35 Burst results for "Political Editor"

Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:33 min | Last month

Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

"The united kingdom voted in local elections yesterday while scotland chose the next parliament with potentially huge implications for the future of the union. Well for more on this. I'm joined by katie bulls. The spectators political editor katie. Welcome to monocle twenty four. Let's begin in the most significant areas. Scotland wherein snp victory could be a catalyst for the uk's disintegration. Do you think that nicholas sturgeon. The first minister can hold onto her job. Do we have any results that indicate that so far so in terms of the scotland at results. I think it's gonna mean much clearer by the end of the day today. And if it's close it doesn't look it estimate comfortable Majority between is what Once she's staked her reputation on then. It could drag veto tomorrow morning. dementia scraped together a majority. If it's come to lose by this evening at intended the results forgets against much places. I caught the poo and kansas in england. Bit scotland I think is the most high stakes will the uk government because if nikola session can get majority in there is a even a wider pro-independence majority which could actually be more difficult for the uk government than it just being smp one. It presents an issue in the sense. What does boris yeltsin say about this request for a second independence referendum. We know he doesn't want to grant one but as much debate in western says to the best to do not saying never when then. When is the right time if it's not

Scotland Katie Bulls Nicholas Sturgeon United Kingdom Parliament Katie Dementia Nikola Kansas England Boris Yeltsin
Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

The Leader

02:28 min | 2 months ago

Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

"Some queued for hours outside wall substitute library for walk. In short of the coluna virus vaccine. Three thousand jobs were given here during the day earlier. This week it was announced that fifty seven percent of all adults in the uk been given at least one shot but now could the nation's children also joining the lines. Trials are apparently on the way. Our deputy political editor. Nicholas cecil has stored nicholas. How young are we talking about here. Well at the moment scientists and health experts in bristol. The building children's vaccine said they have a study underway involving children who are teenagers. And this is a study using the astra zeneca jab. They're expecting shortly to be given the go ahead to start recruiting younger children as young as five and the reason why they're doing these trials is that so far all. The clinical trials have been adults to check that the vaccine was safe and worked in adults. And now they're checking out with it. It'd be equally safe and effective for for for children for people under eighteen benegas. Do we need to give children a virus facts. Because i thought you know the whole point of them. Going back to school was because young people don't get the serious effects of covid nineteen if the contract. This is a very interesting ethical question children as you say if they do get grown virus they are very unlikely to get the disease severely. But there's a big issue here of nuts about the circulation of the virus so this study will look at whether the vaccine works in children and then the the experts expect decision by the government in the summer about whether to start vaccinating children and professor. Adam finn who's from bristol university one of the leading experts on this. He was explaining that to vaccinate children just for the benefit of other people that that could be questionable and he would feel uncomfortable about that but he explained that actually if vaccinating children meant that the disease was kept under control and that meant that schools could reopen safely in september then there would be a benefit to children and therefore actually giving the jabs to children we would be beneficial only to them but also society

Nicholas Cecil Benegas Astra Nicholas Bristol UK Adam Finn Bristol University
EU regulator says AstraZeneca vaccine 'safe and effective'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:26 min | 3 months ago

EU regulator says AstraZeneca vaccine 'safe and effective'

"The european medicines agency has concluded that the astra zeneca covid nineteen vaccine is safe and effective. A review of the job came after thirteen states suspended. Its use over. Fears of linked to blood clots. But the now says the vaccine is not linked with a higher risk of clots. Well for more. I'm joined from brussels by darren. Mccaffrey the political editor euronews. A darn good morning to you and thanks for joining us with the doubts then about the vaccine. Will this kind all started last week or georgina. A in italy and austria where the reports of suspected blood clots for people who received that vaccine in fact amand had died in those extended to norway last weekend's and more importantly specifically to germany on monday and that led to a whole swathe of countries at particular the big four in the european union. It's the spain and france and germany deciding to suspend the use of the astrazeneca vaccine on what they call the precautionary principle so just in case essentially and that meant that the em aid and investigated these claims and yesterday. She said e kook. The director insisted that the vaccine was safe and effective. They said they couldn't find any link at all between an increase in blood clots and the vaccine however they did also that they couldn't rule arts at that there may be one specific type. Ucla cloth that has seen an increase and they couldn't rule out that that might be linked to it book again. Mccook pointed all medicine. All medicine has got side effects. You pick up a box of paracetamol at. You'll see that. In the most extreme circumstances it is possible. You might a reaction to its the point. Is that risk does not outweigh the benefits of this vaccine is the ema insisted yesterday. There are houses of people dying every day today tomorrow the next day across europe from corona virus and that this vaccine will help save lives or stop people getting ill. It will stop the main open hospital. It will stop them dying. And that's why they have consistently said that countries should have carried on using the astrazeneca vaccine an interest in the of course while not all countries stopped it for example they didn't hear belgian said. It would be irresponsible to do so. It is interesting the eu countries. Listen to the european medicines agency yesterday but ignored advice all week. The advice consistently has been not to stop the use of the astrazeneca vaccine. And i mean it just seems such a giant waste of time in terms of a race that everybody is trying to keep up with to suspend this for four really what has appeared to be no reason i mean as any woman knows taking the contraceptive pill as a much higher. Incidence of blood clots. Indeed i think from their point of view and this is where it gets complicated here in european union. Of course you've got european agency which is kind of the overarching body that authorizes drugs and authorized vaccines but you then also have national regulators. Who essentially gets to decide how those rules applied or or whether a member state should've finds by those rules when it comes to germany and where we saw a whole swathes countries at backing germany. The was the principal. There's also concerns about potential legal action because ultimately this is a state authorized vaccine service ad. That's been offered obviously to every german. And i think there was concern. That even could be farmed and they had data evidence to say that the wasn't increase increasing site. When it came to one specific type of blood clots the wilkinson's that may well open the german state of legal action and they wanted it to be investigated but yet. In retrospect all men many of these member states looking back. I answer that decision and decided it was the right one to do. Given the unfair. I would suggest damage reputation of astra zeneca for a whole load of ruse reasons across the eu and the damage that might do to the overall vaccine program. I'm not entirely sure was the right thing to

European Medicines Agency Astra Zeneca Germany European Union Amand Mccaffrey Astra Georgina Darren Brussels Mccook Austria Norway Italy Ucla Spain France Europe Wilkinson
Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

Coffee House Shots

02:16 min | 4 months ago

Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

"Yes and katie. Boris johnson is trying to lead the way on this discussion. What does the u k position. Severe macron is Five percent of the current vaccine intake. I think that the strong sense she got from ministers involved with this is that they don't want to give away vaccines until they have been able to offer a vaccine not just to the most vulnerable. But ideally everyone in the country and tens of the adult population. And i think this goes to a desire by the uk to almost tried. Reach head mean free. Immunization see something happening in israel. I think it's probably easier said than done. And even though we all very lucky to be high vaccine uptake country if you looked is rather as where we could be going the beginning to see slightly when for example at vaccines fatigue characters. I think the age group you go. The uptake still very good uptake. But no expansion to see the level you get say eight year olds amongst thirty roads. Now i think that when it comes to giving away vaccines. Dj very much does want to do that. And i think that they can see that. You can emerge as a global player by coming gossip benevolent as james touch and actually right near copies. Various governments have ready. Go ahead startled that. As to whether i think there is still some debate to be had because there has been idea at the senate. Mtv countries and food scheme at has been talked about the idea of countries in africa. And beyond. But i think that that has also been to airmax. Mp's such as if the public violence is very far behind the uk. Actually as close allies neighbor. We should be stepping in there now. I think what might make this decision. Earlier is ultimately what is the desire what is demand for some of the vaccines. The uk has given hearing more reports of various european countries. Saying they don't want the oxford vaccine may be actually some the things he geeky has to offer an received. But i do you think the senses that this will stop being a problem soon. Enough because ministers and officials believe that you'll start to see the data showing that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine does have a really important facts and what she had that that the level of skepticism is going to go

Boris Johnson Katie UK Israel James Senate Africa Oxford
Trump's Senate impeachment trial moves to opening arguments

All Things Considered

05:29 min | 4 months ago

Trump's Senate impeachment trial moves to opening arguments

"Trump committed a massive crime against our Constitution and our people and the worst violation of the presidential oath of office in the history of the United States of America. That is lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin of Maryland today. He and his fellow House members presented opening arguments in Day two of former President Trump's impeachment trial in the U. S. Senate. Call the former president on insider in chief who reveled in the chaos of his supporters of the capital on January 6th joining us now to talk about the day or NPR congressional reporter Claudia Chrysalis and NPR's senior political editor and correspondent. Domenico Montanaro. Could have you both. Here. Thanks. Thanks. Claudia, you were actually in the Senate chamber today, where the 100 senators as jury members sit silently listening to the House. Impeachment managers make their case describe the mood for us. It was clear much of the time that I was in the chamber that the members were very engaged. For example, they were watching lead manager Jamie Raskin, in his presentation very intently reminded me of the chamber yesterday when Raskin was giving his emotional remarks. About the day he and his family experienced here. During the insurrection. I was seated on the Republican side of the chamber. Republicans were intently watching him and the other managers and that includes those who say they won't be voting to convict Trump like Mike Rounds of South Dakota, Republican member of the Senate. Also, Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell was also watching. Very closely even watch some of these videos of the president's past statements on a television screen on the chamber floor. Many members were taking notes, and this includes those who have voted for the constitutionality of the trial, among them, Ben Sasse of Nebraska had a pile of no cards on his desk. Domenico. The Democrats were making the arguments today. I know you've been watching since the beginning of these proceedings yesterday what stood out to you compared to yesterday's testimony. Well, only later in the day here, have we gotten some of the personal passion and emotion that we had yesterday about the violence on January? 6th? Mostly today, Democrats had been methodically mounting, pretty dispassionate case to show Trump is the reason for why all of this happened. They claim that it's not just isolated to January 6th and tick through numerous things for months and months. That this was months and months in the making that Trump laid the groundwork before the election and drove it home after after that election and was aware of what was being planned. Um, it kind of really makes me wonder how and what the trump lawyers they're going to say in rebuttal, aside from saying that Democrats are being selective and use the word on that they didn't say that he used the word peaceful. In his speech on January 6th. Claudia tell us more about how the Democrats are actually building their case here. Yes, they're focused on showing the timeline of how Trump built a crowd of people who distrusted the election and believed they were following his orders. Jonah Goose, one of the managers of he's, a House member of Colorado. He also talked about this. Let's take a listen. Senators is clearly was not just one speech. Didn't just happen. It was part of a carefully planned months long effort. With very specific instruction. Show up on January 6th. Get your people to fight the certification. So from manager to manager they're building this case each piece building on the next the beginning, middle and end and today mark the beginning of that story. He made a point of connecting directly to their share terror that day, and this was especially apparent is, Domenico noted in the late afternoon when managers have shared dramatic sounds. And footage video footage from the day of the insurrection that the public has not seen before. This was sounds from police scanners of officers pleading for assistance. Pleading for their lives. It's seen as they were being assaulted by the mob. There's video footage from Capitol security cameras showing the mob breaking into the capital and another stunning moment where we see Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, walking outside of the chamber, running into an officer being told they need to clear out quickly and he is running. Behind this officer to escape the mob. Wow well yesterday, Trump's lawyers dismissed the House managers arguments, calling Democrats accusing Democrats of trying to cancel the former president by stifling his freedom of speech. Medical. What did the impeachment managers say about that claim right? Trump's lawyers yesterday said his speech was protected by the First Amendment. But Jamie Raskin, the lead impeachment manager, who we heard from earlier You know, he's a constitutional law professor, And he argued that the quote factual premise and the legal underpinnings of that claim are all wrong, He said. Incitement to violence is not protected speech, and here's how he put it with a familiar phrase. It's more like a case where the town fire chief Who's paid to put out fires sends a mob not to yell fire in a crowded theater, but to actually set the theater on fire. And who then, when the fire alarms go off in the calls, start flooding into the fire department asking for help does nothing but sit back, encourage the mob to continue its rampage and watch the fire spread on TV. Clea and delight. You know,

