35 Burst results for "Polio Vaccine"

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Will now be available. I'm Brad seger. And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. New York declared a state of emergency over polio in an effort to boost vaccination rates. This on more evidence of the virus spread when it was found in wastewater samples in Nassau county on Long Island. The executive order signed yesterday by governor Kathy hochul expands the network of those who can administer a polio vaccine. The laboratory that detected arsenic in the drinking water at an east village public housing complex retracted its test results. We get more about that from Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. Suzette environmental monitoring and technologies is calling the initial results that showed those traces of the dangerous heavy metal at the Jacob riis houses incorrect. And this is according to a statement coming from city hall. Now, officials are going even further and they say environmental monitoring and technologies admitted to being the ones that introduced the toxic compound in the samples. But despite this retraction, susana city officials are again warning residents of the complex to continue to avoid the drinking water for now. And they say more tests are being conducted. The company said that, quote, complexities in the original testing method, which included a test for silver, introduced trace levels of arsenic. Meantime testing for the bacteria that causes legionnaires disease is underway. Stocks broke a three week losing streak on Wall Street, but investors shouldn't get too comfortable, says Anastasia amoroso chief investment officer at eye capital. We're in a pretty treacherous part of seasonality here. We're in September and typically we see that the market kind of tops out in the first week of September and then let's face it. We did not have any major economic developments this week, but we're going to for the rest of the month. For the week, the S&P 500 rose 3.6%. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm susannah Palmer. This is Bloomberg

Brad seger Susanna Palmer polio governor Kathy hochul Bloomberg Denise Pellegrini Jacob riis susana city Nassau county Suzette Long Island city hall Anastasia amoroso New York eye capital legionnaires disease S susannah Palmer
Polio in US, UK and Israel reveals rare risk of oral vaccine

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Polio in US, UK and Israel reveals rare risk of oral vaccine

"Poliovirus is recently found in New York Jerusalem and London were mutated versions of viruses that first originated in vaccines meant to stamp out the disease However rare scientists have long known that the oral vaccine made with the live virus can spread polio We are not going to eliminate polio from this world until we stop using the world polio vaccine Doctor Paul offit director of the vaccine education center at the children's hospital of Philadelphia says here in the U.S. we no longer give the oral vaccine with the live virus but the injectable containing the killed virus however in other parts of the world like poorer countries Much easier said than done because it's an expensive thing to do And it requires the kind of paramedical personnel that can give a shot In New York and unvaccinated young adults suffered paralysis in his legs after being infected with polio Doctor offit stresses everyone should be getting the injectable polio vaccine to keep themselves protected I'm Julie Walker

Polio Paul Offit Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Jerusalem New York London U.S. Paralysis Offit Julie Walker
Dr. Robert Malone Breaks Down the Science Behind Vaccines

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:29 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Robert Malone Breaks Down the Science Behind Vaccines

"What is a vaccine? How is a vaccine supposed to work? And what is special about the mRNA vaccine technology that you developed doctor Malone? So what is a vaccine? The CDC and their infinite wisdom has redefined the meaning of that word just like the meaning of the word anti vaxxer has been redefined as anybody who is against vaccine mandates. So you're right in this nuanced area of nomenclature. I prefer I'm among other things. Yeah, I've had all this training, but I was a Carpenter and a farmhand before I was a physician and a scientist. And I do like to go back to let's try to use plain language. So for me, a vaccine is as a vaccine does and what a vaccine is intended to do is to elicit an adaptive immune response against some threat, whether it's cancer or of a virus or a bacteria or a toxin. Et cetera, to protect against disease and in the case of infection against infection and spread. In replication in your body. So that's my definition of a vaccine for what it's worth. What is a vaccine used for or intended for? I think it's useful to think about vaccines as having different types or categories of a sneeze in a minute. Here it goes. Bless you. Thank you very much. So no, I don't have COVID. I've already had it twice, and I've been vaccinated. But I do have health. So it's useful to think about vaccines in different categories. There's the cancer vaccines will park those because that's not really relevant. Live attenuated vaccines are basically viruses that are tweaked in some way either intentionally or through passage evolution. To make them less likely to cause disease in humans, but still elicit a very strong immune response. So examples of those include the oral polio vaccine, the smallpox vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine. All of those are fairly wicked and have risk of causing disease in your body because they're still live viruses. They're just tweaked, so they're less disease

Infection Against Infection Malone CDC Cancer Polio Smallpox
8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

"8 things that children are more likely to die from than COVID. Cancer significantly. Almost 20 times more likely vehicle accident suicide homicide. Cardiovascular disease drowning flu and pneumonia. We live in a world with numerous threats. It's part of existence. And there's also a false promise in safetyism, too. There's a false promise and you see this in the people that are vaccinated, which has always been one of my complaints about the way that they've been pushing the vaccine is it gives people a false sense of security. And no one wants to talk about this. The false sense of security of someone who gets vaccinated, and then they believe they can resume regular life, and then all of a sudden they have a breakthrough case, and they don't know what to do. They thought they had the protection. They thought they had the same sort of protection that they would get from the measles mumps rubella or polio vaccine. And all of a sudden they get a breakthrough case and they get caught by surprise. Maybe they would have made different social decisions. Maybe they wouldn't have gone to big gatherings. Maybe they would have handled things differently. Maybe they would have prepared themselves with azithromycin Ivermectin hydroxyl chloroquine, monoclonal antibody treatment centers or aspirin. Instead, there is a false sense of security that comes in with the overemphasis of we as the government we as the CDC we as NA 8 NIH we as the medical industrial elite, we're going to protect you. And what it does is it erodes what it does is it diminishes its suppresses humans own responsibility to take ownership of their actions. It's a false sense of security. When in reality, our leader should have said, look, if you want to get this vaccine fine, we're going to be very honest about what it can do what it can't do. But also, if you get it, you better be ready to treat it. We're now 70% of all deaths in the United Kingdom are vaccinated people. Why? They had a false sense of

Measles Mumps Rubella Cardiovascular Disease Pneumonia FLU Cancer Polio NIH CDC United Kingdom
'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 1 year ago

