33 Burst results for "Polio Vaccine"

Fresh update on "polio vaccine" discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

02:17 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "polio vaccine" discussed on P&L With Pimm Fox and Lisa Abramowicz

"You know so-called registering a vaccine this early stage and I hope that Donald Trump is not going to take the cue from Putin and try to do a similar thing in the United States because. It's not fair to the scientists were working on the vaccine or certainly not fair to the general public to expose them to vaccine whose safety and efficacy is not completely determined. So Peter. For Big Pharma companies vaccines is not been a real business line for them over the years some wondering here a lot of resources from big Pharma. A lot of biotech leaders are focused on. This is A. Coordination. Between these companies or are they each in their own lane pursuing their own tests in their own product? It's more the latter. I mean I think on a fundamental science point of view there is still sharing, which is a positive but then the nationalism that you're seeing from the government's is sort of driving people apart, and as he said each in its own lane the ideal would be some sort of a patent pooling approach where we just all agree okay. If it's a patent that's necessary for development of Covid nineteen vaccine, it'll just be placed into a pool where everybody can share it. The royalties are split on some equitable basis and that would be the science forward much faster but it's. The United States among other countries has not gone along with proposals for patent pooling. Yeah. I mean good luck with that as much as it seems to be the obvious thing for all rational thinking people to do than you know I. I'm not sure if Russia would go along with China would go along with it if the US would go along with us, Peter wh, where should we be looking for the first batch of potential vaccines? So as my article lays out and there's an accompanying graphic which I worked on with SEAN hostile You sort of have three broad categories of vaccines. When is the whole pathogen approach which is a traditional you know like polio vaccine where it's either a killed or weakened virus you the actual virus that gets injected into your body and stimulates the immune system, and then the other kinds. Most of what's being worked on new stuff it really is not as well tested. One is where you actually give the body sort of a piece of the virus of some kind of sub-unit, maybe a protein or something and have the see how the body reacts to that, and then the third is really cool. You actually give the body, some of the nucleic acid from the virus and the body itself manufacturers portions of the virus, not the whole virus but portions. That stimulating the immune system so you. Turn your own body into a of vaccine production factory I mean it's just amazing what scientists are up to today. And and I really obviously got to wish him well. The participant at some point, right? So One of the things that's also. Block there that we've talked about before is production and distribution..

Peter Wh United States Polio Vaccine Big Pharma Putin Donald Trump Covid Russia China
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

Science Talk

04:27 min | 5 d ago

COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

"US government's. Warp speed is ambitiously trying to create test and licensed vaccine for covid nineteen in less than a year compared to the five to ten years typically needed for a new vaccine. The program is borrowing strategies from a crash effort undertaken in the nineteen fifties against polio. Arthur caplan was seven years old when that paralytic disease which had been terrifying parents nationwide came to his town. Last. People. In America. Get. Polio in the Boston outbreak of nineteen, fifty seven, that's where I'm from. Saw Kids in our loans on kids die in the floor. It's one of the reasons I got interested in medical ethics. The Polio vaccine developed in the fifties it saved millions of lives and brought us tantalizingly close to eradicating the disease altogether. But in the haste to produce them researchers and manufacturers occasionally made mistakes and crossed ethical boundaries. Experimental vaccines were tested on intellectually disabled children, for example, as well as millions of people in the Belgian Congo and the Soviet Union who were not given the option for informed consent that today we consider indispensable. Medical ethics come a long way in the past sixty, five years. The World Health Organization has already set up a working group on ethics and Kobe Nineteen of which Kaplan is a member. They have started thinking through many of the tough questions ahead as companies race to test experimental vaccines, and we hope eventually ramp up manufacturing of those who succeed to billions of doses. Worldwide these questions include how can we make sure vaccine trials don't exploit people or enroll too few participants from black native Latino communities who are disproportionately sickened been killed by this disease who will get approved vaccines I and who will pay for them and what if anything should we do about vaccines being sold on the black market? The most immediate questions involve large-scale clinical trials those trials will take months to produce results. Can says, one reason is if I give you the experimental vaccine. Then, I have to wait for the. Virus in nature to infect me to see whether I'm going to do better than a group that didn't get vaccine usually have a placebo control group were you don't give them an active agent and you sort of monitor one against the other. If, you're waiting for natural infectivity with Kobe we have a problem because the Degree to which the becoming infect is very slow. So you'll notice that people are starting to recruit subjects for trials right now in hot spots, they may be looking at Brazil. They may be looking at Atlanta it could be looking at a region of the country that has. A A big outbreak. But at the same time, morally we have to try and tell people who sign up for vaccination studies they should not get themselves infected. So it's a sort of moral catch twenty two, you can't really. Encourage people to be reckless and get themselves. In fact, an the problem is you're probably not going to take sicker people because it makes it difficult to assess whether a vaccine is causing an adverse event or an underlying illnesses causing events. Most of the people who come into these big vaccine trials are healthy volunteer still they're younger. Is An effort underway. In the NIH sponsor trials to try and get more diversity ethnicity and race but a lack of transparency in who is being selected for the vaccine trials has raised concerns that historically underrepresented communities may once again be overlooked. Kaplan says that the preference for healthy volunteers is also one of the reasons that vaccine testers probably won't turn to one otherwise logical place to recruit participants prisons where corona virus has been running rampant, you can't use a vulnerable population because you worry that they can't consent. They're gonNA try and say I'll do it because they want to get out of jail or get parole the other main reason why Is prison populations usually have two or three underlying diseases. I know MTV everybody's at the gym looks such Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in fact, hepatitis HIV drug abuse is a bunch of reasons why they're not a best subjects for for any beginning studies

Polio Vaccine Kaplan Polio Kobe Arthur Caplan Belgian Congo United States NIH MTV Arnold Schwarzenegger Soviet Union America Boston World Health Organization Brazil Atlanta
Fresh "Polio Vaccine" from Lynne Hayes-Freeland

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

00:54 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh "Polio Vaccine" from Lynne Hayes-Freeland