Jamie Raskin Donald Trump U. S. Senate Claudia Chrysalis Domenico Montanaro NPR Mike Rounds Ben Sasse Claudia House Domenico Raskin Jonah Goose United States Of America Mitch Mcconnell Maryland South Dakota Nebraska Senator Mitt Romney Colorado
What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

Here & Now

04:52 min | 4 months ago

What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

"Now Democrats and Republicans are gearing up for another momentous impeachment trial beginning tomorrow, the two sides are hammering out the details of the unprecedented second trial of former President Donald Trump. We're joined now by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. We've simply never seen this before. In American history. A president impeached twice the second time after he's left office. However, senators preparing for this occasion Well, you know they're going to be the jury, and we've already seen that 45 Republicans have sided with Senator Rand. Paul, who brought this measure forward that believing that this is unconstitutional for Senate to even bring it forward. Well, we're gonna see tomorrow. Them starting this trial. We know that the house impeachment managers on the democratic side are trying to push a, you know. Shortened case one heavy on video and emotional pleas from you know, recalling the events of January 6th to try to make it, You know, sort of somethingto, you know, almost try the president. Before the public to convince them rather than just the senators. I see. And they will be led by representative Jamie Raskin and again the charges for inciting a riot. Aside from that emotional appeal, I mean the nuts and bolts. How are they gonna make the case? You said the president, a singularly responsible not just based on his rhetoric at the January 6th rally at the lips of the White House when the pro Trump mob then stormed the capital, but also his role in false claims that set the groundwork for this and this false grievance that they had That that the president had a right to say that there was that the election was stolen from him, even though there was no evidence for that, and that that groundswell that was the whole reason why they were there in the first place, and that the president's responsible for that. So his culpability is sort of a substance of the case against him. But there's also this procedural point and as you said Domenico 45, Senate Republicans voted to dismiss the trial before it even began claiming that just from a process standpoint, you can't convict a president who isn't in office anymore. Let's hear Trump ally Lindsey Graham. And the way he put it on face The nation yesterday. If you believe you committed a crime, he can be prosecuted like any other citizen. Impeachment is a political process would never impeached a president. Once they're out of office. I think this is a very bad idea. So Domenico, he says. It's a bad idea. On the other hand, he like all of these members of Congress had very scary experience just last month, so I mean to Republicans think Trump should face any consequences. Then you know, some have called for censure. But on the case of president, you know it's interesting. Lindsey Graham leaves out the case of Ulysses S. Grant, swore secretary in 18 76, who was tried after he resigned and the impeachment managers back then thought that this had settled the case because the Senate had voted back then. Uh, that it was that they did have jurisdiction. Now it was controversial. Back then the trump lawyers who have just put out their 75 page. Brief responding to some of the charges. You cite this case and said that you know, essentially because Belknap wasn't convicted by two thirds and because most of the senators back then Didn't think that they had standing. Almost the senators who voted to acquit him thought that he didn't have standing that. That's enough to say it's unconstitutional, even though the majority of the senators voted to convict him. So it was a controversy back then, and it's still a controversy today. I see some details there of the arguments that the former president's defense team is going to make. How about a few other process things Domenico in the moment that we have left because we need other things to get sorted out like how long the trial is going to take whether both sides can call witnesses where those things stand. We're not sure how long this is going to go on. You know, all signs are that it could be a week or so on. Do you know I really think that what's interesting is going to be how the Trump Team how their lawyers go down this path. They're going to make what looks like a narrow constitutional argument that a former president can't be tried and then impeachments mainly about removal and not disqualification from office because if they go down the path Of the election fraud that that could shake loose some Republicans, and there's only just a glancing mention. Of even the election fraud and the president's rhetoric on one line and one page of the 75 page brief. That's NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. Thanks You're

Domenico Domenico Montanaro Senator Rand Jamie Raskin Senate Lindsey Graham Donald Trump NPR White House Paul Ulysses S. Grant Belknap Congress
Can Australia and China learn to get along?

Between The Lines

05:36 min | 4 months ago

Can Australia and China learn to get along?

"Tensions with china. Australia's tried stash with. China has escalated sharply with savage new tariff. Sit hit our wine industry hard from tomorrow. All australian wine will be hit with a one hundred to two hundred per cent hike. A move gross. I will devastate the industry. There was an abc news account of china hitting our wine sector of course assign deterioration of sino australian relations in the past. Gee indeed relationship between our nations have not been so dismal in more than half a century that is since before them opened ties with communist china. Mainland we give expression to new international album. No nation is on you. Aspirations symbolize law china upon our region. That was then prime minister. Gough whitlam ushering in a new era of cooperation between beijing and camber that was in nineteen seventy three. However in the past year in response to cambridge calls for an inquiry into the origins of covid nineteen. The chinese government has launched an unprecedented economic retaliation against our export industries. We mentioned one. Is bali. Beef lamb cotton lobster timber call and so on. Now you might ask not unreasonably. Why can't cambridge just restore relations with china indeed. How often have you heard the critics. Say if only camera toned down its rhetoric. Restored a dialogue rebuild trust with beijing. If the government did all these things did more to accommodate china all would be well instead where told cambra native sleep provokes trade partner by implementing foreign interference laws rejecting the wildlife. Fog j. network beat and calling for an inquiry into the origins of the crown of ours. Now that's what the critics site and you've heard many of them on this show in recent years. The hugh watt the jeff rabies. The stephen fitzgerald's the linda jakobsen's the giants lawrenson and some of them. however kanchana really rise peacefully. And is it really fair to say that when there's trouble it's invariably the fault of either washington's hawkish policies or a net australian diplomacy. How do you deal with our largest trade partner that is converting its economic might into strategic and military clout. Well we have a terrific panel is political editor of the sydney morning herald paid. His forthcoming book is called red zone. China's challenge australia's future as published by lacking books. Get i paid. I welcome back to national tomo. As a pleasure and she'll mahbubani is a distinguished fellow at the national university of singapore's asia research institute keisha. Most recent book is called. Has china won. The chinese challenge to american promessi k. Show it's also a pleasure to welcome you back to between the lines especially it'd be backed up now. Many australians as you will know are understandably anxious about what they see. Is china's discrimination against australia. What do you think is targeting. Us and abbey's measures against our exports justified in your judgment. Let me try tom to be very frank and help flow by giving you. What's that regional exception of australia. In the larger context the world has changed. We have gone from the euro than domination of world history to us. The ancient century and australia is very lucky that it is situated in the heart of issues now but australia still behaves culturally a western society in an asian dominated environment. And just to give you one simple example but you walk into an asian home. Most times you take off your shoes. That's asian culture. This not western culture the take off your shoes now with decide their fall to live and work in sight and asian home. Do you want to try and understand the issue norms or do you want to work. Only with western nas. That's the fundamental question that australia faces. Well you have risen case your that as westin palace slowly but steadily received from asia australia could be lifted stranded together with new zealand as the sole western entities in asia and paid a casual guys on following on from what he just said that quote as western power recedes. Globally australia's predominantly western population could feel very isolated and lonely. Niger asia paid a hatchet. How would you respond to katia model. Bonnie depends on how you define whist and tom If western society western values includes retaining liberties if it allows us to have free speech freedom of association freedom to choose our governments and reject them. Then i think straightens would happily subscribe to the definition of wisden

China Australia Chinese Government Cambra Hugh Watt Cambridge Stephen Fitzgerald Beijing Linda Jakobsen Lawrenson Kanchana Gough Whitlam Sydney Morning Herald Abc News Mahbubani National University Of Singapo Mainland Bali Giants Government
EU pressures AstraZeneca to deliver vaccines as promised

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:47 min | 5 months ago

EU pressures AstraZeneca to deliver vaccines as promised

"Leaders across europe according on brussels to impose measures to curb the export of corona virus vaccines as tension grows across the eu. Over the sputtering rollout of vaccinations. Germany is the most vocal demanding. The european commission toughen export rules to ensure drug orders of being met. This comes amidst claims about so-called vaccine nationalism from countries already dealing with shortages of doses because of manufacturing delays. While i'm joined now from brussels by darn mccaffrey. Who's euronews political editor. Darren good morning to you and thanks for joining us. What what has prompted these measures. So it's all kind of started last weekend when astra zeneca announced that it would not be able to meet the numbers of vaccines that the european union had been expecting in the first quarter of this year. In fact it suggested that it will be able to deliver only around forty percents of what originally thought it might be able to produce. This was an addition to pfizer. Also a couple of weeks ago saying that they were not going to be able to quite meet the the numbers of vaccines to the european union and the on because altered problems. Astrazeneca has blamed it on the fact that they're not deal with vaccine particularly at the plant in belgium and had hoped ultimately are not going to be able to essentially achieve the the number of jobs that the european commission thought contractually that astrazeneca had promised them now. Things got pretty difficult to the start of the week in a very public war of words. Clearly the commission. The commission was quite angry. Frustration with astra zeneca. There were several phone calls between on the line and the ceo of astra zeneca with the eu demanding. Essentially that they find vaccines from elsewhere. Of course the vaccine is made in different parts of the world most notably in the uk where there is no effect on the supply and what we heard then last night however was from the astrazeneca ceo in an interview which accused the european emotional. At essentially it signed contracts much later than the uk don and that the glitches that was being that had proven to be showing up in the production. The vaccine in belgium was done to the fact that the eu took three months later to sign contracts at dan the u. k. And so what. We've now got this very public battle. Almost a war. I would say between both sides and so what is it that the eu is proposing so the suggestion essentially they argue for transparency reasons the vaccines that are manufactured in the european union. The pharmaceutical companies need to give notification of precisely what's manufactured. How many are where it's going to if they are going to leave the eu now. The germans have gone somewhat further suggesting that if they're not getting their so called fair share off the vaccines at that. They may well blockades those axioms from leaving the e u all together to ensure that european union's proportionally. Don't lose arts now. This would have an impact for example the uk when it comes to the astrazeneca vaccine because it is manufactured in the uk but it would have an impact on the pfizer vaccine which is produced indulgent. Now clearly would be pretty dramatic stuff for the eu to start to do this. Many would accuse the european union off. As you say prompting vaccine wars vaccine nationalism. Something would have thought. The eu itself would accuse others off if they were to do. It's not what we said. Brussels so far are not backing. The germans want to see they are saying that this puree of our transparency though given the fact that the head of astra zeneca yesterday seemed to be laying blame at the european commission's door so this fiasco that the pharmaceutical company itself and the commission data so far not published the contracts which. Mep's in calling for four weeks suggests that today attention will turn to precisely what is in those contracts and has the commission itself nest up. We must also. I am not forget this really important. Point that actually. The european medicines agency to date has not authorized the astrazeneca vaccine so this all seems rather semantic to a degree though that authorization is probably expected on friday

