop the run and i love that and if they do that right i'll have confidence competition and a lot.

david pollick
"pollick" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"To this story which we didn't get to joe pollick wrote this for breitbart said california state senator dr richard pan a democrat of sacramento has proposed a bill the online false information act that would require anyone who has a website to post news on the internet who post news on the internet to verify their information through fact checkers okay the bill filed quietly in late february s fourteen twenty four requires all california based websites to develop a plan to fight fake news to us fact checkers and to warn readers including via social media of false information and they go through the bill and it's interesting normally we don't read bills 'cause bills are boring but this is actually i think interesting any person who operates a social media internet website with physical presence in california shall develop a strategic plan to verify new stories shared on its internet website the strategic plan shall include but not limited to all of the following number one a plan to mitigate the spread of false information through new stories number two the utilization of fact checkers to verify new stories number three to provide outreach to social media users regarding news stories containing false information for placing a warning on a new story containing false information.

breitbart dr richard pan sacramento california joe pollick senator
1 student dead, 1 critically injured in apparent gun accident at Alabama high school, officials say

The Mike Opelka Show

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

1 student dead, 1 critically injured in apparent gun accident at Alabama high school, officials say

"Added andrew pollick who lost his daughter meta was stolen douglas high school says the governor's grab a pen miss stand united in asking him to sign this historic bill into law and rent jury and alleged shooter nicholas crews charging him with seven team premeditated murders and seventeen attempted murders those crimes would merit the death penalty in florida and the prosecutor in the case has said they will consider execution as an option fox's eban brown police in birmingham alabama say a student brought a gun the school yesterday was showing it off to others when it fired seventeen year old girl struck and killed is someone's bottle some once niece someone's best friend birmingham's mayor randle would good says it apparently was just a tragic accident fox news.

Douglas High School Florida Prosecutor FOX Alabama Birmingham Randle Andrew Pollick Seventeen Year
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Here & Now

"Were the earth could sue ari pollick is a lawyer helping to get woodman comments up and running he's offered to drive me around the site essay you still need a bit of imagination to picture right now where the orchard used to stand it's mostly piles of dirt and construction equipment pollick points to where it the first phase of buildings could pop up next year if the weather cooperates there's going to be a group hub a performing arts venue shops restaurants with apartments above we get calls a regularly four enquiries for the apartments what are they gonna be ready when can i sign up when can i move in video tell me how it's going to look what's it gonna feel like what's against molik while there's no smell just yet that demand is a good sign because woman is going to need a lot of it there are more than fourteen hundred residences plant including townhouses and singlefamily homes and more than one and a half million square feet of commercial and office space would not isn't part modelled on other developments popping up in the south end midwest projects like easton in columbus ohio and the river district in charlotte north carolina they are a complete one eighty from how most developed was done during the past fifty sixty plus years that is called the sax because that was the american dream liam a suburban house a lot and what a picket fence and a lawn demo and so forth and so on this is peter france cease a close observer of the region's housing trance he says there's been a shift in consumer demands many younger families and young professionals can't afford the property taxes the come with twenty five hundred square feet of house said onto acres to say nothing of the timesuck that ease weekly yard work on the other side of adulthood empty nesters baby boomers they're looking to downsize would not is the private markets response but france he says there needs to be a balance did you do like this idea this concept of the mixeduse downtown a assertive manufacturer downtown i love it i think it's fantastic now you know what i want to see fifty of them know too many of these he says and you lose what makes new hampshire new hampshire you can they listen listen illicit things that could go wrong elizabeth would is a town planner and out.

ari pollick columbus ohio north carolina liam peter france elizabeth woodman charlotte mixeduse new hampshire
"pollick" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Late bell and pollick champions are the people dot com bellen pollick find them online at champions of the people dot com yes she makes me want to be a better version of myself who were a good team that's for sure and she laughs it all my jokes even when they're not funny love it's a gift celebrate your relationship this valentine's day with handcrafted jewelry from shane company this year we've created an exclusive collection of romantic necklaces with hearts the universal symbol of love we have styles from one hundred seventy five dollars to thousands with natural diamonds rubies sapphires or cultured pearls one of my favorites is a modern heart necklace lined with diamonds in either fourteen carat yellow gold white or rose gold for five hundred seventy five dollars many other heart pendants have a stone cut into a perfect tart shape with fresh new styles from our own team of designers you'll easily find a gift that she'll love now you have a friend in the jewelry business shane company and shane co dot com hey you philly stressed let my frizette in amac helped take away your stress at night it'll max can show you sleep technology that works all night long stop by an aum acts in loved one at the outlets or the original endeavoured i 25 and i seventy to see the latest in advance sleep choices that are sure to make the most out of restoring your mind and body's energy it'll max whose name means maximum innovation is chockfull of crazy an exciting new sleep technology all designed to distress your nights in a max is always ready when you are to show you what they're all about and how you can redefine rested forever if you're feeling like breaking the mould when it comes to your next bed let the experience.

