35 Burst results for "Political Editor"

"political editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"political editor" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The idea of connecting with a public figure, a royal in that way, can you just talk a little bit well, the last minute with you about the personal connection that perhaps you felt and that many others feel? Yeah, you're right. It's quite a hard thing to describe actually, because I'm British, I was brought up not to ever share my emotions. I'm sure your audience knows. We don't do that over here. And actually, it's quite a big she's just always been there. She was there and I was born. She was over my parents just about when my parents were born. And she's never put a foot wrong and she's always been this sort of main stage of life like whatever. Like whatever government changed, whatever was politically going wrong or you know whatever bad thing was happening in the world. She. Was there. You made me feel emotional again. I'm sorry about that. No, no, kitty, we really, really appreciate your time and your perspective and your coverage on what I'm sure has been a very, very long day, really appreciated. That is kitty Donaldson. She is, of course, Bloomberg news, UK, political editor, joining us on the phone in London is of

kitty Donaldson Bloomberg news UK London
Sebastian Talks Hunter Biden With Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:07 min | 5 months ago

Sebastian Talks Hunter Biden With Breitbart's Emma Jo Morris

"She is the political editor for the conservative juggernaut breitbart dot com Emma Joe Morris. Welcome back to America first. Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. Dumb question, naive question. Hunter Biden's story ever going to end. No, never. And it's actually only going to get worse because the Republicans are coming into power and God willing and, you know, if they have any sense, which I'm sure that they do, they're going to look into this because, you know, this story that we're talking about today. We're talking about eugen Ming, who had that was the subject of the time story that Biden told his son, you're clear. You Jin Ming is charged for bribery, and this is the same person who was involved in the CEFC deal with hunter where we saw the infamous line 10% for the big guy. So, you know, it's just more confirmation that not only was Joe Biden aware of his business dealings, not only was he talking to him about them which he denies. But again, this guy's has been nailed on

Emma Joe Morris Hunter Biden Eugen Ming Jin Ming Cefc America Biden Hunter Joe Biden
"political editor" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:53 min | 5 months ago

"political editor" Discussed on WTOP

"Sports The top stories we're following this hour the House select committee investigating the January 6th attack is holding its second public hearing Chris steyer wall to former political editor of Fox News has wrapped his testimony already Defended his decision to call the state of Arizona for Joe Biden on election night in 2020 he was fired from Fox News because of that decision The committee played recorded interviews with former Trump campaign manager Bill stepien and the recorded video stepien says that he specifically told Trump to tell his supporters at the race was too close to call and that voters were still votes were still being counted Former president Trump reportedly disagreed and went out and declared victory anyway Stepien says he decided to step away from the campaign when it was clear that Trump was leaning in a direction that was not quote honest or professional Cepi and is no longer testifying in person today because his wife went into labor The committee also playing videos from former attorney general Bill Barr who says the baseless claims of voter fraud were based on what he called complete misinformation You can watch the hearing live It's underway At WTO dot com And stay with me for more on these stories in just minutes Turning to the war in Ukraine heavy fighting continues in the eastern part of the Louvre region of Ukraine our national security correspondent JJ green says Russian troops have seized control of a chemical plant Hundreds of troops are sheltering there civilians and children are there inside the plant And it's believed that Russia could take control of several Rodney's going a few days and maybe the whole region in a week or so Ukraine's presidential adviser says they're losing between a 102 hundred soldiers a day Just ahead in money news Last week slum continues today on Wall Street I'm Steve dresner 1148 Traffic.

Trump House select committee Chris steyer Fox News Bill stepien stepien Stepien Cepi Bill Barr Joe Biden Arizona Ukraine Louvre region JJ green WTO Rodney Russia Steve dresner
1/6 panel to hear Trump campaign manager, probe election lie

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

1/6 panel to hear Trump campaign manager, probe election lie

"The House committee investigating the January 6th riot at the U.S. capitol will hear from more witnesses Monday The select committee delves deeper into former president Trump's unsupported claims of mass voter fraud and his effort to overturn the election today Trump's 2020 campaign manager Bill stepien who according to a subpoena oversaw the conversion of Trump's presidential campaign to a stop to steal effort is likely to face questions about what those in Trump's inner circle were telling the president about the election results The committee will also hear from a former Fox News political editor Chris stirewalt who stood by an election night decision to declare Biden had won Arizona A second group of witnesses will be made up of election officials investigators and experts including a former U.S. attorney who resigned after Trump pressure Georgia state officials to overturn his defeat committee members are saying they have uncovered enough evidence for the Justice Department to consider a criminal indictment against the former president Jennifer King Washington

Donald Trump Bill Stepien House Committee Select Committee Chris Stirewalt U.S. Fox News Biden Arizona Georgia Justice Department Jennifer King Washington
Which States Proposed New Congressional Maps?

Mark Levin

01:57 min | 10 months ago

Which States Proposed New Congressional Maps?

"Texas is being sued by the DoJ which is less the state through its congressional districts with the aim of limiting the impact of minority voters It's not the only red state that gerrymanders are calling to the holder run organization Recent news releases by his group take Republicans and states from Tennessee to Kansas to New Hampshire and Ohio to test for gerrymandering efforts Ohio Republicans map is said to be particularly egregious The Ohio map analyzed by the Princeton gerrymandering project oh I'm sure that's great Gets an F Obama and hold our silent though on Democrat led states Maryland faces multiple lawsuits Illinois congressional map includes several districts that snake narrowly through Chicago neighborhoods and suburbs before spreading out in the nearby suburban and rural areas Reducing the chance that any of those areas could elect a Republican Another district starts on the western edge of the state across the river from St. Louis Missouri and cuts almost all the way across the state that the Indiana line in the shape of an apostrophe Both of those maps got an F two In New York the most recent blue state release its redistricting plan which governor Cathy sign in the law Thursday eliminates for Republican districts Shrinking the Republican congressional delegation by 50% By 50% unlike the Democrats Illinois gerrymander which was thrown together pretty sloppy at the last minute I can only find a few isolated places where in the New York gerrymandering strands Democrat votes in GOP testing and even then we're talking fractions of points cut political editor David wasserman said it's a brutal map in New York for Republicans

Ohio DOJ New Hampshire Princeton Tennessee Texas Kansas Governor Cathy Illinois Maryland Barack Obama Chicago St. Louis Missouri Indiana New York GOP David Wasserman
Breitbart's Political Editor Emma Jo Morris on Joe Biden's Knowledge of Hunter's Business Dealings

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Breitbart's Political Editor Emma Jo Morris on Joe Biden's Knowledge of Hunter's Business Dealings

"I don't know what he was doing. I know he was on the board. I found out he was on the board after he was on the board. And that was it. And there's a lot of time. Isn't this something you want to get to the bottom of? No, because I trust my son. But that doesn't pass the smell test. It's like, when you're a vice president, isn't there a higher standard? Don't you need to know what's happening with your family. Don't need to put down some guardrails. Unless there was something that was there was something on his face that was wrong. There's nothing else face that was wrong. So look, if you want to talk about problems, let's talk about Trump's family. I mean, come on. This is amazing. Nothing on its face was wrong. Let's not talk about me. Let's talk about the Trump family because yeah, reasons. That is the sad pathetic old man who bear Bailey bears the title president of the United States, talking about whether he knew anything about his son's business relations. No, I didn't. But just stop asking me questions. Let's get to the truth about the actual knowledge that he had of Hunter Biden's corruption in so many different ways. With somebody who, well, broke the laptop from hell story. We are delighted to have her in studio. She is an awful terrible. Maybe because she spent far too much time in Canada. She's Emma Joe Morris. She is the political editor for one of the most powerful organizations in the world that's on the right side. It's called breitbart dot com and she is in studio welcome Emma. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. So first things first, I'm going to ask you about your background. How you get to bright about where you were before that. But just to reaction to that random act of journalism from axios where we're here to see how old guy get a little bit touchy at the end, but first say, no, nothing to see here. Yeah, I mean, it's pretty unbelievable, especially after all of the reporting from the New York Post. I mean, the first story, the first story was addressing that claim, specifically, which was that he didn't know. So he was kind of skirting by saying my son does what my son does and I don't have anything to do with it and nobody had anything to say actually you do until the post reporting, which was the first story. Vladimir from burisma says, thank you for the opportunity to meet your father. And that was an email that we have the actual words of the originator who it's going to thanking Hunter Biden for having me meet what your daddy. Yeah. And then obviously, you know, a couple with that story of the same day. We had the story of The White House leaking conference calls to charisma. So obviously he was aware, obviously, they were helping each other. And the way that they were kind of making this whole thing look okay if you don't have the emails in public view was they weren't being paid while Joe Biden was in office. So that was kind of the plausible deniability way that they

Hunter Biden Emma Joe Morris Donald Trump Bailey Breitbart Burisma Emma United States New York Post Canada Vladimir White House Joe Biden
"political editor" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on The Media Show

"Hello, this week, we want to explore what makes a political story matter. And what makes a particular story, however important it feels at the time, soon, be forgotten. We'll talk to the BBC, Steve Rosenberg about his remarkable interview with the president of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko will consider the change of editor at the daily mail and how much influence he will have over the stories that stay with us, and we need to talk about Peppa pig. I'm sure most of you saw the prime minister's speech at the CBI. It was an eventful affair. Let's begin the program by quickly speaking to Anushka Astana deputy political editor at ITV news, hi Anushka. I assume ITV covered Peppa pig? We certainly did cover.

Steve Rosenberg Alexander Lukashenko Belarus BBC Anushka Astana CBI ITV news Anushka ITV
Boris Johnson, Inviting Battle, Prepares to Break Vow on Raising Taxes

The Briefing

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson, Inviting Battle, Prepares to Break Vow on Raising Taxes

"Johnson is today announcing a tax rise to pay for the effect of lockdown on the nhs it breaks the tory manifesto meaning. He'll be facing down rebels from his own party. The prime minister is expected to say that national insurance will go up by around one and a quarter percent that could generate more than ten billion pounds for the nhs for months. We've been told a solution to the social care. Crisis was coming but political editor. Ben reilly smith has learned that the new phones will i e goto reducing. Nhs waiting lists. Now let's let the claims. The plans are a

Johnson Ben Reilly Smith NHS
Ministers to Outline Proposals to Address NI Protocol

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Ministers to Outline Proposals to Address NI Protocol

"You government. Ministers are set to outline how they want to overhaul trading arrangements between britain northern ireland the measures which governed by the northern ireland protocol designed to prevent the need for border checks on the island of ireland after brexit but the government in westminster is concerned about the impact that it could have on exports to northern ireland when the terms fully kickin over the next few months the agreement has also angered large sections of northern ireland's loyalist community. Let's get the latest now with george parker political editor at the financial times. Thank you for joining us. George just bring us up to speed. I on what we can expect from today. Well we're going to have to wait very long. See precisely what the british government's gonna say in this regard. There's gonna be a statement to the house of commons by the northern secretary brandon. Lewis in about half an hour's time where he's also going to publish a government statement on how it sees the future of the brexit deal relating to ireland's but essentially What's happened here. Since brexit took effect is that the uk government regards the checks on goods passing between the mainland of great britain's northern ireland to be fought too onerous. They think the eu interpreting the deal and as far too legalistic away and it's created tensions in northern ireland where the pro uk unionists community very much disliked. The idea of any sort of trade off between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom shots background so it and what the government is expected to announce today is it wants to basically get rid of those checks on goods travelling between raping the person in northern ireland. Right much more sort of honesty books. Kind of approach where british Goods thrive in northern ireland. That they'll be some sort of guarantee sticker on the mall. Something saying that. The could should only go into circulation in northern ireland across across the open land border into ireland which of course remains possibly even single market.