'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

"Daniel Horowitz for the blaze dot com says the data is in. And we are now worse off than before the experimental shots. Now this is a thought crime. In October of 2018, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health published a report that if one did not know better, Mike make readers think the authors were involved in gain of function research that likely created the Fauci virus. The report was titled quote technologies to address global catastrophic biological risks. Risks. It offers novel social control and mRNA vaccination ideas to deal with emerging pandemics. Whether naturally emerging or reemerging deliberately created a released or laboratory engineered and escaped, that could lead to sudden extraordinary widespread disaster beyond the collective capability of national international organizations and the private sector control. One of the many bone chilling sections in the publication Daniel Horowitz writes, provides a blueprint for quote self spreading vaccines. Describe his vaccines genetically engineered to move through populations in the same way as communicable diseases. But rather than causing disease, they confer protection. After noting that such an idea would violate the rules of informed consent and possibly spread allergic reaction, they add this shocking prediction about the challenge of such technology Daniel horwitz writes, finally, there is not an insignificant risk of the vaccine virus, reverting to a wild type virulence. As has sometimes occurred with the oral polio vaccine, which is not intended to be fully virulent or transmissible. But which has reverted to become both neuro virulent and transmissible in rare instances. This is both a medical risk and public perception risk, and the possibility of vaccine induced disease would be a major concern to the public. Daniel horwitz continues by saying, whether this vaccine actually sheds the spike protein onto other people, is still not yet proven. Although Pfizer seems to indicate it can spread through skin to skin contact rather than inhalation. But the principle of mass vaccination with a faulty vaccine making a virus both more transmissible is something that is hard to deny at this

Daniel Horowitz Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Daniel Horwitz Communicable Diseases Mike Vaccine Induced Disease Polio Pfizer
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"So you know, there's there's enough data now to say we have a pretty good under understanding of what's going on. And you know, I don't know. I'm just I just say, I said it was going to talk about it now. But at 12 25 When I go to break I'm done talking about this, But in general terms, I think, baby boomers, the elderly Uh, they went through the polio vaccine, which was a a game changer for everyone. They went through the chicken pox, mumps vaccine measles vaccine, which change for everybody, But Millennials didn't have any of those events and I think that's one of the reasons they're not excited about vaccinations. Again. And I had this conversation with my mom last night because I was telling her what was going on in my home because she knows a couple of these people as well from when I was a kid and, uh and and my mom said the exact same thing she goes. I remember the polio vaccine. I remember being terrified, Terrified that I was going to end up paralyzed for the rest of my life. That was what polio did to you and she said when they lined us up. Oh, boy. They lined us up in school. They didn't ask for anybody's permission. They just gave us the shot. And that was it. Exactly. I don't want to go back to that and again. See, here's the thing. I don't want to ever mandate vaccination. Don't ever want to make compelling enough of an argument. I want to lay out a compelling enough case, but the CDC has undermined their credibility so badly. That they're the ones that we should be looking to for guidance in this situation, and Dr Anthony Fauci holds a great deal of that responsibility. I've got an actual story about him at the bottom of the blog. It appears through Freedom of Information Act request. The doctor Fauci has been proven again a liar this time in front of Congress. Rand. Paul was right. When we get back, though, I want to jump into some local issues, including a story that I don't have on the blog because I just saw it before the show started Civic Center Park. Is going to be closed. Guess why. I'll tell you after this chat Bauer in for Susan Witkin, Chad, What do you have in your news today? Well, Mandy, the King super shooting suspect was in court this morning, and President Biden visited New Jersey to assess damage from Hurricane Ida. Whole story's coming up at 12 30 on K Away NewsRadio, 8:50 A.m. and 94. 1 FM Bundling home and car insurance with Geico is so easy. Your neighbors.

New Jersey Rand Freedom of Information Act Susan Witkin Congress 8:50 A.m. Civic Center Park Fauci Mandy Anthony Fauci CDC 12 30 today Paul last night this morning Hurricane Ida Geico K Away NewsRadio one
Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

"Look you you've You've had we've been talking about mask. Mandates for practically this entire show because the idea that we're going to start imposing mass mandates on the vaccinated is just ridiculous and it's counterproductive to getting people on the right path to the end of this pandemic which is universal voluntary vaccination so that we can put an end to this thing. They are talking about in fact they are imposing a mask mandate in the house of representatives. You had a fiery speech about this. Tell us a little bit about what's going on there and what your objections are. Well look i mean. Let me first start very crystal clear that i'm pro vaccine. My dad had polio. He's lived with the ravages polio his whole life And i'm very glad that my children myself Other americans have been able to develop cells polio vaccine. And we're so blessed we've had two hundred. Ninety billion americans get maximum aided for cova think about that one hundred ninety million in seven months. We had an extraordinarily rollout. Thanks to the efforts by president trump which were opposed by democrats. Remember them closed. My democrat even have the vaccine. Now we have one hundred. Ninety million americans have been vaccinated when you include the people who've already had the virus. We're at something like eighty percent of all people over eighteen years old. I have some form of immunity led to keep working on that. Let's keep making sure that american people are free but now they want to force people to either be back stated by force or they want to force people to wear masks and on the floor of the house of representatives. Nancy pelosi wants to make everybody wear masks again. Despite the fact there's no data to back it up they're hypocrites. Dc mayors hosting weddings and parties without masks and reinstated. The mass mandate you see The mayor only had twenty seven people in the hospital when she lived into mask mandate of a couple of months ago. There were ninety people in the hospital where this is all show and politics and by doing it you're weakening freedom importantly you're causing people to say wait wasn't how was the purpose of getting the vaccine. You guys are insane. You don't know what you're talking about. It and i think it's harming america.

Polio President Trump House Of Representatives Cova Nancy Pelosi America
Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

BrainStuff

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

"The vocal anti vaccination movement is fairly recent and was really kicked into gear in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight by a now discredited paper that appeared in the medical journal lancet which falsely linked vaccines with autism however vaccine. Hesitancy is as old as vaccines themselves. How stuff works also spoke with dr katherine edwards. The author of an american academy of pediatrics clinical report called countering vaccine hesitancy and she said this has been going on for centuries and pointed to a cartoon published back in eighteen o to the depicts people growing cow-like parts this was in response to edward jenner pioneering smallpox vaccine by using material from cowpox a medical historian by the name of elena kanas wrote in a twenty fifteen in the american historian that the first smallpox vaccine quote was met with enthusiasm but also dread while many patients and physicians were eager to fend off air as most feared diseases. Many others balked at the prospect of contaminating their healthy bodies with disease matter from an animal. And then when european countries began making smallpox vaccines mandatory. And the early eighteen. Hundreds she wrote that quote societies of anti vaccination assists formed to protest what they saw as unequal treatment and undue infringement of individual liberty. But they didn't get much traction. There was also little protest against the polio vaccine which was released in nineteen fifty four to wild enthusiasm in america according to conus she wrote parents so dreaded polio that they were quick to seek the vaccine for their children and course of politics never became necessary but as the decades went on american parents. Were not so excited about vaccinations for measles mumps and other diseases. She noted perhaps because people were used to living with these diseases.

