20 Episode results for "Political editor"

The Morning Briefing: Friday, March 20

The Briefing

02:16 min | 4 months ago

The Morning Briefing: Friday, March 20

"Hallo is Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Friday march. The twentieth and the chancellor is unveiling a wage bailouts so unprecedented supports going to be offered to millions of workers. Today is designed to help persons hit by the corona virus crisis. Richie soon acts putting the finishing touches to the economic package to be unveiled this afternoon at about five o'clock. What can we expect? Well to measures under discussion by the government includes subsidizing by freezing income tax payments and giving national insurance tax breaks. Deputy Political Editor. Anam Mikhailova. Has Everything we know. And we'll of course have rolling updates in our live blog at the same time. Officials are drawing up plans for further restrictions on movement in London. They're likely to come into force. If people continue to ignore the advice to stay at home. We've got a piece on. How O two's in talks with the government about how it can use its location data. We know the. Nhs's under strained now in London hospitals. Become the first to admit it's turning away. Corona virus patients bosses warned services in the capital or on the brink of being overwhelmed across the UK. One hundred and forty. Four patients are now known to have died from the disease. We've got a postcode track APP. You can search for confirmed cases in your area. And if you're planning to do an online shop. There're some changes afoot customizing shop online with one Market could start receiving their food from a rival stool now. Zonda emergency measures to begin next week. If you're struggling to buy everything you need. We have a guide to cooking with store cupboard essentials right staples if you're listening on WHATSAPP. I'll send you those links. Now if you're listening on spotify law wherever you get podcast you'll find them in the show notes. As well as links to some non corona virus material including an interview with caroline flex former publicist and how NASA fixed a malls probe by casing it with a shovel. That's it you're up to date. I'll have your second briefing of the day this evening.

Danny Boyle London Anam Mikhailova chancellor spotify Nhs Richie Political Editor UK NASA caroline
Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

NPR Politics Podcast

16:43 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court Appears To Lean Toward Allowing Census Citizenship Question

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Comcast. Comcast values your time. That's why you can schedule to our appointment windows, including nights and weekends that way. You can spend more time doing what you love. Comcast working to make things. Simple, easy, and awesome. Hey, guys. It's tamra Keith host of the NPR politics podcast. The pod squad is heading to Philadelphia. This Friday, April twenty-sixth for a special live taping of the podcast. It's all about the road to twenty twenty. You can find tickets on NPR presents dot org, and we hope to see their. Hi, my name is Jose Linares in on my way to during middle school in Agawam, Massachusetts were coached chess this podcast was recorded at three thirty five pm on Tuesday, the twenty third of April. Thanks cheese by the time. You made your. This show. I see what he did there. Oh my gosh. The pun my like that the chest puns. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Domenica months in our political editor, and I'm Z lung national correspondent and Hans welcome back to the pod. It's been a long time. Thank you, Tim. And you are back to talk about the same thing that we talked to you about before. Which is the US census today. The supreme court heard oral arguments in a case that involves the census, but before we get into what the arguments were about. Let's go back to the very beginning. What is the census hons -i? It's a headcount. It's a headcount of every person living in the country. And it's done every ten years, and it goes literally back to the founding of our country because this is in the constitution. Article one section two calls for we go walkie term actual enumeration. That's the census we're talking about. And. That's an important word enumeration because it's about the whole says, quote, the whole number of persons in each state is not just about citizens in the country. They want to get all of the people in the country. How many of them actually are there? So like every ten years, you get a form or someone comes to your house, and they want you to answer a bunch of questions. Right. What is sort of the standard census question? The most important question is how many people are living in a household. And then it goes wants to know the age the birthday the race and ethnicity specifically is someone of Hispanic or Latino origin. Those are really important questions per the constitution. This census data's used to determine how many congressional seats each day gets based on its population from the senses, and that also determines how many electoral college votes each state gets. And this information is also used to guide an estimated almost nine hundred. A billion dollars a year in federal funding for schools for roads, rather public services in local communities around the country. So this brings us to the case that was before the court today, the Trump administration in this coming census wants to ask every household whether the people living there are citizens of the United States, and this is not a question that has been asked in the basic census in a long time. But the Trump administration wants to bring it back, and there's this big court fight about it. Yeah. It hasn't been on the census since nineteen fifty as I understand it. Right census. History's very complicated. Trust me after nineteen fifty beginning in one thousand nine hundred seventy the census bureau did ask about citizenship status of a sample of households. Not every house on a does for the census. And so it was doing this a long form question that only some households got around the country. And and now that question is on a sample survey known as the American community. Survey. Okay. So the Trump administration wants that question on the twenty twenty census Honsi, why is that? And why is this? So controversial will the Trump administration says it wants to use those responses to better enforce part of the Voting Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act part section two of it has been enforced using citizenship data ever since it's been enacted its use the government has used citizenship data from that long form that sample of census participants. And now the American community survey the Trump administration says that's not adequate they want it from every household from the twenty twenty cents is and that is a major concern for the census bureau for saddest ins ace. It isn't ship question has long been known to be very sensitive question. And especially now in this current political climate of increasing immigration enforcement, growing anti immigrant rhetoric. There is a lot of concern. And there is also research from the census bureau that if. You were to ask this question on the twenty twenty cents is you're likely going to discourage a lot of households with non citizens and those households do include some citizen, so experts within the government say something like six and a half million fewer people could actually wind up answering this question, which would mean a severe undercount of the number of people in the country. So part of what's controversial here, though, Tam is the politics. I mean where this started and how the question actually got onto the census, given the president's hard line on immigration and the people around him it started with some of those folks within the White House. Right Hans, right? We know that commerce secretary will Ross was in touch with former chief White House strategist Steve Bannon who connected Ross with Chris buck former secretary of state and former vice chair President Trump's now defunct voter fraud commission and crisco box suggested to Wilbur Ross to ask a citizenship question because he wrote in an mails Haraz that he was concerned about a problem. He called it that it's a problem. Kodak believes that undocumented immigrants are included in the apportionment counts in the census numbers use it to them and how many congressional seats each day get right? And a lot of that came out in what depositions from the from in the lower courts. These actually came out through emails, and memos that the Trump administration was required to release as part of these lawsuits said the origin of the Trump administration trying to put this question on the census is the subject at least partially of several lower court rulings. Is that right Jose? Yes. Three federal judges in New York and California. And now Maryland have all ruled that converse secretary Wilbur Ross, you know, his stated rationale for adding this question the Voting Rights Act was sham justification. That's the words of US district judge Jesse Furman in New York because you know, he initially testify before congress that the Justice department initiated this request for a citizenship question and that conversation was solely responding. To request from the Justice department. But in fact, based on documents released as part of these lawsuits commerce secretary will Ross was the one who really wanted a citizenship question on the twenty twenty cents is pushed the staff to get one on the twenty twenty cents is so much. So that they shopped around this idea and asked multiple federal agencies, including the Justice department who lower level staff initially said, no, we don't want ask us citizenship question and referred them over to homeland security. Wow. So what Ross testified before congress was like wildly not accurate congresswoman grace Meng of New York said that commerce secretary will Ross lie to her face. So a bunch of years ago. I previously covered a census, and there was like a huge effort to try to get people particularly non-citizen people or Latino families to even respond to the census, and and to not be afraid of it. What has been the response to this citizenship question? Controversy in immigrant communities. I think my reporting has shown it's really exacerbated that fear that there. You're right. That fear has always been there that there is a portion of the population that has this distrust of the government is unsure about giving up hersal information and hearing that there is a citizenship question being asked for the first time. I've every household since nineteen fifty that really raises the suspicions of a lot of immigrant communities, and they're unsure about exactly why the Trump administration wants to ask questions. A lot of people are concerned that this data could be used to deport. Individuals who are here in the country illegally somehow use for immigration enforcement, even though census bureau data cannot be used for law enforcement. And even though data identifying individuals collected by the census bureau cannot be released until seventy two years after its collected. These are federal laws protecting the confidentiality of census data that a lot of public either. They don't know about or they don't trust this. Gratien will uphold. All right. We are going to take a quick break. And when we come back, we're going to talk about those arguments before the supreme court today support for this podcast and the following message come from Fidelity Investments as a fidelity wealth management client. You get a dedicated advisor to help grow and protect your wealth. Find ways to minimize the impact of taxes and make clear recommendations for your full financial picture. Learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth. Fidelity brokerage services LLC. We're back with a new season of rough. Translation. Yeah. And this time we are following people who break the rules in lying his part of the business. In my opinion. The best revenge against ISIS is to be humane. A mess supposed to pinch. Yeah. Yeah. New episodes every other Wednesday subscribe and were back and Hans you were at the supreme court today hearing those arguments was this your first time covering the court. It was thank you, Nina totenberg. She got you in. She helped me get a seat in the press box. So I had a kind of a sideways view of the justices in the courtroom. What was it like it was very surreal? I was sitting and share kind of behind these red velvet curtains striping from the ceiling down to the floor, and I kind of peek through and see the justices, you know, all nine of them that we've seen on TV all the time. But to see them in person, and then they're asking questions, and you know, as soon as or arguments begin they're they're asking questions, they are interrupting the attorneys who are trying to make their arguments, and we're going and it lasted for eighty minutes, and that's longer than usual. So this that tells you how controversial this topic, and how complicated this cases. We have multiple different groups plaintiffs multiple legal questions being. -sidered even the house of representatives had a attorney there representing him. So what is the fundamental legal question here there? Two main questions. One is did commerce secretary will be Ross who oversees the census bureau was his decision to add a citizenship question to the twenty twenty cents is did that violate administrative law was that a misuse of his authority over the census, that's one big question. The other question is whether or not including a citizenship question on the twenty twenty cents is in this current political climate is that a constitutional decision the plaintiffs are arguing that asking about citizenship right now really harms the government's ability to meet eight constitutional mandate to count every person living in the country. Given what the census bureau research is showing that it's likely to discourage households with non-citizens and likely to Risley accuracy of the twenty twenty cents is count. And what is the argument that the government that the Trump administration was making before this court? The Trump administration is arguing that this question. They want it on the twenty twenty cents. So it can better enforce part of the Voting Rights Act, and that adding this question was an appropriate use of the discretion. That commerce secretary will Ross has over the census that he is the one he is the decider over questions to be added. If he feels that it is fit and that he considered research from the census bureau, and he consulted with various officials about what would be the best way to collect better citizenship data, and that heels heals you decided that asking a citizenship question would be the way that he wanted to do it and the administration is arguing that he was in this full authority in order to do that. So are they saying like, it doesn't really matter what the origin is whether it was the Justice department, or whether it was, you know, stay Bannon and crisco Bach that will Ross the commerce secretary is can do whatever he wants. Yeah. I mean, that's basically what they're saying. I mean, despite the controversy, you know, you had these other courts alone. Our courts who seem to buy that argument and say look administratively this went against everything that you're supposed to do. But that's not at all. What the how the conservatives on the court appeared to see it today. It looks pretty clear, you know, we're burying the lead a little bit here. But it looks pretty clear that they're going to uphold this by five four conservative to liberal ideological split. That's what everybody who has covered the court took away from it today and the two things that really the justices seem to be hanging. Their hats on the conservative justices was number one. Why not why not ask a question about citizenship? You had Brett Kavanagh today. In fact, say look other countries asks itizens ship questions. Why shouldn't we the second part of this? And I think this is a real key part of the court ideologically is they don't wanna undercut Ross's authority. They really believe in an expansive view of executive power and of administrative power and the executive branch they feel like. Like this is their call. This is what they decided to do. And so what and it is a five four conservative Justice court. Now, it is. And you know, it's the most conservative it's been in seventy five years or so as Nina totenberg will say, you know, they're going to be a lot of these kinds of decisions where you see a lot of these kinds of big societal changes that happened generation -ly that you know, is interesting because a lot of Democrats really don't vote on the supreme court Republicans have taken them it's taken them generation or so to get to this point. But they really organized around how to sort of vote on the supreme court, and it's a real key salient issue for them. And this is the fruit of that. And we should say that it is not necessarily the safest thing in the world to predict what the supreme court will do based on oral arguments. But that it definitely seemed like they are headed in the direction. Potentially of allowing there to be a citizenship question on the twenty twenty census hons e there are a bunch of deadlines. Like, I know that it's not twenty twenty yet. But the census is coming right. What comes next it is coming, and there is a major deadline coming up by July. First is when the census bureau says it has to start printing the paper forms for the twenty twenty cents is there's one point five billion pieces of paper that need to be printed, including the forms, the letters postcards. Wow. They're headed to everyone's mailboxes. And that has to start this summer in order to get that done in time as it's currently budgeted. So the census bureau says a needs to know by the end of June, which version of the twenty twenty cents is for him to start printing one with a citizenship question or when without they have two versions ready to go, and they're waiting to tell the printer which one to use and that's going to be a major deadline. This is going to be the census that everyone can participate online and also dial by phone, but paper is going to be super super important for the twenty twenty cents is especially for. Folks, who do not have reliable internet access and also in case of any major issues. If there's any major technical breakdowns paper will be the backup in order to make sure there's a twenty twenty senses. And of course, twenty twenty senses also has the numbers in it for twenty twenty in election year. So this is gonna wind up being an issue into next year, certainly on the campaign trail with now you've got probably going to be about twenty Democrats running twenty Democrats running in twenty twenty possibly talking about the twenty twenty cents us that is a wrap for today. We will be back as soon as there's political news that you need to know about to keep up with up to the minute news. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram just search for NPR politics. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. I'm Monica Montenero, political editor and I'm Han zeal along national correspondent and thank you. For listening to the NPR politics podcast.

Wilbur Ross NPR tamra Keith United States White House Hans Comcast Jose Linares Justice department Nina totenberg political editor Philadelphia Trump attorney Massachusetts
The Morning Briefing: Monday, August 8

The Briefing

02:13 min | 1 d ago

The Morning Briefing: Monday, August 8

"Halloween Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph it's Monday August the third and new ninety minute corona virus tests are on the way. So it's the new face of rapid testing COVID, nineteen entire cities will be tested for corona virus to contain lake allowed breaks. New on the spot test will give results in just ninety minutes they start week they'll be routinely used to check hospital in care home staff and patients, but there are plans for more than a million a day by the time winter arrives. Political editor Golden Rayner explains how ministers think the new tests will see off the danger of another national lockdown. At the same time, there's a backlash over plans to extend the shielding program to some over-fifties. This winter some Tory MP's warning, it risks damaging the economy. We've got a round up of the latest rules on shielding and how they could change. Now, a former Tory minister was arrested over a suspected rape at the weekend. The government's chief whip now accused of failing to act on complaints for four months mark expenses under mounting pressure to explain why he failed to launch an inquiry. The senior conservative who's not been named was arrested on Saturday and bailed L. Team in Westminster have all the latest details and reaction. This is perhaps an unlikely pairing the BBC's teamed up. So David Bro with Dave, the classical musician turned rapper. It's for a new series showing animals overcoming adversity designed to lift view is spirits. We've got more what to expect from the new show. Can also recommend some other articles to including the future of fitness how we should all be exercising now and how to join the exodus to the country I'll send you those links now listening on WHATSAPP, you'll find them in the show notes if you're listening on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts, that's it. You're up to date. Chris will have your second briefing of the day this evening.

Danny Boyle Golden Rayner Political editor Westminster spotify David Bro rape BBC Chris Dave ninety minutes ninety minute four months
Super Saturday: Brexit deal or Peoples Vote? Crunch time for the UK.

The Leader

12:49 min | 10 months ago

Super Saturday: Brexit deal or Peoples Vote? Crunch time for the UK.

"From the Evening Standard in London this is the leader Hi I'm David Nelson calling it super Saturday they will be marching in the streets will be furious in a moment. Joe Mafia political editor on the big brexit decision so it's a day dubbed Super Saturday here's verdict a divided nation voted on brexit referendum. Super Saturday really shows that there's a lot of division in the country the certainly the country divided we cared a massive poll of polls a week ago we previous people's vote marches seen e you flags hoisted high above crowd the since the referendum opinion has crept slightly more remain but was still split as a nation fifty three forty seven the question is can you get don't know MP's May vote the deal down and decide that a second referendum must be held if that is what parliament decides the government should respect age of talks on our country's long-term relationship with Europe and peace with many different views may come together to give the prime minister a majority Structure Ages and England face their own the Saturday tint political editor Joe Murphy's been backwards and forwards between London and Brussels over the last couple of days keeping they will want to vote for it on on Saturday and then in succeeding days it would be vote to move on but onto what we being done the building now begins and I'm very confident that when my colleagues in parliament study this agreement taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column this is the leader for the whole thing pick up the newspaper or had to standard Dokodo UK slash comment can you get a delay the line that people will accept as a reasonable compromise evening standard's political editor Joe Mafi out with developments he's in our really busy Westminster Office right now joe well MP's debate the deal there's a protest in the streets and everyone's got an opinion on the way forward Oh family therapy is coming to east London to help tackle gang crime why we're welcoming is an auditor in southern Japan where England are taking Australian the the Brexit do even if it passes is not really a final deal but simply an agreement to turn to the next hundreds of thousands the latest in London is looking for a record attendance and it comes as MP's debate the surprise brags it dropped by the prime minister via twitter it to happen according to Oliver Letwin who's been one of the rebels but says he'll be backing this deal tomorrow because it comes somewhere in the middle of middle range of what people will accept what's it later simply telling the stories that we've heard over and over again off the violence doesn't do much desensitize people to the US Stein influence on the MP's as they go into the chamber well it packs a huge emotional punch and it will influence I and those divisions have only hardened since then no single choice now we'll Hilda Braxton now Jomaa Donald Treads are very tight line on being loyal to Jeremy Corbyn his great friend but also pushing and pushing for how are the numbers looking for Boris Johnson in parliament right now to me by my count is looking at least fifteen short it we're revealing today that John McDonnell shadow chancellor is going to be the Big Star Headline Speaker at that final say March tomorrow morning lots of MP's will found themselves buttonholed in the corridors at Westminster maybe some of them may be taken out for a Nice Cup of tea and a chat in an attempt MP's Kennedy Gets Sixteen Labor MP's it's tough school now I can imagine that probably all through the night and all today impossibly explicit that there should be a referendum on this particular deal Labor has yet to put down any amendment that would actually cause that to happen persuade them to to go with the government but we do also have this people's March taking place cannot if it gets numbers have any so that's on the basis that they're donate seven Tory MP's he's going to lose some it's alleged that there are two minister's resignation March today but he's going to get at least the children and East London borough is to trial and a huge crowd in parliament square as MP's preparing to vote and the particular traction that could have on the Labor Party is and and this big rally might be the final thing gets labor impeached and Mr Goldman particular say come on fifty seven I'm told of the whipless twenty one plus a couple of other independents and fifteen needs to be filled by Labor next family therapies being a success in the US but it's used to tackle violent crime why we think it'll be and final Salem brexit but he's never actually committed to a referendum on Boris Johnson's deal John McDonnell speaking to the standard is quite in a specific way with the Labor Party so the emotional punch comes when you're GonNa have tens of thousands of people marching through London possibly hundreds it can work here to this is a welcome bid to address the root causes of the type of offending that has led to so much bloodshed it is the much-vaunted public health approach in action and is much needed at a time when knife crime in London is at record levels are the councils should he the AH deal over the line people will accept as a reasonable compromise and that has the potential comport here the impact of knife crime in London this year has been under family therapy scheme it's an attempt to reduce gang violence and an idea brought over from the US where studies have shown it can bring down youth crime the standard tomorrow in the coach car this is the biggest game in eight years or rugby correspondent will make fastens in Japan typhoon battered tournament enters its final stage the capital's streets under the scheme to be implemented in Redbridge a clinical therapist will spend five months working with run rable youngsters and their past he can't sit on the fence or be perceived to sit on the fence because that's damaging to so let's have a referendum vote and that could be a game changer if it had hey but to actually vote for a referendum on this particular deal now Jeremy Corbyn has said he'll is up for public vote in praise for keeping the show going despite some gains being hammered by Tornado rugby correspondent will McPherson is in order for the match will house the city preparing for opens and I'm not saying it will happen I'm not saying that when it in the Commons either they Detroit on Mrs based deal at one point and it didn't make any difference recording this podcast England still in the Rugby World Cup and preparing for the quarterfinal clash with Australia The tournaments entering its closing stages in Japan a country that's haven't or cares to identify and overcome negative patterns of behavior within the family that might otherwise push them towards gangs Australia and England World Rugby Seva to of the travelling supporters attitude. They've sold the most tickets to two votes to nations so it makes sense in Yokohama cancelled so in going into this game on inquiry situation having not played for two weeks so no one's quite sure what that sort of how now at the time and so this week it's been it's been it's been a town it's called great stadium just outside of Thomas been getting into the World Cup but really you could you can sense for. I'm waterspout Australia Australia on the other hand of come for a really tough group with Wales and Fiji they beat Fiji lost away all of the schemes lead or procedure turnips that can talk the cause of offending success will save lives uh-huh actually all wait there haven't been too many fountain is it expected to get busier noisier for tomorrow people just started pollens town and unfortunately over the last ten years I've lost to young people I worked with Mysore road is a youth worker so we need to support the most wonderful young people clashes in parliament and after all we may know the future of Bragg's it very soon can this country ever move the certainly the country is divided the question I chased Markle Checker of Australia and Eddie Johns of of England who's also in Australia and of course sprung major selection surprises yesterday joins dropped George Ford fifty miles of course and stuff like that say I think the atmosphere will be sensational the places just onto buzzer little bit and everyone's very get in touch and continue the conversation on social media use the Hashtag the leader podcast back on Monday it can be very very lively annoyed term Beppu over towns nearby magnum funds as far away as coca which is aw that Salita taken from the Evening Standard editorial column it's our opinion but we won't use oil stepped on the September two thousand sixteen at Saudis. How're we knew that today was going to be hard I take that first two games were were by England's founded simple games against told her I'm the USA and then they face Argentina who had a man sent off to seventeen minutes which meant that she had a big of fake by tests so far as well cup which is very sad to to to get to court farnell without situation about tomorrow's game how prepared are inland in comparison to Australia this is our biggest gave an eight years almost without doubt they got through the group stages quite come ah a nineteen year old outside Centre Parkway jordan-qatar he hadn't made his international debut before this month I believe won the first three games and then talk hundreds which has been this devastating storm hit Japan laws weekend saw their game against Franz Law Sasser they were to they would have big challenges which survey they probably know a little bit more about themselves I mean come free is challenges if that makes sense but both both uh-huh yeah we need to we need to increase the peace and we need to create more -tunities young menu at risk of getting Goldeneye part not just young men young women the former punishment was given nothing will ever bring use it to combat stye because we need to stop not L. Terry's quad little spoiled down on me On down in southern Japan Beppu is wearing and disdain just up the road office being arguing Platter World Cup so far and check it as almost trading Meteo cooling the biggest gambling Australian World Cup history.

