20 Episode results for "Politburo"

China Is Easing Birth Limits Further to Cope With Its Aging Society

TIME's Top Stories

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

China Is Easing Birth Limits Further to Cope With Its Aging Society

"China is easing birth limits further to cope with its aging society by the associated. Press beijing china's ruling communist party will ease birth limits to allow all couples to have three children instead of to to cope with the rapid rise in the average age of its population. A state news agency said monday. The ruling party has forced birth limits since nineteen eighty to restrain population growth but worries the number of working age. People is falling too fast while the share over age sixty five is rising adding two strains on the economy and society. a meeting. monday of the party's politburo decided. China will introduce major policies and measures to actively deal with the aging population. The xinhua news agency said party leaders pointed out that further. Optimizing the fertility policy implementing. The policy of one couple can have three. Children and supporting measures are conducive to improving china's population structure. The report said it gave no details on when or how the change would be carried out. China's population of one point. Four billion already was expected to peak later this decade and start to decline census data released may eleventh suggests that is happening faster than expected straining underfunded pension and health systems and cutting the number of future workers available to support a growing retiree group restrictions that limited most couples to one child were eased in two thousand fifteen to allow all to have to but after a brief rise. The next year births declined. Couples say they are put off by the cost of having children disruption to jobs and the need to look after their own parents. The share of working age people fifteen to fifty nine in the population fell to sixty three point. Three percent last year from seventy point one percent decade earlier according to the census data the group aged sixty five and older grew to thirteen and a half percent from eight point. nine percent. The twelve million births reported last year was down nearly one fifth from two thousand nineteen about forty percent. Were second children down from fifty percent in two thousand seventeen according to ning g her. A statistics officiallu announced the data on may eleventh.

China politburo xinhua news agency beijing ning g
Sheila Fitzpatrick on the Cold War migrants of Russia

Between The Lines

29:07 min | Last month

Sheila Fitzpatrick on the Cold War migrants of Russia

"This is an abc podcast and welcome to between the lines. This is tom switzer from radio. National thanks for tuning in. Well my guest. Today is one of the world's leading historians of soviet russia and she happens to be australian however her reputation as an expert on soviet history is fog writer abroad than in her home country. It's interesting fees ago. Andrew clock the veteran distinguished journalists at the australian financial review. This is what he said about outguessed. A short woman still striking looking. She skips with a breezy but impressive authority from talking about collectivisation to the politburo stalin to putin love affairs to murder. Andrew clock is onto say a brilliant scholar who combines intellectual insight with a magnetic rotting style. She majored in russian at melbourne university. Graduating with first class honours in nineteen sixty one sixty years ago. She received the doctrine philosophy at oxford university. She was a research fellow at the london school of slavonic and east european studies for two decades. She was a professor of modern history. The chicago and then she returned to our shores. In twenty twelve shayla fitzpatrick. She's author of about a dozen books including several award. Winning books including mice notably the russian revolution that sold more than two hundred thousand copies in america. Europe and australia now these days. Sheila is a professor of history at the australian catholic university and her most recent book is called wash russians red peril a cold war history of migration to australia. It's just out by latrobe. University press in conjunction with black ink books. Sheila welcome back to between the lines. Thank you very much for having me. Now you've distinguished yourself as a historian of the soviet union especially in the united states. How is it that you came to the subject of the coal history of migration to australia. Well i think i'd have to say it was because i myself became a migrant. I'd be no way for an awful long time. Forty eight years actually And then i did come back as you say in twenty twelve and the whole experience of uprooting yourself and then rerouting his a really interesting one. And that's i think what made me want to pursue it and of course when you lift australia's post grad in the in the in the early to mid ninety sixties margraten was an acknowledged aspect of a strong history. Wasn't it you know it wasn't it wasn't a big one. No migration history. It became you know. In the years. I was away. I'm not quite sure. When i became aware of it in two thousand that it had become something important for the historical profession in australia. Yes i suppose. My point was that really in the postwar period. We did hear a lot about a european immigrants but very little about russian now iran as an outsider about soviet displaced persons who settled in this country in the early postwar period. You have no rule family connection with post war. Russian migrants either. The europeans will the chinese russians. That tell us more. Well that's true now. Of course. I am a russian expert and i mean that's my view of of study and so in a way that made it interesting. I've always before looked at soviet russians in the soviet union. Now looking at the post war migration these are not all ex-soviet russians but many of them are so i see my soviet russians up rooted and landing in another place now on the question of the that you raised earlier about them being overlooked the russians on. That is a really interesting question. The figures that you would derive from the census way too low in my opinion. And i argue it in my book. I think there's probably upper twenty thousand or or more. That counts the ones from china coming after the war and the reason that they underestimated is that so many of them basically gave folks identities and the reason for that is that they were afraid of being forcibly repatriated to the soviet union. Fascinating aspect of your story. Sheila is that australia was the nation that talking the largest number of russian displaced persons until until the us overtook it. They were just destroyed at the end but yes. There was a time when australia was a russian calculation by the way rather soviet calculation. I think the australians had no that they were doing that now inflicting. It's deep as and we're talking about displaced persons. He australia use any implicit iraqi. Till's about that. That's a little alarming. When you find it in the archives now you're gonna find it in published form. What you find is in correspondence between canberra and the australian military mission that was doing this election of displaced persons and when that high the hierarchy of course the reasons were not exactly discussed because he's ledges a practical letters in other words they're saying go latvians particularly or whatever they're about action rather than about the thinking behind it but when it is argued dot it's basically into of a similar ability cultural similarity so northern europeans considered most desirable in that way and also suitability for manual work because in selecting the dp's. Australia really really wanted people who'd be manual workers in domestic servants orderlies in hospital. That kind of thing. We absolutely didn't want intellectuals. And jews were at the bottom of hauraki correct jewish the bottom of the hierarchy and indeed ofter awhile quotas in these actually are announced coaches imposed on the numbers of jews jewish migrants. It can come on any single ship bringing migrants at that was a twenty five percent our quota but it was never fueled in any case so it actually did not stop jews from coming as migrants in these years but it made it harder for them. It delayed it. it made it more expensive. They came instead of coming under the scheme. Arranged by the international refugee organisation called mass resettlement. They came as what was called landing permit migrants. They had to have a sponsor who paid the passage. Okay so go. The people from the baltic states there at the top then got the slabs russians and ukrainians in the middle. Then jews at the bottom. The title of the book is called. Wash russians red peril. Tell us more about the watch russians. Sheila right well apply russian in my title. It basically means russians who see themselves as anticommunist historically the main meaning of that term. It's the russians who fought the bolsheviks the reds in the civil war that followed the russian revolution of nineteen seventeen. Now things are never easy because there is a secondary meaning white russian. Remember the soviet union they. There was a republican bill. Russia which is now called bellarusse. Will that translate it white russia so you can also call those people in white russians and australian immigration. People were not sure when asked whether they would take quite russians where they would go on their list They were not sure who is being referred to. I think they never found out what people who are edgy. Communist or whether it meant. People from belarus your. Abc's radio national with me. Tom switzer my guest. Is sheila fitzpatrick. And we've been talking about Latest book what russians red peril now and other interesting nugget from your new book. Is that the soviets furious about resettlement which started. Anonymous forty-seven reach. It's a couple of years. Lettuce i forty nine fifty now here. We have the soviets sheila they're essentially telling us that we had essentially stolen the citizens. And i also made determined efforts to persuade the migrants to return home. The question here is why did the kremlin what everybody back including this interesting wished ukrainians who loathes the us What accounts for this strange conduct. It is extraordinary. Isn't it an. I spend a lot of time thinking about it. The soviet union if you look at other east european countries it is i think alone in wanting everybody back who was ever at citizen. Poland for example doesn't polish ukrainians. It doesn't want polish jews. It just wants polish polls and that was fairly common but the soviet union wants everybody back and that includes people as you saved from west ukraine and from the baltics from the areas that became part of the soviet union. More listen voluntarily and largely unwillingly at the end of one thousand. Nine hundred eighty nine is a result of the hitler-stalin pact. So they want all of those people back and they go around. There are a lot of displaced persons in in prison in the occupation of germany. Go round collecting them. They go around collecting from psychiatric hospitals and also a lot of gp's there and most countries are very unwilling to take even their own citizens back but not the soviet union. The easy explanation is they wanted labor on the other hand These people from the psychiatric hospitals are not going to be great in terms of labor. They can't because basically they going to be Probably on equivalent of welfare. Most of the time. I think there was also as i read it. There was just a sort of gut feeling. These are people. They're being prevented from coming back. This was a very strong feeling. Mp being prevented from coming back By the allies who are now not our allies anymore and we have to reverse that and so they didn't even give up after the people had been resettled and in nine hundred fifty one two. They sent out an undercover agent. His name was jif to persuade them to come back. And i had the great good fortune to accidentally or more or less accidentally happened upon this man's reports back to moscow about his attempts to get russian dp to return the soviet union of course really starts to appear now public imagination in naunton fifty four with his spa across nine. Says the pitch of a tell us more about petrov and how he fits into your story petroff keeps coming into my story but somewhat on the fringes now most of the russians who came after the war anticommunist and certainly they all had to say they were anticommunist otherwise they wouldn't be selected by australian. Sediction committees There was a minority of them that were pro soviet and sort of left wing and they had a club in sydney on george street called the russian social club and it was next door to the anticommunist russian club could brush in house petroff and other soviet officials went to the russian social club. It was one of their few contacts with well. Basically with anything that could be called australian life now. What is interesting. You look at the royal commission on espionage and petrov gives the impression that he's telling everything that he knows about in which much because he was a really incompetent as by but curiously is very reticent about his friends in the russian social club and when he's asked about them specifically is his own. No no he wasn't it wasn't i. I don't think anybody was running him as a spy. He's not. I don't think he hasn't dubious connections. I'm not saying they were spies but he's very different and as i read it. I thought my goodness this is predicting his friends now. The second way he comes in is when the royal commission on espionage hearing his testimony opens anticommunist russian. See this as a chance to put out their flag and basically say to australia. He'll we are specialists on anti communism specialists on the soviet union. You know lettuce. Join you in your fight against communism and they put up the hand and they get a little bit of publicity for a while but not for long because the migrant anti-communism different route it's goes captive nations now russians. Were quite some of them. Quite eager to join the captive nations movement but no one would have them because of the thought that at hot they would probably russian imperialists themselves on iran disease between the lines with tom. Switzerland your on. Abc's ready national with me. Tom switzer my guest. Is sheila fitzpatrick. And we've been talking about lightest book. Why russians red peril a cold war history of migration to australia. She let let's turn to the book your now rotting the shortest history of the soviet union forthcoming by blacking books. Now you mentioned gorbachev and how he cops a lot of criticism for prodding the disintegration of the soviet union the prevailing wisdom in the early eighties was very different. Wasn't it tell us about the consensus among america's servia tallest in the early eighties. Yeah well that's how. I decide to start my book with nine hundred and eighty because it's such as sort of interesting contrast between what actually happened. Just don't a decade later in one thousand nine hundred eighty. The soviet union was in what seemed to many people a period of stability com relative prosperity. It's a superpower eight had as a superpower since the war been markedly inferior to the soviet union in terms of military strength. It's now on at least on some maxi's as caught up so it's achieve military parody. It's standard of living has ridden risen. Its economy has been growing in previous decades. It's now it's plateaued but still so it's a period the britishness period before the impact. They go into afghanistan at the end of nineteen seventy-nine but i take ninety nine hundred implications of that unwise move. Haven't really come through and it's just at that time. That western soviet tallest decided it was time to give up the previous assumption that the soviet union is an unstable. Pod isn't going to be around for very long. That had bean at least widely felt and widely hoped. I would say during the cold war but in severe and bella publishes a book about the soviet union in which he basically says let. Let's recognize that. This is a stable long-term power and the other thing that happened which i find very a quite ironic. Is that library of congress. That's the main deposit library in the united states. Are it had since a revolution refused to admit in its catalog card catalog. At that point refused to admit the existence existence of the soviet union. So if you look for cod code soviet union or us's you wouldn't find it. You would have look for the soviet union under the hitting russia nine hundred twenty three on a crazy of course but finally. They're not very congress. Jim billington who was actually a russian est wrote. This is the early eighties sometime in early eighties. I can't i was one of the recipient. So i i i know it from not from documents but for my own memory. He wrote to people in the soviet field soviet colleges in america and said listen. Isn't it time that we gave up pretending the soviet union doesn't exist shouldn't we have. It didn't cod catalog. And we all said yes. No it's silly not to recognize so there's about a decade of entries on the soviet union and then it stops yes but notwithstanding all those soviet tola gist that you mention there was mentioned awning icty ronald reagan who came to power now. He distinguished himself from both republican and democratic immediate predecessor. Richard nixon gerald ford. Jimmy carter on the question of detente. He called detente. Something like a one. Way street for the soviets to lie and cheat and get leverage over the americans. He had a lot of support. He was reelected in a landslide and ninety four. How much credit does reagan deserve. The helping. bring down the soviet union by the end of that decade. I wouldn't think he does deserve that much credit or really. I don't see as a tool the crucial factor i'm the argument goes that the basically the end of detente forces them to overspend. And i am not true. I mean they. They had to budget problems. But it wasn't to my mind that they brought him down the short term economic problems. The shop fall in oil prices. I think it's crucial because in the bridge if you're in one thousand nine hundred and for example they writing on really high oil prices over one hundred hundred and twenty bauer in crude. And it's down to forty so there are no. that's not good for a major oil exporter. And my sense of of what brings about the soviet collapse. Is something quite different room. It's the fact that for complicated reasons as of nineteen ninety one There were two presidents in moscow. One was yeltsin. Who was the president of the russian republic formerly a part of the soviet union and the other one was mikhail gorbachev who was president of the soviet union and formerly his superior. Now these people were were. They were bitter rivals. Basically and what happened was the yeltsin one and he abolished the competing presidency and with it. The country of which gorbachev had been president this period light eighties early nineties. I mean it is remarkable period in world history the soviet union. He's basically voluntarily letting go of. Its walsall pack satellite. Steitz it acquiesces in the dismantling of its. It's virtually no violence. How do you account for this. I mean why didn't moscow just resist. The forces of change and extended sympathize loft by imposing you know brutal order on former republics client sites in eastern europe. Just locked by the soviets did in east germany nineteen fifty-three hungary fifty-six czechoslovakia poland and ninety one. Sheila fitzpatrick it's bizarre. I think that. I'd gorbachev it's he who felt. He had an agreement at thirty four to do this. Because he had an agreement that they wouldn't be signed up in nato which is the carnage gentlemen's agreement a gentleman's agreement not written down. I mean biggest belief that that a national leader should operate this bit. He didn't now it's also require for. You're talking about the deal. That bush apparently reached with gorbachev that in exchange for a unified germany's inclusion in nato in the early eighties. Sorry in the early nineties. The western alliance not move eastern upset russia's strategic sensibility. That's your point. Yes that's true now as a sort of background to that i mean. It's not only that gorbachev feels. He has a deal that he lit eastern europe goal. He i think without without force one first thing is very averse to using force. I mean this is something. This is a moral conviction. I think he really doesn't like it. He was critical as young communist of hungary of the use of force there the soviet use of force and czechoslovakia also in one thousand. Nine hundred hundred and it seems that personally. He despised many of these european leaders. The reason that he lets the whole situation develop is that he thinks that people konica and chow said they deserve to be to be replaced by the people. Now he didn't perhaps anticipate are drastic that replacement there's also a minor thing one anxious in question of who thinks they are being exploited by whom the east european nations that they were being exploited by moscow and moscow thought that it was economically subsidizing eastern europe. You get the same situation. With regard to the soviet union the non-russian republics think that moscow is exploiting them and The russian republic thinks that it's subsidizing the non russian rob republics. This is between the lines. Tom switzer she. It's patrick is one of the world's leading experts on twentieth century. Soviet russian history. Her award winning books include my father's daughter michigan's war on stalin's team and the russian revolution. Now we've been talking about gorbachev and certainly his detractors to this day would argue that. He brought chaos a national humiliation to russia sheila. How do you account for this widespread hostility towards russia across the west if you read the uk. Telegraph the london times. The australian he the wall street journal those publications on what passes as the right spectrum but also on the left spectrum. Lot the guardian the new york times the washington post the sydney morning herald. There is overwhelming hostility to putin's russia. How do you account for these. It's true and it is one of these historical puzzles. All the more in the degree of the hostility appears to treat it as if it were still a great par and it isn't basically so it doesn't deserve that amount of coverage let alone. I can only understand it in terms of continuation of the past. I'm the historic enemy for the soviet union through the second half of the twentieth century. For the sorry for the united states was the soviet union and russia is the success of state and it seems to me that the same kind of conversation goes on about it and it also seems to russians that i can remember many conversations in the one thousand nine hundred ninety in the two thousand when russian says basically russians would say to me basically america. Just hase's they used to say they hated communism but we stopped being communist and they still hated. So let's infre- dick. I'd since the end of the cold war and the collapse of the soviet union and it seems to me that in the western press. There's less debate about the merits of engagement with russia than they walls during the cold war. That's a point that steven cohen past guest on this program who unfortunately died about a year ago. He often made that point that there was more debate in the west about engaging moscow then there is in the post cole will era. I think that's true. I mean it's it's hard to think of of many voices. Yes it's one of these topics said one of these positions. It's very difficult job. You're you're a specialist in the history of the soviet union and much of your intellectual focus has been on joseph stalin's quarter-century rule. We obviously live in different times. Are there echoes of stalin in modern day russia. Well our memories of stolen but people who say this stalinism return. I think they don't have a good idea of what stalinism was like. But you'll often hear. The putin is stalin's yes. I mean actually. I don't know if i don't hear that so much but putin himself has a reasonably high regard for and as a nation builder that's muddy seizes his own role a nation builder. Who's operating difficult. Circumstances trying to put our nation back together after after chaos. So he feels feels some kinship with stalin and is generally approving talk much about urges. He does talk a lot about the second world war victory. Now what's interesting there. Is that almost everybody who likes. Stalin will also like lenin but not putin. He is the exception. He doesn't like lenin because he thinks lennon was a nation destroyer as a revolutionary in contrast to stalin. Who's the nation builder. Yes spies putin despite his authoritarianism and his regime's state-sponsored mood of independent journalists. He doesn't shed blood in the way. That stalin did goes without saying doesn't it. Yeah i mean it's it's also a different modus operandi. I don't remember poisoning of journalists. Understand he killed lots and lots of people but that wasn't individual knocking off of journalistic the west and in russia. That's a whole different thing but basically the the rage of repression was so much higher undis- thailand and virginia what putin fujian's russia did remind me of the last time i was there it was britishness russia not britishness soviet union not stalin's britishness and that's a very different kettle of fish. And what made me think of that. Was i was at a meeting with people at a conference attended by prime minister images but in this meeting there was a panel and people criticized putin overtly and also obliquely and every it was a packed audience. Everyone was terribly excited to be part of this daring criticism and the people the celebrity journalists who making it very pleased with themselves and to a degree competing for who could be more daring and so everybody felt great and more superior but they did not feel in real danger. That's why it why they vote so great and that was britishness time in other words the feeling of self self-satisfied daring at challenging the regime in stalin's time. You just didn't do that kind of thing. Exactly chalk and chasing us. The other thing too is a stalin would never have done judah will sport bed chested fodder. Sheila figure fort sheila. It's been absolutely wonderful to chat with you again on between the lawns. Thank you very much. Sheila fitzpatrick author all why russians. Red peril the cold war history of migration to australia that's just out by latrobe university press in conjunction with black folks and we'll put a link to the book on our website. Well that's it for the show and if you'd like to hear this or other episodes including last week's debate about climate change policy just guy to abc dot net dot edu and follow the prompts to between the lines or just kind of the idc. Listen up where you can download us for free or wherever you download your showers online. This is tom switzer from radio. National happy tune in again next week. You've been listening to. Abc podcast discover more great abc. Podcasts live radio and exclusives on the abc listen app.

soviet union australia tom switzer russian social club Sheila fitzpatrick Sheila russia us politburo stalin Andrew clock melbourne university london school of slavonic shayla fitzpatrick gorbachev moscow putin international refugee organisa stalin petrov
Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

The Economist: The Intelligence

21:21 min | 5 months ago

Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

"With no fees or minimums on checking and savings accounts and an app that lets you bank anytime anywhere. Choosing capital one is like the easiest decision in the history of decisions. That's banking reimagined. What's in your wallet. Terms apply capital one. Na member fdic. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist. Radio i'm your host jason palmer. Every weekday we provide a fresh perspective on the events. Shaping your world. Schooling in america remains pretty patchy mostly schools have been shut but even where they aren't. There are plenty of empty seats. Our education correspondent explains why warns of the damage. That may already be done. And this month marks a century since the birth of patricia highsmith author of works. Such as the talented mr ripley. We try mostly in vain to separate highsmith's own demons from those of the dark characters. She conjured I up though. Once every five years with much pomp and pageantry the bombs communist leadership convenes in a national party congress thirteenth. One again in the capital hanoi. This week the expectation is that there will be a raft of stamp policies and new party leaders john despite the country's relatively low kobe numbers and positive economic performance. The party's position outside. The national conference center is weaker than it seems at the national party congress. They discuss issues confronting vietnam. They set policy and they elect the central committee. Politburo and the four top jobs. Charlie mccann is our southeast asia correspondent among them the most powerful job in the country. That is the party. Secretary-general and what's the overall tone at the congress. This time around pretty self. Congratulatory parties had a good year. They've handled the pandemic pretty well. Had just over fifteen hundred cases and fewer than fifty deaths and the economy actually grew by three percent but there's still a lot of disquiet and the party and indeed in the public disquiet in the party in the form of some kind of opposition. There's no organized opposition. Nobody's going to supplant the communist party anytime soon and ever since the nineteen eighties. When the country embarked on the transition from a century planned economy to market one the party has state its legitimacy on rising incomes on his ability to increase prosperity. And it's done that over. Four decades vietnam has transformed from one of the poorest countries in the world to middle income manufacturing powerhouse. But if you look beyond. Those headline figures are causes for concern. The economy has been growing at about seven percent. The last several years and the economy needs to reach that level of growth to keep the labor market. It's not clear that it can do so however at the same time as you have this depressed. Economic growth inequality is rising and social mobility is declining. okay that's about formal opposition parties but you mentioned disquiet among the public as well. What's happening. They're vietnamese can't express their discontent through politics. Because opposition parties are banned but informal criticism is growing. There are a lot of vietnamese. Social media users about sixty five million out of a total population of one hundred million according to our social british firm as level of education has improved in the country and more and more people have access to the internet. they've been exposed to values that are antithetical to the communist paradise that the regime is trying to build these values like democracy and human rights and they can express views on social media and so it's that disquiet than in the public that's causing the disquiet in the party. I mean how is the house. The party dealt with that space for criticism harshly. They have cracked down over the past five years. They've arrested two hundred eighty people for quote anti-state activities up from sixty eight in the previous five year period instructed the serum press to scrub phrases like civil society and human rights from their pages and in the months leading up to the national congress. This crackdown has intensified earlier. This month day sentenced three freelance journalists famous for criticizing the government to between eleven and fifteen years in prison. It's a lot easier to shoot off an angry tweet or facebook post than it is to organize in vietnam where protest is technically illegal but actually there have been a lot of protests in real life over the last several years so in two thousand eighteen for instance tens of thousands of vietnamese took to the streets. Because they're angry about a proposed law that they were worried would allow chinese companies to lease special economic zones for a ninety nine years as a lot of anti chinese sentiment in vietnam. Because there's a lot of concern that chinese infringing on their offering sovereignty and the protests so violent angry there were clashes between the police and protesters. The government eventually abandoned this law so a good pandemic response and the economic growth. That comes with that somewhat offset by this discontent. What else is on party leaders minds. Ironically trade is going to be a worry as well and i say -ironically because trade is a is a massive driver of economic growth. It is through trade. That vietnam has been able to transform itself into manufacturing powerhouse and yet at the same time it gives its export markets leverage over the government. So for instance in order to get the eu to agree to free trade deal last year. Vietnam had to agree to abolish forced labor and allow the creation of independent labor unions which was a massive concession but surely concerns such as that aren't limited to the you know means the party officials have to think very carefully about their relations with both china its biggest trade partner and the us biggest export market. The trump administration came down really hard on vietnam labeled it. A currency manipulator late last year and trump has described vietnam quote. Almost a single worst abuser of everybody for that reason. So the party will be very keen to rebuild the relationship with the biden administration. But at the same time i can't be seen to cozy up too closely to the us for fear of offending china. With whom it has an incredibly important relationship you know. Shares ideology shares along land border and they have an important trade relationship you know. China is largest source of materials and equipment for vietnam manufacturing industry so that it's a tricky balancing act required of party officials to get that relationship right so whoever emerges from the congress secretary general. There won't be much time for celebrating. He's gonna have a lengthy to do list. Charlie thank you very much for joining us. Jason maybe is fifteen. She's very much a typical t niger. She loves school. She's extremely social outs. Being around people jefferson from seattle is the mother of maimi who like many other children in. America hasn't been at school since march two point where she was getting so frustrated at julius scream and then she would start to aita. South life without in person. Learning has been particularly hard on me. Who suffers from angelman syndrome. A genetic disorder that causes severe. Physical and learning disabilities mania is non verbal and can't operate a computer. you've seen a lot of physical regression. She uses a walker to get around. She walked at school in the corridors and in the hawaii's and she covered quite a dispense. And it's not a situation where i can set. Okay let's go and walk around the block or something. she's not going to be forced into. Physical activity is not really a reason for it. And regarding the academic skills it's a whole year that she's missing only says that home learning was becoming counter-productive. I just decided you know what this is. Not worth ahead by the amount of stress it causes not only to have to the rest of the family in and she's not really gaining things that we actually stopped any form of online at dissipation in november hopes of a return to lessons for those children who've been stuck at home may have been lifted recently by president. Joe biden one of his first executive orders upon taking office last week. He promised to throw the strength of the federal government behind an effort to reopen schools by april. But it's going to take more than an infusion of federal funds to get kids back into the classroom. It's now nine or ten months since america's classrooms. I closed yet. Less than half of children in america are being offered any kind of in person. Schooling mark johnson is our education correspondent. Even where in person schooling is available. Many parents choose to keep children at home. So in some urban districts for example we're seeing on the twenty to forty percent of children. Take up the offer of in person schooling when it's being made available to them and how does that all compare with other parts of of the rich world wait compares very poorly so almost all european countries fully open their school systems for at least some period since lockdowns first began and during the autumn we saw france belgium. Switzerland keep schools open even while they were the national infection rates. That was some way above any that. America is yet recorded. People's in some parts of europe have had to return to periods of remote. Learning schools in britain for example have not reopened after the christmas. Break but in general these kinds of shutdowns. I've only happened after authorities have existed all the other means their disposal of controlling rising hospital. Admissions and what do you think. The reason is for that difference with america. Well there's an important difference in who is actually making the decisions about whether schools should or should not reopen so in europe these decisions they fall largely to national or regional governments but in america the power has generally been devolved to officials in each of its fourteen thousand school districts so that makes it more difficult to have joined up infection fighting strategy where you make sure with schools at the very last thing that you close in the very first things you open. When contemplating lockdowns these districts in america have had to negotiate with unions and with parents and some of them are coming to about reopening. But don't look especially well reasoned so. We've got research for example from brown university with shows that local infection rates made little difference to whether schools opened all stays closed at the end of the summer. In fact the main factor was local politics so areas. That lean republican. We're much more likely to reopen those that lean democrat. Were much more likely to stay shut. The same research found the schools. Were much more likely to stay. Shut in places had strong teachers unions so given all of that having gone on at a local level. Could anything have been done at a federal level to help in emergency times. I think a lack of trust in federal leadership is one big reason why we are where we are so joined the summer. President trump did push schools to reopen indefinite school. Closures will inflict lasting harm to our nation's children. We must follow the science and get students safely back to school while protecting children teachers staff and family. We have to remember that. There's another the problem. Is that not many people. Believe that he'd grappled with the science or even necessarily that he had kids best interests at heart so this is probably contributed to a situation where local decision makers teachers and parents have retreated to parties positions or or making decisions about school reopening based on their gut. And how much will that change now. That america has a new administration. What should president biden do to help. Kids get back to school in his first days. He has done some of the right things so he says he wants most schools open within his first hundred days and he gave school reopening mentioned in his inauguration speech. We can right wrongs people to work and good jobs. We can teach our children in safe schools. We can overcome the deadly virus. He's promising to find a lot more money to help. Schools reopen that will be especially helpful in rundown urban districts that find it much harder than others to put in place basic measures like masking ventilation air filtration but i think he could be making better use of his bully pulpit to be reiterating the harm. That's being done as a result of school. Closures and underlining the urgency of the situation it's not as if european classrooms stunningly spacious and highly funded. It's more that there's been a more thoughtful debate in those countries about weighing the risks and benefits of getting back to school and about those harms. We've talked on the show. Before about the impact that closures ultimately have on students in the longer run. Are we seeing any evidence of that already in america absolutely so it's not just lost learning though. That's very serious. It's also lost opportunities in life so there's been a twenty nine percent fall in the number of low income. High school is going straight from school to university. That's just one example of the problems we're seeing now and that's in part because teachers aren't around to encourage them to take those chances and of course welfare is a huge worry. There's been steep declines something between twenty and forty percent in the reports of child abuse in several states during the pandemic in part because teachers aren't around to keep an eye on vulnerable kids. I mean there's a lot going on in america right now and there's a lot going on for months but i can't help but think that when we look back at this period a few years from now the fact that the world's richest country was only able to get a minority of children in two classrooms nine months to a year. I think we'll look back on that with a sense of shame. Thanks very much for joining us mark. Thank you part of the schooling. Debate in america has hinged on trust trust that is also at the heart of the country's vaccination push this week checks and balance our sister show on american politics takes a look at how past health crises and nefarious experiments influence. How trusting americans are when it comes to healthcare. Look for checks and balances from your preferred podcast purveyor. Sometimes it can be a challenge to establish where an author ends and they're fiction begins take thriller writer patricia highsmith who is known for her dark calculating and frequently cruel characters and character. Every single thing highsmith ever wrote or wrote about herself is indicative of who she was joan. Schenker is a biographer of highsmith. Who was born hundred years ago this month. She could not have one idea without having its opposite so everything in her books is contradicted. Then she presents a really complex reality books like the talented mr ripley and strangers on a train. She was born nine days after her mother divorced her father so she was born into a contradiction and it allowed her always to say that she was born out of wedlock but still legitimate. And that is high smith. There's always an aura of some kind of illegitimacy hanging around her reading. her novels. Spend watching the many film adaptations insights into her complex psyche. What's fascinating about patricia. Highsmith work is murder was central. But they're not mysteries. You always know who the killer is emily. Bob wrote writes about culture for the economist. She was most interested in the psychology around killing around murder. She was more interested in whether someone felt guilt. Or even more intriguingly if they didn't and the thrill ends up being not piecing together a crime but siding with the criminal most famously. Tom ripley in the talented mr ripley. Who is basically a psychopath. But you end up rooting for him. And so what do you see in her her life in her biography that the might lend itself to that kind of interest in in the dark corners of psychology. Oh yes she was fascinating difficult very prickly and her stories regularly portray love as this fragile illusion and the marriages tend to border on farce. He clearly has very little faith in monogamy or in matrimony. There's little question that all of this came from personal experience. Her mother often would say it was funny that her daughter like the smell of turpentine because that was what she drank when she tried to. Abort her and patricia highsmith once explained in an interview that most murders take place within the family. You mustn't forget that. It's hardly a coincidence. That in strangers on a train. Her first novel published when she was twenty nine hinges on a man's desire to kill his father and tom ripley is an orphan and most of her heroes are loners. And what about the the romantic end of her life. She preferred solitude and saw love as an allusion. So what's interesting about her. Is she preferred men in every way but imbed. She was a fairly veracious lesbian but she didn't seem to have much respect for women she wants. Said i don't see women as leaving the house. This was in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. She complained that feminists were always complaining about something then fascinating that she is actually the author of the very first lesbian story. That had a happy ending. The price of salt was made into a film several years ago as carol which was very good film it doesn't feature murder and it's actually quite romantic. She published it. It's held up as really a beautiful important book. And yet she had a lot of shame about being a lesbian and she insisted that she couldn't be in a relationship living with someone regularly because it undermined her creativity. It sounds like she didn't much care for people even in a way. Yeah it's fair to say that she was not only misanthropic but she was also fairly odious she nursed some prejudices. She was racist. She was fiercely anti-semitic. She believed that the holocaust didn't go far enough in fact she was a really complicated woman and she lashed out at others but was often fairly uncomfortable within herself. So why then. Her work the legend around her been so enduring. Do you think well she captured something. Really unsettling about the human condition and so her books don't of that they're not associated with time and place. There's something timeless about what she's investigating. Her heroes are lonely and immoral and painfully self conscious. Perhaps like highsmith herself and she understood that. The crux of life for all of us is to try to figure out how to bridge the gulf between ourselves and others and also that that often feels impossible. Emily thanks very much for joining us. Yes of course thank you. That's all for this episode of the intelligence. If you like us give us a rating on apple podcasts. And you can subscribe to the economist at dot com slash intelligence offer. The link is in the show notes. See back here tomorrow.