"Oh, my goodness. And I don't think that Mike's an amateur at calling into the show, either. I'm almost positive. He's done this before. Mike, you there. One more time. Mike McCue decay, but no, he's not. OK. Whatever. Okay, So here's the other thing. I mean, we talk about you know Vladimir Putin saying that you know they got this vaccine. We? We had the president, you know, touting different drugs. I mean, this is all kind of new mean. I don't remember, you know, or certainly wasn't around to remember. You know the salt in the polio vaccine, but You know, I mean, having presidents come out And tout these things is this kind of new phenomena. Somehow they take the political credit. For this. I mean, ultimately, it was the scientists that made this possible. So the idea that a leader of any country then comes out and it didn't even give the okay. I mean, if you're going to say that you're the one who got bin Laden or gotten. Ah, Big Daddy because you're the final person who said Go gotcha. Why the delay claim that somehow you get the credit for developing a vaccine because you were the head of state of where it took place. That's a ridiculous thing to 2 45 wins. Avoid traffic on the guy's powered by 1000 Chevrolet experience the power of 1,000,000 Chevrolets that still Guys the afternoon rush heating up a little bit in spots over on the Parkway East inbound your before Edgewood's voicemail of the Squirrel Hill tunnels out found just about back to the bend and Bates corporate approach slows between Grant and standing works. It's heavy and slow on the lower deck of the four to Cambridge. Inbound Parkway West, about 3/4 of way of grain tree Hill does your head towards a Fort Pitt tunnels. The parkway North is rolling along fairly well. No delays in either direction between the bridge and 79 65. Traffic light. The late the McKees Rocks Bridge Our next report at 2 55 from the president, Irian Senior clarinet or Traffic Center. I'm Scott still are on NewsRadio 10 20 K T. K. Thomas. Karina. See their ideas. Observe our lovely stances social. Si alguno. Ana Soto. Serious, Sarah. Oh, no Demos CNN matter. Go South depended.

Mike Mccue President Trump Polio Vaccine Vladimir Putin Fort Pitt Tunnels CNN Ana Soto Mckees Rocks Bridge Grain Tree Hill Squirrel Hill Laden Sarah Traffic Center Cambridge Karina Bates Scott Grant T. K. Thomas
A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

Short Wave

10:33 min | Last month

A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying

Joe Palca Polio Vaccine NPR Food And Drug Administration Sean Kirk Baltimore Jonas Salk Rachel Martin Seth Berkley Fauci Anthony Dr Lewis Fellow University Of Pittsburgh Medic CEO Garvey
Fresh "Polio Vaccine" from On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

00:44 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh "Polio Vaccine" from On Point with Juandolyn Stokes

"Black feasible. I do cross stop after I see what I see. Yesterday, somebody called it in See I'm pushing some conspiracy, Miss Wanda. You know everything I tell you. I've got received. All right. Okay, So so whoever said I'm talking back to spirited, they need to do research. Okay, I'm gonna take you back in time. Okay. Okay, go back to go back to the speech in the sixties for Dwight. I how when he said what he said. About industrial term place. The military industrial town play the You Goto. I think thatyou, 1963 with John Fitzgerald Kennedy is it vertically of president of United States? Your speech about secret government. Okay, So whoever said that don't do research. Okay, again. I'm a brain defect. They run the same play book They ran. Okay with this cold word virus. They run the same play book they hear about Ponyo vaccine, right? Okay, I'm going to your receipt. Media back trail's end up taking that polio vaccine in the sixties. Okay, ejected that miss one both off in that we can't cancel. Okay. So idea. Research on the polio vaccine. Look up, Simian virus morning. Where they made that vaccine. What I gave the markets they put the market. Ah, Brad make stand up in and a back scene shot people that would count. Okay. Okay, man. I talked to a white new He took the polio vaccine to what? He had a problem. Okay, so they threw me. Bye Bye. Received. They've got two different vaccine one for black people and white clean. Okay, whoever they're there Remember what you just remember that I remember that Okay. That's received wanted that receipt. So after they playbook what they didn't So what they do or not, that's called an algorithm. About the sea. What again 16 then that can't be what they do in the future, So it's all up to you and those like it's just repeating that whole same cycle that is something different for different communities. This man the whole population control the white black people based on Earth again Another day by conspiracy where my mama and daddy got together that with the experience, and then I popped that you're back. Okay. That's good Spirit. Anybody The born from a woman? They had a man for the seed, and they had a conspiracy. So you call it conspiracy anything that anyone experiences Yeah. When two people get together, okay? And one would get together. That's good spirited. Okay, so you had to go. You have to make a baby. Okay? You're saying whoever called and when that stopped a major new research got Maurice are going on a J. C. Okay, Now I know you do research. It's got a bump in a dump with somebody. I'm a wise man. Would somebody bring me information? Actually up, research it and then I go looking up like my man. Gregor. I know you're good. You got that right be called. He'll show. Squeeze might say, Samo Boba estimate everything. Okay? You know you've been looking up. Well, I appreciate you for sharing because we love to hear the voices a diverse voices of our audience. So we appreciate you for sharing your talking to is definitely got alright, Healthy boundary. Don't I got receipts for everything? I think. Okay. Awesome. Awesome. Say healthy. Stay connected. Stay on 0.40489 to 27. 03 Some of you are want this new vaccine out of Russia. Out of Russia's camp. Let's continue the conversation. Let's see them about Do I have time to go to mail mail? I'll come to you, Bruce City of South Fulton, I've got you coming. Just that connected. Stay on point. Uh, We've got a lot more to talk about this morning, and we certainly want you to stay connected. The Russian business conglomerate. Sister Irma has said that it expects to put this vaccine into mass production by the end of the year. Even while the doctors of volunteering just take fascination. They're going to put it in a mass production and it should be available there. They're already getting orders. They already have secured orders for 500 million doses already. It's on barbell Waddle in stuff's releasing dark 13 80 w Your Munna Love came out, so spirited today is doing that list. You know, It's so spirit, you know, just for a moment, so call years and appreciate you. We waited for you to come on air in mourning, you know, here in but You were so gave a message. Your monologue you spears. You're with 4048922703 on news and talk. 13 80. W ay. Okay Right now.

Polio Vaccine Miss Wanda Gregor Dwight Russia John Fitzgerald Kennedy Samo Boba Brad United States Thatyou President Trump Maurice South Fulton Irma Bruce City
"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

02:07 min | Last month

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:43 min | Last month

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

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"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

04:40 min | Last month

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

"Or not..

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:34 min | Last month

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

02:10 min | 2 months ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

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"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:37 min | 2 months ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

"One by seen it and wired. visit our exclusive link. Express VPN DOT com. Innovations and you can get an extra three months free on a one year package. That's E. X. P., R. E. S. S. VPN Dot. com slash innovations one last time express. Dot Com slash innovations to learn more and show your support for our show. In Pittsburgh.