Australia London Evening Standard England Joe Mafia political editor Australia Australia Fiji David Nelson Japan Japan Beppu George Ford Wales Yokohama USA Eddie Johns Bragg Salita
Weekly Roundup: Thursday, January 24

NPR Politics Podcast

27:23 min | 1 year ago

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, January 24

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Also, come from IBM to meet the needs of the world's growing population. Farmers are working with IBM and Watson to help increase crop yields. Let's put smart to work. Find out how it IBM dot com slash smart. Good morning. This is Kyle from Peachtree city, Georgia. It's currently seventy AM. And I'm just now headed home after my seventh overnight shift in a row. Luckily, it's also my last, but unfortunately, like the other eight hundred thousand federal employees. I'm also not getting paid for it. As currently the thirty four th day of the government shutdown. This podcast was recorded at one fifty one pm on Thursday, January twenty fourth things may have changed since you've heard this. All right. Here's a show. A lot of neighbors in this situation. And it's not easy for anyone and not easy, especially for the people not at the top of the totem pole in a lot of those places to intern janitors who are having a difficult time. That's totally true. And we're going to talk more about the government shutdown just a bit. Hey there. It's the NPR politics podcast. The state of the union has been postponed the president conceded to house speaker Nancy Pelosi so could that be assigned that we're getting closer to the end of the government shutdown? I must Mahala political reporter, I'm Sharon SCO, covered the White House onto medical much narrow political editor, and I'm Mara Liasson national political correspondent, so you know, for a minute, it seems like there was a lot of uncertainty about what was going to happen with the state of the union. But now it has been officially delayed. So let's walk through how this all played out. I should do you want to start with a letter that Donald Trump put out yesterday? Yes. So yesterday. President Trump sent this letter to speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi about the state of the union, and this is after she it's in a letter a little while back saying that we need to reschedule because of the shutdown, and basically what he says is I'm gonna fulfill my constitutional duty. And I'm going to deliver the state of the union in the chamber of the house of representatives. Just so you're clear, and it would be very sad. If this doesn't happen. So he basically kind of called her bluff he called her bluff and presumably he thought that she'd backed down, but she didn't. She informed him that the house was not going to officially invite him because the government is shutdown. She wrote a counter letter saying that, you know, the state of the union could happen in the future with government was open. But she wasn't budging. And so Trump actually heard about this letter. He seemed to hear about this letter during a photo op, and he kind of responded saying I'm not surprised we just found out that she's cancelled. I think that's a great blotch on the incredible country that we all love, it's a great, great horrible. Mark. I don't believe it's ever happened before. And it's always good to be part of history. But this very negative part of history. This is where people are afraid to open up and say what's going on? So it's a very very negative part of history. But he also said that we're going to come up with an alternative, and we'll let you know, basically in the coming days what we're going to do, but we'll have an alternative and then a little after eleven pm last night at the president took to Twitter, and he had this to say as the shutdown was going on Nancy Pelosi asked me to give the state of the union address. I agreed. She then changed her mind because of the shutdown suggesting a later date. This is her perogative. I will do the address when the shutdown is over. I am not looking for an alternative venue for the state of the union address because there is no venue that can compete. With the history tradition and importance of the house chamber. I look forward to giving a quote, great state of the union address in the near future. Exclamation mark. This was the first off of divided government to Coequal branches Donald Trump versus Nancy Pelosi. He blinked and in the end, although the White House had considered taking up the invitation of state legislatures in Michigan or West Virginia. Or maybe giving the speech in the Senate or giving the speech somewhere, he decided as an old real estate guy location location location was really important, and he said as he as you just read nothing can compete with the history tradition and importance of the house chamber. He's a reality TV producer. He cared about the set he wanted to do it in the house chamber. She had something he wanted and she wouldn't give it to him. You know, a lot of this is wrapped up in the shut down, of course. Because that's really the premise here that ANSI Pelosi. Saying don't do this until the government is reopened and the president agreed essentially in that tweet saying that he wouldn't do it until the government was back open which was backing down. And he's been facing a ton of political pressure. Just yesterday the row trio of polls from the Associated Press CBS news and Fox News importantly, because it's something that President Trump watches with bad news for the president when it comes to the shutdown and his stance on this issue, and usually shutdowns one party or the other reaches their pain threshold, I and it seems like the Republicans Donald Trump have been getting to there's faster than the Democrats. His approval ratings have fallen people blame him by big margins for causing the shutdown and he has tried with all the tools at his disposal and Oval Office address visit to the border. You know, he has tried to make this argument and nothing has worked. And I think that for this president your he is very caught. Up on the power of the Oval Office, the trappings of the presidency, and if he had went out to the West Virginia state house, you're just not going to get the imagery that you're going to get being in the house of representatives with the Democrats kinda forced to sit there. And listen to you to like, you have this captive audience of not just your supporters. But also kind of at times the way it seems they can be viewed as your opponents, but the other party, and you get to kind of give your message, and they have to kind of sit there and listen to it. That's a powerful seen that you you don't get by going someplace else. And so it always seemed kind of sketchy to me, whether he would really consider going to another place, and you can't just the state of the union isn't a rally. You can't just throw it someplace. So I am curious how big of a deal. This is that the state of the union has been postponed Dominican. I know you've looked a lot at at. History right of the state of the union is a whole do. We have a sense of how rare this is it's very rare for this to occur. I mean, the last state of the union that was delayed was in one thousand nine hundred eighty six which was when the challenger happened and wrong Reagan decided that it wouldn't be appropriate to give the speech at that moment. That was his call not the speaker of the house to reject him. Now at the same time all that said, the speaker of the house and congress have the final say here. So Trump didn't have the leverage to be able to say I'm gonna go anyway. So one of the things we've heard from the Trump administration is that this is part of their constitutional duty. Is that accurate? Well, you know, it's a little bit of a twist because there's no requirement for them to have to do it. In person at the capitol on television for millions of people to see. In fact, there's no requirement to actually even do them every year, it's a constitutional requirement to deliver periodic updates. So with the constitution. Actually says an article two section three. If you wanna follow along at home, he shall from time to time give to congress information of the state of the union and recommend to their consideration and measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. So in other words, he can come forward and say I want you to do stuff. Nobody has to do any of that stuff. He has to tell them what's going on once in a while. But not all the time. He could do it in a tweet. He could do it in a letter series of tweets. I've heard threatening a thing now. All right anything backs so 'nineties. All right. Well, we are going to take a quick break. And when we get back. We'll talk about the latest on the government shutdown support for this podcast and the following message. Come from SimpliSafe home security. Simplisafe is complete wireless protection for your home that can be self installed in under an hour. There are no long term contracts and no hidden fees. Seeing that the wire cutter N P C MAG have all named simply safe in editor's choice for home security and simply safe protects over two million people every day. Learn more about simply safe and how to protect your home and family with their home security systems at SimpliSafe dot com slash NPR politics. Support also comes from ZipRecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology finds the right people for you. So you aren't overwhelmed with tons of resumes. Plus ZipRecruiter, actively invites the top candidates to apply. That's why ZipRecruiter is rated number one by employers in the US based on. Hiring sites on trust pilot with over a thousand reviews, try it for free by going to ZipRecruiter dot com slash weekly. Hey, it's Peter sago from wait. Wait, don't tell me if you're a normal. Wait, wait listener, you shout out the answers to all the questions, and then you get frustrated that no one can tell how smart you are. Here's the solution. Wait, wait quiz available now on your smart speaker, just ask your smart speaker to open the wait, wait quiz. Finally, your genius shall be recognized. And we're back and today, congress is set to vote on two bills that would potentially reopen the government so Dominican why don't you give us a quick recap of what's actually in them? And whether we actually expect them to be successful. Yeah. So one is based on what the president said Saturday in his speech, which is essentially five point seven billion dollars in wall funding for temporary protections for immigrants. So that would be essentially what they're voting on that's expected to fail. There isn't enough democratic support to get that over the line. And the second one is simply a few week. Lay reopen the government and then start negotiations. So that is just a very plain Bill continuing resolution as they call it to you know, to just temporarily get the government going that's also expected to fail. But what I think is notable to watch is how many Republicans deviate on one or the other. So if these are both expected to fail what are the next steps at this point. Well, the next step is to have a real negotiation. No, the president made the first step when he offered in his Oval Office address, a kind of compromise solution. He said, okay, I still want my five point seven billion dollars for the wall. But I'm willing to talk about deportation relief for dreamers and for another class of of immigrants from our he didn't really negotiate that he didn't. But that was interesting. He laid that out. He spoke the language of compromise. But then mysteriously he didn't invite any Democrats to the White House. He has been talking with Republicans all week. So it seems like what they wanted to do was wait till today. Keep. Republicans together. And then presumably both sides will begin to talk. Now. Democrats who have not made a official counterproposal to what the president laid out in the Oval Office have said several of them that everything is up for negotiation, including a barrier. Not a wall except the shutdown. In other words, they're not going to budge on negotiating with him. While the government is shut down because they feel that that setting a terrible precedent every time. He doesn't get what he wants. So shut the government down. I is there a strategy in the White House right now. Because one of the things that is very curious to me is we do know what Donald Trump himself put forthright over the weekend. But then you also hear that. There was an immigration meeting today with members of say, the LeBron conservative group it also loo lack which is sort of a much more mainstream Latino immigration group. I don't understand entirely what's going on. So. Yes, tamra Keith. Our Timor Keith is reporting that there are discussions kinda in the background. About possibly a larger immigration Bill. This is something that's being floated by Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and his senior advisor in the White House. There have been some listening sessions at the White House about this. But we don't know where the president is on that. But talking to people at the White House. They're throwing it back into the the court of the Democrats and basically saying we made an offer. Now, they need to come and make us a counter offer. But as Mara talked about the Democrats are saying they will not negotiate at all until the government is reopened. But in the past when when we've had these government shook downs, usually they come up with some solution where the government is opened on a weak to by week basis while they have negotiations and that every week they get a chance to either close it or keep it open. And that means that you still have the leverage of shutting down the government. The problem for the president is that the shutdown has become. Less and less popular. And as long it's so long at this porn is long. And he's being blamed for it. And you have people like the commerce secretary Wilbur Ross who said this morning. He doesn't understand why why federal workers on furlough have to go to food banks. Why can't they just go take out a loan yet? And here's commerce secretary Wilbur Ross on CNBC this morning there reports that there are some federal workers who are going to homeless shelters to get food. Well, a no they are an unopened really quite understand why. Because as I mentioned before the the obligations that they would undertake say Abar from the Bank or credit union are in effect. Federally guaranteed. So the thirty days of pay that some people will be out. There's no real reason glide they shouldn't be able to get a loan against it loan that presumably would come with interest. With interest. It also takes time to get alone. And why should they have to take a loan? Right. I mean, you know, it's not everyone can qualify. Not everyone has good credit for a lot of different reasons, and it can be hard to get alone. And that was a big fat target for Democrats who in the past Nancy Pelosi has already said, what does Donald Trump think these federal workers are going to do just take a loan out from their daddy. But the Fox News poll, which has had pretty bad news for the president this week asked a question, how many paychecks could you miss before you wouldn't be able to pay your bills fifty four percent of people said to and that's the number of paychecks that workers are about to miss. That's what's coming tomorrow. And you know, it's just an easy political punching bag for Democrats. And by the way, right up, the twenty twenty Democrats messaging Allie to be able to say look at these billionaires these folks who are out of touch don't get it. They all work for Trump. They're not looking out for you. It's easy political messaging. Especially at a time when Republicans and and President Trump had their backs against the wall in this shutdown. Couldn't come at a worse time to have him say make a comment like that for the president. And I think that this didn't ring well with people because even for those who greatly support the president. They I think there is sympathy for people who cannot get paid, and who aren't getting paid and cannot feed their families and can't pay their mortgage. And all these things that most people can relate to that. They would have a hard time if they were missing multiple paychecks or even missing one paycheck, and you know, another viral moment this week was the coastguard top officials from the coast guard recorded a video where they were just scathing about their disgust at both sides for letting the shutdown go on because the coast guard is the rare branch of the military that is under the department of homeland security, and they are not being paid you as members of the armed forces should not be expect. Added to shoulder this burden. I remain heartened by assistance available to you within the lifelines and by the outpouring of support from local communities across the nation. But ultimately, I find it unacceptable that coastguard men and women have to rely on food pantries and donations to get through day to day life as servicemembers. Well, she's got to go out to sea for five months and do a lot of the interdictions and actually the work along the border. You know that that President Trump talks about trying to stop drugs who stopping drugs, it's the coast guard. Right. I mean, they're the ones doing a lot of that kind of work. So yeah, look, this is gonna cause a lot of pain. It's already caused a lot of pain for a lot of people. There are people. Yes, they're going to food pantries. There are people who are you know, needing donations of diapers. You know supplies things. Like that that are that touch on the core fiber of what we all. No. I mean think about your own situation, and whether or not you could make the mortgage or the rent if you missed a paycheck, let alone to all right? We're gonna take a quick break. And when we get back can't let it go support for NPR and the following message come from Lincoln and the new Lincoln learning, which offers more than thirteen thousand online courses to help you achieve your goals. It's short video tutorials, cover business, tech and creative skills. Employers. Look for at every level all taught by experts and new courses are added every week plus Lincoln learning. Personalized recommending courses based on your interests and life, Kate listeners. Get a month of learning free. Start your free trial at lengthened, learning dot com slash NPR. Support also comes from better help better. Help offers licensed professional counselors who specialize in issues such as depression stress, anxiety and more connect with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environments at your convenience, get help at your own time and your own pace schedule secure video or phone sessions, plus chat and tax with your therapist. Visit better help dot com slash NPR. To learn more and get ten percent off your first month before you can start your day. You like to know what's happening in the news. That's what up I is four. It's the morning news podcast from NPR. The news you need to take on the day in just about ten minutes. Listen up first on the NPR one app or wherever you get your podcasts. And we're back, and it is now time to end the show like we do every week by talking about the one thing politics or otherwise that we just cannot stop thinking about Dominica. Would you like to go first I would. And you know, what's interesting is completely out of. Of politics here. And I was so this kind being passed around on Twitter a little bit. And then I had to go read this interview with Rolling Stone and Jack Dorsey, the founder of Twitter himself as was heading around Twitter, and he was talking somewhat middle to like further down in the story about this weird dinner. He had with Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook. And they asked him like, what did you what's the most memorable encounter? You had. With Mark Zuckerberg said while there was a year. When apparently Mark Zuckerberg was only eating what he killed brings the hunter. You know, he said that he made goat for him for dinner and he killed the goat. And they were like encountered forty. He like finally went in the battling the little baby. They say they didn't kill it in front of him. But he said that he killed it with a laser gun and the and then the night, I find that hard to believe lazy. But they do. So that was what they wind up coming to that. It was a stun gun. But the best part of it here was that apparently sent it off to the butcher. And then he says what else are we eating and he says salad then he said where's the goat? It's in the oven. Then we waited for about thirty minutes. This is from the article. He's like I think it's done now is break. Yeah. Can't cut it down. Was or what? But this shows that Mark Zuckerberg is not running for president. Thanks Mars, Mars, a one track mind. So he's like, I think it's done. Now, we go in the dining room. He puts the goat down. It was cold. That was memorable. I don't know. If it went back in the oven. I just ate my salad it so you stunt it in then you take a knife to it that just seems cruel road. No, you're gonna. Yeah. You have to slit its throat. Okay. Okay. Are is only done it twice. I know. Brian who has anyway, let's not even get started on Mark Zuckerberg? So how many times have you killed a animal or anything? But I can tell you that my freezer is full of wild boar that my son and husband kill or sometimes it's filled with fish that. They caught an Alaska. Most of my protein does come from my family member. Every so often maybe once a year, I'll buy a chicken on the bottom. On the bottom shelf though in the back of Mars freezer is the hearts and souls of every pundit who tried to challenge. Dr. All right. Well, I'll go next mine is political. So what I cannot let go of this week are millennials? So this week the mayor of south bend, Indiana. His name is Pete Buddha. Judge I believe it's a little bit difficult for me to pronounce his last name Buddha. Judge and his husband had actually tweeted out a bunch of different pronounces. So you could sort of like go in a million or a few different directions. He has on his site boot edge edge Buddha, judge, I guess Buddha judge, and then sort of Buddha judge like Egal's pick your pronounce a few different ways. We'll mayor p announced he's running for president. And he's joining you know, what more than half a dozen other Democrats who've also officially declared their intentions to run. But what I find really interesting about him. You know, he's a mayor. He's a mayor of a pretty mid sized city in Indiana, south bend. I don't even know how many folks have heard of it where the university. Exactly. But but he's really sort of pitching his agenda on in running as being this candidate who represents intergenerational change. And he, you know, he talks in this video ad that he had about how Washington's a mess, but we can't look for greatness in the past. And that that's what too many politicians have been doing. I belong to generation stepping forward. Right now. We're the generation that lived through school shootings that served in wars after nine eleven and we're the generation that stands to be the first to make less than our parents unless we do something. So they have it millennials were finally ring for office. We might be poorer than our parents. We might be way older moms that are moms because we can't afford to have children. But hey, you know. That he's he thirty seven thirty seven. He's a mayor and he served in Afghanistan. Like, this is you know. Hey and married. Yeah. I mean, I think him highlighting that generational change. Message is something that's underlying so much of what we hear about. Whether it's on Capitol Hill with the sort of like restive democratic activists base not really liking what they see with democratic leadership all the time, and their, you know, age and on the campaign trail, frankly, you know, his mar- knows the party is changed quite a bit. This is not Bill Clinton's party anymore. And you know, it really does seem to belong a little bit more to this more youthful activists base. This is where the Democrats are strongest. I mean, they have tremendous support among not just millennials. But the generation after that, and this is obviously a selling point for young candidates like Buddha, judge or Beto Aurora. But it's also something that Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders should they run? We'll have to answer for. All right. Well, mar do you wanna go next? I want to go next mine is a political very topical. Can't let it go. I have been thinking a lot about what? Donald Trump said about Nancy Pelosi in one of his photo ops yesterday and here he is Nancy Pelosi Nancy as I call her. The reason I thought that so much is that his nicknaming superpowers failed him in the face of the speaker. He couldn't come up with a derogatory belittling diminishing nickname for her or as I call her Nancy Macioci, call her that's as good as you can do pause there the wheels turning their some stuffing didn't want to have to know. I just think that he the fact that he hasn't made up a nickname for her. And he certainly has for Chuck Schumer shows that he is either intimidated, he's befuddled doesn't quite know. Juanita letter or maybe he respects her. We're not quite sure. But what we do know is that for me that little moment summed up what we saw this week, which was the first true clash of divided government Nancy Pelosi versus Donald Trump. And even though it was just about the state of the union address. He blinked she. He didn't are those Aisha. Why don't you wrap things up? Yes. So my can't let it go. This week is the Oscars. And I I'm not a I like the movies, but I don't get to the movies very much because I'm saying, I got them kids and stuff. So I don't get to the movies. But I made a point last year noticed the incredible student make AD I love that movie. Yes. So but one movie I did make a point to go see 'cause I never get out to go to the movies is the Black Panther. And I love that movie. I felt like it lived up to the hype some people may disagree. But I love that movie, and it is nominated for a best picture, and it is the I didn't even realize this that it was the first superhero movie to be nominated for best picture. I thought the dark Knight had been nominated for best picture, but it had not been. So as a superhero lover in my core. I am like very happy that they're that superhero hero movies are finally getting recognized. All right. Well, that's a day. We'll be back as soon as there is more political news that you need to know about. And we have exciting news. The podcast team will be hitting the road will be in Atlanta, Georgia for a live show on Friday, March eight you can head to NPR presents dot org for tickets. I must Mukalla political reporter. I'm Sharon though. I cover the White House. I'm much narrow political editor I'm Mara Liasson, national political correspondent and thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast. Actual speeds. Vary and are not guaranteed.

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 Change UK: how not to set up a political party  podcast