vietnam america mr ripley congress jason palmer national conference center Charlie mccann patricia highsmith highsmith biden administration maimi julius scream china Politburo national party central committee fdic
2285 - Bloomberg Bombs Another Debate & Trump's Coronavirus Incompetence

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

1:18:37 hr | 1 year ago

2285 - Bloomberg Bombs Another Debate & Trump's Coronavirus Incompetence

"You are listening to a Free Berge of majority report with Sam Cedar to support this show and get another fifteen minutes daily program go to Jordi Dot. Fm Please Giardi Rob. It is Wednesday February twenty. Second Two thousand twenty. My Name is Sam Cedar. This is the five time award winning majority report. We are broadcasting live steps from the industrially ravaged Ghana's canal in the heartland of America downtown Brooklyn. Usa on the program. Today South Carolina. Debate a crap show which according to the instals apparently helped Bernie Sanders meanwhile White House and panic mode over the stock market's reaction to corona virus. Meanwhile everyone else a little bit more concerned about the White House failure to respond to the actual virus polls show Bernie and Biden now tied in Texas. That is Joe. Biden's second firewall bulls also show sanders leads amongst African Americans which was Biden's first firewall Amazon. Doing its best to curb mask price gouging in the anticipation of Corona virus hitting the State's Supreme Court. Okays border guards. Shooting children across the border clyburn endorses Biden in South Carolina. Mody starts building detention camps. That should end well five year. One hundred million dollar. Nsa program yielded one serious or even remotely serious investigation. All this and more on Today's Program Ladies and Gentlemen Welcome. I welcome to the show. I headlined this yesterday but did not get to talk about it and I probably will. There's GonNa be a couple of votes that McConnell's taking we're not sure exactly when those votes are scheduled but they're starting to discuss them in the Senate part of operation. Well I mean it's part of the cultural aspect of Of the election. In in the fall you know and and and really part and parcel of the over one hundred and eighty judges. That trump is now placed on the Federal Judiciary. We will begin to see the implications of this go You know for for for decades the other day. I can't remember why was the case that went to the The DC circuit but one of the judges on the three bank panel that I think it was the Medicaid. A work requirements. One of the judges that quashed the work requirements was appointed by Jimmy Carter. So just imagine that but in reverse from these enormous amount of judges that Donald Trump is put on the on the federal judiciary and he still has another year essentially to do it presuming he loses in November. And that's you know that's a big presumption Combatants do have advantages all right. Let's talk a little bit about the debate. We did do a wrap up of the debate which you can find on Youtube. We'll do a little bit more now. We have clips. Obviously from last night it really was a disaster. I should say If you were watching last night You saw me admonish. My son Saul to go to bed. At one point he He's had a little trouble going to bed. As of late. He did go He had some comments about the About the debate that maybe I'll share a little bit later. Oh my God. I can't wait. He thought it was pretty funny. Thought Bernie was older than he thought and he thought he looked like Joe Biden and but then he also got very confused and thought that the the the people The people onstage could actually hear us when we were talking so mistake to make your while. He was punished for that page. One Gay can't is wrong with you. Just a reminder tradition to keep up the AM quickey the AM quickey is available at am quickie Dot Com. Check it out. We have had a what percentage is it a fifty percent bump in a month. Fifty percents bump in In listenership so If you are not one of those people you are making a mistake. people are finding it very very useful particularly in this day and age Keep up on the news it we should have put it in the feed When we were on vacation that was a big mistake on our part but forgive us so here is how this clip number one correct. Michael Bloomberg. I think was probably the biggest loser in this debate. To the extent that there was a loser I would say that it was Michael Bloomberg. I think a lot of people did not win. I don't know that anybody one and in that in that situation you're in like a four corner situation basketball and the person in the lead wins and I think that's why you know some the polls right after the debate showed Bernie got the advantage there. Because I think on some level it's like people went in and he was obviously a leading in the polls and I think people came out and said there Diab- no reason to believe that anything's different and I think that's probably what happened but Bloomberg. I would be surprised if he doesn't lose another couple of points because of this debate he. I mean the first debate that he was in Really hurt him bad and it was a couple of moments. So what do you do if you know that you did horribly in the first debate? But you want to sort of make. It seem like these things happen. Just obliga- isn't that a big deal right. It's not a big deal. We've all been in the situation where something embarrassing happens near embarrassed about something and you have two ways of responding you can respond defensively and signal to people that you're defensive about it and maybe there is some truth there or something. Maybe that's a problem or you can respond confidently and Slough it off and maybe make even a joke at your own expense. Which which signals to people like he's not bothered by this well Bloomberg really tried to do the latter but he ended up doing the former and this is important here Matt is going to scroll through to where it is in the debate. Now this is an hour into the debate and Michael Bloomberg has asked the question about redlining but he wants to know that he was in no way embarrassed by last week's debate performance in this fair Bloomberg. Please we were going to ask you about this. I want to give you a chance to respond. Because in addition to what Senator Warren set on twitter. She called you a liar and borderline racist because of what you said about red line. Yes she's I'm sorry. But unfortunately she's misinformed on red lighting. You can go back and look at the record. I fought against it before eight the crisis during await and after that redlining is not the problem with the mortgage market but it was a problem for the communities where it was done and we stopped that. Let me also say because just. It's since why have the floor for a second that? I really am surprised that all of these my fellow contestants up here I guess would be the right word for it given. Nobody pays attention to the clock. I'm surprised they show up because I would have thought after I did such a good job in beating last week that they'd be a little bit afraid to do that. Let me just say when you're talking about affordable housing folks? Listen all right. This is the you know we try and stick to politics here. I don't like to give personal advice about stuff certainly not financial advice and but I do understand this dynamic and if you want to communicate to people that you're not defensive about something if you meant to say at the beginning of seeing them again for the first time and you forget don't wait to bring up out of nowhere because then it makes it seem like yes. In fact you've spent fifty percent of this debate waiting for a moment to pretend like you're just casually remarking about to spontaneously say now an Ala into the mark of the debate that we are presently in that now that you're discussing another horrific thing that I've said and done by career we've already done. I guess two of those but it's not true. I didn't say that black people shouldn't have houses but I did so great last time to to take just pop that Joe. Koff you gotTa let it go. Don't WanNA force a round peg into a square hole. If you find yourself I mean this is like he had an audience. That asked me a question about a `bout gun violence please. And then it goes like this. Not a racist. Incidentally WanNa make that clear. It's goes like this. You ask for the question about gun violence and I go okay. We'll get to that. What about blaming the financial crisis on Wall Street but on poor people? Boy I gotTa tell you weather have it means day's isn't Eh really. What did he mean by contestant because no one's following the clock in reality shows break the clock to you just like black people break mortgage agreements? Which is why we had. Oh I should have said that. I'm I guess. I hope you will miss informed about what I just said for some rain. Doing a great debate every candidate besides Berry last night that it'd be a good idea or at least Biden and Bloomberg to complain about how everyone's over talking right right right. Winey Biden is the best exactly complaining right. Just make fun of me. Mr Trump is spoken against me. Do I get extra points? They want to speak to the manager. If Bloomberg does it drop at least ten points after this debate we will definitively know that. The debates don't matter debates. Don't matter that much I mean he. The last one seriously seriously damaged ten points. I mean I was twenty. I mean that one was bad. I don't know if it was ten actual points but it but you know his trajectory went from like strayed almost straight up to basically like almost straight down. I guess especially for someone like Him who is living in his own as he was so susceptible to that because there was no there was there was no foundation for his rise. Well as Tony. Karen said Bloomberg's best moment was last night right the ad for his campaign right. That's right exactly that's also first off. Let me just say this about the debate? Debate was was bad. The the the questionnaires were really bad. You know and the there was a time where the League of Women Voters sponsored all the debates and they would have more or less the same the same moderators a small group of them and Some of them were were were decent. Some of them were problematic but at least on some level they could create a narrative over the course of the debate. And because they weren't so commodified wasn't such a desire to go after stuff that was sort of meaningless but might be more I don't know of the moment and this is I mean you know. I don't expect candidate to complain about those things because it comes off poorly but really. This is such a disservice. The idea that these things are commodified in this fashion the DNC. Rnc can do what they want. I guess I mean will the DNC to can do what they want but what they really should do is make a concerted effort to Because they can't control the outcome of these things. It's already been clear right like they tried to do it during the two thousand sixteen election and it didn't work it didn't cut in the favor that they thought it would. They don't have the ability to anticipate or predict the implications of these things. So just give it. To an organization that is nonpartisan put in a list of moderators. That you want. The Republicans can put on a list of moderators. They want and you randomly pick from them or something like that. There's a way to do this where it is not commodified. You can let the different networks the broadcast rights but it's not should not be a commercial for their own. You know like cross promotion of their shows. It is just get people in there who can do the job. Well as opposed to like trying to you know pump your evening news thing like calling me vision that sounds icon. In fact I think when the League of women voters did I mean I remember. It was like McNeil Lear. Who would do a Lotta has always on? Pbs on Earth Right. I can't quite remember but nevertheless you can put it on if let all the networks decide if they want to carry it or not and if they want to bid for the rights let them bid for the rights. But you don't get control over the backdrop you don't get control over the moderators who street control over that. Yeah it should be for public. I mean this theoretically the public service we got shut down on twitch last night I mean. I don't really care that much about it but we anticipated that we probably might but it's ridiculous. It's totally fair use. What we're doing. I agree particularly because it's not just criticizing the politicians. It's also criticizing the way this stuff is cover. That's important for democracy as well and it's important that they don't have a say over people doing that. We'll figure out another way of doing it. I guess Hassan he does like a seat some tempests sink thing figure that out but hey folks sustainable sneakers. I've noticed this across the board. 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There's a lot of like oh read about like pick up some quick history books you know. Just some of the key takeaways norm some of the some of the stuff like the business stuff. Like I always like. I don't know anything about business and there are some concepts that I've picked up through this stuff that has been helpful. Just like even the eighty twenty rule. I didn't know anything about that. You don't WanNa put you know eighty percent of your resources into something. That's only going to give you twenty percent returns. You want to do the reverse and mostly eighty percent of the returns comes from twenty percent of your efforts but now I'm onto this whole thing where it's like and I wish I knew this They probably didn't have a fourteen years ago but they have all these titles in parenting and you can read six of these things in an hour. Essentially or listen to them And because you know I went through. I don't know twenty parenting books and you get to the end of it and you're like this was a waste through what having the kids period No I I may still do it like I will not sit down and read an entire parenting book. But I'll listen to three different parenting books. If it takes me half an hour takes me thirty five minutes. You Bet you could use any tips. You can get with blink. You get unlimited access to read or listen to their entire massive library of condensed nonfiction books all for one low price and for a limited time. Blink is has a special offer for our audience. Go TO BLINK DOT COM slash. Majority report you try it for free for seven days and then you save twenty five percent off your new subscription. That's blinking B. L. I. N. K. I. S. T. dot com slash. Majority report to start your Free Seven-day trial and save twenty five percent. They got that. That book by Jared Diamond Turning points for nations in crisis that seems particularly relevant right. Now you really interesting book future of capitalism by Paul Collier I don't think it's a Marxist critique all yours is a development economist that'll be interesting Yep And maybe not necessarily something you want to read the whole thing or maybe you listen to that for ten twelve minutes and you say I'm GonNa read the whole book. That's what I was going to say. Lancaster is actually also a great way to preview it or not. You really have to like you know those great intro. I'm GONNA read the rest sign up. Now at blinking dot com slash majority report blankets dot com slash. Majori all right. Let's get back into the debate here. and Go over some of the things that we are We could talk about also Let's do the Let's do the debate and then we're GONNA get into it. I mean the big story. I think is Corona virus and that. I think you know we said this in the wrap up last night But I still believe that the there was a big opportunity for the Democratic presidential candidates last night to to leverage corona virus and. I think like it actually could have been affected for all of them because one for I think sixty percent of the electorate at least the idea and and people are predicting this now that we're going to have travel restrictions in this country. I don't think they're going to be like you can't go out of your house or but I think it's quite possible that the it may impact the domestic flights at certain times. I mean who knows and I don't think we're going to have like a you know a huge rash of deaths but I think like they want to keep it under control because it's not as bad as the the flu but it's in terms of its ability to kill people at this point but we also have an entire system that tries to mitigate what happens with the flu right like we have flu vaccinations. We have hospitals that are prepared to deal with kids coming in with the flu and it still kills a ton of people killing people and so and regardless of whether it turns into anything or not. The concern in anxiety is real. My kids have been coming home from school for weeks concerned about the corona virus which means that there are other parents out there who are concerned about the corona virus because the kids are not reading as far as I know you know the international section in the newspaper and This would have been an opportunity for any of these candidates to go up there and show like I'm completely competent. Talk about a kitchen table Issue this is one it also would bring about the fact that one of the things that really Donald Trump has escaped in his presidency because many of the competencies that throughout the administration are things that are obscured to people who aren't in government and things that you know we will feel the impact of the incompetence for years to come years and years to come but we won't necessarily be able to draw a direct line to it but there are times where there are crises where there are events western Japan on on twitter. friend who called in during Fukushima reminded me there are no natural disasters. There are only things that happen in nature. That man is not prepared to deal with. I think that was the point he was saying. And and this is an instance where Donald Trump has not had to face a crisis of this sort and it is one that is like coming down the pike slowly and there is political value to this. There's actually also material value because you put political pressure onto the White House and they're going to have to respond and actually start to do stuff because this is going to be a problem for us and and so the I think the they missed an opportunity in. We'll talk about Chuck Schumer. Apparently yesterday was already in the Senate and had You know was outlining list that they wanted everybody in the Senate to start to push to get the administration to To ramp back up because they've done a lot of cuts. We'll talk about the specifics of that. But you don't want people to vote out of fear out of fear. Yeah exactly I think the idea that this is you know. We have not had an opportunity. People go out there and they say Donald Trump is incompetent and but but as a as a as a citizen of the country. You some people. I think. Experience Donald Trump's malignancy insofar as you know you're a person of color and you know Jeff sessions says to the The police departments around the country. Like hey don't worry about a guys we're not GONNA we're not gonNA come knockin or You know if you're an immigrant Or if I mean there's a whole host of folks who are directly implicated by his malignancy but in terms of incompetency we've only been told about his incompetency right. There's only acting cabinet members. We don't see anybody but it's all theoretical. This is where the rubber meets the road. And this is why would will have salience and this is why. They're there so freaked out about it in the White House in pretending that it's not happening. Well we saw it in Puerto Rico but a lot of people apparently don't care don't Care Puerto Rico. Don't care exactly. And that's why they're response to what was happening in Texas. Was you know they put more emphasis in it? I think what we saw in Puerto. Rico was one part incompetence in part malignancy like. I think that there was just like we're GONNA PUNISH THE PUERTO RICO. I would say more than yeah malignancy but I. I think it's a big problem and don't want this to become. I don't want this virus to spread. Obviously but I think that there's been a certain. I think part of the reason that trump is doing well in terms of his polling numbers that for a fair amount of people. They're starting to conform to the idea that he's actually just you know just normal president and that doesn't match with the Yuji amount of melodrama around him so something like this could undercut that. Yeah absolutely absolutely In fact let's do this. We don't need to do the debate in order right. We can do some of the corona. Let's go to the debate. And then we'll come back to the corona virus stuff In the debate like I say Michael Bloomberg was the biggest loser at one point he. He is asked about China now. Michael Bloomberg has an enormous investment in China enormous investment. I mean in in ways that like I don't think we can even imagine and The Corona virus is bringing up an issue. And we'll talk about it in in a in a bit of you know we're going to have right now there's a list that the CDC's has I think it is one hundred fifty antibiotics prescription medications etc etc. That they are concerned. We will not be able to have access to because the corona virus will have shut down production and this is a big concern of a lot of people that not only like that. You Know Matt. Stoler is very good on this that we have outsourced so much of our production to China that we are very very Reliant on them doing things that are in our interests when sometimes they may not be able to do that and so here is Mike. Bloomberg being asked a question here you said that President Xi Jinping of China is not a dictator and that he is responsive to his constituents and the US must cooperate with Beijing. How far does that go? Would you allow Chinese firms to build critical? Us infrastructure. No I would not and I think the Chinese government has not been opened their press. Freedom press does not exist there they human rights record is abominable and we should make a fuss which we've been doing. I suppose make no mistake about it. We have to deal with China. If we're ever going to solve the climate crisis we have to deal with them. Because our economies are inextricably linked we would be able to sell by the products that we need and in terms of whether he's a dictator he does serve at the behest of the politburo their group of people. But there's no question. He has an enormous amount of power. He but he does play constituency. You can negotiate with him. That's exactly what we have to do. Now there's a story in the intercept right now by a woman named Linda Hong Fincher. We've had on the show and she talks about the stories. About what the Bloomberg would have limited partners threatened her face. Szekely just she. It wasn't even. Her husband was reported for Bloomberg. He reported the series on how the pinks family had enriched themselves essentially they got credible death threats and this was when the a period of time where it was. You know real death threats. A British businessmen had just been poisoned by the wife of a senior politician. Read the article the context so she tweeted out an October. Two thousand twelve now. The time has gone public about the Chinese government. Pressure can emit that. We've gotten death threats. After the Bloomberg Story on Xi Jinping within hours of my tweet the original Maya plot replies to questions of Bloomberg manager called my husband and said get your wife to delete her tweets immediately and anyways it it it goes from there. We can't summarize all but the point is is that Bloomberg did not have the back of their journalists and this family getting threats for doing this reporting I'll be there they help their Their Holdings are so huge in China. They are so afraid of offending the Chinese government that their lawyers were attacking this family and the Bloomberg then the killing this story and basically said if we run it will be. We'll be kicked out of the country. So folks can check that out the interest. So you've got Michael Bloomberg here now this concept. He said this before that they have a constituency. The idea that there is any leader of any country. Like if you're a king guess what you have a constituency you have to deal with the Dukes or you gotta deal with the you know the king of the North or whatever it is it does. It's like this because it does show in general that it is actually kind of dumb to speak about singular heads of state in general that is almost never the case like even North Korea. You're always talking about more a complex systems so if he was just making a public service point of like. Wait a second guys. That's actually not how China works and we need to be smart about it. That will be valid. But the they're not autocratic year they have a polit bureau manages democracy is optional but which I think is quite optional. He is conflating. A democracy with having a constituency right in every single leader has a constituency. It may be just the billionaires. It may be just the people who have all the military or it could actually be like the people who voted for them democracy. Trying to imply he said this before this is not the first time he said this and ZANU public opinion polling. He's equating that as well. And that's very Bloomberg in. That's when you look at the Chinese model will look. I mean this is actually what the Chinese will perform this. Ino- were incredibly responsive if you come out and you say there's a problem with garbage pickup here or something like this. We got you bright as long as it's not your you're actually looking for any type of power. We're just trying to provide you with services so that you do not kick us out of out of power if you get to the point where you could so Bloomberg goes on gets away with that because of how credulous the CBS moderators are. But now. But what what what you will not get away with. Is saying exactly what Barack Obama said that there are some countries who are autocratic who have achieved some Success in certain areas of serving their public like for instance. You could say that. They're good with the garbage pickup but the the CBS will not let Bernie Sanders. Get Away with anything like that. Even though they've just let Michael Bloomberg get away with the idea that China because Xi Jinping has a constituency these. He's not a dictator topic Senator Sanders. It's on it's in the same same sir. You've praised the Chinese Communist Party for lifting more people out of extreme poverty than any other country. You also have a track record of expressing sympathy for socialist governments in Cuba and in Nicaragua. Can Americans trust that? A democratic socialist president will not give Authoritarians a free pass have opposed authoritarianism. All over the world and I was really amazed at what Mayor Bloomberg said a moment ago. He said that the Chinese government is responsive to the Politburo but who the hell is the polit bureau responsive to who elects Bala pure you got a real dictatorship there of course you have a dictatorship in Cuba. What I said is what Barack Obama said in terms of Cuba. Cuba made progress on education. Yes I think really bad to Barack Obama saying is they made progress on. Education is making US healthcare. That was Barack Obama Ronco occasionally. It might be good idea to be honest about American foreign policy and that includes the fact that America has overthrown governments all over the world in Chile in Guatemala in Iran and when dictatorships whether it is the Chinese or the Cubans do something good. You don't have trae loveless that also that clip also not only. Did it point out that you are asking me a question about about being sympathetic to autocratic leaders in you? Just let that dude get away with talking about the largest dictatorship in the world as if it was a responsive democracy. Because there's a polit bureau also featured Pete Buddha ges like sort of verbal tic that he had the whole evening where he was talking almost like as if people to judge was in a separate debate in a separate temporal plane that would sometimes like the streams would cross. And you would hear him talking. No one was paying attention. And he thought that he was being statesmanlike and he couldn't really get there was like a TV show. Where the first time through events a character is like Ver- speaking very forcefully and then you look back on it and actually he wasn't saying anything at all he was just imagining he was saying. Exactly right. It's one of those things like this is what I would have said in that moment and so that that was. You got the whole gist. And of course they're sanders again. Doing something that you you know I think by now. It's not as sort of shocking. I remember in two thousand sixteen when he did that in a debate with Hillary Clinton where he actually the words like we intervened in countries and was wrong. Like that was shocking. Then and now. It's a sort of nobody to even pull called and Yahoo reaction or assist. That's historical what's also messed up about that moment. Though was they only asked the Jews about Israel and then just through in Warren for like To make it seem like we're GonNa this is like I mean. Israel is a pretty significant issue for all the candidates. Go on my valley look for thirty seconds regardless of Bernie's got a calibrate a lot of things and I. I think they're actually overall doing a decent job. But these are just stoorikhel. They're trying to dislodge governments in Venezuela Nicaragua Cuba right now and really your opinions on them are irrelevant to US interference which is extraordinarily aggressive particularly under trump and POMPEII. Oh and so. It's not just the history lessons usually important but it's like when people like Buddha judge are posturing and saying we don't first of all we don't want to talk about the Cold War. We'll get to that it's offensive but they're talking about regime change and coup mongering right the second. Yeah I mean they brought a guy in from Venezuela state of the Union address and everybody in the room. Democrats Republicans alike addressed. The guy is president and basically they're the only people who do nobody in Venezuela refers to that dude. Is the president and in Nicaragua. You know those demonstrations which are done in two thousand eighteen absolutely had a significant. Us role. Does that mean that? Ortega you know I it's always the same dynamic and the one thing I will add. That is actually pretty interesting. That like if you're going to give if we're going to go and there's legitimate criticisms of both but like I would err on the side of cutting a break for an eleven million person island nation states that resisted. Us economic warfare assassinations economic terrorism to vision in invasion to today and gave people healthcare literacy and also helped end apartheid and liberate Angola. I would actually air a little bit more softly for them more. So than like you know the largest states Capitalist country or neoliberalism Chinese characters. The moderators are absolutely unfair in equating. Cuba to China. There's no question about it also like okay. I know maybe we don't need a history lesson as part of the debate. But if he wanted to Bernie could bring up. Some of the terrible atrocities committed by say the Somoza dictatorship like the worst things that you can think of raping children things of that nature so moving on the you know so we have Bloomberg. I exposing that he's an on a metron and cannot deliver a joke and doesn't understand the point of the joke then we had Bloomberg showing. I mean it's almost as if he's showing every aspect of his of what is problematic about his candidacy and he's doing it one step at a time and so we had him. We showed his wealth in his investment. In China. How how conflicted he is in terms of assessing what China is and therefore would be equally conflicted in terms of curbing things like. Hey you put a million to three million people in concentration camps because they're Muslims etc etc. Now we're going to see what is problematic about Mike Bloomberg as an oligarch in this country no longer conflicted with international things which is very similar. Donald Trump here. He is going to expose why he's conflicted in this country where he accidentally reminds people. He has bought literally all his support in Congress. Let's just go on the record. They talk about forty Democrats. Twenty WanNA positive. I should say this is in response to the fact that Elizabeth Warren pointed out that Michael Bloomberg funded multiple Republican senators through the Senate to the Republicans through all the money he gave to people like Pat. Toomey he gave money. I don't think she brought this up to Snyder in Michigan Lindsey Graham etc Etcetera Snyder. After I believe I believe Noah guess it would be before Flint but there was before Flint. But it was it was it was after he had already a propagated the city manager rule but he basically that money helped Snyder go onto poison. Hundreds if not thousands of people let. Let's just go on the record. They Talk About Forty Democrats twenty one of those with people that I spent a hundred million dollars to help elect the all of the new Democrats that came in put Nancy Pelosi in charge and gave the Congress the ability to control this president. I I got them you talk. I bought him. What gives you that again. I got them really staying. Quiet parts out loud exactly. How don't remind everybody? I bought the politicians darn it. It gave the Congress the ability to control this president. I I got them. Come extremely Simpson's level stuff here exactly exactly and you know what they're doing right now only moment of self awareness in the debate. I'll tell you what they're doing right now to Bloomberg headquarters. They are writing a joke about like him buying and he's going to wait until like three or four weeks from now in spring and on everybody remember that time. I going to remind you again about how badly I did in the debate. So there it is. That was Michael. Bloomberg's one of the problems with Michael Bloomberg being an oligarch now next up Michael Bloomberg. I mean honestly it's amazing how multidimensional problematic Michael Bloomberg. He's a target rich environment. Let's just go through this one more time here. Okay can't tell. Joke is horribly defensive. That's fine he's can't you can't you can't really campaign. He defends dictator in China. Because he's got so much holdings there that he doesn't want to get on the wrong side of them he accidently claims that he bought Congress because he's he's literally paid for so many of his endorsements and whatnot in trying to defend the fact that he also bought the the Senate for the Republicans. And now let's move into his Treatment of women who work for him and his use of NDA and his money again to escape any count ability result. I got my first job is special education teacher. I loved that job and by the end of the first year. I was visibly pregnant. The principal wished me luck and gave my job to someone else. Pregnancy discrimination you bet but I was twenty one years old. I didn't have a union to protect me. I didn't have any federal law on my side so I packed my stuff and I went home. At least I didn't have a boss who said to me. Kill it the way that Mayor Bloomberg never have said to one of them on Greg. Employees people want a chance to hear people want a chance to Hellyer. Fry the women who said that. The record of shoes a teacher in New York City. She would never have had that problem. We treated our teachers. The right way and the unions will tell you exactly that positive one second just on that one point go into my tweets please because I re tweeted a writer from that right wing Rag. I mean. Excuse me that. Left-wing RAG The New York Times who has been writing on schools. Who New York? Times reporters do not generally Take these positions here there. It's right there Elisa Shapiro and she tweeted out so Bloomberg was in an all out war with the Teachers Union in New York City for years. If you call them as Bloomberg suggested you will get quite an earful so lying about that but which is a prime officia argument that he's a liar but continue mayor. Bloomberg editor warned. This phrase let us have. The women have an opportunity to speak the Bloomberg corporations and Mayor Bloomberg himself have been accused of discrimination. They are bound by nondisclosures so that they cannot speak if he says there is nothing to hide here than sign of Berlin Kit. Release and let those women's account. He's the way. Tell my story without thank you. I ended up to billionaire. Thank God we have a number of issues disgusting. I wanted to give the mayor and opportunity to respond because she has raised concerns about women in your workplace at the last debate. You said some of your female employees might not have liked some of your jokes to these women. Take your jokes wrong or were you wrong to make the jokes probably wrong to make jokes. I don't remember what they were so I assume I if it bothered them. I was wrong. I Apologize. I'm sorry for that but what happened here is we went back forty years. We only find three cases. We'll have two convenient. They were uncomfortable. We only found three doing anything other than just making commenter to and what the senator did suggest was that we release these women from the nondisclosure agreement. I did that two days later. And My company has said we will not use nondisclosure agreements. Ever again the senator has got it and I don't know what else she wants us to do. I'll be with Allah wing exactly what she asked. I don't rumble is with this. Senator enough is never enough for what I'm going to start focusing of things. We just cannot continues right into and can't even get through his probably made the mistake of it and by my company renouncing using these. We probably not nominated. We'll be re-litigating this all year long pause it like this has this clip also has everything in it. There's Michael Bloomberg trying to defend himself and can't help but like basically say we gonNA listen to this. Sounds like my ex-wife remember the Old Bush? Bill joke it ends with the punchline is killing baby this this is just another part of the complaint of one of the complaints. That was in the. I don't know how they got hold of this baby. They somehow is released. When Bloomberg noticed garrison standing nearby he asked. Why didn't they ask you to be in the picture? I guess they saw your face. He said to one of these employees sick burn got her the graph above. Oh Yeah and here. It is okay and so a continuing. His pension for ridiculing recently married women into deployed Bloomberg asked. The plaintiff house married life. You married plane responded that her marriage was great and was going to be better in a few months that she was pregnant and the baby was due the following September. He responded to her. Kill it and plaintiff ass Bloomberg to repeat himself and again he said kill it and muttered great number sixteen suggesting plaintiff his unhappiness that sixteen women in the company had maternity related stat and just the source of the Washington Post interviewed a former Bloomberg employee David zones in Zelinger. Who said he witnessed the conversation with a saleswoman zone said He was not he had not previously. Who has not previously spoken about? The matter said Bloomberg's behavior toward the woman was outrageous. I understood why she took offence in case you need verification. Because he's just lying about that. He's totally line but let's go back so he's dropped ball there and then people to judge has a comment that is actually like decent like we're going to be litigating. This throughout the entire next general campaign may be true or not again he manages to Sir sorta sound like somebody just like dropped in a random pete. Buddha Jude Sound Michigan watching at home. Yeah exactly that. When he spoke last night in the that Matt was doing drops you get nominated. We'll be re-litigating this all year senator warned that is a very serious charge that you leveled at the mayor. Yes older woman to get an abortion. What evidence do you have of that? Her own words and Mayor Bloomberg could you respond to this a never set it period end of story. What had a Gora cly never said it when it was accused when I was accused of doing it. We couldn't figure out what she was talking about right now. He's sorry if she heard what she thought she her husband. I didn't take any pleasure in that. And we've just I want her is to do a release of all people who have doing that senators. Who ever again to get to the issue. So great against trump when they talk about abortion writings and like. I would never say that you know. There's some people that are still literalist idiots. Think that trump won't do that. He'll he'll have a field day with all this stuff bloomberg we got one more Bloomberg Clip. And then we'll get to that we'll get to that one one more. Bloomberg clip to round out his multi dimensional problems that he has candidate we have gone through his conflict of interests with China and his inability to respond truthfully about China because of all his holdings there. That's where his billionaire status becomes a conflict. We've seen that. Obviously with Donald Trump. We went through his being an oligarch where he basically admits and then quickly changes his words. He's using that. He's bought a bunch of Congress people. We've gone through the point where he is shown incredible disdain for women even in the context of claiming that he didn't show any disdain for women he did shows disdain for a woman bringing it up again. There's no pleasing these people. There's no pleasing the lady. Thusday you guys have the same hormone came unglued gives me and then of course you know. We showed his inability to actually be a campaigner. And you know even deliver a some self-effacing joke well here is Mike Bloomberg and they've actually cut this clip as a wave showing that he has sensitivity to the experience of African Americans in this country and yet he's totally woke. Is the one thing that Michael Bloomberg cannot possibly imagine is that his billions of dollars worked a function of him right that his position and station in life that there were no. You know the doors that were not shut on him. Because of just how he was positioned they don't exist and it takes takes all the effort. He can muster to concede that maybe things are a little bit more difficult. There would have been difficult. Had he been black? Wait a second. I know that if I were black my success would have been a lot harder to achieve and I know a lot of black people that if they were white. It would've been a lot easier for them. That's just a fact and we've got to do something about it then rather just demagogue about it. I love how he says like. He gets his big. The big concessions he has is that I understand. My success would have been harder to achieve. I would have been the owner of bt. I was black. I mean the the idea that the these just statistically speaking the chances of becoming a billionaire if Michael Bloomberg was particularly his age Version of black like me starring Mayor Bloomberg. I think it'll be excellent and making his money on Wall Street Services I think is highly highly dooby also lied about the positions. Were Unread Lennon earlier? And he continued his lie about What his position on. Stop and Frisk that which he will continue to do. And this again I I will plug Adolf read though this is a big part of his critique of all of these discursive methodologies because they basically are like look if you can be trained to check your privilege or whatever else all this other rhetorical maneuvering you can use that to barrel forward with the same policy set. And that's exactly what he's doing. Well he is from a lot of. Yeah that's what they're all doing because it's just too discursive agreed course because it just the discursive you know. It's just a discursive method. Do we want to go into the stop? And Frisk law now. I'm sure let's do that as long as we're doing. Our Bloomberg swing here is Michael Bloomberg. He's talking about stop and Frisk claiming that this is done in the past voice right which is like it was there and then it metastasized got out of hand like something some you know like the invisible hand of the of the police force was driving this and then when I saw it was getting out of Control. I I tried to control it as much as I could. It was like riding the tiger. I WanNa ask me about a question that impacts the black and Brown community. You've apologized for stopping. I repeatedly what exactly are you apologizing for we let it get out of control and when I realized that I cut back by ninety five percent and I've apologized and ask for forgiveness. I've met with black leaders to try to get an understanding of how I can better positioned myself and what I should have done and what I should do next time but let me tell you. I have been working very hard. We've improved the school system for black and Brown got us. Subscription to safety box Ari Melber head on the woman who ruled on. This is the judge who heard the case that stopped. Stop and Frisk. And let's hear her perspective. She's now retired and this was before the debate. By the way she was responding to previous time he lied a retired federal judge did Mike Bloomberg decide unilaterally. It sounds like this has gotten out of hand. We better pull this back. I'll say this whether whether you do or not as a as a former judge mayor. Giuliani had a tough policy. That was controversial on predominately black neighborhoods in New York and Mayor. Bloomberg came in and said let's make it even harsher to the point that it was ruled by you unconstitutional. That's true and there was a second half to your question you said. What did people say last night? That was wrong. Well Mayor Bloomberg said when I realized that it was bad toward the end I ended. It dropped ninety five percent. That is not accurate in the last two years or so it began to drop dramatically dropped sixty seven percent not ninety five but it wasn't because he realized heading to Pippin that was wrong. It's because of the court rulings. That's what happened ruin. Joe Biden said out of the Obama Administration it. I thought you stopped Joe Biden correct or not. Of course he's not you got just had. I was going to say that Vice President Biden was lucky on your courtroom and said that the Obama Administration appointed a federal monitor totally wrong. I appointed a federal monitor in August of two thousand thirteen. Who didn't take office for ten months because Mayor Bloomberg insists that I'm trying to appeal my ruling and getting it over simply put Joe Biden in. Your view took credit for something. The judge is actually did. That's what you call like. What is it you you get the strike and even though that's the split the spare rather and you got one pin over here one pin over here and you just the ball rolls and bounces off of both houses guy being in the gavel. That's right that was the guy who stopped at all I started with. I mean Bloomberg Horrible Liar Biden. Horrible Liar and we didn't even have time to get into Biden talking about him getting arrested in South Africa or something. Hey got talked to Mbeki. I was there but I just I want. I want to really keep emphasizing. The Joe Biden's lies are terrible in their agreed. And they're like Hillary Clinton's lies there. There is something qualitatively different. We get to in the realm of Bloomberg where he is the personal conduit of authoritarianism and stop and Frisk is literally an apartheid style policy. It's not hyperbole and I. It's not like a bad thing where he sort of put himself in position that maybe somebody else told them the story. And he's like yeah. That was me thing like I don't know versus Bloomberg is lying. I'm lying about In a in a completely verifiable manner banking on the fact that my money and propaganda will overwhelm people telling the truth. Yeah doing trump shit. Yep So there it is. I mean those are the precision different elements of Bloomberg. That any one of them. I think would be enough to depress enough. Democratic voters in general election two causes loss. And that's why I mean. The fact is after two debates literally. I don't know how many how much time did did Bloomburg speak in those two debates combined maybe twenty five minutes. Let's say twenty five minutes of Exposure Mike Bloomberg gets versus the hours. Maybe days MINU probably you weeks. I mean this continuous loop of thirty second. Ads probably could could amount to a full week or two or three or even a month. He spent over three hundred fifty million dollars on ads and thirty minutes of actually opening his mouth and addressing. What's going on has sunk? The value of that money I I think you should be able to run for office unless you go into a debate but I don't know how you'd ever make them. How much twenty six minutes. Somebody's gotTA count. How MUCH THE AD? Time that he bought and sort of calculate like it's amazing. It's amazing what happens and this is. This is a very very positive thing. Not just for the Democratic Party Not just for America but for for democracy across the world on some level because it shows that there is a limitation to what you can do with money now he's particularly egregious guy who You know but there is the the irony is is that his superpower right which is has sixty five billion dollars is also is his Kryptonite because he has been that sixty five billion dollars has kept him in such a cocoon that he has absolutely no ability to understand why he is such a liability. Yeah I like I mean. Call me naive but I really thought that much money would be able to afford like the best coaches in the world and the best like you need to know that you have a problem and the problem with that money. Is that everyone around. You does it. Says like you've got no problems boss. GonNa Save Marriage Dot stats in ninety percent of it and I think ten percent of it is is like. I think these debates are when you watch Nba Game. You know that you can't do that when you watch this. Especially if you do we do. We're like can figure that out and you don't realize that all of these people. This is a really intense process. Right and I I you know. He's coming in with a typical arrogance. And it's like especially when you're completely out of touch billionaire oligarch but you also have campaigned for over a decade okay. The last ten years all you've been doing is going to Davos and sitting with read Sakaria Mainland. How would you change education mayor Bloomberg and all of a sudden Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders in your face and the moderators have to at least pretend to ask you about your any number of abominable positions? You're totally not ready. And you can't be claiming he could hire the best coaches in the world and look trump does first of all. He's an entertainer first and foremost and he weird like he has higher emotional intelligence. Like I don't mean that as a valujet it's also. He knows how to work the room. He has political skills that Bloomberg lags. That's true but also remember like the debates like the the advantage that trump had in the debates was he would say like I'm going to build a wall and then Jeb Bush or Marco Rubio will come and I'm going to build a wall that's two feet higher. Nobody hears that was really fundamentally different from you know regardless of whether you think the Democratic Party uphold these principles. Everything that we're talking about are theoretically principles of the Democratic Party. I'm also like instincts like I don't know how the will look. We know that you have to pay a huge amount of money to be in that audience. Okay so even if Bloomberg had nothing else to do with it. Apparently the tickets to get into that room. If I'm reading Lifan correctly I mean tell me whether or not that's right I read. I've heard that that has been the case in most of these rights but it does feel like they. It feels like the room is pretty nice to Bloomberg. Yeah there was an amazing clip going around last night of trump getting booed vigorously at a Republican debate and trump. Doing frankly with Bernie. Maybe she do at a certain point being like looks like the room stacked against me but sorry folks telling the truth. That's the difference. Limburg is paying for the room to be stacked in the metaphorical sense. Trump had no problem going out there and working broader electorate and which is another reason that people coming out with this scam that Bloomberg could be trump are the most just either delusional or dishonest people in the entirety of politics right now or or really well compensated employees. I'm hearing so employees. Some of these anecdotes have to be real like like. I saw a tweet. The Day of women said Canvasser came through her house. She said. Sorry we're Bernie Household Canvasser said. Oh Yeah me too. Absolutely have a good one. How much do you think? How much do you think the team that came up with these hats made total just coming up with the design for this not a socialist and bringing the by how about a little flag in the tag respect the whole world is take other? They all not a socialist bringing the boss that is just like I mean. 'cause we all know how much Americans love their bosses? Did you bother focus grouping this? They couldn't have like who their right mind would broadcast their love of bootlegging to the world. They'RE GONNA they. They said to Bloomberg this is a message directly to trump. You're the boss. And he's like I love it. I love it. How much of the hats seventy five dollars a hat? Wow that's seems normal okay. So no no no more expensive than out of mill. Exactly Banana Michael. How much am I really getting? I can't believe how cheap this is dollars. You I I knew I should have gone with you. Guys you were right. You could get the best deals of Americans around here complaining about costs. You could get a basic book APP for seventy five dollars. What about a wine is unbelievable? The only boss I want to bring in his Bruce Springsteen by the way needs to endorse Bernie young young. All right. Let's take a quick break Headed to the fun half when we come back we get a little bit more on the debate. But we're going to talk a lot about Corona virus because I think there is Well one I think it's relevant thing to talk about but from a political standpoint terms of pointing out something that could be extremely significant in this election extremely significant in something that could be a big opportunity for Democrats both to you know show that they're competent to the American public and to actually get the the trump administration off their ours apparently based upon. I think the pushing that we've seen you know credit where credit's due chuck Schumer Got On this. I think the pressure is now forced the trump administration to respond at the very least. I just don't know that they have the capacity the ability to To do so but we will. We will check that out in a moment a just a reminder. This program relies on your support when you become a member of the majority report not only. Do you support the free show? You get the free show free commercials and then you get the extra content we have. Our members can see our video last night. I don't know if it lives anywhere else right now. We got shut down on twitch got a shut it down on Youtube so if you WanNa see our blow by blow the debate hop on to become a member or if you're a member now check it out. It's on the APP. You can play video right on the APP. We're going to be doing more of that as time goes on so Check that out also just coffee dot co up fair trade coffee tea or chocolate using coupon code majority get ten percent off. Am quickey sign up for it folks. Try it out. I guarantee you if you listen to this show. Am quickey sign up at am. Quickie DOT COM. You've listened to it five days in a row you'll be hooked hooked for life and it's free also don't forget checkout The No Miki show. You can find it at Patriot. Dot Com slash. The No Miki Show and Michael and no Miki are going to be in California super to six days from now cheeses nuts. It's GonNa be fun. Get your tickets. You like alone is going to be there. Just in Jackson. Non Availa huge mega lineup. There will be fun On the latest. Tm BS talked. Benjamin Dixon about Singapore and Mike Bloomberg And the Cable News Tantrum. Richard Wolff explained the Labor theory of value to us and whole bunch more patriots dot com slash. Tm BS in where you get you fast. Amount of extra content is a patron August April third at the north door. Austin Texas live show with Anna. Cass Burien Abby Martin and this Sunday. Check out my twitter timeline. Podcasting with Briana Joey Gray and Daniel Denver. And then we're canvassing in the bay St Jude for. Oh Yeah. He's going to be doing. I think right now. A livestream from Worcester Mass with John Benjamin. On Saturday night in front of a bunch of canvassers burn canvassers in Worcester. It worm town in some mill all MEL building and we'll be going over the What do you call it the South Carolina results? And then I guess to get some tunes there. Oh and I should also say Brendan okay go ahead. That is Jamie. Go ahead time. You know I walked around Worcester recently thing. It helped me understand you a little better. Do you walked around Worcester. What if SAM was a town? Yeah there's some of that sure anyway. This week on the ANTIFA put myself on camera. I had on other fortune formerly of the amazing post punk band wax idols currently a solo artist as well as a writer and kind of their bag. Leftist shit poster on twitter We talked about our canvassing trip to New Hampshire which involve seeing Bernie open for the strokes and starting a riot. Also we talked Abou- capitalism is ruining music a little bit of girl stuff. Feminism all the missing women of New Hampshire and other spills. The unwise. She quit the band white lung. That's for the real heads page on dot com slash the ANTIFA literally hangover. We did Ebony. Zor Cooks the history of Colonel Bacon's rebellion. It's a poem but don't be put off by that we basically just talk about Bacon's rebellion end. Among other things how George Washington's Dad committed a war crime immediately upon arrival brandon. What are you what is this? Is this the one that That Leo is a heaping. Yeah so I worked on a pilot and twenty eighteenth spring two thousand eighteen and is now finally being brought to series Tru. Tv It's called. It's personal with Amy Hoggart who was on The Sambi show I was the research producer and the casting coordinator for the pilot. Why when I was gone for like six weeks here in two thousand eighteen which Sam so graciously let me go on. Sabbatical wasn't gracious. But it was nice. I was gonna say that was brutal. I think I can't tree if those dreams. I got another thing to tell you. We gotta sit down and talk. I didn't work on the series but I am going to take credit for getting it helping get it to series so best of luck to them. It's a ten C ten episode season. We'll see if it gets picked up for a second season premieres tonight so help. Those people have been here for it took longer than I think. They said it would take as these things tend to do. But you know you're not. This is more of an off my conversation right. My Friend Leo. Allen is the EP of this show. Hey Brenda he wasn't there. When you were there brandon these apples. I can eat them. Sell if you don't leave for six weeks. I share Brown bag lunch with. You already. Did good job. All right folks the are an for it. I folks six four six five seven thirty nine twenty. She in the fun. Alpha males are back on the Alpha males are back. Just imagine the males of back back back back back on the Alpha males of backed by just want to degrade the White Man Alpha males all the males up says what our mails stopped. Alpha males total. We bring back the intercity song or a couple of put them in rotation these identical. The problem with those is there like forty five seconds long so I don't know if they're enough for the break that's not. I Have Parkinson's on the Alpha males PSYCH BUCKLE. Almost has what what what what what what what what what what. What what. What a lot of back to back back back all. Have you tried doing an impression on a college campus? I think that there's no reason why. Reasonable people across the divide can all this psych out bills off by males but black about their doesn't a little bar. Do you think that American deserves to be taken over by jihadists? Keeping at one hundred cannot game went birthday. Happy Birthday to me. You boy I the Alpha males off by Glass Alpha males. Pay The price. We around here I it was. It was it was.