Medical Journal Lancet Smallpox Dr Katherine Edwards American Academy Of Pediatrics Elena Kanas Edward Jenner Autism Polio Measles Mumps America
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KGO 810

"I trust when Got the polio vaccine I trusted when my kids got the free our shots. I mean, I'm not a scientist. I don't know all the ins and outs. But I'm assuming and I hope correctly that the CDC wouldn't approve these if they didn't work. I gotta have trust. There. Are you, a supporter of alternative medicine? Mike Romeo Patrick Medicine. It's not that I'm opposed to it. But I want you to know I go to my doctor who I trust Dr Schrader. If if he's listening, and I follow his advice I do. I have Good Does he ever suggest to you that you take Vitamins and supplements and even perhaps, of herbal medicine. No. You know, something is very interesting. I take a vitamin everyday a multi vitamin I take vitamin C. I do it. I've done it since I was a kid because my father who was a doctor recommended that I do it. My friend, Dr Bill Wattenburg of Blessed memory used to say. All these vitamins are are very expensive urine. I'm cleaning it up. So you know, I take it It doesn't do me any harm. I seem to be in great shape. I feel great. So why not? But we'll see there You have it. All right, sir. Thank you. Thank you for your call. This comes from CK for your information. My sister, My brother and a dear friend of mine all had their vaccines. They had minimal side effects after the first vaccine, but all of them Were sick for a couple of days. A very sick for a couple days after the second vaccine, fever, chills, headache, body aches, Good luck. You know you get so many conflicting reports. But I have no fear of taking the vaccine. I want to know how you feel about it, Of course. 4158080 a 10. Let me squeeze in before we take the break. Robert calling from Davis Robert, Welcome to KGO. I don. I got a lot of things I could say, but I probably don't have time. I got that the first shop Madonna about nine days ago and I didn't have a sore arm after so I just went and did push ups. Didn't really start getting a sore arm until about four or five days later. I got very slight side of victorious, like half a degree favor a little bit of a chill. I think the side effects with the second shot, probably it's because the nan system is really starting to kick in. You're getting it. You're getting a reaction. I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. That shows that the body's responding and I don't worry about the variance so much because I've lived almost 75 years and I figure I want my body to be similar. Here with this virus, and the vaccine is familiarizing. Is that a word in English? Yes, my my body with the vaccine. With what? The back not with the vaccine. What the virus with what The virus is so even if there's something that Comes in the future. That's a mute mutation or something. At least my body has some idea of what this virus is. It is more likely to respond in a in a good way. You know, as far as my immunity goes, and if I hadn't had the vaccine at all, and you recommend people you recommend people take the vaccine. Oh, God. Yes, I mean, I read The New York Times and the Chronicle These horror stories of people in their thirties and forties and fifties set of dying of it and let her in the hospital and I feel lucky, You know, I mean, there's people that tell me. I know that Ah lot of people that aren't going to get it And they say, Well, there's probably mercury or aluminum in the vaccine. Ordinarily, when I get a vaccine, I get a single dose vial. I say that I don't want any mercury. Or a woman in there called single dose files. But when it comes to this fact, they know I don't think that I have that choice and the alternative is, you know I've lived. I'm a male. I've lived almost 75 years, and that's the highest risk group of all. And the alternative is just too ghastly. So I'll take the vaccine. May I say Amen to you, Robert? I agree. Thank you for calling. Didn't have trouble getting up. Oh, good. Well, thanks for calling. I call it my health, dignity, health and say that I You know, my eligible might find me up. The operator signed me up for it. That's great. Well, I'm gonna try again tomorrow. Thanks a million. I appreciate the call. Oh, my You know how we're having this conversation because we're listening to the radio. So it's my chance to put in my plug for the CC sky wave. CC radio has one of the best.

polio vaccine Davis Robert Dr Bill Wattenburg Mike Romeo Patrick Medicine Dr Schrader CDC scientist Madonna The New York Times Chronicle
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Is brought to you by Sweet James accident attorneys in an accident go to sweep Change dot com. Next chance to win in about an hour. 3 20. All right. We mentioned this UC Berkeley Institute of Governmental Studies Poll, which gives Gavin Newsom overall just to 46% approval rating. In fact, only 22% approve of how Newsome and the state government are overseeing the vaccine distribution. That is probably the biggest grievance right now among anybody that's worked up over the pandemic. Is the slow pace of vaccination in the state. And wouldn't you know story after story that we discovered today in this one I'm looking at right now is from Cal Matters. By Ben Christopher. It's all excuse, making Well, it's a very diverse state with 58 counties in a widespread population. It's a logistics nightmare like it's all just excuses because it's partisan. Defense. Now there are plenty of time the L a times to the very similar one with the same kind of nonsense trotted out and the same political experts. They talk to their also lazy, these reporters, terrible talk to the same people in the same echo chamber, saying the same things. This is unprecedented. It's never been done before and if and if we had a Republican for governor What do you think they'd be right The same thing. It's partisan claptrap. That's all. It is their public relation. Outlets now their public relations specialists. They're not journalists. They're not reporters. They're not correspondents there doing PR. And when you do PR, you mitigates failures and you blow success is out of proportion. You exaggerate on both ends the also going toe times. Talk to save Yaroslavsky. I mean, really Because Yes, The former L. A county supervisor stepped up to say it's difficult because you see when you get down to it. Some counties have a county supervisor board and No. One executive in charge. Great. Well, why do we have that government but that that's a separate issue? Well, I I don't. I don't see the complicated aspect of vaccination because, as Newsome said, Back in October. California's been in the vaccination business for a long time. Every year. They vaccinate millions of people for the flu. And and they've done that for for decades and vaccinations go back. At least in a mass scale. I think to the 19 fifties. Maybe earlier than that. Polio vaccine, polio vaccine and measles and mumps and You know everything else under the sun. Now, I think there's a probably about 14 different vaccines that you can get. If you go to the vaccine store, all right, let's roll out this clip from October. This is Gavin Newsom, explaining how the vaccine rollout wouldn't seem like a difficult task of my right. You're the one that asked for this clip, so I don't know what's on it. Yeah, yeah, because what caught my eye is in the Cal matter story, it said on October 19th, the governor assured the public that California has long been in the vaccination business. And so I looked up a six minute clip of that particular press conference. And this clip doesn't have him saying that exact line but listen specifically to how this starts it because the whole mid it is about We know what we're doing. The experience with vaccinations is well established here in the state of California, and so as we work to advance the protocols and partnerships As we advance our formal planning an engagement with the CDC and the D, O D and others. We do so on the basis of the architecture of a framework that has been well established for many, many years and stop in a second. Way established the architecture of the framework that has been established as anybody ever put those words together in one phrase. That's why people love him. Okay, So what do you say such a clear speaker today? So what he's saying is, we've been vaccinating people a long time. But you know the way he wait Fortress the architecture of the Earth, the sorest, But that'll all right, play the rest of us for many, many years here in the state of California. Recently, we put together more formally a vaccine steering committee. In fact, in April, the vaccine steering committee was put in play within the state of California City pH. Department of Public Health we now ever advanced the logistics task force working here at the Office of Emergency Service for the last few months. They have been coordinating with federal regional local partners Toe look at logistics side of how we implement and actualize our vaccine. Industrialized. Yes. Oh, wait, So he's got a steering committee and he's got a task force. But wait, there's more by the rest of it. I think that was the minute that was the end of it. We have 58 seconds I was told. You know what We could keep going. Come down on it. Then he gets to the advisory board. And he's got experts from all the UC schools. But he goes on for six minutes. So at some point, you have to cut him off. Okay? Put up with six minutes, right? That's right. I know that even to prove your point, there's again, okay, but he's got He's got a steering committee, a task force and an advisory board. No strike teams. Put this vaccine strike team. They put off this together in April. Okay? It's now February. It's nine months later. And look where we are. 10 months 10 months later, that's 10 months from April. Oh, you're right that that's dead months. So after 10 months of the advisory board, which I think had 60 people on it And the task force and the strike team. I'm sure we're well into triple digits on all these people who stuck their snaps into the plan. And so what did we get? What did we get? I had thought, And I was wrong that they just Didn't believe Trump And they thought that the vaccine was never going to be here by December. And so they didn't do anything. I think you're right. But they claim his.