Today in Focus

26:11 min | 1 year ago

Change UK: how not to set up a political party podcast

"Today with the Tory, shifting rightwards and labor left. Why didn't change you K breakthrough into the center of British politics and environment editor Damian Carrington on a frightening number of plant? Extinctions. One morning during the European election campaign last month. The guardians political editor had Stewart with sitting at home with her nine year old daughter who'd been leafing through the campaign literature that was coming through, and she said, mommy wants the black lines party. I said, oh, the coup change you k. Do they want Brexit? I said, no, they don't want Brexit. So she wasn't sure from. And then she said, what do they want to change mummy? Compared to the leaflet from the Brexit party, which is pretty clear what they thought on what they wanted it was. You know, it felt this summed up the problem with their messaging to some interest, which the Brexit partly them. No, I don't think I but that's because our house Brexit is like code for thing that makes mummy busy, so that we don't see it as much as. So they want to stop Brexit, because they feel like it's Brexit's full this. Brexit, mommy. Mommy back. Has dosa wasn't the only one he fell to be persuaded by changes in the end despite a promising star. They ended up winning just three percent of the vote. And now the party's falling apart with six of its eleven MP's quitting. The party was set up by disillusion politicians walking away from labour, and the Tories, because they believe there was a gap in the middle of British politics, and this week that space seems wider than ever a story contenders launch their leadership bids with the favorites shifting further to the right. Johnson. What would he do if he was prime minister tax cuts anybody to meet, or the house of Commons? Andrea, led some her plan of a managed no deal exit Jeremy hunt. You're going to tell me he can unite the country even though yesterday. He said he believes in lowering the washing limit from twenty four weeks to twelve. So why would change you k unable to find a space in the centre ground from the guardian I'm Donna today in focus? How not to set up a political party. Janis was summoned to the press conference just across the river Thames from parliament's. And, you know, there was a logo that was uncovered and this group of seven MP's, walks from the back of the room, nobody was quite sure who they were going to be into later merged, or he was going to be part of the group, and who wasn't so, you know, it's not every day, you see a new political grouping launch politics in this way. So it so it was it was quite a moment. I think at the time there were many commentators, who felt it was the beginning of something really big, the beginning of major realignment of British politics, last few years have shown the established parties are simply not up to this challenge. They can't be changed because they have become the problem, so who did walk through. So they were Luciana Birger that Liverpool waiver tree MP Gavin shuker and coffee. Mike, gapes Angela Smith. Chucker Ramona, and Chris, Leslie good. If this was a pub quiz pretty, well, I'm bringing you in from pop quiz fries. So that was them the labor contingent, and another MP Joan Ryan joined them pretty quickly. But then there was another big moment, quite soon afterwards. Yes. At the following week. And I mean, we'd we'd wondered whether there would be more labor MP's joining, and also, whether perhaps more interesting more tantalizingly for political journalists, whether they could attract any recruits from other parties. And so the following week, we saw these three conservative MP's on a super Heidi Alan and Sarah Wallis, STAN announce quite dramatically just before prime minister's questions that they were going to join this new group. So you've met the magnificent seven you've probably heard last night about the lone ranger. So I guess that makes us the three migos. We're sitting up in the press gallery prime minister's questions which is one of the moments of the we the Commons is packed. It's quite an adversarial atmosphere. Lots of sort of. Chatting joshing going on both sides of the house. And in what these three erstwhile conservative and peas women, and they woke up to the back benches on the opposition side of the Commons and sit alongside the labor piece who left the week before. And they sort of gave each other other's sisterly pats. And it was it was quite moment. And it's very rare thing in British politics that you see that divide being breached, and it was, it was quite hard warming in a way, and certainly quite unusual. And there was just this massive sense of optimism. It seemed to be going quite well. And they seemed like this kind of they seem to all of them that you've been quite unhappy in their parties, quite angry. Perhaps about the leadership of their parties for quite a long time for different reasons. And they to differ, kind of weight had been lifted from their shoulders. And so, you know, they will posting photos of each other city on the table at Nando. Always done. Does the call themselves the independent group and very quickly, you know, journalists alike, where was looking for a kind of a cheeky name for something. So they very quickly became the tickets, so cool Intel. We need a team. Wow. Did you hear us today? I am very found. Approach to. To introduce our tickets. But it wasn't all perfect to being under Smith. Did make a little mistake on the first day yet. She certainly did she? She went onto BBC and talked about people of a funny tinge. There isn't history of the politics of just left suggested. It's not just about black hole. You know, different from the community, but the, the Jewish ache, which we unfortunate. So they were tick, the tickets, the independent grape. The big decision they have to make was whether or not to set up a political party that could fi- elections. Yeah. Which they felt was the decision. They had a bit of time to take. Right. There were no elections. They thought coming up that didn't feel any particularly stand for local councils. It may so, you know, they, they would they were planning to set up a political party, perhaps, by the end of the year. But then, all of a sudden, Mr Speaker the discussions at the council were difficult in the end. What was agreed by the U? K E U twenty seven was a compromise. An extension lasting until the end up Tober Brexit gets delayed and quite at the last minute, but government can see going to have to run European elections. European parliament elections, and has now be very quick decision about whether to be a party and stand in those elections. And they decided you know, we haven't got much time. But let's go for it. So they decided to become an official party to stand in European elections, and the couldn't be called the independent great. They needed a new name and went the change you k- given the Brexit with such a driving force for them. Why didn't they call themselves the remain party? Well, that's a good question. I think these were MP's who felt they were setting up something long term. They wanted to found a political movement that would realign push politics for the long term and the time they were founded, they were expecting Brexit to be over and done with and wanted to have more on jeopardy than that. So they felt if they just call themselves the remain party focused on this one issue, what's their future after Brexit is dumb. I mean change u k is a bit of a witch for a party that's arguing for the status quo to stay in the EU all play remain would have been clearer and it wasn't just the name itself. It was set. Pulling on it a one point when they call change you k colon. Be independent grape. Lots would say that was their first misstep and then the mistakes really started to take off beginning without logo. What was that about? It was a series of horizontal black lines, and it wasn't quite clear, what it was meant to signify, a, why that they had it printed in a series of different colors. And so a campaign, European campaign launch she saw them holding up these soda placards with, with the poets lines in various different colors and you weren't sure what any of it, signified or meant on the black ones, basically, like a prison outfit. Like by it's all to know what it was what it was meant to tell you. I mean I actually saw quite a few mockup tweets of them biz of change. You UK Cole on thin dependent group imprison if the loco and it just perfect. Yeah. And of course, this is a neighbor in which snarky Twitter responses can very quickly come to define how you see. Yes, they had a few issues with the name. They had a few issues with the logo. And then there was the bus Norrish today. We're in Nottingham. I we are in Sheffield and then Cardiff Edinburgh. Absolutely. It's brilliant. And we're going to have a bus, and we want everybody to come and join us. Sure. Anybody else hand should we see? Yeah. I mean, if, if the logo on the sort of messaging wasn't confused enough, they then printed, it always been Princip with dot matrix printer. Using Microsoft Word circa, nineteen ninety nine but, you know, this white bass with the black bars and sort of said, four remain four people's vote change, u k and again, there's the slam business about all the anti Brexit party while they something a bit broader than that. All right. So the printing hunting gone. Well, and then we start getting the gaffes tell me about the vetting process, actually paid a firm to do background checking that not a longstanding party with its internal bureaucracy. That's been doing this for years, so they bought in some betting, including checking social media profiles. And, you know, a couple of candidates were rejected, I think, because of sort of dodgy tweets that turned up in the past and the piece themselves sort of sat round with the pilot CV. And look through them and help to choose the choose the candidates. But unfortunately, within about twenty four hours or forty eight hours of their candidate list being announced two of their potential. Emmy piece it had to step aside because sort of don't G tweets from the pasta being found, including one said he was afraid of black women seem pretty extrordinary. It hadn't been picked on say that was bad and then the review quite awkward moments. There were, there were a lot of quite awkward moments are scheduled to join Chris went to a very sparsely attended a press conference in Bristol where Rachel Johnson Boris Johnson sister, who was one of those sort of more high profile candidates effectively conceded that no Johnson winning. Look at what's Rachel Johnson said, she's your can't kinds of in the southwest, and she said trains, you a terrible nine, I'm jumping on another sinking ship with change, you k-. We hope it's not sinking but it's not right in the ocean waves. I think it will be a slow build of reverse, Malcolm. Look, I can't speak for Rachel. Another press conference where Joan Ryan, the mpc, this very sort of old speech where she got the audience to hold out their hands and set. The future was in the hands. Can you can you just look hands? Please. Really do. Evison. That's the best of brilliant. That's it. It's there. That's the answer to this is in your hands. I head Jane Ryan channels David Brent does she quite hard to watch. But this just came to be a narrative that they had a string of missteps really say about branding Goths, but another major problem is that there was a clash of egos. How did they work together? Well, not. Well, I think the. You know, it's almost like setting up a small business starting and political party and. You know, you need to think about the structure over and it's not just policy decisions and, and. How you gonna up market the thing and what you're going to call it? It's also how you're gonna run it behind the scenes. And there were a lot of cash, she's over that there was a feeling that chucker in particular a particular wanted to be leader considered himself to be leader sort of publishing pump flits about what his policy platform would be even though actually it wasn't the leader at the time, it was kind of combination of personalities and both tactical disagreements, and personal disagreements. I think I think Chris, Leslie sort of a bitty that really when we to politics weekly recently, they were certainly clashes think we've we do values. I think there was some turtle disagreement. I'm trying to give diplomatic as I can. Okay. So I think fastest that change. You came made a pretty bad of it really. I mean they made a lot of unforced errors. It's been a bit of a comedy of unforced errors. But even if they've run a perfect campaign is an argument that they were kind of doomed to. Fail. Anyway. I mean I spoke to hide island this weekend. Do you accept that things went badly wrong in the way that you will? I mean you were the leader. Yeah. What changed medically almost as soon as we'd formed, of course, with local elections, and that's probably the one strategic error would say, we did make we didn't consider what affect that might have on the polling landscape and of course, lib Dem's did incredibly well in that, and she felt that a really big moment was after they decided to set up the party, and then the local election results came in. Good evening. Welcome to the BBC news. At six two main political parties at Westminster have suffered losses in the local elections in England Northern Ireland and the sign that voters are fed up with the deadlock over Brexit. The main winners are the Liberal Democrats who've gained five hundred ninety. Why was that difficult for them Brexit? It's become a more motivation. More polarizing shoots become more sort of defining of British politics. And so this position lipped M's have consistently held, which is we should stop. Brexit has become a more and more popular one and their message is very, very clear. So the fact that they had done. Well, in the local elections, was incredibly important because people he wanted to protest in the European elections on the remained side needed to choose which party to do it three g think that change you k made a mistake in a seemingly Amsara tainted brand. Do you think they were to our Ghent about the Liptons? I think I think they absolutely were. Then there was a feeling that Vince cable of older leader to some extent tile. With the brush of the coalition government, because it was a it was a cabinet minister course in government, the implemented a lot of the cuts now seeing the effect souls. You know, there was a feeling it was a kind of dead party, almost it was Maury bond. And then all of a sudden, you know, you remember they've got great organization at grassroots level, and they've got a very, very clear message the launch shows a European elections by the Liberal Democrats is with a very simple message, which is stop Brexit. This moment in British politics is Brexit moment. It's deeply polarized moment in the end, it's kind of binary you've got to plant your flag, and the Liptons hooping almost as dormant force for quite a long time. Absolutely understood that. And their campaign launch there was a bloody great poster saying, stop Brexit said they absolutely said, we are the sort of torchbearers for remain at these elections, and that makes it quite difficult. If you're an upstart party with no infrastructure, no members on the ground a no data about how people voted in the past to make any impact and say, wasn't this question. Of how they treated other parties also wanted to remain absolutely key to things really went wrong for the party. Yes. It became the real bone of contention. So as the campaign went on on your shortcut Bain, but change you poll rating was very, very weak and some in the party, including interim leader, Heidi Alan thought, actually, they should be vising voters to vote Lipton. Did you frighten to resign as I've been told later? Yes, I did, how it been left to me. I would have upset yet is tactical voting but others disagreed. Yes. I think it is a rather bizarre for an interim leader on the eve of polls till people, essentially not to vote for their party. Absolutely. Anisul prefix felt very, very strongly. Hang on. We've just set up this party. We've just persuaded all these people to stand as candidates and recruited activists who were going out and handing out leaflets. How can we turn around to them? And if I days of the campaign, and don't vote for this party we've just founded. And say things really came to a head in the end in those European elections. They got three percent of the vote, and that led to a crunch meeting, what happened there. Yeah. So there had been these simmering tensions about whether they should stand continue to stand candidates, whether they should support the lip domes and those really really came to a head meeting where the political party change, you his split off to six of its MP's, have quit, ultimately six of the eleven p so more than half of them decided to walk away, including the leader, including Chaka, Ramona, including govern Shuka, hooping really important in laying the groundwork, setting up the structure for the party. So really the, the most prominent figure some of the most prominent figures walked away. And then after that change, you k now left behind with on a super as its leader and just five MP's. There are five of these with five experienced politicians, we have got hun hundred thousand supporters, and then the stunner Shing Jeep to my. Polling zero percent nowhere. Yeah. I mean is that debt now? Well, they, they, they say they going to toll the country, they're going to talk to voters and ask them what they want. They're going to try and put together some sort of policy platform on a su- breeze. So quite charismatic crap quite outspoken. Although, you know, it's her and four Abram peace. There is a sort of in a way slightly or fit, but I'm sure they will continue. You know, one does what happens. Another general election. Do they hold their seats, all they strong enough personalities to hold their seats? Or are they just washed away to know? Okay. You've set out what went wrong for change, UK somewhat that they will hawk came back to politics of twenty years ago, and the willed not like not anymore. It's much more polarized, but then must be voters still looking for something in the middle. So then our room is that Jack criminal is going to join the lip dams Heidi L, and another is going to sit as independence. And there is talk about to twelve Tores joining them. If Boris Johnson wins the leadership. Do you think there is still space in the centre ground of British politics? I certainly don't think that the failure of change you k or the near failure near death of change. UK tells you there isn't a space at that point in the political spectrum that was what some gleefully some labor figures were saying. I don't think it tells you that a tool, it tells you how incredibly difficult it is to set up a new political party and particularly at this moment, we need a very clear message. You need a good leader. You need to be slick you need. Good communications all. Those things didn't go. Well, that may at some point, be a big reap of MP's that might break away from the labor party those, those tensions that were simmering before the independent group was created about -solutely not going away, but a lot depends. It seems to me on what happens in the Tory leadership contest. So what kind of conservative party you get, and what, which bit of political territory, which bit at the spectrum occupies what space that leaves quite depends on what happens with Brexit? So if it's as it were done and dusted in the next three to six months in, in whatever way, then all those analyst tell you that normal politics, wherever that is reasserts itself, and you start to talk again, about taxes spending policy and left and Ryan and what to do about the NHS and all those other issues that have been swept away. Maybe that the sort of normal axis of politics, reasserts itself, but Brexit could live a very long shadow Heather, thank you very much. Thank you. That was the Guardian's political editor had a Stewart, do follow her. Excellent reporting during this tumultuous time for British politics out the guardian dot com. Coming up, scientists discover the scale of plenty extinction. Now, the Guardian's environment, deter Damian Carrington on how scientists have discovered a frightening number of plumped extinctions in the first global analysts of the issue. Punks basically underpin the entirety of life. Onus, even people that netted stood not very dramatic, and not as charismatic as big animals, like polar bears and elephants, everyone depends upon them, and actually the my striking way it was described to me by one of the scientists, when I was reporting, the story was they said, plants turn air into food, and that's amazing. The new thing about this report is for the first time they've done the very best job. They can of making a global comprehensive assessment of how many plants who've how many species have gone extinct in the last two hundred and fifty years or so. And they came up with big number five hundred seventy one. Unfortunately that so, so likely to be drastic underestimate, for reasons that involve the facts, we still don't know how many different plots are out there, scientists find about two thousand new species every year. So some of them that we've never discover may go extinct before we even put a name on them. I think perhaps, the most bizarre story that has come out of this work was a plunked cooled bandit trinity, which is a small flower. It was all because only the flower grows above ground, no leaves, but moral was where it was found in nineteen twelve it was found in street in south Chicago called Torrence avenue and a few years later that was built over or destroyed in some way and no one's ever seen that plant ever since. A lot of scientists thinks that the earth is now experiencing what they call the sixth mass extinction, and that sir alluding to the fact that five times before, in history of life on earth have been periods juicer volcanic, eruptions or meteorite strikes, where many species have gone extinct in a very short space of time and actually, this new study does relate to this in a sense in that the scientists were able to estimate from the work that they've done that the rate of extinction of plants is probably guessing for about five hundred times faster than it was in the times before humans dominated the surface of the earth is quite early on to be calling it a massive extinction. But certainly, the rates at which things are disappearing because of this massive destruction of wild places forests. And so on all around the world, certainly gives us the idea that something very big and very negative is happening in the natural world. This study is giving us a glimpse into how quickly and how many plots extinct we know. That's really important. And often, people say to me, well, what can we do about it, and that certainly big question and it's all to do with preserving habitat? Okay. That's what you've got to do, if there isn't space for nature. You will not have any nature. What each us to do in terms of what you buy kennels are making affects so, for example, livestock, have a disproportionately large impact on the natural world. Many forest chop down in order to ranch, cattle or to grow soybeans, which are then fed to cattle so eating less meat can be one thing that you can do palm oil is a complicated issue. Certainly unsustainable, palm oil is also involved in the destruction of nature and not just plans all life on us. That was Damian Carrington. My thanks to him and to this Jewett to head nine year old daughter. Thanks to all of you, as well who've been leaving us, some lovely reviews we do like reading them, a big sorry to Trevor taika, Hugh missed his train stop listening to one of our recent episodes. But I'm glad you enjoyed it. Today's episode was produced by Josh Kelly, and Rachel Humphries, sound design, was by axel cockatiel, the executive producers on a co Jackson and Phil may not we'll be back tomorrow.

Brexit MP Brexit Brexit party Joan Ryan Guardian Rachel Johnson Chris prime minister Damian Carrington Liberal Democrats political editor BBC Angela Smith Stewart Heidi Alan Tober Brexit Chucker Ramona
The Evening Briefing: Monday February 17

The Briefing

02:09 min | 6 months ago

The Evening Briefing: Monday February 17

"Good evening I'm Chris. Price with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Monday February the seventeenth and the death toll from storm. Dennis is rising so Britain's enduring second day of flooding and travel chaos at is being confirmed. Four people have died during storm. Dennis thousands of being evacuated from their homes as the number of flood. Warnings hits an all time high and the death toll is expected to rise to five. It's after police say the search for a woman is now a recovery Robin rescue operation. She was swept into flat. Water near temporary in Worcestershire or this comes as Labor leadership contender Says it was an appalling decision not to hold an emergency. Cobra meeting on the flooding burst. Johnson's yet to visit any flood hit areas. You'll remember he twice headed to places affected by adverse weather during the general election campaign. You can see a gallery of the damage left by storm. Dennis laviolette will return to screens tonight. Following the death the former host Caroline flack and the program will feature a tribute to the star. Who was found dead at her London home Saturday having taken her own life. Rebecca breed has written a piece about how she called out flack on her relationship with Harry styles. She was then shocked by her anguished response and read the Telegraph's Obituary of the much-loved presenter and if the BBC hadn't had enough unwanted headlines lately now one of its top journalists is off BBC news. Deputy political editor John Pena's leaving after three decades at the corporation. He's joining the soon to be launched times radio station as its drive time presenter. Right say put. If you're listening on WHATSAPP post and you those links now if you're listening on spotify or wherever you get your podcast you'll find them in the show notes as well as links to Norman. Tebbit on wide range of Dominic Cummings is the anathema to the Thatcher years and the delightful English town with a very horrible history. That since you're up to date more from Danny tomorrow morning.

Caroline flack Dennis laviolette Telegraph Johnson John Pena BBC Dominic Cummings Worcestershire spotify Robin Britain political editor Danny Thatcher London Norman Rebecca Harry three decades
The Evening Briefing: Friday, May 22

The Briefing

02:14 min | 2 months ago

The Evening Briefing: Friday, May 22

"Allo Roy Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph as Number ten hints. At how London's lockdown will end so the UK went into lockdown at the same time but will it be different on the way out while Scotland Wales and Northern Ireland? Already moving at a different pace to England now Semaj that London could be released from restrictions quicker than other parts of the country. Boris Johnson's move to take over control of the capital's rhinovirus response from the mass Com As political editor golden rain reports. London has a lower rate of infection that other parts of the country and on some days. It's recorded no new cases a tool also at the latest Downing Street briefing Hung Secretary. Pretty Patel confirmed that two week. Quarantines will be imposed on new arrivals to the U. K. That's from June. The eight but the government has given fresh hopes of international summer holidays. It's considering air bridges with countries that have a similar infection rates. We have a piece explaining what that means. Now we can reveal a design flaw with home testing kits sent to households around the country. It turns out they have swap sticks. That are too long for the sample Boscell. They go inside. It might explain. Why many samples of being returned without the LID screwed on properly? Our exclusive report explains how it's contributing to delays in guessing results and with a womb bank holiday weekend many households will be heading outdoors but what exactly do restrictions allow you to do now in England at least remember that different elsewhere in the UK. Well from picnics to car parks. We've rounded up everything you need to know before you Travel Royce. If you're listening on WHATSAPP I'll send you those links. Now if you're listening on spotify apple lower ever you get your podcast. You'll find them in the show notes as well as links to some non corona virus material including video from the aftermath of a plane crash in Pakistan and three years old remembering the Manchester Arena. Terror attack victims. That's it you're up to date I'll be back with your next briefing.

London England Roy Danny Boyle UK Boris Johnson Pretty Patel Manchester Arena spotify Northern Ireland LID Pakistan Scotland Secretary political editor Wales three years two week
The Morning Briefing: Monday, April 27

The Briefing

02:23 min | 3 months ago

The Morning Briefing: Monday, April 27

"Halloween Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Monday April. The twenty seventh the prime minister's back in Downing Street's sorry Boris Johnson's return to number ten. He's taking fulltime controlled of the corona virus crisis. The PM's chairing a meeting of the covy. Nineteen so-called war cabinet his first since he was taken to hospital himself more than three weeks ago. But we're now told he's well enough to stop plotting a route ounce of locked down by colleagues in Westminster hearing Mr Johnson could modify pulse of it before the May seventh deadline. He suddenly got a lot to get through. We've looked at what's likely to be his in tray fair to say it's full of Fulani is over the weekend there was fresh evidence the public's losing patience with social restrictions so has the rebellion. Begun Bari. Stallings written a piece for our Song. Cueing Britain's realized they can't live like this for long and research has found. The public can be divided into three groups when it comes to compliance with the rules C. Which tribe you fit into now. One consequence of lockdown is a shortage of migrant labor. So workers have been furloughed being encouraged to take second jobs as fruit pickers where approaching the soft fruit salads season. More hands will be needed for harvest political editor Golden. Rainer explains how the pick of Britain's game is inspired by the Second World Wars Women's land army and yesterday should have been the day that forty thousand runners took part in the London marathon. The race of course was postponed. But that didn't stop thousands from getting active to raise money for charity in the most creative ways we've got a roundup of the best stories and pictures from the two point six challenge Roy. Stay Pertz if you're listening on. Whatsapp will send you those links. Now feel listening on spotify apple or wherever you get your podcast. You'll find them in the show notes as well as links to some. Non Corona virus material including biography of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Am What we can learn from the BBC show race across the world. That's it you're up to date. Have your second briefing of the day this evening.

Boris Johnson Danny Boyle Britain prime minister Stallings Bari Sussex Westminster political editor BBC Rainer spotify Roy Whatsapp London apple three weeks
Thursday, May 30, 2019

Up First

13:29 min | 1 year ago

Thursday, May 30, 2019

"Mulu breaks his silence, but only to repeat his conclusions out loud, Russia interfered in the US election, but we did not ever make a determination as to whether the president did commit a crime. Does that change the Democrats push for impeachment? I'm Noel king here with Rachel Martin. And this is up. I from NPR news. One guy declared himself the rightful leader Venezuela months ago. But nNcholas Maduro is still in charge. Our reporter sits down with Guido for a one on one interview what comes next for his revolution. And the possible health risks of a common weed killer thousands of lawsuits have been filed against the company that makes round up some research connects the product to cancer, other studies don't we just? Evidence differently. These are honest disagreements. What does that mean for the consumers now battling cancer? Stay with us. We'll give you the news you need to start your day. Support for this podcast and the following message come from ZipRecruiter hiring is challenging, but there's one place you can go were hiring is simple and smart. That place is ZipRecruiter, where growing businesses can next to qualified candidates. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash up. I support also comes from Google from Connecticut's, California, from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact after two years of silence special counsel, Robert Muller went before the television cameras and gave his first public remarks yesterday about the Russian mestigation that's right. Muller said the special counsel's report speaks for itself, he doesn't think it's necessary for him to testify in front of congress. But he also used the moment to talk about his findings on whether or not the president obstructed the investigation. If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said, so wait has press secretary, Sarah Sanders responded this way. Bob Muller had determined that there was a crime. He would have had a moral obligation to report it to put that into his report, he didn't for more on this. We're joined by NPR's lead political editor, Domenico Montanaro, Dominica. Is this a case where if it didn't happen on TV it didn't happen? I mean, Robert Muller seemed to just repeat what he had put down on paper in in the special counsel report more than a month ago. Yeah. I mean all that's really very true. I mean, all of this information is not new. It's all in Muller's written report, as you note. But if he's telling the American people, it was in the Email, I sent basically right too many Americans are saying, T, L DR too long. Right. I mean, people, you know, can lament that, but it's just the world we live in the fact is when something is on camera when there is video, it has far more political power. So he again, made clear, the central conclusion Russia interfered in the US election, but he also made clear. Here's report does not exonerate. The president said so explicitly in, in print, the White House keeps insisting falsely that it does of course. But as you note, none of this is new. So is it going to change the debate over impeachment because Democrats keep pushing this? Well, in some ways, it isn't in some ways. It's not a growing. Chorus of presidential candidates yesterday started calling for the start of impeachment proceedings but they're on their own track. They're running for president. They have to win over an activist base. That's different than Nancy Pelosi. The speaker of the house. She's trying to maintain the house majority. And remember that majority was won by mostly moderates, not people in liberal districts, Pelosi's holding firm. She says it's important to gather facts and not have impeachment. If it came to that be a partisan exercise. She told K QA dis Scott Shafer that Muller's comments. I don't really change the path that she set out. We have to have the facts and we would like to have the facts presented in a way to the American people that makes it almost impossible for the Senate to. Exonerate. Right. We'll remember the house does not control this alone. And that's the point. She's trying to make an order to remove a president. Not just impeach won. The Senate has to go along in that Chamberlain controlled by Republicans and not necessarily willing to go along with this, of course. So the House Democrats who are pushing for impeachment, and they know the math doesn't add up for them. So what's their case? I mean, they believe it's important for democracy. I mean, they feel like morally taking the political considerations out of it, that the presidents acted in bad faith that he should be held accountable, and it would set a bad precedent to shirk what they see as Congress's responsibility. But again, take a step back and realize overwhelmingly the people calling for impeachment proceedings are from liberal districts where there's not a lot of political consequences to impeachment. In fact, their constituents want it real quick is Robert Mueller gonna end up on Capitol Hill says he doesn't want to go, but because of the power of the cameras certainly possible that you might have democrat subpoena him to do. So NPR Lee political editor Dominica. Denaro. Thanks to medical. You're welcome. Four months ago. Venezuelan opposition leader, one glide oh, declared himself. President. Then it deal. But Venezuela's current President Nicolas? Maduro says he is still the president Guido has been recognized by millions of Venezuelans by the US and by dozens of other countries as the rightful head of state, but for now Madero is still president, despite Venezuela's deep deep economic crisis appears John, Otis got a rare opportunity. He sat down with one glide oh for an interview that happened yesterday. And John is on the line from Caracas Venezuela now, so John, there's a lot to, to discuss here. There have been first off. We should talk about these negotiations that have been happening in Norway recently. These are some talks to try to settle this power struggle between a Guido and Maduro did Guido tell you give you an update on those talks. Yes. She did why does told me that there had been really no concrete results. The two sides still seem to be very long way apart. Guidos demanding that Medusa step. Down to open the door for free presidential elections. But Madurai just isn't budging that said we talked about how these types of negotiations can take months if not years in process all that is United Somme as young debut. Will we had this this, why does saying here is that Venezuelans don't have the luxury of time that the country's going through a humanitarian crisis? There are people dying every day from lack of food and medicine and that the country really needs to leave now. So one glide L has a close relationship with United States. US officials often say that all options are on the table when it comes to Venezuela, which hints at some kind of possible military action to remove remove Madero if it's that to be necessary, a deguerin talk about that. Well, yeah, I mean just to give you an idea about how close that relationship is our interview with Guido got pushed back a half an hour because he was on the phone. With vice President Mike Pence. Why don't says it's a huge boost to have the US in the opposition's corner. But that does allow president Madero to pant Guido is kind of a puppet of American imperialism. Why do said he would prefer a peaceful solution. But he also said that support for foreign intervention in Venezuela's catching on C lived on kinison. We'll get could he komo's now what he's saying here is that things are so bad, that if you asked most Venezuelans, what's the best way to bring about some kind of regime change? They're going to tell you pretty much by any means necessary, including a US invasion. So what does he do now? He has started this revolution. It seems to be in this kind of stalemate, what's next month of. Yeah. I mean stalemate is exactly what it is. The opposition's had a lot of setbacks just last month. Guido tried and failed to leave military uprising against Modesto. But why does says look, I've only been at this for a few months, any claims that in that time the opposition has become far, stronger, and that he's now recognized as Venezuela's legitimate, head of state by more than fifty countries and that sooner or later, president, Madonna's, just going to have to leave office NPR's, John otas, he got an interview with opposition leader in Venezuela? One glide dough. Thanks so much. We appreciate it. Thank you. All right. The most widely used weed killer, the entire world is round up and roundup has been accused of causing cancer yet. It's there have been three civil cases so far a few weeks ago, a jury awarded two billion dollars to, to people who say the weed killer caused their cancer, thousands of other lawsuits have been filed. And in the meantime, Bayer's share prices dropped by nearly half in the past year. Bear the parent company for round up. So we've got NPR science correspondent, Dan Charles in the studio to talk about this. Hi Dan, a Rachel, so I'm going to venture a guess that a lot of people have seen roundup. You go to the hardware store. Even in, you know, some grocery stores, you can buy roundup. How did it get to be such a such a big deal? There are a couple of things about this that I'd find just fascinating. The one is this is kind of an outgrowth of the controversy over genetically modified crops GMO's? For twenty years. Farmers were spreading roundup on their fields and nobody heard much about it. It was widely seen as one of the safer pesticides. And then genetically modified crops specifically roundup ready crops, which is, you know, crops it we're tolerant to the active ingredient in roundup called glyphosate which meant farmers could plant their crops, spray roundup across the crops, and the crops refined. But the weeds got killed there was a huge increase in the spring of glyphosate or roundup and lots of controversy around GMO's, which translated into lots of scrutiny for this chemical. And what happened was there was an agency of the World, Health Organization, the international agency for research on cancer that then took a look at this chemical and said, we think it probably can cause cancer in humans huge controversy erupted. Is that true? I mean, does it cause cancer. Well, this is the other fascinating thing because the site. Science is pretty murky and you get into these situations where it's a question of who. Do you trust in evaluating the science? So I work the WHO agency. They say probably causes cancer, a bunch of other various authoritative agencies looked at it and basically concluded the opposite looking at somewhat different evidence. Looking at slightly different way. I talked to one of the scientists involved in one of those assessments, Dave Eastman from the university of California riverside. This is what he said, for Meyer eating things, you know, if glyphosate causes cancer, it's pretty weak carcinogen, which means you're going to have to have pretty high doses. Okay. In order to cause so then this goes to trial and juries after decide this Monsanto said, look agency, say it safe. The plaintiff said, don't trust them, and the jury's came out with these humongous verdicts against Monsanto, which is now owned by Bayer. I mean really humongous? Right. Like tens of billions of dollars. What's. Can they can they take that? Can they take that kind of hit everybody, I talked to says this will get settled eventually, but who knows for what amount of money, five billion ten billion twenty billion? We don't know speed price tag, but it's a really important issue. NPR's Dan, Charles for us this morning, Dan. We appreciate it. Thanks for your reporting. Nice to be here. One more story. We're watching this morning comes out of Israel. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has called for new elections. Right. That comes after he missed yesterday's deadline to form a governing coalition. This was a setback that stunned many observers, you can follow that story as it develops on the radio and at NPR dot org. And that is up. I for this Thursday may thirtieth. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm no willed king. We would love it. If you start your day here with us tomorrow, you can subscribe to up, I wherever you listen to podcasts, and it helps the show if you rate us in review us on apple podcasts. And if you're ready for more NPR news, there was a radio show for that very thing you can find NPR's morning edition on your NPR station at stations, NPR dot org. And for podcast local news, headlines, stick, NPR everywhere you go with the MPR one app. You can find it in your store. Mitch McConnell has become a champion for conservatives. But back in the day, he wants got support from groups like labor unions, market, down is one of the worst things I've done what I see you thought about over the years, still think about if time I see a safe, Mitch McConnell new series from embedded subscribe now.