Michael Bloomberg Bloomberg Donald Trump China Usa Winey Biden Senate president Senator Sanders Congress Bernie Joe Texas Cuba basketball New York City Saul South Carolina Politburo
Mike Church Show-Consider This: Did The Soviet Politburo Have A Minority Party& If So, What Good Did It Do!?

CRUSADE Channel Previews

16:46 min | 5 months ago

Mike Church Show-Consider This: Did The Soviet Politburo Have A Minority Party& If So, What Good Did It Do!?

"That's a lot of people. Migrated threw their hands up in the air went. That's it. I'm done i'm out. Why won't the same thing work to change a system or a form of government. One that is as menacing. Any government has ever been We are on the precipice of having a soviet. Politburo already have one in california. There's nothing you can do if you disagree with any of the diabolical things that are going on are being made legally california. You don't have a voice you're you you may as well live in the soviet union. Because they're going to do it now. They can't necessarily force you as an individual to do all those things but they're going to make it legal and empower others to participate in the evil hundreds of thousands if not millions of souls are going to fall into hell like snowflakes in california because they have a one party rule. now people are sitting there going. Why why do. I just don't get this. What what in jail or what. What on earth makes people think that in two thousand and twenty two wine bucks. Nancy smuggles chuckles And greed lust infanticide maniacs biden and harrison all the gang that pulled off and perpetrated the coup against trump and the election. What makes you think they're not gonna do it again for me once. Shame on me. Fool me twice a for me once. Shame on you fool me twice. Shame on me to someone. Show me any act. It's actually happened in any legislature georgia for example. That's going to prevent the stacey. Abrams gang from not only your credit stole two senate seats starting to steal them seats from the house of representatives. Georgia senate the georgia assembly and ultimately Either shield note or someone else will run again and taking the governorship and it won't matter what that you're the democrat party of the democrat party of twenty twenty one is not the democrat party of democrat zell miller from two thousand to two thousand or two thousand to two thousand and six. Who zan governor of georgia's politely different. This is the cult of debts party and it and it figuratively speaking. It is for them. It's a party let's maim. Let's kill anyone that gets in our way for objecting to our good time. What is there a good time entail. You don't need me to you of that but anyone says you you'll never got enough people. Twenty five million people moved over to telegraph. Does the signal app. Which we've been promoting i promote a signal at because it's open source and sucker burg and dorsey and the rest of these creeps. He's diabolical adreno chrome guzzling pedal island attending creeps. Don't own it it's not. There's for the time being is relatively safe and secure. What was the figure for gab. A million people migrated gab. In one gab. Dot com is an alternative to twitter. It's kind of a combo between twitter and pride book over a million people in one. Here's another one signal. Messaging app hits top of stores after reaching one point three. How many was that now. You may the exact total navigate. I wanna make sure i know. There's one point three. Mary and download in one day all but we can't change our form and system of government and we can't leave the one we're currently because not enough people. We'll do it. There's one point three million right. They're voting with their feet as ronald reagan would say maybe folks have to be instructed and told you gotta have to be careful with this because you don't wanna establish one soviet police bureau for another which is why i say this happens. Community by community and county by county works out at the main for us. The main thing that happens is i'm out. I don't obey you. You're not my president. This is a union that i am no longer and longer desire to be an i'm out self-government is coming. We will find people to make common cause with and if we have to redraw brownies. That's the history of the world. We act as though we'd be the first people in history that have redrawn boundary not true private messaging applications signal. Now i know if this continues apple and google play are going to start feeling pressure from demonic possessed an obsessed lib tards to cancel the app. They're planning violence. I got a hold of a signal will. Have you know how to use signal. Set your exp- set your you look look. I've used a signal for two years. Now you set expirations on messages and you can custom. Set it for anyone that you want. If i'm having a conversation with iran and i do have one with. Iran is right aron. Iran iran and i are buddies on the signal lab. If i want to set my conversation with a iran so that it expires it will self delete and let's play mission impossible. Should you choose to accept as missing iran. Just message will self destruct and six and sixty seconds you can set it so that it deletes itself. It's not there. It's not on their servers. Can't get it. You can't screen shot it. You can't go in a way back machine pretty ingenious. You could send it to six hours. If you want to set at the six days you could set it to never. Maybe you trust someone who really want the message to expire the number downloads. And this is why. Now it'll be far more difficult for these crayton's to prove dare proud there are a Mystique ruler dear leader. Chairman mao biden by the by this nonsense about this stupid military coup or whatever it is that this military force that's going to invade The capital and Try and What i don't know what it is that their religion we're gonna take biden. Now they're gonna take hairs out one of the wherever it is that they allege this is just trying to foment fear so that draconian drastic polit bureau type measures can be taken put into place and negative things like well. We find anyone anyone in the dc area even if you have a license or an excuse to carry firearms. We're going to take them away from because we got There is this There is this threat in other words. You're manufacturing this threat. Just like they manufactured the case against trump the number of downloads was recorded by topa which tracks apps. The number was a new iraq. Hold for the app. Signal utilizes an end to end encryption to keep conversation secure according to the website of the nonprofit signal foundation the apps developer. We can't read your messages or listen to your calls. And no one else can either. Privacy is an optional mode. It's just the way that signal works every message. Every call airtime said the foundation. The developer high profile users include edward snowden and elon. Musk speaking at elon musk. I never thought i'd find myself saying elon. Musk is right. How many of you for again. This is the crusade channel in the white shirt. Show from time to time is going to do this. I'm going to encourage you to leave. Get out find everyone you know and tell them leave get out. Where do we go. that's up to you again. That's up to you form own. I read a piece today about someone. Basically taken what we've been talking about and that's good saying that will the first thing that you better. I know it was. It was gary potter on catholicism. Or go brother andrea. Maria said on january the fifth. If you have a strange family members make peace now. Tell them hey. Maybe you won't come home before you still can elon. Musk has a- satellite has a i s p service that's in beta testing. There's like ten thousand people have it. I believe it's called starlight. I signed up i don't live in an area where they had the low-flying satellites but it's i read. I read an entire story about it. I was intrigued and went to star light website. And then i found out all about and i'm going like that's really. I'm not sure. I like older satellites flying above but as an alternative to land based and monopoly controlled. Isp's maybe this is an alternative The way it basically works is instead of having one satellite like houston it twenty three thousand miles above the earth. Yeah have hundreds of little satellites at like one hundred miles so the transmission time is severely cut in half and so the down and the down speed of the download. Time is cut and the bandwith if they can actually do the bandwidth that they're talking about after one hundred megabits Down and forty megabits a second up. That's like best pro grade. I almost run the crusade channel off of that however now again. Musk says it is not for big cities not for big suburban areas. It's for basically for the boondocks as a college for the boonies for b f. e. as you and i used to call it. Live live in the middle of nowhere. And all you get is a copper. Dsl line that caps out at what fifty six k. like in nineteen ninety nine well. Moscow has a Alternative for you but it's things like that that are are being developed are going to challenge these monopolies you know anything about monopolies is the The the major problem with the united states at the turn of the last century There was a monopoly problem with the industry. The industrialised have gotten so big so fast many people feared that no one else would ever be able to get into the industry and by the by Some of this may have been as a result of the economy of scale like for example. is it really feasible for a for a small version of bethlehem steel for example to open up. Could you even do that now. You can get iron ore and smaller quantities and smaller smelters and smelted down and there are these places across. The united states are called foundries and foundry used to be a vocation a trade. Something you learn it. Remember the movie rudy manley. Ned beatty was rude. His dad ned beatty do you remember member member. He worked at bethlehem steel or usda. Whatever it was a massive steel mill. What did rudy's brother do worked at a steel mill. The same one right well. Isn't that babies reason for sending moody very young Sam kimchi for the lord of the rings. Sean asked him reason. For city rudy. To holy cross into notre dame showing ever had to step foot inside a steel million. This was the mindset. We want our kids to be better than us. We want them to have to have to ever work a day in your life. We want them hanging around water coolers and air conditioned buildings playing air guitar. I used to make fun of this debt a decade ago. That's a communist idea. The ending of trades vocations was planted by the cpi by the communist party off source. All your manufacturing. You don't need it. You want us to be stupid ignorant louts and you want them hanging around water coolers with these new things we're going to invent called smartphones playing air guitar and talking about the latest video game or leroy jenkins moment g. That plan came true but the elimination the trade again foundries. The movie planted the seeds thousands of others. We want our kids to the american dream. Is your kid never has to have a tropical sweat health. In retrospect thinking back who thinks that. Mike church show here on the crusade channel. I was on air. Always online at crusade channel dot com. You seeing that lauren. Bogert has been kicked off twitter as been suspended. newly elected member of the has a represent lauren. Boettger she's the one that went into went leg. Not wearing your stupid mask. No you have to wear a mask. I don't is. She wearing what i saw jim jordan. Speaking yesterday co a congressman. He had one but she's an. I ain't wearing masks. She's also the one from colorado at talking about bringing her to defend herself out of security detail. She was a security detail. She's kind of like machine gun. Margie from georgia. There's a By the by. I just have to say Don't take this wrong way. Anyone i like. Lauren beaubrun and i liked machine gun margie. I don't want women running around with semi autos acting like the men ought to and these big bold i did. This is just over feminism on steroids. Yeah but i could go home to show fry the baker up in the pan okay. Weren't joan doing it again. Just it an my sanchez. Bad person saying machine i. I'm saying anything about their character or anything of the sort. Just don't like the idea again. You're undermining the role of men. Showman going to do anything. Because margie will guard me or lauren. Baalbek regard me two hundred and ten pound guy they can take. A couple of rounds will crush her.

iran georgia assembly democrat party of the democrat california elon biden Musk georgia senate Chairman mao biden Politburo zell miller topa twitter signal foundation edward snowden democrat party Abrams gary potter soviet union
Explainer 242: RCEP: Whats the Deal?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:39 min | 7 months ago

Explainer 242: RCEP: Whats the Deal?

"Anybody who has spent much time around. Soldiers will be aware that for the purposes of saving time and door baffling civilians. They communicate to a large extent in three letter acronyms. So an armored fighting vehicle is an a an improvised. Explosive device is an and a three letter. Acronym is itself a t. l. a. There are many more some formal some colloquial some veils for cheerful obscenity if journalists employed a similar vernacular one such t. La would certainly be bb. I to denote a story which is boring but important which brings us. And we think we've just about stuck the landing here to a four letter acronym asset and that seems to be the consensus on pronunciation which is going to catch up a few news. Readers or it could be are kept or chip or recap whichever way you say it. The letters stand for regional comprehensive economic partnership. Stop come back at cetera. Sip is a trade deal all seriously this will only take a few minutes also is a mighty big trade deal indeed arguably the biggest ever don. It includes japan. South korea new zealand and the ten members of asean from tiny brunei to immense indonesia at which the unwieldy asset name does make a certain amount of sense comprehensive regional asian partnership being an obvious non runner. This will seem hilarious in about ten seconds. You'll get that. There is a lot going on with all set as is to be expected from any agreement which fifteen countries many of whom don't get terrifically will have been nearly a decade negotiating but it will be significant given that the signatories of set between them account for nearly a third of global gdp. Some oftens have already estimated. That are sept. Could add two hundred billion dollars to the global economy this decade which given how much of this decade is likely to be spent catching up from this year is no small change. The economic headlines are approximately as follows. Many tariffs on imports. Among member states will be eliminated. Some immediately of his more gradually they will be new unified rules of origin which might encourage companies in asset nations to build more of their supply chains with each other and hopefully do lots of what all free trade agreements is supposed to increase production and opportunity reduced prices on bureaucracy and contribute to a climate of cooperation as opposed to competition which is where our sep looks almost as significant diplomatically. As it does economically it is the first time that china has signed up to a multilateral. Free trade deal. China's premier li ka chiang himself an economist by trade has indeed hailed it as a great victory for multi-lateralism and free trade. Fine talk it may be muttered for the second ranked member of the politburo standing committee of the central political bureau of the communist party of china. And it's at least worth wondering. Is this really where china sees the real value of asset because just as notable is who is in our set is who isn't specifically india and the united states india pulled of the talks last year for fear that eliminating tariffs would threaten indian manufacturers and producers however as the leaders have stressed that the door remains open the us flounced from a different asia pacific trade arrangement in two thousand seventeen. I'm going to issue our notification of intent to withdraw from the trans-pacific partnership a potential disaster for our country. The trans-pacific partnership was one of the first victims of a donald trump tantrum. So there is little doubt about which of assets members will be the dominant partner but it does appear to have been the middle powers of that drove the deal possibly recognizing that it would be preferable for all of them to have china japan and south korea coming to terms rather than blows an optimist a class of pundit who is having a testing kind of you might suggest that this also indicates that china recognizes that submitting to rules-based trade is the next step in its journey to modernity and that it cannot prosper in the long term purely by bullying and menacing a pessimist. Might that this is exactly what china proposes to use this new block for that asset is a means for to keep its friends close and its enemies closer and whether or not that quote is correctly attributable to sun. Suu or michael corleone. The point stands for monocle twenty four. I'm andrew molo.

two hundred billion dollars China li ka chiang south korea brunei ten seconds central political bureau of th japan indonesia La new zealand politburo india asia pacific us donald trump michael corleone Suu monocle andrew molo
Wednesday Red Pill Diaries-Consider This: Did The Soviet Politburo Have A Minority Party& If So, What Good Did It Do!?

Mike Church Presents-The Red Pill Diaries Podcast

16:46 min | 5 months ago

Wednesday Red Pill Diaries-Consider This: Did The Soviet Politburo Have A Minority Party& If So, What Good Did It Do!?