Astrazeneca European Union Brussels European Commission Mccaffrey Belgium Pfizer UK Darren Germany Europe MEP European Medicines Agency
Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

04:26 min | 5 months ago

Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

"Party has today set out how it plans to secure a new referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. The Scottish National Party, or SMP, says it will try to hold a referendum if it went the majority in this year's elections to the Scottish parliament. The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has made clear his opposition to another vote. The last referendum was in 2014 when 55% voted no to independence. Paul Hutchins, political editor of Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, will the SNP leader Nicholas Sturgeon be able to secure that second referendum. If you look at what they are plan ears, it is to get a joint agreement with the U. K government on a referendum on scorching depends, which is what happened back in 2000 and 14. But this time around Tory government in London has decided that it will not grant what's known as the section 30 order, which is effectively a joint agreement, so that's put the S and P in a difficult position, so they come up with a plan B, which is to organize their own referendum at the Scottish parliament. The big issue. There is whether or not that is legal. And while there's no doubt that they will probably go down that road is going to end up in the courts, so the question of whether there will be a referendum is probably will be decided by judges. Would unionist parties in Scotland go along with the referendum that hadn't been sanctioned by Westminster? Well, that is the key issue here. I think there's a big distinction to be drawn between whether Scotch Parliament can legally organize a referendum on the legitimacy of such a process. So even if the Scottish Parliament did push ahead with our and judges To say that it was legal. I think that be question Marks Reese because first is this court's conservatives who are pro union. They've already said they would boy court such a referendum on so you could be left for the situation where you have a referendum, but one side is just not taking part. And then you end up with the result could be C 18 90% fever of independence on internationally just looks quite amateurish. So I think that ultimately what you need is a process that is agreed by both sides on as we speak to snow and agreement on that looks quite far off. In the last independence referendum you mentioned there was a pretty large margin 10% in favor of Scott, the remaining part of the United Kingdom has that shifted dramatically in the last six years. There's no doubt that in the last couple of years their husband a shift in favor of independence. I think that around the last 20 opinion polls on independence surely lead for independence. So I said quite dramatic turnaround. From 2014, and I think there's a few reasons for that. One is Brexit as you well know, People school rejected Brexit when there was a referendum on that subject. There's also no doubt that the conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is hugely unpopular. In Scotland, and I think that is partly responsible for the shift in public opinion. There's also a perception that Nicolas Sturgeon has handled the pandemic better and Boris Johnson has. I think it's a combination of a wussy factors as resulted in the increase in independence with the last couple years. And yet, I suppose in the back of people's minds is is the worry that actually, if membership of the European Union was driving things, there's no guarantee is there a tool that Scotland could quickly rejoined the U. Well, Brexit is the degree imponderable off this to beat. On the one hand, there's no doubt that is driving increased support for independence, but it does re some issues for the pro independence state. After was a referendum there's MP would liken depends got to rejoin the U. So you have the issue of? Well, how long would that teak and then even if an independent school and did join the European Union? What would that mean for things like Borders on immigration and cite the United Kingdom of what would it mean in terms of trade between Scotland and the rest of the Yuki? So I think that you would see a very different referendum. If we lose to tea, please, with a different set of questions raised. That was poor Hussian of Scotland's Daily record newspaper.

Scottish Parliament Scottish National Party Paul Hutchins Nicholas Sturgeon U. K Government Tory Government Scotland Boris Johnson Scotch Parliament Marks Reese United Kingdom SMP Daily Record People School Prime Minister Boris Johnson Westminster Nicolas Sturgeon
Brexit negotiations extended

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:50 min | 6 months ago

Brexit negotiations extended

"The brexit negotiations have been extended. It's been a tense weekend of talks which ended without a resolution except that the teams will continue to bargain. Darn mccaffrey's urine news political editor. Ann joins me now. Darna blustery man and a crumpled face and impeccably turned out an utterly composed woman libertine and lutheran images of boris johnson's meeting with usher underlying dominated the front pages and it seemed to me at least pretty much characterize the tone of the brexit negotiations. So can you tell us what happened over the weekend will in many ways. Of course the talks restarted. Again as you say. After that meeting with vonda line and boris johnson in brussels on wednesday nights they did seem not make an awful awful lot of extra progress. They inched forward to a large degree editor. Tina particularly in this area of the level playing field dot es britain would have to adhere to many of the rules and regulations of the european union for years to come that wants to have access to the single market particularly on this idea of divergence. Oh britain wants to forge. Don't power in the world committee regards. That's what brexit is. All rexiti is all about was the european union since she says well. If you do that that means consequences. It means. We may well the limit your access to the single market and the have been suggestions that it britain diverged. Too far the cop. Some of those rules and regulations that brussels could put on what a cold kind of like tariffs taxes on some of its goods to try and keep it into line. And that's been the really controversial area on that point. Europe seems to be conceding some ground that may be britain might be able to reciprocate by doing exactly the same to the eu all that the independent all between posts deciding if britain is undercut those regulations. That in the end that process is a bit more complicated and drawn out and then the eu it initially anticipated all although that's an awful lot of detail on what is a minor point there are still these inefficient gaps but there is a sign of progress and the reason that the talks continued. Go beyond yesterday is done to kind of to simple reasons. A neither side wants to be seen to walk away from these talks. Georgina no wants to collapse them. Because ultimately they'll always be a blame game about who brought about the no deal brexit and second of all you know it may well bore us all to death and there's no home and carry on talking no one loses so why not talk until the cows come home or indeed the. We're not allowed fireworks in us even till they're crackers get pulled. Whatever happens on new year's eve this year. So i mean the talks could actually go on until the deadline which is the thirty first of december. We'll in practical terms not really. Id so that the front pages of today's daily telegraph suggests that talks could carry on until new years. That's the headline. at least though. It doesn't suggest what year which is likely distancing. No i in theory. And i think we all kind of i keep saying this into the last week. I was told last week by an eu diplomat that were looking at the eighteenth around the as well as the last days to secure agreement because then we really all pushing the envelope in terms of actually just having time at all for both the european parliament and the british folder to ratify this agreement. Because it will have to be. There is a deal will need to be ratified by both parliaments. Not there is talk and with the eu everything is flexible that potentially it could be agreed by e you leaders and ratified provisionally in the new year. So almost in retrospect. I'm not entirely sure that can happen with the uk parliament but you know talks will continue at some stage. Somebody's gonna have to make a decision though. I mean they cannot continue indefinitely. And as you've said as the telegraph suggested they definitely cannot continue beyond news because of the legal deadline that is in place. But i mean there are also things like for instance tax systems need more than a fortnight to boot up to change various things. We're also being told that supermarkets have been ordered to stock up the goods. In event of a no deal will cost twenty percent more that there are interim measures to keep planes flying and so on. I mean there's so much detail that needs to be worked out the things that are really interesting about this first of all even if there is a deal it's only really covering about twenty cents of the existing rules and normality. That's already in place which means that's eighty. Percents is either having to be made up by changes that businesses are having to make stuff that you and i won't see but will cost them time and money and additionally the will be disruption because of course will be extra checks at borders particular over in calais and that means that we will see many more pictures of those lorries cues them for after aftermarket after mile. And you're right. We all still likely to see an increase in food prices to a degree. If there is no deal that gets worse because the tariffs potentially william place will be in place sterling will potentially fall even further on those two factors will mean that food prices will likely increase the destruction means that supermarkets already ordering goods talk about destruction to medical supplies and also in the amended. No deal as you rightly dives there will still have to be many deals. Don't breakneck speed to ensure that you know planes continue to be able to fly into european espace. That lorries are able to even enter the opinion so even if there is no overall trade agreements that will still have to be some deals just to make sure that things carry on beyond the. I generally in a relatively normal way now. What about the navy. The royal navy has been told that it should patrol to police channel waters To to stop illegal fishing as it may well be by then Charles michel the president of the european council referring to that said the britain was not lose. Its cooling. Go overboard he said. I'm trying to be serious on the european side. At least we keep our sang for. Yeah i think we'll see what happens with the role now. I mean even in the event of not we'll see what happens with the law. Maybe i'm sure they will patrol and all we're going to get into fish wars that we saw. I think it was back in the nineteen seventies involving iceland's when it really did get a bit nasty and ships were sunk certainly pretty badly damaged in wars over fishing there. You have to remember the european union in its deal contingency. Planning junior suggested that. If britain bolts these breakneck speeds kind of temporary deals. That i was talking about when it comes to the ability to move call goran or indeed planes that they would have to concede that the current agreement on fishing would continue for at least another year. Which makes me think that in the ends. That probably was likely to happen. Not least of all as well because we have to remember no deal. I deal on. Fishing may be banned from both sides and fishing but no deal is also bad. And i'm not entirely sure that the fishing communities of the east coast of england or northern france. Want no deal either. Because that may mean they don't have access to each other's waters but given the acrimony were to see in the nastiness in no deal. Brexit may will also mean that those uk fishermen for example will not be able to sell the fish to the european market.

EU Britain Boris Johnson Ann Joins Vonda Line Brussels Mccaffrey Tina Georgina European Parliament Europe Charles Michel Calais UK Royal Navy European Council William Navy
"If Florida goes blue, it's over": Trump and Biden campaign in Florida

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 8 months ago

"If Florida goes blue, it's over": Trump and Biden campaign in Florida

"When Joe Biden traveled to Florida yesterday, he explicitly referred to the electoral map, he said. If Democrats win Florida four days from now, quote it's over. It would be very hard for President Trump to reach the 270 electoral votes that decide the presidency. The president knows this, too, and also campaigned yesterday in Florida, which not coincidentally, he has made his new home state. We are going to win Florida. We are going to win for more years when you use your power. Power of the vote. We literally are going to change the course of this country for generations to come. So that's one state on the electoral map and let's look across NPR's final version of that map, which is out today. NPR senior political editor Domenico Montanaro is with us, Domenico Good Morning. Morning, Steve. So, what do you see on that map? Well, like you say Biden has the advantage when our map shows is that, with states leaning or likely to go in either candidate's direction, Biden now leads with 279 electoral votes. The 125 that to 70 is obviously over the threshold needed, eh, so that if the president is going to win, he's gonna have to win all of the toss up states and one of those states that's leaning in Biden's direction, and it's not completely out of the realm of possibility. He's certainly within striking distance in those competitive states. We made two big changes in this map. We put two important states. In the toss up category, Arizona and Texas. Not all these toss ups are created equal, though we hesitated with Texas because of its history of voting Republican hasn't gone for a Democratic president since 1976 and Trump wanted by nine points in 2016. But look, it's been remarkably close. Early Voting's been through the roof, lots of young voters, lots of Latinos turning out on DH, You know, Biden has been leading consistently in Arizona, also since early March. Polls are within the margin of error there. So to keep that, Ah, competitive. Trump is certainly pulling out a lot of stops, and it looks like you know, Right now it's a toss up because you made the change in Texas and some other changes You see, toss up states that air now leaning blue. You see traditional red states that air now toss up states. That's the way the map is moving. But you mentioned that the president could still win this. Absolutely. I mean, like I said, all the toss up states are pulling within the margin of error. So when you see a state that's within two or three points, one way or another, which is where a lot of those states in the middle are. That's not much of a lead at all. So I understand Democrats being very nervous and the outcome is certainly not clear. Trump would have to win all of them all those toss up states and went over one more of those states leaning and Biden's direction. If he does, that it would make it 259 to 259 and leave Pennsylvania as the state next up in the polling averages, and it's a state we know Both campaigns are making strong pushes for Pennsylvania, though, is expected to be slow and counting the vote this year. We could be waiting sometime because Pennsylvania just doesn't have a history of dealing with as much mail in voting as it is this year.