president Venezuela United States Guido NPR cancer nNcholas Maduro Robert Muller NPR Rachel Martin NPR Dan Charles political editor Google glyphosate John otas Madero congress Russia Noel king
Friday 5 October

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:51 min | 1 year ago

Friday 5 October

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the fifth of October twenty eighteen on monocle twenty four the globalist in association with UBS. Live from London. This is the globalist on monocle twenty four. I am Ben Ryland coming up Brazil heads to the hulls. This is very unpredictable because we don't have an official candidate. A government candidate. The president is very weak politically. So every candidate wants to these associate himself with the government. So that's not normal for Brazil will hear from the political editor of the nation's biggest newspaper as one of the most contentious elections in decades gets underway also ahead, democracy in Belarus. It may be early days, but there are signs that the country, many see as Europe's lost dictatorship could be shifting Westwood's and vans. Carta hits the sinuses destined to ask the, but the thing you can do from profile a relatively unknown Austrian politician who wants to steer the country away from the far-right plus the day's business headlines the European newspapers and new space program prepares for liftoff in Bavaria. Yes, that's ahead. Live on the globalist starting now. This Sunday Brazil heads to the polls to vote for the country's next president with the nation reeling from corruption. Probes that have deposed recent leaders with one of those currently in jail and unemployment high, whoever wins will need to bring optimism back to the country, but Brazilians face a stock choice. Leading the race is the hod ride candidate. John Bolsonaro being trailed by phenomenal Haddad on the left who recently joined the contest when it was decided that currently imprisoned former president Louis, it knows Hewlett Silva couldn't run centrists Giraldo men, marina Silva, and Sarraute Gomez make up the rest of the field. In a moment. We'll be hearing from Fabio Zanini political editor at disallow Paulo. But before that we're joined on the line from El Pollo by Monaco's. Fernando, Augusta, Pacheco, Fidel. Thank you for joining us reminders. I, what are the key issues at stake in this election? Well, in terms of issues ban. The main topics is of course the economy. I mean Brazil's living through one of the worst recessions in its history and increasing levels of violence, and it's funny that you mentioned, I mean, who is going to bring optimism back to Brazilians this from what I can few here in some Paulo. At least it's not an election basin optimism. Like, for example, when Lula was voted in two thousand two, there's lot of pessimism in the country, and it seems to me that people are voting, not for the candidate they want, but for the candidate, they don't mind actually winning because, for example, both on IRO, I mean, you know the things that he says, the far-right candidate lot of people. He has a very strong rejection rate among Brazilians, but at the same time, there's the order, a third of Brazilians they're very much willing to vote for him. And the same happens to the candidate for the Workers Party very polarized, not Optima stick at all, and and end the centrist candidates are not doing well at all. Shutout welcome me. Everybody was expecting more. It's got the more time on television, but it didn't work. I think Brazilians are not ready for this type of candidate in this election. And of course we will be televised debate last night, but is it safe to say that at this point in the contest? I mean, look from my perspective, it feels like it's being going on for such a long time. Now, anyway, at this point, we really past the point of really convincing anyone to switch their vote of the views pretty much settled now. The are settle down, but I think ban on Saturday, usually there's the latest poll published in the main newspapers. This poke can change the vote because if if people are saying, okay, my centrist candidate is not going to do well. People are my giving up on their vote and choosing either fair another dodge or your boss on IRO choosing the ones. As I say, the ones that they hate the least. In a strange way. So things can change like they didn't fourteen when people were predicting Dilma Rousseff am I Dina silver to go to the second round? But in the end I asked to navigate phone the right party managed to go to the second round was the very last minute decision, and it can easily will happen this year as well. Orlandi to all eyes will be on the polls come this Saturday, then end of course, Fernanda you have been busy. His speaking with Zannini political editor at dislo Paulo. Brazil's largest newspaper been involved with election coverage sees at least nine hundred ninety six and this is by far the most interesting and probably the most surprising election of all I've covered. For example, the election of Lula of president will in two thousand and two as a reporter. That was a very interesting election. There was the first time the Workers Party is socialist. Left-wing government reached Bauer, but this one is different from everything. This is very unpredictable because we don't have an of. Official candidate, a government candidate, the president is very weak politically. So every candidate wants to these associate herself with a governmental that's not double for Brazil. Always the government has a strong candidate, and this election has been taking place in an environment of disbelief of the population. This trusts a lot politicians. The political class is very unpopular these days, partly because of our corruption probe called LA. Jacques took our wash in English which has decimated part of the political system, and we have this novelty of an outsider candidate. It presented himself as an outsider, bozo and also probably destroy against candidates of the mall is in jail for present Lula. So we have this novelty of an outsider, a right wing candidate and a very strong political figure in jail. And other factors that contribute for this election to be crazy secret Putin. Many people, you know, they look at Brazil and they say, oh, it's a fairly kind of liberal country with its problems. And I do notice that people are surprised the Brazilians are southern turn into very much of a far-right candidate with some extreme views and do think it's because people are very much disillusioned with politics in January, and then they will go for this kind of savior type. Well, first of all, I think this image that Brazil presents abroad of liberal country. It's true, but it's only partially true, maybe Brazilian image of a country of music and carnival and football at cetera, presents Brazil in a distorted image to the world. Yes, Brazilians are ferry relaxed people Brazil's our liberal shell liberal values, especially in the big cities in religion EROs on powered cetera. But there's also another Brazil. Will, which is a huge diverse country. There's a very conservative Brazil's. Well, I have no doubt that the post show this, that the majority of Brazilians have very conservative values in terms of religion, drugs consumption, security laws, crime, punishment, etc. So I think this right-wing voters these right being Brazilians they have only now and debt for me is the biggest questions of why it has taken so long for these Brazilian conservative and right-wing Brasilia's presented themselves as a political force. They are now coming out of the closet. We can say and vote in in droves for also narrow and a few other right-wing candidates. But the thing is, obviously, as I said, they virement of corruption and of rising criminality and maybe the wrought in politics that is perceived by many has contributed for these right-wing resilience to present themselves to show themselves. And to support a candidate s Jay Bruce on this Foley at some European papers will not on European with each youth. Candidate in election, I believe fully doesn't do that is there's a fully tradition or Brazil tradition here in the country. It's true for that has never endorsed any candidate in elections in the past. I don't believe it will do again thing. The tradition will be kept even though if we have a second round with Bozon Naro and another candidate pressure for forty to endorse the abolishment of Bozon will be huge. But Foley, I don't see Foley at changing his position for believes in working in non partisan way and giving space and visibility to our candidates and fully has a very strong tradition of searching impartiality. I'm not saying we always managed to be impartial, but that's our goal. So other Brazil vehicles sometimes endorsed candidates, I remem-. Member. We started some Bal visual magazine endorsing this is the best but fall. It doesn't do. And also it's interesting. We talk about the printed press around the world and its problems. But I think for the, for example, I think many people looking forward to read the Saturday edition of the paper with the latest polls. Perhaps they would even change their minds and we must adhere that you you guys are fully group has data foyer, which has one of the most respected or Pinon polls in the country as well. So do you think Brazilian still enjoy buying the print product or the printed folio on Saturday? Not only printed, but I think I've liked to discuss more different. Yes, definitely. And you mentioned that the foyer, our sister company here they're respected, opinion poll institutes, and it's become a tradition in the last elections, that elections in Brazil always take place on Sundays. It's become a tradition that the previous Saturday afternoon, the latest data fuller bowl arrives in the past. It was print. Only in the Sunday edition today. Obviously, we read it online as soon as we get it and that opinion poll is awaited by millions of Brazilians literally and won't be different this time. This will be the definitive opinion poll. Last election, two thousand sixteen. He was a municipal election. This poll predicted the victory in the first round, for example, of the mayor of some power at the time Joan daughter, which was a huge surprise. Some people are predicting some are hoping in some are dreading the possibility that something similar will happen. This election also narrow maybe to win in the first round, but we'll see, we'll have to eight on Saturday. We'll see how it goes. And I'm sure as millions of Brazilians who be expecting eagerly for this Fabio's any the political editor at they'll sell Paulo, Brazil's largest newspaper. He was speaking to your Monaco's Fernando Augusta, checker. And now here's what else we're keeping an eye on today. Hundreds of demonstrators have been arrested for protesting against Donald Trump's, a supreme court nominee in Washington Republicans say that an f. b. i. report has exonerated, Brad Kavanagh of sexual assault allegations. But Democrats not unreasonably say the inquiry is incomplete and deeply flawed. The gremlin says it needs to study allegations of cyber attacks in the Netherlands in greater detail. Dutch authorities say that Russian intelligence agents attempted to hackley chemical weapons watchdog earlier this year thought most foreign ministry claims the west is attempting to tarnish its reputation and today's monocle minute reports on the various space ambitions. It comes as the state's premier. Marcos Certa says his Christian Social Union plans to invest seven hundred million euros in aerospace. We'll be exploring that story with the astronomer and author Dr David Whitehouse little later here. On today's program. This is the globalist stay tuned. It's just about to hit nine thirteen in men's seven. Thirteen. Here in London Belarus doesn't have much experience with democracy. It's frequently and somewhat mockingly described as Europe's last dictatorship, but is that now changing? It appears that President Alexander Lukashenko is beginning to shun his countries historically cozy relationship with the Kremlin in favor of closer ties with the west while I'm joined now from Albro in Zurich by been a dog, a researcher at the center for security studies at eighty Zurich, he's just written a report on Bella vers and its relationship with its neighbors and also joined here in the studio by Stephen de l. a. Russia analyst who covered the collapse of the Soviet Union for the same, welcome both to the program then. Oh, all stop with you. You couldn't take us back just a little bit in history to tell us how politically speaking Belarus got to where it is now. Most certainly hyphen Zurich. So bellarusse could independent nine hundred ninety one from the Soviet Union without much history of stated before that, and it actually became independent reluctantly. It had always been one of the most Soviet of all the Soviet republics and with a very little sense of an independent and distinct Belarus in nation. So until this day Belarus's maintain much of this Soviet system. For example, today the economy's supposed to be controlled by the state to up to seventy percent, which is staggering. Pretty much a few years after the independence President Lukashenko came to power in the country's last fair elections, and he was a very much campaigning on a pro Russia and anti-corruption ticket. And since then there's been, as you mentioned quite an alignment with Russia. So the two countries are connected through a very dubious union state as they call it, which includes military alliance as well as the free movement of people and of labor. And one has to say economically Belarus system quite well since the end of the Soviet Union as opposed to many other post-soviet countries. And it has remained fairly stable among the six eastern European Eastern Partnership countries of the European Union in the Caucasus and in eastern Europe, Belarus is the only one without a territorial secessionist conflict. So this stability and somewhat economic success. Maintenance of this welfare system that they inherited from the Soviet Union is certainly distinct for the better we're seeing case and explained to us a little bit at the moment. What are some of the signs that we're seeing that that Belarus might be maybe breaking away a little bit from its close ties with Russia. Well, this this quite a few of those and particularly emphasized in twenty fourteen which is the year where Russia started meddling in Ukraine and Belarus, certainly had to re reconsider its strategic alignments of these signs are a few most rhetorical many instances bellarusse has openly criticized Russia for some of its policies. For example, it has not endorsed the annexation of Crimea. It has also introduced a limited visa free regime for for western tourists and visitors, which is quite controversial because of this free movement of people with Russia, Russia as a as a response reinstalled border control at the border with Belarus, which is quite a strong sign by Lewis has also expressed that it is ready to foster economic ties with the west of it more, but I think we should be very careful and people in Europe roles very skeptical towards these moves because much of it has been rhetorics. And there's very little in terms of actual concessions in terms of human rights and democracy. The has been no real improvement in Belarus of any sorts. Stephen deal here in London. Listening to that as Benaud says, a lot of this has been talked, not so much in the actions department, nevertheless has Moscow being critical of some of these hints that might be less at ties with the Kremlin stronger ties with the European Union. Definitely Moscow is is certainly irritated at least and actually quite angry in some parts with actions of Belarus. I think pants one of the most significant signs, outward signs of that early this year was when they had the Zappa eighteen military exercise of. That's that's not the big one that just had in the in the east, which is a stock eighteen, but Zappala eighteen looking towards the west because that's what was up at means which was supposed to what it was a joint excise between the Russian army and elements of the Russian army and. Lukashenko was ignored by Russia. He wasn't invited to the grand opening, and that was a real international snub because Russia very much sees that that Belarus is is effectively a part of it. Indeed, in twenty eleven President Putin may speech saying that actually, we should incorporate Belarus into the Russian federation. It should become another subject to the Russian federation. So I think you've, you've got this interesting game. I agree with everything that Begnaud has said as well. We particularly since two thousand fourteen and it is it was the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of Ukraine by Russia that had President Lukashenko on the one hand worried on the other hand, seeing an opportunity because he was the one who put forward minutes case capital as the place for the talks on resolving the Ukrainian situation. And there have been a couple of supposed- agreements which haven't had a great deal of effect, but they're still called the Minsk agreement. So so been a Bruce has got its name on the map as it were. But I think Lukashenka does see a concern from from Russia. If Ukraine is fifty million people bene- Russa's ten million in if Russia's decided they wanted to take Bela Reuss and make it part of Russia. It'd be very difficult for him to to stop them militarily. And so he his biggest advantage is geography. It's the fact that Bill Rouge is this country that sits between Russia and not only Europe, but now the European Union potent borders on it. And so I think he's he's trying to play something of a clever game, but also he's, he's wary and the Russians are getting very annoyed by this because as far as I concerned bellarusse is there's despite that irritation what is the relationship like between President Lukashenko in Belarus and Vladimir Putin, and it's become pretty frosty I, it was. It was pretty good at first because again, as I said, I mean, you know, at a Reuss return back to the Soviet past one of the symbols. For example, one of the first thing Lukashenko did after he became president in nineteen. Ninety four was that he replaced the post Soviet, built a Russian flag with the Soviet era of yellow, Russian flag as a sign that we're. Those are all routes really. And I, of course, he he's been there longer than President Putin. President Putin came to power was elected president in two thousand. And at first he saw pro Putin. So Lukashenko's a reliable ally. And there'll be a Russian friends, but because of the attitudes Lukashenka's taken since twenty fourteen that personal relationship has become frost. And as I say this ignoring him, the time of these big military exercises was a real public slap in the face been. So again, in Zurich, it has been Belarus has been called Europe's last dictatorship. Do you think that's a fair label for the country? And do you think that that is is perhaps nearing some sort of change. Well to to begin with the most famous person to utter those words was Condoleeza Rice, George W Bush's foreign minister, and she's probably not the least biased person in the world. So to be honest better is is not a dictatorship. It may feel very eerie if you walk through the streets of Minsk because that's few people very wide boulevards all everything is very neatly tidy, but it's certainly not dictatorship. It is authoritarian as in the president has very large power and democracies false, but look is not the state. The state is not entertain a huge propaganda machine there. Awesome. Free media particularly online that can criticize the government and even though there are certain repression, so freedom for semblance. Certainly not a thing. There are no political prisoners, for example, and people are free to travel there. Actually the Schengen champions in the world when it comes to Schengen visa per capita. But there there are small signs of change. I guess sometimes when in two thousand sixteen that you lifted all sanctions. It had been because there has been no strong crackdown against protesters of the regular elections, but there's also setbacks, for example, just earlier this year, a few editors of independent media have been summoned both authorities and question, which was very much seen as intimidating move. So as I said earlier, there's a lot of rhetoric going on, but in terms of actual concessions improving human rights and people's liberties, there's very little going on. And even though there is this move towards Europe that you're very much endorses to some extent despite skepticism, we would really have to wait for actual substance. And if we look at the regime, it is doubtful that that will be very strong improvements in civil liberties or democracy in such. Well, as you note, press freedom is quite a problem in the country just yesterday, we sold the European Paul. Can't pass a resolution that code for Belarus to end all judicial harassment, intimidation and threats towards journalists of Belarus has indeed restricted access to an opposition website. Coda charter ninety seven. Now, of course, the European Union does have a responsibility to stand up full values, such as press freedom. But when it does it also does also risk damaging relations with countries like Belarus, how Begnaud do you think the EU can balance those two opposing situations? That is certainly a tricky one. Do you has made certain moves towards Belarus as in announced that they want to cooperate and technically shoes. For example, they've increased the budget for cooperation within the Eastern Partnership scheme of its eastern neighborhoods and certain publicly certainly publicly have criticized Belarus less than they used to MIT USA very much be this rhetoric of loss dictatorship, even though not in those words and a very heavy criticism against, for example, Belarus exercising the death penalty as well. And I've restricted to basically strengthen better roofs, sober sovereignty, and it stands against Russia. And because the old pouty is have a certain interests to have Belarus slightly less in the Russian camp slightly with more more leeway towards both east and west. They've been ready to do this. But as I mentioned, as long as we don't see actual concessions and actually improvement. Both in the civil sphere as well as in the comics fair where the state control is still very tight. And innovation is very restricted. All parties will be quite hesitant despite this geopolitical endorsement of Belarus, increasing independence and stance in opposition to Russia. In some instances, Stephen de l. I, it is unlikely that country like Belarus will embrace valley value like freedom of speech overnight. But if it were at some point in the near future to embrace a free media freedom of speech, what would it do to its relationship with Russia would worry roughing greatly because Russia relies on it. Sticking to what Russia sees is Russia's values and Russia's values has set by the Kremlin now don't allow for freedom of speech don't allow for genuine political pluralism and I, it's, it's as I mentioned, it's in the geography of the country that makes it so fascinating. I mean, I think it's very good. We're having this discussion because it's it's a place that's often overlooked and yet. Its geography and position in in Europe. And as that link between Russia in Europe could in the future become crucial if either way, if Russia were to take it over and make it a part of Russia, then of course, that would would be seen as an aggressive act by by the west, just as as the invasion of Ukraine was. So that would have a serious affect on international relations. On the other hand, if you're a ruse looks more does become freer look more to the west and does have a free press that gets Russia worried I, it's it's in this position where it can actually have a a, a larger on international relations, and perhaps it's the size of its population might suggest as you say, it's it's unlike the mo- Lukashenka's being there almost almost a quarter of a century. It doesn't look if you're going anywhere soon seems to be very healthy man as well. So he will continue to play this clever game. Mm-hmm. I mean, digital things he's done. For example, when Russia stamped its foot in in response to western sanctions over Ukraine and said, well, we're not going to buy western products. Bill Larousse quietly, imported a whole lot of western products and stuck made in Belarus, product labels on them and percents Russia. Some of this was discovered and it was it was criticized by Putin, but he, he's, he's playing this clever game at the moment and has been says, as long as it doesn't become too liberal too friendly towards the west, which seems unlikely he, he can probably continue playing for now, but there will be times when. Pushing metaphorically slap on the wrist because he certainly doesn't want him getting too close to the west. It is a very interesting case. Stephen DL here in London and Benno SOG in Iraq bureau. Thank you both for joining us here on the globalist. Bs has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different. Over nine hundred of the shop is maulings on freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. No one is more the one though small find out how we can help you contact us at UBS dot com. Twenty seven minutes past the hour. This is the globalist on Monaco twenty full well tweak Australia, social, Democratic Party appointed a new chafe. Following the resignation of the former chancellor Christian Kern. The party's new leader Pamela Renae wagon is a relative newcomer with not an awful lot of political experience. So how did she do it? His monocle Alexei, Corey love in Vienna. The I leave again. No. Sin can also defy me biggish vamps in Costa here to scientist to stay the night, then you can function Pamela Andy Wagner speaking at a meeting of the Austrian Social Democrats last week setting out plans for a better Farrow Australia. When they spend via weekly cliqueish here to San for on chef Islas. Women can achieve anything. She says. Self as a good example. Virtual unknown just a few months ago today. She's one of the most recognized women politicians in Australia and the fast female leader of the Australian social Democrats to boot. How did she get yen? Yen under on to get the domino town, bugging out for INA, Botha I just missed the boondocks. Canceling that we're going from yet a Michigan snowing and found minister enforce logging moosh side. Handed success story began in March last year when she was an expectedly appointed minister for health. The decision raised eyebrows both in the Australian medium and inside the ministry itself, even though should lead one administered departments for several years. She was more of a physician than politician while she equal to the task. As it happened, she didn't have much time to prove a snap general election in October brought about a change of government, the social Democrats, and then ministers were out. With a new coalition government of conservatives and far-right and Wagner went into opposition and took up a seat in parliament where she quickly became the number two social Democratic Party behind the former chancellor, Christine, Ken, and then two weeks ago is shift. He's still unkowns state often birth to count announced his resignation, making any Wagner. Number one. The the spear for Pamela rain can baton knife. Again, just like last year commentators wandering. She opted jump bay. Miller is as Finnan stabby in an immediate action. I bet. And all the rest of the party fall into step with solo is tearing the Barkman Vitas when it candidat