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on American Innovations

"The diamonds in the world and I won't do a bit of good and less major advances are made in the lap. He's reluctant to rush forward. Last time. Scientists rushed polio vaccine through the development process. The results were disastrous. He won't allow the mistakes of the past to be repeated and calls difficult. Hard edged genius who most of the time is only interested in one opinion. His own Lester O'Connor good to see you. Thanks for coming in. Thomas Rivers is director of the Rockefeller Institute. Hospital A self-described roughneck and the forefather of modern virology well rivers. Get right to the point. I want you to head up my foundations committee on scientific research. We need a polio vaccine and we can't have another park. Brody calmer situation God. No, you see. A lack of funding hasn't been the only thing slowing down polio research. Three Years Prior William. William H Park a professor of bacteriology. New York University medical. School had joined forces with the researcher named. Maurice Brodie to develop the cure for polio. They prioritize speed over safety and injected animal nerve tissue directly into children. They had no idea how dangerous that might be. The ended up infecting many of their young test subjects with the disease when they should have been and knock them against it. If that wasn't bad enough. The competition amongst researchers have the opposite effect of inspiring. Good Science John Colmer a pathologist in Pittsburgh heard about parks attempts and wanted to beat him to the punch, but there was a problem his vaccine was if anything, even more poorly researched. It killed nine people. Since then scientists have been understandably hesitant to test new vaccines. O'connor wants rivers to get the scientific community back on track, and to take a measured approach. How `bout you drop a list of research priorities, so we can emphasize first things first and trying to get somewhere for a change all run the scientific research group and I'll make sure it's run the right way, but we can't move forward unless we know what we don't know. By one, thousand, nine hundred thirty eight rivers has a plan. He says it before. Researchers can even think of developing a vaccine. They must I figure out how polio works how it gets into the human body. Now it's transmitted. The fight against polio books likely to be long-haul. With everything going on right now. A lot of people are asking if it's even possible to buy life insurance at all. The short answer is yes. You can buy life insurance during a pandemic, and if you have loved ones depending on your income, you probably should as an insurance marketplace policy. Genius is in contact with the life insurance companies on their platform every day. They're keeping track of all the changes in the market, so you don't have to. Which means they can get you covered quickly and for the best price. Here's how it works. Policy Genius compares quotes from the top life insurance companies in one place. It takes just a few minutes to compare quotes from the top insurers to find your best price. Wants to apply the policy. Jeans will handle all the paperwork and red tape for free. So if you're one of the many people.

polio polio vaccine researcher Lester O'Connor Thomas Rivers William H Park Maurice Brodie New York University Brody John Colmer Rockefeller Institute Jeans Pittsburgh first things first director professor
Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

06:10 min | 3 months ago

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
Greatest Hits: Physician, Test Thyself

Your Brain on Facts

04:56 min | 3 months ago

Greatest Hits: Physician, Test Thyself

"While at the medical pneumatic institute of Bristol in the seventeen ninety s Humphry Davy studied gases studied by inhaling. The today's theme was still in any way unclear. Devi would set up chemical reactions and then inhale the resulting gas one gas gave him a pleasant sensation and the impulse to laugh at everything he had discovered. Nitrous oxide though. His initial attempts were meant to reproduce the pleasurable effects of opium and alcohol. Davey would ultimately recommend the use of nitrous oxide as an anesthetic. Your dentist gives you a blend of fifty percent nitrous and fifty percent oxygen but devi was huffing hundred percent nitrous oxide which is probably why he enjoyed it enough to start hosting parties. Were friends would inhale it from silk bags when it came time to test his polio vaccine. Dr Jonas Salk decided to avoid the long drawn out. Human clinical trial process the only suitable tests subject was himself and his family in nineteen forty seven. Salt was working on a vaccine for the crippling disease. While at the University of Pittsburgh he needed a healthy volunteer to test it and administered it to himself his wife and their three sons. It worked and was soon implemented in a nationwide test that showed dramatic results in two years. Polio cases decreased from twenty nine thousand to less than six thousand salk didn't patent the vaccine in assisted that it should remain free and available to everyone saying. Could you patent the Sun as a result? He's often remembered. As one of history's great humanitarian. Since Dr Olivier Immune System was a brilliant cardiologists zone practice in the second half of the twentieth century when he developed a life hindering addiction to alcohol fearing for his life. He immersed himself in a rehab therapy but nothing worked so he did the only thing he felt he could. He took his treatments into his own hands. Searching For a cure he happened upon back. Lafon a muscle relaxant. That had been used for years but it shown promising results in studies with laboratory animals addicted to a variety of substances Doctor Amos in prescribe himself the drug and experimented with increasingly higher doses until he finally reached a level that left him free of any craving for alcohol. He published his results in two thousand and four which a team of Italian scientists tested with promising results in two thousand eight Werner forsman was German urologist who during his surgical training in nineteen twenty. One pioneered the technique of cardiac catheterization the inserting a catheter into the heart. To measure the pressure inside and decide whether a patient needs surgery building on the work of scientists who has successfully catheterization a horse in eighteen sixty one force was inspired to try to replicate that work in humans but couldn't get permission for human trials of such a dangerous sounding experiment undeterred. He asked an operating room nurse to procure the necessary equipment. She agreed but only on the noble condition that he experimented on her rather than trying to do it to himself. No sooner was she prepped. On the table than foresman anesthetize his own arm and made a cut inserting the catheter. Twelve inches or thirty centimeters into his name. He then casually climbed two flights of stairs to the X. Ray Sweet before threading it all the way into his heart and having an x ray done to check the placement. He was later forced to resign from that hospital. Then hired back and fired again in the early thirties doctors. Herbert Woollard an Edward Carmichael. Notice that when an internal organ was damaged patient sometimes felt pain in unconnected parts of their body. They decided to deliberately damaged one of their own internal organs to study the effects. But what internal organ did they have? That was both critical and easily damaged. Maybe one or a pair of ones that's effectively on the outside of the body for easy access Yup. They chose to experiment with their gentlemen's BITs to study pain in their notes. Willard in Carmichael recorded that the testes was drawn forward and placed under a Pan that could hold weights though they recorded. Neither whose testees. Who did the drawing forward weights were added to the Pan and the resulting sensations were recorded. The pair performed the experiment. Multiple Times sometimes injecting various sections of the testicles with local anesthetic to

