Audioburst Search

21 Burst results for "Political Magazine"

Tusk to Johnson: Brexit not 'stupid blame game'

BBC Newshour

03:20 min | 9 months ago

Tusk to Johnson: Brexit not 'stupid blame game'

"Britain's chief bricks of the guys said to David frost is holding for the talks in Brussels today on the government's two proposals for leaving the European Union on October the thirty first the prime minister Boris Johnson the German chancellor Angela Merkel levels have been discussing how to break the current deadlock box at the same time the government officials told the BBC that the British government is preparing for a break down of those talks this week it follows the publication of a series of texts in the spectator political magazine on Monday from an official in the prime minister's office which claimed that and I could if the deal dies in the next few days then it won't be revised let's speak to a political correspondent rob Watson said rob what Annette is going on well I think this is a a truly dramatic moments and the press pros that someone I know it's been a pretty dramatic all along to them but this is an extraordinary moment because this tax ma'am I want to be like to call it does come from a senior number ten official we think it is from a Michael Dominic Cummings Mister Johnson's chief of staff and if you remember the man he was the brains behind the vote leave campaign want significant because you have to be blind as a pact not to see the message coming from number ten and that is that the vessels that with the E. or about to fail are they going to say it's it's gonna be the E. U.'s fold and that we have I'm going to play tough we're going to try and do our best to still leave the European Union even the facts will out of jail the end of October and if we have to fight a general election we're gonna blame those in the U. K. who stood in the way as they would say it of practice at and those in the European Union he stood in the way of brexit I mean it is a truly still missing moments to them clearly aware of this the European Council president Donald says because accuse Mister Johnson of engaging in a stupid blame game he has a lot I can finish the rest of the tweet for you Julian because it's not extraordinary that's how it came out of that it's at stake is the future of Europe and the U. K. as well as the security in and trust of our people you don't want to Dale you die once the extension you don't want to revoke clove obvious which for those who don't know lance and as you know well enough you guy and of course very pointed to land and that's missed the Tuscan knows of calls that Boris Johnson who this is directed that started lacks it indeed here in Oxford to Mister Johnson than full could possibly blame the European Union for the break down all of negotiations but that doesn't life make life any easier for him necessary doesn't know and I think look a bit of context him and I think one of the reasons why Downing Street has got so incredibly aggressive it is it also reflects the fact that Mister Johnson is in a tight spot on that to some extent he has lost control of the brexit process it's sort of it suggests that these doubling down on the back of the sort of basically taking the view look my very political survival depends all on delivering brexit and that's why I'm that's why anti the gloves are off but it's immensely risky it may put off the vote says it may be put off even some of his own government so I will Britain believing the European Union on October the thirty first question I'm glad time was running out I don't know okay well we'll have to leave it there with a bit of a gap the term rob anything subs on political correspondent rob

Britain David Frost Brussels European Union
"political magazine" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"Twenty twenty Democrats stance on ethanol and how all of them have basically fallen in line in support of ethanol despite other policy positions that they have that might make you think that they would have come out against it. And actually spoke to the author of that piece. Joining me now is Michael Gren walled senior writer for politico magazine. He's the author of the peace from March twenty nineteen how the twenty twenty Democrats. Learn to love ethanol, Michael thanks so much for joining me. Thanks for having me. So in this episode, one of the central plotlines is that all the democratic candidates are expected to support ethanol production, but it's actually. Kind of cynical because none of them actually believe in ethanol production. And I was surprised when I was researching for our discussion to find your article in political magazine because it turns out that maybe things haven't really changed that much since this episode aired in two thousand five well, the main thing that's changed is that there's a lot more evidence that ethanol is bad. But certainly the ethanol pandering has not changed their I guess a lot of rural votes in Iowa. You know, I read a study from the department of energy that said ethanol production is getting better and getting more efficient, and you know, at one point in the west wing episode. They talk about how it takes a gallon of fuel to create a gallon of ethanol making a gallon of ethanol takes almost a gallon a boil it's like same using tonic. Water is an attitude reduces our demand for Jin. So, you know, it's not a net energy creator. But in this energy department report, it says the ratio is actually gonna to one, and it's gonna get better as technology continues to improve have you found that that's not the case. We'll know that part is true. Certainly agriculture corn growing ethanol production all of that has gotten more efficient but back in two thousand five there is a real misunderstanding of ethanol's impact on the environment. Partly because people weren't as focused as they should have been on climate change. Which is the the main area were ethanol so problematic back in those the days of two thousand five people figure that the actual act of growing ethanol was carbon neutral because you know, you took the corn..

Michael Gren Democrats politico magazine political magazine Iowa writer
"political magazine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"What you've got through the first responders first responders right here. Have you been incredible law enforcement has been incredible. What they've done is. They all just helped everybody. Mr. Trump at first lady Melania held hands as they paused in front of each of the markers or record narrow church serving as a makeshift disaster relief centre. Tom Foty, CBS news, Washington. President Trump calls the Democratic Party anti Israel and anti Jewish over its response to controversial comments by freshman. Congress member Ilhan, Omar, the president accused Democrats are being anti Israel and anti Jewish after the house passed a sweeping resolution rejecting hateful speech, including anti-semitism and Islamaphobia. The Bill did not call out democratic congresswoman Omar by name who sparked the debate on Capitol Hill with comments that promoted, antisemitic stereotypes, all Democrats voted in favor of the Bill twenty Republicans opposed it and one voted present. Meanwhile, Omar is ripping former President Barack Obama during an interview with political magazine, the Minnesota democrat called Obama a pretty. Face and suggested his agenda of hope and change was an illusion Omar is a freshman Muslim lawmaker who recently came under fire for challenging US policy toward Israel. She said Obama was responsible for authorizing drone attacks on countries around the world. She says her comments about former President Obama have been distorted we begin with spring training. The Red Sox trailing the Mets ten to is. They're playing the ninth inning in Fort Myers. Dustin Pedroia play two innings he grounded out to third and his only at bat hockey the Bruins look to extend their point streak. Ten nineteen games. When they host the Shanta. There's tonight. Patrice Bergeron says it's not always pretty, but they continue to get it done. Thank.