Joe Biden President Trump Florida Texas NPR Domenico Good Morning Arizona Pennsylvania Domenico Montanaro Political Editor Steve
UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

The Leader

04:19 min | 8 months ago

UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

"Boris Johnson has dramatically told Britain to prepare for the new deal brexit after a bust up with Brussels on trade talks the minister put the country on notice that it's e you departure at the end of the transition period. On December, thirty first could be without a trade deal with the European bloc that could leave businesses facing tariffs and quotas to trade with European bloc and transport delays could see some food shortages. Deputy political editor Nicholas says spoke to the Evening Standard's Bonnie Christian. Nick, what happened today and we're we're expecting it. This was a bit of a surprise. This announcement by Boyce Johnson appear that the EU and the government were coming to an arrangement to continue talks next week on a trade deal. But there seems to be a difference in stance taken by the EU leaders and the European Commission. The EU leaders probably Egged on by Emmanuel macron. Stiffen the stance or the European bloc and particularly over the row over fishing. This led to a response for Mr Johnson threatening to walk away from the talks. Why has this decision been made completely out of the blue? Boys. Johnson had set a deadline of October, the fifteenth for a breakthrough. In, the negotiations in order for them to continue this has not happened basically. Going to be some woods agreed for them to continue of them pull the whole house of cards down now. One with the British demands was an intensification of talks. This had been proposed and flashed around Brussels. But when the summit conclusions came out, there was no mention of that. The government in Britain responded by saying that we were going to start prepare now for a no deal. So does this main? A deal is completely off the table? No. It doesn't mean that could mean that. But what happened Lychee now after Bush Johnson has made a statement is that the European Commission President Sheila Underlay? tweeted that a team from Brussels would be heading to London to intensify the talks. This was a key British demand. So it looks like there's been a political spat between the leaders at political level. But now that the Are, trying to keep the show on the road if we are to leave without a deal what are the big knock on effects of that, we could see here in the UK economically, they could potentially be catastrophic. You'll certainly talking about businesses, facing tariffs and also quotas. That could also be food shortages. Some shorter particular fresh food shortages in the UK I for weeks even before the threat of a no deal ruptured lunchtime the boss of TESCO's was saying that they could be some future tages. If there literally is no deal. Then obviously, the likelihood of those would increase dramatically shortly optimistic Johnson spoke that the pound fell against the euro, which is a sign of concerns. The next step is really the me t next week to see whether they eat negotiators and the okay Shakespeare's could make a break food. The meeting may not happen, but it looks like it will happen and is imposed. Sides interest to strike a deal both will play hard ball and often agreements are really only reach five minutes to midnight when both parties are staring into the abyss and the they know that unless a deal now things can get very very messy. These talks have been stalled for months. Now with a the side, not really bunching at all is there any sense of what the outcome could be? Is Too hard to tell given. The economic damage in Odio could calls and Boris Johnson will be fully aware of this and Michael is you would expect a deal to be reached but e you leaders they got the stronger hand and so we'll trying really go for the best possible for them. and. That will put pressure and strain on the British government because they really don't want to make many more concessions especially with so many hard line brexit is in the Tory party.

Boris Johnson Brussels EU European Commission Britain UK Political Editor Nick British Government Bonnie Christian Emmanuel Macron Tory Party Nicholas Tesco Odio Sheila Underlay London Shakespeare
C-SPAN suspends Scully after he admits to lie about hack

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

03:01 min | 8 months ago

C-SPAN suspends Scully after he admits to lie about hack

"So last night fence we had the two competing town halls and Joe Biden got a two hour town hall. President Trump got a 40 minute town hall because the 1st 20 minutes of his town hall were spent arguing with Savannah Guthrie, who thought she was there to debate the president. But what last night was supposed to be was supposed to be nice to be a town hall with both candidates on the same stage, which could have happened last night and should have happened last night. But that was a goat rodeo. And so it didn't happen last night, thanks to the council on the presidential debates. S so instead, we have the two competing town halls. Now. C Span's Steve Sculley was supposed to be moderating that town. Holly's has been one of the moderators of the town hall That was supposed to happen last night. And the whole thing fell apart and part of this whole thing falling apart. You know the president was was the president, you know? Could he be there without being a super spreader they were calling on Biden's campaign, you know, apparently didn't want in there. They only wanted him there. If he was encased in like the boy in the plastic bubble like John Travolta, you know all these ridiculousness, but Steve's going one of getting caught up in this Because President Trump criticized Steve Scully as a never Trumper And Scully tweets at Scaramucci Anthony Scaramucci build Trump aide Should Scaramucci Should I respond to Trump? And everybody is thinking. Oh, he meant his put this editor a D. M. He meant to message right scare a Scaramucci directly, but instead he tweeted it out. And that, of course, caught everyone's attention. So in response to that, Scully says, My Twitter account was hacked, and we all laughed at it because it was like the third time. He said that his Twitter account has been hacked. And every time it happens, his Twitter account goes away. And then it comes back once the controversial wait. I'm sorry. There were multiple times that he did that. Yeah, there was more than what there was more that I have. No, it's okay. I didn't. I just didn't realize that okay? Yeah, he's done a multiple times hilarious even worse. Yeah, so so his account goes away, and then it comes back. So that's why I think a lot of people were a little little suspicious about him, saying that his account was hacked yet again. Well, turns out he could not keep up the lie, and he has admitted that his Twitter account was not hacked, he said. I falsely claim that my Twitter account had been hacked. So he has now been suspended as the political editor Force C span after he admitted that his Twitter feed was hacked. And you know what part of me feels like. Okay, good for him. He admitted it. How many of these people especially on the left will ride that denial down into the grand and into their graves? Because they say, Hey, it worked for joy Reid. So it'll work for me and what is left. Do they just deny and double down on denying double down and then they dare you to continue to come after them and most on the right, Just go OK and they walk away, but that didn't work for Steve

Twitter Steve Scully President Trump Joe Biden Steve Sculley Steve Scaramucci Anthony Scaramucci Savannah Guthrie Joy Reid John Travolta Holly Editor Political Editor Trumper
Biden outperforming Trump in all key swing states, polls say

All Things Considered

02:44 min | 8 months ago

Biden outperforming Trump in all key swing states, polls say

"Competing tonight for eyeballs. The candidates were supposed to have a debate. Instead, they're speaking at two different town hall forums on two different TV networks at the same time. President Trump There's pressure to persuade some voters to his side. That's underscored by a new NPR PBS NewsHour Marist poll out today, showing Biden jumping to a double digit lead nationally. NPR's senior political editor, Domenico Montanaro joins us now. Hey, Domenico Hales. All right, So we have been seeing the president slide in other polls since the first debate since his illness. What did our poll find here is very similar to other national polls. Biden is now up 54 to 43. That's the highest Biden has gotten in our poll since it began tracking the race in February. Trump notably has gotten has not gotten above 44% in any of those poles. And the president is running out of time, frankly, to turn things around. The thing that stands out in this poll is Biden now is actually narrowly winning white voters by a 51 to 47% margin. Trump one white voters by 20 points in 2016. If Biden were to get that high, it would be the highest recorded for any Democrat even since Jimmy Carter and that could indicate a very big blue wave building up and down the ballot. That's you know, big, of course, because Trump is still within striking distance in key swing states and those will decide the electoral college. We don't know how things are going to go over the next couple of weeks, but white voters are somethingto. Watch for Why Biden. Khun do well in those places. But Baba, But can we just remember for a moment? What happened in 2016? I mean, Hillary Clinton was up by what about 10 points at this point in the race? I guess what I'm wondering is how much should we be reading into this lead? Biden has in the polls right now. Sure. Well, you know the phrase out, believe it when I see it. Well, yeah, I see it, but I'll believe it. When it happens, Anything can happen here. And when you talk to Democrats, they're not satisfied with the poles. Many aren't even looking at them. And they want this election not to be close. So they're doing everything they can. To make that happen. You know, Clinton certainly had a significant lead at this point, not quite this wide, but that race tighten significantly in the final couple weeks. We have to remember, so that's something to watch. But they're really a few reason reasons why 2020 is not 2016 1st. There's been far less volatility in the polls. This time around, there are far fewer undecided voters are poll shows. Just 5% of people are persuadable, meaning people undecided or who could say they know they might change their minds? Third parties don't seem to be playing as much of a factor. And, frankly, surveys and are reporting are telling us that Biden is just better liked than Hillary Clinton overall, Huh? Okay, well, I want to

Biden President Trump Hillary Clinton Domenico Hales Domenico Montanaro NPR Jimmy Carter Khun Baba Political Editor
Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:04 min | 8 months ago