"That's a lot of people. Migrated threw their hands up in the air went. That's it. I'm done i'm out. Why won't the same thing work to change a system or a form of government. One that is as menacing. Any government has ever been We are on the precipice of having a soviet. Politburo already have one in california. There's nothing you can do if you disagree with any of the diabolical things that are going on are being made legally california. You don't have a voice you're you you may as well live in the soviet union. Because they're going to do it now. They can't necessarily force you as an individual to do all those things but they're going to make it legal and empower others to participate in the evil hundreds of thousands if not millions of souls are going to fall into hell like snowflakes in california because they have a one party rule. now people are sitting there going. Why why do. I just don't get this. What what in jail or what. What on earth makes people think that in two thousand and twenty two wine bucks. Nancy smuggles chuckles And greed lust infanticide all maniacs biden and harrison all the gang that pulled off and perpetrated the coup against trump and the election. What makes you think they're not gonna do it again for me once. Shame on me. Fool me twice a for me once. Shame on you fool me twice. Shame on me to someone. Show me any act. It's actually happened in any legislature georgia for example. That's going to prevent the stacey. Abrams gang from not only your credit stole two senate seats starting to steal them seats from the house of representatives. Georgia senate the georgia assembly and ultimately Either shield note or someone else will run again and taking the governorship and it won't matter what that you're the democrat party of the democrat party of twenty twenty one is not the democrat party of democrat zell miller from two thousand to two thousand or two thousand to two thousand and six. Who zan governor of georgia's politely different. This is the cult of debts party and it and it figuratively speaking. It is for them. It's a party let's maim. Let's kill anyone that gets in our way for objecting to our good time. What is there a good time entail. You don't need me to you of that but anyone said you you'll never got enough people. Twenty five million people moved over to telegraph. Does the signal app. Which we've been promoting i promote a signal at because it's open source and sucker burg and dorsey and the rest of these creeps. He's diabolical adreno chrome guzzling pedal island attending creeps. Don't own it it's not. There's for the time being is relatively safe and secure. What was the figure for gab. A million people migrated to gab in one gab dot com is an alternative to twitter. It's kind of a combo between twitter and pride book over a million people in one. Here's another one signal. Messaging app hits top of stores after reaching one point three. How many was that now. You may the exact total navigate. I wanna make sure i know. There's one point three. Mary and download in one day all but we can't change our form and system of government and we can't leave the one we're currently because not enough people. We'll do it. There's one point three million right. They're voting with their feet as ronald reagan would say maybe folks have to be instructed and told you gotta have to be careful with this because you don't wanna establish one soviet police bureau for another which is why i say this happens. Community by community and county by county works out at the main for us. The main thing that happens is i'm out. I don't obey you. You're not my president. This is a union that i am no longer and longer desire to be an i'm out self-government is coming. We will find people to make common cause with and if we have to redraw brownies. That's the history of the world. We act as though we'd be the first people in history that have redrawn boundary not true private messaging applications signal. Now i know if this continues apple and google play are going to start feeling pressure from demonic possessed an obsessed lib tards to cancel the app. They're planning violence. I got a hold of a signal will. Have you know how to use signal. Set your exp- set your you look look. I've used a signal for two years. Now you set expirations on messages and you can custom. Set it for anyone that you want. If i'm having a conversation with a aron and i do have one with iran is right. Aron aron a. iran. On i are buddies on the signal lab. If i want to set my conversation with a iran so that it expires it will self delete and let's play mission impossible. Should you choose to accept as missing iran. Just message will self destruct and six and sixty seconds you can set it so that it deletes itself. It's not there. It's not on their servers. Can't get it. You can't screen shot it. You can't go in a way back machine pretty ingenious. You could send it to six hours if you want to set it the six days you could set it to never maybe you trust someone who really want the message to expire the number downloads. And this is why now. It'll be far more difficult for these crayton's to prove dare applauding are a shot in mystique ruler. Dear leader chairman mao biden by the by this nonsense about this stupid military coup or whatever it is that this military force that's going to invade the capital and Try and What i don't know what it is that their religion we're gonna take biden. Now they're gonna take hairs out one of the wherever it is that they allege this is just trying to foment fear so that draconian drastic polit bureau type measures can be taken put into place and negative things like well. We find anyone anyone in the dc area even if you have a license or an excuse to carry firearms. We're going to take them away from because we got There is this There is this threat in other words. You're manufacturing this threat. Just like they manufactured the case against trump the number of downloads was recorded by topa which tracks apps. The number was a new iraq. Hold for the app. Signal utilizes an end to end encryption to keep conversation secure according to the website of the nonprofit signal foundation the apps developer. We can't read your messages or listen to your calls. And no one else can either. Privacy is an optional mode. It's just the way that signal works every message every call airtime said the foundation uh developer high profile users include edward snowden and elon. Musk speaking at elon musk. I never thought i'd find myself saying elon. Musk is right. How many of you for again. This is the crusade channel in the white shirt. Show from time to time is going to do this. I'm going to encourage you to leave. Get out find everyone you know and tell them leave get out. Where do we go. that's up to you again. That's up to you form own. I read a piece today about someone. Basically taken what we've been talking about and that's good saying that will the first thing that you better. I know it was. It was gary potter on catholicism. Or go brother andrea. Maria said on january the fifth. If you have a strange family members make peace now. Tell them hey. Maybe you won't come home before you still can elon. Musk has a- satellite has a i s p service that's in beta testing. There's like ten thousand people have it. I believe it's called starlight. I signed up i don't live in an area where they had the low-flying satellites but it's i read. I read an entire story about it. I was intrigued and went to star light website. And then i found out all about and i'm going like that's really. I'm not sure. I like older satellites flying above but as an alternative to land based and monopoly controlled. Isp's maybe this is an alternative The way it basically works is instead of having one satellite like houston it twenty three thousand miles above the earth. Yeah have hundreds of little satellites at like nine hundred miles so the transmission time is severely cut in half and so the down and the down speed of the download time is cut and the bandwidth if they can actually do the bandwidth that they're talking about After one hundred megabits Down and forty megabits a second up. That's like looks pro grade. I almost run the crusade channel off of that however now again. Musk says it is not for big cities not for big suburban areas. It's for basically for the boondocks as a college for the boonies for b f. e. as you and i used to call it. Live live in the middle of nowhere. And all you get is a copper. Dsl line that caps out at what fifty six k. like in nineteen ninety nine well. Moscow has a Alternative for you but it's things like that that are are being developed are going to challenge these monopolies you know anything about monopolies is the The the major problem with the united states at the turn of the last century There was a monopoly problem with the industry. The industrialised have gotten so big so fast many people feared that no one else would ever be able to get into the industry and by the by Some of this may have been as a result of the economy of scale like for example. is it really feasible for a for a small version of bethlehem steel for example to open up. Could you even do that now. You can get iron ore and smaller quantities and smaller smelters and smelted down and there are these places across. The united states are called foundries and foundry used to be a vocation a trade. Something you learn it. Remember the movie rudy mundi. Ned beatty was rude. His dad ned beatty do you remember member member. He worked at bethlehem steel or usda. Whatever it was a massive steel mill. What did rudy's brother do worked at a steel mill. The same one right well. Isn't that babies reason for sending teen moody very young Sam kimchi for the lord of the rings. Sean asked him reason. For city rudy to holy cross into notre dame showing ever had to step foot inside a steel mill. This was the mindset. We want our kids to be better than us. We don't want to have to have to ever work a day in your life. We want them hanging around water coolers and air conditioned buildings playing air guitar. I used to make fun of this debt a decade ago. That's a communist idea. The ending of trades vocations was planted by the cpi by the communist party off source. All your manufacturing. You don't need it. You want us to be stupid ignorant louts and you want them hanging around water coolers with these new things we're going to invent called smartphones playing air guitar and talking about the latest video game or leroy jenkins moment g. That plan came true but the elimination the trade again foundries. The movie planted the seeds thousands of others. We want our kids to the american dream. Is your kid never has to have a tropical sweat health. In retrospect thinking back who thinks that. Mike church show here on the crusade channel. I was on air. Always online at crusade channel dot com. You seeing that lauren. Bogert has been kicked off twitter as been suspended. newly elected member of the has a represent lauren. Bobo she's the one that went into went leg. Not wearing your stupid mask. No you have to wear a mask. I don't is. She wearing what i saw jim jordan. Speaking yesterday co a congressman. He had one but she's an. I ain't wearing masks. She's also the one from colorado at talking about bringing her to defend herself out of security detail. She was a security detail. She's kind of like machine gun. Margie from georgia. There's a By the by. I just have to say Don't take this wrong way. Anyone i like. Lauren beaubrun and i liked machine gun margie. I don't want women running around with semi autos acting like the men ought to and these big bold i did. This is just over feminism on steroids. Yeah but i could go home to show fry the baker up in the pan okay. Weren't joan doing it again. Just it's an my sanchez. Bad person saying machine i. I'm saying anything about their character or anything of the sort. Just don't like the idea again. You're undermining the role of men. Showman going to do anything. Because margie will guard me or lauren. Baalbek regard me two hundred and ten pound guy they can take. A couple of rounds will crush her.

iran georgia assembly democrat party of the democrat california elon biden Musk Aron aron georgia senate Politburo mao biden zell miller topa twitter signal foundation edward snowden democrat party Abrams gary potter
Ep. 275 - Saving Sonora: The Green Desert

In Defense of Plants Podcast

44:55 min | 11 months ago

Ep. 275 - Saving Sonora: The Green Desert

"Would you like more infants of plants each month? Well, you're in luck and defensive plans is now offering bonus mini episodes over at our patron page to find out how you can gain access to this bonus botanical content head on over Patriot dot com slash in defensive plants and consider becoming a patron as always. Thank you for your continued support of independent plans together. We are helping care plant blinds around the world one episode at a time. Hello everyone and welcome to the in defense, plants podcast the official podcast limit offensive appliance dot com. What's up? This is your host Matt. Welcome to the show. How's everyone doing this week? Today we're tackling topic of been meaning to cover for quite some time. We are of course talking about the biodiversity conservation of the floor of the Sonoran desert. Joining us to talk about this Dr Helen Row. She's the director of the person's field institute. The McDowell Sonoran conservancy and she's also an associate research professor at Northern Arizona University as you're going to hear Dr Rohan, her colleagues have recently taken up the. S S C.. Sonoran desert plants specialist group to assess the extinction risk of all Sonoran desert plant species, no small task. Might I add but also to educate the public about the Sonoran desert species and the myriad factors that threaten their survival as well as to also implement conservation plans supported by these red listing groups. This work is in its infancy, but as you can hear Dr row and her colleagues crossing borders to do everything they can to understand protect sewer biodiversity. Now you may notice. We don't really talk about any of fires in this podcast s because this episode was recorded before any of the fires like the big horn fire had started, but do understand how much of an impact those fires are having in an ecosystem. That really isn't adapted for fire, so I just want to put that in your mind. You probably should go and look up. What's going on with the fires? Find out why they're having such a big impact on this desert ecosystem all right? That's entirely enough outta. Let's head on over to my conversation with Dr, Helen Row I. Hope you enjoy. All right Dr Helen Row. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much for coming on. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who are and what it is you do. A Hi. I'm Helen Row, and I'm have a split position. I'm associate research professor at Northern Arizona University in the School of Earth and sustainability and I also am associate director of the field institute at the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy. So within that role I. started the ICN's Sonoran desert plant species specialist group. So we just are in early. Stages Matt. But it's really important task, but I'm curious. What got you to this point? Mean? Were you always in nature? Not? Did you have your focus on any group of life forms in particular? Are you a plant person or you just enjoy it all in kind of work to understand and conserve the environment listed. Yeah well Louis say. I would say. My path has been a little bit one of a meandering when but. My Hd course was in apology. My focus was on restoration, ecology, an invasive plants and so from that perspective on definitely more of a plan to call adjusts, and then you know with the conservancy. We have a a really large suite of programs ranging from one group of area that focuses on restoration and invasive species but the other group We have several long term monitoring projects. Projects, but when thing that it actually arose out of the work that we have a really we, we started the field institute by putting together Flora. And finalists, and we really struggled a bit with what that meant regionally on the status of those plants, and so then That's sort of what urged may towards wanting to know more about plant species status, which is something that we can learn. By assessing plants through the red list process. Let's fascinating because I look at the place a place like the Sonoran desert. At least the areas surrounding, it is kind of being something celebrated in our in our culture, at least in this country in some of the most iconic images growing up, were of the Sonoran Desert Seagal Cactus, and that sort of thing so curious to find that there is actually this big disconnect between it, being probably one of the most famous desert in the world, but also by the sounds of it, not really well catalogued in terms of flurries, diversity that kind of where the mismatch or the hiccups kind of started to pop up. You know we have a really good flora, and so we have a good list. It's just we don't know what it means you know once you get past making your list. You WanNa know a well. WHAT SHOULD WE PROTECTOR? What should we do about it now? We want think about it from a conservation standpoint in so just to explain a little bit more about what the red list adds. Is that the red list? Process is a systematic approach to assessing the extinction risk for every species, and so there's a list of five criteria that you can use to apply to your species on, so you gather information about its distribution. is life history. Threats its protections, and then through that you, them have an expert workshop in which you combine those factors for each feces to figure out whether where it plays out is at least concern, so he's got a really large distribution in. There might be threats to it in some parts of it, but populations aren't in severe declines. It's a combination of those that information that you done. Apply using this criteria for each of your species, so in doing so species don't fall through the cracks right? You can get this amazing once way make our way through a lot of these species. We can get a really good sense of what species are in need of conservation, and where they are right, so you can look at their distributions on top of each other, so take the most threatened species. There's several threatened category, so there's threatened. There's endanger their critically endangered on. Extinct and so, but within those threatened categories you can layer those easing GIS and start to look at whether there are conservation plans. Are there common areas that could be protected or their common threats? You can just look at these different trends and and start thinking about solarge scale planning approach. I like that, and it's really cool to kind of see. especially you know talking to an ecologist, because oftentimes you know we're thinking a lot about different processes, how different forms of life interacting work together to create what we see like an ecosystem, but then to calendar a couch that in biodiversity to take the species perspective in in realized that each species matters. Matters you know on some level whether it's you know for ecosystem services for human use or something like that, but just intrinsically biodiversity matters and I really liked combining these ecological processes, these understanding of the environment, and then using that to inform species, level, conservation, or even groups of species. As he said you can overlay these layers see a spot. That's very. Very valuable for conservation, or might need some attention and go from there, but again at the corval released biodiversity and I like what you said about it being a number in what do you do with that list of numbers? And what does that mean and that something come up against all the time teaching? Is that when you say by diversity people to say? Say More is better in so you always get examples that involve said tropical rainforest because tropical rainforest just naturally have more species in them, but that's not to say that they are more valuable than say a like the Sonoran desert, which is still got a unique compliment, a really interesting flora, really important flora just doesn't have the numbers of a tropical rainforest. We have almost four thousand plant species in the Sonoran desert. Wow, that's incredible. Yeah! Yeah we're going through that Philemon. Airy work now may not suffer step. What species do we consider? Sarunas desert, species and so? Because, you know we really the goal for ICN is related to as SAS as many species possible. We have a fairly loose. Restriction on that. Which is that? At least five percent of its global distribution needs to be in the Sonoran desert. Which means that you know we're willing to consider any that just sort of. into the Sonoran desert a little bit. But still obviously that's it's a really large number of species that we have on our plate. Yeah. That's pretty remarkable to think about again. When people hear desert, they think you know sand and maybe a few. CACTI, but this nor does is living proof that desert's can be immensely biodiversity mentioned over four thousand plant species. What is it about the Sonoran desert that makes it such a special place for plant diversity I mean there's probably a lot of factors that can be factored in there, but what? What is what makes the Sonoran desert special from? Say the Mojave or the Chihuahua Desert? Wise it unique. Yeah, well, it saw one of the greenest deserts in the world, because of its two distinct rainfall season, so it's got the monsoon as well as winter rains, and so that's what typically people point to in terms of why it's got so much green, in Y Y, it's got such a high diversity, plus we have coastal environments we. Have Sky Islands within around. We're not cutting those out of not cutting out. You know like riparian areas starting things, but really it says those rainfall about earns that really characterize the Sonoran desert. One of the things that were just thinking about now when we think about the Sonoran desert, and the reason for this project is because it's a quickly urbanizing region. Phoenix's expanding considerably. And so with those threats, we also want to consider A. How are our plant? Species will respond, and as I mentioned before you know the they're sort of these ways of thinking about regional conservation ACN has come up with sort of this four buckets approach which I really like which thanks about like I said you know. Are The plants co located? So maybe you can think about an approach that will provide regional geographic protections or if. If it's a threats approach. There may be some policies that can help with that, so that kind of thinking is something. That I don is really good at land. So one thing we're trying to do is this next year one of the important things as to to map out those threats so that we can see for each species whether they are under a specific threat or not start with land use, and all this sort of. Land Use change that we can put on their mining those kinds of things that would affect plants across the Sahara desert. Try to bring those data pieces together until one map on. That'll really help bar assessments, because that's a really critical part as you can say okay well. This plant species has only ten locations, but then this these two over here have this threat that can then increase the level of threat that we we apply wrong. That's neat, and it's cool to see that there's a lot of flexibility built into this because again. Just defining a geographic region can be challenged although the Sonoran desert has its own rainfall that you can kinda regimes that you can start to pick things out of, but also realizing that species definitions change the threats change I mean this is a dynamic process. It's so much. That has to be figured out in. It's also kind of sounds like even from the start. It's not saying okay. We're GONNA. Start with say the CIGAR CACTUS it saying. Let's gather all the data. We can put it together and see what comes out to us first foremost. Is that kind of where it begins? Just it's not saying we want to prioritize this group or this family. It's okay. Where are the biggest priority threats? And then we can kind of go from there. Well to two directions so I I wanna hit on your thought about changing definitions of the species, which is we have a a red? List Authority coordinator Linda Howard at Asu. She has systematically going through every single species embedding them, and so you know as you know, there can be a plant one single plant. Species that might be listed under three different names rights to get all that synonymous correct and gathered up under one plant, because it's does planter. Oh and then, and which ones should we call it? And so she's gone through the tribulation of having first started with one database, and then finding out that actually there's more updated database that we should be using, and so that's been a real challenge and that's always really the first step. We have to define those but as far as your question of of approach, we are actually focusing on a couple of families just to so that we can say okay well. Here's the state of cubbies. In similar death so probably start with that, and maybe who carry out is, there's just a few species. So we'll, we'll have that that sort of level and just kind of hoped to have some kind of systematic approach, but that combined. We need to know the threats I mean. That's part of the information. We need to gather so at the same time we need to have gathered tools so that we're effectively conduct these assessments to understand their risk of extinction. WHO. When you think of the four thousand number of the task seems like it gets pretty daunting in my hat off to your colleague to try to vet this process in it. It does kind of bring up a really important. In fact, I was just having this discussion over the weekend with a couple of friends. Is this lumper splitter taxonomic debate? It's interesting. It's entertaining it can get. People pretty fired up and I. Understand that it can make horticulture angry. When names change suddenly have to Redo it. It can make taxonomic angry when people. Give them flack for okay. We did a revision on this group or this genus, but at the end of the day it's about biodiversity and his about that species number, and so figuring out. What is what where to long where to split is it's more than just this philosophical debate. It kind of comes down to these conservation issues and I'm not asking you to take stance on the subject, but it does seem like you know. If you are a splitter, you can have two very small groups of endangered species, and if you're lumper, you can have one medium sized group of endanger insult. These debates means something. You're right. If you split them, you could have one of those splits the. Risk of extinction you know which could legitimately bring attention to conservation need. I think it also brings up the point of four. They have made the policy that we do not assess subspecies. So, that's sort of a similar, do of in Arizona and I'm sure many other places it may be the sub. Level and similarly that. If you assessed it individually, it might have a status of endangered because of population declines or something, but if you assess it at the species level than it may not, and so this, this becomes an issue when we get to expert workshops where the expert on that species signing more, we can't say at least concerned because the subspecies is really at risk, so that same kind of splitting comes out in that way and the way that we deal with that is that we would still have to assess the species as least concern, but we would make a note about the subspecies in the assessment. Rate and I would guess that there's definitely an element of say you know subspecies x is located in this region in that region is more under pressure from say, mining Lee so that kind of comes out into the further getting to understand the species from that level rate, and it's not like you're just saying African it. They're all one. Yeah, no, that's right and that's where these maps come into. You can say okay right so they're. The are the current minds. Here's where the anticipated ones are this? Blow up on this subspecies or there's a damn coming in where this one subspecies is, and it's not to say that that subspecies shouldn't be protected. It's probably should but yeah. I think for ZAN perspective. It's such a big task to assess all the species in the world without also committing to assessing the subspecies but I think also in sort of splitting generalization. We just tried to keep sort of the common known criteria on that, so we we just follow the guidance. We don't really go one way or the other where we just sort of report what others of? experts on that species of figured out. Sure and me, and that's probably the best option. Overall is just because. All of this change depending on WHO'S GETTING THEIR DISSERTATION? Published that year. On year to the next. And so it sounds like a lot of this word is revolving around sort of the species distributions mapping idea. Than historical records, so I mean is a lot of this I would assume starting at the basis of say or Barium in getting data points for different locations. So this is another point that I wanted to bring from something you said earlier. Stephen Bachmann at Hugh Gardens in London, the put together part of. As well and he developed a rapid assessment tool. So we're also going through that since we have so many species in it was designed for plants, and what it does new type in your species. an-and it then will download Gibbes data pints, so g Beth is global biodiversity information an. Option for. It's dumb. It is a global database. So for the Sonoran desert we have a regional database which has digitize or Barium records is called sign up. It uploads databases from all these different regional databases in also will include work from I now last. So if there's you know research grade announced s records, it will also include those, and so that's where we get a point data, and then that will actually automatically create some useful information for assessments looking the extent of occurrence and the area occupied by species. And so, that's where we we use a so. Yeah. I it originates from. Him better digitized land collated by this global database. I mean that's amazing that that exists so fantastic, but it's really cool also to hear sort of the next steps in the technology being embraced. You know how many scientists have had on this podcast like yourself that are using I- naturalist in a very stringent in you know well documented capacity, allowing citizen scientists to help with collection of data in for species ranges to a higher detail than say historical herbarium of Sirte region will small may be. The disc doesn't get the kind of data that. Hikers bought nizer's can do so. It's really cool to hear. This is all making your job easier the. Job Easier, but it's also kind of engaging a wider audience in being able to provide sound scientific data that can go on to help the conservation of you know who knows how many species. Will, absolutely I mean to the work for the McDowell snoring conservancy we work with over seven hundred volunteers. We call stewards and some of our citizen science projects creating research grade documentation of chloride entirely a really valuable resource. In so. That's an impressive number of volunteers, and from you know McDonalds perspective, I know it's kind of Sonoran centric just in general but. What kind of efforts I mean, is it always just sending people out to go look for plans, or is it? You know restoration coming. How are you engaging volunteers in? What's the response from? Seven hundred different people probably bring seven hundred different perspectives to the table I mean. Is it it cool or do you see like this engagement process where people are suddenly saying I never really thought about this plant in terms of its numbers now. Okay, let's let's get fired up about conservation. DC those links start to happen. Yeah while the conservancy has many programs, so we work on McDowell arm, preserve, which is the largest urban preserve the North America? It's thirty thousand five hundred eighty acres. Smaller than some other areas but remember. Cities don't often decide to preserve land at that scale, so that's why I ranked so high. And our volunteers do everything from do patrol where they are hiking around the biking around on trails on providing information the trail heads providing information there are. There's a lot of education that happens to. Both adults and two kids. And Our citizen science program or the person's field institute is one of the programs, and so within that we have programs both in restoration, invasive species as well as monitoring, so the icy on work fits within that up, really well in terms of conservation and yeah, thinking about the research, but an leading to management and Conservation Action as the as the end goal. And so We're very thankful for the work that these volunteers do. They come from all sorts of different leadership background and bring all sorts of different skills and perspectives. Agile all of our program. And, so we try to engage them in all different arts of our research programmes. That's fantastic. It's really good to hear again. Diversity only adds to the strength of any sort of efforts especially when it comes to. Land Conservation species conservation that sort of stuff, but. Any group you're working for whether it's McDowell or the IUCN on anything that focuses on the Sonoran desert. Its biodiversity has to deal with that Pesky. thing that humans like to do drawing geopolitical boundaries into. You know things don't end at the US. Mexico border there is interchange of flora and fauna, and how does say the McDowell versus say the I. U. C. N. You have to take that into consideration, because again like if you're considering numbers, save the organ pipe cactus barely makes it into the United States, but its range extends into Mexico Is that something that has to be contended with a from obviously from a conservation standpoint? Yeah. Well so I have a CO chair in Mexico. Dr Alberto Briquettes. He's at yu-nam and we have members of the fan groups that are Mexican scientists as well, and so as we launch this effort, mind more definitely plan to engage those scientists as well and are very eager to do that and Dr Broadcast is a expert in both invasive species on. He's done a lot of great work in also in Botany Anna. He actually just came out with a book on the Sahara that he co authored with some authors. I believe a desert botanical garden. So. We have a really good partnership there, so that's really important. The other point is that for all our species will be doing global assessments. So, regardless of where they are besides the Sonoran desert will be conducting assessment for wherever they their distribution as in so were careful to engage with other species specialist groups, so for example the desert botanical garden is the host organization or the. CACTUS and succulent species specialist group. And so we're we're. We call up rate with them, they've they've already finished all of the CACTUS. Unfortunately, that only takes about ninety one. I think it was ninety one species. I would have thought there were more or we'll still. We're still in the process of binding. Atta we that our our species, but there's also the Bogle tree assessments in so they're taking our trees. So so it's it's a global effort in. Yeah there. Certainly some overlaps and we're very happy for other people to to do as many. This week and so. Yeah, I like the Division of Labor there, and it's good because you can get specialties that really kind of pick up on nuances in kind of understand different groups better, but from your perspective. I mean undertaking something like this has got to be one of those moments where you're like. Yeah, this sounds great, and then you try to go to bed that night and you're like Oh what have I done? And so it is nice to see that it's a collaborative effort. Involves a lot of different people led a different groups of specialists, but I mean this is obviously in its infancy and so much needs to be done still, but were. Did you decide to just Kinda? Take the reins on this in Golick now. This needs to happen I mean. How do you take that? Well So. I was at a Seo. Before all of this and a good friend of mine in colleague, Dr Beth Politburo. She's been involved with I. Use John Longtime back she worked for CNN before she became professor at Asu Anthem, she was developing at that time a partnership with Asu, becoming one of just nine partners of issues. And so through that effort, she was working with a desert, botanical garden and dam M, becoming the host Organization for the Fobel. CACTUS group There were some other initiatives. That's when we started talking about the need for this Sonoran desert plant group, and then, when I became the associate director for McDowell sonoran conservancy. We're thinking about sort of this scope of projects again. That's where I was looking at our flora and thinking well. How can we better make sense of it? And so that's when it occurred to me as sort of saying well, it would be great, and for a while. It was trying to get some other people to take on more desert. But there were no takers also added. That would be something that we could at least Probe the impetus for this important work that will not only benefit you know are preserved and that species, but can inform just this. This whole region I think it's very important work. Yes, I think it's just one of those things as one foot in front of the other. that's a very mature way of looking at it and again Kudos for taking it on, and it's really exciting to hear that you know this is something you recognized in it just. Whether, it's going to be a lot of work, somedays or a little bit here there it's it's something that needs to happen in. We already kind of touched on one of the bigger threat, which is obviously human development urbanization of this area, but you know you're in a unique position to by being despite agreeing desert, a water stressed habitat. You're in an area with geopolitical boundaries borders going up in different institutions, changing hands different political boundaries happening in dissolving all at once. But what are some of the major threats? You hear a lot of stories about like Cactus, poaching and stuff like that or even is seemingly as innocuous as just more people equals more hiking in more traffic on I mean there's a lot of complex issues that face Sonoran biodiversity in general right. Yeah well, so the global CACTUS group put out of paper after they'd they'd completed their cactus assessments by Barbara Gach I. Hope I'm pronouncing that wrong. GET IT SH- and some other authors, and they listed the threats to Cactus. Anyway and you're right. poaching was I think number one. It's a really big problem for cactus and succulents or so cute. And some of them are really rare So that's that's definitely a big threat in the land use chain across the board of his is reading a paper the other day, so land use change. tends to be number one across plant species, so that could be anything from you know going from natural areas to urban or to mining or Any other kind of threat like that climate change. Invasive species I think those are are the major threats. Climate change is more difficult to cut off and that's something. That's some collaborators in I want to. Really think about is. It's not just climate changing. You have to look at the traits of the plant species to understand how they'll respond, and so there's some really good work on this topic for for guidance on how to sort of. Think about the different traits that plants have and then pairing that with the anticipated threat. Climate Change that you're gonna see on the ground whether it be drought or altered rainfall or higher temperatures, you can look at those different traits. Probably Limited to some of the more rare species, because extensively a species with larger geographical distributions are a little bit more flexible in how they can adapt to that, although that's not known either but so that's that's one area. Invasive species is something we're certainly looking at. That's always. That's a little bit difficult to get at this scale because we don't have very. Very good data real. Will we have our point data? So what I was Gonna say the McDonald's norm conservancy is working with partners to conduct trainings for surveys across Miracle Accounting, which is you know the largest county in Arizona, but even so that kind of gives you a kind of the wrong scale of information, so yes, we have some point information on invasive species. How do you then scale that up and then compare that with your plant that you're? You're native plant that you're trying to assess and what the threat is to the species that also comes down a little bit of those species traits are, and and how how dense those invasive species are to a certain site so. That's also something that's really tricky may require some some modeling to. Dig into that the other. Threat that that was listed was also possible. Air pollution nitrogen deposition things that can. Shift in blank communities as well and so again that that sort of a more of a subtle threat where is sort of depends on what plant species you're talking about so for that reason my talk about this threats map or starting with the most clear-cut one which is land east. And so then all sort of work our way down from there. To these other other threats to to figure those out a little bit of chicken of yellow, more complicated. But again going back to having a diverse group of people in different specialties can working on these questions because a trade ecologists, the kind of questions they're asking are different than say the model is per se, but they can all inform each other to make long-term efforts, a little bit easier in more, sustainable or easier to understand at least implement so again this getting the right groups of people together the diversity of interest in backgrounds, but a really couching it all again in the species. Species level sort of assessments I know the trade stuff can kind of help get away from that a little bit, and make it a little less confusing, but you really do have to understand how individuals species responded chain engine, and how that might play out when a new invasive comes into the system, you know. Yeah, it really is. You can't say all plants are going to do this thing or that thing in response to climate, and in response to many things it's there's winners and losers. And that's a hard thing to communicate a lot of times, especially in the context of invasive species and climate changes that the scenarios aren't always GonNa like you said play out exactly the same way in so certain times it might benefit one over the other or mutualist might get pushed out that sort of stuff. Gets complicated yeah. Bit Off quite a chunk to chew on there, but you know kind of going into your background. A little bit too is is some of these more subtle threats when you hear about land, use change and herbs Asian population growth. Mean you're you're seeing a lot of more subtle things like nitrogen deposition. That's something I deal with in the southern Appalachian Mountains just because it's such a huge tourism area, and like you said that changes the dynamics of that, but also just foot traffic and I know you even looked at in your past research just the impact of even. On some of these plants, and oftentimes it's like the hardest to get to places like the most pristine. Just because of that, there's not enough foot traffic to really have an impact, so is that things that eventually get factored in here? Is that just something to kind? Keep in mind in the context of say, increasing urbanisation in just more feet on the ground. I don't know to what extent I mean. Certainly foot traffic in increase visitation of parts can certainly have an impact for Leeann sets a little bit You know if you have a trail, right over a you know it'd have to be a pretty rare species or sort of. Trailed configuration that really was unlucky to be placed over a rare species to I. Think have a huge impact that way but when you think about sort of more generalized degradation of areas where you have kind of combinations of. Traffic and people going off trails invasive species coming in because they're overused disturbed I think there can be at combining of the facts that you can see in some areas that are not very well protected or managed where you can just have really a denuding effect, and if that that is placed over, you know important parts of a plants distribution, it can have a highly negative effect on on an individual species, but certainly it can have a negative effect just on you know denuding an area and decreasing its utility for Habitat, even for other visitors to enjoy that space. For sure yeah, and it's good that again. This assessments are going in because these are the sorts of things that guess will start to. Filter out from these. Different approaches and projects that people are undertaking, but in thinking about this from your perspective, though you obviously are a a native or resident of that area, you care about diversity. That's pretty evident Are there any plans that say stand out to you or ones that you're really kinda hoping to get your head wrapped around a little bit better that you're excited to kind of prioritize over others I mean is there certain species are groups that really kinda scream. Sonoran biodiversity encompass what you truly appreciate love about this desert. Well! Let's see I. Don't know I, mean I think we're going to be folks starting out with Phebe because it's, it's quite a large group and their nitrogen fixers, so they help in so many ways some of the other planets species, so I think they are an important group in. It'll be an interesting group also to think about whether they're represented I'm not sure that any family really is but It'll be sort of our first indicator besides the CACTUS and succulents about how group is is faring across its processes. Learn another. Cool. Yeah, I like for Basie for that reason. I mean there's plenty of variety within the family itself, but they seem to have really done well in places like the Sonoran desert where they're living on the edge, they can kind of conquered territory that a lot of other plants can't, but also like you said scientists set the foundation for a lot of other species I mean the amount of times I sell baby, Guarico or Pharaoh cactus, the had germinated underneath say of Palo Verde or mosquito It just Kinda get why you would pick those. Yeah Yeah I think it'll be a good family to to work our way through. Gives plenty to do to start anyway dea. Yeah, you've definitely got your work. Cut Out for you, but sounds like a lot of enthusiastic hands. Ready to be put to work. So in that regard, if people wanNA keep track of the progress, find out more about any of what we talked about today. Where do you recommend the go looking to find out more in in kind of keep up to date on everything that's going on. I. Wish I could tell you ahead. This awesome website for bank. So, I will direct you in We hope to have more information on McDowell Sonoran Dot Org and also on our. Website is John. creates these project reports every year. and. They're just now working on the twenty nineteen report and then I believe those get posted onto ours species specialist group page on the icy website, saying you can Kinda get a glimpse of our targets and goals, and those are Nice, little snippets about where up to and and we'll be posting are twenty eighteen one banner McDowell. SONORAN DOT ORG website. Fantastic and I will put up links to all of those in the show notes for this episode, but Dr Row. Thank you so much for taking time to talk to us and thank you so much for taking on this task, good luck and keep us posted, but I think it's a really important. Project that you've you've started here in and I. Just hope the Best I hope. It results in more plant and land conservation in the Sonoran desert. Thank you so much. Yeah, of course a have yourself a great day. Okay you cheer. Stack you later. Art, everyone that's this week I think. Dr Road for taking time out of her busy schedule to talk with us. And I hope you will go check out. All of the links over in the show notes for this episode. That's indefensible. Plans DOT COM slash podcast. That's where you can find information on not only the show, but every other podcast we put out. 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Communisnt: Crony Capitalism In China With David Barboza