Omar Barack Obama President Trump president Democrats Mets Israel Patrice Bergeron Democratic Party CBS Red Sox Tom Foty Dustin Pedroia Congress lady Melania Fort Myers Shanta political magazine
"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And if you're just joining us, my guest is Tracey thorn singer, songwriter, formerly half of the group everything, but the girl and now a solo artist, she's British and also writes a column for the political magazine the new statesman in England. I wanna ask you about the album cover for amplified heart. It looks like you and Ben are either getting dressed after sex are getting undressed before sex. Like, your t shirt has hiked up. Your belt is unbuckled banish shirtless in the background. What what does that album cover about? It's interesting because I look back at the album cover, and I think well, we look so skinny do we. Yeah, we ready to, but you know, that was posted illness he'd lost all that way because of being sick. And I'd lost all that weight because of not eating for months because of being in this terrible state of anxiety. And you know, we're partly indulging in the extremity of. I think what had happened, and what we suddenly found out bodies looking like, and you know, I is this something quite rock and roll about in a way exposing that degree of extremity. Look, my ravaged to look, you know, there's something you will my sexy about it is interesting that you say it does give off that vibe. But you know, is quite edgy. It's very much of the times. It's a very. Mid-nineties photo, you know, people like car in day, and you can tailor we're taking those sort of photos of Kate moss for vogue where everything was a little bit grungy looking, you know, very skinny multiples with cigarettes, and I do think the imagery on the front of the album does buy into that a bit. And because we just happened to look like that at that moment because what what what did just happen to us. I think we just though, oh, let's just go for it. Let's show what we like. So I love your deep voice. And you said that you didn't initially think of yourself as a singer. But when you did start singing that you wanted to sing like Patti Smith are Susie. Sue from Suzanne the ban. She's, but you started singing that way on stage, and then just kind of lost lost your voice. So what did you do? Instead. I think for a while then I had to try and work out a way of coming up with a voice that was my own that that I could have some control over that took me quite a while. I think for a long time, I was a much better studios thing live singer. Because again, I could sing as quietly as I needed to and often what people say about my voices, you know, it's very intimate. It's very direct sounds like I'm singing right in your ear. And that's because a lot of the studio singing, I did especially in the early days is sung like that. It's very whispered into the microphone kind of singing. I then had to learn was how to convey the songs on stage where inevitably you have to project a bit more. You know, I had to build up a bit more, strength and stamina. So I tried having some singing lessons for awhile. I I learned how to do breathing exercises. And I just had to gradually build up a voice that was my own, and you know, which could serve the functions it needed to. So you had a singing teacher for awhile who'd worked with a lot of stars, including Johnny rotten, Ozzy Osbourne, Linda McCartney, CO, drummer, some of these things happened after studied with her. But she wanted you to sing higher and more of a head voice than a chest voice. How did you like it up there in the higher toll? Not at all. I think I completely ignored that piece of advice from her. I didn't have very many lessons to be to be honest. And I found bits of it helpful I found some of it helpful as sort of warm up exercises. But then when it came to actually singing my songs, I would go back to singing in the voice that seemed like mine, so when you did you tell your singing teacher that you wanted to sing in your chest voice in your deeper voice as opposed to the head voice and. What did she have to say about that? I don't think she was very tolerant really of pop singers wanting to sing in their disastrous pop voices. I mean most pop singers single wrong. And you know, we we we do all these things and most popular knees about having a distinctive voice and using into distinctive way. Which technically might be completely incorrect when you get through seeing teach. They usually trying to correct those things, and what you then come up against is that anxiety of what am I gonna lose the thing that makes me distinctive? If I start trying to sing properly. To just turn into a not very good promising. You know, you've written that your voice got deeper because of menopause, and I think it's great that you wrote about that. Because I think a lot of women are uncomfortable at knowledge of the existence of menopause. It's personal. And it's also a sign of age. Yes. No. I think I think that's right. And especially in music, obviously, which you know, there's still a lot of pressure to. Maintain an image of youthfulness, so this insurance and sexiness. And so as soon as you bring menopausal into the room think of young men, especially might run screaming. And so that's that's a risk. I'm prepared to take my guest is Tracey thorn, her new album is called record. We'll talk more after a break. This is fresh air..

Tracey thorn menopause Kate moss Ben Patti Smith political magazine England Suzanne Johnny rotten Linda McCartney Ozzy Osbourne
"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The purpose of these people come in here is because George and his administration has done nothing with our lives. So we bring our day to you, and they were determined to deposit the ashes of their loved ones on the White House. Steph part of aids is one of the few diseases behavior matters. Called on somebody will change your behavior. Using. Because eight changed the behavior. No one of these. Is asking. You can't rationally Peterson observed that the overwhelming majority of citizens without power or direct acquaintance with the deceased. A president is not a person, but in event one with vast and potent consequences for good or ill. So when assessing a presidency kindness simply doesn't apply if you were talking about World War Two, right? And you only talked about the good things you talked about victory in Europe. And you never talked about trapping the atomic bomb. We would say that that is not accurate to the historical record. You wouldn't say you're being mean to World War Two. So what voices would you have included if you had to write the historical record of president, George H W Bush. A soldier who served in the first Gulf war. Someone who lost a loved one to aids crisis. Someone who was sentenced to under the war on drugs. But then also, you know, someone who's life was really changed by the Americans with Disabilities Act or who after Bush signed the Ryan white act into law that made receiving aids treatment possible. So there's a full cornucopia. That's not just people who have covered them or other presidents or senators, and that sort of thing the piece that I saw that really did a good job of this is David greenberg's piece in politico. Well, I think obituaries are off in the first place that we turn when we wanna learn about it historical figure. David Greenberg is a professor of history journalism and media studies at Rutgers University and contributing editor to political magazine, you know, we're not engaged in a discourse with the Bush family. Right now, we're engaged in a discourse. With the American people and new generations who may be learning about President Bush's presidency and career for the first time. Okay. You wrote a book about president Nixon, you watch the obituaries you read them you saw them when he died. He's about as complex a character as you could encounter with Richard Nixon even more than with George Bush. Yeah. There was I would call almost a whitewash at the time of his funeral. How'd you were the chief news editor for Newsweek in Washington? Richard Nixon didn't like you very much. I thought what he knew of a stomach sadness theater. Richard nixon. Accomplished a lot of political career opening the door to China easing the tensions with the Soviet Union pizza Vietnam and brought a lot of good to the world on the domestic front. He was very successful as the president. And the tragedy of Richard Nixon. Most of all he's going to be made number from Watergate, it was sort of hard to imagine. From hearing some of the eulogies why this man has gone down in history in disgrace. As the first president ever to resign as someone who committed constitutional crimes and abused. The powers of his office. It was almost. It's just one part of the story. So what was the main story in the eulogies of George? Herbert Walker Bush as Inc was left out the story. We have been hearing is a man of Greek decency and bipartisan ship, but in fact that decency which no doubt was part of who Bush was most of the time lost out to political cynicism. When he wants to win in a Texas Senate race in nineteen sixty four he is denouncing the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act, which is one of the great achievements of modern politics. He embraced supply side economics that he had called economics during the campaign. That's right. And he also threw aside his support for abortion rights because Reagan wanted him. Two he dropped his support for the equal rights amendment for women because Reagan wanted him to. So I see a pattern of repeatedly subordinating what we might call his nobler impulses, or at least as more liberal or moderate impulses to political expediency, I won't even bother mentioning the low of the Willie Horton ad during the campaign. It's probably been played ad nauseam at this point. Bush liked to say, oh, yeah. During the campaign, I could get nasty. But once I was elected all fewer governance from there on out. Well, it's never like that for Bush or for any president that the pressures of politics way on particular decisions. He wasn't standing up for this older strain of republicanism. He was sacrificing it in the short term in the hope perhaps of being implemented in the long term. But that long-term never came. What happened instead was the concessions that he made to the far right ended up only empowering the far, right? Greenberg notes that such vaunted Bush achievements says the Americans with Disabilities Act and amendments to the Clean Air Act, where confessions Democrats controlled both the house and the Senate he wrote that George H W Bush often slung decide to create space for far-right ideologues and practitioners of personal destruction. And that it shouldn't surprise us to see that others made a far more malignant stuff than he have. Now taken over that space where does a president or a powerful politician leave that is the essence of a legacy, and in this particular case the role of eulogy an event like a president is not a subject for public eulogizing star. He so far. He no longer belongs to his family or friends a president by dint of the power. He wields belongs to us all and especially as Peterson says, the least among us anything less betrays history chance to learn from it. Choose better and do better..