Northern Ireland George Parker Britain Westminster Financial Times British Government House Of Commons Brandon George Lewis EU United Kingdom Government
Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:33 min | 1 year ago

Scottish Election 2021: SNP Hopes of Majority Remain on a Knife Edge

"The united kingdom voted in local elections yesterday while scotland chose the next parliament with potentially huge implications for the future of the union. Well for more on this. I'm joined by katie bulls. The spectators political editor katie. Welcome to monocle twenty four. Let's begin in the most significant areas. Scotland wherein snp victory could be a catalyst for the uk's disintegration. Do you think that nicholas sturgeon. The first minister can hold onto her job. Do we have any results that indicate that so far so in terms of the scotland at results. I think it's gonna mean much clearer by the end of the day today. And if it's close it doesn't look it estimate comfortable Majority between is what Once she's staked her reputation on then. It could drag veto tomorrow morning. dementia scraped together a majority. If it's come to lose by this evening at intended the results forgets against much places. I caught the poo and kansas in england. Bit scotland I think is the most high stakes will the uk government because if nikola session can get majority in there is a even a wider pro-independence majority which could actually be more difficult for the uk government than it just being smp one. It presents an issue in the sense. What does boris yeltsin say about this request for a second independence referendum. We know he doesn't want to grant one but as much debate in western says to the best to do not saying never when then. When is the right time if it's not

Scotland Katie Bulls Nicholas Sturgeon United Kingdom Parliament Katie Dementia Nikola Kansas England Boris Yeltsin
Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

The Leader

02:28 min | 1 year ago

Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

"Some queued for hours outside wall substitute library for walk. In short of the coluna virus vaccine. Three thousand jobs were given here during the day earlier. This week it was announced that fifty seven percent of all adults in the uk been given at least one shot but now could the nation's children also joining the lines. Trials are apparently on the way. Our deputy political editor. Nicholas cecil has stored nicholas. How young are we talking about here. Well at the moment scientists and health experts in bristol. The building children's vaccine said they have a study underway involving children who are teenagers. And this is a study using the astra zeneca jab. They're expecting shortly to be given the go ahead to start recruiting younger children as young as five and the reason why they're doing these trials is that so far all. The clinical trials have been adults to check that the vaccine was safe and worked in adults. And now they're checking out with it. It'd be equally safe and effective for for for children for people under eighteen benegas. Do we need to give children a virus facts. Because i thought you know the whole point of them. Going back to school was because young people don't get the serious effects of covid nineteen if the contract. This is a very interesting ethical question children as you say if they do get grown virus they are very unlikely to get the disease severely. But there's a big issue here of nuts about the circulation of the virus so this study will look at whether the vaccine works in children and then the the experts expect decision by the government in the summer about whether to start vaccinating children and professor. Adam finn who's from bristol university one of the leading experts on this. He was explaining that to vaccinate children just for the benefit of other people that that could be questionable and he would feel uncomfortable about that but he explained that actually if vaccinating children meant that the disease was kept under control and that meant that schools could reopen safely in september then there would be a benefit to children and therefore actually giving the jabs to children we would be beneficial only to them but also society

Nicholas Cecil Benegas Astra Nicholas Bristol UK Adam Finn Bristol University
EU regulator says AstraZeneca vaccine 'safe and effective'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:26 min | 1 year ago

EU regulator says AstraZeneca vaccine 'safe and effective'

"The european medicines agency has concluded that the astra zeneca covid nineteen vaccine is safe and effective. A review of the job came after thirteen states suspended. Its use over. Fears of linked to blood clots. But the now says the vaccine is not linked with a higher risk of clots. Well for more. I'm joined from brussels by darren. Mccaffrey the political editor euronews. A darn good morning to you and thanks for joining us with the doubts then about the vaccine. Will this kind all started last week or georgina. A in italy and austria where the reports of suspected blood clots for people who received that vaccine in fact amand had died in those extended to norway last weekend's and more importantly specifically to germany on monday and that led to a whole swathe of countries at particular the big four in the european union. It's the spain and france and germany deciding to suspend the use of the astrazeneca vaccine on what they call the precautionary principle so just in case essentially and that meant that the em aid and investigated these claims and yesterday. She said e kook. The director insisted that the vaccine was safe and effective. They said they couldn't find any link at all between an increase in blood clots and the vaccine however they did also that they couldn't rule arts at that there may be one specific type. Ucla cloth that has seen an increase and they couldn't rule out that that might be linked to it book again. Mccook pointed all medicine. All medicine has got side effects. You pick up a box of paracetamol at. You'll see that. In the most extreme circumstances it is possible. You might a reaction to its the point. Is that risk does not outweigh the benefits of this vaccine is the ema insisted yesterday. There are houses of people dying every day today tomorrow the next day across europe from corona virus and that this vaccine will help save lives or stop people getting ill. It will stop the main open hospital. It will stop them dying. And that's why they have consistently said that countries should have carried on using the astrazeneca vaccine an interest in the of course while not all countries stopped it for example they didn't hear belgian said. It would be irresponsible to do so. It is interesting the eu countries. Listen to the european medicines agency yesterday but ignored advice all week. The advice consistently has been not to stop the use of the astrazeneca vaccine. And i mean it just seems such a giant waste of time in terms of a race that everybody is trying to keep up with to suspend this for four really what has appeared to be no reason i mean as any woman knows taking the contraceptive pill as a much higher. Incidence of blood clots. Indeed i think from their point of view and this is where it gets complicated here in european union. Of course you've got european agency which is kind of the overarching body that authorizes drugs and authorized vaccines but you then also have national regulators. Who essentially gets to decide how those rules applied or or whether a member state should've finds by those rules when it comes to germany and where we saw a whole swathes countries at backing germany. The was the principal. There's also concerns about potential legal action because ultimately this is a state authorized vaccine service ad. That's been offered obviously to every german. And i think there was concern. That even could be farmed and they had data evidence to say that the wasn't increase increasing site. When it came to one specific type of blood clots the wilkinson's that may well open the german state of legal action and they wanted it to be investigated but yet. In retrospect all men many of these member states looking back. I answer that decision and decided it was the right one to do. Given the unfair. I would suggest damage reputation of astra zeneca for a whole load of ruse reasons across the eu and the damage that might do to the overall vaccine program. I'm not entirely sure was the right thing to

European Medicines Agency Astra Zeneca Germany European Union Amand Mccaffrey Astra Georgina Darren Brussels Mccook Austria Norway Italy Ucla Spain France Europe Wilkinson
Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

Coffee House Shots

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Deputy Political Editor of the Spectator, Katy Balls, Discusses Where the U.K. Stands on COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

"Yes and katie. Boris johnson is trying to lead the way on this discussion. What does the u k position. Severe macron is Five percent of the current vaccine intake. I think that the strong sense she got from ministers involved with this is that they don't want to give away vaccines until they have been able to offer a vaccine not just to the most vulnerable. But ideally everyone in the country and tens of the adult population. And i think this goes to a desire by the uk to almost tried. Reach head mean free. Immunization see something happening in israel. I think it's probably easier said than done. And even though we all very lucky to be high vaccine uptake country if you looked is rather as where we could be going the beginning to see slightly when for example at vaccines fatigue characters. I think the age group you go. The uptake still very good uptake. But no expansion to see the level you get say eight year olds amongst thirty roads. Now i think that when it comes to giving away vaccines. Dj very much does want to do that. And i think that they can see that. You can emerge as a global player by coming gossip benevolent as james touch and actually right near copies. Various governments have ready. Go ahead startled that. As to whether i think there is still some debate to be had because there has been idea at the senate. Mtv countries and food scheme at has been talked about the idea of countries in africa. And beyond. But i think that that has also been to airmax. Mp's such as if the public violence is very far behind the uk. Actually as close allies neighbor. We should be stepping in there now. I think what might make this decision. Earlier is ultimately what is the desire what is demand for some of the vaccines. The uk has given hearing more reports of various european countries. Saying they don't want the oxford vaccine may be actually some the things he geeky has to offer an received. But i do you think the senses that this will stop being a problem soon. Enough because ministers and officials believe that you'll start to see the data showing that the oxford astrazeneca vaccine does have a really important facts and what she had that that the level of skepticism is going to go

Boris Johnson Katie UK Israel James Senate Africa Oxford
Trump's Senate impeachment trial moves to opening arguments

All Things Considered

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Trump's Senate impeachment trial moves to opening arguments

"Trump committed a massive crime against our Constitution and our people and the worst violation of the presidential oath of office in the history of the United States of America. That is lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin of Maryland today. He and his fellow House members presented opening arguments in Day two of former President Trump's impeachment trial in the U. S. Senate. Call the former president on insider in chief who reveled in the chaos of his supporters of the capital on January 6th joining us now to talk about the day or NPR congressional reporter Claudia Chrysalis and NPR's senior political editor and correspondent. Domenico Montanaro. Could have you both. Here. Thanks. Thanks. Claudia, you were actually in the Senate chamber today, where the 100 senators as jury members sit silently listening to the House. Impeachment managers make their case describe the mood for us. It was clear much of the time that I was in the chamber that the members were very engaged. For example, they were watching lead manager Jamie Raskin, in his presentation very intently reminded me of the chamber yesterday when Raskin was giving his emotional remarks. About the day he and his family experienced here. During the insurrection. I was seated on the Republican side of the chamber. Republicans were intently watching him and the other managers and that includes those who say they won't be voting to convict Trump like Mike Rounds of South Dakota, Republican member of the Senate. Also, Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell was also watching. Very closely even watch some of these videos of the president's past statements on a television screen on the chamber floor. Many members were taking notes, and this includes those who have voted for the constitutionality of the trial, among them, Ben Sasse of Nebraska had a pile of no cards on his desk. Domenico. The Democrats were making the arguments today. I know you've been watching since the beginning of these proceedings yesterday what stood out to you compared to yesterday's testimony. Well, only later in the day here, have we gotten some of the personal passion and emotion that we had yesterday about the violence on January? 6th? Mostly today, Democrats had been methodically mounting, pretty dispassionate case to show Trump is the reason for why all of this happened. They claim that it's not just isolated to January 6th and tick through numerous things for months and months. That this was months and months in the making that Trump laid the groundwork before the election and drove it home after after that election and was aware of what was being planned. Um, it kind of really makes me wonder how and what the trump lawyers they're going to say in rebuttal, aside from saying that Democrats are being selective and use the word on that they didn't say that he used the word peaceful. In his speech on January 6th. Claudia tell us more about how the Democrats are actually building their case here. Yes, they're focused on showing the timeline of how Trump built a crowd of people who distrusted the election and believed they were following his orders. Jonah Goose, one of the managers of he's, a House member of Colorado. He also talked about this. Let's take a listen. Senators is clearly was not just one speech. Didn't just happen. It was part of a carefully planned months long effort. With very specific instruction. Show up on January 6th. Get your people to fight the certification. So from manager to manager they're building this case each piece building on the next the beginning, middle and end and today mark the beginning of that story. He made a point of connecting directly to their share terror that day, and this was especially apparent is, Domenico noted in the late afternoon when managers have shared dramatic sounds. And footage video footage from the day of the insurrection that the public has not seen before. This was sounds from police scanners of officers pleading for assistance. Pleading for their lives. It's seen as they were being assaulted by the mob. There's video footage from Capitol security cameras showing the mob breaking into the capital and another stunning moment where we see Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, walking outside of the chamber, running into an officer being told they need to clear out quickly and he is running. Behind this officer to escape the mob. Wow well yesterday, Trump's lawyers dismissed the House managers arguments, calling Democrats accusing Democrats of trying to cancel the former president by stifling his freedom of speech. Medical. What did the impeachment managers say about that claim right? Trump's lawyers yesterday said his speech was protected by the First Amendment. But Jamie Raskin, the lead impeachment manager, who we heard from earlier You know, he's a constitutional law professor, And he argued that the quote factual premise and the legal underpinnings of that claim are all wrong, He said. Incitement to violence is not protected speech, and here's how he put it with a familiar phrase. It's more like a case where the town fire chief Who's paid to put out fires sends a mob not to yell fire in a crowded theater, but to actually set the theater on fire. And who then, when the fire alarms go off in the calls, start flooding into the fire department asking for help does nothing but sit back, encourage the mob to continue its rampage and watch the fire spread on TV. Clea and delight. You know,

Jamie Raskin Donald Trump U. S. Senate Claudia Chrysalis Domenico Montanaro NPR Mike Rounds Ben Sasse Claudia House Domenico Raskin Jonah Goose United States Of America Mitch Mcconnell Maryland South Dakota Nebraska Senator Mitt Romney Colorado
"political editor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"States and to all of you around the world welcome Germany's federal and state leaders have agreed to extend the country's coronavirus lockdown. Until March summons. The decision came after Chancellor Angela Merkel held a virtual summit. The leaders of Germany 16 federal Stakes, Merkel made it clear that she wanted the national lockdown extended for several more weeks. At least. Schools, shops, bars, restaurants and leisure facilities have been closed here in Germany since mid December. A number of coded 19 infections and deaths have been on the decline here in Germany, but Chancellor Merkel is urging the public to stay vigilant and today's summit, she warned that coronavirus mutations could feel a new wave of infections. It's up to start in a little villa. This is a third wave that we have to fight and we can only fight it. If we bring down the incident rate if health authorities get control of the virus again, meaning they could be in contact tracing again, then we can reduce the instant rate even more with further steps. Thing, and that's what we want. When On steps up is just keep such penetration. That is why the period between now and mid March when the experts tell us that the mutated viruses could gain the upper hand over the previous fires. It's so important that we must continue to reduce our case numbers and be very careful. Therefore, if he said it was the German chancellor, speaking earlier tonight, let's go now to our chief political editor, McKellar quickness. She's been following the story for us because of the chancellor's. She entered the discussions today with a cautious approach, and we know that she's worried about these viral variants. Did she get what she wanted? She did. Partly what she didn't get was that there is some kind of agreement on schooling. She had to leave it to all 16 states what she legally has to anyway. But she couldn't find a common line for those gradual school re openings which some states want to proceed with, and others don't. What she did do is for the first time she pegged re openings. Very localized ones, even to that magic formula, which used to be 50 infections, but 100,000 people within the space of seven days that was the threshold. When debate started about gradually getting out of the lockdown that's now down to 35 because of the fear of those mutations. But at the same time, there's a promise that if this can be reached at the very local level that there could be very local re openings. So that's a real change in the approach. As this mutation is arriving in Germany, do we know how is just going to go down with the public? People have been living in the lockdown now for months. Yes, well, still upwards of way beyond 50% of Germans are behind the lockdown At the same time when you talk to politicians, the converse.