Capitalisn't

46:20 min | 3 months ago

Communisnt: Crony Capitalism In China With David Barboza

"I would say. Many of the americans meet in china. They're either incredibly naive or they're pretending. Be incredibly naive. And i my own view. Is americans doing business in china. Don't know the half of it. i'm bethany mclean. Ever have a moment of doubt about capitalism and whether greens a good idea. and i'm losin gallus. We have socialism for the very rich rugged individualism for the poor and this is capital. Isn't a podcast about what is working and capitalism virtual told me is. There's some society you know that doesn't run on greed and most importantly what is it. We ought to do better by the people get left behind. I don't think we should have killed the capital system in the process for most of last century getting rich in china was against the rules. The communist government's planned economy saw to that but things change in the nineteen eighties. When then leader deng xiaoping's rallying cry was to get rich is glorious most people these days. Don't focus on corruption in china. Why because china's so successful you don't want to think about it. As corrupt lawyers who have represented activists have been disbarred. Journalists who write critically have been thrown out of the country and as many as two million party members have been investigated for corruption she has replaced collective leadership with centralized authority. When the lijian. I decided to do an episode focusing on corruption. In china we thought of course of david barboza. David is the former new york times reporter. Who's two thousand twelve piece revealed that the extended family of china's prime minister controlled assets worth nearly three billion dollars who better to talk about. How deep the corruption really extends and whether it matters in the end david i i met back in the early two thousands when we were both reporters covering enron speaking of corruption so. I'm particularly delighted to have him on this episode. It might actually be interesting to start on a bit of a personal note. David because you and i did way back when in the wake of your coverage of of enron and you were just making the decision back then to learn chinese and go to china to work for the new york times there. What what made you make that decision. What took you there after the my work on enron. The time said to me okay because you lived in a hotel in houston for a whole year. We're going to let you go on vacation and you can pick anywhere in the world my friend. Jim yardley my colleague was just being moved to beijing and he said why don't you come to china. I was so fascinated immediately. After i got to china and so i went back and i told them i think six months later or so and moved i moved to shanghai and what pieces of that played out as you expected. And what did not play out as you expected. Strangely you know. One of the first meetings i had in china was with a young guy who had graduated from brown and he said i read your stuff on on enron and i can tell you every chinese company is enron then of course. I thought he was crazy but back. There were so many enron's in china they thought of is a good thing. Enron was a good word in china. They are so clever. I just couldn't have imagined the kinds of stories and adventures in threats in people following me all the crazy ups and downs of living in an authoritarian country. That is both market-oriented in also kind of wild west End dictatorship and as you can see since. I got back to the us in two thousand and end of two thousand fifteen. I cannot let go of. I could let go of is a great story but i could let that go but i can't let go of the china story and in the meantime you won a pulitzer prize and i read for your striking exposure of corruption at high levels of the chinese government including billions in secret wealth owned by relatives of the prime minister well-documented war published in the face of pressure from the chinese officials leaving america after four years of the trump presidency. We're little bit not so sensitive corruption because corruption anywhere. So can you explain. Ask what is the level of corruption. China is a trump level of corruption is much worse as much better. Tell us sure short. I mean a lot of people actually said when trump was running for president. The joke was he's the first chinese president of the united states. I mean there are a lot of things that are not very chinese about him. Obviously but the chinese part was that he's an authoritarian leader and he believes like family. I so this is like the china model right. Which is you bring all of your relatives in. Do business with them. It's a family owned company and you crush your enemies you threaten them. This is kind of like a combination of a top chinese tycoon. End the communist party leadership you have to be politically connected to do business in china the big scale not on every level. But if you wanna get really big. There's no way i'm told by my friends. My friends even who admit that they were involved in this. Say you've got to know the right people you've gotta make payoffs you have to perform. It's not just like you pay someone. And you get all the spoils but you have to do both the business side and the government relations side in your expected to share your wealth because your wealth in china is really the country's well and the country's leaders of the communist party in so when you rise up a businessman you need to make sure that the local officials who helped you're taking care of the provincial officials are taking care of the central government officials are taken care of so often i would track the sort of career of a tycoon. And so you knew that in the city that he started or she started. They pave the way through corruption locally then. They moved their headquarters. Maybe to the provincial capital and then they got those levels and then when they wanted to go national they moved to beijing or shanghai and they needed to get people at the very top to be a part of them into my story. With about the prime minister's family was really following lots of tycoons. That felt the best way to make. Sure you have support at the top is to bring in their families and to make sure the family or the what they call. The white glove is tied into the political elites that will secure your business against the government against competitors against all sorts against regulation. You need to have someone Maybe many people on your side. It's almost like a more diversified or democratic form of corruption. Which is it's not going to be five people or five families. It's going to be a every region can do corruption in their own area. Every member of the politburo standing committee can have their own little fiefdom. It's lots of corrupt individuals rather than a country you know. People would say a lot of emerging markets african countries russia. Other places are a few people just steal everything. China was lots of people steal because it's a big country and it's not concentrated like it is in russia and other countries to come up with a shorthand word for it it would be some sort of mix of communism and capitalism all combining in a form of crabs it and because it's involves family members. You're taking care of everybody along the way there's a communist communist and yet there's a capitalistic element to this. And that he at the top collects the most foils and you have to perform a lot of people. Think the communist party is really. It's really not a communist party. They tried communism that failed. And then they went back to sort of like the imperial times. Like the dynasties. And they said now. The tongue dynasty or the ching dynasty is really the communist party. And you need to to make sure all those leaders and their families are on the same page with your business that your business supporting the empire and the imperial extended family of communist party leaders. You know what they say. I think the eight leading cadres of the communist party the founding families of communism all of them have become gained wealth in the billions. Now there must have been to do the story you did. And i remember reading it and just feeling proud that i knew and saying a while but there must have been in the run-up to this key moments of realization. That things were wrong here and one maybe was that first moment in hong kong. Where friends you every. Every company is enron. But what were the other moments where you said. Wow this is how deep the corruption runs here. I think when we started getting the records so i heard the rumors for years. They're a secret shares held by the leading families. At one point. We tried to make a map of each family of the leaders and see where their children wear their money. But i was really hoping in this investigation that we would find three or four million dollars but when we got the records we calculated that this is a billion dollars in wealth. We've found. I think maybe the second or third month into i couldn't believe that it was real. I was you know we have to go through the wreckage. We could this be possible. Could the prime minister's family really be sitting on a billion dollars worth of assets in it's documented in government records so that was not only the realization that my goodness. This is a big story but also was a scary point. Because i knew how dangerous it would be if this were true in. I knew how dangerous it was going to be for me to continue to report on this story knowing that confirming these details tracking down the people that was going to be very. I mean. I think a few months before. I started the investigation. The not had just mentioned that some of the families of the leaders were involved in private equity not illegal but just mentioning their name. Even the western media could get you followed in. China threatened in china attracting china in a lot of people killed in china so they took by the way for the f. t. story they took the byline off. There was no. Ft violent for that story in china even though it didn't say anything outrageous instead what everyone knew which is the son of this leader is that you know a private equity firm. The son of this leader is at another one and there's no bynum for the f. T. right so. I knew it would be dangerous. I also felt a little what i felt when we worked on n run together. Which is the excitement of the mystery that i had these chinese records with all sorts of maps of who is doing the ownership and who these people were in diamond companies and insurance companies and real estate companies. And i knew it was going to be exciting unraveling that mystery and then trying to get the times to publish it by the end of the year. This is like october. And i'm saying that really believing that i could do this. By december which was impossible. We publish the next october. So if i am let's say i'm tesla and i want to start exporting in china. Do they ask me and million dollars more be also out. Does it take place. I think china. I mean that's probably the old way But china has gotten more and more sophisticated. If you're a for you say tesla so you're you're foreign company. You're an international brand coming to china probably chinese government. No one's gonna walk up to elon. Musk in say. Can you pay us off in in. Send money to the leader. What's more likely to happen is when you come to china. You often need a partner. You need a local. You need a fixer. You need a government relations person. Those people will be the one that will figure out the sophisticated way to move that money. I mean one of the more sophisticated ways is not to ask for cash but to ask for a steak so we can set up a lot of companies around tesla or whatever your company is and they can be suppliers right and i can charge you higher than market rates or i have a stake in your subsidiary of tesla or i have you know i bring in a person who is your chinese partner. Who think is just like a western educated great person but actually that person needs to have twenty percent is gonna funnel that money back to the leaders in the families and remember there being advised by often by lawyers by accountant so they know many of the sophisticated ways if you're an international firm. They've been doing it for a long time if you're a local firm there's cash payoffs there's lots of those other old ways but if you're a sophisticated big company you would rather have it through an interlocking network of shell companies kind of like the enron right. Which is we can backdate things. We can change the ownership structure. We can create a series of show companies around your company. That can siphon off some of that money or some of that value. We're not just going to ask you to give us a pile of and that's why the case of the prime minister that i did was so interesting because that was the turning point where they started to go for shares in. I remember asking someone. Why do you pay them in shares in they said you know when we pay them in cash then once our company had trouble they were they were already out them to be a stakeholder to be a long term shareholder and so we decided to them through company shares over time through lots of vehicles and your experience did western companies that came to china to do business. Innately know this and if they didn't already know this what was their reaction when they learned it if any company that does business in china tells me like you know i know. There's a lot of corruption in china. But i've never seen it. I completely just roll my eyes and say that's impossible but of course a lot of companies know that they can't talk about this because of cpa and in fact one of the trends. The early trends. That i was writing about in one of the work on the biggest story about china was many of the multinationals. The old way was we put a an american or someone from taiwan someone from hong kong as the head of our china operations. But the problem is they're not really mainland chinese there from hong kong maybe they're mandarins not so good but the americans and the foreigners trust them right but the increasing trend when i was there is a local mainland. Chinese is the partner and with that local part they really knew how to play the local game and they knew how to take care of those officials in those families and they also knew that we don't want to know about that at the big company so set up a consulting firm. Set up something but you do get. Fcpa training so make sure we don't know don't tell us so that when you go down we say we had no idea right. We just blame that local partner. I think is the prevailing trend now in also those local partners. They may not only be paying off an important person in china. They may be siphoning off money themselves. I wrote about gs k The cheesecake as one of the things that we found in the glaxosmithkline corruption case was not only were they paying to doctors to prescribe but the people locals running gs k. The chinese managers gs cake had created a series of companies inside gs k. That supplied all sorts of equipment and things in so they had extra salaries. Like why should i. The general manager taking big risks with corruption. Why should i make a hundred thousand or two hundred thousand dollars. When i can siphon off several million and it would be very hard especially teamed up with the other locals for the managers. The bosses that come in from new york. They don't know chinese. They re chinese. We can run them in circles. We can have our own operation. We can report fake numbers to them. So it's really kind of a scary thing for multinationals is they can't really know what's going on in china they don't wanna know some of the things they have to trust their local partners. Obviously many of those local partners are trustworthy people. But i would tell you. A lot are not so. Let me be a bit naive here. But all this companies have big accounting firms that i suppose to audit the accounts while we know that all of those don't have a mandate to ferret out for or corruption however they have an obligation that if they see something that looks like or have suspicion they have to report upward. What i've seen so out can like american audit firms audit the chinese operation of the multinationals in good faith and report and everything is fine. They can so. I'll tell you why this is so interesting in complicating right so the major accounting firms from the world you know the pws's etcetera. They have to set up a local operation in a lot of those are like franchises. They're not even really in control of them. In china for its state security law doesn't even let regulators like the sec. Get close to those records. That's one of the battles with the us. Government in china is the. Us would like even listed companies. I mean even alibaba. The sec could not go into china and get the records and these are not the same as the accounting firms in the standards that they have outside so they are local firms. The firms are told a lot of what you're doing is a state secret so you would never tell a company. Ge or name. Accompany if you go to ge or one of these big companies and say well. We found that The chairman of our local operation was paying off the family of a leader. The families of leaders their names are forbidden in the media. You can't publish them on the internet. When i searched for the family that was looking for. They can't even be published in chinese online. So those are state secrets and this is a state security matter and by the way anyone who worked for me as a translator researcher was reminded every week at lunches that they went to occasionally with the with the state security agents that whereas david doing. What does david doing. where is he going. You realize that This is china and we know where your family is. You need to be loyal to china and these are state security issues. You could be arrested for doing the wrong thing. Those audit firms in those locals are not going to protect a foreign company from the chinese government. So yes there's some of them are better than others but look and coffee. Kinds of stuff happens all the time. How often does that happen. Because an audit firm talked about it. It's it's really because the short seller or send journalist or some something was leaked out. You know i just wrote about this company. Agent which is a chinese company is enron squared. I mean this is related. Party transactions the son and brother of the chairman set of companies which are bought and sold items to h in a it is. Everyone is known this been fraud for a long time. It became a hundred billion dollar company in it only recently collapsed. We're a long way away from china to having a trustworthy system of auditing. In regulatory oversight doesn't matter in the end. I mean when you think about the flood of american money into china even as thanks to your reporting all of this has become more and more known yet. The flood of american corporate money into china hasn't slowed does does it. Does the corruption matter both for the flood of money international money into china and for china's long-term success and what if it matters. What point does it start to matter right. So i think what matters is for the companies is their return. What will two things it their return in. Also how much of a pr problem is it. If china sensors the press and makes it very difficult for western journalists to find out about my global companies corruption in china then. I don't have a pr problem. The bottom line is the returned. So if you tell me well you're gonna come in. You're gonna make a hundred million dollars but you're gonna have to pay five million dollars in bribes and like fine. I'll do that. Many companies will probably say. We'll take that wager. So as long as china is growing in. it's the fastest growing. It's the future. It's been incredible. What this model has been able to do for global companies is long as you have that calculation. You're only going to get out win. The corruption is greater than your investment right or you stopped making money or you got caught in the corruption scandal. So big i mean look at. Gsk five hundred million. Are they out of china. Know at qualcomm. I think something like five hundred to a billion. You're going to get out when it's not profitable to be in so in some ways you can say. China has the perfect model for global companies. What are the country in the world can grow eight nine ten twelve percent a year for twenty years and deliver you unbelievable profits and also let you manufacture everything at a very low cost in have a relatively small number of corruption cases involving companies like yours. So it's actually you know when you look at the us cases against multinationals the fcpa cases. Most of those are self reported ninety nine percent. I think are self reporting the company calls and they told us they were violating the books and records incorrupt right so those are a tiny tiny percentage so actually. If i were to be cynical i would say. China is the dream market for global companies. I was thinking as you were talking that china's the reality of business while american companies visions and value statements. Are they idealized. Form of yes. Exactly i would say many of the americans. I meet in china. They're either incredibly naive or they're pretending to be incredibly naive. China's a very nice culture is a very welcoming culture. You're treated so well when you come to china. They probably have no idea that everyone. That's welcome then has ninety nine thousand strategies for how to profit from from this relationship. I my own view. Is americans doing business in china. Don't know the half of they're they're they're probably you know. I get flown in. They take me to the factory. I see great things. It all looked so fun. And then they take me to a great dinner and they treat me and then they send me the apart and behind the scenes. They could be doing anything they want. Because i want to hear a positive story in a growth country. I wanna see my numbers. Go up. I don't wanna see the details in probably wouldn't show me the details anyway. I think that's a great point that we're all always biased toward seeing what we want to see right and does incredibly true of companies doing business in china. How do you think the pandemic these dynamics if if at all in the sense that china has gotten world-wide opprobrium floor it's handling of the pandemic at the start and yet china arguably is emerging from this on a healthier footing then certainly must of the west the positive for china. The pandemic is how it handled it right. It showed the world that maybe this authoritarian model is at least it's good for pandemic to deal with the pandemic in the business and economic sense. I think it's certainly a positive for china that while the rest of the world is a mess that its economy is open. It's gaining more trade. It's get its factories. Or churning out everything they can actually take a bunch of old state owned factories and sells stuff all over the world. Because you can't even open your country to make the stuff so how even how are you gonna produce things and basically now wake up and see. Almost everything is made in china in almost everyone is tied into china and they have leverage that we never thought china could have. I mean. that's one reason why we started. You know the magazine. The wire magazine is because that china in the world understanding china into role outside of china. That's what we're mostly writing about. China outside of china how that plays in how that affects every company so if china is the standard for what a movie should be that hollywood produces well. We're all gonna be watching movies. That chinese like because they are the biggest market if china decide what louis vuitton bags should look like wrongly gonna be wearing having louis vuitton bags. China's going to change all these things because the world is going to coalesce around the biggest market for while the biggest market has been the us so the rest of the world gets wet. America lights now. The rest of the world is going to get what china likes. That could be a very different world. And it's fascinating because we all tend to think of china system as being antithetical to ours are opposed to ours are opposite to ours and yet the accumulation of wealth and the income disparity in china is looks quite a bit like the us and so that leads to a question of how fundamentally different our systems actually are for every allegation of fraud and cronyism in china. I think well. Here's here's here's the us foolish. Civil is not my style to defend. People tend to be more on the attack. But this time i have to defend the united states is not as bad as china. I think we all the criticism wherever the people who govern us. I don't think that you have a prime minister. Who accumulates on the job. Three billion dollar. I don't think it's as extreme but the same forces are in place. Us presidents generally become very wealthy once they leave office because it is the connection to political power that enables them then to gain great wealth after at least by by most people's standards not three billion dollars of wealth but often tens of millions of wealth. And so there is a critical ruble in the us for all that we think we have a free market system it it crony capitalism pervades every every aspect of it. People who who have have access to political power tend also to get money so no not three billion dollars but some of the same forces are at work for sure he's true. Us presidents get paid a lot of this peaches and by the way not just us presidents also former central bankers for example. But first of all. We're talking about. Different order of magnitude pre shocking. That jon allen. Made what seven on eight million in speeches after. She stepped down from the fed. But we're talking about millions not billions that i think i think that people have proximity to political power in the. Us can use that to become quite wealthy. Not you're right. It's an order of magnitude issue. It's not on the scale of what you see in china. But they can if they choose not to. It's because they make the moral choice not to not because the option isn't available to parlay political power or access to it in into money. So i think my argument is that the same dynamic in the us system. It's it's not. The order of magnitude is absolutely different. But but you still see some of the same forces at work of course. Human nature is equal everywhere. And when you have power you try to get money and when you have money you tried to power. So the system is the same but i think that transparency that comes with a us stat of system limits that a great. But i thought when david said that enron was something to be admired in china because of its cleverness because of how they got away with it i thought that was really telling comment and it was interesting. That part of his discovery part of his discovery process got there was how systemic corruption was in how endemic it was to the way. In which china functions there is probably something to that very lack of transparency as well as this really unique mixture in china of capitalism communism and nepotism that some of acid working in the us but near the same degree. You know that the term nepotism stands from nephew in italian and was actually was invented for a pope that at a child. And because you didn't want to say that the cia. You said it was a nephew and so that was called nepotism. I've had no idea but of course everything interesting comes out of italy. Saw not surprised corrupts. I was trying not to go. Go to the jar of but i think that that's to the story. I think that the combination of the strong family attachment a huge amount of discretionary power because unlike in many other countries the central power steal the active and a lot of money to be made. The market is so big democracy. Pecunia so big that if i am a local officer in china and my yes can make you a fortune. Why don't you share it with me. Rather than sharing with the county lodge maybe in the form of taxation you share with the local office in the form of a of a bribe but bribes. Are they well. These guys these days with business participation shares and stuff like that. I love the story that david said in the old days. Bribing place in cash and now people realized that they preferred to bribing shares. Because you are committed for the long term rather than just for the show right but again at argue there's a similarity to how the us functions is china moves toward less transparent means of giving bribes if you think about for instance some of the scandals we've seen with companies boards of directors where the boards are essentially in some ways being paid in order to keep quiet or to or to not raise objections to what's to what's going on in in the boardroom. And again it's a difference of degree but it's the same sort of fundamental attitude. But i think the degree does matter and the pervasiveness does matter and also the moral sanctioning matter. Seems to me for my what i got from. David is that not only this is pervasive is not really shine. Upon is something that everybody knows that is taking place and they look the other way. I i hear you. But then i would point to the financial crisis in the us which while perhaps not criminal. The argument after the fact was well. We can't prosecute anybody because these are all good guys in these are all the people we know when we're all in it together and so therefore nobody did anything wrong. This is one hundred year storm. That is jamie. Diamond said the ceo of j. p. morgan chase that couldn't have been predicted. And that was the mantra from those in power. It's not outright explicit corruption in in the same way but it was a way of doing business that was sanctioned by all of those in power and then after the fact all of those in power agreed the way of doing business would be sanctioned so again it's a difference in degree and and perhaps explicit corruption versus implicit corruption. I'd maybe summarize the difference a little bit a little bit differently which is to say that in the us when these things happen we make a really big deal about the right books about them and we produced tv shows and excoriate those involved as as if these are the exceptions and then when the next one comes along we we do the same thing whereas in china people just pretend it doesn't happen yet but that gives a confidences acuity that makes people go deeper increase the amount and making the system woes. One thing that stuck with me of the interview was the fact that said the basically china is the market for corrupt companies because market where you can make your ernest. Be whatever you want. And nobody's ever gonna portu you. I think the level of a society is the by. What are we willing to accept in this dimension and it seems to me. China is a stab below the united states. We're going fast in that direction. So i'm not underestimating that we are in the same objective but i fear that number one china's wars and number two agley china is dragging us down because the other thing that shocked me on the interview is that david said pretty clearly that everybody knows about this all the system that we have in place that we're proud of like the foreign corrupt practices act the audit rules with saban. Oxley these people that are pay a v. richly to check the all looking the other way around that the thing that stood out to me was when he said if somebody says that they don't know about any fraud and if somebody doing business there says we'll wait. I've never encountered this. He knows right away that they're lying because he knows that's not true and to your point about dragging us down. I mean i think it's our american companies single minded focus on profit at the expense of any kind of morality that allows what happens in china to drag drag us down but when you look at what. Us companies are willing to do in order to do business in china it. It does make you cynical for sure and then it. It makes me wonder since everybody feels like they have to make compromises to they're supposed moral principles in order to do business in china. Because god forbid you get left out of such a huge and growing market. It comes back to the conversation. We've had about the necessity of government rules and regulations to define a fair playing field playing field upon which which people are going to compete. Because if if you don't have that then of course everybody has to figure out how to do business in china in any way possible because their stock is going to get hammered otherwise and they're gonna get left behind and so if there ever were for clearer set of rules around it. Maybe maybe it's here. Yeah and What was me even. More is what david said. That china is also an additional power. That is so big that even from a purely market point of view is going to shape the taste and is going to shape the norms of the taiwan. I grew up in italy shea by the gene. Send the coal candidate product that americans were selling all over the world and i think the next generation will go up with the product that china wants which is fine. I don't mind actually. I prefer chinese food than cokes. But the more important point is they're gonna also be extremely influential in term of business norms particularly so because not only big market the big market that can be influenced by just a couple of players precisely because are non democracy and as all about eve. The chinese government say. We don't want to do business with you because you spoke in favor of the minority hugo's because you said something about own kong then all of a sudden you're cut out of one of the largest market in the world that we have seen what happened with the houston rockets. When the gentleman manages tweeted a tweet backing pro democracy demonstrations right here in hong kong. The nba makes billions of dollars in the chinese market. And it's apparently citing with beijing. Calling daryl morey tweet regrettable. National basketball association went on their needs to try to say please on meet us back. The same happened to it. Play in in europe That is jim appear but of turkish origin. That he's sort of. Feel as strongly. Because those moslems vase strongly about a muslim minority in china and is basically blackballed by many football association. Now because they want to show their games in china raises a really interesting question that maybe we're not paying enough attention to which as we take for granted america's ability to shape the world culturally and in terms of business narms at the very moment when that might be going away and the world will look really really different. If it's china shaping those those norms and not us. It's something we've taken for granted for a really long time. And it's changing underneath us. And we have to be careful because inevitably people my interpret you as you have something anti-chinese and i have nothing anti-chinese the issue is is not a democracy in the west and sense of water are not some fundamental freedom including the one to expose the problems in this as made bows to run away from china and they closed down the office of the new york times for awhile of that. So that gives you a sense of how aggressive this is. Everybody was going on when trump was saying. The press is the enemy of the people which was terrible. But i have to say there was a lot of bach and that not as much by china does and makes a difference. Have you ever wondered what goes on inside. A black hole are y time only moves in one direction. Are what is really so weird about quantum mechanics. Well then you should listen to why this universe on this podcast. You're about the strangest and most interesting ideas in physics broken down by physicists. Dan who burnt and shama waxman. If you wanna learn about our universe from the quantum to the cosmic. You won't want to miss why this universe part of the university of chicago podcast network. So what do you make of china. Today and jason pangs efforts at reform chinese president xi jinping has launched an anti-corruption campaign and overseen investigations into the country's wealthiest and most powerful more than one hundred thousand has been jailed for battlement and bribery. Do you think they're real. Do think this changes china going forward. I don't i see jinping as concentrating more power. So if you see the pattern from the famous moment of the end out of hong kong to china there was A hope that was montaigne that china will evolve in the direction of the western world with that hope as these appear in fact china is becoming more in a talk. Crecy the occasional scandals Just designed to make it easier for xi jinping to get rid of some of the people if everybody's correct then you can use anti-corruption clean up as a way to get your enemies who you're going to push acute because you're gonna find a reason to prosecute it's it's it's control disguised as a cleanup right. I think there were as recent moves involving ten cents. An aunt are pretty fascinating to china putting the brakes on. The world's biggest anchor listing both shanghai and hong kong have been suspended and group and chinese regulators apparently have not reached a restructuring plan. That will turn jack. Mas fintech giant into a financial holding company. The chinese authorities wanted to imply somehow that they needed to get more control over ant financial. Now would come under much. Greater scrutiny of chinese authorities setting a different standard in china for how firms have to behave. Which is one hundred percent control based right but what i heard is with the story of an financial was also way to show to the world the communist party control and they can do whatever they are not afraid if you burn billions of dollars in order to enforce something you care. This is literally a good signal in economic burning. Money's a signal here. They will literally burn money as a signal that they are really in power and they can do it. I think it was mouth say you. He'd want locate one hundred. That's exactly what they're doing. They're using this as an example for for the rest and the world is washing. Yes it is that capitalism and communism can coexist but communism is in control not capitalism. And i think i saw a piece. I think it was in bloomberg. About how jack. Ma had given a very dismissive speech right before the ant financial idea was pulled and it was clear evidence that certain kinds of speech and challenge to the communist party. Just simply are not going to be permitted. No i think you're absolutely right. And i think that the point you you as early earlier the connection between capitalism democracy is incredibly important because i think that the success of the chinese corrupt modo ease warri me not only from a calculus view but also democratic point of view because if the rest of the wall becomes s corrupt as china i think is difficult to maintain the level of corruption. And the at the same time and so the simplest way is to actually get rid of democracy is not get rid of corruption. Getting rid of corruption is extremely difficult but get democracy. Unfortunately not so. I thought there was a fascinating statistic incredibly relevant to this idea that communism is somehow a purer system and so when we were researching this episode. I came across the two thousand sixteen study from peking university which said that in china the richest one percent of households hold a third of the country's wealth while the poorest twenty five percent only owned one percent of its wealth and so if there ever were a contradiction to the idea that communism means economic equality for all. Its it's that statistic. But i i should say and this is an easy one is the chinese. Communist has not really communist. Maybe is common isn't be that is obvious but it's still made me laugh. Comes back to the point that you mentioned in it's very dispiriting observation. But maybe just as china's method of of capitalism might be dragging the us down it's also the us style. Capitalism has perhaps dragged the pure ideal of communism and so perhaps both countries are evolving in following up up a race to the bottom evolving to be more like each other rather than true to the best ideals inherent are different systems. Mogul like each other. I think they get the worst from the other side. No not only the worst. Because the chinese communist system has imported a dynamic growth of the capitalist system that is good and we should not ignore the fact that china did dick create a lot of wealth indeed lifted a lot of people out of poverty. I think one thing that could be done is less naievety in our view of china and thank thank goodness for people like david barboza who have exposed the fact that great wealth has been accumulated by those in control because that's that's the way communism has has always worked there's communism for most people and then great wealth for a at the top so that's one solution is just continuing to point out that yes our system in the. Us has problems but dear. God what is that man. But it's not as if the perfect system has been invented by anybody anywhere joshua kelley right. The the other is following a bit water to was saying that. When you don't like something you tax it. Maybe we should start. Considering taxing businesses in china more is if there are this negative spillovers on our norms and the way companies around. And all the stuff. Maybe we should do less of it and economics. We know one thing. Well if you want to reduce the foot action of sending you tax it and so if you want to reduce business with china you tax it. Yeah that's it's interesting to think whether we need revised foreign corrupt practices act whether we need something that more explicitly sets rules so that the that that capture the continued evolution of corruption in in china. And that's specifically is aimed at creating a non corrupt and level playing field for us companies operating there and i'm not well enough versed in the intricacies of the foreign corrupt practices. Act to know what what else we we we might need. Maybe maybe it's not enough to capture the continued evolution of corruption. Yeah the problem is then. You need to agree with all the major western countries. Because if you go alone. And let's say france and germany. I exempted from that. You're basically concede the market to them which maybe is a price worth paying but something clearly would be used against you to try to stop it. You're right you're you're absolutely right in global economy the us if we ever had the power to unilaterally make that decision we don't we don't have it anymore and that it becomes an argument that us companies are being put at a huge disadvantage relative to the rest of the world which already exists with. That's already argument with foreign corrupt practices. Act and it happens to be true and you're right that idea with challenges capital isn't as a podcast from the university of chicago stiegler center in collaboration with the chicago booth review. Also check out pro-market dot org a publication of the stiegler center. Don't forget to subscribe and we've reviewed a capital isn't wherever you get your asses.

china enron Us China tesla david barboza hong kong bethany mclean losin gallus david lijian Jim yardley politburo standing committee the new york times chinese government shanghai beijing David
#86 Norwegian ble berget, men hvor lenge vil det vare?

Liberaleren Podcast

16:44 min | 1 year ago

#86 Norwegian ble berget, men hvor lenge vil det vare?