California advisory board Gavin Newsom polio vaccine Newsome supervisor UC Berkeley Institute of Gover Sweet James Ben Christopher California City Yaroslavsky CDC executive Trump UC schools Department of Public Health measles mumps Office of Emergency Service
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Yes. What the hell is going on? Stop? Yeah, It's back up today. But yesterday a palm it'd the day It's back up to almost where it was. This is goofy man. Once again, we're on the outside looking in you and I We had a lot of people made a lot of money on the game stops giving a bunch I have given these guys some money. Here's my retirement. Please don't screw me. But you know, I never was a while. Look up, the stock went down like why did this happen? Right? So And this is very complicated. Sure, everyone out there, at least by today's heard about Gamestop stock okay, and that it was shortened. You know, there was a short sell of it and involved people on Reddit, and they basically did what hedge fund managers do or what they would do or if they did do they get thrown in jail for Well, I know is some guy put in $50,000 and you made 200 million off stock of a company that is in the toilet like Gamestop is not apple. It's not going anywhere, but because of some crazy. Manipulations of stocks that I don't understand short selling stuff. Which you and I both talked about the day that like, okay, I have had you told me that same thing today. I've had people explain to me what it is. Couple of three times five times, baby and every time ago. I still don't understand what the help you blur. Do. How guy Nick Riley's financial guy, I should explain this, okay? And I understood 50% of it. But It seems like there's this is like another one of those bubbles like the dot com bubble were. A lot of people are getting phony. Rich really quick, but then, also like Bitcoin, right, But ah, lot of people are going to lose their ass quickly. If this trend kind of contains, anyway, so we will at four o'clock. Nathan back, her act will be with us to explain. Hopefully In a way we can understand what went on with Gamestop stock and the share holders in the bubble in the short sale, and all that. You put it to me perfectly today. Let's have him because you and I totally concurred on we don't ever It's been explained to us. We don't understand it and you said, Let's having explain it to us and everyone else. If we were nine year old is if we're not. I want to go. Seven year olds. I'm gonna hit mean this. Break it down, explained the sun in the stock market to me, and how all this stuff works. I thought if I gave somebody my money It was kind of. I've always thought it was like a casino thing. But a bitter casino where you know, there was solid investments. And these guys, they're gonna make more. Kroger's gonna make more money. PNG's gonna make more money IBM apple it on down the line. So I'm thinking that But when people start doing this stuff and bitten sideways and betting on stuff to fail, that's weird. Yeah, betting on stuff to fail out. Do hedge fund manager? Yeah, Zraly, but But also part of this is the communication over. Read it. Which is that expands a billion different places started. So how do you How do you arrest someone? Right? If you know someone's gonna laptop of communicating about some insider stuff, Okay, you can crack down on them. But this is the Internet man that's everywhere. So anyway, that would be a four o'clock, so I I go the blob right now. Eddie In rocky blogged on 700 w w w dot com I put a video out of So I'm sure you do. Ed. You get I get asked a question. Like, why want more people take the vaccine. Okay. What people? So if you if you prove always curious about that, if you're used to watch the video, or I'll just explain to you right now. So look and for the record if you want to take the vaccine, take the vaccine. I think people should do what they think There's enough information out there and you talk to your doctor. If you want the vaccine, do it. My attempt was to explain. Of folks who don't understand why people aren't taking do it get inside their head of what they may be thinking I laid a bunch of things. One thing I do is I look at the polio vaccine, right? Which was one that probably most successful vaccine that ever hit at the modern world. Right so that polio came around like 1917 Okay was until 1947. The virus is even identified. Ah, year later, it was discovered there was three strings of it. Okay in 1952 was just three years after that first human trials were started by Jonas Salk. Okay, Two years after that, 1954 vaccine trials took place in 1.8 million Children over three different countries. Okay. That was in 54 1955. The vaccine was deemed 90% effective. It was available to the public 1957 polio crazy cases They dropped 90%. So the moral of story is that vaccine took 40 years to Research. Discover identify study. Have trials and get it, okay. Covert 19 came about in January of baseless called January of 2020. And here we are one year later. And there's a vaccine. The Madura started phase one trial of a covert 19 vaccine on March 20th of last year. Three months into this three or four months into this, there was a trial. So the point is look, and I know that things have come a long way in 100 years since 19 I get all that. But the point is, it came about very, very quickly. That is why people are a little bit weary of there hasn't been the enough time. To see what happens when there wasn't one. It took place over the course of years. You could you have. There was time to get it out to a bunch of people also in the vaccine trials, or 18 of them. 50% of those S 09 of them. Excluded people over the age of 65. Now we all know 65 people you almost of most afflicted that accounts for 80% of the covert death 65 over So in half the trials Eggs 65 over wasn't even included. So people go. What the hell? Okay. There was no trials under age 18. Okay, So you got that so people look at that. Then they say, Well, how come How long does the vaccine last? We don't know. Is it? Three months is a two months is it Year. Wolves have heard that you can still transmit the virus with the vaccine. Okay? Yes, that's the That's the thing. I've heard all that okay. And then then, lastly then you Dr Fauci yesterday, for instance, is on TV. And he said, even after you get the second dose of the vaccine It's probably not a good idea to travel. In other words, even after the second dose of the vaccine, you probably still can't get back to normal life. So people say it was rushed. We don't have enough information. Not enough people were included in the trial, and if I take it, I'm not able to get back to normal life. Why should I rush out and get this? That the I'm and I'm not saying that's the right line of thinking. I'm just saying, that is the perspective of people that are weary. That is what is going through their head there. If it was, Hey, we got this vaccine has been. We've tested it for a while and it's really working Great, Ellen. By the way, once you get it, boom, you're ready to go like the polio vaccine. People would get it. But there's so many factors up there that ZZ to see why 40% of the population will not take the vaccine. I won't tell you, you.