Chancellor Angela Merkel Germany chancellor McKellar political editor
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Winner, fundraiser today. Some cloud cover today the rest of the afternoon, and it looks like tonight for the Bay Area and the Sacramento Valley. Sacramento's high Today about 63 56 in San Francisco up to 62 today, San Jose Santa Rosa 62. And Napa 60 degrees. From NPR NW bur I'm Tanya, mostly I'm Callum Borchers. It's here. And now Democrats and Republicans are gearing up for another momentous impeachment trial beginning tomorrow, the two sides are hammering out the details of the unprecedented second trial of former President Donald Trump. We're joined now by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. We've simply never seen this before. In American history. A president impeached twice the second time after he's left office. However, senators preparing for this occasion Well, you know they're going to be the jury, and we've already seen that 45 Republicans have sided with Senator Rand. Paul, who brought this measure forward that believing that this is unconstitutional for Senate to even bring it forward. Well, we're gonna see tomorrow. Them starting this trial. We know that the house impeachment managers on the democratic side are trying to push a, you know. Shortened case one heavy on video and emotional pleas from you know, recalling the events of January 6th to try to make it, You know, sort of somethingto, you know, almost try the president. Before the public to convince them rather than just the senators. I see. And they will be led by representative Jamie Raskin and again the charges for inciting a riot. Aside from that emotional appeal, I mean the nuts and bolts. How are they gonna make the case? You said the president, a singularly responsible not just based on his rhetoric at the January 6th rally at the lips of the White House when the pro Trump mob then stormed the capital, but also his role in false claims that set the groundwork for this and this false grievance that they had That that the president had a right to say that there was that the election was stolen from him, even though there was no evidence for that, and that that groundswell that was the whole reason why they were there in the first place, and that the president's responsible for that. So his culpability is sort of a substance of the case against him. But there's also this procedural point and as you said Domenico 45, Senate Republicans voted to dismiss the trial before it even began claiming that just from a process standpoint, you can't convict a president who isn't in office anymore. Let's hear Trump ally Lindsey Graham. And the way he put it on face The nation yesterday. If you believe you committed a crime, he can be prosecuted like any other citizen. Impeachment is a political process would never impeached a president. Once they're out of office. I think this is a very bad idea. So Domenico, he says. It's a bad idea. On the other hand, he like all of these members of Congress had very scary experience just last month, so I mean to Republicans think Trump should face any consequences. Then you know, some have called for censure. But on the case of president, you know it's interesting. Lindsey Graham leaves out the case of Ulysses S. Grant, swore secretary in 18 76, who was tried after he resigned and the impeachment managers back then thought that this had settled the case because the Senate had voted back then. Uh, that it was that they did have jurisdiction. Now it was controversial. Back then the trump lawyers who have just put out their 75 page. Brief responding to some of the charges. You cite this case and said that you know, essentially because Belknap wasn't convicted by two thirds and because most of the senators back then Didn't think that they had standing. Almost the senators who voted to acquit him thought that he didn't have standing that. That's enough to say it's unconstitutional, even though the majority of the senators voted to convict him. So it was a controversy back then, and it's still a controversy today. I see some details there of the arguments that the former president's defense team is going to make. How about a few other process things Domenico in the moment that we have left because we need other things to get sorted out like how long the trial is going to take whether both sides can call witnesses where those things stand. We're not sure how long this is going to go on. You know, all signs are that it could be a week or so on. Do you know I really think that what's interesting is going to be how the Trump Team how their lawyers go down this path. They're going to make what looks like a narrow constitutional argument that a former president can't be tried and then impeachments mainly about removal and not disqualification from office because if they go down the path Of the election fraud that that could shake loose some Republicans, and there's only just a glancing mention. Of even the election fraud and the president's rhetoric on one line and one page of the 75 page brief. That's NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. Thanks You're welcome. Well in many places throughout the country. There's a contentious relationship between police and communities of color. Nate Heggie of Mountain West News Bureau visited one town in Washington state, where activists say police are doing things right. Moses Lake is ah, hardscrabble, working class community out in the dry, flat scab lands of eastern Washington. We have a lot of factories out here. A lot of Johanna been. Wahid is taking me on a tour downtown. There's a lot of airbag factories. He's got piercings, dreadlocks, and he's taking drags from Reveille pet dangling around his neck. He's lived here in Moses Lake for most of his life, while the town is kind of diverse. We have a lot of Latinos while he does one of the few black people here, so he was pretty nervous when he helped organize a black lives. Matter protest in Moses Lake this summer, he says. There's a white racist element in town. It came together nicely. We just had a nice march snacks. We talked shared stories, You know, I mean, it went really, really well, which surprised the hell out of me because I get called the n word around here quite a lot. And so I want heat and others were protesting police violence and systemic racism across the country. He says they weren't worried about the local cops. Believe me, you I'm not a huge.

president Domenico Montanaro Donald Trump Senate Moses Lake NPR Lindsey Graham political editor Bay Area Sacramento Callum Borchers Napa Tanya San Jose Santa Rosa Sacramento Valley Jamie Raskin Senator Rand San Francisco Congress
What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

Here & Now

04:52 min | 1 year ago

What to expect in Trump's historic second impeachment trial

"Now Democrats and Republicans are gearing up for another momentous impeachment trial beginning tomorrow, the two sides are hammering out the details of the unprecedented second trial of former President Donald Trump. We're joined now by NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. We've simply never seen this before. In American history. A president impeached twice the second time after he's left office. However, senators preparing for this occasion Well, you know they're going to be the jury, and we've already seen that 45 Republicans have sided with Senator Rand. Paul, who brought this measure forward that believing that this is unconstitutional for Senate to even bring it forward. Well, we're gonna see tomorrow. Them starting this trial. We know that the house impeachment managers on the democratic side are trying to push a, you know. Shortened case one heavy on video and emotional pleas from you know, recalling the events of January 6th to try to make it, You know, sort of somethingto, you know, almost try the president. Before the public to convince them rather than just the senators. I see. And they will be led by representative Jamie Raskin and again the charges for inciting a riot. Aside from that emotional appeal, I mean the nuts and bolts. How are they gonna make the case? You said the president, a singularly responsible not just based on his rhetoric at the January 6th rally at the lips of the White House when the pro Trump mob then stormed the capital, but also his role in false claims that set the groundwork for this and this false grievance that they had That that the president had a right to say that there was that the election was stolen from him, even though there was no evidence for that, and that that groundswell that was the whole reason why they were there in the first place, and that the president's responsible for that. So his culpability is sort of a substance of the case against him. But there's also this procedural point and as you said Domenico 45, Senate Republicans voted to dismiss the trial before it even began claiming that just from a process standpoint, you can't convict a president who isn't in office anymore. Let's hear Trump ally Lindsey Graham. And the way he put it on face The nation yesterday. If you believe you committed a crime, he can be prosecuted like any other citizen. Impeachment is a political process would never impeached a president. Once they're out of office. I think this is a very bad idea. So Domenico, he says. It's a bad idea. On the other hand, he like all of these members of Congress had very scary experience just last month, so I mean to Republicans think Trump should face any consequences. Then you know, some have called for censure. But on the case of president, you know it's interesting. Lindsey Graham leaves out the case of Ulysses S. Grant, swore secretary in 18 76, who was tried after he resigned and the impeachment managers back then thought that this had settled the case because the Senate had voted back then. Uh, that it was that they did have jurisdiction. Now it was controversial. Back then the trump lawyers who have just put out their 75 page. Brief responding to some of the charges. You cite this case and said that you know, essentially because Belknap wasn't convicted by two thirds and because most of the senators back then Didn't think that they had standing. Almost the senators who voted to acquit him thought that he didn't have standing that. That's enough to say it's unconstitutional, even though the majority of the senators voted to convict him. So it was a controversy back then, and it's still a controversy today. I see some details there of the arguments that the former president's defense team is going to make. How about a few other process things Domenico in the moment that we have left because we need other things to get sorted out like how long the trial is going to take whether both sides can call witnesses where those things stand. We're not sure how long this is going to go on. You know, all signs are that it could be a week or so on. Do you know I really think that what's interesting is going to be how the Trump Team how their lawyers go down this path. They're going to make what looks like a narrow constitutional argument that a former president can't be tried and then impeachments mainly about removal and not disqualification from office because if they go down the path Of the election fraud that that could shake loose some Republicans, and there's only just a glancing mention. Of even the election fraud and the president's rhetoric on one line and one page of the 75 page brief. That's NPR senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Domenico. Thanks You're

Domenico Domenico Montanaro Senator Rand Jamie Raskin Senate Lindsey Graham Donald Trump NPR White House Paul Ulysses S. Grant Belknap Congress
Can Australia and China learn to get along?

Between The Lines

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Can Australia and China learn to get along?

"Tensions with china. Australia's tried stash with. China has escalated sharply with savage new tariff. Sit hit our wine industry hard from tomorrow. All australian wine will be hit with a one hundred to two hundred per cent hike. A move gross. I will devastate the industry. There was an abc news account of china hitting our wine sector of course assign deterioration of sino australian relations in the past. Gee indeed relationship between our nations have not been so dismal in more than half a century that is since before them opened ties with communist china. Mainland we give expression to new international album. No nation is on you. Aspirations symbolize law china upon our region. That was then prime minister. Gough whitlam ushering in a new era of cooperation between beijing and camber that was in nineteen seventy three. However in the past year in response to cambridge calls for an inquiry into the origins of covid nineteen. The chinese government has launched an unprecedented economic retaliation against our export industries. We mentioned one. Is bali. Beef lamb cotton lobster timber call and so on. Now you might ask not unreasonably. Why can't cambridge just restore relations with china indeed. How often have you heard the critics. Say if only camera toned down its rhetoric. Restored a dialogue rebuild trust with beijing. If the government did all these things did more to accommodate china all would be well instead where told cambra native sleep provokes trade partner by implementing foreign interference laws rejecting the wildlife. Fog j. network beat and calling for an inquiry into the origins of the crown of ours. Now that's what the critics site and you've heard many of them on this show in recent years. The hugh watt the jeff rabies. The stephen fitzgerald's the linda jakobsen's the giants lawrenson and some of them. however kanchana really rise peacefully. And is it really fair to say that when there's trouble it's invariably the fault of either washington's hawkish policies or a net australian diplomacy. How do you deal with our largest trade partner that is converting its economic might into strategic and military clout. Well we have a terrific panel is political editor of the sydney morning herald paid. His forthcoming book is called red zone. China's challenge australia's future as published by lacking books. Get i paid. I welcome back to national tomo. As a pleasure and she'll mahbubani is a distinguished fellow at the national university of singapore's asia research institute keisha. Most recent book is called. Has china won. The chinese challenge to american promessi k. Show it's also a pleasure to welcome you back to between the lines especially it'd be backed up now. Many australians as you will know are understandably anxious about what they see. Is china's discrimination against australia. What do you think is targeting. Us and abbey's measures against our exports justified in your judgment. Let me try tom to be very frank and help flow by giving you. What's that regional exception of australia. In the larger context the world has changed. We have gone from the euro than domination of world history to us. The ancient century and australia is very lucky that it is situated in the heart of issues now but australia still behaves culturally a western society in an asian dominated environment. And just to give you one simple example but you walk into an asian home. Most times you take off your shoes. That's asian culture. This not western culture the take off your shoes now with decide their fall to live and work in sight and asian home. Do you want to try and understand the issue norms or do you want to work. Only with western nas. That's the fundamental question that australia faces. Well you have risen case your that as westin palace slowly but steadily received from asia australia could be lifted stranded together with new zealand as the sole western entities in asia and paid a casual guys on following on from what he just said that quote as western power recedes. Globally australia's predominantly western population could feel very isolated and lonely. Niger asia paid a hatchet. How would you respond to katia model. Bonnie depends on how you define whist and tom If western society western values includes retaining liberties if it allows us to have free speech freedom of association freedom to choose our governments and reject them. Then i think straightens would happily subscribe to the definition of wisden

China Australia Chinese Government Cambra Hugh Watt Cambridge Stephen Fitzgerald Beijing Linda Jakobsen Lawrenson Kanchana Gough Whitlam Sydney Morning Herald Abc News Mahbubani National University Of Singapo Mainland Bali Giants Government
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's KQED news. I'm terrorist. Siler. San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulkner has officially announced he's running for governor. Whether the campaign to recall Governor Gavin Newsom makes it to the ballot or not. Faulkner is a Republican who says he voted for Donald Trump in last year's election, although he disagreed with many of his policies. In an interview with Kay Cuties political editor Scott Shaffer today, Falconer criticized Newsome. For failing to get California schools reopened, and the fact that the governor has not engaged to get the job done is unacceptable as mayor of San Diego during the pandemic. I've worked with are firefighters union are police officers union are librarians or refuse collectors want to give people back to work safely? Have that conversation is to make it happen. And we did the fact that in virtually every state every state across this country schools reopening, But California is it. It's a lack of leadership. Well, In fact, I would say the foundation of your campaign really is the governor is mishandling, as you would say of the pandemic. And you know when you look at San Diego, for example, and you know, this is a county and you were the mayor of the city, but it really the county hasn't done. Anything different than other California counties. In fact, it's done a little worse than some of the democratically controlled counties like San Francisco and Alameda. When it comes to, you know, Case rates per capita positivity rates, eh? So how do you make the case that you could do better as governor when you didn't necessarily do better is mayor Well, the foundation of my campaign is a mayor that got results in the second largest city in our state. We touched on homelessness. The fact that it's growing and virtually every other city I did not allow tense on the sidewalk in San Diego. Cause I believe if you love somebody to sleep on a tent on your sidewalk, you're condemning them to die on your sidewalk. We're better than that. Rebecca that is California's but coming back to the pandemic could not defeat the police. Just a second. Didn't defund the police in San Diego. I increased the budget, and as I strongly believe we have to have safe cities. We have to have a safe state. That's a dramatic contrast. Unfortunately in the rhetoric we've seen coming out of the governor's office, But let me get to the pandemic because I'm Get the right to the point. I think it's incredibly important. We follow the science and what we have seen with our shifting metrics coming out of the governor's office. Shifting virtually every other month is that a lot of it was not based on science. The fact We closed outdoor dining down with absolutely no science behind outdoor transmission was occurring. The fact that the governor came out several months ago and shut down playgrounds for kids and families before he changed this mind. A week later. That's not science. We all have the same goal. Let's keep California and safe and we all the same call. Let's get Californians vaccinated. And yet as the most entrepreneurial Folks were doing the planning necessary. The vaccine showed up. The fact that our great state is at the bottom of vaccine distribution is unacceptable. That's what needs to change. All right here. I know we're short on time. One more questions. A little odd to end on this, I'll admit, but you know, Governor Newsome enacted a moratorium on executions in California. Would you reverse that if you were governor? I tell you, I strongly support the death penalty in California. I think it's incredibly important. So you would reverse it strongly supported. It should never have been changed. San Diego mayor and candidate for governor Kevin Faulkner, speaking with Kay Cuties, Scott Shaffer, and I'm terrorist Siler..