Herbert Walker Bush president president Nixon David greenberg George Peterson Bush family White House Europe Texas Senate Reagan Senate political magazine China Willie Horton
"political magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Purpose of these people come in here is because George Bush and his administration has done nothing with our lives. So we bring our day to you, and they were determined to deposit. The actions of their loved ones on the White House part of aids is one of the few diseases where behavior matters. Call somebody will change your behavior. Using. Because. Behavior. No, one of these groups is out saying. You can't talk about it. Rationally Peterson observed that to the overwhelming majority of citizens without power or direct acquaintance with the deceased. A president is not a person, but in invent one with vast and potent consequences for good or ill. So when assessing a presidency kindness simply doesn't apply if you were talking about World War Two, right? And you only talked about the good things you talked about victory in Europe. And you never talked about trapping the atomic bomb. We would say that that is not accurate to the historical record. You wouldn't say you're being mean to World War Two. So what would you have included if you had to write the historical record of president, George H W Bush? A soldier who served in the first Gulf war. Someone who lost a loved one to the aids crisis. Someone who was sentenced to under the war on drugs. But then also, you know, someone who's life was really changed by the Americans with Disabilities Act or who after push signed the Ryan white act into law that made receiving aids treatment possible. So there's a full cornucopia. That's not just people who have covered them or other presidents or senators, and that's the piece that I saw that really did a good job of this is David greenberg's piece in politico. Well, I think obituaries are often the first place that we turn when we wanna learn about it historical figure, David Greenberg. It's a professor of history journalism and media studies at Rutgers University and contributing editor to political magazine, you know, we're not engaged in a discourse with the Bush family right now, we're engaged in a discourse. With the American people and new generations who may be learning about President Bush's presidency and career for the first time. Okay. You wrote a book about president Nixon, you watch the obituaries you read them you saw them when he died. He's about as complex a character as you could encounter with Richard Nixon even more than with George Bush. Yeah. There was I would call almost a whitewash at the time of his funeral. How'd you were the chief news editor for Newsweek in Washington, which addiction didn't like you very much? Give us your first thoughts of what he died in was coming sadness theater. Richard nixon. A lot of political career opening the door to China easing the tensions with the Soviet Union pizzas. Vietnam and brought a lot of good to the world on the domestic front. He was very successful as the president. And the tragedy of Richard Nixon. Most of all he's going to be league number from Watergate, it was sort of hard to imagine. From hearing some of the eulogies why this man has gone down in history in disgrace. As the first president ever to resign as someone who committed constitutional crimes and abused. The powers of his office. It was almost. Just one part of the story. So what was the main story in the eulogies of George? Herbert Walker Bush that you think was left out the story. We have been hearing is a man of great decency and bipartisan ship, but in fact that decency which no doubt was part of who Bush was most of the time lost out to political cynicism. When he wants to win in a Texas Senate race in nineteen sixty four he is denouncing the nineteen sixty four Civil Rights Act, which is one of the great achievements of modern politics. He embraced supply side economics that he had called voodoo economics during the campaign. That's right. And he also threw aside his support for abortion rights because Reagan wanted him. Two he dropped his support for the equal rights amendment for women because Reagan wanted him to. So I see a pattern of repeatedly subordinating what we might call his nobler impulses, or at least as more liberal or moderate impulses to political expediency, I won't even bother mentioning the low of the Willie Horton ad during the campaign. It's probably been played ad nauseam at this point. Bush liked to say, oh, yeah. During the campaign, I could get nasty. But once I was elected, you know, it was all fewer governance from there on out. Well, it's never like that for Bush or for any president that the pressures of politics way on particular decisions. He wasn't standing up for this older strain of republicanism. He was sacrificing it in the short term in the hope perhaps of being able to implement it in the long term. But that long-term never came. What happened instead was the concessions that he made to the far right ended up only empowering the far, right? Greenberg notes that such vaunted Bush achievements says the Americans Disabilities Act and amendments to the Clean Air Act, where confessions Democrats controlled both the house and the Senate he wrote that George H W Bush often slunk aside to create space for far-right ideologues and practitioners of personal destruction. And that it shouldn't surprise us to see that others made a far more malignant stuff than he have. Now taken over that space where does a president or a powerful politician leave us that is the essence of a legacy, and in this particular case the role of eulogy an event like a president is not a subject for public eulogizing star. He so far. He no longer belongs to his family or friends a president by dint of the power. He wields belongs to a. Us all and especially as Peterson says, the least among us anything less betrays history chance to learn from it, choose better and better..

Herbert Walker Bush president president Nixon David greenberg Peterson White House Europe Texas Senate Vietnam Reagan George China Senate political magazine Soviet Union
George H W Bush remembrance