Boris Johnson will delay decision on quitting Brexit trade talks

"The brexit transition period is due to expire on the thirty first of December at which point the UK will leave the single market without a deal unless an agreement with the EU is reached in the next few weeks British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he wanted the broad outlines of the deal to be in place by the time the European Council Summit begins, today. The McCaffrey is your news political editor. He joins me on the line from Brussels could money cheat today it's the deadline. So why aren't we walking away? In this process is brexit process. We're very very used to deadlines coming and going out we gene and two large degree. At today he's GonNa come and go again and what we're expecting is no deal at the end of today when. Leaders meet in Brussels who were also not expecting Britain at top walk away either in fact we're expecting. Probably weeks of negotiations. Why is that I? Think because progress has been made though it is interesting last night the Boris Johnson spoke to US London line the EU Commission, Presidents and chose Michelle the EU council president in a joint to call and he. Exposure of his disappointment that the had not being a substantial or not progress. But clearly think that there is still an opportunity to get a deal. Hence why these talks will continue. We have to remember at the end of all of this book Britain and the e You have repeatedly said, they do wolves future trade deal I. Think both of them are willing to give it another shot of you like a bit more time So what are the underlying issues that holding up this process? Will listen to you though kind of three key areas in all of this at first of all is the so-called level playing fields or state AIDS, which is essentially the e you wanting you to adhere to the same rules and regulations to a large degree that and they already do as a former member of the European Union and things like environmental protections, food standards, for example, so that Britain can't undercut those in a more competitive way and join to that is this issue of state AIDS. The idea that the state can subsidize heavily industries to keep them afloat if you like, and again the EU is king the Britain essentially really can do that because it could convey. Could gain a competitive edge. Undercut the E. U., two degree now Britain would point out and rightly so some would say that actually if there is any part of the two sides who are used to subsidizing their industries, it's more likely to be countries like France and Italy than it needs to be the UK or indeed Germany for example, who just failed out Lufthansa to the tune of ten billion euros I mean the UK hasn't yet bailed out any of Big Airlines then disease you have governance How to settle speech future future disputes in essence the EU, has conceded that it's no longer going to be the European Court of Justice and they're trying to work out to kind of independent tradition if you like. And then finally, there's this kind of issue of fishing which economically is not important either to the EU or the UK in the sense it doesn't really make much of any countries economies to large degree, but it is politically symbolic. Ephraim. Brexit. As it will is what Brexit was all of out retaining sheesh water and also some European countries. It's incredibly symbolic importance at French fishermen, for example, or at pretty significant force in France and Emmanuel macron is staring down election in the not too distant future. So that is an issue. That actually is always the most difficult of issues because as as a Britain wants to gain back control of its waters, the EU still wants to be allowed to fish in those waters and it suggesting that if it cannot will. Then Britain is not going to be able to sell its fish to the rest of Europe and that is by far the largest markets. So shortly, collapse the whole deal on fishing. Think not though there are genuine concerns that it could be at the key issue. In the trade talks over the next couple of weeks, not least of all, because as become this to the issue in from both sides that for Britain. It's very symbolic as I say what Brexit is, they are absolutely determined. That they can have you know European fishermen essentially in the seas for years and years to come. Katrina to the fish they just think that is fundamentally unacceptable. It is not in essence taking back control. For the EU are equally determined. That if Britain wants to gain access to it single market by selling fish and eighty I, think it's eighty percent of British Fisher exploited in sixty percents. In, total those to the rest of the EU then. You're. Not, GONNA be able to sell your fish and you can have all your efficient chips he wants, but they'll have to be British people are going to eat them and not the EU, and they would also point that actually half of the so-called Bush's boats that fish in fresh waters at the moment are actually forward. So in practical terms, would it make that much difference I think the compromise, the them at may well come, and with this idea of quotas every year that potentially will start where we all now and year after year decrease. On a negotiated faces a bit like Norway has dumb but for Emmanuel macron fishing is a key key factor in all of this. Simply because you know French, fishermen are a potent political force but for the countries like Germany. In essence fishing's not very important and they would be very, very disappointed when push on for the deal to collapse on that single issue. So I mean what happens next and is a no deal Nella a probability rather than A. So. When you talk to people here and is being a whole range of MVP's and official yesterday, they were putting it at a probability of sixty percents. Gene essentially, that will be no deal, which is point stalk in many ways given the fact that we are getting into the game and we really all because time is to Michelle Volley ticking in this process I think what will happen next though is that they will conclude. Leaders at tomorrow that enough progress has been made and the talk should continue. I expect the British will accept that and talks will continue for the next couple of weeks. up until. Either the end of this month or the start of next. But then a deal is going to have to be done or essentially both sides have to accept the will be no deal because ultimately if there is to be a deal, it is a massive. Weighty Hefty document that has to be translated into all the official languages of the EU. EU Paul, we'll have to vote on the British parliament, some national parliaments to and so that decision will have to be pretty soon at the start of the next month because ultimately, they'll only have up until the end of to send the. It's because Boris Johnson his always all. And that he will not extend beyond December thirty. First, we've heard of course that before I think this time that really is a hard deadline and so at the Mo- wind, you'd have to conclude or less things substantially change that you know no deal. Is a real. Possibility, but probability, how is the British parliament reacting to this brinkmanship? Well, there's this. Thing is when we kind of what? It's not weird actually, it's probably not surprising the tool. But, it's not really consuming European on British national politics. At the moment clearly, we're in the middle of a pandemic. Clearly everyone's focusing on not just the fact that there is a second surge affecting almost every corner of Europe and deed every corner of the British isles. And Other increasing restrictions, talks about lockdown. So not not anyone's really talking about Brexit I think. Boris. Johnson's going to take enough majority that no deal is not good to trouble him like it. It was last year when there was a possibility that the government collapse on the issue I don't think that's GonNa happen this time round for the genuine concerns in Britain about what this will mean. Already, the government is already having to spend millions and millions of pounds to get a border posts. Customs checks to employ people essentially to work on that border from the first of January and no matter what the trade will be there will be extra checks a respectable. What happens

European Union Britain Boris Johnson Brussels Brexit British Parliament Eu Commission Europe Michelle Volley France Germany UK European Council Summit Aids Mccaffrey Political Editor Ephraim European Court Of Justice
"political editor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:56 min | 9 months ago

"political editor" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Moderate within Quality index up 54 time Now for a little bit of news from your neighborhood at 5 11 on a Wednesday morning. I'm not really sure if I wanna ask you what you thought about last night or not. Albert Parnell joining us? I gave me a headache. I felt exhausted after watching them. What my brain was like, What is going on here? Yeah, I think I mean, you have expressed a similar sentiment. So this is coming out of the Stockton record. So a 67 year old state prison locating and Tracy will be closing by next fall. The decision to shutter the dove Oh vocational institution is the result of the state's 2020 multiyear budget plan, which included the closure of the state prison. All right, thank you. Sounds good, buddy. Suppose Steve Scully is doing this morning. Oh, yeah, he is. You told me but tell everyone else. Steve Scully is the senior executive producer and political editor for C Span. And he is the next moderator of a man Now, you know, it was interesting. I was listening to a podcast yesterday, and they interviewed Martha ratted, Um, and for ABC, and she's done many big debate. So Martha Raddatz has been a White House correspondent and a political figure for sometime covered the military for many, many years, so she talked about the debates that she has moderated in the past. She did moderate one with President Trump. She's moderated. She moderated with Bill Clinton. And she said, as a moderator, one of the things you mentioned in this interview. This is before the debate eyes that as moderator, it's really tough. You can't play fact checker during the debate in real time, you know, and Chris Wallace got caught up in that a little bit last night. Ah, a few times, you know, Look. I felt for the guy and I think you know, as I said to you before and are our meeting before the show. I felt like he was me in the middle of my house and my two teenagers are arguing, right? I can't. I don't know how to stop this. And when he would argue with the candidates on certain fax a cz Martha Raddatz pointed out, she said, it makes you look as moderator like You're arguing with the candidate and taking the other candidates side. So she said. That was one of the things that she really concentrated on her debates is like, okay, there'll be plenty of fact checking. So are tweeting out fax right now I'm goingto like stick with just the question, Boy. Talk about a job where you have to think on your feet as a moderator. I mean, it's just coming at you so fast on especially last night. Well, and everyone was saying he really needed to be able to the ability to cut the mikes. There's so much talk about not only from last night, but what we can look forward to the second debate and how the format may even change now. I mean, everything is just up in the air. Given that craziness we have all experienced Koven, 19 and kids going back to school. Is it safe? The new trends the science Dr Simone Wilds. We like her. She joins us in three minutes. Judge.

Martha Raddatz Steve Scully Chris Wallace President Trump Dr Simone Wilds Albert Parnell Martha ratted ABC Tracy White House correspondent Koven Bill Clinton C Span senior executive political editor producer
Covid missteps in the UK

Between The Lines

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Covid missteps in the UK

"Been seven months in sparse Johnson's conservative scored the best Tory parliamentary majority since the me nine thousand nine hundred. And yet outsiders well, that could be forgiven for thinking that it was Jeremy Corbyn Socialism. That's triumphed. You think about it in response to the Cova crisis, the size and scope of the British state. Well, that's increased dramatically, and what's being called, a radical woke minority that continues to march through British institutions for more on Boris and British politics. Let's turn to is a bill oak shop. She's a former political editor at the Sunday Times I started by asking bill about the state of Boris Johnson's premiership. I think that it is. Fair to say that Boris Johnson's. Administration has. Hit a really difficult patch and you know. Isn't it extrordinary when he achieved? An an unbelievable majority you know against all expectations, and really they only had a few weeks in which to relish that feeling of trial before the corona virus hits, and the handling of the pandemic has been a very widely criticized. You know we have ended up. I think we have the surge worst gas rate in the world from from Carina and his being one u-turn after another. We've got another one today in the only on Sunday at one of our leading cabinet ministers said that it would not be compulsory to wear face masks and short, and now we all told the we'll be illegal requirement, and that is very characteristic old the government's approach to this crisis. They've been too late. To make required changes, you know that has gizzard they have you turned, and of course not help by. The Prime Minister himself was hit very very hard by the virus, and to Cologne time to get back on his feet. You know this is a he. He was in a life, threatening position and the government woes consequentially very weakened for a period. You mentioned that the Johnson government is moving to make these face masks for shoppers mandatory I. THINK THEY FACE A. Hundred pound fine if they gotta shops without Feis mosques, but at the same time on way told the Britain is slowly getting back to its old self that businesses either reopened and travel restrictions. Lifting does all this main? The Brits are to learn to leave covid nineteen I think we have to learn to live with covid nineteen and I would say we should have had begun learning that lot quicker. You know the UK at the moment is a real place. Contrast I live in Oxfordshire about seventy miles from London, and for the first time last week I decided to get the train into loans, and I have been driving list time and I basically had to show the driven train in both directions. I was traveling at what would normally be rush hour peak time going in in the morning and I had the whole carriage, and the won't be on that myself, so I will. Say Small, but there's no need for face off. You've got your exclusive carriage. And Central. Is Much the same. It's a dead zone and yet here in the world's where where I call home and we can mind. It'll town which luckily. was absolutely housing. The big AUDEN's with school. There were a lot of people out in the bounce. So you know we have a real mix pitcher going on by the way, remember that the schools on back. You know this is an extraordinary situation. You know we've got people in big Ordonez in restaurants are. Our children are still not back in school by large. The counterargument to not having that lockdown during April, and my is that you might have seen far more deaths in in Britain it's. It's very lucky for the government that however bad things get. They will always be able to say it would be much worse if we hadn't done. X Y, or said they won't be able to cruise otherwise politically. That is something that they can always fall back on, but I think that all the evidence now shows that it was a big mistake to allow tens of thousands of people every week to continue pouring into the country from some of the worst hit areas overseas. Coming into Heathrow without any checks or any corentin or any restriction. For weeks, so then I mean for months discontinued, and then very belatedly off to the media, worst of the crisis passed, the government changed tack, and and suddenly entered used quarantine measures, but not before all these people had come in and helped increase of viral late

Boris Johnson Government Political Editor Jeremy Corbyn Johnson Government Britain Cova Ordonez Carina UK Prime Minister Oxfordshire London
You mustn't lower yourself for men around you. You must show him what a strong woman looks like

Dare I Say

05:27 min | 1 year ago

You mustn't lower yourself for men around you. You must show him what a strong woman looks like