San Diego California Mayor Kevin Faulkner Governor Gavin Newsom Governor Newsome Siler Kay Cuties Scott Shaffer San Francisco Donald Trump KQED Kevin Faulkner political editor Rebecca Alameda Falconer
"political editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Everyone knows what they're all about. Tampa Bay is a region competing with other parts of the country for the best talent and the best businesses. So again. I don't know if you can quantify all of that exposure, but I think it makes a difference, You know? Look, there's nothing wrong with winning. Winning is great. It is good to get your look. One lesson. Any city had the kind of run that Tampa is having this year sport. Boston had a couple of years like that. We're like all four teams were in contention, but it's so rare. It's impossible to predict a city's performance. But you don't need to host the Super Bowl to get your city in the four championship game. I will, I will say, though, you know, you're right having the hot city having the cool place to live. That hard to replicate and hard to do, And that comes with a lot of things that comes with young people wanting to live in your downtown right like it is having good live work areas. It's having all sorts of education, and it's the big picture. Do you need to host the Super Bowl spent tens of millions of dollars in debt? Probably not. But you know, just as important is look guys like Rob Higgins. You know, One of the big masterminds behind the Super Bowl effort also does a kind of work getting youth volleyball Tournament, the town and softball tournament that all these youth events that also put a ton of heads in bed. Exposed the rest of the country to Tampa Bay, one of the time throughout the year, sometimes a great weather, sometimes in the summer, but like they do a really good job to sell Tampa And those things don't cost the city very much money at all. So there's a lot of different ways to their hotel room. There's a lot of ways to sell your city at the end of the day. Super Bowls are one of those ways. But sometimes it's just more about like feeling really good about your town, and it is actually getting marketing value. That makes sense. I'm joined by Know Prance Key political editor at NBC LX Staying on the topic of the Super Bowl. You have a report out about the political donations made by the Bucks and Keeps owners. I thought this was interesting. What did you find? You know, people are quickly days to call her boycotts, whether it was calling Kaepernick stuff, Or, um, you know, black lives matter. We've heard called boycott of brands and companies based on their political behavior. So at LX, you can check out her story and Alex Duck. Um We took a look at how the owners of the Chiefs and the Bucks We're spending the political money and buying large owners of sports teams are wealthy guys. They like keeping their taxes low in their profits in their pockets. So 9 to 1 Republicans, Republicans get supported NFL owners almost across the board. Owners lean conservative, however, you do have one of the bucks Conor's Abram Glaser, who is an enormous Democrat booster, and he's in the box of one of the few teams that doesn't like, just tilt completely to the right. So you've got even Glaser, who's given 200 million bucks in recent years to the Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden related campaigns. Then his brother Ed, is an enormous Donald Trump supporter. So heads held fundraisers for the president, former president he's given millions of dollars to trump related committees. The talk about awkward Thanksgiving dinners here you've got the Bucks literally house divided on how they support political donations. A story also goes into somehow the other team, including the Chiefs. Which candidates they support a lot of Senate candidates from the Chiefs and you know people again. They don't know anything about their sports products really do often go into political pockets. At the end of the day. How much money are we talking about it they big players in politics, or are they more fringe donors where you know occasionally they'll offer up Either a party that they support our candidate. They support some money, but they're not active in politics. So two of the 26 bucks siblings, a Berman head between them. Given almost $5 million over the last five years of political candidates, almost all of them related the presidential campaign. Um, but the other four siblings have given very little They get made A few donations to Charlie Crist wonder Rick Scott, but like it's pretty few and far between The book themselves as a team have also given some money to like the transit referendum. They've also given money to gambling initiatives. Um, what you spend money in politics because it works. It gets you access, and it often helps. You know, grease the wheels get what you ultimately want. NFL teams spend a lot of money on lobbying, and they spend a lot of money giving the politicians that they want to see advance your agenda. Last question for you when you were looking at the Bucks owners and the Chiefs owners was there a difference in who they were giving to were members of the chief's ownership, giving Morte to local and state officials or with a similar two bucks ownership, focusing their money more at the federal level like a presidential race. Both the hunt family and the Glazer family. We're very focused on federal campaign compared the local They didn't get quite involved in local stuff until it was something specific to the team, like moving the hills were a forward transit referendum for the Bucks. For instance, however, the differences Glaser's are very focused on the presidential race is, it seems, where's the hunts are very focused on the Senate. The 100, you know, support. Senate candidates Josh Holly, Ted Cruz, Ron Johnson, Marco Rubio. Even John McCain. But not a single donation to President Trump. Really interesting stuff working everyone find both of those reports. I know the one on the Bucks and Chiefs owners is out, and the one on the economic impact of the Super Bowl is coming out. You can find them it lx dot com You can watch us over the air in Tampa. You can also buy me Noah Krinsky on Twitter. All right, Noah, Thanks So much. Always good to talk to. You have a good one. You too, Ryan. Thanks. All right..

Bucks Chiefs Tampa Tampa Bay Abram Glaser Senate NFL Noah Krinsky Donald Trump political editor Boston President Trump volleyball Rob Higgins Twitter John McCain
"political editor" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Truly. I'm very hopeful and this sends a signal that these these courses, judges were open to hearing about the log what's actually going on? And so I would encourage my fellow attorney general's across the country. Look at what's going on, and whether these air executive orders or just edicts. No one's above the law, including the president in this president's decided more than any other president to issue a lot of executive orders. We're just now digesting and I think over time, I'm hopeful that a lot of attorney general's across this country will say no, We cannot allow this to happen. Our state that's takes this attended. General Paxton talking about, I think very wise. Very wise potential response to the flattery of executive orders taking state action. We have a Texas judge who has halted the executive order on immigration undermining the trumpet minute administration's immigration policies were talking too bright bart dot coms. Matt Boyle, Washington political editor. With with the house in Nancy's hands with a 50 50 split cross the tiebreaker for commander in the Senate. Is this. What we are limited to in terms of responding to these flurries of activities is gonna be state action or individual cases of that have to be brought or is The Democrat majority. More fragile than that. Well, I think it's a little It's a little more complicated than we're just limited to outside action by states and, you know third parties bringing lawsuits that's definitely gonna be part of how this plays out. We already have already seen an early win from Attorney General Paxton against the deportation freeze in Texas. We'll see how that plays out over time. That's gonna Obviously go to an appeals court and then probably eventually, the Supreme Court will probably see several other lawsuits like this from states and or, you know, interest groups or someone and so forth. Play themselves out. Unions might sue over some of these job losses so we could see that, But I also think that there are tools that the Republicans have in Congress that they can use. So first and foremost. The majority is for the Democrats in both chambers are very, very, very slim, so they've got a six seat majority in the house, and they're 50 50 technically in the Senate. So, um, in the Senate, you have the filibuster. So that was a big thing that Mitch McConnell make sure it's still in the, uh, in the rules, Esso, and there's enough votes against overturning the filibuster. Now s O that zany and your reading is that yes, it's safe in this congress so because there's two Democrats, senators who have publicly stated that It will never do it. So even if they did flip a Republican, they have to flip to Republicans against it. So I just don't see that happening. And there's other Democrats, senators who have expressed that they like the filibuster because then they know the pendulum will swing and they'll be back in the minority. One day s O whether that be in two years, four years, six years, eight years, whatever the day, we're just gonna cop s O. You need 60 votes to pass legislation there, But there's also things that lawmakers could do from the minority. Uh, tol pressure. We saw this, with Congressman Jim Banks actually fighting. For the Hyde amendment. He organized 200 House Republicans signing a letter calling on the congressional leadership to keep the Hyde Amendment in place despite Nancy Pelosi's deputy, Rosa DeLauro, the chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee pushing for that you can also I mean, just speaking out using your voice and pressure writing letters. Um uh, The demanding documents. There are oversight tools that you have in the minority that they have the ability to do one place where I'm gonna be washing. This very closely is how does the Republicans and how do the Democrats handle this whole thing with this whole game? Stop trading thing. So that's that's part of the magazine. Right? And Janet Yellen, the new Treasury secretary, apparently got $800,000 in speaking fees from the Citadel firm S O. Jennifer Psaki was Today, would she Would. Janet Yellen recused herself from the actions on this? She wouldn't answer. You know, she just tried claiming that Jenny Yellen's a world renowned market expert, so but here's the thing, How the Democrats handle this and how the Republicans handle it will be interesting so they can use their voice they can use. There's letters, this document requests, etcetera. And then eventually, the hope is the Republicans get the majority back in November, 2022 Which point they get the subpoena power and the power of the committee's We're out of time. I have to ask you one question. Very short answer. Are you happy? Are you excited that the President Donald Trump opened his office of the former president Florida this week? Very excited, And I think there's a bright future ahead for this movement. The fact that he has already endorsed his first political candidate in the personage of Sarah.

president Janet Yellen executive Senate attorney General Paxton Congress Nancy Pelosi Appropriations Committee Texas Congressman Jim Banks Donald Trump Supreme Court Mitch McConnell Esso O. Jennifer Psaki Matt Boyle political editor Jenny Yellen
EU pressures AstraZeneca to deliver vaccines as promised

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:47 min | 1 year ago

EU pressures AstraZeneca to deliver vaccines as promised

"Leaders across europe according on brussels to impose measures to curb the export of corona virus vaccines as tension grows across the eu. Over the sputtering rollout of vaccinations. Germany is the most vocal demanding. The european commission toughen export rules to ensure drug orders of being met. This comes amidst claims about so-called vaccine nationalism from countries already dealing with shortages of doses because of manufacturing delays. While i'm joined now from brussels by darn mccaffrey. Who's euronews political editor. Darren good morning to you and thanks for joining us. What what has prompted these measures. So it's all kind of started last weekend when astra zeneca announced that it would not be able to meet the numbers of vaccines that the european union had been expecting in the first quarter of this year. In fact it suggested that it will be able to deliver only around forty percents of what originally thought it might be able to produce. This was an addition to pfizer. Also a couple of weeks ago saying that they were not going to be able to quite meet the the numbers of vaccines to the european union and the on because altered problems. Astrazeneca has blamed it on the fact that they're not deal with vaccine particularly at the plant in belgium and had hoped ultimately are not going to be able to essentially achieve the the number of jobs that the european commission thought contractually that astrazeneca had promised them now. Things got pretty difficult to the start of the week in a very public war of words. Clearly the commission. The commission was quite angry. Frustration with astra zeneca. There were several phone calls between on the line and the ceo of astra zeneca with the eu demanding. Essentially that they find vaccines from elsewhere. Of course the vaccine is made in different parts of the world most notably in the uk where there is no effect on the supply and what we heard then last night however was from the astrazeneca ceo in an interview which accused the european emotional. At essentially it signed contracts much later than the uk don and that the glitches that was being that had proven to be showing up in the production. The vaccine in belgium was done to the fact that the eu took three months later to sign contracts at dan the u. k. And so what. We've now got this very public battle. Almost a war. I would say between both sides and so what is it that the eu is proposing so the suggestion essentially they argue for transparency reasons the vaccines that are manufactured in the european union. The pharmaceutical companies need to give notification of precisely what's manufactured. How many are where it's going to if they are going to leave the eu now. The germans have gone somewhat further suggesting that if they're not getting their so called fair share off the vaccines at that. They may well blockades those axioms from leaving the e u all together to ensure that european union's proportionally. Don't lose arts now. This would have an impact for example the uk when it comes to the astrazeneca vaccine because it is manufactured in the uk but it would have an impact on the pfizer vaccine which is produced indulgent. Now clearly would be pretty dramatic stuff for the eu to start to do this. Many would accuse the european union off. As you say prompting vaccine wars vaccine nationalism. Something would have thought. The eu itself would accuse others off if they were to do. It's not what we said. Brussels so far are not backing. The germans want to see they are saying that this puree of our transparency though given the fact that the head of astra zeneca yesterday seemed to be laying blame at the european commission's door so this fiasco that the pharmaceutical company itself and the commission data so far not published the contracts which. Mep's in calling for four weeks suggests that today attention will turn to precisely what is in those contracts and has the commission itself nest up. We must also. I am not forget this really important. Point that actually. The european medicines agency to date has not authorized the astrazeneca vaccine so this all seems rather semantic to a degree though that authorization is probably expected on friday