Between The Lines

07:44 min | 1 year ago

George H W Bush remembrance

"Era. It's usually intended as a criticism, isn't it? However in the case of George H W Bush, America's forty first president and father of his forty third is really a compliment. Bush senior was the last president to grasp the complexities of foreign policy my judgement. He represented fiscal discipline that helped to merica on the path back to balanced budgets. Moreover, he was by temperament a man of the middle in what has become an age of increasing Audie logical polarize action. He's a Wall Street Journal editorial this week, quote, a gentleman in a culture growing cruder by the Bush also had a regime. Unlike today's creep hall, Titians ninety pollen, and what will to oilman special envoy to China. UN ambassador. CI direct congressman Voss president president. Well, someone who called the historical significance of George Bush Sania early on is my next guests nearly two decades ago. Jonathan rash wrote a cover story for the new Republic. Back then Washington's leading liberal political magazine and the toddle father superior out greatest. Modern president Jonathan is the author of the happiness cove, and it's a great pleasure to welcome back to between the lawn high. They Jonathan hi, Tom. It's great to be back. When Bush was president in nineteen Ninety-three. He had no shortage of critics liberals dismissed him as a wimp intellectuals ridiculed his sentence fragments and jumbled Syntex and even conservative detested him for not just Rausing, Texas. But losing to Bill Clinton why? Then you write Bussan Holly. Bush was a problem solver if not for him Ronald Reagan's presidency would have looked like a semi failure and Bill Clinton might well have failed. He cleaned up the messes that Reagan left behind and he left a healthy situation for Bill Clinton to build on. And he got punished for doing it kind of typical of his generation and the kinds of constructive attitudes. That they had voice nine is a foreign policy president. And of course, he's price full. He's handling of the collapse of the Soviet Union yet at the time Bush was widely criticized for not embracing democracy. National self-determination. Bush was a man of restraint. And of course, he was ridiculed for that wouldn't be prudent and so on, but he turned out to be right? He was very careful. Not to rub the Russians face in the collapse of the Soviet empire. Give them room to adjust. And in fact, ending the Cold War with Germany and NATO was darn near miraculously batter. For example, said don't even try it. It can't be done and same thing with the economy. He was careful not to go overboard with stimulus. He understood that it was too late in nineteen ninety two. He was careful not to invade Iraq. And occupy Baghdad he knew that that would be a disaster again. And again, he proved his critics wrong. It's interesting because after the US lead victory in the Persian Gulf, though, many critics poll Koetting alpha prime minister was one among many who expressed disappointment at the failure to finish Saddam off boosting Cup that Chris. After recite invited Iraq Diddy. No, that's that's exactly right. And it's you know, it's not just at the man was cautious. You know, this kind of negative virtue of caution. He also had the positive virtual being able to Wade into these very complicated difficult situations. And somehow get the problem solved. He brokered a compromise. That broke the back of the US federal budget deficit made possible balanced budget surpluses a few years later, he did that working with Republicans and Democrats it cost him the support of his party. But it was a huge thing. He sold the savings and loan crisis, which was the biggest financial meltdown until the one in two thousand very very serious very dangerous. We've forgotten about it, probably Australians don't even know about it because he solved it. So well, he dealt with the open source Nicaragua which Reagan had left one thing after another. He would just go in and deal with it. Like a grownup guesses. Jonathan rash from the Brookings Institution in Washington. He's also the. Oh, throw the happiness cove. We had a segment Ilia this year on that subject. And which about the great modern US president, George H W Bush who died last weekend at I ninety four John you obviously prize Bush's prudence and pragmatism. How does he compare to say he's Republican successes there? There are a whole bunch of them. I think of the new Gingrich revolutionaries who want to slash the size and the scope of the federal government. The George W Bush Neo conservatives who want to democratize the world, and they were the Trump populists America first and all that how does Bush saying compay to his successes. He's so different in so many ways home where does we're just going to be getting the first thing to say that he could not be elected dogcatcher. I mean, I mean literally he would not be a serious candidate for high national office. He would be considered. What's what's known over? Here is a rhino or Republican in name only. So first of all the difference is temperamental. He was not a populous. He was not elitist. He was someone who understood that he was fortunate and believed in giving back he valued expertise he valued wisdom. He was in fact, his own secretary of state working the phones, and he understood that there was no substitute for knowledge. He had deep experience in government, something Republicans now reject it turns out now that in both parties in the US even more Republicans than Democrats experiences seen as disqualification because it makes you part of the swamp. Okay. Quick quick quick Chris Christian for whom did George H W Bush vote for in two thousand sixteen. Well, I don't know that we know that. But we know he didn't vote for Donald Trump. Yeah. I read. Well, that's true. But I believe he actually voted for Hillary Clinton any sun abstained fest nodding. Yeah. We'll fascinating d I mean, he much more resemble Hillary Clinton someone else who comes along with a deep resume in government and lots of proven skills, but is not a very good campaigner not good at connecting has many of the same faults. A well what about sense of decency? Let's get your reaction to the hand risen letter that Busse ride for his successor and opponent Bill Clinton. This was on the die of the January twenty nine ninety three inauguration, by the way, I happen to attend that inauguration as one of the best moments of my life. This is an NPR voice. I've dear Bill when I walked into this office. Just now I felt the same sense of wonder in respect that I felt for years ago. I know you will feel that too. I wish you great happiness here. I never felt the loneliness some presidents have. -scribed? There will be very tough times made even more difficult by criticism. You may not think is fair. I'm not a very good one to give advice, but just don't let the critics discourage you or push you. Of course, you will be our president. When you read this note, I wish you well. I wish you family will your success now is our country's success. I'm rooting hard for you. Good luck. George George W Bush's handwritten leaded to his opponent and successive Bill Clinton on the day of the transfer of power in non Hain Ninety-three. That was an MP voice of Jonathan Rashleigh. It's a beautiful notice and it and

George H W Bush President Trump Bill Clinton United States George George W Bush Ronald Reagan Bush George W Bush Jonathan Rash Hillary Clinton Washington Wall Street Journal America Jonathan Rashleigh Chris Christian Congressman Voss New Republic UN Texas
Calculating The Brexit Arithmetic

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:51 min | 1 year ago

Calculating The Brexit Arithmetic

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from the fresh market, offering prepared sides desserts in ready to heat meals for your thanksgiving celebration, plus fresh Turkey spiral sliced Honey ham and more details in recipes available at the fresh market dot com. This weekend marks a major step in Britain's more than two year journey to leave the European Union. The us remaining twenty-seven nations will vote on a divorce agreement with the United Kingdom and for more. We turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Hi, Frank may Mary how is this vote likely to go in Brussels any chance of defeat. I think people would be really surprised if there were defeat, you know, there there are complaints about at Spain is threatening to vote against it. Because they have a dispute with the United Kingdom over Gibraltar in Britain is ruled Gibraltar for several centuries. But the sense is the European Union is generally getting most of what it wants out of this and it's expected to pass their on Sunday. Okay. But then it has to get through the British parliament, and it phase a much steeper climb there. Tell us about how it's looking. It's totally different over here in the British parliament. And the numbers are bad. All right now, as far as anybody can tell May's conservative party doesn't even have a parliamentary majority here. So they don't have enough votes of their own to do it. Speaking of naming Stephen Bush, he writes for the new statesman. It's a left leaning political magazine here, and he's a top political journalists in in this is what he said she is seventy two votes down before you kind of factor in the fight and the opposition parties will vote against. So she is well adrift and on calls for quite a big defeat as it stands so objections from the left and the right from her own part in how he's had of her party. What happens if affairs? Well, this is really interesting some people in our own party, Brexit tears. They they would love to go back to Brussels and try to get this deal tweaked, but Brussels is not an immune to make changes. They've been negotiating over this for a ton of time. And they're kind of tired of it some people here have been talking about a pretty interesting scenario that will sound familiar to Americans. They're saying in recent US history. There's something that could be relevant EU member in two thousand eight the US global financial crisis. There was this troubled asset relief program at heart which. We all covered. This was going to have the government by all these toxic assets were hundreds of billions of dollars will congress initially voted it down markets crashed. And even though congress didn't like it. They passed it later kind of in a panic. Now, the thought is there could be a market crash here that could push members of parliament to change their mind, but it's not clear because most people don't expect this thing to pass in the first place. Remind us why British leaders of so many different political stripes hate this deal. Well, they hate it. Because it comes down to the Irish border at certain point when the United Kingdom leaves the European Union. It will create the need for a border on the island of Ireland between Northern Ireland which is a part of the UK and the Republic of Ireland that's part of the EU. And basically with the US saying is you can't leave until we solve this problem and Brexit. Here's are saying gosh could take forever to get a new trade deal. We not sure how to solve the problem. Exactly. So we could be stuck in the U for years could Theresa May's political career survive having this voted down in parliament will normally prime minister Ori is. You know here would have to resign. But since the Brexit vote in two thousand sixteen normal rules, definitely do not apply to British politics anymore. Stephen Bush that journalist I was talking to thinks that she actually make just keep coming back to parliament until she gets the answers. She wants this is how he put it. I suspect than want have to happen is you have a defeat. Everyone expects another vote where people kind of expected to be falling when it's not fine. And then perhaps that point you get the necessary panic Theresa May has been in such an odd position for the last two years implementing or trying to implement this policy that she was not a supporter of before she became nine ministers sack. I was she managed to survive through all of this. You know, it's it's remarkable to watch her. She gets a lot of criticism here. But she just doesn't quit. Nobody seems to be able they try to beat her down. It doesn't really work. There've been a number of memes out that depict her as the black Knight in Monty python's clearly grail. This is the night that keeps losing limbs and keeps fighting on saying it's just a scratch, and Stephen Bush, the journalists I was talking to he says this has been her style for a long time. She would affectively just grab. Really exhaust away to victory. Not affectively Theresa May's political approach just keep on, you know, Putin along and Wakefield opponents to themselves out poodling along poodling along, and I should add one of the thing here that the prime minister has going for her. If this all falls, apart, the United Kingdom could leave the European Union with no deal at all. Which most people think would be an economically disastrous, and it would be seen globally as a huge self inflicted wounds. So there is a worst case scenario that she's you know, and she stands between the United Kingdom, and that scenario the other thing is that when you listen to all of her opponents, none of them have a better idea honestly for leaving the U it's a bad situation. But she does have some respects relatively strong position NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Thank you. Happy to do at Ari. This message comes from NPR sponsor Capital