"Jamile is not afraid to call out body, shaming and diet culture. When she's not filming. The actor and activists can be found sparking lively online debates about toxic beauty standards. The social media account of her I wake campaign has more than nine hundred forty eight thousand followers. In this episode, Dare I say. Jamila spoke to Harper's Bazaar's political editor. Jennifer Ashley Right on top of curated Harper's bazaar's Politics Coverage Jennifer has written history books about fearless woman in history, deadly clothing items and bad historical breakups, Jennifer and Jamila want free social, an mainstream media, toxic masculinity and body and image shaming. They are women who dare. Jamila I'm so excited to be talking to you. Probably know. I, feel like it's important to make it clear that toxic masculinity is not all masculine behavior. Example that I think is somewhat helpful is that it's like saying I don't like burnt toast. That doesn't mean I dislike all toast that means I don't like toast when it's burnt and displace ripple to most people. And I know that means that we have to define what toxic masculinity is and social series have some very different definitions. Since the term was first coined I think in the nineteen eighties by a man who wanted men to get back in touch with their more masculine side by by doing drum circles. It's evolved a bit since then, but in my mind, it's probably fair to say that it is a vision of masculinity that. Dominance over everyone else whether it's women or gender, non conforming people or men who might appear weaker in some way, and that's a vision of masculinity that allows for violence for sexual harassment for tremendous cruelty in all manner of forms think. Stairs women. And I. I think that that feels. Makes People want to suppress them and empower them for what they recognize empowered, because a lot of men are very afraid of our politics. If you think about how extrordinary we always and I think sometimes then become faith that they are. Redundant beyond feed and that we need them, and they recognize that that is. within relationships so within our lives, and so therefore they are afraid of and try to. Pressure or undermine or balloon us into submission? And that feels like something that we're experiencing a tremendous amount of right now. I feel like I've been surprised in kind of terrified by the men who are very young who love people like Donald Trump who, to is kind of the living embodiment of toxic masculinity, just someone who views every human interaction as a battle for dominance, things of people, only in terms of winners and losers, views, women mostly as physical objects to be owned and one and not someone who he's. You know human interaction as a given. Take you know away that both people can benefit so I'm I'm wondering why right now we seem to be living in a moment where been seem to love the idea of toxic masculinity and not men, who I necessarily think would reap the benefits of toxic masculinity. It's insecurity that makes you feel the need to hugely press your masculinity of other people what you deemed to be Masculinity I. think that you maybe happened out of your, and then whatever masculinity is to use and definitely you feel the need to exaggerate it to other people and. And Demand you know I think they're trying to prove something. The mine does protest too much. And I think again stems from CEO and I think about fair. That's the basic now because the Internet has given a connection. Women because they're able to tell stories, and we are able to help one another story. The whereabouts allowed to see what's going on across the world and I think we divided and conquered anymore. We have this communication line that brings us all together as one and I think that if you look at the fact that there are more women who CEO's, we have female world for the first time women and fighting back, women are becoming meeting voices publishing the predominantly female industry now, and this is where we are receiving books from, and we haven't done. Many female journalists, and there are high pay highly paid actresses women on the full list and female billionaires. It is a time where it feels like the whatever they have to hold that they had the weld. Fine picking between nothing, and so that is making them I believe double down now more than ever, because I can't remember if he said it that someone said that to the privileged equality feels like oppression.

Jamila Jennifer Ashley Harper CEO Jamile Donald Trump Harassment Political Editor
U.S. Economy Slumped in First Quarter: Live Updates

Morning Edition

06:16 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Economy Slumped in First Quarter: Live Updates

"And the economic toll has hit so suddenly that it is hard to compare directly with anything in memory this morning the commerce department shows how quickly the economy has crashed and the new NPR poll shows how widely the painting is sprint NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is with us along with NPR senior political editor and correspondent to medical Montanaro gentleman good morning to you both good morning morning Steve and we are all properly distant in our own homes Scott how bad is the GDP number likely to be for the first quarter what we learned today forecasters expect the GDP report this one will show the US economy shrank during the first three months of the year for the first time in six years and worse that's all because of the corona virus for the first two and a half months of the year the economy is actually chugging along at a steady if not spectacular pace but then we got to the middle of March and there was a sharp and sudden downturn that's of course when restaurants and retail shops all over the country store to close their doors tens of millions of Americans were ordered to stay home been hers on who is an economist with IHS Markit says that triggered a sharp decline in consumer spending and that alone was enough to erase whatever gross income before whenever you have the entire country changing behavior at one time in a way that would be suspending it certainly enough to wipe out any gains that we saw earlier in the year her son is expecting that the first quarter growth declined at an annual pace of almost five percent and some forecasters expect even bigger number I'm just trying to think through the math two months two and a half months of pretty good growth and then just two weeks everything being stopped and the stoppage is so bad that the total is down sharply that makes me worry about the second quarter that we're in now where things are going to be stopped for a whole lot longer yeah that's what's kind of scary just half a month of hunkering down sent the economy into reverse what happened this quarter when we're looking at you know a full month in some parts the quarter of more than that in other parts of the country economists expect to see a really deep contraction in the second quarter when those numbers come out in the summer her is not expected to show the economy shrinking at an annual pace of thirty seven percent between April and June you know in just the last five weeks we've seen some twenty six million people are joining the unemployment rolls millions more could be added to that list before we're done this is all shaping up to be the deepest recession in the US since the nineteen thirties okay so those are the overall numbers what do they mean for individuals we have some clues about that from an NPR PBS newshour Marist poll and Domenico what does it say on sticking a pretty harsh toll on most people fifty percent of Americans say they've either been laid off or lost hours at their job because of it that's up from just eighteen percent a month ago and the pandemic is having a harsher financial impact on people of color people without a college degree younger people and those making less than fifty thousand dollars a year Steve let me stop there for a second because you just said fifty percent which is a mind blowing figure half of Americans have you lost a job or lost some kind of pay lost part of their paycheck and you're telling me in certain groups it's even worse than that worse than fifty percent absolutely we're talking about household here so at least fifty percent of Americans or fifty percent Americans have been touched by this and you know Americans are large largely pretty cautious also though about re opening too quickly you would think people would want to you know open much faster if they're being affected economically but eighty percent or more of Americans are saying that they do not want schools restaurants are large sporting events to start taking place again as normal until there is further testing two thirds say they don't want us to physically go back to work without widespread testing but a majority of Republicans say it's time to get back to work so there is a partisan difference here and some of these findings in the way people view your vents up to now as always there are some partisan findings in in a lot of these numbers well what do voters think of the president's handling of the economy in this election year well about forty four percent of trump's approve of trump's handling of the pandemic is pretty similar to what his overall approval has been we talk about this partisan splits you've got Democrats and independents disapproving and Republicans largely very strongly approving of the job the president's been doing on current virus most people think the other governors are doing a far better jobs in the present and handling corona virus by two to one margin and overall they're huge gender and educational divides on how trump's handling it men approve of how trump is dealing with it women overwhelmingly disapprove if you have a college degree you overwhelmingly disapprove if you don't you do approve of the job he's doing I think it's slightly higher marks for his handling of the economy half still approving of the job he's doing on that but I have to say it's interesting when you look at the twenty twenty election the presidential election more Americans think Joe Biden the democratic the presumptive democratic nominee would do a better job handling both of those things I just have to observe also after nine eleven George W. bush also polarizing president had something like a ninety percent approval rating for a little while because of his handling of the crisis in here the president has forty four percent but we are now moving toward a new phase where academies might begin to re open at least a little bit in certain states what might that recovery look like Scott Horsley you know the commerce department numbers look backwards not forwards but the kind of Mr certainly trying to figure out what's ahead economist her son's been looking at industries like airlines and restaurants which have been hit so hard by this pandemic there's really nowhere to go but up traffic is down ninety five percent from year ago levels seated diners from OpenTable is down a hundred percent you can't go lower than that you know all these indicators are a really bad right now at some point they'll turn we'll just have to keep an eye on on when that happens best case scenario if the economy starts to stabilize this summer and then we begin to see a rebound later in the year but it depends you know if there's a big danger but the second wave of infections that requires another round of lockdowns then I guess we have to ask if by then we've found measures to get businesses open and keep them open safely and safely enough that consumers would think that it's safe to go out and shop or go to the restaurant or anything else that's

NPR
"political editor" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Wilt is the political editor for fox news I says boxes have Tammy a newsletter and is author of every man a king Chris welcome back I your bad the thousand let's just stop right there all right all the introduction perfect I think we can just walk on that but I think America once he would have to say Natchez TGG juice to I've done right now you make now you're gonna make me work so do you believe that that Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell gonna call Congress back to session no yes he says he she will admits does well you tell me the legislation looks background checks by the way fall into the category of some other issues that we think of as intractable firearms in the United States we are told repeatedly is an unsolvable intractable issue but the reality is something like seventy five or eighty percent of Americans agree the problem is that the extremes in both parties disagree and because of our primary election system you just can't act there are only to my knowledge to Republicans who support the concept of universal background checks and I know this is a loaded term and for people who were second amendment activists that they'd see concerns about registry lists and all these things but it would be something that would probably be very popular but fear of a primary challenges fear of the sanctions that can be imposed by the extremes in either party make sure that nothing even something that would be widely popular is going to happen roughly Chris which appears in the background checks we get now and universal background checks basic well we did it would depend on the bill one that we have at hand would be the legislation that was proposed a few years ago by Republican Pat Toomey a conservative from Pennsylvania and Joe Manchin moderate Democrat from West Virginia basically there what yours it so they talk about what's called the gun show loophole there isn't really a gun show loophole I'm sorry they didn't but people talk about the gun show loophole there isn't such a thing what there is though is in the United States I can give you a gun right if it as a as a Christmas present I can give you a shot gun for Christmas I could sell you a gun I could give my kids a gun you know and that's the that's the thing that in my family a curse that is normal where I'm from which is I have given firearms is present I have received firearms from family members all of those things are happening outside of the federal background check rules guy too now look that wouldn't obviously have prevented the el Paso massacre were really many that I can think of throughout the and I will take any but I can't think of an incident of one of these mass killings that would have been prevented by that but it is the sort of action when when you have a pernicious problem like this people do want to see some sort of response it is the sort of thing that does have broad support so tell by broad support I Serra Blumenthal and Lindsey Graham of got together on a red flag bill I don't know the details of it but let's hear what he has to say come fourteen what we do this is not gonna be a federal law to be a federal grant.

Wilt political editor Tammy fox eighty percent
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the parliament, take place every five years, and voter turnout has been steadily declining in two thousand fourteen it was the lowest ever just forty two point five percent. You're listening to a European parliament elections special on inside Europe. So why is voter turnout so low? That's ask Ryan Haith, who is political editor as politico Europe and he's on the line from Brussels. Hello, ryan. Hello. Why is voter turnout solo? Well, that European institutions are so far removed from people's everyday lives. A lot of people don't really understand who the member of the European parliament is, and the election that they care about lease. So to drive up turn out, you really have to combine elections. And if you have more than one or two elections at the same time, then people tend to skip this one. There are few party groupings of four election, which of the main party groupings are expected to do, well, actually nobody this time round. So the two biggest groups, the European People's Party, the Christian, Democrats the center right and the socialists and Democrats into left. They're really getting down to sort of twenty two twenty three percent levels. Of support. So it's starting to look a lot more like some national politics, the Netherlands, which is very fragmented. The grains are doing very well in some countries, but they basically don't exist in central and eastern Europe. And then you've got all of the eurosceptic parties, a split. They can't really form one single United grouping. So you're looking at a very divided. Parliament basically run-up to these elections in Italy is deputy premier Mateo Salvini. Here's he's been spearheading campaign to bring Europe's far right parties together, how is up in impacting the election campaign? It's definitely being driving a lot of the discussions. And I think a lot of people in Brussels, our afraid that the eurosceptics will be much bigger this time round, and they're not wrong to Warri it looks like skeptics will make up about one third of the parliament about two hundred fifty individual members. But matatus any has not succeeded in getting more than about seventy five of those likely as to come together and his grouping. So he'll be the biggest euroskeptic leader and his party will have. The most impact, but they still going to be divided over issues like Russia, and how do you deal with flood Mia Putin, and it means that they weren't really have the big impact that, they'd like to have on the one of the first tasks of the new parliament will be to elect the next president of the European Commission who's your prediction for the top job? It might even be one of the candidates who hasn't been appearing on the debate stages, and on television in recent weeks. It could be someone like Michelle bountygate chief Brexit negotiate for the EU and the reason for that is none of the parties doing so. Well, so it looks like they'll have to have a very complicated deal for a lot of different positions because there's going to be a clear winner on the night of the election. If there is going to be someone from that debate stage it's likely to be Manford Vega. He's the center, right candidate from Bavaria. Okay. What we watched that with interest, and that's why he on the line from Brussels. Ryan is the political editor of political Europe Ryan again on inside. Thank you. You're listening to a European parliament..