Astrazeneca European Union Brussels European Commission Mccaffrey Belgium Pfizer UK Darren Germany Europe MEP European Medicines Agency
"political editor" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"And make it so strong should someone who is here without documents. And that is his only a fence. Should that person be deported? That person should not be the focus of deportation. We should fundamentally change the way we deal with. How exactly would you detain immigrants? If at all in a Biden administration the way we did When we reform the system with the doctor, I would not retain them behind bars, Just like I've argued all along. Any woman who crosses the border areas here and being beaten by her husband, But she's undocumented. She cannot be deported because she reports there are certain things you can not deporting undocumented alien four undocumented person for and that would be one of them. What exact changes would you bring the Isis and agency? Would hold ice agents accountable if, in fact, they stepped over my executive orders, which is no arrest of anyone outside of the school. So how do you change the culture? The culture by saying you're going to get fired. You're fired. If, in fact you do that you only arrest for the purpose of dealing with a felony that's committed and I don't count drunk driving as a felony. Should undocumented immigrants also be able to get subsidized health care? If they are working in the United States America and they are paying taxes. They should have access to health care. They should have have access to everybody else's has access to. We are a nation of immigrants and one of the reasons why we are so powerful and we've been so successful is because we're a nation of immigrants and the way we're acting both domestically and internationally, is is a crying shame is not who we are. Guess what, through the reason why the legal as well as undocumented. Recent Y our society is functioning reason why our economy is growing. We don't talk about that. We stand up and act like it's a burden. It is not a burden. It's a gift. All right. That's Joe Biden over the years, joining us now Laura Rees she's a senior research fellow Homeland Security Heritage Foundation. Recent article on Immigration clearly outlines the troubles ahead with undocumented A people from around the globe entering the U. S. Might makes a big deal to yesterday about we'll get in get rid of the Muslim travel ban. There never was a Muslim travel ban. There was a band from four countries and a vetting process for people from countries that have known ties to radical extremists. Certain countries that are predominantly Muslim. We're not on the list because they don't have that problem anyway. She joins us. Also, John Daniel Davidson, senior fellow for the Texas public. Policy Foundation and political editor for the Federalist. Thank you both for being with us, Laura, Start with you. Look here. This is everything that he promised everything that we tried to warn people about it in ahead of the election. Now, you know he's doing what he said he would do, which is what I kept saying, everybody, this is the most radical agenda ever stated and run on by any major political party. Yes, thank you for having me on and you're right. He has been very busy just in day one. And that includes sending proposed legislation to Congress. And if the left, the Democrats roll back the Senate filibuster, which has protected against mass amnesty bills for the past 20 years. They will be able to push through a very radical immigration agenda. Well, I think we're seeing it before our eyes. You know, John Daniel Davidson. Look, it's been known for over the years. One of the reasons that Left the right conservatives liberals over really. Republicans and Democrats will always try and negotiate their gang of eight gang of 10 Gang and 12 Gang of this gang of that is because Republicans for their constituency they seem to always want. Inexpensive labor or cheap labor. As we call it well that impacts Americans and their ability to get AH, high paying jobs and on the other side of you have liberal Democrats that I've always wanted it because I think they see that majority of new immigrants would likely vote for the Democratic Party, so everyone's got their own motives here. Don't think. Yeah, that's one of the reasons our immigration system dates from about 1965. We haven't had any major shifts or fundamental reform to our immigration system. Since then, our immigration system does not serve the economy. It doesn't serve the American people. Um and it does need reform. But this isn't what needs. This isn't how to reform it. This is just opening up the floodgates. Toe everyone in Mexico and Central America on sending them a message saying, If you can get here you can stay and we're already seeing that. Yeah, well, I mean, that's that's the point. So what is the impact of this? There's really nothing Laura that I see that Republicans could do to stop it. Do you see anything? Um, The one hope is that Um President Biden does not want to be responsible for the next Southwest border crisis Now. Unfortunately, he has already terminated the emergency declaration that President Trump put in place, But he has said Look, this is going to take six months, not just one day because we don't want to million illegal immigrants on the border. Nevertheless, the executive orders that President Biden has signed the legislation he seems to have sent to Congress. Point in the other direction, so he himself lived through a border crisis. When he was vice president in 2014. He seemed to forget that But he's gonna have his handful because clearly he's ringing the bell for Mork caravans and, um, more mass immigration illegally. Then I said, I don't see the way to stop it, and I don't see anything Republicans can do, stopping building the border wall. One of the things I'm thinking, John is that this is oh, come to America because not only going to be able to cross but you'll be able to cross and then we'll give you a path to citizenship. So now the latest caravan is is building against this one. I'm not sure Honduras I think they tried to stop him in Guatemala. And Mexico is now preparing for the caravan. I guess hitting there and then you know, and then bite administration's response is you don't come just yet. It's not a good time today. OK, we'll come next week you come a month from now it's too late. It doesn't matter what Biden says. It doesn't matter what anybody says. Democrats have made clear over the years, especially over the past year with the election what their position is on immigration and what they'll do when they get in power, and now they're going about doing it. So don't expect anyone in Honduras or Guatemala or I'll Salvador and by the way, these are countries that have been devastated by two hurricanes late last year. And the Corona virus pandemic. People are there are desperate and they want opportunity..

President Biden Democrats Laura Rees John Daniel Davidson Congress executive Mexico America President Democratic Party Honduras vice president Guatemala Policy Foundation senior fellow senior research fellow Texas Homeland Security Heritage Fou political editor
"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Party has today set out how it plans to secure a new referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. The Scottish National Party, or SMP, says it will try to hold a referendum if it went the majority in this year's elections to the Scottish parliament. The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has made clear his opposition to another vote. The last referendum was in 2014 when 55% voted no to independence. Paul Hutchins, political editor of Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, will the SNP leader Nicholas Sturgeon be able to secure that second referendum. If you look at what they are plan ears, it is to get a joint agreement with the U. K government on a referendum on scorching depends, which is what happened back in 2000 and 14. But this time around Tory government in London has decided that it will not grant what's known as the section 30 order, which is effectively a joint agreement, so that's put the S and P in a difficult position, so they come up with a plan B, which is to organize their own referendum at the Scottish parliament. The big issue. There is whether or not that is legal. And while there's no doubt that they will probably go down that road is going to end up in the courts, so the question of whether there will be a referendum is probably will be decided by judges. Would unionist parties in Scotland go along with the referendum that hadn't been sanctioned by Westminster? Well, that is the key issue here. I think there's a big distinction to be drawn between whether Scotch Parliament can legally organize a referendum on the legitimacy of such a process. So even if the Scottish Parliament did push ahead with our and judges To say that it was legal. I think that be question Marks Reese because first is this court's conservatives who are pro union. They've already said they would boy court such a referendum on so you could be left for the situation where you have a referendum, but one side is just not taking part. And then you end up with the result could be C 18 90% fever of independence on internationally just looks quite amateurish. So I think that ultimately what you need is a process that is agreed by both sides on as we speak to snow and agreement on that looks quite far off. In the last independence referendum you mentioned there was a pretty large margin 10% in favor of Scott, the remaining part of the United Kingdom has that shifted dramatically in the last six years. There's no doubt that in the last couple of years their husband a shift in favor of independence. I think that around the last 20 opinion polls on independence surely lead for independence. So I said quite dramatic turnaround. From 2014, and I think there's a few reasons for that. One is Brexit as you well know, People school rejected Brexit when there was a referendum on that subject. There's also no doubt that the conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is hugely unpopular. In Scotland, and I think that is partly responsible for the shift in public opinion. There's also a perception that Nicolas Sturgeon has handled the pandemic better and Boris Johnson has. I think it's a combination of a wussy factors as resulted in the increase in independence with the last couple years. And yet, I suppose in the back of people's minds is is the worry that actually, if membership of the European Union was driving things, there's no guarantee is there a tool that Scotland could quickly rejoined the U. Well, Brexit is the degree imponderable off this to beat. On the one hand, there's no doubt that is driving increased support for independence, but it does re some issues for the pro independence state. After was a referendum there's MP would liken depends got to rejoin the U. So you have the issue of? Well, how long would that teak and then even if an independent school and did join the European Union? What would that mean for things like Borders on immigration and cite the United Kingdom of what would it mean in terms of trade between Scotland and the rest of the Yuki? So I think that you would see a very different referendum. If we lose to tea, please, with a different set of questions raised. That was poor Hussian of Scotland's Daily record newspaper.

Scotland Scottish parliament Prime Minister Boris Johnson Brexit Scottish National Party Prime Minister Boris Johnson European Union Paul Hutchins Nicholas Sturgeon United Kingdom London Marks Reese Nicolas Sturgeon political editor U. K Westminster Scott
"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"political editor" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Scottish National Party, or SMP, says it will try to hold a referendum if it went the majority in this year's elections to the Scottish parliament. The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has made clear his opposition to another vote. The last referendum was in 2014 when 55% voted no to independence. Paul Hutchins, political editor of Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, will the SNP leader Nicholas Sturgeon be able to secure that second referendum. If you look at what they are plan ears, it is to get a joint agreement with the U. K government on a referendum on scorching depends, which is what happened back in 2000 and 14. But this time around Tory government in London has decided that it will not grant what's known as the section 30 order, which is effectively a joint agreement, so that's put the S and P in a difficult position, so they come up with a plan B, which is to organize their own referendum at the Scottish parliament. The big issue. There is whether or not that is legal. And while there's no doubt that they will probably go down that road is going to end up in the courts, so the question of whether there will be a referendum is probably will be decided by judges. Would unionist parties in Scotland go along with the referendum that hadn't been sanctioned by Westminster? Well, that is the key issue here. I think there's a big distinction to be drawn between whether Scotch Parliament can legally organize a referendum on the legitimacy of such a process. So even if the Scottish Parliament did push ahead with our and judges To say that it was legal. I think that be question Marks Reese because first is this court's conservatives who are pro union. They've already said they would boy court such a referendum on so you could be left for the situation where you have a referendum, but one side is just not taking part. And then you end up with the result could be C 18 90% fever of independence on internationally just looks quite amateurish. So I think that ultimately what you need is a process that is agreed by both sides on as we speak to snow and agreement on that looks quite far off. In the last independence referendum you mentioned there was a pretty large margin 10% in favor of Scott, the remaining part of the United Kingdom has that shifted dramatically in the last six years. There's no doubt that in the last couple of years their husband a shift in favor of independence. I think that around the last 20 opinion polls on independence surely lead for independence. So I said quite dramatic turnaround. From 2014, and I think there's a few reasons for that. One is Brexit as you well know, People school rejected Brexit when there was a referendum on that subject. There's also no doubt that the conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is hugely unpopular. In Scotland, and I think that is partly responsible for the shift in public opinion. There's also a perception that Nicolas Sturgeon has handled the pandemic better and Boris Johnson has. I think it's a combination of a wussy factors as resulted in the increase in independence with the last couple years. And yet, I suppose in the back of people's minds is is the worry that actually, if membership of the European Union was driving things, there's no guarantee is there a tool that Scotland could quickly rejoined the U. Well, Brexit is the degree imponderable off this to beat. On the one hand, there's no doubt that is driving increased support for independence, but it does re some issues for the pro independence state. After was a referendum there's MP would liken depends got to rejoin the U. So you have the issue of? Well, how long would that teak and then even if an independent school and did join the European Union? What would that mean for things like Borders on immigration and cite the United Kingdom of what would it mean in terms of trade between Scotland and the rest of the Yuki? So I think that you would see a very different referendum. If we lose to tea, please, with a different set of questions raised. That was poor Hussian of Scotland's Daily record newspaper..