in us that we're Bannon middle Sheesh and gets in the to the past two is. The biggest question is, well, she succeeded ten central Democrats power in Australia. Will she stop the fiery right wing populism and the statement holding his country flown shop Islas. Women can achieve anything. Monocle in Vienna, an corridor. Thank you. Alexei. You're listening to the globalist. And at seven thirty one here in London. It's time to review today's newspapers. I'm joined in the studio by Alison would who is a consultant at control risks Ellison. Thanks for jumping in and I up going to the front page of the FDA because as we'll, I'm, I'm sure will surprise very few. We've got a Russia on the front page day, and it is the story regarding these claims of of cyberattacks. Yes, exactly. So we've had a case where a group of hackers has essentially by in caught red-handed. I'm trying to hack organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons, which is interesting because Russia, of course, has been accused of using chemical weapons recently or in the past rather. And they've also been accused of hacking number sports agencies as well. And I think was interesting here is that we're seeing increasing coordination across governments to really sort of combat Russian interference in organizations like this. So in this case it was a cooperate. In between US and Dutch officials that led to the apprehension is this over to be said about the tactics used because it is quite curious when I was looking into how this attempted attack was going to take place. It does feel quite old fashioned the the tactics used hovering outside in a car and using machinery with with a b area attached to it. It's not exactly the most shall we say contemporary way to launch a cyberattack. Yeah, I think you know, we've seen a number of fairly braised operations by Russian intelligence over the past several months, and I think it does. It does kind of strike, you know, one as a bit curious that they were so conspicuous about the way in which they went about it. And and on the one hand, you know, I think a lot of Putin is, of course very calculating figure and kind of strikes me that is perhaps not entirely mistake that they use these types of techniques, but obviously they weren't successful in that she's in their their end of check. So, yeah, I think what we will see though is is continued pressure on Russia as a result of these types of activities. Interesting to hear the retaliation from will. The response from from Russia was that of this is simply the west again, trying to punish the reputation given what we've seen in recent years, even going back to 'em age seventeen. The reputation doesn't seem to be quite there anymore. Yeah, I think that's a, that's a tough argument to make at this point. Let's move along now to the times of got page ten of the times most buying going on this time. China's in the spotlight. Yeah, exactly. So this was a case where sort of chips, chips made from China where suspected have been sent for computers that were destined for the Pentagon. So essentially concerns that these chips would allow sort of the end users to monitor and even take control of these computers and that they were sort of, you know, the end consumer was the Pentagon, obviously raised a lot of concerns. And this I, you know, also comes amid common set. Mike Pence made as well. I've leave yesterday about concerns over Chinese interference in the US midterm election. So I think just amid the sort of ongoing trade war between the US and China vice president Pence, his comments about sort of this interference and and now the story about chips. I think we really do see, you know, increasing tensions between the US and China on both sort of political and ideological levels wells that comic levels. Well, we'll, it was quite a few years ago that these strange government stopped hallway from taking over a government contract due to national security concerns in that that ruffled quite a few feathers. Of course, it wasn't the only government to block hallway for him from taking some business. But I mean, the article here in the time today explains that the microchips will reportedly also inserted into computer serve as used by thirty American companies, including apple and. Amazon's this is quite an extraordinarily lodge project that was really underway here. Exactly. And it looks like the sort of it's one of those cases where the company, the immediate company that was contracted was based in California, but it was the subcontracting serve down the supply chain where these ships might have come into play. So you then kind of start to have to wonder is, is there going to be more attention or even regulation with regards to sort of that supply chain for these types of products where you know there's an increasing national security concern about the potential for spyware living over to the guardian now, and we've got something completely different protests of the minimum wage. Yes. So I thought this was was interesting kind of as a change of pace from the espionage themed articles. We've been talking about this morning and also struck me as interesting given that this has been an ongoing issue in the US as well. You've seen increasing women's across a variety of states to push for a minimum wage for workers in places like fast food restaurants. Sort of, you know, hourly wage workers, I guess. And I think it's it's a reflection on the sort of rising cost of living in a lot of countries. The reality of sort of I s I could omic opportunities for people with limited education, and I think it will be interesting particularly in the context of Brexit and and a lot of say immigrants that are working in these positions how this debate will play out over the next couple of years. Well, certainly when a when you talk about the rising cost of living, perhaps unsurprising that it's taken place he in London of the the image here in the guardian and today on page five is some protesters in less to square. So certainly one of the most visible places you can possibly be in this city, but look given the current climate for these sorts of debates. It really has become quite a bad look for any company to be underpaying. Staff has an, I think it's become a bad look. But I think also it's if you speak to small businesses, it's it's also kind of a challenge. I think. In some cases, I think the argument is stronger when you have these multinational companies that are employing people for very low wages. I know one debate that's been raised in the US is that it's really limited the ability of employers there to say, employees part time workers, or you know, teenagers over the summer of this type of thing. So I think it's one of those things that the debate is perhaps more nuanced sometimes than it is on the very surface of those headlines. Well, let's move a staying in the guardian. However, insect allies or enemies is the headline here. US research raises fears of foul play. So this is regarding insects as biological weapons. I just thought this sort of science angle of this was fascinating. The fact that there is a project whereby they were trying to use insects too, I guess pollinate genetically modified crops, and there's concern that this technology could be used for two to spread chemical or biological weapons. And I think that this is, you know. I, you know, I do think this just highlight sort of the role of, you know, science and technology and how in concerns over how sort of new animation can be used for nefarious means, and how do you balance that? I, I don't know. It was just a sort of fascinating development in that world. I thought this is one of those articles that I start reading, and my brain starts to extend up to explain it to me when we have much time just before we wrap I do when I touch on this other article, you have found that back in the times today, although it is reported in a few different newspapers as well. This is quite a festering case of an interview that went awry because drew Barrymore was allegedly interviewed full, the inflight magazine of Egypt f- but then it turned out that perhaps she wasn't interviewed, tell us more about this one. Well, yes, this is quite a bizarre article that was covered in Egypt, Mary Eggesin and it basically, you know, has drew Barrymore sane in the interview that she's had completely dysfunctional relationships that she's in Cape. Table of sort of having any sort of long-term relationship with anyone. It's just a string of very bizarre comments that that just you look at it and think this can't be real. And in fact, she's, she's, she's disclaimed it as being true. I think though one of the interesting sidebars, the story is one of the individuals that broke the story on Twitter is actually sort of a journalist and researcher that's been working in Yemen for years, and someone who I followed in that context in his reaction was sort of, you know, I've been tweeting about Yemen for years, and this story has gotten, you know, almost as many hits as anything I've ever published in twenty hours or whatever it is. Well, not surprised. I have to say it is completely surreal to read this piece. I mean, part of the reason for that allegedly is because it was a written originally in Arabic and then translated back into English. So it does feel as though drew Barrymore speaking in broken English, but some of the claims here and apparently it was actually stitched together by comments you've made at press. Conferences. So the journalists never actually did speak to drew Barrymore at all. Yeah, exactly. And it just it's bit nonsensical. I mean, I'm having trouble describing it because it's so sort of off the wall. I'd encourage listeners to to look it up for themselves if they wanna laugh this morning, don't worry if you do need to read that interview with drew Barrymore. You don't need to buy ticket on Egypt Air at made it and has made it into pretty much every newspaper this morning, Alison would thank you very much for joining us today with newspapers still to come on the program. Bosnia Herzegovina election the business headlines and various plan to join the space race. Yes, that's right. You heard me correctly Bavaria. You're listening to the globalist. Did you Bs as global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of people. We bring fresh thinking in perspective to our work, and we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for Clinton's. It's about having the rights ideas, of course, but it was time about having one of the most company systems and unrivaled network of global experts. That's why at UBS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. June in weekly to the bulletin with UBS for all the latest insights and opinions from UBS and experts from around the world. Seven forty one here in London. This is the globalist. Brazil isn't the only nation heading to the polls. This weekend, the three and a half million people who make up the ethnically diverse population of Bosnia. Herzegovina will also be costing their ballots and the divisive issues that dominated the bloody wool there in the nineteen nineties are expected to be looming lodge. I'm joined on the line by Monaco's Balkans correspondent guide, Delaunay guy. What are the difficulties facing the elections themselves? Let's speculation of election fraud and some of that's been confirmed to balance it because the electoral commission has been ruling out thousands of applications for absentee ballots. If I'd almost ten thousand of those ruled out so forth. Various reasons of the people couldn't be confirmed that in terms of our identity or dress, and you can extrapolate something else from the figures of people have been registering last time round in two thousand fourteen forty, two thousand people registered for. Postal votes this time that numbers more than doubled. So this is raising a lot of red flags and the being instances already, which have been documented of people checking out whether they're registered to vote and finding out that somebody has already registered for them claiming that they live in, for example, Austria or Serbia countries, which those people who have genuine air entitled to vote actually don't live in. So the loss of people trying to own hair, it would seem vegetarian somebody else's name and hoping that that person isn't bothering to vote and the this is an avid obviously to to swing the ballots in particular ways. We don't know who's behind it, but it's clear that it's going on. There's also a problem then with the electoral law at self, constitutional court of Bosnia has ruled the parts of that law IRA legal at did two years ago, but parliament never around to amending the legislation Posner being Bosnia, and this could cause problems inflammation of the government's both on the national level. And in the federation, which is the half of Bosnia in which most of the ethnic Bosniaks and Croats live. We don't know how this is going to pan out at could be extremely sticky, some serious concerns there, but nonetheless, the vote will take place guy. What are the issues that you think people will be voting on this election? Well, a National Democratic Institute poll confirmed. I think what pretty much anybody who goes to me on a regular basis with Talia, that demand a unemployment corruption that electical situation and the outflow of the population. Now, this is interesting because I think pretty much anybody who's got a choice or chance in Bosnia leaves. So if you're an ethnic Croat, for example, you've got the possibility of getting Croatian passport. Well, people, especially young people. Take advantage of that. The Croatian passport and and off they go into the European Union. We've had five percent of the population leaving over the last five years. That's one hundred and seventy thousand people. More than eighty percent of those who asked say that they would leave together broad for work if they could. That's not surprising bearing a mind, an official employment rate of twenty percent, which rises to forty percent. Among the I've seen figures as high as sixty percent for youth unemployment from reputable sources there. It's quite desperate for people in Bosnia to be Frank. And in I really, honestly, I'd be leading the listeners down the garden path of I said that I thought this election was going to change any of that or if there's an angel among any of these figures who is standing for election, who is against represent a beacon of hope for the people of pulse Manta to governor. He doesn't paint a very good picture of any of the aspirations of this election, but guy as I understand that it is also a fairly complex process to to elect the representatives that really are up for election this time. As I understand that there are three separate presidencies well, as. It gets terribly complicated. You can actually say this, this five or three presidents of Bosnia, depending on how you count it. So on the national level, there is a presidency with three seats. One, each of the main ethnic grapes Croat Bosniak and Serb, and each of those takes turn for eight months in in being the president and to just rotate. So they get to goes eight months in a four year cycle. The issue of this of course is if you don't identify yourself as a Croat Bosniak all Serb your disenfranchised, which is not great if you call yourself just for example, Bosnian or of you. Have your happened to be the Jewish, you'll romance Nick rapes, and this is a case which is ongoing, and the European Union wants that to be fixed. But there's also presidents of Republika Srpska which is part of Bosnian, which most ethnic Serbs left the presidency of the federation. As we mentioned before, this ten cantons in the federation, each of which has a prime minister. There's also Birch co district, which is co, governor. Nd by Republika Srpska and the federation, I think all in all when I ended up this five presidents fourteen prime minister's and just one whole load of Kales guy. It sounds like a fairly confusing situation. Do you have any predictions on how am I go? Nothing will change. I mean, the basic thing is that might be a little bit of musical Chaz. So for example, in the presidency, the one to watch here is where the Milorad Dodik who is the currently the president of Republika Srpska and has become the bogeyman of the west because of his constant agitation for the secession of Republika Srpska whether he can gain the seat in the national presidency from from from Vanna veg. I who is generally considered to be one of the more reasonable ethnic Serb politicians in in the country. That's one to watch. I mean, another one to watch might be how well gel com shish does. He's an interesting guy. His parents were one was a Croat was. A Serb and he's married to Bosniak. So he's one of the very few people in the country who can actually stand and say, I represent all ethnicities and, and really mean it and he's standing for the Croat seat in the presidency in another quirk of the electoral system, both Bosniaks and Croats convoked for the Croat member of the presidency if they won't take. I think there's a fairly good chance that he could take that seat and he said, there are no beacons of hope. He's about as close as you're going to get to it. Monaco's Balkans correspondent at Guidolin. Thank you for joining us. It is seven forty eight here in London time to talk business. Now I'm joined on the line by the financial analyst Louise Kupa ways. I, we were discussing this in some detail in the newspapers, but tell us more about it because there are some concerns over China infiltrating US hardware with these are hardware hacks. Yes. So Hsieh's in the Chinese hardware mak- PC may Cologne ovo fell foul up to twenty three percent in Hong Kong. Last time I looked about fifteen minutes ago. They were down about fourteen percent because the question is if there has been this hard wet heart hardware hack, and it has to be said, everyone denies it, but Bloomberg's seemed pretty confident they've got the data that if it has been hardware, why would you buy your from Lenovo now? Clearly, my personal PC is slightly different than PC's and service from Amazon and apple and government agencies like the CIA, the defense department of defense and navy warships, but it is really quite. Concerning these these service, these motherboards, these tiny, tiny chips. You know, who knows? It's very difficult to compare them to. To the design should be. So they just increases concerns about supply chain safety. And like I said, shares of eight of actually quite a lot of Asian technology companies are fooling on the back of this because there's, you know, given you've got Trump in the White House, the bigger Trump's fight against China of trade. This just plays to what Trump has been saying for quite some time. Absolutely Louise, let's move on because this will surprise no-one. Elon Musk is in the news again. Oh, I do try to go days without talking about eight on Moscow Donald Trump, but it is quite difficult. So just to take you back, tesla share price fell massively last week SEC the American referential regulator find Elon Musk, twenty million dollars over the weekend and said, you can't be chairman because you pretended to have this private by that was going to buy the whole of tesla and actually didn't have enough information. So we're gonna find you. We're gonna tell you off. So that was wasn't the weekend. Now what we four days later. Okay. They said it was any Thursday he did this. He started to tweet again, please on us. I really don't think tweeting is a good idea because shampoo of tesla fell two or three percent even. So he now has dubbed the American financial regulator, the SEC, the short seller enrichment commission. So shortsellers those who are betting on tesla Shep is fooling. And he's saying that the SEC the big financial powerful regulator in the states is basically helping those who have a dim view of tesla. Imagine the SEC. We'll take a while the dim view of this because one of the agreements for the settlement last weekend was that he wouldn't deny any wrongdoing. I also imagine it probably means not taking to Twitter to slack the regulator of as well. So I, I, you know, I mean, it was a great quote from one of tesla shareholders who basically said he ought to pay attention to manufacturing cars instead of Twitter. What can you say? I mean, truly extraordinary. I mean. We sort of like point extorting, but on the same time, one does wonder about the man's mental health. I mean, he's clearly being told keep off Twitter behave yourself. It's cost you twenty million quid your your last ridiculous tweet pleased, and he keeps each just does what he wants to do. So. You know, I imagine tesla shout is going to be pretty unhappy yet again, his Twitter antics, yes, you've only all the world's belligerent and powerful men state of Twitter Louise only got a few a few seconds left, but I want to jump to this story about the UK supermarket chain chose apparently pledging to unpack you'll groceries when you're out not the first market to come up with the idea, but certainly it's an exciting prospect, isn't it when it is that they're going to trial in south London. I live and Trump in south London, very exciting. Although right choice is very expensive and they can. They can working with Yale locks so that they have a little delivery. Drivers has sort of smart lock technology that opens your door. And then it's only for one for one trip in makes me wonder if that if the delivery driver close the door behind behind him, he'll delivered half the food and then having it'll, it'll. Cameron his chest to show the only doing is unpacking your groceries and not rifling through your underwear drawer. So so if that is encouraging. But my issue with this is way it sounds wonderful. Balan packing groceries is what happens if he puts the mayonnaise in the wrong place. I put my mayonnaise in the fridge. There was a particular shelf, but my baked beans might choose to goes next to my beans. So it sounds like a great idea. But to me, I like to put my voice threes on what even even. I see. So for those who are even more particular about me, how's that going to work? Geneva little messages baked beans here. It might be quicker just to do it yourself. Yeah, I can imagine getting home and not being able to find anything. It'd be an absolute nightmare. Oh, well, white chose did try to make lives easier, so we're going to give them. Thanks for that. Louise's Kupa. Thank you very much for joining us. We today's business, you're listening to the globalist. It's eight fifty three in Munich. Seven fifty. Three here in London. Today is Bavaria planning to enter the space race. It might seem like a bizarre proposition. But according to the verion premia Marcus soda, it could help boost the German powerhouses sizable aerospace industry. Well, joining me on the line is the space scientists and author Dr David Whitehouse, David, first question that springs to mind when I read all of this was why. Won't. Yes. He Sydney was lambasted a bit for for this weird Noga. We had for Bavaria one his name for the region space agency, but there's a. It's not quite as laughable that you would think because as you intimated Bavaria is one of Germany's industrial and indeed the world's space, powerhouses aerospace. And if all it after Seattle will they'd be lots of brains and after to lose where they build lots of satellites purveyor is like next enlist because of the the space activities, high-tech space companies it's got like, come Abbas aids MTV, I think to ten billion of the local economy and sixty five thousand people employed. So if he's saying not so much, we want to vary in space agency and that would annoy the German space agency and the European Space Agency. But if he's just saying, this is a new effort, this is our program. This is drive now to bring more space to this profitable area. Then it's not quite as much of a joke as that may seem at first, of course. You mentioned some of the other perhaps aviation markets that we've that we know Seattle is one of the ones you mentioned. And we often think of of that is really something that is a domestic issue. We've got certain regions who who build certain types of equipment, but when it comes to space, that's always been considered a national interest as the United States really leading the way and and Russia launching their their space program as well. Is this a sign that we need to start thinking of aerospace really is something that is much more approachable for for small amounts now, wound of couse where you get nothing. He space the very sensitive major space centers for the European Space Agency building satellites and trucking, etcetera, but aerospace, the wide aeroplanes, etc. Will you have that type of industry concentrated? Oh, you tried to make an effort to bring more to it? Of course, it's not so. Much in the building the aircraft, whereas the the hanging aircraft with with jobs in the money comes from, it's it's all the Ansari industries, all the support industries, which number in the tens of thousands of businesses to support the building of one aircraft. So he's trying actually to. So the seed to improve what is very successful region. And he said that, yes, we have a successful region. He believes it can be more successful is interested in space because, yes, there are new markets emerging in space for small satellites for more regional development. But of course that together with these huge multinational, multi continent ever plane products. He could be, you know, improving big economy factor in his region dramatically over the next twenty years. When this story broke the therein premium knocker said attract quite a bit of attention as you stated earlier. And, and he certainly put his name and he's. On the international news cycle for a little while, how much of this do you think was about good pay and how much is a credible idea, a vision for what the future of Averia could hold. We should mention that he he wants not only a space program, but also varies hyperloop track. Now. Hyperloop is very interesting because that technology is doing a lot better than people thought it would. This is the day where you could have a railway if you like transport vehicles in a tube and you evacuate the tube, you put a vacuum in the tube. So he's able to travel without friction of resistance, and that technology was thought to be very difficult. But I think one of the things that Elon Musk Lind as showing in that particular field is that actually they make strides with that. So the idea of having a European research center into this hyper loop, transport technology equivalent to what's happening America does actually make sense if you've got the high tech industry. To support that, but you're quite right. He faces election and although he, you know, he's a politician. He likes not only the publicity but also to sow the seed of the dream. And what else? What else could politician differs region than say, where success in aerospace will be more of success in aerospace, there'll be more jobs. I'm sure that while he wants that he's a, whereas that's vote seller as well date his shooting for the moon, duck Ed White House. Thank you very much for joining us on the globalist. That's all today's show on this Friday. Thanks to our producers, Tom hall and Reese. James researches page Reynolds, Barbara, my Mona and Martha liberty as Judea manager. Sam n. p. as well after the headlines there is some music on the way with the continental shift. Stay tuned full. The briefing that's going live at midday here in London, seven AM. If you're listening in New York City, I'm Ben Ryland. Thank you for joining us and enjoy your weekend.