Dr Jonas Salk Nitrous Oxide Polio Vaccine Devi Humphry Davy Dr Olivier Immune System Edward Carmichael Polio Medical Pneumatic Institute Of Opium University Of Pittsburgh Werner Forsman Davey Doctor Amos Salt Willard Herbert Woollard
Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

The Big Story

08:41 min | 3 months ago

Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

"If I had to guess what you'd say if I asked you how long a Kobe nineteen vaccine would take. I Bet I could do that. But best estimates even though we've ramped this up or probably twelve to even eighteen months away from having that available the first vaccine could be ready in eighteen. Months could still be at least a year away and I said that could be a year to a year and a half. I'm not changing any of the dates. So where does that twelve to eighteen month timeframe come from to be honest? I couldn't really tell you but I've heard about it since March and it does sound good to think that a year and a half is the long end of this but this of course is one of the challenges that we all face in the course of learning about this virus the guts of how we research and test and develop and manufacture. Vaccines is probably not something. A lot of us spent time thinking about until now all of a sudden though any piece of good news is desperately welcome so we start to hear about every single potential savior tonight the new findings from the NIH on the antiviral drug rim desert showing promise in speeding up recovery worldwide. There are now roughly one hundred vaccine candidates under view. Researchers advisor believed this Genetic Code Vaccine available as soon as September. How likely though are any of those trials to result in an actual vaccine and even if one of them does. Will it really be available later this year or early next year? Do we even know how to make the vaccine that we might find on a large enough scale? And have we come to grips with the fact that not every disease is a vaccine? How well do we really understand this process? How well do we understand the hope that we're clinging to today? We'll try to help you understand it better right after a very quick update from Claire Broussard. The government says it'll be very careful when it comes to easing border restrictions with the US. That deal which means no nonessential travel between the two countries is set to expire next week but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not say whether or not the border would reopen. At that time Deputy Prime Minister Christie Freeland said. Talks were ongoing. The federal government has announced financial aid for seniors a one time tax free top payment. Those who receive old age security will get three hundred dollars and those who receive the guaranteed income supplement will receive two hundred dollars as the number of new cases of Kovic Nineteen in Ontario remain. Steady the province's chief medical officer of health. Dr David Williams says the by the weekend. Health officials may consider advising the province to move to the first stage of its reopening plan that includes opening select workplaces allowing for more people at certain events like funerals and having hospitals resumed some non urgent surgeries and lastly tradition in Ontario. The Canadian National Exhibition has been canceled for the first time. Since the Second World War it was set to take place August twenty first to September seventh. The President of the Association says they did not take this decision lightly and it was made in consultation and with the support of public health experts. As of Tuesday evening seventy one thousand one hundred fifty seven cases of covert nineteen in Canada with five thousand. Two hundred eighty three deaths. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story. Robert Venison has worked on various vaccines and in the vaccination industry for almost forty years now. So I'm hoping that he can kind of walk us through this high Robert. Hi How are you? I'm doing really well except I never know how to feel these days when I see news reports about a new potential vaccine for Cova nineteen and breakthrough and success. And then it's still eighteen months away. Do you know what I mean I do. Why don't you sort of start by telling me what the media and the public get wrong When we discuss potential vaccine for this virus. Well what a here on the media is. It's almost like it's a slam dunk for starters and that it's not going to take very long at all and twelve months eighteen months. I I feel that's really very overly optimistic. My view is that it could take much longer. The probability of success is a lot lower. And you know for some diseases. We've never been able to come up with a vaccine like AIDS for example right. Can you sort of walk me through the typical process for finding vaccine For something I won't say something like this because I realized this is kind of unprecedented in its global scope but but when you normally discover something in you're searching for vaccine what happens well. The normal process takes fifteen years the ranges between ten and thirty years and it starts with an awful lot of academic research understanding the disease and the disease organism before manufacturers even. Start Looking at a potential vaccine. But once they do. Then there's what we call the preclinical phase where we do a lot of animal testing and developing what was called a vaccine platform and scale up occurs and production of enough vaccine for clinical trials. And then after the clinical trials there's three phases one two and three submit to the regulators for a license and Which usually takes a year and then you have to manufacture it and some vaccines like salk polio. Vaccine for example takes eighteen months to make really yeah from scratch. It's not like pharmaceuticals. You're not cranking pills. Can you tell me how the search for a covert nineteen vaccine can cut down that Really Depressing Time Line. Like everybody's working on this one thing around the world. What do you do to shorten that? Okay there's a number of things that we can do first of all. We do everything in parallel instead of doing one thing I and step to second and step three first. We started all of the steps at the same time where wherever we can. So we're we're going to do without a lot of academic research and knowledge of the organism. We're GONNA use some new technologies that we haven't used for vaccines before so these newer technologies hopefully will be a make us able to manufacture a vaccine much quicker. What are those technologies these are some of the DNA and RNA? Vaccines that are being looked at. There's never been a vaccine currently licensed using these technologies but there's a lot of axes in the pipeline so the thought is it might work for this so while these cut down the timeframe on the other handy reduce the probability of success. Where are we then in that process? I mean I read different reports every few days. Well the good news is there's about nine hundred ninety five vaccines that are candidates for clinical trials. Not all of them have started yet. But there's a and of those the top sort of Twenty that I've looked at the top twenty contenders. Some of those are finishing up animal studies and some of them have actually already started in phase one clinical studies so the positive thing is that there's so many companies developing candidates that wild up the probability of success of any one of those is low the fact that there's a lot of them means that we may get lucky and And one of those will come through or two when you say you look at ninety five or however many that are being done around the world and then you look at the top twenty contenders what makes a potential vaccine a contender as opposed to one of the other ones on the list. What are you looking for? Well what I'm looking for because I know how difficult the process is. I'm looking for basically a platforms. That have we have some experience with. So we've had some success with this platform in making another vaccine and I look at how fast that platform will be able to be scaled up to make to make a manufacturer vaccine because normally it takes five years just to build a manufacturing plant for many of the traditional vaccines. We need something. That's a lot faster

Ontario Robert Venison Deputy Prime Minister Christie NIH Dr David Williams Federal Government Justin Trudeau United States Prime Minister Aids Claire Broussard Cova Canada Advisor Jordan Rawlings Medical Officer President Trump
Report raises concern about rare polio cases caused by oral vaccine