Scotland Scottish parliament Prime Minister Boris Johnson Brexit Scottish National Party Prime Minister Boris Johnson European Union Paul Hutchins Nicholas Sturgeon United Kingdom London Marks Reese Nicolas Sturgeon political editor U. K Westminster Scott
Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Scotland's leader vows to push for second independence vote

"Party has today set out how it plans to secure a new referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. The Scottish National Party, or SMP, says it will try to hold a referendum if it went the majority in this year's elections to the Scottish parliament. The British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, has made clear his opposition to another vote. The last referendum was in 2014 when 55% voted no to independence. Paul Hutchins, political editor of Scotland's Daily Record newspaper, will the SNP leader Nicholas Sturgeon be able to secure that second referendum. If you look at what they are plan ears, it is to get a joint agreement with the U. K government on a referendum on scorching depends, which is what happened back in 2000 and 14. But this time around Tory government in London has decided that it will not grant what's known as the section 30 order, which is effectively a joint agreement, so that's put the S and P in a difficult position, so they come up with a plan B, which is to organize their own referendum at the Scottish parliament. The big issue. There is whether or not that is legal. And while there's no doubt that they will probably go down that road is going to end up in the courts, so the question of whether there will be a referendum is probably will be decided by judges. Would unionist parties in Scotland go along with the referendum that hadn't been sanctioned by Westminster? Well, that is the key issue here. I think there's a big distinction to be drawn between whether Scotch Parliament can legally organize a referendum on the legitimacy of such a process. So even if the Scottish Parliament did push ahead with our and judges To say that it was legal. I think that be question Marks Reese because first is this court's conservatives who are pro union. They've already said they would boy court such a referendum on so you could be left for the situation where you have a referendum, but one side is just not taking part. And then you end up with the result could be C 18 90% fever of independence on internationally just looks quite amateurish. So I think that ultimately what you need is a process that is agreed by both sides on as we speak to snow and agreement on that looks quite far off. In the last independence referendum you mentioned there was a pretty large margin 10% in favor of Scott, the remaining part of the United Kingdom has that shifted dramatically in the last six years. There's no doubt that in the last couple of years their husband a shift in favor of independence. I think that around the last 20 opinion polls on independence surely lead for independence. So I said quite dramatic turnaround. From 2014, and I think there's a few reasons for that. One is Brexit as you well know, People school rejected Brexit when there was a referendum on that subject. There's also no doubt that the conservative Prime Minister Boris Johnson, is hugely unpopular. In Scotland, and I think that is partly responsible for the shift in public opinion. There's also a perception that Nicolas Sturgeon has handled the pandemic better and Boris Johnson has. I think it's a combination of a wussy factors as resulted in the increase in independence with the last couple years. And yet, I suppose in the back of people's minds is is the worry that actually, if membership of the European Union was driving things, there's no guarantee is there a tool that Scotland could quickly rejoined the U. Well, Brexit is the degree imponderable off this to beat. On the one hand, there's no doubt that is driving increased support for independence, but it does re some issues for the pro independence state. After was a referendum there's MP would liken depends got to rejoin the U. So you have the issue of? Well, how long would that teak and then even if an independent school and did join the European Union? What would that mean for things like Borders on immigration and cite the United Kingdom of what would it mean in terms of trade between Scotland and the rest of the Yuki? So I think that you would see a very different referendum. If we lose to tea, please, with a different set of questions raised. That was poor Hussian of Scotland's Daily record newspaper.

Scottish Parliament Scottish National Party Paul Hutchins Nicholas Sturgeon U. K Government Tory Government Scotland Boris Johnson Scotch Parliament Marks Reese United Kingdom SMP Daily Record People School Prime Minister Boris Johnson Westminster Nicolas Sturgeon
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Their ways in which they're trying to shift attention and their narrative to try to make themselves in some ways, victims of what's played out and to make themselves able to go on the attack against the new administration, rather than defending the old one. I feel we always have to slap that back a little bit. Hunter Biden, who did you can say make foolish business decisions. Investigations found he did not do any influence peddling when it came to his father, who was then vice president. David, you know more about how the trump followers are addressed. We're reading about how believers in the ridiculous queuing on conspiracy theory that Trump was here to save America from Democrats who were Trafficking and with Children are now shocked that that's not true. And then there was the erect insurrection as you mentioned 16. How does the hard right media catered to Trump's base as it may be discovering it was like to? Well, you've seen them have to back off a little bit about some of this explicit claims about the election in the face of some very strong and probably pretty powerful legal arguments made by lawyers for one of the main of voting machine companies, Dominion that a lot of seemingly completely false claims were made about. And yet the larger claims utterly baseless. Continue to be propagated in places like Newsmax places like Oh, and place like Gateway pundit, other places online Fox News itself. You asked about how they've changed what we know. They say they've done a certain kind of restructuring to meet the moment, the finances and what have you They also ushered a number of their sort of more straight ahead news folks out the door, particularly on the digital side, including a filling in Chris Star Walt, who was not only the political editor for Fox. But somebody who appeared on the air and somebody who defended Fox is call on Election Night itself of Arizona for Joe Biden, not for Donald Trump. That was the first outlet to do it. It has been a sore point ever since. There's been reporting. This suggests that Rupert Murdoch, the ultimate owner of Fox News, waiting and said, We don't want to be in the calling Trump's supporters out camp. We want to be finding ways to appeal to them, and you've seen them also strip away an hour of news at seven o'clock each night that was devoted to news and it said, Now it's for harder opinion. Yeah, I wanna make sure I've asked you. I mean, of course, there's CNN. And here's CNN's late night opinion host on Lemon, who marked the end of Trump's presidency after playing a clip from trumps 2016 inaugural address. Four years that started with that speech about American carnage for years, and they went through American carnage. A riot Ah, pandemic carnage more than 400,000 Americans dead from Corona virus and the president who's dereliction of duty. Let this all happened on his watch. Look strong words on much of CNN's fuel was in criticizing President Trump in the last few months, especially but David We're reading a column in today's Washington Post is from opinion editor Karen of Tia. It's titled The Media had a role to play in the rise of trumpets, timeto hold ourselves accountable. She calls out the endless oxygen, she says, given to Trump lies, and you could add, while many newsrooms were debating whether or not to call them lies. She takes on other ism the idea that you couldn't say something negative about Donald Trump. Unless you said something negative about Democrats does she have a point in the minute?.

President Trump Fox News Hunter Biden CNN David Fox vice president Rupert Murdoch Joe Biden Chris Star Walt Arizona America political editor Corona president Washington Post Lemon editor Karen
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You will listen to the debate itself. Until then, we want to check back in with her NPR team on what we've heard and what we can expect. We have with us. NPR's congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Justice correspondent Carrie Johnson, senior political editor. Ron Elving, White House correspondent Tamara Keith and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Welcome to all of you are welcome back for those who have been with us throughout the morning and Kelsey, we're going to start with you once again. We're in the middle of the vote to determine the rules of this afternoon's debate. Just tell us briefly if you can, what's going on now? And what are we expecting for later today? So we heard this morning as members began the debate about moving to impeachment at all. This was a lot of conversation about whether or not they should be doing impeachment in this moment in this time when there's such heightened Fear and tension and anxiety in this country on You know, arguing that Democrats are too quick to try to impeach President Trump, and we expect to hear a lot more from Democrats who say that the president's own actions on January 6th led to the insurrection of the capital. Want to bring in Justice Department correspondent Carrie Johnson to talk about the threat of violence with a concern about an imminent future threat of violence that Kelsey just talk. Talk with us about. Uh, Carrie. Welcome. We're going to play a clip that the Department of Justice released early this morning. This is the acting attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, who warned people about any upcoming violence. Any potential upcoming violence? Here it is. I want to send a clear message to anyone contemplating violence, threats of violence or other criminal conduct. We will have no tolerance whatsoever for any attempts to disrupt the peaceful transfer of power on January 20th that our Constitution calls for. We will have no tolerance for any attempts to forcefully occupied government buildings. There will be no excuse for violence, vandalism or any other form of lawlessness. The American public. I asked that if you are aware of any criminal activity or violent acts being planned. Please share what you know, with law enforcement or the FBI. Along with our other federal partners and local authorities. We will spare no resource is in protecting public safety in the coming days. And everyone should understand one key thing. The Department of Justice will seek to hold any violators accountable to the fullest extent of the law. Any wrongdoers will be caught and they will be accountable. So carry his safe setting down a pretty pretty clear message here. But would you just remind us of the role of the Department of Justice in all of this and what our investigations are going on now? Yeah, the lead federal prosecutor, the acting U. S attorney in Washington, D C. Says the heavily fortified U S Capital is actually a crime scene. The FBI has opened more than 170 cases. The FBI is also scouring 100,000 Digital Legion leads of footage and threads from online from last week, The Justice Department has created a strike force on sedition and conspiracy in connection with the erection of the insurrection. On January 5th. They're also prioritizing assault on police officers and media that day. They are continuing to look for the person or persons who planted a biped pipe bomb. You're the Republican National Committee and the Democratic National Committee last week pipe bombs that prosecutor said would actually have worked in this morning. They're continuing to arrest people who entered the capital last week, including Robert Keith Parker Packer. Rather Robert Keith Packer, who was arrested in Virginia this morning. He's 1 may be familiar because authorities Point out that they believe he's the man who was at the Capitol wearing that camp Auschwitz shirt. Now, you know, this is gonna take weeks, if not months. The U. S Attorney in D. C. Michael Sherwin says You're going to be shocked when you learn what occurred inside the Capitol last week, But there was actually instances of hand to hand combat between rioters. Members of the Capitol police and the Metropolitan Police Department here in D. C. There is a lot more to come out Michelle about what happened, and one authorities want to know about planning in advance for this insurrection. Scott. Uh, we're going to turn now to NPR's senior political correspondent Ron Elving, Ron. I don't know where Begin. Stop listing the ways in which this is unprecedented. But we have a new administration, um, coming into office in a few days as impeachment hearings into President who's about to leave officer going on in the middle of a public health crisis unprecedented in this country. And ah lot of people who say that the U. S government is under threat of physical assault. Has that new administration takes the oath of office. Yes, This is a picture we have never seen before. The extraordinary layer on layer panoply of Crises problems, things that are facing the Biden administration. The only analog one can imagine would have been when When President Roosevelt took office in 1933 in the midst of the depths of the Depression, So so this is this is an extraordinary moment. But I think we should say that the government that we have Congress that we have the Justice Department that Carrie was describing. These elements of the government are functioning. They are sorting through what they must, and they are looking at some extraordinarily difficult things to look at, such as Hand to hand combat in the capital between people who fashioned themselves patriots and people who are actually Capitol police. And also this debate that we're having right now today in the House chamber, where one of the salient issues brought up by the Democrats and really not addressed by the Republicans in their responses. Is not whether or not this is necessary at this point because of procedure or or whether or not it's an overreaction or whether it would be divisive in the country. The other issue that hasn't been addressed so much in the Republican response is is the Democrats assertion that the president is dangerous? That having him in office. Even for another week could result in Serious consequences for the country and possibly more violence. Thea argument we've heard so far from Republican lawmakers on the house seems to be that it is dangerous to have a president. Um, of impeachment, like like this accomplished so rapidly, But they, as you mentioned for the most part, have avoided addressing the question. The supposition that Democrats bring up and then a number of Republicans. I think most notably, I will quote her now Liz Cheney of Wyoming, who believes that it's There's no no way. Nice way to put this that every hour..