European parliament Ryan Haith eastern Europe Brussels parliament European People's Party Mateo Salvini political editor Europe Ryan Europe Manford Vega European Commission Netherlands Warri Mia Putin Russia Michelle bountygate EU Bavaria
"political editor" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And they were trying to get the baby from the car. Said that she stole the car with the baby police say the incident happened about two thirty yesterday afternoon when a woman filter car with gas at a station on Euclid insider avenues in east New York and then went in to pay for the fuel. Well, Fifty-three-year-old woman, then drove off with the car striking a pedestrian. The child was not injured the pedestrian was taken to a local hospital and the drivers in police custody with pending charges. I'm sue Guzman on seven ten w what are the lessons learned from the messy post-election battles in Georgia? The democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams has acknowledged that Republican Brian camp will be declared the governor. But she plans to file a lawsuit to challenge what she called the gross mismanagement of Georgia's elections more from ABC, political editor recline for Democrats in Georgia. This is a fast changing state for very excited about the fact that they have this potential first African American woman as the democratic candidate. They thought they could break through. It is a bitter disappointment. But I think more so than the Florida disappointment. This one is instructive to Democrats and tells them they're going to have to start to work on the laws of voter access. If they're going to try to be competitive in a range of states today. Florida's Senate race is officially over democratic incumbent Bill Nelson has conceited defeat the Republican governor Rick Scott who led by more than ten thousand votes after a manual recount five. Forty is our time right now, twenty minutes before six o'clock. Let's get to your traffic burger Vanderberg down. Now on the New Jersey turnpike westerns I south on into the southern mixing bowl. You've got a disabled vehicle blocking off part of a lane a bit of a slow down there and route nine southbound by the Edison bridge that offramp remains closed down with a collision. Now, if you're traveling and heading for the Garden State Parkway both ways by the Driscoll bridge. That's a good way to go. No problems over in Franklin. They Greg's town causeway remains shut in both directions, Saul because of flooding and that is until further notice, George Washington Bridge, looking good both levels in or. No, big problems Lincoln and Holland tunnels. Okay. Just getting word of an issue on the drive traveling northbound by sixty I read that is exit twelve an accident takes out one lane. Delays coming out of the forties. Heading north on the drive west side..

Brian camp Georgia Florida Driscoll bridge Edison bridge Euclid sue Guzman New York Stacey Abrams George Washington Bridge Bill Nelson New Jersey Rick Scott political editor Saul ABC Senate Franklin Lincoln Greg
"political editor" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on Here & Now

"The fact the matter is we have a record number of candidates running a record number of democratic women who have won nominations to how seats for example, mostly spurred because of President Trump at that is not what Democrats have been focused on the lesson that they've learned from the two thousand sixteen campaign was they felt that Hillary Clinton's campaign was far too reactive to Donald Trump. And what they felt like she didn't do what they needed to do is have a positive message and offer people something and what that has been in. This campaign repeatedly has been healthcare how to keep health care affordable, and then the Republicans with their tax cuts the. Irony. They thought they'd be able to run on that Republicans and Democrats instead seem to be benefiting from that. Because polling showing that people would rather vote for a democrat as a result of those tax cuts as opposed to a Republican and one democratic operative said to me is we're gonna call this the tax cuts scam. That's intended to cut your Medicare, social security, and Medicaid, and that's certainly what they've closed on. And it seems like there are a lot of people who have already voted early voting numbers. Looking pretty strong around the country will be watching that. And of course, we'll be here on Tuesday and Wednesday to look at what is going on NPR lead political editor, Domenico Montanaro. Thank you. You got Google CEO soon. Darpa CHAI says his company is listening to the thousands of Google employees around the world who staged a walkout yesterday in protest of the way, the company handled accusations of sexual misconduct against top executives. I just the walkouts as they were happening at a New York Times conference yesterday the sanguine frustration. Within the company, we all feel it. I feel it to Gooby said a very high bar and be clearly didn't live up to our expectations. Which is why we felt it was important experts are support for the employees today. So how is social media responding to me? Okay. Host of the stream on al-jazeera English keeps an eye on that for us..

Hillary Clinton Donald Trump Google Gooby Darpa CHAI Domenico Montanaro President New York Times Medicaid NPR political editor CEO
"political editor" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

WLRH 89.3 HD3

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WLRH 89.3 HD3

"Are people asking questions about whether or not they are going to be able to keep their winning streak because older voters don't like having to fill out these forms and they of course lean pretty heavily republican many people i talked to here said that they've been raising alarm bells with the national election pool for a decade to no avail and they see this as a pretty good thing light a match under those exit pollsters to change i talked with a consultant to one of those exit polls and he said that they are actually going to be trying to make changes and that this is part of that that's npr lead political editor domenico montanaro in denver thank you so much.

consultant domenico montanaro denver npr political editor
"political editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Now is the eu as deputy political editor there and it kinda knew this is happening even the white house said now now now now he's not going anywhere but as soon as i say you're not going anywhere the going somewhere he will play rolling resignation the and uh he is some friends he was quoted out there at you could tell that he was sore out having lost to speak internal battle over the tariff and it wasn't the first time you put out that you might be looking for other things to do and then finally lo and behold either out it was the last straw kind of thing or do you think it really came down to the tariffs in that that was a policy as a free trade guy and former wall street banker you just couldn't support well i think one thing we don't know yet is our the steel a little tariffs is that this is a single issue or is there some kit that's going on in this administration where they're gonna start going after everybody who trump thinks has an unfair advantage because he talked today about tackling european cars there's a report on bloomberg about hitting back on china on intellectual property so maybe there's dan i mean we know there's an internal struggle over these tariffs but it could be there's a fight over more than that and he doesn't he doesn't like the way things are going to be going i is really interesting strategy here because i i i think that the president the as he's impulsive and emotional and all those things but i think where he he's but he keeps his mind focused on one thing which is the electoral map and in order to have the did an and also in order to get from november december essentially of 20 18 to november of 2020 he's gonna have to keep majorities in the house and in the senate because if he doesn't get majorities in the house and the senate they're going to make life very tough democrats takeover either of those were both of those houses it's gonna be really something and for him and he knows it so what he's doing here is despite with republican ad the national committee wants here he's gonna go out is going to make his own policy for them and his own policy is going to be american jobs in protectionism and.

eu political editor white house bloomberg china president senate national committee
"political editor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Year's bills which is very important and an overall number the governance next year's bills actually writing the twelve individual bills when republicans try and stick certain riders in there or try and make policy on those bills democrats in the senate can still filibuster them if they don't like that policy so there's still a slight chance of that mischief happening but it's lessened dramatically is there anything more washington than that you know this is the twoyear deal so i had to ask you is it does it to your deal mean a twoyear deal and of course the answer is well not really like everything in washington well maybe yeah so let me ask you this yesterday in know most of the headlines were about the president saying you know what if we can't fix this thing let's have a shutdown must go ahead and do a shutdown did that move the ball at all did that actually do were doing was mitch mcconnell able to go to chuck schumer and say either this as nazis actually gonna shut down the government did they did that have any impact now an real quickly the reason why is because it's unclear what shutdown would have been attached to the president's demand on immigration right we're facing a shutdown deadline tomorrow right now the immigration deadline is march fifth and the next the spending deadline you'd have after that would be later in march there was no actual deadline for spending or something that would shut down the government attached to march fifth so it's unclear what the president was talking about gotcha all right thank you steven that for joining us again he political editor over the washington times real fast do you expect if this does get put to bed and they pass it as it appears they will do you expect immigration to be the next item of forbid recalled proud of that we have darth out debate on the floor next week boy i sure we'll be talking to you again then belga thanks for joining us coming up in a moment we're going to be with ron meyer lease a border supervisor out loud and counting you know that county bullet dumb hill vilis will get his take it amongst washington's mall w m a l washington comes to talk this is.

senate washington president chuck schumer political editor the washington times supervisor mitch mcconnell steven ron meyer twoyear
"political editor" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KKAT

"That attract seasonal foreign workers this coming from a couple of different sources including daily mail i any deputy us political editor for said publication the administration so far has put a moratorium on haitians applying to come to the united states almost skilled seasonal work visas a week after the president was accused of saying a word that numerous officials including senator tom cotton said he didn't say the move follows an earlier decision by homeland security department to in the temporary protected status temporary for the almost sixty thousand asians already living here uh and i think that the united states ever has every right of for low skilled workers to be able to say fight by the way if you try to emigrate tuesday amid number of other a caribbean nations they're going to tell you what i'm sorry what's your skill set i gold there's a place that i vacation a couple of times in aides say what is your skill set 'cause we an even gonna give you residency status if you don't have a decent skills no joke no joke and it is not a predominantly white nation on my if smart handle your immigration right maybe protect your protect our citizens move on down the line here this was us new polls who americans don't care what canadians think a us leadership actually it's the gallup survey finds canadian approval of us leadership is plunged at this dovetails with something that david axelrod has been trying to push today when he says that the popularity rating of the for of our nation has gone down according to gallup and he cites the same study and he says us popularity rating it down 20 points after barack obama's administration oh my gosh but look at our economy and look at how we were able to kinda push north korea back and look russia has stalled its aggressive outreach and my gosh maybe it's we don't really give it to him about the impopular with a bunch of individuals who think that are popularity can only be attained by completely being subservient to their whole nations agenda and ignoring.

political editor united states president senator tom cotton barack obama north korea russia caribbean david axelrod
"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Of the fulltime far today is red by neil sleet theresa may will travel to brussels later today for a summit of eu leaders after a bank bench revolt in the commons last night resulted in a first significant defeat for her brexit legislation eleven conservatives chose to side with labour and demanding that mps be given a votes on any final deal with the eu before it is implemented mrs may moved quickly to sank one of the rebels from his post in the party some rebels say they were extremely reluctant to vote against the government but did not rule out the possibility that they might do so again is our assistant political editor norman smith government insiders concede last night's vote wall's political blow dashing hopes of a revival in mrs maes fortune's after last week's successful agreement in brussels brexit however they insist will not be affected it's understood the government will now introduced changes to the eu withdrawal bill to ensure the defeat does not impact on the timing or handling of britain's departure from the eu the government of also rejected charges the vote was mishandled amid claims concessions while left until too late and the party whips were too heavyhanded in the aftermath of the result there were calls by one tory mp for the rebels to be deselected and the pot is vice chair steven hammond was sacked for voting against the government speaking on this program however mr hammond defended his decision i've never rebel oh that would be a member of farm for twelve years and i have no intention of abetting again and i don't and i think frankly last night was avoidable and there's dismay on all sides we got to where it did.