AP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Report raises concern about rare polio cases caused by oral vaccine

"Four African countries have reported new cases of polio link to the oral vaccine in a report late last week the World Health Organization partners noted nine new polio cases cools by the vaccine in Nigeria Congo Central African Republic and Angola seven countries elsewhere in Africa have seen similar outbreaks in cases have been reported in Asia in rare cases the live virus in oral polio vaccine can mutate and spoke out breaks the World Health Organization has long relied on the cheap and easily administered oral polio vaccine however western countries use a more expensive injectable vaccine the contains an inactivated viruses capable of causing

Africa Asia Polio Vaccine World Health Organization Polio Nigeria Angola
Polio outbreak 2019: The WHO just declared another polio virus eradicated

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 10 months ago

Polio outbreak 2019: The WHO just declared another polio virus eradicated

"The World Health Organization says we could be one giant step closer to wiping out polio around the globe as in Paris Jason Beaubien reports a strain of the virus known as type three polio has been eradicated there are three strains of the polio virus they all can cause paralysis but a different vaccine is needed against each one the last reported case of type two was in nineteen ninety nine this new announcement leaves type one is the only original form still in circulation so far this year they've been ninety four type one cases reported globally all of them in Afghanistan and Pakistan but as the world gets closer to wiping out polio another form of the disease has emerged in some rare cases mutant strains of the live oral polio vaccine which is only used abroad can start to spread regain strength and cripple children currently there are twelve vaccine related polio outbreaks in Africa in another one just emerged in the

World Health Organization Polio Jason Beaubien Afghanistan Pakistan Polio Vaccine Africa Paris
Philippines Vaccinating Over 9 Million Children Against Polio

The World

03:47 min | 10 months ago

Philippines Vaccinating Over 9 Million Children Against Polio

"Heidi Larson has been directly involved with the global campaign to eradicate polio she had the vaccine confidence project at the London school of tropical medicine she says the Philippines is experiencing something called vaccine derived polio it doesn't mean that when you take the vaccine you immediately get it but it's a live virus which sounds a bit complicated but it's very little of it so it doesn't make you sick but it goes right through you into the environment and if there's no protection in the environment that live virus can travel to somebody else and the cases that came up in the Philippines actually came from not process because they didn't have that protective cover that the vaccine allows when everybody gets it so let me get this straight Heidi you're saying for example a Filipino kid got vaccinated with this live polio vaccine and then I don't know urinated and that goes into the water stream and then other people drink that yes it's not through urination it's through ball and it gets into the water and starts to circulate and we've seen that happen in a few places and part of the reason that's happening is because we've eliminated so wild virus from most of the world so when it does circulate it becomes much more potent so you're basically saying the virus from the vaccine because this resurgence in the Philippines yes in addition there were low vaccine rates and meets mistrust begin with how did that start two thousand seventeen the country which has a very big burden as they call it of Dinky virus which is really bad fever and people call it bone breaking disease it's very painful it can kill children and it's transmitted by mosquitoes yes it's like malaria but it's interestingly transmitted at a different time of day that so because Brazil and the Philippines had some of the worst dangi and the world when there was a new vaccine available that could prevent it those were the two countries that really started to introduce that but a year later manufacturer who makes the vaccine sent out an announcement and said we've just learned that there is a small risk that this vaccine can create more severe tanky if you've never been exposed to thank you before so that created a panic in the population and that's that was not a rumor that is in fact true is that right that was true and that's another challenge with building vaccine confidence is that there are risks for vaccines there's risks in just about any medicine you take but this was a real risk and there are ways to manage it you just need to make sure that the people who get the vaccine have had some kind of exposure and that can just mean living in an area that has a lot of Dinky but they did stop the vaccination campaign and it really it really scared the public so now the government of the Philippines has is big vaccine drive going on this week it started how's it going do you see any problems so far it's going well and there's been a big investment in trust building and we've gone back and re surveyed and the population what he's thinking about vaccines do you think they're safe to think there are a factor do you think they are important and actually the confidence is starting to come back Heidi Larson has the vaccine confidence project at the London school of

Heidi Larson Polio London School Of Tropical Medi
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Alexander YouTube Westwood One Ashley Hamer BT Senator IBM America David Turner ten minutes five hours
The Inventor of the Polio Vaccine Didn't Patent it

Curiosity Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Inventor of the Polio Vaccine Didn't Patent it

What Is the Black Hole Firewall Paradox?

Curiosity Daily

03:12 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Black Hole Firewall Paradox?

Double Rainbow Science

Curiosity Daily

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Double Rainbow Science

"Remember that YouTube video that went viral in two thousand ten with the double rainbow guy, you can find it on YouTube. It's basically just a guy pointing his camera to double rainbow in freaking out about how cool it is. Yeah. It's nothing super special. But it's kind of funny. Well, today, we've got the science. Behind what makes a double rainbow, and what makes the dark strip of sky between the two rainbows. Now, simply put a rainbow happens when raindrops refracted and reflected light think of it this way when late goes into a raindrop. It'll twist around in its colors will separate then the late will bounce off the outer boundary of the drop. Then all twist again, as it leaves, the droplet, double rainbows are basically the result of extra bouncy light. When late raises ski raindrop. After two reflections to rainbows are visible. The second year rainbow is almost double the width of the primary Rambo and its colors are reversed. You could hypothetically get a triple or even quadruple rainbow this way BT dubs anyway, if you ever see a double rainbow, check out the stretch of sky between the two arcs it looked darker than the rest of the sky. And that's because the patch of sky below rainbow is the brightest because light bounces off the back of a raindrop and emerges on the same side at answered. So the same thing happens in the second, but as a mirror image. So the light is brighter above that. Second maim. Bo. Hence that rainbow sandwich leaves you with a dark arc of sky called Alexander's band. It's named after Alexander of Afridis ius who I noted the phenomenon in two hundred AD, although he didn't really know why it happened. And that's L exander is banned, by the way, not to be confused with Alexander's other band. The Arctic monkeys does that have in Alexander in it leaves singers Alexander, David Turner. Oh, yes. I had to look like a pedia there. If I that to know, I'm so hit with the pop culture.