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Michael McCord & End Times

Two Broads Talking Politics

36:38 min | 1 year ago

Michael McCord & End Times

"Hi this is jane from nashville and you're listening to two bras talking politics yeah hey everyone this is kelly with two brads talking politics and today i am excited to be talking to michael mccord who is a former political editor and columnist an award-winning journalist and a writer has written a new book called n times more great adventures in real america hi michael south dade kelly how you doing. I'm doing great so uh-huh and time seems like a pretty appropriate title at the moment because it's somehow it. All you know it all comes out. The intersection of construction is becoming perilously unknown right. Now yeah for sure so i want to dive into that but maybe we could start with just sort of a little bit of background about you. Tell us a little bit about your your history writing about politics and and then later decided to get into fiction writing. I am a native west coaster. I was born in the state of washington grew up in las vegas during the final days of of mob control of casino so that was a very interesting environment to grow up in <hes> i was in the military <hes> i was in military intelligence branch <hes> and so you can only imagine how amazing it was. You know forty plus years later. <hes> you know i had worked hard with many many hundred thousands of others to kind of keep the k._g._b. And the g. r. u. Day and in in eastern europe and <hes> and now they're just invited in as if they're esteemed guests so so you can imagine how that have that kind of made me feel. I began my first presidential. Primary covered has a student newspaper editor editor in nineteen eighty that was the primary where <hes> ronald reagan one new hampshire now with my first one and covered seven of them cents and as i went through various career phases and i ended up my final full-time <hes> gig was with the fourteenth details i was there <hes> political editors and columnists and anti covered my last fall election was two thousand eight <hes> <hes> between you know the battle between pro and hillary clinton's office mccain who who made quite some back yeah that year so oh i and then i continued to free rancher. That's what i've been doing for the past decade here in new hampshire and as a business writer economics writer and also a little bit. It's <hes> on the political side. My last <hes> on campaign good i covered was congressional campaign here in new hampshire in two thousand twelve and and <hes> that's when i started making the transition into fiction i mentioned on my website. I wrote an essay creating real uh-huh america in which i talked about how i came. I was becoming increasingly concerned. About where the country was this a decade ago. I hate cover to cover a a couple of the key party rallies here in new hampshire and i was appalled. <hes> i was appalled by the level of vitriol all i was appalled by the kind of fantasy land that <hes> the tea party protesters you know we're living in and that was fueled at the time you know oh by fox news but it was also rush limbaugh and it was also a congress which with dedicated to to total obstructionism to everything that obama was trying flint do and i started thinking and i i was i was a history graduate students at the university after many years ago and i started thinking talking about my studies in american political history and the kind of ebb and flow that you get with this and i thought this is pretty unique period and for one of the things i didn't want to do is nobody needed another book about what was wrong with kansas or texas or whatever so i wanted to take a a fictional roots and a satirical i'd always wanted to write a satire and so i began creating real america and what would happen just imagine if the country went politically bonkers and it was based on my belief that the republican party had given up governing <hes> it'd been building you know <hes> since the reagan era but it really accelerated during the newt gingrich era they were more interested in tax and right wing judges and not doing much else and that nihilism i thought was a very dangerous <hes> quality to have any democracy. That's far more more fragile than we think it is. Yeah i think a lot of us maybe weren't paying as close attention as you were and and didn't realize quite how fragile it was is but it's pretty obvious now just how how fragile everything was and you know i i think we we saw that towards the end of barack obama's presidency agency it seemed like all the republicans were interested in was obstructing anything that obama wanted to do and then when trump was elected and they suddenly had three branches <hes> you know it was like the dog who cut the car and they didn't know what to do with it. I have a pretty good. I believe that they knew exactly what to do with it and it was it was going to be you know tax cuts right wing judges and then essentially destroying everything not just obama. I'm good but going back to the new deal of franklin roosevelt and i believe that that was that was the intent all along. I mean it goes back to ronald reagan talking about welfare queens. It goes back to richard nixon southern strategy. You know it's been there in the d._n._a. Are long and and <hes> in a sense trump was the republicans frankenstein. They traded him. <hes> they created the environment for him to essentially prospers and <hes> so if years ago i was i was the keynote speaker at hampshire progressive <hes> summit and this was the year after the two thousand twelve election and people were feeling pretty good about themselves and for good reason well i had written this book that <hes> the first book in my real america saga the execution channel a political fable. Which was you know pretty. Dark pretty wild pretty very satirical and essentially i gave i i told them that. I think that your optimism might be just a little bit <hes> on the wild side <hes> because i don't think you know what's coming not that i knew exactly what was coming but i don't think they they they thought it was the normal political ebb and flow and i thought that this is distinct what was happening. Has what happened in the years before the civil war. When things is it was it was a political pasta. Just can't oiling. You couldn't really see it but you knew what was happening. Because the rhetoric was becoming more partisans it was far more intense and one political party again as i've said many times he gave up on governing which is a very dangerous thing and then they stay in power. You have these things like i citizens united <hes> that's spring court and then the holder decision which essentially got into the voting rights act and gave way to <hes> voter suppression crush that we haven't seen since the jim crow era. I thought those things were coming down. The pike because republicans knew that with the changing demographics in the country country <hes> there was no way they can stay in power on unless they had like the solid south and then the talk. It's like wisconsin and michigan under pennsylvania <hes> that that that they could be both work against the changing demographics. I mean a far more diverse country than we've ever had before and i thought that combination of racism and kind of appreciation for authoritarian need and practices was dangerous and so i said at this in the speech that i gave i said that it's not gonna be easy. You think isn't gonna turn blue right away. It might turn blue by the end of the decade but it's certainly not gonna turn blue in two thousand fourteen or two thousand sixteen. There were just too many institutional <hes> barriers in place and the republicans was counting determine. Keep them in place. So <unk> has the reception to your books changed from the the first book in twenty thirteen to two now the second book in twenty nineteen. You know it seems like if you had had handed me your first book in twenty thirteen. I would have thought oh this is so far fetched. This is so crazy and and now it's like well. It's it's almost not crazy enough <laughter> well when in two thousand sixteen it had a cult following <hes> because it was kinda crazy like an occurred kurt vonnegut way and <hes> but it was a had a political edge to it and people are saying oh this is wild visit kooky and this buoy character you created you know who who is proud of ignorance and incoherence and his drive for power <hes> you know it's just too much and it's funny but you you know it can't happen here and and then over the past couple of years and especially since trump was elected. I've had readers just reach out unsolicited to me and sent me emails. I said wow that was happening and i said i didn't predict trump now. That's a that's a unique phenomenon in its its own right but i get predict in many ways about <hes>. You know a country going off the rails. You know what could happen now now. The second book is it's really cutting close. I one reader a semi. Anybody said you know this book is pretty psychologically disturbing which i kept at the compliment <hes> because it's meant to shock you say i would. I'm saying this isn't what's going to happen. This is like an alternative. Give unit universe of what could happen you know with all the madness and i believe that we're closer than ever to country having some kind of split it won't be like a civil the war but i think we we are in the midst of a civil war and we don't quite see it yet and i think there's civil wars between sane and insane america and i think that the readers now that are reading this kind of see this and see what's happening so what i did. I created a different second in books for the second part of the real american saga in which there is a resistance as you as you must've seen in the book and you know they are fighting back against this because buoy who is now the leader of of a real america they slip and now the a new the old country is called u._s._a. Which is kind of <hes> stunned that this could happen and <hes> can. I read something from the buck kind of explains it sherry at least two yeah well. This is a this is one of my favorite characters who is <hes> you know ah penelope the psychic and she is she is the leader of the resistance and <hes> and what are the things that you know make sure unique is that she's not your typical <hes> resistance leader either politically or militarily. She's a con artist and has been oliver life but this is kind of a crazy time which requires crazy you know which requires you know <hes> <hes> off-the-wall solutions and so one of the things that happens is. I think it's in chapter three is that she meets with british agent who is trying to figure out what's going on a real america. These militias are taking over <hes> the order is is literally being either chills or exile and and <hes> you know and so he was right there in the middle of it she was running a a psychic salon right in the middle of the real america rebellion for instance southern california and so you know one of the <hes> you know one of the things that that i said that she says to the <hes> pretty pretty station is that this was different and people can see it coming. She's a transplant either way. She's a transplanted german who grew up in east germany and she saw odd. You know the the follows. The mall collapse it for country and so what she said to the british agent is this only only this was different. This was violent political pot that has been simmering for years seventy boiling over it never imagined anything could change as they community work control their your kids to soccer practices or cozied up nightly home with their digital toys. The crews were as clear as day can meet but i'm predisposed to detect political faster. I lived at these typically complacent. Americans students assume stability and democracy were given like oxygen by the time they paid attention. It was too late and so in that passage she's time explains how the country fell apart. People just could not see what was happening because they couldn't believe it. They didn't trust what they were hearing or. Just you know they just assume that what happened. Yesterday was going to happen tomorrow so you think that <hes> so that was certainly the case before trump. I think we were certainly headed that way. Do you think that's still the case that people still still aren't seeing what's happening aren't believing what's happening sadly. I i think that <hes> that is the case. Now that doesn't mean especially after we had the women's march you know right after the inauguration and we've had plenty of of marches and in this no social media <hes> you know <hes> engagement is very strong but i still believe remember forty americans vote in the last election and i'm very curious to see what's going to happen in the next election and i still think that there's a huge. It's chunk of this country. That doesn't realize what's going on. <hes> you know you know regarding the regarding the <hes> what what the trump administration is doing administratively what they're doing to the environment <hes> what what they're doing to farmers with the sheriff's with doing immigrants <hes> we are and and the the republican party is complete pitch situation on this is dangerous. 'cause there's nothing stopping him. Except you know the resistance you know that we see and and hopefully the democratic party you know real become got both work. You know against that <hes> after twenty twenty but i'm still not convinced and we'll have to see the election about what's gonna happen. I'm far more pessimistic in. I don't like to admit this but i'm far more pessimistic. Go in two thousand and thirteen and i think part of it is for good reason but i think that there is a huge chunk of this country. Maybe up to forty forty five percents that are that. Are you know <hes> they don't let trump but you know they. They don't mind him and i think that complacency patience is is as dangerous as the nihilism of republican party which i think is evolved into or devolve depending on your perspective in through national crime to adjust call. Why did you choose to make your protagonist a con artist you know do you think that that is the kind of personality the that we need right now to get us out of this mess or she role in i in in the first book and <hes> you know one of the things that one of the many plots with that i put into this one is that it's actually the british come to our rescue you know in this one and they take the lead in trying to save america from itself and y you know which i thought was a nice historical twists and she has capabilities you know because the plot is actually a plot here about how the resistance works and it brings brings in a lot of the information warfare stuff that we saw in the two thousand sixteen election. I'm sure you noticed you know to create these allusions of things that are happening that may may or may not be happening and so- penelope were meant to be a kind of a. She is a con artist but she's not a meanwhile. She is a very she professional and <hes> what they need is is someone who can who can deal with the disinformation information on all the conspiracy theory and all the lies and and stuff is coming from real america they need someone who can kind of either deciphered deciphered quickly and youth or ignore it and just you know bullhead forward <hes> to get the job done to to <hes> upstage and weakened buoy and his followers you know in real america <hes> you know and i created this army kachimuqam mutuel resistance front and <hes> you know she since we the head of it but there are many people involved and she's a natural reader because because she knows how she knows how to create a new <hes> the reality that's necessary to come to touch me about figuring out how in the world world to write satire when things are so crazy i suspect joking the other day that all the editors of the onion have just resigned in discussed because they don't know how to top you know this this attempt to buy greenland would you how how do you possibly write satire when the whole world feels like satire well one of the things you do. Is you know i started this years ago with him. As a main character <hes> <hes> you know my emperor supreme for life <hes> bluey you know who was who was this larger than life character that i actually created that a five or six different not one you know i guess he led the indus oh caucus in congress i ha- i had to create that that was just as i was getting so he was kind of a a a he was meant. You know to be the you know the new standard for what the republican party now the real america party you know <hes> with your summit was was meant to be i i just kept pushing forward and tried to make hits ranger so of course giving an and it's especially almost shocking to me is that i create when i created the outline for this book i the plan for a revival of slavery and essentially this was like political slavery or people who sold themselves into slavery because they were <hes> because they did not have the proper citizenship or they were four <hes>. I you know created that like five years ago and then when you hear you know what's happening with the sixteen nineteen project and the reaction to it and then you have this kind of revisionism on the <hes> you know confederate ateret finches about well slavery. What's that bad you know. <hes> you know they got free room and board and vocational training you know it was it was it it was the way to help the country and stuff like that and so it's kind of shocking but i meant slavery viable which would draw informed and huge <hes> investors around the world <hes> has has a satirical <hes> point of like there is no bottom there can hamby no bottom recycling history over and over again and <hes> so you just have to keep pushing forward and to try to make stranger and to make it and what ended up to be much to my surprise you with the first book and now this one is you end up with something that is shocking and both in the early familiar you know as i've heard back from from readers. Are you read the book. What what did you think yeah i mean. It's it's the kind of stuff draft as you're reading. You think you know five years ago ten years ago. I would have thought this was you know over the top now. They're in moments like a gas lighting. You know what the people who are. Who are there in know what's happening and then here leader you know there were casualties oldies that that didn't actually happen but but this gas lighting the happening and it's so it it's so real. It's it's what's happening. Now we are. We're being gasoline on a regular basis. <hes> you know and in the idea of sort of state run media which is becoming closer and closer to a reality at this point <hes> so <hes> you know obviously the way that <hes> the way things are playing out. I is is not exactly cle- what's happening right now but <hes> but in a lot of ways that it does it feels sort of shocking. They familiar and i'm not sure how i feel about that. You know it. Does it. Make me feel better or worse well. I <hes> you know one of the things that i still for was that i did want people to laugh half like perhaps it's a nervous laugh laugh because it's six thirty and then you say well. Maybe it's not that absurd or you know you know it could be you know true or closer than we think it is because i tried a buoy before there was trump and do he was meant to be this kind of <hes> this figures that would be it'd be all like it called <hes> and he was you know ignorance. It's was like unparalleled and incoherence was amazing and you know and his ten is pathological. Lying was you know was well documented and the more he lied you know his people figured out through social media the more lies more popular teams and <hes> you know that <hes> you know i i started you know working down that path you know before trump and then to see it happen is you know is a little bit shocking and <hes> but you know one of the things i like to also revista small passage <hes> from the book. This is in chapter one win bowie. It's speaking to the real american <hes> or the daughters at the real american revolution and its during his we loved her. We rally tour you know which it should be leads up to one of the plot points in the book where he has this you know this huge coordination where he's officially appointed in brusett pren- for life a real america okay and so he goes <hes> i introduced like this the popularity of the we love rally to a reflected a real american renaissance real americans deposited their meagre salaries and we bank and it said to the jewish church abreu on sunday excessive thinking was discouraged. We end his advisors. Visors made a priority keep his supporters. Entertaining distracted has real america inc went through the growing pains of economic destruction. The buoy red shirts the young genetically weekly pure real americans who swore allegiance to buoy read gold news spectrum where we bonfires to burn heretical books such as the u._s. constitution the grapes of wrath uncle. Tom's cabin and the handmaid's tale their red shirts also brought communities together with three lynching party to get mature liberal feminists to rita's deviance and taste of swiss american justice. We went to every corner of this country. Just spreads a guy his gospel. I'm honored to be here ladies with my my favorite with my favorite women in this great palace of golfing and mike. I don't bless here but i wanna thank you for setting the highest standards of fornication and procreation in the world we said november twenty twenty one the location highlighted the golden heritage in all slave mark the largest free labor plantation and the reasons he liberty territory where two thousand six hundred twenty nine free labor slaves twelve eighteen hours a day making we live buoy baseball caps apps because real america focuses on protecting you and keeping you at home supporting your valiant man we need you to do your sacred work the key point accounting and making white baby real americans who agrees to making when they reached the age of consequential you women are real america on the front lines protecting our great nation nation from harm. Mama buoy told me the other day that real american needs lots and lots of white baby real americans because the colored hordes mean to out throughout bertha's and takeover has always our beloved mama but we is right. We can't let that happen and so that's an example of the kind capriciously <hes> envelope satire and <hes> because this is a country that essentially considers itself to be the second coming of the confederacy cetera. It's if it turned out far more precious than i imagine you know what would happen after trump was elected did when it became obvious if this was a white supremacy regime in the making so that was thankful if where you know fast kind of hot up with my my question to make satire that so far out there that it couldn't be touched but well imagine my surprise yeah so what's going to happen in twenty twenty where weight is going to happen. I think it's going to be <hes>. I've been asked this question a couple of times. I think i don't know exactly what's going to happen. I think as trump continues to become more unhinged and sleep and slipped put deeper into madness which just becoming more clear by the day. I think this is going to want to protect him all the more and and i think we're gonna see more stuff like with yesterday when they announced that they want indefinite detention of of all the migrants. I think we're we're gonna see a lot more of that and i think we're gonna see the nastiest campaign <hes> in american history by far. I think that the russians and who knows facade is the israeli we've who and who knows the chinese. My you know are going to get involved. It's gonna be it's gonna make two thousand sixteen. Look like a you know a lake a key party <hes> in comparison <hes>. I think that issues are gonna kind of you. Know are going to be irrelevant as climate change. Thanks becomes more and more frightening and more and more real <hes>. I think that that's going to be the one that's dominate and <hes> it's gonna take whether the democratic candidate they're going to have to be able to handle themselves more deftly than than we can even imagine now because because it's going to be ruled see live an in earliest date and you have followed and covered politics for a long time. Do you think the democrats are sort sort of playing things too much normal politics well. I think it ebbs and flows. I mean you know we have this. You know where you you know with foreign kamala harris. You know joe biden certainly rourke. You know it's not normal to call the president united states you. You know a white supremacy. That's you know so you can tell we've kind of be on you know we've. We've strayed beyond those boundaries for sure. I think there's going to have to be more of that. The problem is that the mainstream media is still like stuck like where the covering the nineteen eighty-four campaign. It's it's appalling there. The lack of context to lack of courage to challenge the administration is is pretty remarkable. It's getting a little bit better but they have been reduced looking like court gestures you know standing on the white house lawn trump go out to which helicopter and babbel's nonsense <hes> you know beyond belief and you know if someone challenged him you know yeah you're the fake news media and you can't be trusted and you don't even know what you're talking about and etcetera etcetera etcetera so it's going to be somewhat difficult because of that but i think that the democratic candidates are going to be helped a little bit fight like the impeachment proceedings in house because i think that slowly but surely the sheer weight of criminality of this fishery gene <hes> is going to be revealed and i did that is they're. They're gonna could you better on that so i believe that once again we're going to end up you. You know at this time. Probably maybe five to seven million. More americans are gonna vote against trump that than before which is still kind of shocking when you think what's happened over the past you know three years by that you know. Let's just hope that you know of electoral college <hes> mac workout because you wanna dance concerned about ago and i it just continues along the south <music> out for example. If trump is reelected i i'm not sure that our constitution can can laugh much longer because you know between the senate and the filibuster buster which essentially stops legislation and dead track you know track and make make no progresses country <hes> and and courts <hes> i would hope i not gonna expected but i would hope that a democratic candidate for president will say <hes> i'm going to encourage senate to drop the filibuster and i'm going to add to members to the supreme court because you no no matter what happens even if the democrats take the house and senate and the white house <hes> there is a reactionary just waiting there to stop everything and that's a that is a reality for the next ten to twenty years and that we're going to have to deal with and again one of the things that my my first book i talked about was the kind of the new mathematics democracy where where the majority is essentially ignored <hes> for for the most part breath how long senate democracy staying there. What do you think yeah i mean i it feels a lot of ways like we're. We're pretty close to a tipping point rain right. Now you know i i i live in of course a very <hes> blue area on the outside of chicago. <hes> you know and so so i i tend to be kind of insulated from all of this to a certain extent but you know when i when i go other places i go and travel to see my parents in ohio for instance. I mean it. It feels sometimes different. Parts of the country are are like different countries like lake. You're going to a foreign land where people don't believe the same things things you believe and and i i'm not sure that the country in the the constitution can survive what's going on well. That's one of the things that's why. I created essentially the split up because the country could handle it anymore. <hes> you know where the strangest became or has marx would say contradictions became so overwhelming that they strangled <hes> you know what we think of our democracy and so i do agree with you in terms of and and now that the within states can go to certain parts because <hes> you know like you live in chicago fear to go to philadelphia that'd be one thing but if you go outside into the parts where you know political pundits accused call you know how you know the alabama part of pennsylvania though you know it's a very different thing i mean i was in pennsylvania. <hes> you know going through some real parts <hes> back in may and i can't tell you the number of trump stickers. I can't tell you the number of maga- hats i saw and and it's kind of shocking because we we don't see that in the part of new hampshire where i live which is like your chicago were somewhat insulated <hes> as as you are so it can be <hes> can become shocking to see how different the country has become well on that cheery note well. That's why we have to keep you know off to keep reading books so people can hopefully be motivated to say we can't let that options and then you know we we asked you know we act encouraged people to think and and and to vote i mean there is i still hope that's why in in my book i create this kind of you know. Just don't be thriller. <hes> i'm sure you've noticed where there was a plot and they had some there watching jeff assist found in especially at the end she saw and even though it's gonna still over to the next book <hes> you know which is going to be called penelope which is she is truly going to become the central character and it'll be the final showdown between penelope buoy and i don't know who's gonna win yet though but i think it'll be an interesting showdown between someone who does think and someone who doesn't think and and and and that's the kind of showdown that i want you know who will win. Will it just is be sure might or will be something <hes> more subtle and more new ones and you know with the garrity towards facts in thinking so yeah. We're we're living in something quite extraordinary. <hes> that whole we're going to be able to elsom some good stories about how he came out on the other end yes absolutely michael. Thank you so much for talking to me. Today and people should go and check checkout times and hopefully we will all see this says a hopeful tale in where we can where we can get you and good motivation jason for <hes> for pushing through to the other side. Well thank you and <hes> people can go to my website at <hes> mcchord author dot com <hes> and you know to find out more and to to read the essay but i wrote you know called creating real america to kind of figure it out you know <hes> you know what what what is it up to you and and what i'm trying to say all right. Well thank you and we'll put a link to that on our website as well and kelly have a great day you yeah you too. Thanks for listening to broads. Talking politics are theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band immune hurry and we're using it with permission mission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by matthew with lynn and was created for use this podcast.

america trump new hampshire republican party ronald reagan congress barack obama kelly europe penelope washington richard nixon pennsylvania writer political editor kurt vonnegut president jane
The Morning Briefing: Tuesday, July 21

The Briefing

02:23 min | 2 weeks ago

The Morning Briefing: Tuesday, July 21

"Join Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Tuesday July, the twenty first and the Russia reports being published. So it's been a long time coming the reports into Moscow's alleged meddling in British politics is being made public today after months of delays. We've got some exclusive details ahead of its publication. We've learned the document will reveal Russia. Trying to influence the result of the Scottish independence votes, it will describe the Kremlin's attempt to divide the UK, as the first post-soviet interference in a Western election, but the report concludes there's no direct evidence of Russian influence in the Brexit vote. Political editor. Golden Raynor's written up everything we know. He reports based on secret material from Britain's intelligence agencies. To Be Released at about ten thirty this morning, you can follow all the updates as they happen as well as expert analysis in our live blog. Now after yesterday's encouraging news about a corona virus vaccine trial it Oxford. Experts say the job could still be ready by the end of the year that save. Scientists can get fifty thousand people in trials over the next six weeks after the number of Covid, nineteen cases dropped during lockdown came difficult to test. Science at its at Sarah Neptune explains how hopes of a Christmas vaccine presence, alive and well. And you'll remember the Prince Andrew Newsnight interview widely described as a car crash most views. It was disastrous pr, but it's been claimed Duke of York's aides were pleased with how it went until they saw the public reaction royal correspondent. Hannah has looked at Prince Andrew's most memorable onces. Can also recommend some other articles to including Tony on how the dunk of York's reinvented herself and multigenerational livings on the rise how to get the balance rights. I'll send you those links now. If you're listening on WHATSAPP, you'll find them in the show notes. If you're listening on spotify apple or wherever you get podcasts, that's it you're up to date. Chris will have your second briefing of the day this evening.

Russia Golden Raynor York Danny Boyle Andrew Newsnight Hannah Prince Andrew Moscow Political editor Sarah Neptune Oxford UK spotify Chris Britain Tony apple six weeks
The Morning Briefing: Friday, June 19

The Briefing

02:24 min | Last month

The Morning Briefing: Friday, June 19

"Hi. I'm Danny. Boyle, with the briefing from the Telegraph, it's Friday June, the nineteenth and schools of promised funds for some accounts. So school might be out for the summer next month. Some pupils will be playing. Catch up last week. Research showed that more than two million children did virtually no schoolwork during lockdown now the prime minister's announcing a one billion pound plan. The government will pay for private tutors for children who full in behind during lockdown schools will also be given extra cash for ketchup activities that could include some accounts before role that we've got a guide to the ultimate homeschooling tips. Ministers are also preparing to reveal the latest corona virus, all value that will be used to guide them on further lockdown lifting can take place, pubs, restaurants and hairdressers rule hoping to get the green light to reopen on July the fourth. We're also hearing that foreign holidays could be given the green light by then our political editor Golden Raina has the details about so-called air bridges. Now the row about historic links to slavery continues today, the Church of England and Bank of England of become the latest bodies to issue an apology. It's merged vickers. Bishops and governors benefited from compensation for the end of the slave trade in the nineteenth century. We've analyzed the evidence used to track back through the years. And, if you've got a dog or a cat, you might want to keep a particularly close eye on them. At the moments, experts at University College London Save as increasing evidence that some animals can pulse covid nineteen to humans that suggesting cat should not be allowed, and dogs kept on a lead health correspondent Henry both Kim explains what we know. Can also recommend some other articles to including A. Cyber attack from what its PM calls as state based actor and Andrew Roberts explains how Dame Vera. Lynn helped to lift wartime morale I'll send you those links now. If you're listening on WHATSAPP, you find him in the show notes. If you're listening on spotify apple law wherever you get your podcasts. That's it you're up-to-date. I'll be back with your second briefing of the day the evening.

Boyle prime minister Golden Raina Bank of England Church of England political editor spotify University College London Andrew Roberts Dame Vera Lynn Kim apple one billion pound
Coronavirus: worst case scenario revealed in UK 'battle plan'; why Apples paying out $500m (in total) to some iPhone users; and is Pretty Woman: The Musical any good?

The Leader

16:23 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus: worst case scenario revealed in UK 'battle plan'; why Apples paying out $500m (in total) to some iPhone users; and is Pretty Woman: The Musical any good?