polio vaccine Gamestop fund manager polio Kroger Jonas Salk Reddit Nick Riley Nathan Madura Zraly IBM Eddie Ellen Dr Fauci apple
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 2 years ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport as NPR's Joe Parker reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country. And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be a fact, if for one thing they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for stars and so that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China. Caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Hopeless. He's nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the with the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives. A vaccine. Made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca's also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in several countries, including India. That country is also likely to have a vaccine candidate that will be inexpensive and widely available. But Judith Twigg says there's already another major entrant into the international vaccine arena. Back on August 11th the Russian government with great stand, Fehr announced the first in the world registration of a vaccine against Cove It twig is at Virginia Commonwealth University, and she follows Russian health policy closely. The Russian vaccine is what's known as a viral vector vaccine somewhat newer technology than the two leading Chinese vaccines. The Russians chose Sputnik V is the name for their vaccine. Tweak says They did that for a reason. They're very deliberately invoking imagery of Russia re emerging is great power status. We're back. We're at the scientific and technological top of the world, and we're ready to start sharing our technology with everyone. The problem there is that they had not only barely Started phase three clinical trials, They had barely started ramping up productions that was back in August. Twigg says production has ramped up and Russia now claims its vaccine is more than 90% effective, although data for that claim haven't been published yet for other scientists to scrutinize Several countries are ready to try the vaccine, including Argentina, Mexico and India. One thing is clear the world is going to need a number of vaccines to work if the global pandemic is really going to be brought under control. Joe

China Joe Parker Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Vassar College NPR J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Russia U. Polio Sars Judith Twigg International Vaccine Arena Russian Government Center For Strategic And Inter Indonesia Brazil
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

02:57 min | 2 years ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Thank you. And the Corona virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport. As NPR's Joe Packer reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country, And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be If active for one thing, they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for SARS. So that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Copeland sees nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the With the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives of vaccine made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca is also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in

China Joe Packer Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Sars NPR U. Vassar College Russia Polio Copeland J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Indonesia Brazil Turkey Center For Strategic And Inter Oxford University
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"All your favorite stations. All three May I say promises made and promises not kept. That's what's happening with the vaccine. Reminds me almost of the circumstances many years ago, the polio vaccine that came out of which large numbers of kids were getting polio had the sock and then the salmon. We had the sugar Cube. Then we had the needle. Whatever it might be. We lined up. We got it done. And it was done efficiently was done quickly. It was risky. Many developed other symptoms from it. Which is possible with the implementation of vaccines. You may recall that in the spring in the summer, the American taxpayer operation Warp speed Said To these two large companies, Fizer into a Madonna that will take the risk his taxpayers on this thing failing the wise had said This is likely to work, but we don't know. So normally, it would take years to develop vaccines to go through the stage three trials, etcetera to make sure it's safe and effective. But to stop that, the Trumpster said, we will take the risk. This is too serious. And he did that pay attention to what they do not what they say. One could come up with many sayings of the president on Twitter or in person during news conferences that made no sense at all. But look what he did. He funded it, which was unique. A lot of people criticize him At the time. He stopped the importation of many from China, which Anthony Fauci said that was xenophobic. Don't do that. He made a lot of right decisions when it came to this now we're at a point where Ready for distribution. Monday after the election, which would have been November the ninth It was a big announcement made by first Visor and then Madonna. The yes stage three trials. It worked. We had the data by the way. They had the doubt in October, but then release it after the election. We have the data. It works 95% effective and because it's already prepackaged and paid for we have literally hundreds of millions of doses ready to go. Sounds great. So here we are. The end of January. And most of the American people who want these are not getting him because each date on its own can kinda within parameters, decide who gets it and who doesn't get it. Ohio's decided with one a one B in one See those most affected about 70% of the deaths are over the age of 65, Maybe 75% over the age of 65. So some thought it made some sense to make sure that the older folks, especially in congregate settings, would get it before anyone else would have gotten it. So here we're sitting on January, the 26th and at this point According to the governor. Ohio is getting ready to inoculate 335,000 school teachers and staff beginning next week. Initial plan was to start the vaccination program of all teachers and staff next week. However, that may change when I speak to Mike DeWine on and off the air. Hey tells you that we could really use a quarter of a million per week, and we're getting often less than 100,000 doses, and he's on the horn is on telephone calls. First, it was Trump and then it was the CDC. Now it's Biden and his folks. We need more. And guess what. Ohio is no different than practically every state. Ohio has about 2.5 million over the age of 65 on doll and or teachers and staff. 2.5 million of those individuals probably 60% or so 70%. Would like to get that that means in the range of 1.5 million, and we're getting something less than 100,000 week at that rate is going to take several months. And the ramping up of the distribution is a terrible problem because government is involved in doing it. Of Amazon was in charge of this thing. Everyone would have it who needs it? And it would be delivered and or administered and um or quick and fashion. It's amazing when I read the story out of Clermont County that they get about 1800 doses a week. There's 36,000 folks eligible to get it. Clermont County waiting their turn. 36,000 cannot be well divided in the 18 hundreds. In Ohio. We need about three million immediate doses for folks over 65. And teachers and staff to throw in cops. How many cops, corrections officers, Deputy sheriffs, bailiffs. Their owner High has got to be a few 100,000. We could easily deal with three million doses and our hurry. Right now. We're getting less than 100,000 week for the last two or three weeks, and needless to say, three million doesn't go into 100,000 very well at all. The other approach. We have calls from Loveland and Kocian coming up the Warriors and the Tigers coming up. Some nations like Russia and India have taken a completely different approach. What they've done in India is to say that if you're a productive Indian. That is the 400 million Indians who work you get priority over the old folks who are close to death. There's something about the American psyche that keeps us from doing such things. We cannot look into a five year old with cancer who might have a year to live and say You're at the bottom of the list. We kind of say in America that our parents and our grandparent's get priority over us. And as a parent, our kids get priority over a personal interest. If you would ask a good mom or a good dad, Do you want to shot or do you want to give it to your mom or dad in their seventies or eighties? Almost all those in the forties thirties forties and fifties were going to say, Give it to Mom and Dad first. The idea in America. At the most productive are taken care of first..