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Healing the Mind

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

17:02 min | 4 months ago

Healing the Mind

"This week, I was out of town for the community drop in groups. So didn't have a recording to offer for the podcast. So, decided to come back and share a conversation, I offered for Temple. Beth-El here in Charlotte, a couple of weeks ago, they had invited me to be part of a panel discussion on exploring healing, the Mind from religious, spiritual and mindfulness perspectives. I loved this. Invite to explore healing the Mind from these perspectives. So this is what I had to offer. At the beginning, I want to say that while I grew up Presbyterian and then spent many years as a practicing quaker I'm not now part of any specific religious tradition and so for me this really is about mindfulness and spirituality. In my professional life. I teach mindfulness classes very much from a neuroscience and humanistic perspective. For me, this is entirely about attending to my spirituality and about offering a space where others can also deepen in that perspective or themselves whatever their path is as well. And love word, roots, the root of the word. Spiritual is related to inspiration or breath. The way I think of that is what brings us to life. What gives us a sense of meaning, a sense of sacred? Sacred is another word. I've thought about the roots of a lot and for me this word is about being alive to A Gifted Essence wage that's available in any moment, all moments, whether a moment of Joy, a moment of deep challenge moment of mundane boredom. And at the heart of it, this is all mindfulness is waking up to the gift inherent and every moment. What's really beautiful? Is that we all already know something about this. So if you pause right now and just take a couple of nice deep and and out breaths. Freelance with aliveness of the body, the body sitting in the chair here. From the space of birth body aliveness. Well, a moment to come to mind and heart. When you felt really alive, awake connected in some maybe in an affable way. Maybe what comes to mind is a small moment. I've seen a sunset bird flying Maybe it's something that was much more life, impactful the birth of a child. Whatever comes to mind. Consider would present. When you have these moments of knowing what it's like to be awake and in touch with a sacred gift business for a moment. Kind of qualities are present. when you are in touch deeply, in touch with the healing flow of life, Breathing, and breathing out. And then let yourself consider what separates you from this. What shots you down? So, these are beautiful useful questions to live with. If we hunger for healing in our lives, Would I would say is that while most everyone can identify moments of being a wait to life and moments of being shut down. It's much harder for us in the midst of stressful. Busy lives to know how to reliably support ourselves with staying in touch. With that Essence. It makes life Rich that opens us to Healing Connection well-being. And this is what I love. So much about mindfulness. There are real teachable skills. We can learn to support ourselves in this package, if we're willing to practice them over time. Mindfulness is a training of opening minehart in the direction of healing. Which makes me come to want to say, what I mean by the word mindfulness. In a lot of ways, I think this is a really poor word choice for that quality of awareness, but encompasses mind, heart and body. When you look at how this quality is pointed to, another culture's is often called Mind heart. But when we westerners who have this tendency to live from the neck up in the head, pick a word to point to. That quality would drop the heart and we just call it mindfulness to really be. When I say the word mindfulness, a better word would be mind. Heartfulness mind heart always needed both parts. What I think of with this quality, is a non-judgmental way of paying attention to whatever is arising in my faults. What's the rising in my emotions with the rising, in my body and the world around me with a lot of wisdom and kindness with a lot of clear mind and strong heart month. There is this spacious open, naturally wise and compassionate awareness. That's always available. And then we can begin to learn how to access through this practice on a drop into in a reliable way. It's learning how to drop into that kind of awareness of myself and others that allows me to be responsive to myself and the world wage in a way that matters in a way that I deeply care about. So these practices are very simple, watch the first move and and out from the body, feel the body connected with gravity to the earth below. But it really takes time and dedication to experience the riches that these practices begin to unfold in our lives. We start to understand, they are endless layers of Tangled complexity, within our own selves. And then some ways it's totally appropriate. That learning mindfulness is often compared to learning to stand in a fire. So the fire of our own Hearts, our own and that we finally start to learn how to meet in a way that makes things better and not worse. It's really sweet when we start feeling that old familiar tight, nodded internal tangle. To begin to untangle and release. When I first started, practicing mindfulness. I remember having this very distinct feeling that someone had finally handed me the training manual to living in this body. And it's really beautiful to me to combine mindfulness, practice with neuroscience and sites. For me, the Neuroscience insights, can be very liberating ways of understanding how we humans get so easily trapped in our suffering, due to our evolutionary survival system, simply misfiring and ways that hurt us and lead us to hurt others. We can actually begin to understand these shared human, wirings and patterns. Related to just even the smallest day-to-day irritations. As well as our true life crisis and the crisis has faced by our world. Understanding the shared, interrelatedness of survival reactivities makes the world a much less confusing choice to live. Makes my body in much less confusing, place to live. So with this practice, not only do we begin to see into the reactivities, but we can also begin to see that there's a way out of these reactivity wage that is attainable and available to us. One other thing that I think is really important about use of this word. Mindfulness is to note that this is a human quality. Not something that belongs to any one religion philosophy or system. I've met three people in my life who have opened in this sort of path to a degree that has revealed something different, to me about our Birthright of Being Human. And these three people came from very different backgrounds. One Catholic, one Buddhist and one, my guess was hinge. So these people for me, was very fortunate to spend time with Mother Teresa. To meet tick. Not Han And to me, Amen. In Kolkata, who gave me a gift beyond? All measure about what it means to be truly at peace and he's the main human. What I remember most vividly about being with all three, was this felt palpable presence. Of compassion of acceptance of Grace. And what I'm now learning is to open my eyes to the so many ways. There are small moments of that all around available all the time. So want to look at the root of one last word, healing. The root of the word, healing comes from wholeness. So, ultimately mindfulness is a path back to our wholeness. No matter. If we access it from a neuroscience perspective, from a secular mindfulness perspective or a spiritual awareness perspective, or religious perspective, it inevitably leads to a place of understanding. Our intervene are interrelatedness wage or interdependence. our wholeness with all that is around us and within it begins to inevitably reveal how ultimately our deepest truest healing comes from healing that Rift of thinking that we are somehow separate from everything and everyone around us. when we can begin to see across this Rift, We can start to know the homeless of being home. Right where we are with things. Exactly are thus they are we can know a true Refuge that is available in any moment of life. So, I want to finish with the poem from picnic on called. Please call me by my true names. Don't say that I will depart tomorrow, even today. I am still arriving. Look deeply every second. I am arriving to be a blood on a Spring Branch to be a tiny bird was still fragile Wings learning thing in my new messed to be a caterpillar in the heart of a flower, to be able to rule hiding itself in a stone. I still drive in order to laugh and to cry to fear and to hope the rhythm of my heart is the birth and death of all that is alive. I am a mayfly metamorphose seen on the surface of the river. I am the bird that swoops down to swallow the mayfly. I am a frog swimming happily in the clear pump water of the pond and I am the grass snake. That silently feeds itself. On the Frog song. I am the child and Uganda all skin and bones, my legs as thin as bamboo sticks. And I am the arms. Merchants selling deadly weapons to Uganda. I am the twelve-year-old girl Refugee on a small boat or throws herself into the ocean. After being raped by a sea pirate. And I am also the pirate, my heart not yet capable of seeing and loving. I am a member of the politburo with plenty of power in my hands and I am the man who has to pay his dead or blood to my people dying slowly in a forced-labor camp. Hi, Joy is like spring. So warm it makes flowers bloom all over the Earth. And pain is like a river of Tears. So vast it fills the four oceans. Please call me by my true names so I can hear all my cries and laughter at once. So, I can see that my Joy and Pain are one. Please call me by my true names so I can wake up in the door of my heart could be left open. The door of compassion. Thank you.

Beth Charlotte Mother Teresa Kolkata Han Grace Uganda swimming
How CBDCs Give Absolute Control to Central Banks

The Breakdown with NLW

15:53 min | 3 months ago

How CBDCs Give Absolute Control to Central Banks

"Quote we believe at digital euro is preemptive response a crypto kryptonite a big tech neutralizer for my part. I think it is worth being forceful in our separation of these two things. Peer to peer network cryptos and big tech. Money's like libra. One is an extension of power of an old already powerful entity in big tech. The other is a new organizational. Form that leaches power from institutions and distributed across networks. I think this distinction is going to be incredibly important in the future including and especially to regulators because there is no doubt that fintech is the enemy. They have their sights on. Welcome back to the breakdown with me. And i'll w it's daily podcast on macro bitcoin and the big picture. Power shifts remaking. Our world the breakdown is sponsored by next dot. io caspar einem and produced and distributed by coin. Toss what's going on guys. It is friday march nineteenth and today we are discussing. Cdc's and the absolute control of central banks. I however let's do the brief. I up on the brief today. Us china talks so one of the hallmarks of the last presidential election cycle was frankly a competition to see who could be harder on china. Well the first face-to-face high-level talks between the two countries are happening at least when it comes to the show toughness is definitely the name of the game. Us secretary of state. Anthony blinken accused beijing of being a force for undermining global stability his counterpart on the chinese side said of the. Us wasn't qualified to speak to china. From a position of strength as bloomberg pointed out both sides comments seemed designed primarily for domestic consumption coming out of their recovery from the corona virus is emboldened and coming off of four years of donald trump the. Us's course is to some extent. Set the question really is whether this bluster is just for public consumption. And there's more room for cooperation behind closed doors or whether this is really the state of things at least one professor said it's probable that after this anchorage diplomatic summit sino. American relations may deteriorate further my favorite interpreter of this stuff. However graham webster who has been on the show before and who basically said who expected anything else. He effectively calls out the twitter. Ati reaction as forced surprise for the sake of the reaction tweet. He tweeted to the chinese side. Went over time in front of the press and delivered the expected litany in public also for public affect the us. I'd sanctioned politburo member days before not after requiring some extra display the people in that room get it on here less oh yang is well known for laying into us visitors to send a message. Sometimes it's that and then shift gears to a productive agenda. Sometimes his job is the message. And that's this visit. I mean the us messaging about this meeting has been that. They're going to lecture china about all the bad stuff china does. Do people expect the chinese messaging to be. Hey nice to see you guys. I just get the sense. People either had unrealistic expectations or more likely had few expectations in specific. But just love a good reaction gif this act. One scene one in a sequel. That never should have been made. But we don't get to opt out. Let's see how it goes next up on the roof today let's talk about. Us spending coming back. The lead story in the wall street journal this morning was economy revs up as americans increase spending on flights lodging and dining out and effectively. What this shows is that there is huge pent up demand for the experiences that were most compromised cove nineteen pandemic the biden administration has announced that they met their distribute one hundred million vaccine doses in one hundred days goal in just fifty eight days and continue to push states to have the vaccine be available to everyone by may. This is leading to big potential growth. Economists surveyed by the wall street journal raise their average twenty twenty one economic growth forecast to five point nine five percent up from four point eight seven percent in february. This would be the fastest pace. In four decades. And as i mentioned there are some specific indicators that the chief beneficiaries are travel experiences and hospitality experiences that were lost. Airbnb and vr b. o. are currently above pre pandemic levels. Us hotel occupancy. Hit a twenty week high of forty nine percent a week ago. The article in the wall street journal also had great little segment about the mohawk mountain house. Which is a resort in my neck of the woods over here in the hudson valley. They had it worse than the two thousand seven to two thousand nine recession. But now they're getting tons of inquiries about of all things have family. Reunions nature is as they say healing third and finally on the brief today. Let's talk about decentralized for those who are still uncomfortable in the physical world. The virtual world is growing fast coins is reporting that he casino in central land. Which is decentralized virtual world is actually hiring real life people so real life host. Now work the floor helping visitors explore roulette blackjack and slots. They're doing four hour shifts getting paid about five hundred bucks a month in die. The first full-time floor manager goes by the name g. l. h. f. said to be a veteran online poker player who quit their previous jobs in february to go full time before the whole. Nfc boom happened. I wondered if it would take the rise of virtual worlds for something like digital art and digital collectibles to take hold. It felt to me like they solve a lot of the problems of display. And while it's obvious that those problems don't seem to be enough to stop the momentum in the nfc space. I do think it's pretty interesting to see more of this. Blend of real commerce and real employment happening in virtual spaces looking for the best way to unlock your cryptos. Liquidity next dot. Io is exactly what you need to borrow. Against your digital assets at just five point nine percents apr earn passive income with yield up to twelve percent and swamp between more than seventy five market pairs with the instant so exchange. Try the next wallet app to get the whole three hundred. Sixty degrees of crypto banking get started at next dot. Io until now blockchain technology has been a series of compromises. No layer one protocol exists in the market that supports everything enterprises developers and consumers need from decentralized applications meet kaspar caspar provides the blockchain ecosystem with a solution that makes no compromises around decentralisation security or performance learn more at casper dot network he dies. I'm excited to share the this week. We have a special product launch sponsor. Symbol the next gen. Public blockchain from them is here. Symbol from them is the connector between blockchain and business. It boasts enterprise grade security and program ability bringing cutting edge technical features two at the heart of the new economy symbol. From nam is bill to be interoperable. It supports public and private hybrid models. Truss cross chains swaps and easy integration with existing business systems and processes. Join us in building. The new economy visit symbol type one dot com or dot. Io for more information without. Let's shift to our main discussion fed chair. Jerome powell spoke at a virtual conference held by the basel committee for banking supervision. The speeches called pushing the frontiers of payments towards faster cheaper more transparent and more inclusive cross border payments. It's actually a pretty short little speech. And this is how powell sets up the context last year. The g. twenty asked the financial stability board has be to coordinate the development of a road map on how the global community could enhance cross border payments. It is long big knowledge that the existing system while safe and dependable suffers from frictions including processes that make it difficult to comply with anti money laundering and counter terrorist financing requirements difficulty in managing payments across time zones and in certain areas reliance on outdated technology moreover these frictions contribute to higher costs of cross-border transactions. Now in response. Powell said that there are two approaches improving existing rails or laying new tracks and he said that the fed is doing both to existing rails. He gave the example of introducing faster instant payments via their fed now service and upgrading the designed to maintain uninterrupted processing twenty. Four hours a day seven days a week. Three hundred sixty five days a year. The plan is to launch those upgrades sometime in two thousand twenty. Three the laying new tracks side of the equation is you guessed it. Several bank digital currencies or cbd's in terms of their work on cdc's he cites two parts. I is research being conducted at the board of governors level specifically calling out a research collaboration between the federal reserve in boston and mit and second. He pointed to a collaboration with the bank for international settlements with a group of seven central banks including the fed. That produced a report on the feasibility of cdc's in helping central banks deliver their public policy objectives. The statement that people most picked up on was this one quote. One of the three key principles highlighted in the report is that a cd needs to coexist with cash and other types of money in a flexible and innovative payment system. One of the key questions for. Cbd's is will they be an outright replacement for cash or will they work in a hybrid system this idea of something more hybrid echoes what we've heard from european central bank chief christine lagarde. Who has been talking about it frequently over the course of the last year. She has said repeatedly that a digital euro would not be a replacement for cash but a supplement to it however it is hard to deny from a central bankers perspective that true. Cbd would be massively preferrable to cash. Cash is completely opaque offering near perfect privacy of use this is why caches the preferred tool of money laundering and criminals. Despite what they say about bitcoin indeed money laundering makes up a dramatically. Larger portion of the traditional systems activity than cryptos chain analysis. Report suggests that less than half a percent of crypto transactions were used for illicit purposes and most of those were internet scams meanwhile the un estimates that between two and five percent of global gdp between eight hundred billion in two trillion annually comes from money laundering. Given how much emphasis that. Traditional central bank establishment puts on anti money laundering. Cash would seem to be quite dangerous for them enter. Cdc's to be clear. Cdc's could be designed to be more or less opaque more or less privacy preserving in fact former cftc chair christian carlo has strenuously argued for a us digital dollar that it would have to be privacy preserving to meet obligations set it in the constitution however whatever the theoretical level of privacy those knobs will still be set by the implementing central bank and so presumably could be tweaked and reset by that same actor. This is why many human rights and privacy advocates are extremely nervous about the prospects of coming. Cdc era today. Alex glad seeing the cfo of the human rights foundation shared a clip of augustine carstens. Carson's is the general manager for the bank of international settlements. The is is basically the central bank for central bankers and they've increasingly been beating the drum especially since the announcement of libra. Let's listen to the clip that caught. Gladstone's attention our analysis. On cbs General juice a tend to establish the violence with cash and thirty a huge difference there if for example in kashmiri. We don't know for some who's using in one hundred dollar today. We don't know who is using one thousand today. A key difference in the cdc ease. The central bank will have absolute control on the rules and regulations that will determine the use of that expression of central wednesday ability. And also we have the technology to enforce that. Those two issues are extremely important than Makes a huge difference with respect to what is obviously the standout line from that is the absolute control piece. And i want to emphasize what glad scene said alongside this clip quote. This isn't some masks slip. This is repeated over and over again is the primary benefit of cbd's over alternatives like cash and bitcoin by central bankers and monetary experts. Of course they claim to keep you safe and to keep things stable and to fight. Bad guys just redefining. What alex said. This is a clip from cross border payments conference last october. And frankly you could find a half dozen more just like it now. As i mentioned there are theoretically different ways to design a. Cdc such that you could guarantee more or less privacy. However some of the cdc race leaders china. Don't even pretend to be interested in that privacy preservation for them. They are transparently interested in the control. Now if you wanna give the bis the benefit of the doubt regarding the statement you might contextualized this idea of absolute control to be specifically focused on the prevention of crime but as many bitcoin is will tell you if the cost of preventing crime is the effective criminalization of everyone. That's likely to higher cost to pay. What's more even assuming no initial mellon tent designing a system. That is as abused as a perfectly transparent controllable. Money creates immense future. Risk as i've said in previous episodes i think that. Cbc's are more or less a foregone conclusion. there's simply too many benefits for central bankers not to go down this path but there are some roadblocks one of them. Interestingly is commercial banks right now. Commercial banks own their relationships with their customers. Cdc's that involved. An account held directly with the central bank could suck trillions out of that system overnight in fact a new bank of america securities report argues that european commercial banks would be collateral damage in the instance of a digital euro. That same report argued that the real enemy that cdc's trying to beat is private crypto specifically private monies from fintechs quote we believe at digital euro is a preemptive response. A crypto kryptonite. Big tech neutralizer. For my part. I think it is worth being forceful in our separation of these two things. Peer to peer network cryptos and big tech. Money's like libra. One is an extension of power of an old but already powerful entity in big tech. The other is a new organizational. Form that leaches power from institutions and distributed across networks. I think this distinction is going to be incredibly important in the future including and especially to regulators because there is no doubt that fintech is the enemy. They have their sights on in america. The libra hearings were a referendum on zuckerberg and facebook in china. It is extraordinarily clear that the digital yuan is a part of an attempt to break the growing power of ali pay and we chat pay and integrate them into a new entirely controlled system. All that said one last line from powell's speech that i wanna point out improvements in the global payment system will come not just from the public sector but from the private sector as well. The us then is at least giving some talk space for some public. Private partnership is still tend to think that there is a much better chance than most people would give it for the us government to decide to effectively nationalize an existing private dollar stable. Coin us dc as a way to accelerate a digital dollar rollout. Should they decide it becomes important. I could be wrong on that. But i think there's a much bigger chance than we might think. Anyways guys always interesting to keep track of how the narrative and ideas around. Cdc's are changing. This is now the second time and we're only in march. That powell has talked about it. Which is a lot more frequent than last year. So i think it's likely we hear a lot more about digital dollar and how it might be designed and where the fed actually is in the process over the course of the rest of two thousand twenty one for now though. I hope you were getting excited for a great weekend. It looks like it's going to be in the sixties here in the hudson valley. We're going to be out. Grilling and i can't wait until tomorrow. Guys be safe and take care of each other piece.

china us Cdc the wall street journal caspar einem Anthony blinken graham webster biden administration mohawk mountain cdc kaspar caspar Jerome powell basel committee for banking su fed
He fell from a parking lot

The Signal

11:28 min | 1 year ago

He fell from a parking lot

"This is an ABC podcast on Monday. A police officer in Hong Kong shot an unarmed twenty one year old protester with live communication at point blank range. The entire thing was caught on video tape later later that day video emerged of a middle aged man being doused in petrol and set alight after arguing with protesters. These videos show a snapshot of how both police and protesters seem to be upping the ante in this ongoing face off. I'm really jeans and I'm Christine Gate and today on the signal I know. There's been a significant escalation intention violence in Hong Kong this week but the student protest remain resolute. So what's China's new tactic and bringing all of this to an end so this reason spike in violence in Hong Kong started on Friday after a twenty two year. Old Uni student died. Yeah he fell from a copper roof roof after running away from police the previous Sunday and it's being called the first official death of a protester inactions linked to police. The the desert of the student surnamed her name Chow did affect people of course because jess does create a different dynamic. And we've heard in public calls for quote Unquote Revenge Bench Gordon. Chang is an Asia analyst and author of the coming collapse of China clearly. The four then protesters Really were were looking to fight the police on because there have been allegations that three protesters on August twenty first were beaten to death in the prince. Edward Mass Transit Railway Station and since that time protesters have Just taking a very different attitude towards the police. The police police also have been extremely brutal and so this has become a fight on both sides and the descendant of violence has been marked specially especially since the end of August but of course with the what is called the the first death of a protester. an action linked to the police Clearly the things got out of control. We don't know if that student was actually a protester But he was running away from tear gas and so therefore His causes taken up by Everyone although we feel sad we need to to continue our movement so We need to gather together and here and voice our something to the police foles so this past weekend has been one of disturbances across the territory especially on Monday. A Hong Kong traffic policeman shot at unarmed student of purchaser in the torso protester dressed in black like many of the protesters are faceless covered. He's approaching a Hong Kong police officer in a wide open area The protests are didn't have anything thing in his hands Obviously was unarmed. Did Not pose a risk to threat to the safety of the officer. Officer wasn't a wide open. Area could easily easily a retreat. It but didn't took out a gun shot the protester asbury close range and clearly this was an unjustified on justified use of force and that shooting isn't the only extreme thing that happened on Monday also there was an argument between People in Hong and One of the people who is expressing pro-beijing statements was doused with some sort of liquid and set on fire. He also was admitted to hospital in critical condition and remains that way with Burns on twenty eight percent body the discovery well have been staged and indeed We don't even know. It's not entirely beyond China's communist us to of Sacrificed one of their own. Perhaps without his knowledge that this was going to happen. I'm not saying that's what occurred. But that's a possibility and until we know more about the perpetrator I. I don't think we can say that. This has been a Hong Kong protestor who did this so no one's apprehended over that attack yet and there's also reports of protesters facing off with police at universities throwing petrol bombs and police yes using tear gas and pepper spray and aiming the guns at people and then this is footage of a police officer on a motorbike driving into a crowd of protesters several times ramming something a little before taking away so later on Monday. Hong Kong's late Carrie Lam gave this press conference in which she he condemned the protesters and code them the enemy of the people. Finally I want to appeal to everyone. In Hong Kong to stay calm the frame from taking part in any unlawful activities. This is not language that Hong Kong leaders would use. This is a language that the Communist Party uses and matter of fact they've used it Routinely in recent years And of course this goes back to the era of Mao Zedong. The founder of the People's Republic of China and was widely heard during the cultural revolution is what started in the mid nineteen sixties. The thing here is that it. Carrie Lam is using chinese-language and this comes after. She had two crucial meetings at the beginning of this month she had meeting on November fourth. Where see Japan the Chinese ruler in Shanghai and she also had a meeting day or two later with the Hong Long? Jiang who is the member of the Politburo Standing Committee the Portfolio for Hong Kong. So this is Essentially Carrie Lam getting her orders and given the even more aggressive tactics of the police since those two meetings we can assume that she got her her orders from the top of the Chinese leadership to move aggressively against a Hong Kong people. Essentially Beijing is is forcing goosing. Carrie Lam to take a a hotline. I think so because this doesn't seem like the Carrie Lam who was elected chief executive This his mirrors Beijing's position on this and ask as we've seen the events last two or three days we've also heard word State media in China step up their attacks on protesters so this does seem to be coordinated right. So according Gordon Carrie Lam has go to roads from Beijing and she's following through. Yeah and Gordon thinks that part of that plan involves a kind of unofficial ray structure of the Hong Kong Police. There are a number of videos which show that People from the mainland are now operating on the streets of Hong Kong in the uniform informed of the Hong Kong Police in I think one of the more telling videos. There is a Hong Kong riot. Policemen who is obviously from Hong Kong because he's speaking colloquial colloquial Cantonese. Then he turns around on to a couple of other riot officers and starts talking to them in Mandarin. Remember Hong Kong cantonese-speaking city and The first Hong Kong riot officer speech calls them comrade now to to Hong Kong. Policemen would not use that term when addressing each other there's other videos Another one of them is Is a line of Hong Kong policeman who who absolutely refuse to show their Hong Kong tleyss identity cards and who apparently don't Speak Candies Because uh there's a A PRO democracy figure. I think he's in the council. I forget Talking to and they just impassive as if they don't understand understand so there is growing evidence that There are either Hong Kong a plea Chinese troops or Chinese police who are now wearing con-conflict doc police uniforms and the one thing that that has always struck me is that once we start to see these videos and it coincided sided with a breakdown in discipline in Hong Kong police if we go back to year two years ago. The Hong Kong police were recognized as the most professional professional and disciplined force in of its kind in Asia and now they've just completely broke ranks. There's very little discipline on. They're acting savagely. This is not the Hong Kong police force of a year ago. And we've got to ask. Why has this occurred? And especially since and this Change in behavior does coincide with these videos of the obviously Chinese personnel in the Hong Kong. Police we can guess that may be. This is very much what Beijing okay. So if he's right that's interesting and pretty crofty tactic to infiltrate the Hong Kong Police. Gordon reckons it shows China's realizing it needs to be more and more covert the in dealing with Hong Kong. This is not one thousand nine hundred nine Tenement Square. Where you had these big broad boulevards low buildings on each side? Chinese armor armor tanks and armored personnel carriers just swept through from the Western approaches of Beijing into Tenement Square. And they killed almost it will. Hong Kong is very different. It's defenders territory. Scott narrow streets and alleys got lot of tall buildings. Every apartment building is a fort for the hostels which means that these kids can go to do these apartment buildings third or fourth floor ring down explosives or petrol bombs on concentration of Chinese troops and then just completely disappear and I don't think Beijing has has an answer Militarily for that and certainly politically this would be extremely disadvantageous. China because countries would start to impose sanctions. Asians don't want an open display of raw Chinese power on Hong Kong streets which I think would enrage many people across Hong Kong society that is the signal for today and if you'd like to get in touch L. email is the signal at ABC dot net. And if you like you can give us a review on apple podcasts. That helps other people find us and we'll be back tomorrow. See you later bye. You've been listening to an ABC Z.. podcast discover more great A._B._C.. podcasts live radio and exclusives on the A._B._C. Listen Up.

Hong Kong Hong Kong Police Hong Kong Hong China Carrie Lam officer Beijing ABC Gordon Old Uni Christine Gate People's Republic of China Beijing Communist Party Edward Mass Transit Railway St Mao Zedong official Chow
More (More!) Roadtrip Mixtape Summer 2019

Ear Snacks

30:52 min | 2 years ago

More (More!) Roadtrip Mixtape Summer 2019

"You're listening listening attention Los Angeles area friends. They were doing lots of singing this summer and into the fall and we hope we'll see you at one of our shows where our shows poly you can sing with us at Children's Book World on July Twenty seven four with Andrew in Pali and the games to vassar whole band yeah a free concert at the Beverly Hills Public Library on Tuesday July thirtieth at four P._M.. Won't WanNa miss that one because it's apt library if you've ever wanted to be loud the library actually didn't have to wait. We'll be loud out there. Yes we will and we plan to be loud. Publicly August twenty four you can sing with us and Mike Furman at the Upright Citizens Brigade Okay Peter we'll be at mccague's with the game on September twenty second and we've got even more fun in free shows in October is getting a little confusing. This is getting old vic confusing. Don't worry we're keeping track head over to our website. All the information is there including links to buy tickets or R._S._V._p.. Three shows and special new link through our new songs Mostar. It's a cover from smashmouth. It's so now we hope you enjoy it and we hope you enjoy these songs on a few more long warm days the friends and family it is nice extra holly. Hello there welcome to your snacks. I'm Andrew and I'm Paulie and you are listening to a road trip. Mix Tape volume. It's summer. We're and we're so happy to share some great tunes from some wonderful artists with you. He might know hey kill. I got what you're GONNA do. When the sun goes down get a got rid of town? Hey pretty pretty thank you <music>. Hey honey. You're funny little. Hey how you'll the chat uh-huh mm-hmm <music>. You've gotta read what you GonNa do on this the Andrew and I'm poly and that was a a singing little bit of you from our album odds and ends <hes> Andrew. Yes Bali WanNa know something exciting. Oh yes folly our friends Sadie V._C._d.. Yup who plays the Violin Yup who plays the violin. She's going to join us at. <unk> at McCabe's on September twenty second and play some of that song with us. That's amazing. I know it's GonNa be Great. Wow It's so nice to share the stage with people you like folly Sorta like one big happy family. Oh that reminds me of a song does that too. That's that's alone. I me me almost he won valley one one family no it doesn't matter where we get through his and snow. Eh are one family one vegas now great family yeah you see God is <music> on jealous the now one family family that's family. Ah Corona I I gotTA sometimes. She knocked me down. Sometimes he knocks me down alone when a go of the meal on how to stay for myself I'll be tough on myself. I the cavs knock me down. Sometimes she's not me down but when a little bit oh how dare I say he. He says she yeah I I. Yes <music> Ma maybe to listen back Andrew and in Pauley thanks for listening to your snacks summer road trip mix tape you just heard little bit tough by Gerrad and before that Grand Familia by Lucy Kellen Tori and the jazz cats from hold tight shine bright so so much good music is out the summer. Let's roll some more. The song is where do the children play originally by Cat Stevens Sung by Rene and friends featuring Ziggy Marley <hes> well. I think it's fine building jumbo plane particular on a cosmic train switch on saw. I'm from a SLOP. Is She here. Get what you want to if you own because you can get anything we've come a long way change day today. Eh where the children will you roll on roll over fresh green grass impact through them long and you make them they go on and on and it seems you can get a No. We've come a long way. We're changing day today but then the chance when you crack the sky scrapers fill. Will You keep on Banding High Too. There's no more room with the AMANDAS LA. Will you make us cry. <hes> will you tell us when you tell us when we've come a long way change today. Where do the children <music> <music> Roach it next the Dow every day these question questions aw his and they share this ability questions uh-huh yeah? Do we bones the break ups. Smile everyday questions in some questions take <music>. You're polly. I'm Andrew and that was why lie by ants ants ants and this is this is ear set your snacks as Nice a fun and free podcast for Kids Abou- how about how ideas are connected to the world we live in but today it's all about bringing you some new music from some of our friends who to enough enough listen to stay to keep the key it is in that few nasty I think the most see Ya Nass equal housing joke the same thing go kina he enough equal thing he got the job see me some e almost <music> <music> on he runs Orna Mexican Nice Cream said in his ballot last Ken. He's he's he's in Bislett nettle his ice cream to your and shut down the street dancing to the radio. We joke laugh. <music> Eh task yeah alleged fifty cents Scream <music> screaming offscreen per aspirin Arpaio street for anyone who meets she's in uh-huh visit. You are listening ears. You just heard Politburo men by lucky jazz featuring US and before that a new song called Kookiness I Lina Celeste off her new album. Love is tick euro. Let an ice tune what advice tune you know what folly Hugh what's that Andrew. Those two songs made me think of some of my favorite summer things going to the beach and cold delicious snacks yet totally. You WanNa know what else that makes me think of sharing those things will you that leads perfectly to another song that I love to share it now. The below firm belong together like a saw families. I'm elise belong families belong. They would know what else is law. Meaning to with Jara Family should call Pablo <music> <music>. I'm Andrew and I'm poly and you just heard Dan sacks of noodles podcast singing together. If you WANNA sing it with him. You don't have to go all the way to Switzerland you can join him at noodle loaf. Show DOT COM DOT com. It's like a music class but it's a podcast. Our family loves listening to them. I mean you can totally imagine that right. I don't have to imagine a poly. I do it every day. Should we mentioned some of them. Besides noodle low some of our favorite podcasts are circle round from W._B._Z.. In Boston brains on from our pals at American public media what if world from our pal Eric O'Keefe wow in the world from our Powell's Mindy Thomas with music by the pop ups and the show about science who stood by our pal neat. We'll put a Ballista these for you at your snacks dot Org Dot Org. What else do we love in our family? Besides podcasts grapes grapes being together being together Yeah Yeah Dan Saxon that's probably most and we believe that families belong together go through that's why we along with Lucky Dias and Mr Cookie jar produced the compilation hold tight shine bright bright twenty seven songs from amazing kindy artists that you know in love together on one album to benefit the nonprofit organization thrice and Texas which is is helping families on the border. Every little light deserves to shine. Here's a song from that album that makes me feel happy. You may know it by another name but this song is called Estela Sita by Elizabeth Mitchell featuring Suni Paz celery ESTA say boy up he and yet again Louis <hes> <hes> Family Eddie <music> <music> says he says Levy says see uh and that's our show. Thanks so much for listening to ear snacks. Thank you got a few more episodes to round out season two so we hope you'll stay tuned can't and stay tuned for our brand new album go for the moon go for the moon which comes out September twenty seven. That's so soon but before we go. It's time to say thank all right to all our music friends who shared their amazing stuff tough. If you can't remember them all go to our website Andrew and polly dot com thanks to Lucy Kalahari jazz cats for Red Rene and friends and Ziggy Marley Alina Celeste Lucky Dias ants ants ants stance ax of noodle Loaf Elizabeth Mitchell and Suni Paz and Elizabeth Waldmann Frazier and Beth blends Lucas for helping us. Put it all together and thank you for spending a little time together with us. We hope you're having a great summer whether you're spending your time at home or you're on the road. We hope it's full of music. We'll see you next time. I boy your snack <music>.