brussels eu britain vice chair steven hammond political editor norman smith mrs maes fortune mr hammond abetting twelve years
"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"While clearing mines in syria a new approach to treating me grains has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and google has been taken to court accused of unlawfully collecting personal data from millions of iphone owners in the uk the bbc news is right bicep says president trump has hit back a downing street for joining widespread condemnation of his retweeting of antimuslim videos posted by british farright group in a new tweet address to theresa may mr trump advised her to focus on radical islamic terror in britain not on him the president's earlier tweet two prompted renewed calls for the government withdraw routes invitation for a state visit although downing street said yesterday that it still stood last night the community secretary center javad said mr trump had endorsed the views of a vile hatefilled racist organization that hate me and people like me his our system political editor norman smith so far there's been no response from downing street to the president's die raked criticism of the prime minister however sources say they expect mrs made to be pressed about the issue at a news conference in jordan later today in his overnight tweet addressed to mrs may donald trump told the prime minister don't focus on me focus on the radical terrorism that is taking place within the uk his comments came off to number ten described as wrong the president's decision to re tweet videos by the farright organisation britain first a decision that has fuelled demands for the president's proposed state visit to be cancelled a move number ten has so far resisted how however his tweets have provoked anger across the political divide and speaking on this program the education secretary justin greening voiced her concern about the president's tweets but cautioned against allowing them to damage us uk relations i can't believe it should detract from the close relationship that the case had than many many years and look i won't have with america and the american people and this is a president that behaves unlike any other in the the nature of the tweets that he puts out and i don't believe that should be able to undermine an overall important relationship for our country quite apart from the controversy over the proposed state visit the concern in downing street must be whether the row has damaged relations between the.

jordan america justin greening donald trump political editor secretary bbc iphone britain syria prime minister norman smith mr trump president british farright group uk google
"political editor" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Mike gallagher venture this town halls political editor he wrote a fat cheque piece about the gop tax reform bill that has been widely cited there are a lot of myths that the democrats notably chuck schumer others are trying to perpetuate about tax reform and guy shot them down pretty effectively let's welcome back to the mic gander show or powell missed a guy benson hit guy how you bet happy thanksgiving happy thanksgiving to year my i'm glad you could join us for a few minutes because there's so much going on and i don't want to lose sight of be between the breathless reporting on charlie rose and and and john uh a con your and all these other stories that are breaking and al franken the ongoing saga of roy more in alabama there is tax reform on the table and you know i've seen schumer others say this is a disaster for all concerned everybody is going to have to pay more taxes in fact aired literally millions of people are going to emerge as pain less taxes they'll be a hideo there there's going to be of you write a nearly a million new fulltime jobs and on average taxpayers in every income group would receive a tax cut can you kinda go through that process that you've gone through in studying this and and and analysing it and coming to a very different conclusion for many of the democrats right now on capitol hill care while the democrats are just making things up and i know that shocked rise of shock um they are trying to paint this as a huge failure by the republicans and a huge tax increase on the middle class what i just did was went back and looked at the analyses performed by nonpartisan organizations including a number of these leftleaning think tanks who went through an analyze the bill for example the tax policy center is notoriously leftleaning and uncharitable to tax reductions by republicans they found that if the bill were to be implemented over a 10year budget window starting in twenty eight through twenty twenty seven the.

political editor powell benson roy alabama Mike gallagher gop chuck schumer thanksgiving charlie rose al franken capitol hill tax policy 10year
"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Amber are pastor pudding rings are fingers liam stars in the new netflixing movie the incredible jessica james and jeff number considers jane austen's most celebrated and misunderstood sentence first news live from npr news in washington i'm lorry london president trump's rage against perceived political enemies monday while speaking to boy scouts has infuriated some parents and former scouts trump was cheered by the crowd but as npr political editor domenico montinaro reports trump's comments put an organization that avoids political conflict in an awkward position there are some councils of the boy scouts that have put out opposing statements to the boy scouts today which said that they you know the bush coutts marco put out a statement saying that the there are nonpartisan group and did not want that some of the council's actually put out statements of rejecting prison trump's speech trump continues to express his displeasure with attorney general jeff sessions taking to twitter early this morning he accuses sessions of taking a quote very weak position at the justice department on what he calls hillary clinton crimes the trump administration's labor our department today started the process of reconsidering the previous administration's plans to increase the number of people eligible for overtime pay as npr's you can gucci reports the department says the obama administration's threshold for being exempt from overtime was too high it is essentially we back to the drawing board for a rule that was supposed to take effect in december in the waning days of the obama presidency that rule would have more than doubled the base salary most workers would have to earn in order to be considered salaried and therefore ineligible for overtime pay advocate said that would have increased pay for more than four million worker irs under president trump the labor department has said the increase to the threshold was too high and.

irs obama hillary clinton twitter attorney political editor london liam labor department president Amber obama administration npr justice department domenico montinaro trump washington jane austen jeff number jessica james
"political editor" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm lorry london president trump's rage against perceived political enemies monday while speaking to boy scouts has infuriated some parents end former scouts trump was cheered by the crowd but as npr political editor domenico montinaro reports trump's comments put an organization that avoids political conflict in an awkward position there are some councils of the boy scouts that have put out opposing statements to the boy scouts today was said that the you know the bush cuts merka put out a statement saying that the there are nonpartisan group and did not want that some of the council's actually put out statements of rejecting prison trump's speech trump continues to express his displeasure with attorney general jeff sessions taking to twitter early this morning he accuses sessions of taking a quote very weak position at the justice department on what he calls hillary clinton crimes the trump administration's labor department today started the process of reconsidering the previous administration's plans to increase the number of people eligible for overtime pay as npr's you can iguchi reports the department says the obama administration's threshold for being exempt from overtime was too high it is essentially back to the drawing board for a rule that was supposed to take effect in december in the waning days of the obama presidency that rule would have more than doubled the base salary most workers would have to earn in order to be considered salaried and therefore ineligible for overtime pay advocate said that would have increased pay for more than four million workers under president trump the labor department has said the increase to the threshold was too high and now is requesting additional information from interested parties you can iguchi npr news washington.

washington trump domenico montinaro bush justice department npr obama administration president labor department london political editor attorney jeff twitter hillary clinton obama
"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"All political editor laura kuenssberg is this laura a real change in practice my trees made you think of mealy recognition hasn't got the votes in the commons for many of the things you wants to do i think nick critics hope that it's the for the former i think the reality might be it's the latter licht is call for contributions from the opposition is a message is not for her critics in her own ranks you number ten are going to go off their salangi's in ten days time and keep stem over this summer rather than having too much at that warren process cohen plungent in leadership prompting he has been highly criticized in her own party for running a tight cabal before the election cry since the election publicly police will say i think today well if she makes his promises if she makes did on a diet time king because you know where more than a month on since the election and say now that she feels ready to admit publicly that she's going to have to be more pragmatic whether she likes it or notes in time we will know if this is the genuine change at higher leadership style that many of her colleagues unleashing its demonstrates what we know for sure already isn't a thought shen of the numbers in parliament's after her fateful decision to gambler election and he's a final south in her party gone backwards laura kuenssberg thank you it's twenty three minutes past eight we live in an era of huge controversy surrounding rights and wrongs of surveillance excuse me in recent weeks and wake the terrorist attacks in manchester and london we've been discussing encryption and the powers that governments and spy agencies should have to know what you are saying the monitoring service gchq who's been run since 2014 by robert and again he announced back in january that he was standing down for personal reasons and is here in the studio monisha monitors let's start with encryption the government world amerada sakhri has said the shall be no place for terrorists to hide what is your view of the ecsc tent to which we can have the security services involved in always being able to hear see or get across what we're saying while everyone would like a simple answer on encryption on on fortunately it is very difficult uh encryption is the.

laura kuenssberg manchester london robert security services political editor nick warren cohen twenty three minutes ten days
"political editor" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on WGTK

"Channel digital political editor i'm not sorry you're offended too vat quit fee in such a week late now you're not going to give it your walls it is time to tack to sarah walter halftime reported fox's dot com and of course the podcasts at tell you what with dana perino also fox's dot com and any time you look up the tv you're likely see him so mitch mcconnell has put off the vote on health care thing until after the fourth of july recess right so is it it is it true that this screaming from the democrats the people will die and they will be rolled out of nursing homes and dumped on the kerb is that's what scaring off these the five or six republicans who won't come around yet and no there and there are out there are a lot more than five or six those are the ones who have publicly stated there those are people who wish to negotiate do you come out and declare your opposition if you wish to be part of the negotiation now you saw jerry moran who's part of the senate leadership team who former head of the national senatorial committee who came out it i am a conservative establishmentarian if ever there was one and he came out after they moved it and said i was opposed to it which me which is his waves saying i want to be at the negotiating table for what goes into this to try to fix it the problem here what republicans know that whatever they pass democrats will say is a genocidal slaughter of the of the most vulnerable individuals uh no matter what so that's it's it's sort of like how you get end up with donald trump is that you say that mitt romney is a racist and a misogynist in you say that he hates women and you say that he hates minorities and has lived his life that way and you're attacks eventually lose their state king so that they when they say no we really needed this time with donald trump people go whatever you say that every time so i would say that to a certain degree those democratic tax are factored factoredin they do something to fire up the democratic base what republican that what there are two schools of opposition to.

fox dana perino jerry moran donald trump mitt romney political editor sarah walter mitch mcconnell senate
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"O'clock it's beautiful weekend in progress in the area we'll have sunshine after the morning overcast partial clearing at the coast with temperatures in the upper 50s the mid 60s we'll have some upper 60s 70s around the bay and some low 80s inland and win sunday the west up to twenty thirty miles per hour this afternoon some of the high temperatures you can expected a sixty six in san francisco succeed in oakland eighty two degrees in conquered this week in addition frank kerr nathan on time and president trump pulled out of the paris climate accord this way more reports possible connections between the trump administration and russia and james comey is chapter saying next week joining us now and pierre's in for bowl ronald somebody pathetic description your political editor bottomless bugner was robbed our euro i'm fine scott in a promise not to sing in for bowlers all or what you do it show you at least you know the lyrics of president trump announced the us of course is going to leave the paris agreement other major leaders around the world to they're disappointed the couple said they're they're not inclined to renegotiate a pack the took ten years to reach the president repeated that he wants to put america first does his announcement accomplish what he wanted to this week yes what he wanted to accomplish this week he wanted to resolve of big conflict inside his white house and his law major political family quite literally family you know you've got globalists' on one hand who were were just assumed get out of this agreement and then you have nationalists or excuse me the globalist want to stay in the agreement of course and the nationals who wanted to get out and here we're talking about you use the phrase america first and this is the crowd that is very inspired by that kind of rhetoric now whether on the long term hand it's going to produce the economic effects that our desired and promised like bringing back coal jobs for instance that's going to take some time to tell a graham's gonna take years for the withdrawal.

san francisco oakland president trump russia pierre scott america graham paris james comey political editor eighty two degrees ten years one hand