Ohio Clermont County polio vaccine polio Fizer America Mike DeWine Anthony Fauci Madonna China Twitter president Trumpster Biden India Trump Amazon Kocian CDC Warriors
"polio vaccine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Help and once the vaccine was available, they suddenly had a new role to play. And after this incident, which was called the cutter incident for cutter Labs, the CDC scientists became more and more visible as a voice of authority and expertise, Polio vaccination and then subsequently, vaccination. Generally, we have AH, video from 1991 of Jonas Salk. He became, of course, a global celebrity Asai understand much to his chagrin. On and here he is talking in 1991 about the development and some of those manufacturing process problems just so people can see and what he looked and sounded like and within a matter of 10 days, two weeks After went into production, and it was in into use. It was a report of cases of polio caused by the vaccine. There was no such encounter in the field trial on it was counted on Leah's herself of the VAC. It's the vaccine from one particular laboratory vaccine was suspended. Its use was suspended for a period of short period of time, reintroduced again after the that problem was isolated in that vaccine was Let's destroy all the others were used and thinks that one proceeded in old fashioned. That's just an example of some of the hazards right One has to deal with particularly at that level of experimentation. So a couple quick questions about that. Is it true that he did not ever seek a patent on his polio vaccine? Yeah, that is true, And he publicly said that he didn't believe that. Ah, Patten was the morally responsible thing to do. But he believed that the vaccine belonged to the people and he saw the vaccine is kind of crucial to health and well being. S o right if he did not, As far as I know, take a patent. It's also worth kind of wrapping back. He was in intense competition with Um especially Albert Saving, who in Cincinnati was leading another team of scientists who were developing a different type of vaccine. One that used a live weakened version of the polio virus and sock was was devastated by the cutter incident. Relieved to say the least when it was resolved. But there was this constant tension. Once Albert Savon's vaccine came to market this constant tension between the two over which was the better product in which should be the prevailing polio vaccine for the country. They each had different advantages and disadvantages. And in fact to this day, we still use both of them globally, although in the global polio eradication, which is seeking to eliminate polio in the last few remaining countries where it's present We tend to use Savon's vaccine, which is administered Orly and requires far less boosters. In other words, no shot and far fewer ghosts is the last recorded case of pulling the United States after that 1955 introduction was 1979 what took so long for it to be eradicated in the United States? That's an interesting question of historian would phrase it very differently would say, Wow, that was fast If you think about it, the smallpox, the first smallpox vaccine Was developed in the late 17 nineties. And I think the last smallpox case in the U S, I think was 1948. So for polio that timeline seems quick, compressed relative to smallpox. What happened with polio to give you kind of a big picture view of what what transpired after the first vaccine was approved. There was so much involvement in so much activity in the first few years after socks vaccine was improved that vaccination rates and coverage were it skyrocketed. Millions and millions of people got vaccinated in those first couple of years and polio cases plummeted. Between 1955 and 1957. Then what happened? After 1957 was he started to see this kind of gradual. Departure between those who had the means they could afford the time and the money to take their kids to the doctor. On an annual basis. For instance, they know Stayed up to date on the news and followed expert advice. These people continue to get their kids vaccinated, while other people either who didn't have the means or warrant aware of the need. Um, we're getting their kids vaccine that a far lower rate and so in 1958 and 1959 you start to see polio pieces creeping back up just a little bit, but starting to creep back up and then start seeing outbreaks and these air predominantly happening in poor communities in urban areas, where Um poor communities are living in proud of conditions and are Out of reach of access to health care and don't have routine visits to doctors, for instance, and in those areas. CDC, epidemiologists and others start to realize that people just aren't getting backstage at the same rate. So we had this sort of push and pull throughout the late fifties into the sixties and by the seven years Polio vaccination was really widespread among Children, and by that time we had enough immune adults that it became most important to focus on Children, and we were capturing them at that point, largely through laws that required vaccination for school. In the 19 seventies, However, it gradually became clear that the remaining cases of polio in the country where those caused by the live virus vaccine Which sometimes lead to community transmission of polio virus as the virus was, shed said, for example, in the fecal matter of Children So we then started to move away from that vaccine and switch back to the Salk vaccine and effectively finally got to a place where we had no more polio in this country. So we have about 10 minutes left, and I want to spend that last 10 minutes talking about the lessons for today. Let's begin with President Trump just a few days ago, talking about the development of vaccines. Tremendous progress is being made on vaccines. In fact, we have ready to go in terms of transportation and logistics way have over two million ready to go if it checks out for safety..