Andrew LA Beverly Hills Public Library Mostar Bali WanNa smashmouth cavs Mike Furman Red Rene Upright Citizens Brigade Pali Switzerland Sadie V._C._d mccague Jara Family Suni Paz Peter McCabe DOT
Steve Moore 12-1-19

CATS Roundtable

08:06 min | 1 year ago

Steve Moore 12-1-19

"During morning America. This is Shaun Catch Matisse. I hope everybody had a great thanksgiving. It's Sunday morning. And what today is a good friend. Stephen Moore almost just a member of the Fed until the swamp got him and he was. He was with the Wall Street Journal and he's now the Heritage Foundation chief economist. And one of the brightest guys in in America to Maureen Steven. How are you? How's your Thanksgiving John? I had a great Thanksgiving hope. You did too the great great to just celebrate the greatness of America and boy you know the market of setup for a very happy Thanksgiving with the with the booming market. And you're right. I think we're at or near all time highs now. the S. and P.. Five hundred the Dow Amazon ESDA. So I mean and unemployment. Climate is the lowest ever. The economy looks great. The earnings from most companies are are pretty. Good Disney's doing great. Should we worry about December. What do you think well drove to slow down a little bit? Like I mean everything you said is exactly right. Missile really really powerful economy. I'm a little worried about the the pace of growth remains of slower than we want to be but still we're growing faster than any other country in the world very kudlow makes at that point all the time So it's it's a look. These are the best at times you know for for workers. If you're looking for a job boy they're out there folks there seven million unfilled jobs that were employers. Can't find workers to fill so No I I hear your enthusiasm. This is a really really good economy and you know if we get at that. Trade deal finally signed sealed delivered twenty twentieth looking really strong I agree with you. One hundred percent interest rates. You think we're going to stay low. What's it's last year in December? You know what happened. It was chairman Powell to craft. Well that's because Chairman Powell yawns to the wrong adjectives What do you think now? Well you're right just replayed ACAS is an important part of history. Remember how miserable we felt this time. Last year the stock market was crashing. It felt like twenty five hundred points when German Powell made these mistakes and continuing to raise rates when he should have been cutting them and by the way when the one the guy who got this right away was Donald J trump who was very hypercritical of the fad But the good news is we're in much better shape on interest rates today than we were your ago This year instead of raising rates Chairman Palestine cutting them. I think that I would do one or two more cops actually. I think we're not quite where we need to be yet. But we're much better condition than In position than we were this time last year or so You know the Fed is not the restraint on wrote that it was the other thing. I feel very strongly about John and and the president made a strong statement about this this past week. We need Nancy fancy to Pelosi to move that bill on. US Mexico Canada Trade Agreement. And the only thing that is holding this up John is pure politics WCHS She doesn't want to hand trump and the American workers and farmers and ranchers and businesses and technology companies victory. And you know I think is a big problem right now because you know the all the business community and many of the farmers and workers would greatly benefit from this deal. Well I've said that on my show last week and I said if we're GONNA talk impeachment half day how about your half day. We do some business. I wouldn't that be something I mean I can't think of anything I mean I think the only thing that's really holding back economy right now is I. Can't think of anything in the last year that Congress has done and actually help the economy. Trump grow this economy. There's no infrastructure bill. There's no immigration bill. There's no US MCA bill. There's no jobs bill. There's no out Gerbil I mean what are they doing. John All they do impeach and obstruct and block everything. Donald Trump is trying to do that. You like what do you like Donald Trump or now. Dan is not an agenda that is is going to create jobs and better health care better education for Americans almost every day this week. The American dollar got stronger. So you're American dollars can stronger now. Let's talk about Europe for a second. Is Europe any hope of. You're making a comeback the risk which they have to do what we're doing? Why don't they follow? Donald Trump's lead. It's not that complicated taxes and get rid of regulation you that that are that are Posed businesses that. Have you know enormous costs. You put your businesses. I I mean trump has found the right formula. And that's why we're the high-flying I find country in the world You know I'm somewhat bearish on Europe but I am hopeful that they might learn you know from what we're doing in the United States. Because because if they don't they're going to get left behind it's going to be a a race between the US and China and Japan and Europe is going to be left behind. I mean they're waving hi technologically they. They're not creating jobs near the pace. We are so We will see whether they can move away from their socialistic impulses and by the way everything I'm hearing from the democratic can that's like those Warren and Joe Biden and and Bernie Sanders. Is We need to be more like Europe. No Oh they need to be more like us right now. The other thing is I had a one of my very good friends wasn't China or last tweak and I'm not a you know not liberty to tell you his name He says he met with all the powers that be in China including the number one one guy and a deal with the United States is eminent. What do you hear? I'll believe it what I see that Dozen Aziz Sister has signed on the bottom of that document. Because I look I am hopeful that happens and I think it's likely to happen but I wouldn't take my life on it because the Chinese they're not honest. You know at least the Chinese government in the politburo there that you know they've been known to retreat at the last minute and go back on their word so I think this is one of the reasons you know. President trump really wants to get this deal done and then committed to change their behavior because their behavior entree has been abusive and predatory and we. You know we can't continue to go. Four and incidentally if do sign that deal what we're calling phase one it's not just good for the US economy. It's good for China as well. Now there's this guy did meet with number one so I have confidence and I'm hoping for the best okay. John More skeptical than you are. I know I know we've only we've had. We've had bad days of waiting. We have about a minute the two left. What else would you like to tell you? Public this synthesis Thanksgiving weekend. I think it's just a great time to reflect. On what a wonderful country we have and how blessed we are to be in a country that has so much economic opportunity You know you're living example of that John. You know how you built up these incredible businesses and and you know for young people listening show either so many opportunities out there. There's so many jobs waiting and start your own business or to you know to join a firm erm and you know. US is flying high right now. there's nothing to stop us and We are an Opportunity Society And we need to do better for all races now people of all incomes. But if you want to get ahead and you WANNA get rich. America's great place to do it. I agree with you one hundred ten percent. Well Stephen even more have a great rest of the weekend of Thanksgiving weekend. And I hope you you need too much Turkey and enjoy the rest of the weekend. I'll see you my friend. Thank you thank you. This is the catch roundtable. We'll be right back.

Donald Trump US John All Europe America Fed China Chairman Powell Stephen Moore Wall Street Journal president Disney Heritage Foundation Maureen Steven chief economist chairman Stephen Congress
The China Corruption Crackdown: Sincere Or Cynical?

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:12 min | 2 years ago

The China Corruption Crackdown: Sincere Or Cynical?

"Hey, one, it's Cardiff. Thank you for listening to the indicator from planet money. I've got a super quick requests for you. We would like to better understand who is listening to us and just more generally how you are using podcasts. So it would be a huge help. If you would complete a short and anonymous survey at NPR dot org slash podcast survey. It takes like eight minutes, and it really will help support the show. That's NPR dot org slash podcast survey. And that last bit podcast survey. That's all one word. And now onto today's episode. Peter Lawrenson is an economist at the university of San Francisco Peter says that it is important for communists to study not just economic policies, but sometimes also politics itself, so which candidate is up in the polls who's down, and what do politicians have to do to win elections, those kinds of questions, and that is especially if you want to understand why it is the politicians so often choose policies that are bad economics. So then the question is what can we look at about their incentives their motivations for getting reelected or staying in power to whatever political system, they are? And how does that in the juice them to do things which may not be in the interest of their citizens and might not sound economically rational, if you're just a public policy person, but do sound rational if you're looking about how you stand power and the political system that Peter has recently studied is the one in China where Xi Jinping rules the country as the general secretary of the pull up bureau standing committee, which has seven members back in two thousand twelve she launched. A massive corruption crackdown on political and military officials and on others throughout the country. And it led to indictments of thousands of thousands of people in the process. And so a natural question to ask is was this an actual tempt to go after actually corrupt officials or was it a political maneuver by Xi Jinping to further consolidate his own power within China will Peter studied that question in one of his recent papers. And after the break, you'll hear the actually kinda surprising answer from my conversation with Peter earlier this year at the American economics association annual meetings where he was presenting the findings of that paper. This message comes from NPR sponsor NCR NCR believes in small businesses. That's why they built NCR silver more than a point of sale NCR silver delivers big enterprise management tools, built for small business owners NCR, silver, search NCR, silver support also comes from mizzen and main creators of moisture wyking wrinkle resistant, dress shirts that require no ironing or dry cleaning heads and mizzen and main dot com and use code NPR at checkout to receive ten dollars off your dress shirt. Okay. Let's turn now to the paper you presented here at the as can you tell us a little bit about the topic. So this is a paper about the corruption crackdown that's happening in China. So under China's current top leader general secretary, Xi Jinping the who took tower in in two thousand twelve there's been this massive wave of arrests and detentions of officials under corruption charges. And so what this paper looks at is. Why is that happening? Okay. So two options here is this sincere crackdown that's actually targeting corrupt political officials getting rid of them and trying to clean up the system so that the Chinese bureaucracy works better. And so that it's more competent, or is it just an attempt by chairman, she to get rid of some of the connections to his political rivals and thereby consolidate his power in China that basically it. Yeah. That's exactly right. Okay. And what did you find? It was really both. We think the corruption goal was the primary one. But we definitely see evidence that Xi Jinping protected people who are connected to him. Okay. So it was both. This is all the above basically. Yes. That's right. How did you actually figure this out because I have to imagine that there are quite a few methodological challenges to studying corruption in China and how it's targeted right corruption is really difficult to study anywhere. Because of course, people try really hard to hide it. So what we did is we looked basically at who was who was getting promoted in different parts of China. And we found that people who were promoted despite not having good economic performance were more likely to get arrested for corruption later in most of China. You get promoted for having the right skill set. And through four performance in you in terms of economic development. In these provinces where a lot of wrestler occurring. People seem to be getting promoted, even though they didn't have the usual background and training, and they didn't have a record of economic performance. And so what we take from that is that these people may have actually been more corrupt. Maybe they bought their job things like that. And that so that supports the idea that really corruption and crackdown was going for the people who who were most corrupt, and then what did you find about the people who are connected to chairman. She versus the people who were connected to his other rivals in the poll up bureau standing committee. So what we found about the people connected to to Jinping is that the people who had a strong connection to him. None of them were arrested, whereas people who had a connection to other members of the politburo standing committee seemed to be fair game. We look specifically at one group of elite provincial official. Nls and within that group of of close to three hundred people. None of those who are connected to she were arrested, whereas people who were connected to other top leaders did get arrested. So it sounds like maybe we should have mixed feelings about these findings right on the one hand. It's possible that yes, the Chinese bureaucratic system is going to work a little bit better. Because so many corrupt officials were taken out of there on the other hand, it's probably becoming more authoritarian. Because now you have Xi Jinping in full control. And it's obvious people. Now know that if you're connected to him, you're protected, but if you're connected to somebody else, you're totally fair game. Okay. What about the US China economic relationship does a more consolidated authority in China in combination? With a more competent bureaucracy have any effect on the existing relationship. I think there's a lot of things going on in the relationship and going on with how in ping as approaching China's role in the world, and for my research, specifically, I think it just shows that he's really going to be able to whatever he wants to do. He's probably gonna be able to do that that could be good one problem with US China interactions in the past has been that we come to an agreement with their top leaders in Beijing. And then we assume that they can do it because we think oh, well, they're they're they can do whatever they want, but actually because of the flexibility that was built into the system and the lack of control the same lack of control that leads to corruption. And also leads to economic innovation. Also means if we say, please enforce our intellectual property rights, and please, you know, do certain things, according to intestinal treaties. The ability Beijing actually carry that out in, you know, all the provinces and prefectures and towns around the country was was more limited. Now, I think with Xi Jinping's consolidation of power if he really cares about something. It's more likely. He could actually make it happen here. Lawrenson? Thanks so much, man. This episode of the indicator was produced by Dr as RAF young and edited by Patty Hirsch, the indicator is a production of NPR.

China Xi Jinping NPR Peter Lawrenson Xi Jinping NCR NCR NCR chairman general secretary Jinping Cardiff American economics association Beijing San Francisco Patty Hirsch US official
Meanwhile At Fox News

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

17:35 min | 1 year ago

Meanwhile At Fox News

"Slate is launching an important new initiative examining one of the most essential questions of our time the question is who counts over the next thirteen and sleeps reporters and podcasters will be investigating who counts in the voting booth who counts as an American whose money counts in the democratic process and the it's toxic but it's fun toxic it's like smoking I thought his defensiveness was so palpable I thought he came across entitled frustrated he saved Oxford three straight weeks I it almost broke my brand I recovered same thing over and over again to the point where it's hard not to start to believe it I will even completely dire the opinion shows that have starting at six and you know seven are just toxic but the five is fun just in how much Fox News do you watch I keep tabs on the network I watch it or something there's more than one channel since the impeachment inquiry launched Justin's been watching but just keeps coming back to Fox he's watched hundreds of hours at this point I confess to having a and more about this project and how to support our work please go to sleep dot com slash who campus quite a bit of the time Justin Peters is slates television Guinea pig. Did you start watching for slate like as an assignment yeah I did guilty pleasure watch in the show the five which airs at five pm it has five people on it they sometimes discuss as many as and you know wake up and do it all again for three straight weeks just done this kind of thing before want to hear from you what should we cover who counts share what's happening in your own communities by emailing us at who counts at slate dot com to learn after a while but that was my first sort of straight through twenty four seven wakeup turn on Fox go to bed turn off Fox dream about Neil cavuto which is weird stupid people very funny people very put upon left wing commentators I can watch it all day it gets my blood pressure boiling port will let us assign more stories traveled to Overlook Places Commission Special PODCAST projects and pay for reporting we otherwise would not be able to do we also Fox News even more closely and watching the now you're starting to get a sense of what their playbook is going to be accuse your opponent everything that you may be guilty of yourself banged the drum about liberal hypocrisy and speak very rapidly so that no one can get a word one time slate had him watch every super bowl than ever been played in a single month I've hated football ever since and I love football I I blame slate for putting me in this place I it was back in twenty seventeen I think where they had me watt nothing but and how did sleepy Joe and not know about the foreign influence through his son and she didn't get to that at least it's a lively panel show you're where it got its name but it's it's an entertaining show it's got this sort of Great Fox mix of very type topics per show undermining giving his side of the story for the first time in a new interview just hours before his dad takes center stage at tonight's democratic debate after we justin's watched hour after hour of one of the president's favourite news sources he's here to tell us what he found a Mary Harris you're listening to what in edgewise today on the show is impeachment changing the messaging at Fox News at all confessed is sometimes watching Fox News or twelve hours a day and starting to think they might have something to point out how intertwined Hunter Biden is with the Chinese state. What's the best panel show that's on Fox almost look forward to it I do it cuts the doldrums the panel shows they have during the day axed stick with us when justine talks about Fox News he's got a sense of humor Mr President and not when it's unpleasant just like just a few weeks back when a Fox's daytime anchors Neil Cavuto got an air and actually took the president tasks he's attorney came out the other day and said well he stepped maybe Adam Schiff either then wait wait wait wait wait go cut asleep go have a beer go out into the world what sports ah knows that the network is a monolith either their opinion shows and then there are the reporters in the newsroom? Fake is when it's wrong for criticizing Fox's newsroom hard as it is to Mr President just because you're the leader of the free world doesn't entitle you to a free pass and recurring personalities who have been free to express opinions that are sort of opposite to what note excuse conservative sort of across the board but from our to our there have always been certain hosts correspondents the primetime opinion might be saying and that's not something new I mean Cavuto has been doing this periodically ever since I think that that has always sort of been the case on the network that it has never really been one a uniform you know cottage industry of saying this but there is tension between the news anchors and their colleagues who host opinion oriented shows impeachment has brought that tension to ahead are reporting begins with President trump defending a phone call he had with the Ukrainian president about his political rival Joe Biden the president just last month after Nancy Pelosi announced her inquiry into Donald trump you could see this tension more clearly than ever volt and the failure to pass the whistleblower complaint to Congress now and then he brings on his favorite legal commentator Fox News senior judicial analyst trump entered the race Chris Wallace has been doing this ever since trump came into the scene the dear departed Shepard Smith made a that you know this is not normal behavior the real issue here is the phone call the claim that the president pressure to foreign leader to investigate a political rival it started on Shep Smith Show you start laying out exactly what the president is said to have done and sort of makes clear Carlson brings on his own judicial analyst Joe Digenova since then allegedly president to solicit aid for his campaign from a foreign government so that would be what the which the president has admitted is in and of itself a Crime Smith now unlike maybe some day side hosts I'm not very partisan and those this sincere question is it a crime or non on our air in our work home is repugnant and then Smith and Apollo Tano just sort of he and his wife Victoria Taunting who they have affirmed together we're working with Giuliani to make stuff happen in the Ukraine is that what happened on Carlson program was repugnant attacking our colleague who's here to offer legal assessments double down on their initial analysis situation they do it again they do it again they do it again he seemed to love the drama yes this is the crime for which trump cut to later that night were Tucker Carlson takes the air and there's no love lost between Tucker and likely cut the next afternoon where ship has entered politburo back on the air and looks directly in the camera and Kepala Tano and Napolitano says point blank that yes you know there is evidence that crime was committed it is a crime for the host Andrew Napolitano a fool well I think judge Napolitano is a fool and I think what he said today is foolish no it is not a crime let me underscore in bosses at Fox News basically told ship Smith to cut it out yet agape Sherman at Vanity Fair reported that the reason why this contretemps did not continue the next day was that the Fox News Breasts told ship Smith to stand down to stop oh it's great yeah I mean look for basic cable it doesn't get any better than this and there's some reporting that that wasn't so a non-partisan actors what you're telling me you're very Parson actor just a guy you know just a standard run of the mill lawyer who fled was toothless Napolitano was to be found he did not pursue the Vendetta Carlson likewise did not continue and then two weeks later this was a big deal I mean other people have left Fox News and kind of you know set the place on fire on the way out I guess not really because it's still there date they obliged under agreement can we talk a little bit about why doing this feud now Fox News officially denies that any such conversation took place regardless what happened is that the next day shifts program they signed on he has been the Avatar for sort of responsible down the Middle Journal in to drop any sort of like pretense at least in its opinion programs of objectivity or sort of fealty to any object Shepard Smith submits his shocking resignation after twenty three years of the network so recently I asked the company to allow me to leave Fox News after requesting that is the trump era ship rose to the challenge of consistently trying to throw cold water on all of the sort of hot conspiratorial takes that trump tweeted about or rambled about and the give truth that does not exist closed epidemic system with the only inputs being breitbart website comment sections he was the during the news in a manner that would not have been out of place in a primetime network broadcast I heard some people put it differently and they said Ian hosts picked up those balls and ran with them Tucker Carlson Laura Ingram Merry Band of Fox and friends alleging sexual harassment how is shep Smith leaving different for one thing he he's a Fox News original he was there from the day they signed on in nineteen ninety six and since the day that he signed awesome this sort of journalism without bias that Fox News has always claimed to provide has been a portia sized in ship Smith you know what I mean like they have you have a guy named Carl Cameron who is a reporter who became a critic as soon as he left you have a number of women leaving like Gretchen Carlson is anchors were strategizing in some way telling advertisers about trump you know he's not our boss sort of giving that Neil Cavuto Shep Smith gave Fox News cover I mean yeah he did that I I've said is much myself in my writings on this nevertheless he still had an hour each day to deliver a real newscast and that's not happening anymore and you could see for the duration of about Tucker Carlson going off the air well and even if he does go off the air there's someone to replace him who will be worse Tucker Carlson Line just to the advertisers themselves do you see that as a change I mean it made me think maybe it's the advertisers who are the real deciders here and there is no compelling reason to transform the networks editorial priorities they do not care about what is happening to America Dr Trump's chorus right there there to take the melody that he that that trump sings and sort of ad yeah well the advertisers were the ones who got bill O'Reilly off the Air Fox News would have stood behind Riley had oreilly advertisers stood behind Riley and when they didn't you know so long bill and there have been these sort of intermittent campaigns since nineteen ninety-six and even as the networks continued to sort of like veer more and more to the right and replaced O'Reilly and they've certainly been times over like this past year and a half two years when I would be like Gosh I never thought that servers and it did really show that they kinda plummeted at the beginning of this year and they haven't recovered to their full strength but of course no one's talking vinced Fox News isn't going to shape shift in any way which is interesting because I have read some reporting saying that watching at home who wants to believe that they didn't make a bad decision by electing him in two thousand sixteen I mean this weekend there was reporting that Fox News well who doesn't we'll be telling the stories of Americans whose voices have been silenced whose votes have been diluted and power been clipped and we need your help your oh easily suborned as Tucker Carlson has been over the past couple of years that he's been on prime time and if they I would consider bill O'Reilly to be acceptable alternative here but you sort of feel like O'Reilly might not have been so to get people to pull their ads from Hannity from Tucker Carlson what have you saw this graph of Tucker Carlson's advertise the network is planning for Donald Trump's departure do you disagree I will believe that there is going to be some great sort of shit harmony to it to sort of like we're as it to amplify it to beat his is heroes and champions for people because they do not care about the erosion of any norm that might exist I will believe that they are constructing some sort of hedge against the employer Cindy Leon Daniel Hewitt and Morris Silvers I am Mary Harris I will catch you tomorrow by whom the network and the rest of the world could point to and say well at least they've got shipped chef is calling it

Fox News Fox Slate Justin Peters Neil cavuto President football president Mr President Hunter Biden Oxford Guinea Places Commission Adam Schiff Joe Mary Harris justine attorney
Wednesday 30 December