European Union United Kingdom Theresa May Stephen Bush Brussels NPR Frank Langfitt United States London Prime Minister Britain Congress Spain Gibraltar Brexit Northern Ireland Republic Of Ireland Mary
"political magazine" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"The question is who are we? Who are wing? Well, let me explain something. This is a piece from political magazine magazine today, you're gonna laugh your head off this at this headline Trump may not be crazy. But the rest of us are getting there fast. In other words, this man is driving all of it's crazy. Says CNN before love making is not his idea of a turn on. But she can hardly turn it off engrossed, and she is in the latest unnerving gyrations of Washington. They're talking about a Philadelphia couple who actually sought counseling because of the agitated state of American politics. It was causing a strain on their marriage was screwing them up in the bedroom. She wanted to watch CNN before they made love, I guess, she was she was into that kind of thing. She's probably into some sort of bondage to bound to be she's if she's wanting to watch Cedo CNN, she's gotta be a SADO masochism or just a masochist. I don't know. The couple story was relatable to go by the therapist on condition of their anonymity. But their travails, according to the national surveys and interviews with mental health professionals are not as anonymous novelists as one might expect even when symptoms are not sexual in nature. There is abundant evidence. At Trump in his daily uproars are galloping into the inner life of millions of American. Only if you are trumped arrange to start with folks, only if you're Trump deranged. Can I tell you? Speaking of therapy. This is the dream. I had last night. Then this is started out there. I'm just throwing it out there. This is weird. I was at my farm. I was down around where we have a cabin. On the property, and I was down there, and it's sort of hilly there. And there were Fox News anchors stationed at different places with with with rifles. And it became clear to me that they were defending either me or something, and I'm talking about I remember there was Steve Doocy. There was a Bret Baier. There was Brian Kilmeade. There were several of them. They were stationed they were at different positions. All around the property and somebody was picking them off with a sniper rifle. And I was running trying to get out of the line of fire. What the heck does that mean? So I think it's probably I'm worried about the left wing media, and these crazy mobs out there, whether it might do lo and behold, I hadn't seen this story. And I swear to you I hadn't we had Brian Kilmeade on yesterday. Did you know that there's been some couple of comedians that have been following around and heckling him, and I didn't I didn't. I didn't see that story till today. It was weird because I'm going. Well, that's probably what this is all about all of these folks that are getting ambushed by the left, and they're taking folks out. I'm sure it's has something to do with that. I don't think that the left is I for one thing. I don't think Steve Doocy, and Brian Kilmeade, actually, come and defend my cabin. But it is sort of Representative isn't it of what we're going through right now. You look at these people out there, by the way, the guy that roundhouse kick the pro-life chick. They've arrested him Justin somebody you got more of that going on these people have Trump derangement syndrome. And now we're finding out from this political piece that people are having to go to therapy. But at least politico is a stupid enough to recognize it Trump's not decrees e one it's the folks who are having to go to therapy over Trump who were nuts. Since for two years or more commentators have been cross referencing observations of presidential behavior. Whether the official APA diagnostic and statistical manuals definition of narcissistic personality disorder journalists compared contemporary video of Trump with interviews from the nineteen eighties for signs of possible. Cognitive decline and even some people on his own team. According to books and news reports have been reading up on the process of presidential removal under the twenty fifth amendment fueled by suspicion that the president's allegedly erratic and undeniably precedent shattering approach to the Oval Office might prove eventually to be a case of non-compliance momentus. A more plausible interpretation in the view of some psychological experts is that Trump has been cultivating adapting and prospering from his distinctive brand of provocation brinksmanship and self drama for the past seventy two years what we're seeing is merely the president's own definition of normal. It is only the audience that finds the performance disorienting. In other words, he's not crazy. But the rest of us are getting there fast. And by by the rest of us. They're talking about crazy people on the left because I don't feel crazy watching Trump. I feel emboldened. I feel at sometimes amused. But we've got this story to and this is what really drives a left crazy..

Trump Brian Kilmeade CNN Steve Doocy political magazine Cedo CNN Bret Baier Washington Philadelphia president Fox News SADO Representative Justin Oval Office official APA seventy two years twenty fifth
"political magazine" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Peter. Surata joining that takes podcast is slash writers. Why turn buoy all rerun in Chris Vangelis STA Hello? Okay, guys, everybody's watching this the Senate hearing, are you guys watching that today in the background? I would. No. I can't take. I'm seeing live tweets on it, and that's bad enough. Everything is bad right now. I'd like it to stop being bid. Yeah, I'm already seeing it through Twitter. I'm kind of wedding watching it on TV myself just makes me depressed and reminds me of my days working at a political magazine. So that was not fun. You worked at a right leaning political. Yeah. I've also just thinking through Twitter and I even that is more than enough. So you know what? Let's get into some happy film news instead concentrate by the way. I, I'm not sure if you guys saw this, but Tom Hanks they released a photo of Tom Hanks as Mr. Rogers for the upcoming movie. We have that up on the site, but that can bring some joy to your day blitz up into the film news. Let's start off with who's replacing Burt Reynolds, including Tinos. Once upon a time in Hollywood tells about it. Brewster is taking over for Bertrand's. Bruce Dern is of course a very well known actor. He's been acting for many, many years, and he was he worked with Tarrant Quentin Tarantino before in the hateful eight. And now he's taking over the role of George Spahn who is who was a ranger, who lent his his ranch to Charles mates. And his family in the sixties. And of course, Burt Reynolds originally cast and his part, but he died before he could shoot any scenes. I mean, not that we wanna see, Burt Reynolds replaced by anybody. I mean, not that we had the choice, but I feel like if they were going to replace them with anybody, Brewster is one of the best choices. Christie thoughts them no Brewster. I mean, this is going to be a character whose you know an old sort of crazy man and Bruce Darren excels at playing this parts now in this part of his career. So I have no doubt he's going to do a great job. If you haven't been following the casting for this film, Chris has a great rate up on the site where he goes through like almost the entire casts and explains who they're playing, what kind of roles they play..