Carrie Johnson Justice Department president Department of Justice Kelsey Snell FBI NPR Robert Keith Parker Packer Ron Elving Capitol police White House correspondent assault Tamara Keith President Trump Nina Totenberg Republican National Committee President Roosevelt political editor Liz Cheney acting attorney General
"political editor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Streaming at Kay's ew dot or g'kar firm to this reality on January 6, but a large minority of the house either repeated that lie or sympathized with it. 147 members of the House of Representatives voted to object to a democratic election and some who objected are, of course, among those who we will hear from tonight. We will also hear from NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, senior political editor. Domenico Montanaro, Legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Good evening to you all. Oh, glad to be here. Hi, Kelsey. I'd like to start with you. We've seen pictures of broken windows at the Capitol. We've heard about extra security. What is it like for the lawmakers there tonight? One of the interesting changes that we're going to see on the House floor tonight is there are now metal detectors at the entrances to the floor. That is not something we would typically see. There are metal detectors at the entrances to the building itself with that something that you know, lawmakers generally walk around and kind of walk around the capital unencumbered this change. Is an indication that there is more security in that building that people are are cracking down. We'll also go Seymour masks members are Please go ahead kills members are going to be required to wear their masks and will be fined. If they don't That is a new change. As of tonight. That was after a number of members got into arguments, reportedly with other members about wearing masks and secure rooms last week. The metal detectors tell us that there is a concern that some members of Congress would bring weapons. There are members who have said that they are concerned about their fellow members of Congress. That is a concern that has been expressed publicly by some members. And Kelsey. What's the architecture of this evening? What are we going to hear? So this? We're going to start with debate on what is known as the rule. It sets up. You know whether or not they can move forward on the the whole rest of the question about the 25th amendment and that vote on that, and then they will move on to debate about Question of the 25th amendment in general, I would expect that as much as that sounds quite procedural. This will be very much about what the president said before the attack on the capital is going to be very much about the president. Whether or not he is fit for office at the moment, and Democrats are going to try to push as many Republicans as possible to speak up. One way or another. Before the vote to make themselves heard about whether or not they support the president's staying in office. Less than let's go to the House floor. Okay, They just went into recess for a period of less than 15 minutes, says House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. There was not speaking just now, but a moment of silence, in fact, for the police officer, the Capitol police officer who was killed In Wednesday's riot, one of five people who were killed and of course, we now know the details that there was an additional police officer who committed suicide after serving and that extremely traumatic circumstance on Wednesday, so a brief moment of silence will only a few people on the House floor. But we expect more people to be on the floor in, we presume a socially distant way. Because Kelsey Snell, there has been even more controversy over the way that members were crowded together when fleeing the writers on Wednesday. Yeah, several Democrats have tested positive for the Corona virus, and they say that it's because they were in a room with other Republican members and staff who refused to wear masks in aid. Crowded, secure room remembers where ushered after the attack on the capital began. They Democrats say that they're waiting for more positive cases and that they anticipate that that will happen because there was an argument about masking in that room. I want to bring another voice into the conversation. NPR's Mara Liasson is with us and Mara. I want to note that this is a partisan moment, but not a strictly down the line partisan moment. It wasn't partisan on Wednesday because a large slice of the Republican Party did vote for reality voted for the reality that Joe Biden won the election. It was a smaller group. That voted in support of the spurious objections to the election. And now we have word of the number three House Republican making a statement about impeachment. What is Liz Cheney of Wyoming, saying This is very significant, although when you say it's a smaller group, let's just point out. It was 65% of the House Republicans voted to de certify the election to overturn the will of the without a doubt. A smaller group overall 65% of the House Republicans. Ah, Liz Cheney is the number three house leader. And I would say that this is a very significant statement. She's been very critical of the president, uh, accusing him of inciting the mob. But she is now the undisputed Republican leader. Of what you might call the constitutional conservatives in the house. There's the part 65% of House Republicans, including the minority leader, Kevin McCarthy, voted to overturn the election undermine the will of the voters, and she's on the other side. So we have a pretty clear leader now of the I don't know what you want to call them. The constitutional conservatives, the reality based Republicans. Just like Mitt Romney emerged in the Senate as the leader of Republicans who believed in the rule of law and the Constitution, and I want to do two things here. First read Liz Cheney statement of some of it anyway. Quote this insurrection caused injury, death and destruction. In the most sacred space in our republic. Much more will become clear in the coming days and weeks. But what we know now is enough. I will vote to impeach the president. They significant Republican family name a significant Republican officeholder. Making that statement, and I also just want to clarify for people. If anybody's wondering out in the audience when we say reality based we're not taking a side in this debate where there were. It's not our job to take aside whether this 25th amendment resolution should pass or fail whether the president should leave office or not, but it is our job to take the side of reality, and we're aware of what happened on Wednesday, and we're going to be clear on that. Throughout the evening, Mara, you know we could go ahead. Go ahead would be even more precise about that. When when there are disputes in a democracy, we have a referee. It's called the Judiciary Branch, and they Determined reality. They looked at the evidence they looked at the facts, and they said there was no widespread evidence of fraud. Certainly not enough that would have flipped the results of this election, which was not close. From Joe Biden to Donald Trump. So it's not just a kind of term of art reality based. This has been adjudicated by the referee that our Democratic system chooses, and that is what we mean by the rule of law. And Domenico Montanaro. Why don't you come into the conversation here is well and tell us why this has created a political dilemma. For Republicans. This is ordinarily have been an automatic vote that perhaps a scattered handful of people would object to in some way. Then, of course, there was this riot, which was carried on television and which has seemed more and more horrible as as we've gone along and learned more about it. Why does this create a dilemma for Republicans? I think the issue here is how Republican base politics plays out. You know, Franklin's Who's sort of Ah Republican message guy and pollster. Over the weekend had pulled Trump supporters and a combined 62% of them. Blame Antifa Democrats, the news media the far left the Deep state or vice president, Mike Pence for the violence at the Capitol. Just 23% said that they blamed Trump or Trump supporters. So you know, when you see that as part of their base, you start to understand why it has taken so much for so many of them to actually cross over and dispute what their base believes..

president Kelsey Snell Mara Liasson Republicans Liz Cheney House of Representatives Donald Trump Domenico Montanaro Republican Party NPR Joe Biden House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Congress national political corresponde Nina Totenberg officer Kay political editor
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Spectacularly his absolute inability to discharge the most basic and fundamental powers and duties of his office. We will carry the full debate here on NPR news, and we will also check, fax or add context if needed, which is especially important to mention tonight because the fundamental act Lawmakers will judge tonight is alive. The president lied for months about his election defeat and then sent his followers to the capital. So here are some facts. Officials from both parties in all 50 states and dozens of court affirmed that Joe Biden won the 2020 presidential election. Bipartisan majority in Congress, both Republicans and Democrats. Democrats affirmed to this reality on January 6, but a large minority of the house either repeated that lie or sympathized with it. 147 members of the House of Representatives voted to object to a democratic election and some who objected are, of course, among those who we will hear from tonight. We will also hear from NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, senior political editor. Domenico Montanaro, Legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg and congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell. Good evening to you all. Oh, glad to be here. Hi, Kelsey. I'd like to start with you. We've seen pictures of broken windows at the Capitol. We've heard about extra security. What is it like for the lawmakers there tonight? One of the interesting changes that we're going to see on the House floor tonight is there are now metal detectors at the entrances to the floor. That is not something we would typically see. There are metal detectors at the entrances to the building itself with that something that you know, lawmakers generally walk around and kind of walk around the capital unencumbered. This change is an indication that there is more security in that building that people are cracking down. We'll also get Seymour masks members are Please go ahead. Cast members are going to be required to wear their masks on and we'll be fined. If they don't That is a new change. As of tonight. That was after a number of members got into arguments, reportedly with other members about wearing masks and secure rooms last week, do the metal detectors tell us that there is a concern that some members of Congress would bring weapons? There are members who have said that they are concerned about their fellow members of Congress. That is a concern that has been expressed publicly by some members. And Kelsey. What's the architecture of this evening? What are we going to hear? So this? We're gonna start with debate on what is known as the rule. It sets up. You know whether or not they can move forward on the the whole rest of the question about the 25th amendment and that vote on that, and then they will move on to debate about Question of the 25th amendment in general, I would expect that as much as that sounds quite procedural. This will be very much about what the president said before the attack on the capital is going to be very much about the president. Whether or not he is fit for office at the moment, and Democrats are going to try to push as many Republicans as possible to speak up. One way or another before the vote to make themselves heard about whether or not they support the president's staying in office less than let's go to the House floor. Okay, They just went into recess for a period of less than 15 minutes, says House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. There was not speaking just now, but a moment of silence, in fact, for the police officer, the Capitol police officer who was killed in Wednesday's riot, one of five people who were killed and of course, we now know the details that there was an additional police officer who committed suicide after serving in that extremely traumatic circumstance on Wednesday, so a brief moment of silence will only a few people on the House floor, but we expect more people. Would be on the floor in. We presume a socially distant way because Kelsey Snell, there has been even more controversy over the way that members were crowded together when fleeing the writers on Wednesday. Yeah, and several Democrats have tested positive for the Corona virus. And they say that it's because they were in a room with other Republican members and staff who refused to wear masks in a crowded, secure room where members were ushered after the attack on the capital began. The Democrats say that they're waiting for more positive cases and that they anticipate that that will happen because there was an argument about masking in that room. I want to bring another voice into the conversation. NPR's Mara Liasson is with us and Mara. I want to note That this is a partisan moment, but not a strictly down the line partisan moment. It wasn't partisan on Wednesday because a large slice of the Republican Party did vote for reality voted for the reality that Joe Biden won the election. It was a smaller group that voted in support of the spurious objections to The election, and now we have word of the number three House Republican making a statement about impeachment. What is Liz Cheney of Wyoming, saying? Yeah, this is very significant, although when you say it's a smaller group, let's just point out. It was 65% of the House Republicans voted to de certify the election to overturn the will of the without a doubt a smaller group overall 65% of the House Republicans. Liz Cheney is the number three house leader and I would say that this is a very significant statement. She's been very critical of the president, accusing him of inciting the mob. But she is now the undisputed Republican leader of what you might call the constitutional conservatives in the house. There's the part 65% of House Republicans, including the minority leader, Kevin McCarthy, voted to overturn the election undermine the will of the voters, and she's on the other side. So we have a pretty clear leader now of the I don't know what you want to call them. The constitutional conservatives, the reality based Republicans. Just like Mitt Romney emerged in the Senate as the leader of Republicans who believed in the rule of law and the Constitution, and I want to do two things here. First read list. Cheney's statement of some of it anyway. Quote this insurrection caused injury, death and destruction. The most sacred space in our republic. Much more will become clear in the coming days and weeks. But what we know now is enough. I will vote to impeach the president. They significant Republican family name a significant Republican officeholder. Making that statement, and I also just want to clarify for people. If anybody's wondering out in the audience when we say reality based we're not taking a side in this debate where there were. It's not our job to take aside whether this 25th amendment resolution should pass or fail whether the president should leave office or not, but it is our job to take the side of reality, and we're aware of what happened on Wednesday, and we're going to be clear on that. Throughout the evening, Mara. How do we could go ahead? Go ahead would be even more precise about that. When when there are disputes in a democracy, we have a referee. It's called the Judiciary Branch. And they Determined reality. They looked at the evidence they looked at the facts, and they said there was no widespread evidence of fraud. Certainly not enough that would have flipped the results of this election, which was not close. From Joe Biden to Donald Trump. So it's not just a kind of term of art reality based. This has been adjudicated by the referee that our Democratic system chooses, and that is what we mean by the rule of law. And Domenico Montanaro. Why don't you come into the conversation here is well and tell us why this has created a political dilemma. For Republicans. This is ordinarily have been an automatic vote that perhaps a scattered handful of people would object to in some way. Then, of course, there was this riot, which was carried on television and which Has seemed more and more horrible as as we've gone along and learned more about it. Why does this create a dilemma for Republicans? Well, I think the issue here is how Republican base politics plays out..

president Republicans Kelsey Snell Mara Liasson Joe Biden Congress Liz Cheney House of Representatives Domenico Montanaro NPR Republican Party House Speaker Nancy Pelosi national political corresponde officer political editor Kevin McCarthy
"political editor" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KCRW

"The People's house. Joining us now with the latest is NPR political editor. Domenico Montanaro. Hey, Domenico. Hey there, all right, so lawmakers return to session just about an hour ago, and the session opened with a syriza of speeches by lawmakers uniformly condemning the events that we saw today. Here is Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. United States. The United States, Congress have faced down much greater threats. On the unhinged crowd. We saw today. We've never been deterred before. And we'll be not deterred today. They tried to disrupt our democracy. They failed. Failed. They failed. Strong words from the majority leader. Tell us Dominica would else has been said so far on the Senate floor tonight. Well, you know, there's been a lot of debate on the Senate floor, going back and forth a little bit, with some members trying to deliver and passion, please. In Democrats in particular across the aisle, telling their Republican colleagues who would have objected or had considered objecting to not do so to not take this up because the house And have someone object. But then they need a senator to sign off on that objection to continue to delay this process that you heard Mike Lee from Utah, for example, a Republican who said that their job is to Open the envelopes count the votes open count, he said. That's it right on. And then Cory Booker delivered a really impassioned plea talking about how the last time There was an insurrection in the U. S capitol where people came into the capital. The way they did today was in the war of 18 12, and he talked about how you know that was a time when people were trying to take over the United States and here, he said, We invited it from within a truly extraordinary comparison there. Obviously, that's that's a big, It's a big deal. Well, what have we been hearing from those Republicans who had originally planned to object today? Are we seeing a great wave of shifting at this point? We have seen a few of them now start to shift away. Kelly Leffler, who lost her race last night in Georgia, in particular, had picked up You know the torch before her election, saying she was gonna be on this and said that the events that transpired today have forced her to reconsider her objection. And I cannot now in good conscious object to the certification of these electors. We saw that from James Lankford of Oklahoma, Steve Daines of Montana, as well as Mike Braun from Indiana, who've now withdrawn their objections as well. So we're waiting to hear on it from a handful of others in particular, Josh Holly from Missouri and Ted Cruz of Texas who and Ron Johnson from Wisconsin who were really instigators in all of this. And what have we heard so far today from President Trump's since all of this began? You know, he's been all over the place. And you know, after being begged by House Minority leader Kevin McCarthy to do something to quell what was going on, right in the middle of all this, he put out a tweet that said, You know, this is we understand how this can happen, but go home. You know, And then he put out a video that was then really, just it was taken down Frank. It was a blocked essentially by Twitter because it didn't wasn't strong enough and they felt inciting violence. That is NPR's Domenico Montanaro. Thank you, Domenico. You're welcome. Let's bring in Leon Panetta. Now he has spent many hours of the U. S. Capitol is a former congressman from California. He also served as President Bill Clinton's chief of staff, as director of the CIA, and as defense secretary for President Barack Obama. He's on the line now. Secretary Panetta. Hey, there. How are you? Well, I think we've all had better days. How are you doing? I did. This is, uh In the 50 years over 50 years of public life that I've had. This is without question the most disturbing day in my life to see what has happened. At the Capitol of the United States. I think it's a sad day for for our democracy, and it's just it's a sad day for our country. Reeling off all your past titles Just a moment ago, drove home to me that you've served in Washington from just about every vantage point, a person could have what has shot two most as you have witnessed events unfolding today. Well, there were You know a number of thoughts that crossed my mind. But I think first and foremost was just the fact that Uh, we I think we all knew that something like this might happen. That there were these protesters who had come to Washington that we had a president who was inciting the protesters and actually went there this morning. To incite them as well.