shane company bell philly five hundred seventy five doll one hundred seventy five dolla fourteen carat
"pollick" Discussed on Thunder Radio

Thunder Radio

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on Thunder Radio

"The include prison time defense lawyer eugene fido l larger and bird goal has look forward to today for a long time as everyone knows he with a capital pollick bonn for nearly five years the thirty one year old soldier from idaho could have been sentenced up to life in prison after pleading guilty to charges including desertion burdon we'll be demoted dishonorably discharged in will pay a ten thousand dollar fine military analyst jeff macaws lindt dope veterans benefits whatsoever obviously that will have an effect while his opportunities for civilian employment mr trump tweets the sentence is a disgrace the president's tweeting a lot from air force one right now on the way to hawaii us drain all morning a day after his account vanished for eleven minutes before leaving he attacked the justice department and the russia investigation there was no nothing it's a great frankly that they continue he says democrats should be investigated he left the door opened the firing attorney general sessions mr trump's ultimate destination on this trip will be asia and a nearly twoweek long tour we'll be talking about fray obviously north korea be enlisting the help of a lot of the government says two hundred sixty one thousand jobs were created last month business analyst jill schlesinger he also saw the unemployment rate drop to four point one percent and that is the lowest level in sixteen years we're starting to get to this place where we're wondering how low the unemployment rate is going to go before we start to see a big jump in waging cbs's jim taylor says a new government report looks at deaths linked to gun after declining for fifteen years experts say the death by gun rate is up two years in a row mainly due to a few hotspots like chicago also embedded in these stats from the cdc suicide by gun far outnumbered homicide gun suicide continue to be an under examined problem robert spitzer political science professor of published authority on gun control roughly twice as many gun suicide as gun homicides each year fbi says more than eleven thousand deaths by gun last year the iphone ten is in stores today in some places that's meant long lines for this man at pittsburgh it's a big day in dc.

dc pittsburgh fbi professor robert spitzer business analyst mr trump attorney russia jeff macaws idaho chicago jim taylor cbs unemployment rate jill schlesinger north korea asia president military analyst ten thousand dollar thirty one year eleven minutes fifteen years sixteen years one percent five years two years twoweek
"pollick" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Were reacting to the las vegas shooting happened last night there time after midnight here in wisconsin more than fifty people killed five hundred injuries stunning numbers horrific casualties when in the act of really just going to a concert on a sunday night las vegas so now the big question of course is the motivation behind this the shooter what was he doing this lasted about ten to fifteen minutes hundreds of rounds and no one knows what was an act of pure evil that's the president new here is the shooter's brothers no political there's no religious there's no any of that stuff the brothers baffled can't understand how this would happen why would happen he claims his brother by the way liz in orlando that stephen pollick is just a regular guy if there was anything i could have gone i would have done it but it was exactly nothing was really era to hear him speak because you could tell that he was just in shock you standing outside of his house he's like i got a year old mother inside who i have to go explain a her her son is dead and be her son killed more than 50 people in the process and as he's talking to reporters all of a sudden this fbi agents says excuse me mr power can we chat and he's like okay asher come on in this very surreal seen for that for him and he can't even imagine what that would be like right you you you having normal relationship with your brother they said know last week they had corresponded about their mom and and some other things and then all of a sudden you're you're here in the face in the head with the news that your brother just kill fifty some people and wounded hundreds more that's gotta be just stunning and and the to his credit he stood there an answer the question is do you have to give credit for that this shooter lived in like a retirement community in nevada was a suburb of las vegas he was not known to police we the mosquito police department have not had any contacts with these people and pass we haven't had any traffic stops we have any law enforcement contacts the arrest or nothing and then there is isis of course isis claiming responsibility will the special agent in charge of the vegas fbi division ear inn rows says there is no evidence.