Monocle 24: The Globalist

31:07 min | 6 months ago

Wednesday 30 December

"You're listening to the globalist. First broadcast on the thirtieth of december two thousand and twenty on monocle twenty four. The globalist brought you in association with ubs. Hello and welcome to the globalist broadcasting to you live from studio one here the house in london. I'm georgina godwin coming up. On today's perga- we've taken back control of our laws and our destiny. We've taken back control of every jot and tittle of our regulation in a way. That is complete and unfettered a day before the deadline the brexit deal will be debated in parliament but how lawmakers really had time to examine. What every tittle actually is. Then being journalist can be dangerous work will examine the second part of report from reporters without borders with a russell through the front pages and roundup up of the latest urbanism stories. That's all ahead here on the globalist on monocle. Twenty four but first here are some of the day's other main headlines in the. Us senate majority leader. Mitch mcconnell has put off a vote on increasing covid nineteen relief checks from six hundred dollars to two thousand and urge senators to override president. Donald trump's veto of defense bill in a rare challenged his fellow republican three weeks before trump leaves office. A chinese court sentenced ten hong kong activists to between seven months and three years in jail today for illegally crossing the border in case stone international attention and concern over the defendants treatment and north korean leader. Kim jong un chaired a politburo meeting on preparations for a wreck. Congress that's expected to set new economic and political goals as the country faces growing challenges. That's according to state media today now. The brexit agreement between the eu and the uk will face a commons vote. Today parliament has been specially recalled for the debate. The lawmakers are being urged to attend virtually in line with the covid nineteen restrictions on movement and assembly. Well political reporter. Vincent mcilvanney has been covering the story since before the referendum four and a half years ago. Vinnie is this finally end or just the end of the beginning is the end of the beginning of this new chapter for the uk's relationship with the u. They apparently have twelve hours to scrutinize at one. Thousand two hundred forty six page document and vote on it. You might say it's they probably daily had time to read it if the last couple of days since it was secured on christmas eve. And i gotta tell you Georgina just as you coming on address and big breaking news and with a cynical hats on some very careful government news management. They have just approved the oxford university. Astrazeneca vaccine here in the uk said that is very much going to lead all of the billiton's today Because that is really the workhorse vaccine to the uk so interesting timing from the government of that announcement and i think we're going to get an announcement on new tier restrictions as well so the government trying to very much play down the significance of today. What exactly is going to happen in parliament today then will that will be debates on the new documentary. Ob started by The prime minister and the leader of the opposition to kiss. Tom willl say responds. The mp's debate for few hours. And then it'll be closed and that will be a vote. It's interesting to watch the opposition parties today because you've got pretty much all of them apart. Labor opposing this so the northern irish parties at the dp unhappy with it because of course there is now a border in the irish sea. Nordmann is in a very different position to the rest of the united kingdom. The snp opposing it as well because they do not want to leave the european union they pushing hard to get a referendum in the next two years again independence and they'd like to rejoin the eu and a suitcase dominant Position because labor party is by default. Very easy you supposing party. But he is instructed his. Mp's to vote through this agreement which he calls very sin deal at because he says it needs to now be put behind us and the blade policy needs to move on from the remain Leave debate which has really sort of bled support from for the last couple of years and looking at other opposition parties. I thought what caroline lucas of the green said was really interesting. She said while. I understand why some would prefer to abstain. Abstention is still acquiescence. It's still standing aside and allowing something to be positive law. Which is plainly wrong for our country and there was some things so serious and so damaging to which. We should not acquiesce as you say. She's not alone does she. Carry with any of the tory backbenches. I really think so. I mean the whole reason. Boris johnson the election last year was said he would have this dunking majority so that he could stop sort of kowtowing is theresa may have done to the you pay. And i think you're gonna get pretty much all of the politics voting for the which is the most brexit t parts of the party has a symbol yesterday that star chamber of lawyers. They claims and they agree that so. This protect sovereignty and mel becket and the of the mp's in the conservative party. That were quite true. You including lots of former ministers pretty much left wholesale at the last election They were the ones that were sort of had the whip withdrawn from them on the dominant comings. And then there anymore. So the prime minister scored enough himself to carry this. It's interesting that labour-saving amendments on today. Those are just not gonna get very far. It'll be more interesting released. A test of power Dhamma as to what his mp's do because of course the spectrum from carbonates to the blairite some fame like ben bradshaw already supports kiss dalma. They've put out statements saying that. They think that this is a thin dale at it. Delayed policy shouldn't simply go along with it but kissed alma has spoken this morning. to the guardian newspaper. Basically saying that you. I've done a years listening. All of its since he's been in palestine six six months ago he's listening excise across the uk. He thinks that simply this time to move forward not backwards. That's the priority. Labor posse has to be the economy but really his priority is that he needs to win back the seats. Jeremy copen lost because of this issue the so called red woolsey north and many in the labor party on cope inside ashley blame zacchaeus starmer for the loss of those seats because it was sakir who put their election position they say last year is wanting a second referendum but secures. Tom seems to be saying really. There will be no discussion of europe. Aso's from the labor party in the next couple of years. That down the line they might try to renegotiate the agreement to make it. Besse is not perfect but he still thinks no deal is the wrong thing and he just wants to get completely away from the european union now as he tries to build policies towards the next general election. I mean as you pointed out given the the length of the agreement around two thousand pages and the fact that it was only published on christmas eve will all interested parties. Have enough time to scrutinize it. And what is every tittle. I'd i hated the kind of smirk. Boris johnson had on his face after use of that rather school bully. Type type word. Yeah it was very flipping in this document will fundamentally change all the lines of people. In britain in a way that's not happened in decades and pass it off. It did feel very car salesman like to say you don't need to worry about this. It's fine. I've got it sorted. But i think really stale. We're not going to see what it really means. Until it is implemented. That will be lots of things have been unforeseen for both sides of the in the uk that will only be seen when it comes into force when you try to actually action it so that is going to be the interesting thing but yeah i think that will be plenty in it over the next couple of months. That raises eyebrows raises questions that you'll wonder why the negotiating team ever agreed to that. We know already some industries particularly there was no service agreements in say. The finance industry particularly the city of london will be an event curious position that translates told them to pass operation another in a different way than can have same kind of access. E markets have before so that would be something definitely torch because nevada huge employer in the one in fourteen people in this country work in the finance industry. And as you know we all know the economic climate is going to be incredibly different. They'll need to retain all jobs that can and financial firms have already signaled and have making redundancies. Judeh state covert this year but we will see how that's impacted and of course fisheries will be something much lookout out because it's very easy for the tabloids splash fishery stories on the front page post pictures of ships not doing the right thing so we will see in due course just what this agreement means for the country. Vincent thank you very much. Indeed that was vincent mcevoy anita now. Here's what else we keep an eye on today in the. Us senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell has put off a vote on increasing covid nineteen relief checks from six hundred dollars to two thousand and urged senators to ride president donald trump's veto of the defense bill in a rare challenge to his fellow republican three weeks before trump leaves office. A chinese court sentenced ten hong kong activists to between seven months and three years in jail today for illegally crossing the border in a case that's drawn international attention and concern over the defendants treatment and north korean leader. Kim jong un chad politburo meeting on preparations for a rare congress that's expected to set new economic and political goals as the country faces growing challenges state media said today the eighth congress comes amid the presidential transition in the united states which north korea has yet to comment on. It's not yet clear. What joe biden's presidency will mean for relations between washington and pyongyang. You're listening to the globalist on monocle. Twenty four last week saw the release of a report from reporters without borders or rss and now the second part has been released. A total of fifty journalists were killed worldwide in twenty twenty while the number of journalists killed in countries at war continues to fall more up being murdered in countries. Not at war will joined by rebecca. Vincent who's director of international campaigns at reporters without borders rebecca. Thanks so much for joining us. What all the main findings of this report. Good morning. so the main findings were looking at another deadly year for journalists around the world and the fax dot so many journalists were killed in a year where fewer journalists were actually out in the field doing their jobs israeli alarming. Because that showed that you know. The violence is continuing the trends. That we have highlighted in the past two years are accelerating despite the situation with the pandemic so you mentioned the figures that more more journalists are being killed countries at peace in fact that was sixty eight percent of the journalists killed this year were in countries that are not meant to be at war so these are countries like mexico india the philippines and honduras and eighty three percent of journalists. That were killed in twenty twenty. Were deliberately targeted. That is a figure that has increased sharply over the past few years. So we're seeing a situation now where fewer journalists are being killed in the field in the line of work of their work rights Fewer being killed in dangerous places places we think of as conflicts and more deliberately being sought out targeted and murdered in connection with their work. That is very often investigative journalists that we saw that some of the most dangerous stories this year were people that were covering misuse of public funds. Local corruption organized crime And issues like that. And in addition we had a new trend in twenty twenty where seven journalists were killed covering protests this year. Is there anything that links. The country's together that all the worst offenders are the countries that are a list of deadliest countries. This year are longer term offender so the deadliest country this year was mexico where eight journalists were killed. followed by iraq with six afghanistan with five pakistan with ford india with four and these are countries that have been on the short or slightly longer list for several years now. i think mexico is really worth examining because the killings there are becoming even more violent. The manner that dr lesser being killed is becoming really particularly barbaric We saw a case of a journalist. Beheaded this year another hacked to pieces And that is a result of the fact that journalists have been being killed with impunity in mexico for years now so that impunity has clearly emboldened those who are committing these acts and they're doing so a more barbaric fashion also quite shocking was towards the end of the year the execution by hanging of ruhollah zombie. Who is in a rainy and journalist who had been living Abroad in exile inside france He was lured back. He was alerted to iraq and then brought into iran sentenced to death by hanging for corruption on earth so some really shocking cases this year you mentioned the pandemic hell has covid nineteen played into this so in terms of killings of journalists Well we saw three deaths of journalists that appear to have contracted covid in prison and did not get adequate treatment for such and so died shortly after their release so that was a journalist and russia wanted egypt and one in saudi arabia. The pandemic played a clearer role when we look at the detentions of journalists We were speaking about that just the other week. Weren't we the the fact that now. Three hundred and eighty seven. Journalists are detained around the world at the end of the year The pandemic exceleron arrests earlier this year from march to may we saw a fourfold increase in the arrest of and fourteen journalists who were arrested in connection with their coverage of the pandemic remain in detention. At the end of the year. You talked about mexico and how these killing seem to be taking place with impunity. Do you think that the advent of trumpism and cools of fake media have exacerbated. The situation is it now just acceptable to attack the fourth estate. I mean over the past few years. We've definitely seen that. Trend increases while that this sort of rise of not just trump but that that strongman model of leadership and and leaders like in various countries that use hostile language towards the media that has been more often translating into real life. violence So certainly that does impact the climate in the united states this year although we fortunately did not see any journalists killed in connection with their work in the country this year we did see a law of aggression against the press. You know tear gas rubber bullets Other deliberate targeting. Let's not to mention arrests of journalists. Who are covering protests this year. I think that was a real life. Manifestation of some of the trump administration's hostile rhetoric. But this has played out in other countries to So the philippines. I mentioned was one of the countries that is meant to be at peace where were killed. Three journalists were killed with impunity so far in the philippines this year And that is a country where president continues to use extremely violent rhetoric towards the press He's he's infamous for saying things like just because you're a journalist. You're not exempt from assassination if you're a son of a bitch so that's that's the attitude there. We do see that manifest in real life violence so absolutely leaders have a. They have responsibility for their words and must bear in mind the impact of their actions. Obviously it's a great thing that your organization is holding these people to account but is there anything concrete that can be done to improve. The situation will in terms of safety of journalist. One concrete measure that we're advocating is for the establishment of a u n special representative on the safety of journalists. We have called on the un secretary general antonio guitarist To create this position it would be a representative of his office. That would be responsible for ensuring that all of the various you and mechanisms that have some responsibility related to this actually working there is follow through because there is a large body of international legal framework in there are parts of the. Us that are supposed to be working on this issue but it's clearly not effective so far the fact that we're looking at tenure picture now of nine hundred thirty seven journalists who have been killed in connection with their work over the past decade. The vast majority of those cases have been committed with impunity which simply leaves the door open for further attacks. And until we get control of that intel. They're actually start to be concrete costs imposed on those who are using violence to silence critical voices. This is only going to continue. So we think that the un has a role to play there and the creation of this mandate could go a long way ensured that everything that exists could actually work properly and that we can start to chip away at this impunity. Rebecca thank you very much indeed. That was rebecca vincent from reporters without borders. You're listening to the globalist on monocle twenty four. Ubs has one nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries. Nine hundred of the shop is moins. Freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. Find out how we can help you contact us at. Ubs dot com. This is the globalist on monocle. Twenty four. i'm georgina godwin. Well it's time to review some of the day's newspapers now joining me down. The line is monaco's contributing editor and jamila. Good morning to you andrew. good morning. Gosh that's uncharacteristically cheerful No because it's it's this early in the morning. And i consequently have literally no idea where i am. I have been reading the newspapers from the old country which is to say australia largely to sublimate my irritation. That i'm not actually there right now. Which is where. I normally am at this time of year But the stories inevitably do concern the reason. I'm not there and there's a somewhat depressing in the sydney morning herald explaining that it might be some wall before i am unless they fancy a two week. Interregnum in an airport travelodge. well yes. There are suggestions that hotel quarantine on arrival might stay in place for years as a which is a an extraordinarily sobering thought. It has been very very weird. I think for everybody who has been accustomed their whole lives to being able to come and go as they please restrictions and especially to those of us. There are many of us who live overseas. I think that the for the off we've always made with our friends and families back home is that you know. We're only really a day away. You can get on the plane and you can be there this time tomorrow wherever you are in the world and that is apparently very much no longer. The case coupled to which there is a recurrent outbreak now in melbourne minutes only three cases. But that's after two months of none and it does t. Up another story. I was looking at which is about sydney and the third test of this year's series between australia india which they want to go ahead at the sydney cricket ground on new year's day with half capacity. But there's some suggestion that that's not terribly wise. No absolutely not. Well i am going to let you do the sports story. But only because see james you you will remember him. says What do they know of cricket only cricket. No i'm quite. You're going to broaden this on beyond the immediate sporting a hook for it. Yes i i'm not going to go on and on and on about the difficulties destroying there is presently having finding an opening batsman who could last longer than the first six. Oh there's no this is this is about. This is a public health issue. Now now. i do understand that to a lot of our listeners. They will be rolling. There is somewhat at the idea. That astrologer is panicking. That eighteen and i stress one eight cases were confirmed in new south wales. Yesterday there are a lot of countries in the world that would swap for that but australia has taken a very hard line on this largely successfully but yeah there is now considerable consternation at the idea that this game will go ahead in sydney even at half capacity which is maybe thirty thousand people when as has been pointed out the players and the officials that everybody else in melbourne right now which only has three cases at large and does have a cricket ground. They just play the game at so. I'm not sure how this is going to work out in the balance between managing public health. And god goddamn at the cricket ground wanting one of the test matches. There's two there's two great powers at large there. And i have a question for you. Could you describe your thongs me and this is a lovely color pace on the abc by a fashion historian called video redwoods now. The phone to the bemusement of many visitors to australia is not an undergarment in the old country it is. It is what we call the flip flop and at ease regarded. I think as a sort of quintessentially australian footwear but this piece generally points out that a lot of things that we prefer to regard quintessentially australian. It was doubtless imported from somewhere else. Somewhere else halt. The peace points out that. It has been worn in egypt rome greece sub saharan africa and many many others. But there's some lovely sort of a cultural highlights of how this is figured in australia when the thong as we call it started becoming popular in in the nineteen sixties and the legislation had to be passed in the nineteen sixties to stop people wearing them while working construction sites and so forth the queensland government in the nineteen seventies passed a law banning school teachers from wearing them to work. And you're not allowed where the ministry of your day citizenship formalities. which which. Actually strikes me as a somewhat counterintuitive. Because i would have thought that somebody who turned up for formal occasion wearing thongs had had pretty much acclimatized by that point. And we also saying that. There are various branded versions. I mean you. It's not just a cheap russian foot flop. No if you do have more money than sense you you can spend comfortably into three figures on a pair of thongs. But that's just not right. Eat the proper. Australian phone is off a rack at your local supermarket or petrol station for probably a some not an excessive. What you paid for the accompanying meat pie. And i'm very happy with that in hoping that we can return to actually talk about your underwear at some point and me there. Thank you very much. You're to the globalist. a monocle. Twenty four ups is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking on perspective to our why we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and heart to create lasting value for all clients. It's about having the right ideas of course but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivaled network of global experts that's why at. Ubs we pride ourselves on thinking smarter difference tune into the bulletin with ubs every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the world on. Today's program i'm joined by hannah to have a look at the biggest stories in the world of urbanism right now. Good morning good morning. What urban center do you join us from. Or i am in london stone so yesterday in east london haven't moved quickly far beyond fairmount. Frankly and of course along with everybody else in london. You're not going to pubs clubs restaurants or anywhere else like that The future of hospitality both here in the uk and in the us Is is under discussion the telegraph and the new york times. Pick up on the foot that actually it's really difficult and these institutions may not recover absolutely so the new york times piece is looking a bit more detail already particularly retail Highlighting the role of the sector as kind of second biggest private employer in the states so to be thinking about wolf elsie wins. It mean for individuals. His jobs are impacted. But also thinking about you know what some of the broader trends. We'll see certain types of retail having declined but also the rise of others in particular companies like peace is an interesting one was focusing radio more detail looking pub particularly kind of british institution looking at just about the kind of economic rolling house. But it's a kind of love letter to pumps in terms of the kind of role they vein communities to now one thing about a restaurants and so on being closed let's rubbish on the street for scavenges and it's affecting the urban fox i'm slightly. This is a slightly older article but one my kind of particularly interesting Looking really on the eve lucien. Fox's and particularly kind of differences emerging between fox's urban areas. Like london i lab rural counterparts and kind of suggesting really not see the kind of ovens heinous which. I'm sure you know some of us obscene You know if you're out and about anything. Walk is often quite surprising. How kind of findlay. Some of these other focuses will be. And that's that means intensive you know evolution anakin parallels with how sapiens of all too naturally. Is that resents being more friendly being willing to trust and communicate. is actually favored binding process. So kind of starts in an school. Very much chino about difference between focuses on its highlighting. I guess some of the positive aspects of human hate it too well hemispheres up on mass moving out to the country particularly in france. So what about rural humans. Yes this is an interesting article. I think they kind of been an ongoing series. Begin about kind of the great of an exodus. Quite an interesting point highlighted here in Lemond was halloween. Previously medically had global cities kind of competing to attract those kind of top tier executives. And and who they could land in comes to competition for talent but actually harrison particular towns. You know in in rural areas almost kind of competing to see who they uk poach from city centres. Kind of that kind of lifestyle that is relatively nipping more Right now especially when all those things that make city living reading in fighting the talk about the pubs and nightclubs the retail spaces able to gather if that's not on offer just hundred side life start looking more appealing and we'll go back to the cities to think off to the pandemic if there is an off to the pandemic does feel a by each. I think it's probably one of the biggest questions you know. How kind of loan is it's threatened. And i think i probably caution that often evil dreaming of that relocation necessarily mean. They will do it. But it's important to look at the figures about who is actually militates unnatural. How that decision will be. So you know. The article highlights those who have second homes for spending more time in the second homes Which is wonderful for them. Actually we'll be talking about pretty small percentage of the population. Yeah and then it's also about well who's gonna find avenue living more attractive you know. Well we do get back to normal about sensor. We can't go back to doing those things we love. And we wanna get atkin. They're doing radio big cat. Thank you very much indeed. That was cut hannah. And that's all we have time for on this edition of the globalist which was produced by page. Reynolds reese james and tally film a court a studio manager with some mp. I'm georgina godwin. And i'll be back on the globalist at the same time tomorrow Also be with you for a couple of more pain. You some great music on some shot programming. Thank you finishing off Monaco newbie ask a proud to present a nobel cause a book that celebrates more than half a century of the nobel memorial prize in economic sciences. A nobel calls gives an overview of the eighty-four winning laureates and their influence on global society. It builds excitement around economics by talking to the laureates unpacking their theories from a pioneer in the field of the climate change to an israeli psychologist. Who changed the way we think about thinking the winners stories make an incredibly diverse read as well as real life case studies applications of the prize winning theories. You'll find an illustrated history of global economics alongside look ahead at what we can expect over the next fifty years you can discover the story of alfred nobel himself and the legacy of his awards on sale from october. Twenty twenty from monaco and ubs purchase the book from our retail stores offer. Monaco dot com a nobel calls asking the questions. That shape our.

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Not Self, Inter-being and Compassion

Charlotte Center For Mindfulness // Podcasts

22:08 min | 3 weeks ago

Not Self, Inter-being and Compassion

"You think all of y'all are familiar with tech, not Han Vietnamese, Buddhist monk, just remarkable remarkable teacher on mindfulness month. And one time when my girls were young, I I he came to the states when he was younger, he's now in up in his nineties and in fragile health. So, obviously it's not been here in a while. When he was younger, he would come every other year to the states and his Retreats were the one place that I could take my whole family. You know, I could take my girls, no matter how young they were and they had no like this wondrous kid program and I could meditate. It was a really, really lovely and they would have like, literally a thousand people at these Retreats. So they were very, very large and somehow just deeply intimate and personal gain a remarkable way and take Mahon when you're with them. Everyone calls him tie, which is teacher went. I would teach, you know, he'd have a thousand people in the room and there was a way that he could do it, that it felt like he was speaking directly to you. That it was, there was this just power off. Felt presence of compassion and love and care. And there's one teaching that he gave one time that I'll never forget was drawing from the teaching of the Buddha and what he did was he held up a flower in front of a thousand people. We could all see, you know, this one single flower that we he was holding up. And he talked about looking deeply into the nature. The true nature of the flower and seeing the clouds, and the rain, and the Sunshine, and the Earth, and knowing that, when we see this thing, we call flower that, what we're really seeing is is woven creation of the universe right here and all of it being held in this flower. There was a way he was able to share that but moved Beyond intellectual fact I mean if you look at the intellectual science of what he was saying is true, that's absolutely true but there's some there's no there's no real question about it. But most of us carry that at a factual level that we very little integrate into our lives and there was something about the way he shared the loudest shift from intellectual fact to embodied. Knowing, oh, yeah. Not just the flower but me too. And everyone around me and everything around me. We all two are connected in this week. Very powerful teaching. I come back to that because I realized I skipped over it and our journey on the Eightfold Path. For those of you haven't been here for a while. We have been exploring the Buddhist psychology teaching of the Four Noble Truths, which are what causes suffering. What we found there is suffering in life, what the cause of that suffering is there's a way out and here's the way out and the Eightfold Path is the path out. And this world quality factor of attuned. Mindfulness is one of those What we learn with mindfulness is it's not just about, you know, watching the breath move in and out. It's about the wisdom that I gain from this practice from this watching, and the integration of that wisdom into our life, in a way that begins to affect all of our nation's internally and externally, So one of the wisdoms that comes up naturally with deep awareness of this moment now or what about the three marks of existence dukha and and a lotta, which are there is this this kind of suffering that is inherent in life as long as we relate with clinging. There is the fact of impermanence, and we've talked about those two and then the third one, I'm not the one that I skipped over wage is a teaching on sometimes translated as no self, which is not a great translation. Probably better is not self, I'm seeing more and more teachers would move to that translation, not self. So that was basically the teaching that that take my Honda, offered that morning with the flower. I put it in the context first of his teaching because it's so easy to misunderstand. This wisdom teeth. I'm not self to like totally miss the boat on it and the Buddhist psychology term of emptiness in a way that instead of helping us untangle for suffering, actually gets us more Tangled Up. And this misunderstanding of it is really not new at all. I love em, quote, I found from the third Century, Indian Buddhist teacher, knock Hashanah. I don't know how you pronounce his name. What he said was empty nest. Meaning this this very similar to that self wrongly grasped if we misunderstand it and we grasp at it at the wrong way, it's like picking up a poisonous off. Think by the wrong end, you know, that's, that's pretty direct of. If you take this in the wrong way, it's not going to help your life the wrong way. That is commonly misunderstood is hearing, not self or emptiness, but we're going to focus on the not self as nihilistic void. As there is nothing there that's never ever, ever, what is pointed to or meant by this by these teachings. Rather, what we are seeing into is the fact of interrelatedness, of all things of all beings of all processes and when we experience the truth of being part of this interrelated, whole then compassion is a natural natural opening and Awakening to it. So not self or not, what it's really referring to is not that we don't have. I mean, everyone all of us having us inside our heads off, some sort of voice that's kind of going on and and westerners it tends to be a voice in our head that we associate. As me, as kind of like being a defining part of who I am. What this teaching is pointing to is not that that voice doesn't exist and not even that there aren't places that that voice can be really helpful and useful. It's just pointing to that. There actually is in fact, no separate existence of any part of us or anything. From anything else. And this is not just a Buddhist realization, by any means indigenous spirituality, deeply, deeply rooted, and understandings of how we are part of a basic web of all things modern science. Now, powerfully pointing to this month, same understanding of nothing exists in isolation. Everything is a part of everything else. I've often shared this quote from evolutionary biologists Linn-Mar Palace that I just love. Independence is a political term, not a scientific term. That's kind of a powerful statement. Independence is a political term, not a scientific one. So back to take the flower teaching is one of his favorites and he wrote his teaching in in his book bag, No Death, no fear. And so I just want to share how he says the same teaching that's pointed to in lots of traditions. And lots of old of you know, for eons people have come to understand the truth of this. So what he says is the flour is made of non-flowering elements. We can describe the flower as being full of everything. There is nothing that is not present in the flower. We see Sunshine. We see the rain. We see clouds, we see the Earth. We also see time and space in the flower. Mayflower. Like, everything else is made entirely of non flower elements. The whole Cosmos Has Come Together in order to help the flower manifest herself. The flower is full of everything, except one thing, a separate self a separate identity. The flower cannot be by herself alone. The flower has to enter be with the sunshine, the cloud and everything in the cosmos. If we understand being in terms of interbeing, then we are much closer to the truth. Intervene as not being, and it is not non-being. Intervene means being empty of a separate identity, empty of a separate page. So intellectually it's really not hard to follow. What we factually know about things. Back to the same basic truth. but a wisdom in our life grows, not from understanding that as an intellectual fact, but rather having a direct embodied experience of how I too am part of everything I see and everyone I see and that's what this practice of mindfulness allows us to begin to see and I just before I moved into that really want to say none of this teaching negates Needing a healthy sense of self. There is a way, we'd have to function in the world that is useful and having a healthy sense of self to help us function in the world. It's really important. That's not what this is about. This is about having a deeper understanding of what's underneath that and moved into that. So, in mindfulness, practice, if I'm just being with the breath, there is a way breath meditation opens to a direct experience of this teaching. Dropping in the simple questions of, where does this breath come from? What is it that I am breathing in and out. What's the mystery of how the body knows, how much in breath? How much out breath? Where does that come from? That works this out. I mean there are just endless Mystical real levels of carrying us into deep relates interrelationship, just from watching a simple in breath and out breath. And then, just noticing how little, as in Sam e, has anything to do with that. I think if I'm not practicing, mindfulness is very easy to think, I'm kind of in control of this body. This self. What? What arises, what happens in it, it doesn't take much to drop believe below the age near of that, and realize how little that voice of me in my head, has anything to do with the fact of living in this life, just the breath that voice of me can decide. Oh, I'm going to prolong an in breath. And I might prolong anambra a little bit, but it's really not going to be very long before that in breath, has to turn around to an out breath in a way that that choice of me has no power over whatsoever. I can't wake up some morning and decide. Oh, I'm just going to do in breath today or I'm just going to do out breath today. It's totally beyond that that me and that, you know, just the littleness that me can have control over the breath, is just the tip of the iceberg of how little that has control over the whole life function of this body. Mental functions, mental are mental Consciousness. Actually operates from a far more narrow range of control. Then we might think if we're not practicing with understanding the nature of the mind, I can just say from my own self before I started practicing with my boss honest I really saw myself as much more of an independent thinking functioning being and that I had some sort of view of things that have an external validity. I had a power of seeing clearly into things as the way they really are dead. It was just the rest of everyone else. Who couldn't see. Clear, not me. The reality is, now I can never think I actually have a factual or objective understanding of things. This is truth of implicit bias. That's coming up so much. Now in our in our racial Awakening that's going on and of growing awareness of all of the unconscious harmful racial associations and judgments the color our views all the time. People are beginning to get that. That stuff is in all of us. So bringing conscious awareness to the fact of that stuff. In me, I can affect what I do with what comes from that that bias. I can affect change in that way. That's very powerful and useful. But what I'm can no longer accept or think about my own self is that somehow I am separate from the influence of all of those associations and racial judgments and whatnot that we carry, I carry them too. And that understanding changes how I interact with my own being in the world and how I understand things in the world and that that idea is by no means limited to race. It just with everything that voice in my head that I associate, as me is really this endless process of inter woven jeans, physiology sociology, family history, cultural history in less interactions, that moment by Moment by moment our general. Waiting. How this me? See these things biological all? You know all of that is is playing out. So instead of a clear me, they're really becomes this understanding of a functioning changing. Enter woven, tapestry of influences, some couches, most of them unconscious. What mindfulness does is allows me at awareness into that process so I can be much more helpful with navigating the stuff that this head can generate instead of taking it, as having some sort of external validity, it can bring up a question and a curiosity of, what is the best relationship Here? And Now, Please call me by my true names. Don't say, I will depart tomorrow, even today. I'm still arriving. Look deeply every second. I'm arriving to be a bud on a Spring Branch to be a tiny bird with still fragile Wings learning to sing in my new messages to be a caterpillar in the heart of a flower, to be a jewel hiding in the Stone. It's still arrive in order to laugh and to cry to fear and to hope the rhythm of my heart is the birth and death of all that is not alive. I am a mayfly metamorphosis seen on the surface of the river. And I end the bird that swoops down to swallow, may fly and a frog swimming happily in the clear water of a pond. I am the grass. Snake that silently feeds on the Frog. I am the child and Uganda all skin and bones. My legs as thin as boom, bamboo sticks. And I am the arms. Merchants selling deadly weapons to Uganda. And the twelve-year-old girl Refuge Refugee on a small boat who throws herself into the ocean. After being raped by a sea pirate. And I am also the pirate, my heart not yet capable of seeing and loving. I am a member of the politburo with plenty of power in my hands and I am the man who has to pay his debt of blood to my people dying slowly in a forced-labor camp. My jewelry is like spring so warm it makes flowers bloom all over the Earth. My pain is like a river of Tears so fast and fills the four oceans. Please call me by my true names so I can hear all my cries and laughter at once. So, I can see that my Joy and Pain are one. Please call me by my true names so I can wake up and the door of my heart. Be left, open the door of compassion.

Han Vietnamese Mar Palace Mahon anambra Honda Uganda swimming
Wall Street Breakfast June 1: OPEC+ Policy

Wall Street Breakfast

14:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Wall Street Breakfast June 1: OPEC+ Policy

"Support for this. Podcast comes from invent together. I bet you didn't know that inventing activity by black inventors peaked in eighteen ninety nine and it has never recovered black and hispanic college graduates patented half the rate of white college graduates. That's just one of the reasons why you need to know about invent together. When our patent system gets more diverse our nation will get stronger and more successful. Find out how you can help. Diverse inventors and unleash economic opportunity at invent together dot org. Welcome to health as wall street breakfast. Your daily source of market news and analysis. Subscribe to this podcast on apple. Podcasts google podcasts. Spotify stitcher good morning. Today is tuesday. June first our top stories today opec plus policy inflation remains in focus and trillion dollar deficits essential or detrimental leading today's news. The latest opec plus gathering takes place via video conference today as pandemic travel continues to prevent the usual meeting spot in vienna. The group is now holding monthly meetings. Giving it more immediate power to make decisions on current oil market conditions as well as room to maneuver. It's also a signal that opec plus producers are wary about how things might play out in the months as they try to balance expectations of a recovery in demand against a possible supply increased from iran. The world's fourth largest crude producer backdrop opec plus decided in april to return two point one million barrels per day to the market from may july anticipating rising global demand despite surging kobe cases in india. Since the announcement crude prices have risen from sixty dollars toward the seventy dollars level and are up more than thirty percent in twenty twenty one alone. Oil has still been trading in the tight sixty to seventy dollar range for the past three months as talks. Continue on the future of the. Jcp away a deal. Revival that would lead to higher iranian output wti crude futures climbed another three point one percent overnight to sixty eight dollars and thirty four cents per barrel ahead of the opec. Meeting russia is expected to seek to accelerate the pace of the ramp up in output but the saudis may call for keeping the more conservative increase given the high. Kobe case counts in india and japan as well as the looming return of iranian exports in the back half of the year said rbc capital markets outlining that opec plus is set to stick with its cost. Production returned schedule. The group is also unlikely to decide on output policy beyond july since the outlook for iran is not yet clear and opec has another reading plan for june twenty-fourth yesterday opec's joint technical committee revised global supply down by two hundred thousand barrels per day and now expects a deficit of one point four million bpd in twenty twenty one from one point. Two million bpd previously meaning inventories faster than expected thought. Bubble western oil majors are under pressure to cut carbon emissions faster especially after the courtroom and boardroom defeats he last week at exxon chevron and shell new energy policies proposed by the biden administration are also discouraging the production of fossil fuels meaning more business for opec plus and the lights of saudi aramco. Add knock and rosina. It looks like the west will have to rely more on what it calls. Hostile regimes for its supply joked a high level executive from russia's gazprom. Well it will take time to boost america's renewable power grid which could lead to higher oil prices in the interim some say the. Us may have the last laugh. If fossil fuel dependent economies fail to shift away from oil and gas in the future that could be susceptible to economic instability and stagnation and in the decades to come however many wealthy countries still have outsourced a large chunk of their carbon pollution overseas for quite some time and that could continue in a future world price. Differentials play out in the energy mix in other news. Traders are returning for memorial day with renewed optimism as stock index futures point higher following the holiday weekend dow futures are up point five percent while contracts linked to the s. and p. Five hundred and nasdaq ahead by point. Four percent more records while the benchmark and p five hundred is starting june. After notching fourth consecutive monthly gain the inflation debate continues to remain in the headlines quote overall given the market's reaction to friday's release investor concerns about inflation may have been exaggerated or perhaps already priced in said chris hussy a managing director at goldman. Sachs consensus may be building that the inflation we are seeing today is good inflation the kind of rise in prices that accompanies accelerating growth not a monetary policy mistake. Many are still concerned about the risks of a market crash sort interest in spy recently. Hit its highest. Since december and the skew index rose to the highest level since august eighteen hedge funds have also slashed their holdings and twenty of the twenty three commodities backed in the bloomberg commodity index by the most since november while the extreme volatility and crypto and tech stocks has sparked worries over broader selloff up next may nonfarm payrolls report set to be released. Friday is likely to be the catalyst for the markets. Depending on the figure it could support stocks or changed perceptions of the economy's strength or coming stimulus measures following the employment number. We'll be watching the fed's latest comments about inflation at nfl. Whimsy meeting scheduled for mid june president biden unveiled his first budget before the weekend that detailed six trillion in spending for a fly twenty twenty two including two infrastructure proposals an increase in military resources as well as domestic programs like scientific research or new energy in total the plan would raise federal spending to eight point two trillion per year by twenty thirty one meaning annual deficits of over one point three trillion and one point eight trillion in twenty twenty two while the plan is only a blueprint for the administration's fiscal priorities and is subject to congressional debate. Other policy promises that were included in the budget may add to the weighty costs student loan forgiveness lowering the medicare eight to sixty creating a public health care option and reducing prescription drug prices. Bigger picture long gone are the days of austerity conversations. The tea party movement or the balanced budget talk. That made some political brownie points in fact the us has already returned to the record. Debt to gdp ratio last seat in the aftermath of world. War two one of the biggest fears among stock market investors if the spending will lead to a sustained rise in inflation which is hard to get rid of and would require the attention and possible. Intervention of the federal reserve in the economic textbooks of yesteryear big deficits were said to lead to price pressures at a possible overheating of the economy. However growing number of economists and the white house feel that the current circumstances call for different economic plan citing historically low borrowing costs and the need to get millions of americans back to work and guaranteeing that the nation remains competitive with china. The fed has also signalled it. Wouldn worries rates before twenty twenty four while investors are still eager to scoop up. Us government debt and treasury secretary. Janet yellen has argued that any risk of inflation and overheating could be controlled quote. The president's budget improves the long term fiscal outlook because his policies are more than paid for over the long run acting budget director. Chalan too young told reporters on friday failing to make these investments at a time of such low interest cost would be a historic opportunity. That would leave. Future generations worse off. How much is too much. There's no magic number or level for winnowed government's debt begins to hurt its economy as long as interest rates. Stay low in the. Us can borrow cheaply. the country can handle a much heavier debt load than was once thought possible however the federal debt cannot grow faster than the economy indefinitely once confidence a roads and treasuries the dollar reserve currency status is threatened borrowing could get more expensive and servicing. That debt would cancel any budgetary forecast that were made in the previous lending environment. The same scenario could happen if the us would also be forced to raise rates as inflation heats up or by borrowing beyond getting crowded out though we could still be a long way from that point despite all the doom and gloom the same scenario could happen if the us would be also forced to raise rates as inflation heats up or by private borrowing getting crowded out the we could still be a long way from that point despite all the doom and gloom employers can require their workers to get vaccinated against covid nineteen according to the latest update to the guidance issued by the us equal employment opportunity commission the mandatory vaccination requirement applies to all employees physically entering the workplace with only a few exceptions permitted under law. Such as a medical reasons. The workforce is unionized or taking it against sincerely held. Religious belief employers must also comply with the reasonable accommodation provision of the ada and title eight of the civil rights act of nineteen sixty four and other considerations. Better be used. Carrots companies can also offer incentives to workers vaccinated as long as the incentives are not coercive a move likely to open a floodgate of lawsuits. According to some experts. What is coercive is unclear because just as with everything else. One person's view of what is a coercive. Incentive is not the same as another person's said helen rela unemployment attorney at a new york-based law form the revised. Eeoc guidance was issued as the us cobra. Nineteen immunization drive reached a major milestone with more than fifty percent of the population. Getting at least one dose. Meanwhile the world health organization is renaming corona virus variants after the letters of the greek alphabet. Instead of the place of their first discovery the four types of providers known by the public as the uk south africa brazil and india variants have now been assigned the greek letters alpha beta gamma and delta other variants of interest will continue down the alphabet quote. No country should be stigmatized for detecting and reporting variants. Who appeared meteorologist. Maria van kerckhove declared to avoid this to simplify public communications who encourages national authorities media outlets and others to adopt these new labels married couples. China are now allowed to have up to three children. According to the communist party's politburo as the nation looks to mitigate risks to its long term economic prospects. The policy change will come with supportive measures. Which will be conducive to improving our country's population structure fulfilling the country strategy of actively coping with an ageing population and maintaining the advantage endowment of human resources for the state. Run news agency. The government is also set to gradually raise the national retirement age but did not provide further details bigger picture. They published several weeks. Ago showed china's population growth in spending at its slowest pace since the nineteen fifties with the numbers on mainland china increasing. Five point thirty eight percent to one point forty one billion. The working age population people aged fifteen to fifty nine was on the decline as well after hitting a twenty eleven peak of nine hundred twenty five million. While the fertility rate is only one point three children per woman during two thousand twenty missing target of one point eight that beijing had set in two thousand sixteen after replacing. Its one child policy. China's statistics agency took an unusual step by announcing that the population did grow in two thousand twenty but gave no total prompting some speculate. It was only an effort to pacify investors and corporations had issues. What are the world's second largest economy may already be an irreversible. Population declined before accumulating the household wealth of g seven nations while china has eased birth limits. Couples have been put off by the high cost of living especially in cities cramped housing many share apartments with their parents and career choices. Job discrimination faced by mothers childcare is also expensive. Maternity leave is short and most single mothers are excluded for medical insurance or social welfare. Payments investment angle consumer companies seem particularly gaining from less restrictive family planning policies. include hasbro. mattel. Danone nestle procter and gamble. Kimberly clark and reckitt benckiser asian communities such as kid focused good baby international japanese baby bottle producer pigeon core and diaper maker unit charm may also benefit disney is getting some further attention while carmakers that sell to the chinese market may get a boost. Saic volkswagen lyod meal x. Paying going jew automobile. Byu company great wall motor and brilliance china automotive as of six twenty pm today. Us futures golden crew all set to open in the green with bitcoin slightly down on today's economic calendar. The manufacturing index is out at ten. Am eastern time. If you enjoyed today's podcast. Please be sure to rate interview. It below your feedback is deeply appreciated. That concludes today's wall street breakfast. Thank you for listening for the best. Investment analysis and news on the web dot com. Subscribe to this. Podcast on apple podcasts. Google podcasts spotify. Stitcher you can sign up for our other podcasts. Behind the idea essay therapies. Let's hope cannabis investing podcasts and marketplace roundtable. Almost five phones as well a great day.

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