Domenico Montanaro United States Secretary Panetta president Senate Cory Booker NPR Kelly Leffler Mitch McConnell Kevin McCarthy Barack Obama Washington political editor Trump Mike Lee Congress James Lankford Twitter
"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"political editor" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People want to see these vaccination happening fast and quick, and that's not taking place. Cornelius, political editor of the German daily Pseudo to die, Tong says Germans in particular, have been sour about how slowly they think Europe is moving on the vaccination front. German politicians and newspapers have blamed European Union leaders for moving too slowly and for wanting to control the entire vaccination rollout. For all its 27 member states. There is obviously someone who has to be blamed because there is not enough vaccines in in Germany at the moment, so who can take the blame? It's normally do you but Brussels based correspondent Venom Muslim writes for the newspaper Frank Photo album, Mina says the truth is more complicated. Last summer, you leaders agreed to order two billion doses of the vaccine from six different producers and effort, says Moose Lor to diversify risk. Nobody knew exactly what which kind of facts in would be would be successful in the future. So that the approach was to negotiate with really every potential producer in November, when it became clear the Fizer biotech and Madonna vaccines were further along in their trials and the others looser, says the EU could've ordered more from those particular suppliers. But it didn't Partly, he says, due to cost materials vaccine caused $22 a dose of Fizer biotech one Ron 15, a dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine cost around $2. In the end Stefan Cornelius says these delays will likely soon be for gotten as the EU is on the brink of approving both the Madonna and AstraZeneca vaccines and biotech is finishing construction of a massive production facility in Germany. Cornelius. Thanks German Health Ministry Yen sponsor prediction that all Germans will have access to a vaccine before July may likely pan out. He says that use approach to the vaccine is an easy target for criticism. Especially for politicians in what is an important election year for Germany. But in the end, it'll prove to be effective. Justin matching Tony would have sort of stepped forward with a higher Wires, power and board supplies from one producer in huge quantities and left other European countries behind. That would of course, huge outcry and political trouble within the European Union. So you have to act unified. With Britain gone from the EU, and with countries like Hungary and Poland threatening to unravel the block. Cornelius says Germany cannot afford to be a vaccine Nationalist Acting as one European Union, with the.

Germany European Union Stefan Cornelius Moose Lor producer AstraZeneca political editor Europe Brussels Tong German Health Ministry Hungary Britain Ron Frank Photo Mina Poland Justin Tony
Brexit negotiations extended

Monocle 24: The Globalist

07:50 min | 2 years ago

Brexit negotiations extended

"The brexit negotiations have been extended. It's been a tense weekend of talks which ended without a resolution except that the teams will continue to bargain. Darn mccaffrey's urine news political editor. Ann joins me now. Darna blustery man and a crumpled face and impeccably turned out an utterly composed woman libertine and lutheran images of boris johnson's meeting with usher underlying dominated the front pages and it seemed to me at least pretty much characterize the tone of the brexit negotiations. So can you tell us what happened over the weekend will in many ways. Of course the talks restarted. Again as you say. After that meeting with vonda line and boris johnson in brussels on wednesday nights they did seem not make an awful awful lot of extra progress. They inched forward to a large degree editor. Tina particularly in this area of the level playing field dot es britain would have to adhere to many of the rules and regulations of the european union for years to come that wants to have access to the single market particularly on this idea of divergence. Oh britain wants to forge. Don't power in the world committee regards. That's what brexit is. All rexiti is all about was the european union since she says well. If you do that that means consequences. It means. We may well the limit your access to the single market and the have been suggestions that it britain diverged. Too far the cop. Some of those rules and regulations that brussels could put on what a cold kind of like tariffs taxes on some of its goods to try and keep it into line. And that's been the really controversial area on that point. Europe seems to be conceding some ground that may be britain might be able to reciprocate by doing exactly the same to the eu all that the independent all between posts deciding if britain is undercut those regulations. That in the end that process is a bit more complicated and drawn out and then the eu it initially anticipated all although that's an awful lot of detail on what is a minor point there are still these inefficient gaps but there is a sign of progress and the reason that the talks continued. Go beyond yesterday is done to kind of to simple reasons. A neither side wants to be seen to walk away from these talks. Georgina no wants to collapse them. Because ultimately they'll always be a blame game about who brought about the no deal brexit and second of all you know it may well bore us all to death and there's no home and carry on talking no one loses so why not talk until the cows come home or indeed the. We're not allowed fireworks in us even till they're crackers get pulled. Whatever happens on new year's eve this year. So i mean the talks could actually go on until the deadline which is the thirty first of december. We'll in practical terms not really. Id so that the front pages of today's daily telegraph suggests that talks could carry on until new years. That's the headline. at least though. It doesn't suggest what year which is likely distancing. No i in theory. And i think we all kind of i keep saying this into the last week. I was told last week by an eu diplomat that were looking at the eighteenth around the as well as the last days to secure agreement because then we really all pushing the envelope in terms of actually just having time at all for both the european parliament and the british folder to ratify this agreement. Because it will have to be. There is a deal will need to be ratified by both parliaments. Not there is talk and with the eu everything is flexible that potentially it could be agreed by e you leaders and ratified provisionally in the new year. So almost in retrospect. I'm not entirely sure that can happen with the uk parliament but you know talks will continue at some stage. Somebody's gonna have to make a decision though. I mean they cannot continue indefinitely. And as you've said as the telegraph suggested they definitely cannot continue beyond news because of the legal deadline that is in place. But i mean there are also things like for instance tax systems need more than a fortnight to boot up to change various things. We're also being told that supermarkets have been ordered to stock up the goods. In event of a no deal will cost twenty percent more that there are interim measures to keep planes flying and so on. I mean there's so much detail that needs to be worked out the things that are really interesting about this first of all even if there is a deal it's only really covering about twenty cents of the existing rules and normality. That's already in place which means that's eighty. Percents is either having to be made up by changes that businesses are having to make stuff that you and i won't see but will cost them time and money and additionally the will be disruption because of course will be extra checks at borders particular over in calais and that means that we will see many more pictures of those lorries cues them for after aftermarket after mile. And you're right. We all still likely to see an increase in food prices to a degree. If there is no deal that gets worse because the tariffs potentially william place will be in place sterling will potentially fall even further on those two factors will mean that food prices will likely increase the destruction means that supermarkets already ordering goods talk about destruction to medical supplies and also in the amended. No deal as you rightly dives there will still have to be many deals. Don't breakneck speed to ensure that you know planes continue to be able to fly into european espace. That lorries are able to even enter the opinion so even if there is no overall trade agreements that will still have to be some deals just to make sure that things carry on beyond the. I generally in a relatively normal way now. What about the navy. The royal navy has been told that it should patrol to police channel waters To to stop illegal fishing as it may well be by then Charles michel the president of the european council referring to that said the britain was not lose. Its cooling. Go overboard he said. I'm trying to be serious on the european side. At least we keep our sang for. Yeah i think we'll see what happens with the role now. I mean even in the event of not we'll see what happens with the law. Maybe i'm sure they will patrol and all we're going to get into fish wars that we saw. I think it was back in the nineteen seventies involving iceland's when it really did get a bit nasty and ships were sunk certainly pretty badly damaged in wars over fishing there. You have to remember the european union in its deal contingency. Planning junior suggested that. If britain bolts these breakneck speeds kind of temporary deals. That i was talking about when it comes to the ability to move call goran or indeed planes that they would have to concede that the current agreement on fishing would continue for at least another year. Which makes me think that in the ends. That probably was likely to happen. Not least of all as well because we have to remember no deal. I deal on. Fishing may be banned from both sides and fishing but no deal is also bad. And i'm not entirely sure that the fishing communities of the east coast of england or northern france. Want no deal either. Because that may mean they don't have access to each other's waters but given the acrimony were to see in the nastiness in no deal. Brexit may will also mean that those uk fishermen for example will not be able to sell the fish to the european market.

EU Britain Boris Johnson Ann Joins Vonda Line Brussels Mccaffrey Tina Georgina European Parliament Europe Charles Michel Calais UK Royal Navy European Council William Navy
"If Florida goes blue, it's over": Trump and Biden campaign in Florida

Morning Edition

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"If Florida goes blue, it's over": Trump and Biden campaign in Florida

"When Joe Biden traveled to Florida yesterday, he explicitly referred to the electoral map, he said. If Democrats win Florida four days from now, quote it's over. It would be very hard for President Trump to reach the 270 electoral votes that decide the presidency. The president knows this, too, and also campaigned yesterday in Florida, which not coincidentally, he has made his new home state. We are going to win Florida. We are going to win for more years when you use your power. Power of the vote. We literally are going to change the course of this country for generations to come. So that's one state on the electoral map and let's look across NPR's final version of that map, which is out today. NPR senior political editor Domenico Montanaro is with us, Domenico Good Morning. Morning, Steve. So, what do you see on that map? Well, like you say Biden has the advantage when our map shows is that, with states leaning or likely to go in either candidate's direction, Biden now leads with 279 electoral votes. The 125 that to 70 is obviously over the threshold needed, eh, so that if the president is going to win, he's gonna have to win all of the toss up states and one of those states that's leaning in Biden's direction, and it's not completely out of the realm of possibility. He's certainly within striking distance in those competitive states. We made two big changes in this map. We put two important states. In the toss up category, Arizona and Texas. Not all these toss ups are created equal, though we hesitated with Texas because of its history of voting Republican hasn't gone for a Democratic president since 1976 and Trump wanted by nine points in 2016. But look, it's been remarkably close. Early Voting's been through the roof, lots of young voters, lots of Latinos turning out on DH, You know, Biden has been leading consistently in Arizona, also since early March. Polls are within the margin of error there. So to keep that, Ah, competitive. Trump is certainly pulling out a lot of stops, and it looks like you know, Right now it's a toss up because you made the change in Texas and some other changes You see, toss up states that air now leaning blue. You see traditional red states that air now toss up states. That's the way the map is moving. But you mentioned that the president could still win this. Absolutely. I mean, like I said, all the toss up states are pulling within the margin of error. So when you see a state that's within two or three points, one way or another, which is where a lot of those states in the middle are. That's not much of a lead at all. So I understand Democrats being very nervous and the outcome is certainly not clear. Trump would have to win all of them all those toss up states and went over one more of those states leaning and Biden's direction. If he does, that it would make it 259 to 259 and leave Pennsylvania as the state next up in the polling averages, and it's a state we know Both campaigns are making strong pushes for Pennsylvania, though, is expected to be slow and counting the vote this year. We could be waiting sometime because Pennsylvania just doesn't have a history of dealing with as much mail in voting as it is this year.

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UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

The Leader

04:19 min | 2 years ago

UK says EU trade talks 'over' but bloc sees room for a deal

"Boris Johnson has dramatically told Britain to prepare for the new deal brexit after a bust up with Brussels on trade talks the minister put the country on notice that it's e you departure at the end of the transition period. On December, thirty first could be without a trade deal with the European bloc that could leave businesses facing tariffs and quotas to trade with European bloc and transport delays could see some food shortages. Deputy political editor Nicholas says spoke to the Evening Standard's Bonnie Christian. Nick, what happened today and we're we're expecting it. This was a bit of a surprise. This announcement by Boyce Johnson appear that the EU and the government were coming to an arrangement to continue talks next week on a trade deal. But there seems to be a difference in stance taken by the EU leaders and the European Commission. The EU leaders probably Egged on by Emmanuel macron. Stiffen the stance or the European bloc and particularly over the row over fishing. This led to a response for Mr Johnson threatening to walk away from the talks. Why has this decision been made completely out of the blue? Boys. Johnson had set a deadline of October, the fifteenth for a breakthrough. In, the negotiations in order for them to continue this has not happened basically. Going to be some woods agreed for them to continue of them pull the whole house of cards down now. One with the British demands was an intensification of talks. This had been proposed and flashed around Brussels. But when the summit conclusions came out, there was no mention of that. The government in Britain responded by saying that we were going to start prepare now for a no deal. So does this main? A deal is completely off the table? No. It doesn't mean that could mean that. But what happened Lychee now after Bush Johnson has made a statement is that the European Commission President Sheila Underlay? tweeted that a team from Brussels would be heading to London to intensify the talks. This was a key British demand. So it looks like there's been a political spat between the leaders at political level. But now that the Are, trying to keep the show on the road if we are to leave without a deal what are the big knock on effects of that, we could see here in the UK economically, they could potentially be catastrophic. You'll certainly talking about businesses, facing tariffs and also quotas. That could also be food shortages. Some shorter particular fresh food shortages in the UK I for weeks even before the threat of a no deal ruptured lunchtime the boss of TESCO's was saying that they could be some future tages. If there literally is no deal. Then obviously, the likelihood of those would increase dramatically shortly optimistic Johnson spoke that the pound fell against the euro, which is a sign of concerns. The next step is really the me t next week to see whether they eat negotiators and the okay Shakespeare's could make a break food. The meeting may not happen, but it looks like it will happen and is imposed. Sides interest to strike a deal both will play hard ball and often agreements are really only reach five minutes to midnight when both parties are staring into the abyss and the they know that unless a deal now things can get very very messy. These talks have been stalled for months. Now with a the side, not really bunching at all is there any sense of what the outcome could be? Is Too hard to tell given. The economic damage in Odio could calls and Boris Johnson will be fully aware of this and Michael is you would expect a deal to be reached but e you leaders they got the stronger hand and so we'll trying really go for the best possible for them. and. That will put pressure and strain on the British government because they really don't want to make many more concessions especially with so many hard line brexit is in the Tory party.

Boris Johnson Brussels EU European Commission Britain UK Political Editor Nick British Government Bonnie Christian Emmanuel Macron Tory Party Nicholas Tesco Odio Sheila Underlay London Shakespeare