Burt Reynolds Bruce Dern Chris Vangelis Twitter Brewster Tarrant Quentin Tarantino Tom Hanks Bruce Darren Senate political magazine Surata George Spahn Tinos Christie Hollywood Charles mates Bertrand Mr. Rogers
Bruce Dern Replaces Burt Reynolds in Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’

/Film Daily

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Bruce Dern Replaces Burt Reynolds in Tarantino’s ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’

"Why turn buoy all rerun in Chris Vangelis STA Hello? Okay, guys, everybody's watching this the Senate hearing, are you guys watching that today in the background? I would. No. I can't take. I'm seeing live tweets on it, and that's bad enough. Everything is bad right now. I'd like it to stop being bid. Yeah, I'm already seeing it through Twitter. I'm kind of wedding watching it on TV myself just makes me depressed and reminds me of my days working at a political magazine. So that was not fun. You worked at a right leaning political. Yeah. I've also just thinking through Twitter and I even that is more than enough. So you know what? Let's get into some happy film news instead concentrate by the way. I, I'm not sure if you guys saw this, but Tom Hanks they released a photo of Tom Hanks as Mr. Rogers for the upcoming movie. We have that up on the

Tom Hanks Twitter Chris Vangelis Political Magazine Senate Mr. Rogers
"political magazine" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"She brought after after the whole display during the hearing when the protesters the protesters are being carried out in all of the craziness that we was undisputed from Kamala Harris and from Cory Booker. Mazey harare. No earlier this week was talking about these allegations by Ford by professor Ford against brick having off she is the one who said this. I expect the men in this country and the men in this committee, and many of them believe me because we all signed onto this letter to demand and FBI investigation, but really guess who's perpetuating all of these kinds of actions. It's the men in this country. And I just want to say to the men of this country to shut up and step up. So so she she's as far as I can tell I maybe wrong. She seems to be the latest to have snapped as far as Trump derangement syndrome the symptoms. Finally, have just accumulated and have overwhelmed her she seems to be the latest shoe snap. Now, she did an interview with political magazine. And in this interview, she hinted, she kind of gave away the Democrats plan. We already knew it though. And let's face it. The Democrats aren't big on hiding what they plan to do because they just put it out there in your face because they know that the Republicans are never going to call them on it or stop them. She talked about being able to hold this seat open Brian Kavanagh seat open until after the twenty twenty election. And because they think that if they can collapse Brett Kavanagh's nomination and Democrats regained control of the Senate in November. They're counting on the house and the Senate in November if digging control they can. Keep that seat empty until the twenty twenty election. And then they're they're pretty sure they can defeat they can defeat Trump. Now, it's a long term game. But did anybody not know this? I mean was this a secret. I don't think it was like, I think we've pretty much all knew what they were trying to do. They're trying to play this out at least to the mid term. But she pointed to the fact that they may be able to hold this open until twenty twenty and she pointed to the vacancy of Antonin Scalia former seat, and also let's face it this whole, Merrick garland nomination, they are really sore about that are very upset about that. And this is payback to Mitch McConnell and the whole, Merrick garland thing remember there. Mitch McConnell rationale one that was produced alternately by Joe Biden in the early nineties. Yes, that you're not supposed to nominate a Justice during an election year ten to allow the American people to ratify who they'd like to see make that nomination. Now maisy Hirono is creating her. Own rule now, which is to say that we are going to obstruct until we get what we want alternately, no matter what there are no conditions to this. And she's promising brazen obstruction. And what is the message? She's sending if she's reflective of the entire Democratic Party as you marry obviously if expect that she is you think she is. Then what the message that she's sending on behalf of the Democrats is elect us, and we promise that nothing will happen in America. Nothing will happen in the United States, Congress and only and one ninth of the entire supreme court will not be seated we promise you that. But that's what the base wants. So the base stands up and applauds and votes. They're smart. They know what their base one era where a do nothing. Congress was a problem. Now, six fifty an asset.

professor Ford Trump Democrats Mitch McConnell Senate harare Congress Kamala Harris Merrick garland maisy Hirono Cory Booker Brett Kavanagh FBI Brian Kavanagh Antonin Scalia Joe Biden political magazine United States Democratic Party
"political magazine" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"political magazine" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Media leaders and newsmakers this week. I'm thrilled to be joined by Michael Cruz senior writer for politico political magazine. Cruise does something pretty simple, but something I'm not seeing anybody else do when Trump's in the news when Trump's down the ropes, he goes back to Trump's own words all of the books Trump road or co road or kinda wrote over the decades and right now at this moment with the Bob Woodward book hitting and that New York Times op-ed stinging, the administration, there's a lot to learn from Trump's own books. Michael, joining me. Thanks for having me brand. You wrote recently about this old Trump called surviving at the top and some of the lessons about how Trump likes a crisis. He, he likes testing survival skills. What did you learn when he read the book. So surviving the top always in the Trump can and has been the most interesting. And in some respects, the most self reflective title that is because he writes it at a very particular moment in his long history, nineteen ninety. He is collapsing financial, he's billions of dollars in debt that collapses coinciding with his own self inflicted detonation of his marriage because of his affair with Marla Maples. And yet he comes out with this book called preposterously presumptuously. Hopefully surviving at the top at a time when he's not at the top and barely surviving. But you read through that book and I just as you reference plucked it off my shelf and reread it this past week, you read through that book and. It is clear both between the lines and also explicitly stated that being kind of on the edge and being in a state of real crisis, a place where it's not a foregone conclusion that he will slip out successfully onto the other side is not something that he is just sort of skillful act potentially. But something he actually sort of likes. He writes in that book that battling back from the brink is his favorite thing to do. And so as always we're sort of comparing apples and oranges and we think about what is going on on any given day in the Trump presidency and how might be Faulk active of something in his past. But here we are in a situation where he is struggling to survive in some ways that are not totally dissimilar to what we see in nineteen ninety. How many books. Trump right or co writer, I guess that sorta right over the years. Couple dozen. I couldn't give you an exact number depends how you count. There are books that are written. There are kind of increasingly obscure titles trumps favorite Gulf tips and titles of that ilk. But I have all of them and they take up a frightening amount of shelf space in my home office. But I do find that having read those books and having them at the ready is in some weird way instructive and useful in my efforts at least to try to keep up with the Trump presidency and try to understand the unprecedented chapter in American history, we are living through. When did you buy all of books? When when did you start reading them? I started buying these books very early on summer of twenty fifteen. And as we got deeper and deeper into the ongoing current situation kept on adding to my Trump library and so over the course of years. But you know, the Trump library at least books with Trump's name on the cover as an author or co author I've had for for for years at this point. Yeah, I just find it interesting at this moment in time because there is so much attention on books about Trump Woodward being the most recent example, but all year long, I mean pretty much every week. The number one near times bestseller is a book about Trump or about the effects of the Trump presidency. The publishing world is book about Trump. Yeah, exactly the this is the publishing world nomin and yet maybe the best way to understand what's going on is actually not just the art of the deal, but also how to get rich. And surviving at the top and champion and crippled America. These are all of his titles that he at least technically published..