Alexander Youtube BT David Turner
"polio vaccine" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on The Talk Show

"Just write a story to somebody dug it up. It was like on the fiftieth anniversary of Jonas Salk polio vaccine getting approved. And it was like they just talked about how it was. It was like another. VJ day or the day. You know? It was like a day when people like went out in the streets to celebrate. And party Year's Eve because it was. And you know, I don't know anybody. I realized that our generation like me, and you like, I don't know anybody who had polio of my peers, but my family, you know, like, my my grandparents did by by my mom's dad had a brother who died from polio. I mean, I don't know any. I mean, it was you know, it. It was crazy. You know? I mean, your kids could get measles, and maybe they die. And it was nothing. You could do about it because they were going to get it, you know, and then. And then. Yeah. And then this terrible disease that even if you survived it would could leave you severely handicapped for life. We we've got a thing we can just give this to every kid, and they'll never get it and science backs it up the largest clinical study at the time that anybody would ever conducted. And it was conclusive that this this is going to work. It was great. And I just can't imagine like so many of the people of that generation because of their age that are gone now. But if if you could just listen, if you could just come back here and slap some sense. People like. Is a great book. I read a couple years ago called get well soon. Bye, Jen, right? She's jen. Ashley right on Twitter, incredibly funny and wonderful person. And the book is a hilarious account of history's worst. Plagues? It's written in a very friendly and delightful manner counts all it's really very interesting. It's much more approachable because it's not as deadly either a dry or her horrifying thing. She's kind of a little bit of a to do to do about it which lets you get through it. But it is it gives you some insight into what the scope of things we used to go through and then terrifying things like the nineteen eighteen flu that killed so many people, and we still don't know exactly why. Or if it would for in that form, and whether we have any way to protect against it. But it's I think it's a great. I don't know. I really really enjoyed reading about plagues. But it just lets you see the scope of what's happened across human history and what we've managed to avoid for sixty something years. Seventy something years for the most part are the lightning round continues the big hack. Bloomberg's. Blockbuster story from I think it was Tober mid. Notes by I keep doing thing where every time I mentioned a report from Bloomberg BusinessWeek, I put an Astro skin right away. And then include a boiler now boilerplate footnote remarking that the Bloomberg has since since that's published offered no evidence backing up their story bit yet have not retracted the story, which to me is an untenable position..

Bloomberg polio polio vaccine Jen Bloomberg BusinessWeek Jonas Salk Ashley measles Twitter
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Dr savings advice as a covert attempt to derail his inevitable success after many years of work. There was eventually a winner in the race for science superstardom on April twelfth nineteen fifty-five Dr Salkin nnounced at a press conference that his injection based vaccine had been proven safe effective and was ready for mass manufacturing and distribution. He was so confident in his creation. He even gave it to his own sons that confidence was infectious and almost overnight. Dr Salk was a national hero not only because he invented a polio vaccine. But also because he didn't patent it. Meaning that there would be fewer. Hoops to jump through for other scientists and pharmaceutical companies on their way to manufacturing and distributing the vaccine Dr Saul wasn't particularly concerned with making money from his discovery the public service and the public fame we're enough. But there were a lot of big pharmaceutical companies the saw vaccination as an opportunity for profit. That's right almost immediately after Dr Saux announcement labs across the country began making the vaccine one of those labs was a California based company named cutter laboratories what followed turn the polio vaccination from the national triumph to national tragedy. The so called cutter incident is considered to be one of the worst pharmaceutical disasters in US history. It created nearly as much fear in the American public as polio itself. We'll see what happened after a quick break. You're fan of the park asked network because you love true crime, and you can get an extra fix of true crime in between our episodes with crime junkie..

polio vaccine Dr Salk polio Dr Salkin nnounced Dr Saul Dr Saux cutter laboratories US California
World Polio Day Honors Vaccine Inventor Dr. Jonas Salk

The WB Show

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

World Polio Day Honors Vaccine Inventor Dr. Jonas Salk

"World polio day, it's a day to honor. And remember the man who helped virtually eradicated that crippling disease, Dr Jonas Salk who invented the polio. Vaccine. First used in nineteen fifty five according to the World Health Organization. Polio has now been reduced worldwide by ninety nine percents and Yahoos

Polio Dr Jonas Salk World Health Organization
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"I, I really love that. You know, one of the things you mentioned a little earlier was about how important the coffee lids on for for the cups. I was curious if you could expand on that a little bit more. So the lids I did not know. You know, I could have written a book on leads probably would not have sold many. It was fascinating to see every little thing has so much behind it, and I talked to the designer of the lid for my coffee Cup, and he was so passionate about it. Any. He was very innovative. He is sort of like an eel on musk of coffee lids. Hopefully a little more emotionally stable. He thinks the problem is the lids will block the aroma, which is a huge part of the coffee. Experienced seller made a bigger hole in the middle. He made this, the shape is like this inverted hexagon like, you know, like the Buckminster fuller type shake. And so you can really get your nose in and get maximum aroma, and it is just hilarious. How much thought goes into this. This little piece of plastic mainly realize there are there are hundreds of these these mini masterpieces thought I actually love the little as is if people who should have been thanked, and one of the people you bring up in your book is Jonas Salk who we all know forget about the vaccine for polio. But for most of us who've heard of him, he's treated as kind of a lone genius. Like, why do you think more people weren't recognized for that discovery? Right? Well, that is one of the big themes of my book is that it takes hundreds of people for every advance and psychologists it. The responsibility bias that lead just like the focus on the one person and say, you know, here's the lone genius and Jonas Salk is a perfect example of that a invented, the polio vaccine on April yo vaccine. And he was like the superhero. He was along on the cover of time magazine, and he gave a speech saying how great he was basically floor convincing the vaccine, but he neglected the thank all the people in his lab, and there were tons of people in his lab. There are tons of people who made scientific advances ligon owing polio. So you could actually do the experiments on the polio and and they were very upset with, which I think is understandable. So. We, as humans have this bias to seizure, the one person, and I totally as an author I play into that it out. This book says, it's by cups, which is ridiculous because. Because. Truthful cover would say by, you know, the words by Jacobs, here's the design. You know it'll have like two hundred fifty people on the cover, and I actually proposed that my publisher thought that might be an interesting sir marketing angle, but I do have a list in the back of a thousand people who helped with the coffee and my book speak. You're being grateful in especially in this sense. What are some of the scientific benefits of being grateful in? Like does it have an impact on our health or happiness? Their studies that show a, it'll lift depression. It'll help you sleep, improve your diet. I, I like this one study that indicated that gratitude causes you to be more generous to strangers..