polio polio vaccine Jonas Salk CDC cutter Labs Asai United States Leah Albert Savon Cincinnati Albert Saving Patten President Trump VAC shed
"polio vaccine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The statistics that are often reported from that year 57,000 plus cases 3100 plus deaths. And this is the shocking number of the 78,269 cases of paralysis. So as that was happening, walk us through the development of vaccines. What Where was that taking place around the country and was it simply foundations who were supported? Peter was the government involved. Sure, That's a really good question. So 1952 was a horrible year. And as you pointed out those numbers, they gripped the nation with fear and they're far lower than the current virus numbers that we're seeing today. So that might be another important lesson for us. But what happened? Woz? The foundation knew that it had to invest not just in treatment for polio patients, but also in either a cure or means of prevention. By the early 19 fifties, it was supporting a number of teams of scientists who were working on different types of vaccines. And eventually, there were a couple of scientists who kind of pulled ahead of the pack. One group was working on a vaccine that used Chemical treatment to inactivate essentially killed the vaccine so that this killed vaccine of sorry killed the virus that this killed virus could be put into a vaccine on Brother Group was developing kind of more classic type of vaccine in which they effectively created a weakened version of the virus, and it was still polio virus, but it was supposed to not cause polio. There were a number of scientists working in both camps and some of the research of they conducted. A lot of this was supported by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. But a number of these scientists had been heavily funded during the second World War by the federal government, which had funded them to try to come up with vaccines during the war to protect troops, not from polio, but from things like flu and measles and mumps, for instance. So there were a number of advances in vaccines science made during the war that some of these teams drew on as they were working hard to find a polio vaccine. There was one team at Harvard, I believe which during the war was funded entirely by the government and was working. Around the clock 24 7 to try to develop a measles vaccine on they developed some helpful techniques to culture, the virus in the lab. But then, as soon as the war ended, they shifted entirely, and by then they were being funded Holy by the National Foundation for infantile Paralysis not to develop the measles vaccine but to develop a polio vaccine. The reason why I point this out is because in effect, there was this sort of back and forth going on at the time in war. We had a different set of priorities and scientific attention was focused on those After the war, Our scientific priorities shifted again. Once we came up with a polio vaccine, then the technology that was developed to produce that polio vaccine was then used. As the basis and inspiration for a number of vaccines that followed. And so we ended up with a bunch of new vaccines in the 19 sixties. So there was this sort of back and forth of scientific attention being focused on different diseases, depending on what the national priority Woz at the time. And as we already know, from the early clip at the top of the hour, the vaccine the polio vaccine that made it across the finish line first was the one developed by by Jonas Salk and saw was determined, absolutely determined that he had the vision for what was going to be an effective vaccine. On with the foundation's help. One of the biggest vaccine trials was conducted with something like 1.2 Million American Children, and I think there were another 400,000, who were also tested. In Canada in Finland. This was an unprecedented number of people participating in the trial of a new vaccine and when the vaccine was fully tested, and the enormous study population It was shown to protect against what were then known to be three different types of polio virus. It was very effective against two of those viral types and Mostly effective against the third viral type, But such details didn't really matter to a country that was so desperate for anything, anything to let them go back to normal. So I have another historic video from the year 1954 as that massive testing was taking place on this brings together a lot of threats because people will instantly recognize the use of celebrities. To enjoying people to the cost. Let's watch. You know, every child has a right to that health and happiness. That's right, but that I don't know a lot of Children that don't even have that. Yes, Jessie. And there are a lot of parents whose Children are healthy and happy now who live in fear? I know I do The fear my friends is polio, infantile paralysis. Polio is no respecter of people. The rich the poor, The strong The week. No one is immune. But soon, perhaps within a year, there may be a vaccine vaccine available to all that may be the answer. That's right. There is a trial vaccine now being tested. It has been tested successfully on 700 people. But now device a large scale tests must be conducted. Hundreds of thousands of people will be inoculated starting next month. Vaccines and test cost a great deal of money. Now, here is your chance to help get this test done as quickly as possible..

polio vaccine polio National Foundation for Infant Peter National Foundation Harvard Jonas Salk federal government measles Brother Group flu Jessie mumps Finland Canada
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

07:54 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Not be available, So just taking your calls. Let's go right to Michael in Lebanon. A Michael your thoughts? What do you have, man? Talking about? Getting vascular vaccinated? Well, you know, I don't know if you heard the story the other day about the 93 year old couple who got their celebrated their 73rd wedding anniversary getting their shot. I saw something about that. I didn't read the story, but they're called Spring Kentucky couple that got their shot and Hamilton, Ohio because they met the requirements and Amazon. So they crossed the borders and got the shot. I just wonder what you think about it. I can't exactly visit Using in Ohio back change, sort of space looking Mike Yeah. And you were talking earlier head right about the snowbirds right in Florida were down of Laura. People are bitching because you could go online. And you know and sign up. And people who lived in Florida couldn't get it. But some guy from like whatever. Cincinnati was getting vaccinated with his wife. It seems like you should just go to the state you live in, you know, And I'm sure everyone has an excuse and why you got to go to another stinger that but I don't know. Just go in orderly fashion state. You live in whatever state is on your driver's license or where you Have your mail sent. Find the vaccine there don't seem like that would be kind of basic that you have to just show your from, you know, here and you get the get the shot. You would think I don't know. It seems like there's certain looking. I'm not Saying, This is not a very, very complex, complicated process, getting the same notice. But there's certain things that just seemed to be like. No. You living your This is Kentucky. You live in Ohio Go over there and get the vaccine. You know you're not more special than anybody else. Just go there and get theirs and more guitars here. Because I'm gonna look this up and I want to see how it was done in the early sixties late fifties, when they did the polio vaccine, because, like I told you, you got that one, right? I vaguely remember. I was a little kid. I might have been. I was Three of my earliest memory. Probably. I was probably like four years old. Maybe. And I remember going to the high school and standing in line with my family, and we ate the sugar Cube that had the vaccine on it. And I don't know how they organize that that we can't get something like that together Now. I mean, it was hard to distribute. Don't get me wrong. I get it, and it's a big, you know the stuff that has to be shifted. I think that's so That's a major part of it. If it could be if they could ship that and just sits in a giant warehouse for months, and they just keep taking vials, But it can't be stored. It Was a negative. Forget water. I forget 17 degrees, so something like that, But the thing is, they got that's a this new Johnson and Johnson thing that's supposed to be room temperature. One shot. You're done. Seems all right. I'm down with that. Again. I'm way ahead of you in life. Thanks for pulling that out. But the only reason is because I'm a lot over a Who do we have here? Court? Is it in Harrison? Yeah. This is court. Enjoy your show, guys. Thanks, man. Um, yeah. So, uh, have a conundrum from everybody. Um, Eddie, I'm saying ages you so if you remember 65 years ago. 55 years ago. Really? You couldn't go to school unless you live had smallpox vaccine and other things like that, Um, when you come a long way since then. Here's the problem. Everybody is talking about bird immunity. Um 70 to 75%. And at that point in time, I think that's when the government and all the agency's going to say, OK, we feel safe about lifting all the restrictions. That kind of thing. Well, here's the Here's that conundrum here. I will tell you that probably 40% of the people out there and I have some serious with people talking in the medical industry. Are not willing to take the shot. Just kind of like Rocky is right now, and I understand that Um, but here's the problem. You'll never get to herd immunity of 75%. Unless 75% of the people either had the vaccine. Or had the Tobin So you know, if 40% I'm taking it, there's no way to get enough people to get that 300 million people vaccinated. Especially when there's no requirement but then to get vaccinated. So you know, we're in a democracy, and I'm all for that. But, you know, 55 years ago, it wouldn't have been that case. So we've got a real issue here with government's gonna wait for her community. We're not going to get to it. Look, I am excited that this shot in the vaccine is out there for the very reason you just gave. I want life to get back to normal. I want to get the damn ass off. All right faces. I want to sit down in a restaurant past 10 o'clock. I wanna go in the store and and be able to talk to someone and see their faith. All of that. I agree with that. I'm happy the vaccines out there and I hope it's and again. I may decide not to get it, but I'm I'm hoping that people do. Let's talk to Steven four, right, Steve? What do you have? Yeah. Eddie, Remember shoot. So I'll talk in 1963 or four. Yeah, I got the football. Sugar Cube hold. So did way gotta write our classroom, right? And it's a great sport, so neighbors in Fort right Nice. Yeah, I just remember my whole family going and they had it at the high school gym, And we all went down there. And it was a giant line as I recall, but you know, you stood in line you went in there took your little cup poop out. Knows it. That was so I've got like, uh, you know, my younger brother and sister. They don't remember that part but my older brothers and sisters, I'm in the middle, the middle child. And they go. Yeah, Yeah, we went got the sugar Cube and you know, pretty good flying. You know, I don't know what you can't do that now with the share of you. That's what I was wondering, And you know what That's the thing is. I don't know either. Steve is why you can't mean that was so easy and it was so efficient And I mean and this is 57 certain professions. It was very efficient. Yeah, I guess it's just, you know, look, the complexity of viruses and a Corona virus and this is now even and already. It was kind of a serious so there's no question. I just don't think it's E just like something's happened easier than others kind of kind of deal. We'll just say we got lucky and he was happy with. What has happened is here is we over? As we've gotten further advanced, we overthink everything. You know, as opposed to just doing it. Has kind of the point of what you and I have been talking about, But we're talking around it as we go and everybody's overthinking everything we could do this better. We're now we're into over in 2021, Man. Everything is used to be a supersized. Everything has to be worth online for their futuristic now. Hell, no. This is still 1948 on the truck and get into the dam site. Thank you. End of story. It is very simple way you put it. Thank you. I mean, maybe it's just wishful thinking. But that's clicking away. There was Robert, What do you think?.