"Thank you for listening to the leader. We Bring News analysis commentary and interviews from the Evening Standard's newsroom. Every day at four pm you can subscribe to your podcast provider to make sure you don't miss an episode now from the Evening Standard in London. This is the leader. Hi I'm David Moslem the. Uk's battle plan against Karuna virus has been revealed. The potential is there for this to be something that our country has to get through. But I've got absolutely no doubt that we have the resources you got. Beat the Health Service We've got the expertise to do. Will it work the evening? Standard political editor. Joe Murphy seen the strategy and talks to the leader podcast also. The older lithium batteries were delivering power evenly throughout the devices. So this is why some people are experiencing that phone. We're just shut down up when it was about forty percent apples to pay up to five hundred million dollars after admitting it intentionally slowed older. Iphones technology journalist. Amelia heathland explains why and it is after all a musical about prostitution which is not really well not a common subject for that kind of out for pretty women strutting onto the London stage and the Evening Standard's critic Nick Carter's has given it four stars taken from the Evening Standard's editorial column is the leader for the whole thing. Pick up the newspaper or had to stand the DOCO. Uk slash comment in a moment how the UK will battle KUNA virus today. We've published the Corona Virus Action Plan setting out all four parts of the UK will take own necessary and reasonable steps to prepare full and tackle. This outbreak in. The plan has four strands faced with the biggest public health emergency for the generation. The Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the nation to present himself as a leader with a plan. I fully understand public concern. A your concern about the global spread of the virus. And he's highly likely that we will see a growing number of UK cases before he spoke. A twenty eight page document was released John List detailing the four state strategy containment delay. The search mitigation by have Modi told that with the Scientific advice that we have with the levels of preparedness that we have with often tastic and HFS our ability to test and to survey the spread of disease. This country is going to get through. Navarre's new DOT ORG and get through it in in good shape. It's a battle plan to tackle could own virus not just on the threats against health but also those against the economy public services and society the Evening Standard at tutorial call them says it paints a grim picture of what could be the government's battle-plan reports in a severe outbreak. One and five employees may be off work at any time pressure on public services would be extreme. The police would focus their efforts on serious crime and public disorder. Major public events would be suspended. The London marathon might not take place. Footfall chiefs are preparing plans to play matches. An empty grounds health. Experts suggest that in the worst case scenario between sixty to eighty percent of the population could become infected at some point in the course of the outbreak. Some other countries have unfortunately reached that point already. Here we are still getting ready. Public servants deserve all our support as they do that. A political editor Joe Murphy was one of the journalists invited by down the street to get a look at the plum job this document reveals a worse case scenario that would hit the UK heart. What they call the reasonable worst case scenario. So he's not. Even the worst case is pretty severe. I mean we are looking they say potentially at a one in five off work situation that six billion people not turning up for work on any given day at the peak which they think will be During the early part of this summer doesn't mean they're all L. Of course some of those will be off as a precaution And some of them will be off because they're because they're looking after people but that's going to be a big blow to the economy without a doubt and it's going to cause a lot of disruption in lots of parts of our lives wall kind of measures is the government licking at implementing them. You're looking at a huge array of measures across public policy all sorts of government departments and led most of all by people doing doing their duty as the health sector keeps putting it which is principally at the stage. Just washing your hands. Things would then ratchet up into more serious measures. If the disease gets worse and no secret here it will get worse. I think what came over the briefings that I went to today at the launch of this battle plan was a resignation that this will actually be an epidemic some point over the course of this year and the real challenge is to make sure when it happens. We're ready and the happens at the right moment. Do you think the government feels confident that it is ready the UK is ready as they keep saying all the messaging. Yes I do seem ready. I mean as we who follow sort of London government. No there are all sorts of plans tucked away on shelves ready to dusted down for dealing with such issues as Excessive deaths so for example. You know we've seen the plans for London to deal with a huge number of extra bodies which in crawls some very grim reading in some very ghoulish detail which we weren't going into the moment And this sort of thing is where the civil services well prepared. What's what the preparation that we're seeing at. The moment is actually preparing the country mentally for the disruption that we're gonNA see for the tragedies that we are probably going to see if this gets very bad and that's a sort of PR exercise combined with with with mental preparation and Building National Resolve. Do they have an idea of when the peak might come they do? And what's more? They have an idea of when they wanted to come. And they'll do their utmost to make sure that happens so the ideal time is for the peak to happen in the summer around June. And that's when they'll make sure it happens so currently we're in a container phase which is probably. I would say having listened some of the advice probably going to last another couple of weeks loest. And then we'll be into a delay phase where they'll be taking measures to delay the onset of until after the current cold weather with this extra burden on the NHS so that things start to build up no earlier than May June into a ready high levels and then they don't want it to be delayed too much because the risk then is that it goes on into the autumn or even worse that you suppress the virus so much that you get a second outbreak that could pop up in the winter's come and better to delay until summer and then bite the bullet summit and get it over with. Let it happen. Manage it mitigated directly sources than to the people who most need it who the vulnerable and the elderly for the rest of us to Groti F- and get on with things. Next Apple is second biggest smartphone maker in the world after Samsung. Lots of people that have those devices and people are very unhappy about the fact that that device may become obsolete in two years. I really heath mun or why apple's paying out up to five hundred million dollars in total some food news. It was one of those very few tech rumors that in the end turned out to have some truth to it. Apple was intentionally slowing down older. Iphones the company admitted. They said it was to help. Make the product last as long as possible. The inevitable lawsuit was filed in California and now three years after the company. I said sorry. It settled the case and is preparing to out five. Hundred million dollars though. It's not admitting any wrongdoing the evening standard technology journalist Amelia Heath. Men's here to explain it all Amelia. What's actually happened? This story goes way back to two thousand seventeen when apple admitted that had been pushing out software updates which slowed down. Older phones. Said that reasoning for is that the older lithium batteries were delivering power in evenly throughout the devices. So this is why some people were experiencing that phone. We're JUS- shutdown up when it was about forty percent and that those automatic shutdowns can affect the sockets inside the phone so it was pushing updates to people with the iphone six the six ask the SEC. And then the fence avenues. While which would kinda stop these automatic shutdowns and preserve the inner workings of the device but people were very unhappy about it because they saying apple bricky mile phone so it stops working and then I have to fork out for a new one thousand pound phone and there was a court case was new in the states. Yeah so on. Friday apple offered a settlement to people who had these devices by saying that they would offer out five hundred million dollars which works out to about three hundred nine hundred million pounds to people that have been affected by this. They said they haven't admitted any wrongdoing. And so people who have who are named as claimants in the suit got about three thousand dollars if it is approved. And then if you had this phone and you had specific updates which included the. Iowa's ten point two one or the IRS Lebron Around December twenty fifth trend. Seventeen which is which is around the time the lawsuit was filed than that means that you could potentially claim some money back from Apple. How much money could Kluber? So if you're if you're not a claim and and you can put a claim afterwards you'll get maybe around twenty five dollars but I'm this is. Us people this is for UK listeners. Unfortunately but the idea is that of a lot of people claim that twenty five dollars book. I write down but if you have one of those phones anyway. Apple was running scheme so it was cheaper to replace a battery in your phone as a result of this kind of updates and things. So you're not going to be able to buy a new iphone with with The money that you might be able to claim from apple but I think what it shows is if they've got up to five hundred million dollars available and claimants can expect somewhere around twenty five million. That's a lot of people who've been affected by this. Well I guess that's the thing that apple is you know the second biggest smartphone maker in the world after Samsung. Lots of people that have those devices and you know they are expensive in the most recent hyphen could cost you. Nearly fifteen hundred pounds and people are very unhappy about the fact that that device may become obsolete in two years minimum and you can read more of that story on the Evening Standard website at Standard Dot Coda UK. It's the latest movie to become a west end musical. Pretty woman fresh out of Broadway and now at London's Piccadilly Theatre but is it to use a line from the movie better than pirates of penzance. Well it's divided the critics but the evening standard's net cutters has given four stars. And he's with me now. Negatives movie came out to in nineteen ninety. Is this just a big Fast or is it something new? Anybody anticipated the pretty warm. Would be a success of musical about prostitution. Which is not really. Well it's not a common subject for that kind of art form but I was really pleasantly surprised by it. By how sort of Bouncy and exuberant it was how the The main character Vivian. The pretty woman of the title is given much more agency And I think it works. I think he's a what a delight. Is it one of those ones? Just sweep you off if he let it and just washes right over here. Yeah I think they've They very cleverly sort of updated the tone of it. It's sort of. They've done it as sort of a dream of the of what the nine thousand nine hundred might have been like in L. A. including a soundtrack by Bryan Adams which is not the most experimental thrilling thing you'll ever hear but it does catch you up and he does know how to write a good choose when I was a kid. Nicknames IS ENTIRELY TRUE. I wrote a review of pre women for my school magazine. My headmaster went ballistic that fourteen year. Old Boy I'd seen a fifteen movie about prostitution. Have they changed tall to adapt things to the the metoo movement and and how society today not over much? Although I think as we said it's it's made clear that this is not some fantasy the the idea of a woman working. The streets is not some sort of jokey fantasy And it's made fairly clear that the character played by Donnie. Mike who's played by Richard Gere in the film is an emotionally. Strange manner somewhat emotionally neutered. Man Who just devotes himself to work doesn't really understand. Emotion doesn't really know how to relate to women and she sort of teaches them how to relate women. She teaches in the value of things rather than the price of things. How do the cast step into Wad January iconic roles? This is the role that created a movie career for Julia. Roberts is defining really for for Richard Gere. How do you step into those shoes? Well I think very cleverly again the The producers don't really try and Replace Richard Gere they solve. Let Danny may just stand around. Amy Atkinson do her stuff because she is rather wonderful. You sort of think of Julia Roberts of the first ten minutes and then you forget partly because Atkinson is dressed exactly like Roberts in the film all the outfits that you remember from the postal from excerpts from it all here and president correct but she really has made the role very much her own. She's very She's a golden extraordinary singing voice. She's very funny very attractive in her. Exuberance you really root for right from the start. And when she's upset you you really feel for her so in the trailer. So new spoilers. The some of those key moments in the movie. That bit. Where Julia Roberts goes together is a necklace out of the box. And Richard Dick Class lines and closed off recreated and the the snooty assistance who won't let her shop or also president correct. And that Salida you can subscribe through your podcast. Provide and get in touch with the HASHTAG deleted. Podcast we're back to at four PM.

Evening Standard Uk Apple London prostitution Richard Gere Julia Roberts apple political editor Joe Murphy Samsung Health Service David Moslem John List Standard Dot Coda UK Boris Johnson
The Morning Briefing: Tuesday, June 2

The Briefing

02:23 min | 2 months ago

The Morning Briefing: Tuesday, June 2

"Halloween Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Tuesday June, the second and the UK quarantine plan could be ditched. So the new quarantine system will come before parliament today and be introduced next Monday, but there are signs today. The policy could be phased out just weeks later. We've learned that the idea to quarantine all UK arrivals for fourteen days is now under review Boris Johnson's understood to be in favor of so-called air bridges. That's where trouble deals struck with foreign countries are political editor Golden Rain is looked at the chaotic origins of the quarantine plan and we've got a simple guide to ED bridges how they can help you go on holiday. At the same time. There's another rethink happening over schools. The government's reviewing the plan to have every primary school people back in the classroom for at least a month before the summer holidays of cool, some schools have reopened that doors reception year, one and year six pupils, Helen, challenge. The wild spent the day in one of them. She's written a piece on the eerie atmosphere. Now a seventh night of protests in the US over the death of George Floyd, tensions, running extremely high after Donald trump threatened to mobilize the military across the country of political leaders of appealed for calm, and had masks handed out to demonstrators to help prevent a new outbreak of covid nineteen. Now US Ben Reilly Smith has a patch from Washington. And with many Britons preparing to head back to work as one family member, who might not be anticipating the change pets. They've become used to having their owners around every day. So how will they cope? We've got some essential advice for dealing with your pet separation anxiety. writes. If you're listening on WHATSAPP will send you those links now. If you're listening on spotify apple or wherever you get your podcast, you'll find them in the show notes as links to some non corona virus material, including the latest from Brussels as a crunch round of trade talks, stop today and Jeremy Vine on. Why says being axed? That's it. You're up to date crystal view second briefing of the day this evening.

UK Helen Danny Boyle Ben Reilly Smith political editor Boris Johnson Donald trump Jeremy Vine US George Floyd Brussels spotify Washington apple fourteen days
The Morning Briefing: Monday, June 29

The Briefing

02:16 min | Last month

The Morning Briefing: Monday, June 29

"Hello I'm Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph it's Monday June, twenty ninth and Boris Johnson stepping up plans to reform white hole. So. The prime minister today begins the search for Brexit. It's to run the civil service. We reported at the weekend that its current heads been ousted that some said well the cabinet secretary who will stand down in? September, he lost a power struggle with dominic cummings whose Mister Johnson's chief advisor. There's wholesale overhaul of white hold in the offing. The PM intends to recruit more. Brexit is and relocate government departments to the regions. He made it clear to so mark that he's not the man for the job. You can read his diplomatic response. What's on the agenda this week? Then starting with a big announcement by the PM Today, he'll pledge one point. Five billion pounds for a school building blitz here is promising to put children fronton center of Britain's postcode economic revival, the new money's passive of a recovery program that will be detailed in a major speech tomorrow after more than three months of lockdown. Mister Johnson now wants to shift the focus to the future. Help political editor Golden. Rayner explains what to expect from a series of upbeat announcements this week. And if you're planning a vacation this summer, he might find yourself with more space. On the coupled streets of Britain's seaside towns, social distancing would be all but impossible. At some results, visitors promised at different feel places including. Senate ives in Cornwall this year, authorities. They're planning to ban calls from busy streets during the day. We've got more of what to expect. I could also recommend some other articles to including how to join the cycle to work revolution and now metropolitan after man. City beat new call suit two nil. Saint James, Park I'll send you those links now. If you're listening on, WHATSAPP, you'll find them in the show notes listening on spotify apple or wherever you get your podcasts. That's it you're up to date crystal. Have your second briefing of the day this evening.

Mister Johnson dominic cummings Brexit Britain Danny Boyle prime minister cabinet Rayner Senate spotify Saint James political editor secretary advisor Cornwall apple Five billion pounds three months
The Evening Briefing: Tuesday July 7

The Briefing

02:15 min | Last month

The Evening Briefing: Tuesday July 7

"Good evening I'm Chris Price with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Tuesday July. Seventh and a super spreaders thought to a forced three businesses to close. Many of you have enjoyed a pint in the Pablo meal at a restaurant on super, Saturday now the hangover's being felt a single positive corona virus cases believed to have caused up to three businesses to close for deep cleaning. The man went out drinking on super sesa visited the Lighthouse in in Burnham on sea before heading to a vape bar driver at a nearby Indian restaurant, had also been in the pop in some sense, and the restaurants closed as a precaution. It comes as pubs in Batley in West Yorkshire and Gosport in Hampshire are also closed after separate customers tested positive for covid nineteen read how the suspected super spreaders. Super Saturday Jones led to mass shutdowns. Allies will be on Richie soon act for his mini-budget. Tomorrow and sources have told the Telegraph the chancellor will announce an immediate. CUT TO STAMP DUTY MR soon ex expected to raise the threshold for paying the tax on buying in England and Northern Ireland's to half a million pounds political editor. Gordon Ryan outlines what we know, but Jeremy. Warner analyzes why the Charleston will need to do something radical to avoid a surge in unemployment. And the High Court in London hosted some star names today. He heard Johnny Depp accused his ex wife. The actress amber heard of being the abuser in their relationship. Both of them were in court for the first day of the Hollywood. Actors live election against the sun, and it's executive editor Damn Woodson over an article which called him a wife Beater. You can read the latest from the start of what's expected to be a three week trial. Along with all that you can read how Republicans in Washington DC veterans, fatal trump won't accept a presidential election defeat and amid sweatshop factory allegations. Could the BOOHOO bubble burst as quickly as it ballooned? Caroline leaper interviews, the fast fashion chains chief executive John Nettle feel it's what's apple singer those links now. If you're listening on spotify apple or wherever you get podcast, you find them in the show notes. That's it. You're up-to-date. Daniel. Have Your next briefing tomorrow morning.

High Court Jeremy apple Chris Price executive editor Batley Burnham Damn Woodson Caroline leaper Richie Gordon Ryan chancellor England political editor Johnny Depp Jones Gosport Northern Ireland Daniel
Weekly Roundup: Thursday, March 28