Trump Trump Woodward Michael Cruz writer Faulk Bob Woodward Marla Maples New York Times political magazine America
"political magazine" Discussed on First Mondays

First Mondays

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on First Mondays

"I love to amass medallion qualifying miles Dan. You know what? Those are in q. m.'s. Delta guy Hume's. Yeah, delta. What's the? You know, the a lot of direct flights from Indianapolis, including to Charleston, gall Ginette direct flight. Well, yeah, it's pretty good. No concord though. No concord, no, sadly, nor nor conquered. If you wanna go to New Hampshire there. So all right, let's get into good behavior because the nomination of breath Cavanaugh has not been generating a lot of news, but it is not also been generating no news. And so I thought where we begin was with an article in political magazine that is very much in the first Mondays over by friend of the show and friend of mine, Lisa Blatt, which is titled and the title really tells you. I think just about everything you need to know. I'm a liberal feminist lawyer so far, so good. Here's why Democrats should support judge Cavanaugh by Lisa Blatt on August second, Twenty-eight teen. You see this article. I did see this thought it was interesting. I tend to think very strongly that people who's in with all respectively. So who we love and has been very great for the show and was I think the first big name person ever. On the show. Right. But I tend to think that people whose job it is to practice for the court fulltime. Yeah, I don't know whether they. Should be writing. They can really right, credible, peds like this. Right? Because they have such a vested interest in in the justices have incorrigible ships with them. Yeah. Well, they, they certainly look if one of them were willing to write an op-ed. That said, this guy sucks. Yeah, I would take that would take that very seriously because that's skin in the game. Yeah, this is this is gonna hurt me, but this view. Yeah. Otherwise, I've never seen such an op Ed. I never have either, and I don't want to be clear. I think that Lisa is being very sincere that she thinks that among the available choices. Brett Cavanaugh is the one that she would pick the hose. I think that she's friends with Brett Cavanaugh like they're kind of, you know, they're the same generation. They kind of have travelled in the same circles professionally for a while. They have actually a personality types that I think are compatible with each other. Even though they're not the same, but like they're, you know, they're friends. So I don't think this is insincere. Right? I think this is her writing about her friend, but I. Share the kind of general like, why is it newsworthy that someone's friend? Yeah, wishes them well, life like look, Dan. If you're ever nominated this court, I will choke down my responsibility to write, you know something nice about you. So you know, so that you'll get a nice little bump from your friend. It would be insane for anyone to take that too seriously because like what do I now right. There's, yeah, there's a couple of interesting claims in your says, she, she says, first of all that you know Roe versus Wade is really important to her as a liberal female, democrat mother of a teenage girl, but whatever judge cabinet decides on row. I know it will be because he believes the constitutional choirs that result. And I don't. I don't disagree with that, but I don't ever set at all. I don't think that's enough right there. The fact that someone believes like his acting good faith, even if there are, we think are bad. That's not a reason to support their nomination. Right, right. I think that Stephen Miller sincerely believes everything is doing right. Like that comes from the heart. That's not that's not true believer. And so I guess what I want to ask these people because there's also like the way this is structured is like paragraph one. The topic sentence tells you what you need to know. Sometimes a superstar is just a superstar. Okay. So then there's a little paragraph about how that's terrific Cavanaugh, which is an objective true. Second paragraph proving up the bona feet..

Brett Cavanaugh Lisa Blatt Dan Delta guy Hume New Hampshire Indianapolis m. gall Ginette political magazine Stephen Miller Charleston Roe Wade
"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If you're just joining us my guest is tracey thorn singer songwriter formerly half of the group everything but the girl and now a solo artist she's british and also writes a column for the political magazine the new statesman in england so i i love your deep voice i think for a while then i had to try and work out a way of coming up with a voice that was my own that that i could have some control over that took me a while i think for a long time i was a much better studio singer than i was live singer because again i could sit of seeing as quietly as i needed to and often what people say about my voice is you know it's very intimate it's very direct sounds like i'm singing right into your ear and that's because a lot of the studio singing i did especially in the early days is sung like that it's very whispered into the microphone kind of singing i then had to learn was how to convey the songs on stage where inevitably you have to project a bit more you know i had to build up a bit more strength and stamina so i tried having some singing lessons for awhile i learned how to do breathing exercises you know and i just had to gradually build up a voice that was my own and which could serve the functions it needed to so you had a singing teacher for awhile who'd work with a lot of stars including johnny rotten ozzy osbourne linda mccartney co drummer some of these things obviously happened after studied with her but she wanted you to sing higher and more of a head voice than a chest voice i don't think she was very tolerant really of pop singers wanting to sing in their disastrous pop voices i mean most pop singers single wrong and you know we we we do all these things in most popping es about having a distinctive voice and using in a distinctive way which technically might be completely incorrect when you get to a singing teacher they usually trying to correct those things and what you then come up against is that anxiety of when am i gonna lose the thing that makes me distinctive if i start trying to sing properly do i just turn into a.

political magazine england tracey thorn johnny
"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If you're just joining us my guest is tracey thorn singer songwriter formerly half of the group everything but the girl and now a solo artist she's british and also writes a column for the political magazine the new statesman in england so i i love your deep voice i think for a while then i had to try and walk away of coming up with a voice that was my own that that i could have some control over that took me quite a while i think for a long time i was a much better studio singer than live singer because again i could sit of sing as quietly as i needed to and often what people say about my voice you know it's very intimate it's very direct sounds like i'm singing right into your ear and that's because a lot of the studio singing i did especially in the early days is sung like that it's very whispered into the microphone kind of singing i then had to learn was how to convey the songs on stage where inevitably you have to project a bit more you know i had to build up a bit more strength and stamina so i tried having some singing lessons for while i i learned how to do breathing exercises you know and i just had to gradually build up a voice that was my own and you know which could serve functions it needed to so you had a singing teacher for a while who'd work with a lot of stars including johnny rotten ozzy osbourne linda mccartney ceo joe scrubber some of these things obviously happened after studied with her but she wanted you to sing higher and more of a head voice than a chest voice did she have to say about that i don't think she was very tolerant really of pop singers wanting to sing in their disastrous pop voices i mean most pop single wrong and you know we we we do all these things in most popular ease about having a distinctive voice and using a distinctive way which technically might be completely incorrect when you get through seeing teacher they usually trying to correct those things and what you then come up against is that anxiety of what am i gonna lose the thing that makes me distinctive if i start trying to sing properly do i just turn into a.