las vegas wisconsin president liz orlando stephen pollick asher fbi nevada mosquito police law enforcement special agent in charge fifteen minutes
"pollick" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:36 min | 4 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Hannity show doing exactly the same thing now as i did this on my radio show that thursday joe pollick over at breitbart who i have great respect for he heard the show apparently when he was washing dishes or something may be able to buy joe a dishwasher but anyway and he wrote a piece about in any added some of his own thoughts apparently that information got to the press in the united states and he tweeted what he tweeted i never said that his wires were tapped or anything of that sort but i also said i understood exactly what he meant he meant that there was some kind of surveillance activity going on and i said on radio and tv a multiple times he was right faced simply on the reporting of the media and the diversity the media that were reporting this you remember all this now we know as a matter of fact that there was surveillance going on maybe at trump tower we know there was wiretapping we also know that carter page was that caught up in one of these faisal warrant so that's two wiretapping we know that manner for it had or a has uh a a resonance in trump tower and we also know that one of these warrants covered a period a time when donald trump a after donald trump had been elected president united states perhaps during the early parts of his president there is no question ladies and gentlemen that the top levels of the fbi the top levels of the justice department and i would argue the top levels had been around long enough i know the top levels of the white house new at the opposition campaign that is the republican campaign the republican presidential candidate uh that there was surveillance activity going on there's no question about this now period now i'm going to keep hammering this no one i put the dots together six months before the leaks that cnn received from the fbi and perhaps from a muller's office and and i explained it and donald trump tweeted what he tweeted which was slightly in akron and of course they were more interested in his tweet than in the fact that the police state tactics by the obama administration this is the sort of stuff we heard in a.

joe pollick breitbart united states trump tower donald trump president fbi justice department white house muller obama administration Hannity carter faisal cnn akron six months
"pollick" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:36 min | 4 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on KKAT

"Hannity show doing exactly the same thing now as i did this on my radio show that thursday joe pollick over at breitbart who i have great respect for he heard the show apparently when he was washing dishes or something they be able to buy joe a dishwasher but anyway and he wrote a piece about an and added some of his own thoughts apparently that information got to the press in the united states and he tweeted what he tweeted i never said that his wires were tapped or anything of that sort but i also said i understood exactly what he meant he meant that there was some kind of surveillance activity going on and i said on radio and tv a multiple times he was right based simply on the reporting of the media and the diversity the media that were reporting this do you remember all of us now we know as a matter of fact that there was surveillance going on maybe a trump tower we know there was wiretapping we also know that carter page was caught up in one of these faisal warrant so that too wiretapping we know that manner for it had or a has a a resonance in trump tower and we also know that one of these warrants covered a period of time when donald trump a after donald trump had been elected president united states perhaps during the early parts of his president there is no question ladies and gentlemen that the top levels of the fbi the top levels of the justice department and i would argue the top levels had been around long enough i know the top levels of the white house new that the opposition campaign that is the republican campaign the republican presidential candidate uh that there was surveillance activity going on there's no question about this now period and i'm gonna keep hammering this no one i put the dots together six months before the leaks that cnn received from the fbi and perhaps from a muller's office and i explained it and donald trump tweeted what he tweeted which was slightly in akron and of course they were more interested in his tweet than in the fact that the police state tactics by the obama administration this is the sort of stuff we heard in a.

joe pollick breitbart united states trump tower donald trump president fbi justice department white house muller obama administration Hannity carter faisal cnn akron six months
"pollick" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"pollick" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The temperature and the global economy we begin with comments by alex pollick of the our street institute deficits by few us a versus those with for system surpluses germany for example and naturally throughout this was the ubiquitous deserve politicians to get a remained in office so political economy is certainly the accurate term here of course discussions of trade deficits cannot be divorced from the nature of the international monetary system the levels of exchange rates or from the role of the us dollar as the dominant reserve currency though or from the role of the united states as a safe haven for capital if you've remarks say i think that one of the key things that the united states produces use a social system which does serve so well as a safe haven for saving some capital uh we could say that what john makin like to call the wealth storage service effectively is traded internationally for net imports today we have a truly distinguished panel to address the economic questions of trade deficits amidst the current political forces employ each member the panel's going to speak for about thirteen to fifteen minutes of opening comments uh astra which will give the panels the chance to react to each other's ideas all right or clarify their points and after that will open the floor to your questions and we will adjourn promptly at twelve o'clock let me introduce the panels in the order in which they will speak first will be jeff frankl who is the james w harpool professor of capital formation growth at harvard university the also directs the program international finance from macroeconomics at the.

global economy alex pollick united states jeff frankl professor harvard university germany international monetary fifteen minutes