polio vaccine Jonas Salk polio time magazine publisher Jacobs
French president pays call on Pope Francis at Vatican

BBC World Service

04:55 min | 2 years ago

French president pays call on Pope Francis at Vatican

"Wants the opcw to be able to attribute blame which would circumnavigate the russian veto at the united nations the uk delegation has been working hard to secure support fritz draft motion which only needs to win a majority of votes to pass russia syria and a few other countries will inevitably oppose it but their numbers aren't likely to be enough to stop the process if the extended powers are granted they could come into effect before the opcw releases its much anticipated reports into the chemical weapons attack in april in the syrian city of duma headed border security in the united states kevin michelina in has ordered his agents to suspend for handing over to prosecutors of migrant adults who crossed the border with mexico until last week's eight been carrying up the controversial policy of removing migrant children from parents at the border david willis has this report such was the subsequent outcry the president signed an executive order keeping detained families together whilst the parents await trial that left officials with the problem of a house those families and the white house spokeswoman several saunders conceded there was currently a shortage of resources to military bases in texas have been earmarked as temporary camps for migrants that the head of us border security kevin michelina told reporters the socalled zero tolerance immigration policy was now on hold david willis political parties and candidates taking part in next month's election in zimbabwe will sign a peace pledge today days after an explosion at a campaign rally killed two people nearly fifty others were injured in the blast in the country's second city bulawayo president emmerson mnangagwa escaped unharmed but his two vice presidents were among those hurt signatories of the pledge in harare promised to us legal methods to resolve disputes with news from the bbc the first case of polio in papua new guinea for twenty two years has been confirmed the world health organization said it was detected in a six year old boy in april it was also found in samples taken from two healthy children in the same community the w h host had only sixty one percent of children in the area are affected moreau bay province on the northern coast of papua new guinea currently received the recommended doses of polio vaccine a spanish doctor accused of stealing a baby from her mother nearly half a century ago is due in court in madrid today the retired kind of colleges had wanted to vail is the first person to stand trial in connection with a theft of thousands of babies during the regime of general franco they were taken from their parents because of republican sympathies or because they're unmarried mothers offended the regime's catholic beliefs the french president emmanuel macron is used to meet pope francis at the vatican later he's expected to accept the appointment as an honorary canon of rome's cathedral the post is offered to every french head of state but several of mr macron's predecessors have declined it james reynolds reports president emmanuel macron leads a country which famously separates church and state mr michael who is baptized catholic has said that he respects the role of religion in society on this trip the president will accept the ceremonial appointments as honorary canon of saint john lateran beyond the bestowing and the acceptance of clerical titles president mclaughlin and pope francis may talk about the more difficult subject of migration a popular japanese blogger has been stabbed to death apparently by man he and get on the internet the blogger kenichiro okamoto was found dead in a toilet in the southwestern ciccio fukuoka after chairing seminar on social media issues police had a man had turned himself in and confessed to the killing bbc news thanks for that welcome to newsday with lawrence and connie on the way in the next half hour we're going to be hearing from yemen where the army sacked a senior general also here from the mexican convict turn chef is advice on how to achieve your dreams and the question of whether the trump administration is actually backing away from its controversial zero tolerance attitude to illegal migration also the business and the sport here on newsday first we start with that story in me and my where the army says it sucked the general who led the military campaign against hundreds of thousands of row hinges because it says he showed weakness at we have been speaking show correspondent in angolan nick beak and i wanted to know who is this general this is major general maung so and he was head of western command in rakhine state and so that meant he was a.

Sixty One Percent Twenty Two Years Six Year
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Yeah who had some very very interesting causations between the polio vaccine and cancer but no i don't know about the aids and i'm not sure if he got into that and that interview or not we talked a little bit about that and of course there's always been that thought that aids was created to get rid of people who knows actually yeah but you know we do know a lot of sinister things happen on this planet that's for sure can't get away from that lille the seat diff on toxin beat infection on this fatal i got it from taking clement myerson was prescribed by a dentist on that infection after having a tooth pulled i did the test for east in the morning before i went to go see him and it was positive and i offered to show him the test on my phone and he wasn't interested you said just take this he wrote me a prescription in any way i have this i'm on my third occurrence been taking vehicle miles it's not working and the insurance company won't pay for a fecal transplant so what would you have any kind of cure for for c the cure word but what can you recommend your march wow you know i'm going to tell you that is totally out of my depth i i really am mostly most of my stuff is about home medicine for the most common ailments that come up in a family and and what i'd really recommend is some of the other resources that are offered here on coast and it's a great reason to be a coast insiders because georgia's had so many wonderful interviews with with people who talking about cbd oils or gioja spends a working with you know mental and emotional states to achieve health and you know dr wallich with lots of information and it'd be perfectly honest with you i that that is way out of my range google carnivora dot com i don't wanna sound like in verse man but truly it is an immune booster karn carnivora dot dot com carnivora dot com go.

polio vaccine lille clement myerson georgia dr wallich
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Secretary belly of health and education find and welfare out what that relationship resigned this is it a lot really you're turned gonna you into come a through math these and documents guess who they put jerry in and make a report to reestablish for us faith in the national institute of health tricky dick nixon nixon and fifty five was given the task of rebuilding of health i didn't after the disastrous production of the salk vaccine as vice president he overlooked it well he had overlook it because he was overly they seem like they've all been overlooking a lot of things so do they still have the polio vaccine today yes it hasn't been perfected or is it still the same stuff well when we talked about perfection i try to tell putting my body gets sick to my nose into my mouth i don't get sick to my bloodstream i'm not designed to get sick to my bloodstream to put foreign dna in my bloodstream to confused my immune system i has never made any sense to me because i wasn't designed like that so watching how they're trying to trick my body was four dna and cancer causing pathogens i'm not really comfortable with this because i think i got people if i get a sliver in my finger i can't sleep look at this live out 'cause it's gonna drive me nuts you get something inside my system and i can't get a how long does it take the process this stuff out of your system i'm personally not willing to take that chance and i had a father that had polio i was at event a couple years ago i was called the oswal event it was about lee harvey oswald jfk in i was one of the speakers there are e and i met a woman there by the name of judith very baker who claimed to have been oswald's girlfriend before he got married is that the same lady who.