political magazine england tracey thorn johnny ceo
"political magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"If you're just joining us my guest is tracey thorn singer songwriter formerly half of the group everything but the girl and now a solo artist she's british and also writes a column for the political magazine the new statesman in england so i i love your deep voice i think for a while then i had to try and walk away of coming up with a voice that was my own that that i could have some control over that took me quite a while i think for a long time i was a much better studio singer than i was live singer because again i i could sit of sing as quietly as i needed to and often what people say about my voices you know it's very intimate it's very direct sounds like i'm singing right into your ear and that's because a lot of the studio singing i did especially in the early days is sung like that it's very whispered into the microphone kind of singing i then had to learn was how to convey the songs on stage where inevitably you have to project a bit more you know i had to build up strength and stamina so i tried having some singing lessons for a while i learned how to do breathing exercises you know and i just had to gradually build up a voice that was my own and which could serve the functions that needed it.

political magazine england tracey thorn
"political magazine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"On that martin is what are your thoughts about that and have a waterbased or limb i don aaa ignited one s eighty two point nine to me one 74 threeweek address at later on but i do want to say something about some of the callers last segment i was asked about the relationship between violence and video games i've not seen any study that suggest that there's a link early have it all the violent images that people see all the vitamin in the violent video game two people play yet the relative small number of people that actually engage in that violence suggest that there doesn't seem to be a correlation but i'm alluded to hear if anybody has anything else that they want to say about that uh an regarding gift in general guncontrol one of the many people i interview and i did my documentary call michael in me with woman named joist lee malcolm she wrote a book called guns and violence and she notes that for the first one hundred years or so of our country that with very very little guncontrol laws uh as they were very little guncontrol laws in england yet the violent crime rate the murder rate in england with much lower than our border murder rate even though neither country had any real guncontrol laws and the conclusion is that for whatever reason on where more tend to commit murder then other people in other countries don't know why a whatever the reason that is not the presence or absence epas of guns based upon the higher murder rate when neither country had any real meaningful guncontrol laws any way the book is called guns and violence by joyful joist lee malcolm will put it up on larry elder dot com we're also going to put up on larry on the dotcom a number of the articles i refer to including one by gary click call defensive gun use is not a myth the reason this is important if you cut with published in political magazine and in the.

martin michael england murder larry dotcom political magazine gary one hundred years one 74 threeweek
"political magazine" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Like uh treatment in in in meal like there's a lot of belief that means district in the opponents of drug legalizing marijuana will dispute it but there's a lot of proponents who say legal medical marijuana um uh dims the the the dangers of the opioid epidemic you were opioid drug prescription pills are prescribed in states with legal medical marijuana better thing speak with james hickman he's a freelance journalist covering drug policy for political magazine there a piece entitled these red state democrats think legal marijuana can help them win so on that issue does it break down into support for medical verses recreational marijuana and it might come up quite a few yet in be eight although you know the in the polling is mixed polling for medical marijuana and these red tape like mbna all three states that i covered in a story medical marijuana pulled over 65 percent okay in indiana it in the seven mile now when you start asking um about recreational marijuana it depends on how the the question is phrased for instance in indiana in two thousand twelve there with a pole but at indiana residents that they thought marijuana should be regulated like alcohol and tobacco and that polled at like when the eight percent or seventy five percent of the vote vote high but if you can ask theme population do support recreational marijuana that numbers much lower just because the word recreational links doom it's james hickman freelance reporter for politico magazine.

marijuana james hickman indiana reporter politico magazine seventy five percent eight percent 65 percent
"political magazine" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

Chicago's Business Authority

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on Chicago's Business Authority

"The prove that he is involved very deeply involved as a committed a looser and is among other things it's his invitation by marina a roberts to what is homeless beer it cooking ritual which i the proves the most really now for the european allies hours over vetted by alastair crowley reporter the most evil man alive reportedly sacrifice his own son precisely this is a rich jewel of specific ritual which participants used the while as human body fluids in order to saw an spiritual energies or assistance in favour at any sane person thous completely luke ludicrous rulers of ferrying this is the practice of enlightenment it's taunting bell initiates them it's something that they understand that they have it lowers our humanity to a low enough level to be possessed by the civil force thus the whole idea to be with us why lucifer absolve and these practices oval lose of hurrying religion and antichristianity are i would argue the oslo inversion ochre she added lowering fares in the emails come we have blood we have seamen and this is what they use pizza gate to divert off to some pizza store that the media all covered we covered than they claim we were part of it again this is at eight and this is what they are pouring out this is unbelievable really we live in that we know of uplands uh uh uh uh you know holy eucharist mass you also have campbell is a a pedophilia uh he's our highlights these are common practices actually amongst losing ferries this makes i the greatest his choice of paintings in his own office all the more revealing the paintings in his lawyers we actually have voters of those as well are very disturbing the campbell i want to ask you in an interview buys of the political magazine politico about the paintings possessor reply that it's better to be the guy with the work rather than the guy on the table this is the guy that was leading the democratic party this is the shot of what looks like eightyearold girls begging not to be gangraped in a shower with i guess like step the time up the ceiling this is.

reporter bell campbell alastair crowley oslo political magazine
"political magazine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"political magazine" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Tax advantaged college savings account for homeschooling expenses so it appears to be on track but there has been this hiccup as was put it by the political magazine back to tatta smiley and cornell west have again thank you very much behind pleasure thank you a tab as you said that president obama you've been a critic also that he should be focusing on a jobs agenda jobs jobs jobs what ought he do that he's not doing well first of all i'm glad he finally got around to the jobs i think the first two years in some ways larry was squandered by not focusing on the concern that matters to most americans are employment uh we bound is poverty tour because the numbers as you will know are growing exponentially ought to many people of all races colors and creeds finding themselves amongst the new poor i've been saying on this tour that the new poor all the former middle class so what he should have done with focused on this sooner than he did number one number two to answer your question marks expressly when he got that stimulus package through he should've asked what morgan he had control of both houses of congress this was package should have been more number three when he got through the package whatever it was not what i wanted to be what what he got it through he should assented to the cities and not to the states the majority states have republican governors the people that are hurting the most live in urban areas if you sent the money to the city's the money might have made it to everyday people who are hurting the most i'm glad he's there now but the bottom line is what she do now now these put forth the jazz beal which i still don't think is up to the scale the size of the problem he ought to draw a line in the sand and jiffy just now joining us this interview i did was to have a smelly five years ago he's talking about obama not trump obama fight my dad abu talk about your dad earlier at my dad said to me all the.

political magazine obama stimulus package morgan congress cornell president larry five years two years