NPR Politics Podcast

31:45 min | 1 year ago

Weekly Roundup: Thursday, March 28

"Tap. Guess what? What's got big news doing another live podcast on the road? We're going to be in Philadelphia. In fact, we are going to be there on April twenty six to record a live podcast onstage all about the twenty twenty election. We just did this and Atlanta. It was great. But here is the catch. We need your help to make sure it's the best podcast possible. And the way to do that is to head over to NPR presents dot org and grab a ticket to be in the audience. That's Friday, April twenty-sixth in Philadelphia. We'll see you there. Hello NPR politics. Pods squad. This is Jess this is Christian. And we're in Iowa City, Iowa redesign tamra Keith at the England theater. Talk about the future of politics twenty twenty and she looked fabulous with her shoes matching her dress. This project was reported that one eighteen eastern on Thursday March twentieth. Things may have changed by the time. You hear this? All right. Here's the show. Were you wearing the dress was actually a hand-me-down from one of my friends? You do always have good shoe game at the live events. You know, like if you're going to be up on stage. People are gonna be looking at your feet. I feel some obligated to make it bling. Look. Good feel good Tam born the same Skopje shoes to literally every. Jessen christian. Thank you so much for coming was awesome. Hey, there's the politics podcast. I'm Scott Tetreault congress. I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House and today, I'm at W, Hugh in Grand Rapids, Michigan. I'm Susan Davis. I also cover congress, and I'm Dominica months in our political editor. All right. We are going to talk about two major topics today. First of all it has been four days since the attorney general submitted his key findings from the ball report to congress, and even as we wait for the actual report both parties are making big strategic decisions about what to do next. We will get into that. We're also gonna talk about the role that gender politics are playing a sprawling presidential campaign with a record number of women running. But let's start with that report on the mullahs report Tam, I vol do we have any idea when we will see parts of the actual report NPR's reporting is that Bill bar. The attorney general is going through the Muller report trying to figure out which parts might need to be redacted. What can be? He sent over to congress. And that that process is going to take weeks, not months, and the New York Times is reporting that you know, it might be a bit of a heavy lift because the Muller report, according to the times is three hundred pages long, which also raises the question of what's in there that wasn't in the four page summary that bar put out over the weekend. It saved to say a lot. Two hundred ninety six pages more than that. Because the four pages were there only like two lines quoted from the mullahs report in the bar letter. Still though that letter did have a big impact sue how have Democrats been reacting to this? And and what have they been deciding on what to do next? Well, in so many ways, I think the Muller report, and what we are at least what we know of the Miller report has really deflated any kind of effort towards impeachment. And I also think it is kind of put a spotlight on Democrats and all of their efforts to continue their oversight and investigations into the administration on that front. I think politically they're gonna try and try to a little bit more carefully certainly focusing on other issues of oversight like healthcare or things not related to Russia. That said Democrats are still unified behind getting the full release of the mullahs report. House speaker Nancy Pelosi reiterated that again. Today that a summary of the summary of the summary is not going to be good enough. Congress wants to see the whole thing they want the public to see the whole thing. They are willing to fight for this report, if the DOJ doesn't willingly turn it over Tim. How has the White House responded to this? The White House is not moving on. Let's say so the first thing that they did is you know, total exoneration was the immediate response. And that has continued to be the response, even though one of the few lines quoted said this does not completely exonerate the president. Yeah. In fact, it specifically says it did not exonerate the president on obstruction though, then attorney general bar decided that there was nothing to prosecute there. So what the White House has done is. They are no hitting back. Like this went from total exoneration to we're going to go after everyone who's ever been against us and make it hurt. Very very quickly Dominica. Do we have a sense in the? The we're recording on Thursday. This letter came out on Sunday. Do we have any sense at this point? Whether this letter has moved public opinion, it doesn't appear it's change people's opinions much if at all as far as their perception of President Trump goes. Three to it doesn't appear. It's changed people's three to it doesn't appear. It's changed people's opinions much if at all as far as their perception of President Trump goes CNN poll, for example, showed no movement and that people don't think the president is exonerated of collusion with Russia. Even though that is what the bar letter said and a CBS poll found majorities want the full Muller report released so people's views of Trump have barely changed. If you think he's doing a good job you thought so beforehand, if you think he's been doing a bad job, you probably still think so and tomorrow NPR will release our own poll with marriage and the PBS NewsHour, which will have more on how people are viewing the Muller investigation and President Trump in all this. But because this is the Trump era I feel like we were all talking about something different by like Tuesday. And that's because President Trump made an interesting choice with the with how to use the political capital that he. So suddenly gained didn't it. Yes. So what happened is there had been is a slightly complicated. But there had been a lawsuit filed by some states that wanted to overturn part or all of the Affordable Care Act, and it was primarily going after the coverage of pre existing conditions. But then a judge sometime ago ruled oh actually the entire Affordable Care Act is invalidated and should be thrown out. And there was the deadline coming for the Trump administration to decide do they want to agree with the judge or do they want to stick with the the previous argument just about pre existing conditions and they decided boom we are going to try to invalidate the entire Affordable Care Act. Let's go all in. And so from there. The president started tweeting saying Republicans are going to be the party of healthcare. So I feel like Democrats were really quite okay. With with the Trump administration. Listen trying to kneecap ObamaCare once again. Well, I would say this to so President Trump, you know, had arguably the best two days of his presidency earlier in the week both with the Muller report. And then the news of Michael Evan Nadi who had been the special earth who had been the attorney for stormy Daniels being charged with his own set of crimes. I mean. He was really that was just shot in Freud. Yeah. Good talk about like a good couple of days for a White House. That has on those issues has certainly been like up against the ropes for the past twenty two months. And then the White House goes in does this thing on the Affordable Care Act that nobody was asking the president to do that totally took hill Republicans by surprise. Although he came up to the hill this week to meet privately with Senate Republicans came up with a fair amount of swagger walking through the capital halls actually took some questions from reporters again set out loud. We're going to become the party of healthcare. I think that for the president it is clearly infuriating to him that the party has never made any progress towards their goal of repeal. Bingham replacing the Affordable Care Act. He said it in private two senators this week that he wants a win on healthcare that it's an area that he thinks the party is fallen short and clearly based on other reporting there has been some divides in the White House over whether the president, and the and should have sort of encouraged this move to essentially advocate for overturning the entire law on the courts, I can say unequivocally this is not a fight that hill Republicans were looking forward to having again, the Republican party still has no alternative plan to ObamaCare. And in the absence of that you now run a risk, right? Like, what if what if the administration wins in court would if the court said I with the administration, and the is no longer the law of the land you create havoc in the healthcare market. So they don't want this problem thrown back in their lap. Because they know they don't have a way to fix it. The president is very focused on keeping his promises he has been the entire time. But as reelection draws. Closer President Trump is just trying to knock things off the list keeping promise after promise after promise. Even if it isn't practical, even if it isn't really a politically great idea, even if his party doesn't want it, even if national security officials say it isn't advisable, whatever he is trying to do the things that he said he was going to do. So that he can go into a rally and say look at me kept the promises and one of his main promises when he was running for president in this like hanging thing that he can't solve that. He the promise he just can't keep is repeal and replace of of the Affordable Care Act. So just like this conversation has shifted. I mean, I think it's really fair to say that Washington shifted. No, it's true Washington shifted from almo all the time to okay now, we're all talking about healthcare. My last question is do you think that win Bill bar testifies before congress win? We get the Muller report released or at least part of it. If Robert Muller goes before congress does that rewrite everything back to where it was? Before. Or does the fact that these big picture conclusion seem to be no there's not a crime here? Does this kind of get ratcheted down a little that's a difficult thing to predict I think though that if it holds what bars letters summary is that there was no no collusion for President Trump or anyone in his campaign. That's obviously a big win for the president. It's the thing that the president has been talking about for two years at there's no collusion. And when it comes to obstruction of Justice, certainly there's some open question apparently on you know, what Robert Muller's level of comfort was with what a President Trump's actions were. But they chose not to prosecute him. Now, if there's no underlying crime, and then there's a potential, you know, cover up or whatever that Democrats try to ply into an look into. I think the country is fairly split on whether or not they want to go in that direction and continue down that path or whether they think. Democrats should be more focused on kitchen table issues and Republicans who for that matter, but to one positive of having hundreds of members of congress is that Democrats can prioritize other stuff and still keep all these other investigations ongoing over the next year and a half. Absolutely. And I think in some ways, you know, there there are certainly an element of Democrats. I think no matter what you'd always have fifty to sixty Democrats who would vote for impeachment on any given day up here. Right. Like that. There is definitely always going to be that voice within the Democratic Party. Although I talked to a lot of Democrats this week to who kind of would say that the mullahs report is also an political terms also a gift in some ways if you didn't want to spend the next two years making twenty twenty about a referendum on impeachment. But would rather it be about issues like health care or guns or budgets, or any other kind of issue, then we are going back to just having a more traditional election in terms of policies, and ideas and not the tougher question that was really divisive as Dominica said to the country. So, you know. I always think that twenty twenty was going to be competitive across the board before the mullahs report came out, and I still tend to believe that all that reality is still the same. It's just what it's going to be litigated on his shifted. I mean, Democrats are gonna have to figure out how to balance saying that they want the report released, and that they have an obligation to do oversight while at the same time, overcoming what this narrative has been with this four-page letter that went out or we're going to have to ask you to leave the podcast now. I'll miss you guys. Thanks, sue. You will not been rose you've been over served. All right. Thanks. We'll talk to you again soon. Susan leave Danielle Kurt Slavin's gonna come in. And we are going to talk all about gender and twenty twenty when we come back. See you guys later support for this podcast and the following message. Come from Exxon Mobil, the company that believes that carbon capture technologies are critical for lowering global CO two emissions and more and more. Scientists agree as a leader and capturing emissions in its own operations. Exxon Mobil is working on ways to make this technology. More efficient and affordable for other industries as well. That's the unexpected energy of Exxon Mobil. Find out more at energy factor dot com. Support also comes from ZipRecruiter hiring used to be hard multiple job sites. Stacks of resumes. But today hiring can be easy. And you only have to go to one place to get it done. Ziprecruiter ZipRecruiter since your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards. Then ZipRecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience. And invites them to apply to your job. Try it for free at ZipRecruiter dot com slash weekly. What does what you eat or don't eat say about who you are in where you put in. It's the memories and the feelings of nostalgia. That is what connects you to your family is not chicken or be a port. This is Jean of NPR's code. Switch this week on the menu food and family. All right. We are back. Sue is gone and Danielle is here. Hello, danielle. Hello. So you just wrote a really interesting story about gender nine AmEx and the twenty twenty race. And the fact that first of all there's so many women running. But Secondly, we are in this point where the male candidates, and especially the white male candidates have to answer questions about the fact that they're white males, which is wild compared to you know, the last two hundred years of presidential politics. Totally right. I mean, this is just pretty much the basic premise of my story is that for the first time, or at least for the first time in a really. Big across the field and mass way the men are having to grapple with their gender, and particularly the white men are having to grapple with their gender and race comes into this too. In a way that white men candidates haven't always had to. So let's before we talk about that here. Three different examples of white men being defensive about that fact, in one way or another betcha Aurora John Hickenlooper, and then Joe Biden, I just got a call from my wife, Amy. He's backing Paso, Texas, where she is raising sometimes with my help, you Liz who's twelve or not asking not asking more often, the women would you be willing to put a man on the ticket. It's kind of change. Is got to change and the candidates defense. Better will work is not is not quite being defensive there. And he did apologize for that later, and he has and I'm sure we'll talk about this acknowledged you a white male privilege on the campaign trail multiple times since then, but these sorts of statements have created in some voters of an uproar, you know, the people asking to award. Hey, you know, it very much reflects traditional gender roles for you to run out around the campaign trail chasing, your political dreams, while your wife stays home and watches the kids, which is what had been done for quite a while with male presidential candidate since time immemorial, and obviously work is acknowledging that right, which is difference between him and pass candidates. I mean, you think about any past male candidate with the wife and children at home, obviously, their wives were the ones taking care of the kids. And they didn't even seem to even acknowledge that as a thing. Right. So I mean one one way to look at this is this is that I I went back and looked at a debate transcript from two thousand seven. Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton to mold breaking candidates in their own rights were being asked questions, and it was a CNN debate. And they were asked questions, you know, Barack Obama had to answer questions about people perceiving him as being quote, unquote, authentically black and Hillary Clinton had questions answer about, you know, being this high profile woman running for a major party candidacy, and and the thing that we're seeing now that is so interesting and for a variety of reasons, for example, that men are no longer the default. We have so many women running we have so many people of color running white men are also being asked. Oh, by the way, you have a gender. Why don't you talk about that? Talk about that. And it was definitely not a thing for John Edwards, right? Thousand seven to have to be asked. What do you think about being a white man running in this election or for Joe Biden any of the times he ran for president before? So Danielle you just ticked off some of the reasons, and there's a lot of layers here. There is back. There's a lot of women running. There's the fact that we have a president who really leans into the masculinity to put it to me to say the least. Yes, we're going to get back to that. But before we dig into that. Yeah. Tam? Yes. Hillary Clinton was a woman who ran for president. In fact, she was she was the first woman to be the major nominee of a party. How did she approach? This fact when she was campaigning, and how did that change between two thousand eight in two thousand sixteen it was a pretty dramatic shift. So in two thousand eight she ran in some ways is, you know, this tough defense hawk like, she was she she didn't run as a woman. She just ran as she didn't really acknowledge her. Gender that much and when she ran in two thousand sixteen she leaned into it more. She talked about being a grandmother. There was more of talking about potentially making history of all the cracks in the glass ceiling, and of course, on on election night had she won. There would have been shattered glass in Feddie, but she did not win. And this gets us something really important, which is that because white straight men have for so long been the main template for presidential candidates. This very particular type of toughness of masculinity has been just sort of the Deridder on the campaign trail, you know, think about two thousand four when John Kerry, George W Bush, we're kind of trying to outdo each other. There was you know, there were footballs being thrown there was windsurfing. There was cowboy ING there was all of that, you know, and the and this has gone on for decades and decades and decades and decades, so then Hillary Clinton sort of shift away from trying to be tough and not talking about her gender and sort of acknowledging it really is a Mark of this whole complex of. Masculinity loosening its grip of it yet. I mean, she was making jokes about her hair twenty sixteen right? Yeah. So Dan, you know, you've laid out all of the stuff happening on the democratic side. But of course, President Trump running for reelection. How does he effect this conversation? He tries to embody this very particular type of straight masculinity. You know, he he compliments the lives of world leaders on their looks. He you know, he talked. Of course, there was the locker room talk tape. He tries to be quite macho and Manley, he likes to pose with construction helmets honor in the cab of a big truck that sort of thing. But I mean, yeah, I think that depending on the voter you're looking at I mean, so it depends on how much the voter cares about that. Whether it's consciously or not consciously because it is quite possible that after decades decades decades of seeing white men run for president that just seems normal. And you had a lot of candidates always try to out macho each other most stuff, and I think the difference. This time around is the makeup of the de. Critic party and its base. And that's why the stands out so much because you know, you didn't see that previously in what you have with Democrats now as a younger more diverse base of of voters who feel very differently about identity as compared to Republicans who are certainly wider older and more traditional and in twenty eighteen over and over and over again, a democratic voters went to the polls and primaries and and more often than not a elected women over men in in the primaries, but still Dominica amidst all this amidst the this push toward more diversity and inclusion of the Democratic Party who is topping the early polls the white male candidates, right? Absolutely. Daniel made that point in her piece that you've got the two top candidates one isn't even in the race with Joe Biden and Beddoe Aurore who just got in and doesn't even have a job three top candidates Biden, aerobic and Sanders in the latest Quinnipiac hall, you have three white men at the top of ticket which. Also highlights one important thing is that race also factors into that race and gender. It's very hard to disentangle them in all of this. Really good story that Daniel wrote you can read it at NPR dot org. We're gonna take a quick break and come back and do can't let it go support for this NPR podcast and the following message. Come from better help better help offers licensed professional counselors, who specialize in issues such as depression stress, anxiety and more connects with your professional counselor in a safe and private online environments at your convenience, get help at your own time and your own pace schedule secure video or phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. Visit better help dot com slash politics. To learn more and get ten percent off your first month planet money tip number seventeen. A great analogy doesn't have to make sense measure in a one legged Bob cat covering up your own crap on a frozen pond. Didn't you just make that? Well. Yeah. Planet money a poetic podcast about the economy. We are. Back and we're going to end the show like we do every week with can't let it go. The part of the show. We talk about the one thing politics are otherwise that we cannot stop thinking about Dominica you have the honor of going first lovely well this week in Ohio. It's testing week for kids in high school. You remember when he took like state exams and stuff like that? Yeah. Right. Yeah. So into Lido WTO L decided to have a little fun with this the local TV station, they decided to you know, they're always trying to appeal to a younger audience. So let's take a listen to how they decided to do that in this segment. Good morning students. It is testing week. And it's time to slay all day. Beyond fleet. They get that Gucci breakfast say by Felicia to that testing strikes. Tweet a weather going to be during testing p chances success. What is? Spend two percent. We look at oak. We're talking. Won't be an issue. No traffic problems around. I feel like I got about sixty five percent of those references. With that crowd. I just think it's a reminder. There was something I was reading about as you're getting older and heading toward age milestones. That it's probably a good idea to, you know, dress your age accurate because otherwise you just become an old head on what looks like a young body. You're saying we shouldn't referred to this week's political noses turnt. Well, I've got a lot of edits to do. He's just got about thirty years older. He's not even I have nothing else to say. Tam? What about what about you is your can't let it go on fleet? Turn it up. I don't think I can use that in a sentence. My can't let it go is bagel gate. I know where you're going this man on Twitter at out his name. Alec crowd Mun. He tweeted out today. I introduced my co workers to the Saint Louis secret of ordering bagels bread. Sliced. It was a hit exclamation point. It was a disaster on the internet. Once he did that way. What did he do with the bagel sliced? So have you ever been to Panara? Yes. So so you you get it. You put you put the bagel in the bread slicer. And so you get these tiny little slices of bagel which is like a sample. So he's like if you were getting fatal sample, it would look like that. But his draw grab here. I had I didn't really understand what it meant. When I saw written was everyone him. And here's my political tie-in one. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer tweeted on behalf of the New York delegation, Saint Louis forget about it wait Schumer from New York and our bagels. New york-based? I didn't know either of those things. Yeah. But but it's it gets better. Because chief Dermott f shea who is the NYPD chief of detectives tweeted out, thank you for reporting this crime. But we only serve New York City where this would never happen. It was it was a crime against bagels. Danielle let's move on from these seven different layers of bagel dynamics going on here. Okay. What can you not let go? All right. This is a story from the campaign trail. It's a few things. It's a campaign trail story. It's a public apology. And it's a moral dilemma all in one. Oh, so here we going. So last week. I was on the campaign trail, I was in New Hampshire. I was following better will work around. So you're apologizing here. I am. I I have a bit of an apology to do. So here we go. So I don't know if you guys have ever been in the situation. This was one of those situations where the campaign stops and the driving times are tightly sandwiched, right? Where you you finish a campaign? Stop you. Gotta get your rental car. You got. To go because you only have like an hour to get to the next event, which starts in an hour. So you just get in and you drive. So I pull into I believe it was Durham New Hampshire where the university of New Hampshire is. But it will work was about to speak there, and I pull it a town. And I'm looking for a parking spot that is relatively close to the place where he is going to speak. So I'm looking around I'm looking around and can't find one I see this parking lot. It is a campus parking lot one of those pay ones that I pull in and I see one open spot, and I was going. Yes. So I pull in I'm about to pull into the spot and the and I believe I'm remembering this, right? The guy in the car next to the open spot gets out of his car on the driver's side, stands the spot waves his hands. And I see him saying something to me. So I roll down my window. It looks like a young fellow. I figured he was a college kid, but I didn't know any. He goes. Hey, hey, hey, go over there. And I said, I don't know if there's a spot over there. And he said, well, I'm saving this for a friend an. Well. Well, I I did get a little the most radio friendly word. I can think of is snooty with him. And I. I said is that a thing like ooh cast of aggressor? And he he kind of went our gets into his car, and I was like cool. And so I was like, yeah. Defended by territory, I got into the spot I looked down. And I'm putting my recording stuff together. Putting my headphones around my neck next thing. I know look up in his car is gone. And I was. Like, he just needed to park next friend. Well, I keep fiddling with my stuff. And then I look up again and agree mini van has pulled in. And you may know where I'm going with this detro- because who's drives a gray minivan on the campaign trail one Mr. Bedwell work. Oh, what I had done goes. I hit advertently stolen the candidates parking spots at. I was like, oh, I you got there before him. I did know listen. All right. So I I. Candidates parking spot. I know, but but this this is interesting because it gets into all the moral layers said Beddoe on the par Noah did not. But I think I I immediately felt a wave of shame as I was like, oh, I was just snooty to someone for no reason. And I believe what I did was I ducked. My head down in my seat. And quietly made a noise something like. On top of the car. So you didn't say like don't, you know, who I am? No. But like, okay, listen, my apology is not because I took the candidates parking spot. It's that I was even if this were a local someone not related to Beto. It would have not been nice of me for me to be kind of passive aggressive. And and let me just say that I have also desperately searched for parking and that very same location for years ago, and it is a nightmare. So I'm with you like, it is tough Durham, well either way to that guy, the lady that was kind of a jerk to you that day who is not terribly. Nice. I apologize dude. Well, I'm going to shift you nor detro-. All right. So this week big supreme court gerrymandering case, which means the return to the supreme court of one former California governor slash Terminator slash undercover. Kindergarten teacher slash many other things. Arnold Schwarzenegger who in his post. Gubernatorial career has become a major crusader on the case of gerrymandering. Now after the supreme court big cases, usually all of the key people come out and speak to reporters. And there is usually an understanding among the reporters that they will all stand in one spot and pool their microphones and not get into the camera shot. Well, there is one supreme court reporter who doesn't play by those rules. Does her own thing. And became a viral sensation on the internet by walking right up to Arnold Schwarzenegger and sticking your microphone right into his face. And that is of course, our Nina totenberg. A reporter. It's slate. A podcast house that slate. Mary Harissa made this into a gift and said walk up to everyone you want to interview the way Nina totenberg, walks up to the Terminator Arnold Schwarzenegger. Re tweeted this saying it's wouldn't be a visit to the supreme college without answering a question from the toll to book. It was a joy. She clearly there's my rule gold. Listen to the naysayers proud to be her co-star Conan O'Brien that was me aiding Conan O'Brien a personality. Arnold schwarzenegger. So I really enjoyed this back and forth. And I haven't had a chance to talk to Nina. But I think there's one of two questions that she was trying to ask Arnold. This is the first one she might have been trying to ask I need you close you and your motorcycle on the other hand, she might have been trying to ask this question who is your daddy. And what does he do? I I really I. I really thought you were going to go with have you seen this boy? Some Nina Nina tweeted later about this because that's what she does. And she said so glad to be a totenberg her to the Terminator. It was a busy day at the supreme for all of us at Skoda's. All right. That is the show. I've set myself up for it. So I'm gonna just continue to be unapologetic and say, we'll be back when there's more political news Scott face. I think it's a really good thing that I got to Sacramento after Arnold was gone. I would have been fired you can keep up with all their political coverage NPR dot org. Another reminder, we will be in Philadelphia on April twenty six you can get those tickets NPR dot org. I'm so sorry. Tetra covered congress. I've ever key. Thank over the White House. I'm Kurtz, Laban political reporter, and I'm Dominican much narrow political editor this things. Thank you for listening to be your politics.

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Poll: Americans Split on House Impeachment Inquiry But That Could Change

NPR Politics Podcast

14:00 min | 11 months ago

Poll: Americans Split on House Impeachment Inquiry But That Could Change

"This is Catherine and make an we're hearing Kobe Japan for twenty nine thousand nine rugby world. We're about to watch England versus USA. I hope that marriage survived this encounter. This podcast was reported at one thirty seven. PM On Friday September twenty seventh things may have changed by the time you hear this. Okay show go England. I don't really think of Japan as rugby country. US really had of course the US has a rugby British sport. We have a cricket. His works is the United States of America word. I think I stepped into some nationalistic territory just do well. Hey there it is the NPR politics podcast. I must mccalla. They cover the presidential campaign. I'm deirdre Walsh Congressional Editor Domenico Montanaro senior political editor in correspondent and I'm Ron elving senior editor correspondent Donna D'Amico. Let's start with you. NPR PBS NEWSHOUR MARIST has a new poll out this week that explores where public opinion is on the issue of impeachment so what what was the clear top line of this poll while the clear top line is surprise surprise. Americans are split on impeachment. They don't necessarily support the house opening an impeachment inquiry. it's forty nine to forty six people approving of it forty six percent disapproving of it and the big key for Democrats here is that independents are not sold on at forty four percent of independence say that they approve fifty percents of independence say they disapprove so Democrats have some work to do. We really should caveat this though because this was a one night poll it was just Wednesday night it was before it was before the whistle blower complaint after we got the White House notes of the official record of the call between the president and the president of Ukraine so a lot can change this is a fluid situation and the pollsters warn in particular because so many people said that they are paying attention to the news independence were lower on the list of paying attention to the news and as they become more engaged their opinion very well could change well. Let's look back to what happened in past impeachments. I mean let's face it. Impeachment as a concept is disruptive is not popular. There's kind of earthshaking most people would rather have the earth stay stable under their feet so back in the Nixon days a while people look back on that as a huge scandal in a huge exposure closer of scandal when the Senate hearings began on Richard Nixon in the summer of nineteen seventy-three only nineteen percent of the people in the country even though they'd already learned a lot about this burglary in this cover up only nineteen percent of Americans wanted to see the president impeached and removed from office it finally ticks above fifty percent in the week before the president resigns and that was the popular impeachment. Bill Clinton's impeachment popularity was way down in fact the month he was impeached. Bill Clinton had the support of most of the country only thirty percent of the people wanted him impeached removed from office and so does your you spent a lot out of time you you pay attention to what's happening up on Capitol Hill. We had a number of moderate. Democrats who shifted their opinion who openly came out and said that they do support Gordon impeachment inquiry is this is your sense that by these moderate Democrats shifting their opinion a sign that maybe maybe these polls aren't capturing entirely highly. What public opinion sentiment is. How do you interpret with the moderates? Did I think in their case and and the group that came out signed an op-ed that was in the Washington Post I which sort of set off sort of new momentum about this issue this week and it was such a fast moving story that was I think a key point that kept the discussion and the momentum going but for that group they all are freshmen. Democrats with national security backgrounds and what they learned to them was it clear national security concern and they made the calculation that this was something that they understood more abruptly and they thought their constituents would understand. I think we'll find out when they go home. If that bears out I WANNA ask you about one nugget though from this poll that caught my eye and that is the favorability of of both Donald Trump and Nancy Pelosi and maybe this is no surprise hugely but I mean I. I was intrigued to see the Donald trump his job approval seems to be tracking better than Nancy Pelosi's well. Donald trump is like super consistent right. I mean none of his numbers have ever been very good. I mean he's overall forty four percent job approval in this poll. That's about where he's been since he was sworn in right. That's no surprise the whole among everybody right and among independent slightly lower than that but it's about where it's been Nancy Pelosi we haven't really tested Nancy Pelosi and I really wanted to see where she would track in this and she's lower than trump thirty nine percent of people say that they look inside the numbers. There's a big reason for as you go into this impeachment fight. What we've learned is that Republicans are far more strongly backing trump ninety percent of Republicans now say they approve of the job he's doing versus just seventy four percent of Democrats who say they approve of Nancy Pelosi and you'll see a lot more of Nancy Pelosi aiming. She's been doing a lot more national media interviews. I think she recognizes that. Part of the job she needs to do is to provide cover for her members. Who are now publicly out there for an impeachment inquiry and once the horses out of the barn they have to deal with the political repercussions of what that means so she's out there talking about why they're doing that and I think we'll see whether or not that changes her ratings but she traditionally has had very low approval ratings and as do most congressional leaders and that is a good eight point to make I believe Mitch McConnell is probably lower even than not only he's the worst rated of all of them and that is traditional that congressional leaders do not do well in these these kinds of approval polls partly because people don't feel the necessity to back them just because they share a party label if you're the president of the United States on Euro Republican I'm Republican looking. I'm going to say I approve of what you're doing office and that's just the way Republicans behave you know one thing. I'm really curious about and run. You can speak to this. Maybe a little bit but you were talking about how unpopular Watergate you know kind of pushing impeachment during Watergate was it's always surprising to me that even fifty years later whenever I hear that Dang Leonard Skill Leonard Skin Leonard Skinner DHS highway system that Leonard Sooner Leonard Skinner Song Sweet Home Alabama. There's the line in were they say. Watergate does not bother me. Does your conscience bother youth now. The first time I heard it on my radio I practically drove off the road. I mean here we are talking about muscle shoals talking about Alabama and all this sort of thing and then suddenly they start talking about Georgia governor and then they say Watergate does not bother me and I'm thinking to myself. What are they talking about do. Do they know their audience. I just wonder how it's GonNa seep into the culture now since you've got to think who would be the person to do the peaches on yeah but for which side okay for. Democrats the four Democrats little ause there you could do that Ukraine road. The soundtrack is all right well. Let's take a quick break and when we get back. We'll talk about impeachment one. Oh one it sounds like a disaster with sounds like repeat all the songs of the Soundtrack Soundtrack Impeachment WanNa one support for for this podcast and the following message come from the Annie E. Casey Foundation developing solutions to support strong families and communities to help ensure a brighter future for for America's children. More information is available at eighty. Cf Dot Org an incident Nashville that sucked the Latino community a computer designed to control the the entire Chilean economy. A Martian invasion and Ecuador is back with a brand new season. NPR SPANISH-LANGUAGE PODCAST will take you around Latin America to show you the fascinating strange compelling stories of the region subscribe and listen every Tuesday and we're back. Let's start with a basic civic lesson earlier this week. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced support for an impeachment inquiry Rod. Can you just define that for folks. What does it even mean gene to launch an impeachment inquiry it just means that they're going to go forward with investigating various aspects of the president's behavior with a specific set set of behaviors in mind in this case this Ukrainian business and it's going to be done by defined group of people starting out here with the House Intelligence Committee for the time being and and it means that they are driving towards impeachment but it is not thought to find that to the what is impeachment because I don't know that folks have a clear sense of what it means if a president is impeached impeached and remain in office as we've seen with Bill Clinton that's correct. The House has the responsibility in the constitution and by the way the Constitution is extraordinarily big egg about all this. It's only a few sentences in various parts of the Constitution and it says the House you'll have the sole power to impeach and the Senate shall have the sole power to try the impeachment the charges from the House and it says that the president or any other federal officer in it's mostly been federal judges can be impeached for bribery treason or ho other high crimes and misdemeanors now. If you know what that means you're possibly the first person to be absolutely certain it's always been argued over what exactly that ain't crime misdemeanor misdemeanors right and as far as procedure. Hey you're on your own good luck. They did it one way in eighteen sixty eight. They did it another way. In nineteen seventy three and seventy four didn't another way again in and nine hundred ninety eight and I suspect this one will look a little different to Ron. You just mentioned three specific incidents in history so we should be clear that this impeachment inquiry is the fourth time that a president is facing. That's correct that is basically correct and and we don't really know how far this is going to go. It might not actually lead to impeachment impeachment proceedings. We know there's going to be an inquiry but proceedings would mean that you were actually drafting articles of impeachment and that those articles were going to be voted in that committee and then sent to the floor of the house although it does seem like they're heading in that direction and I mean when you talk about the Clinton impeachment proceedings. It's this vis and you're saying. This seems like it could be heading that way. I mean Deirdre. This seems like that. Timeline is fairly similar yeah. I I think you're right. I think the other thing is once that you have the speaker of the House who had been resisting publicly backing impeachment now making a national addressing she was now publicly launching an official impeachment inquiry it changes the politics as Ron outlined. It is a political process not a legal process so there's been a lot of talk this week about what's an impeachable offense and I I think different people have different opinions about that but there is now a pretty strong unity among House Democrats that the whistle blower complaint and the notes of the call all between the president of the United States in the president of Ukraine amount to what they believe are impeachable offenses well. The fact is the this is not a legal process. You know this. This isn't spelled out somewhere in the constitution for how it's supposed to go. You're not going to judge and a jury in the house. This is a political process determined by the majority in right now. It's Democrats in the house. They're going to determine what the steps are. How this is going to go weather and how and who files articles of impeachment and what those are that's? It's all about Democrats and that's all a political process not illegal one. You're going to have to wait till you get to the Senate for something. That seems like a trial a throw. The Constitution Institution says that the Senate shall sit as a court as in essence and try and convict or acquit so those are all much more courtroom type terms the the constitution actually specifies that the chief justice of the United States Supreme Court shall sit and preside over that trial so we had William Rehnquist do that for Clinton and it would be John Roberts in this instance and he would sit as the judge at the front of the room but he would not render the final verdict that would be done by the the jury in quotation marks consisting of the one hundred senators and I also think it's important to remember that the Senate is run by Republicans and you need sixty seven votes to convict and remove a president in an impeachment trial and maybe while it's not a political because jury there's a hundred senators and they're all politician to to boil this down though okay if you're sitting there thinking. Why is this worth it. Why would you go through with this well. That's the calculation that Nancy Pelosi has been making this entire tire time when she's tried to pump the brakes and show some caution here. We actually asked this question in our poll. Do you think it's worth it if he's you know impeached in the house and not convicted by the Senate and guess what people were split. They didn't think it was worth it overall. If you look at independence they didn't think it was worth it overall to go through it this if he wouldn't be ultimately move from office all right well there will be a lot more questions but we are going to leave it there for now and we'll be back in your feed on Monday date until then you can keep up with every breaking detail on this story by listening to your local public radio station the NPR ONE APP or NPR dot Org Emma solid in the presidential campaign. I'm dear Walsh Congressional Editor Domenico Montanaro senior political editor and correspondent and I'm Ron elving senior editor and correspondent and thank you you for listening to the N._p._R. Politics podcasts.

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