jerry vice president polio vaccine judith Secretary national institute of health dick nixon nixon oswald
"polio vaccine" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The president of the american medical society he was he had financial and just so he decided to vaccinate his grandchildren in front of the faculty at tulane medical school with that first vaccine it was so contaminated his grandson died of polio in forty eight hours and his grown granddaughter was crippled with it the rest of her like oh my god did he ever blame the vaccine for that he was part of the system you just take it and you keep moving but now the point was this but they tried to stop this but you're not galatian went on and fifty five it was the biggest fiasco in history people they have the any nih resigned and the secretary of health and education and welfare resigned get really turned into a math and guess who they put in to reestablish faith in the national institute of health tricky dick nixon nixon and fifty five was given the task of rebuilding the natalie wood of health after the disastrous introduction of the salk vaccine as wise president he overlooked it well he had to overlook it because he was overly they they seem like they've all been overlooking a lot of things so do they still have the polio vaccine today yes it hasn't been perfected or is it still the same stuff well when we talked about perfection i try to tell putting my body gets sick to my nose into my mouth i don't get sick to my bloodstream i'm not designed to get sick to my bloodstream to put foreign dna in my bloodstream to confused my immune system i his never made any sense to me because i wasn't designed like that so watching how they're trying to trick my body with four and dna and cancer causing pathogens i'm not really comfortable with this because i think i tell people if i get a sliver in my finger i can't sleep at the sliver out 'cause it's gonna drive me nuts you get something inside my system that can't get out how long did take the process this stuff out of your system i'm personally not willing to take that chance and i had a father that had polio i was at in event a couple years ago i was called the oswal event was about lee harvey oswald jfk in i was one of the speakers there are e and i met a woman there by the name of.

president tulane medical school nih secretary polio vaccine national institute of health dick nixon nixon forty eight hours
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I'm like all vaccines this pill form would work by exposing people to a harmless part of the pathogen like maybe a protein of the virus that up stimulate the immune system this way watches a stronger response different counters the virus again synthetic pathogen like protein rather than the biological ones the live versions of it the new vaccine could therefore be taken orally this could probably work they said we'll give it to mice and human cells infected with the flu vaccine stimulated a strong immune response they speaking of the findings divvy i shaw from welcomes infection and immunology team was not involved with the trial but she said this is a very exciting i proof of concept study they could provide a potential route to make vaccines that are thermo stable and be administered early the researchers stress however it could be several years before treatment is testimony humans and is therefore unclear what it'd be widely available would like it like sooner than later so oral vaccines we'll they work well we did have the oral polio vaccine years ago in the nineties we gave the kids the oral polio vaccine and then some grandpa's i guess got polio when they were changing the diaper because it was a live attenuated virus vaccine so live attenuated virus that got passed into the kids and when the parents touched or the grandparents touched it if they were too old to have gotten a polio vaccine polio not your how many total cases they got rid of the oral vaccine fast according to this they are not going to use a live version they will only use a piece of protein and they said this'll be great for people who have a fair needles this could revolutionize the vaccine delivery industry increase accessibility all that good stuff here's my thing i know you guys are not gonna wanna hear this you're really not going to want to hear this but when i hear that medicine has to be refrigerated having seen what i've seen in the medical field i always ask wasn't always refrigerated what does it ever left out on the counter when it got delivered to you and it was wasn't a box.

flu vaccine polio vaccine polio
"polio vaccine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Cases dr share warri at the centers for disease control and prevention says one of the worst hit countries south sudan seems to have finally wiped out the worm it is a huge deal huge huge story so we have our fingers crossed and we are holding our breath and now here's the bad news let's start with worm they have a big furry problem yet dogs a few years ago guinea worm started appearing in lots of dogs in chat there have been more than seven hundred fifty cases in dogs this year dogs that are allowed to roam around and spread guineaworm they have a pretty free range in existence altered spend the night some days as they wish that's robbi big donald and ecologists at the university of exeter he says the problem is scientists don't know how the dogs are getting guineaworm they've even done a forensics analysis on the dogs whiskers to see what they are eating but it was inconclusive until they know how dogs are being exposed they can't stop the outbreak in people poleus problem is more serious because the tool being used to fight the outbreak is the problem this a defect in the polio vaccine you see the vaccine is a weakened form of the virus which who doctors 'afrand says can regain power i actions will gradually mutates and in rare cases it regains its ability to become virulent in cost kids this is exactly what happened this year in the democratic republic of congo in syria those countries recorded 84 cases a vaccine derived polio we are surprised by the magnitude of this year an offer which is very very significant never have such a law albrecht five in fact for the first time in history the virus in the vaccine has caused more cases of polio than the regular wild polio mytilene do cloth npr news poll oh is estimated that over thirty.

sudan donald polio vaccine congo syria albrecht polio robbi university of exeter npr
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just twenty six cases dr sharon roy at the centers for disease control and prevention says one of the worst hit countries south sudan seems to have finally wiped out the worm it is a huge deal huge story so we have our fingers crossed and we are holding our breath now here's the bad news let's start with guinea where they have a big furry problem yet dunks a few years ago guinea worm started appearing in lots of dogs in chat there have been more than seven hundred fifty cases in dogs this year dogs that are allowed to roam around and spread guineaworm forever pretty free ranging existence able to spend the night some days as they wish that's robbi mcdonald and ecologists at the university of exeter he says the problem is scientists don't know how the dogs are getting guineaworm they've even done a forensics analysis on the dogs whiskers to see what they are eating but it was inconclusive until they know how dogs are being exposed they can't stop the outbreak in people poleus problem is more serious because the two being used to fight the outbreak is the problem is a defect in the polio vaccine you see the vaccine is a weakened form of the virus which who doctors 'afrand says can regain power well grudge you'll gradually mutate and in rare cases it regains its ability to become virulent because paralysis kids this is exactly what happened this year in the democratic republic of congo in syria those countries recorded eighty four cases a vaccine derived polio are in all correct which is very very significant we never had such a law child break five first history the virus taxiing has caused more cases of polio than the regular wild polio mike lean duke left npr news this is all things considered from npr news here again as julie deppish for another bay area traffic update you do have new trouble in palo alto ongoing north one of one before university avenue accent evolving overturned vehicle lanes to in three or apply to really guinea heavy from the barca geraud just up the road in belmont north 101 after raulston they're dealing with that crash everything is on the right hand shoulder.

sudan robbi mcdonald polio vaccine congo syria polio julie deppish palo alto dr sharon roy university of exeter npr belmont north