Um Ohio Mike Yeah Florida Kentucky polio vaccine Michael Eddie Steve Amazon Hamilton Cincinnati Lebanon Johnson Laura Harrison Robert football Fort Steven
"polio vaccine" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Vaccines out into your arm and It's going slow, but they have great plans. Joe Biden just signed executive order. 100 million shots in 100 days. And so now, the now the test is on And I will give you this in advance. If you know, gold setting is one of those things where You want to set your goals high? It's just an old business one on one rule. You set your first of all you do gold setting. And generally in business is done on a quarterly basis. Sometimes people do it on a monthly basis, but I think quarter works better. So you do you set your goals, whatever. It might be a sales revenue. Um, whatever number of employees you're adding. Whatever you said some goal and you say, that's what we're gonna do. Over this period of time. You want to set him high enough to be where you gotta stretch. You don't want to set them so high that they're unrealistic and you constantly fail at meeting your goals. You also don't want to set him so low that it's Ah, they're not. They're not an incentive. Try and drive work harder to try and achieve those goals. But if you come in short, so if they come in In 100 days and and it's not 100 million shots. If it's 90 million shots, that's that's adequate that that satisfied that's why you set goals and make you stretch. Sometimes you don't reach him, but as long as you can get close You will generally be much further ahead than if he did never if you never set a goal in the first place. So will you make 100 million? Not sure, but if they make something close to that A lot better than what we have right now. Gabriella in Green Valley, California. Hi, Gabriella. Hi, Tom. Hi. Good to hear your voice. Thank you. I just Tuned in. Probably just about seven or eight minutes ago when I got in on the tail end of listening to what Vince was talking about. Yes, And I just felt I really wanted to call in encounter with Vince was saying because I personally have known 12 people that have gotten covert and two of the people died and the age group we're talking about is anywhere from teenagers to a 90 year old. Yeah, I just am very concerned that you know, people are saying that they're not going to get the vaccine or that maybe it's not contagious because We've got how many million 31 million cases in the United States? Was a pretty high numbers so That's why I was calling in. Just Yeah, please. Well, no, but I am I the take away that I have for my conversation with Vince. Woz. They cruelly don't know a lot about this virus. And to me the to me The takeaway then is if they don't, then I'm going to do everything that I can I I Pretty isolated. Um, I stay away from other people as much as I can. I wear a mask whenever I'm Outside of my home. So I mean, it's Everybody has to do their own thing, and there will always be people that say they're not going to get it. Mm. But right But that's your freedom that your freedom roll the dice And I hope you don't get sick, Let alone I hope you don't die. And there will be people that that never get the flu yet they never get a flu shot. So It all kind of ties together. We are, but we have choice. We have a choice. Way do have a choice except we have to look out for each other. And it's kind of like in my mind a polio vaccine or the mumps rubella when we were Children that we got Right. So, Maxine I was very, very nervous about getting the vaccine. I just got my first shot this week. Oh, good for you. My husband. My husband and I really, really deeply contemplated and thought about it and we said, OK, the opportunity presented itself. Because we're in the older, high risk category and we had and move forward and we had it. Good view are having had no side effects. No nothing. Which one did you get it? You know, we got to fight their anger, okay? So I don't feel like a guinea pig. But I do feel like a patriot. I feel like I have done my part. Oh, well, I don't like protect myself but to protect others. The we part comes in and I think it will. I have great hope that Vince and others will will eventually do this, but They could be reluctant now or they can forever say no. But I do think just like polio and mumps and others once the general public because if you read the stories about Parents back in the fifties, when there were not all that jazzed about getting their polio shots for their kids, and they were using part of a live virus in those days and Once they saw it working and that the number of polio cases dropped dramatically. Then everybody rushed their Children off to get their polio vaccines. And I think that's what's gonna happen here here because what we what we would like to do is eradicate this. Literally eradicated. And the other part is about herd immunity that if we can get to that they're I think they're guessing but 70 80% of us are vaccinated. Or have the virus and collectively have have Evan immunity. Then I'm not worried about being around you. And you shouldn't be worried about bringing being around me. Will be good. We don't want we could have our life lives back again exactly have socialized and we can go eat in restaurants and going to concerts and movies and everything else. But it's going to take a group effort to get to the point. Where are quote normal life is back again. The group effort. Yeah, no question. I'm with you. Hey, I'm glad you got it. So you've got your you got your appointment for your second. Yes, I do. And I will call you back and 3.5 weeks and let you know how I feel and how it went Perfect. I look forward to it, Gabriella. Thank you very much. I appreciate the call. 855295 66 100. Yeah, Jason's me a tweet, says California still working on his intersectionality scorecard before it can start the vaccination. They're turning away seniors and throwing away vaccines that they don't score high enough. On the scorecard. Listen, I'm all for Equality between Ethnicities..

Vince polio vaccine Gabriella polio California Joe Biden flu executive United States Tom Maxine I Green Valley Jason Evan mumps
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Could bring armed individuals within close proximity to government buildings and officials. The head of the FBI speaks publicly for the first time. More than a week after the attack on the capital from Washington, D. C to state capitals across the country. Authorities are bracing for more violence by armed right wing extremists. In the lead up to the Biden Harris inauguration will speak to Propublica A. C. Thompson About last week's deadly insurrection who get it and what comes next. The anti government activists who invaded the capital have been out in the streets and at the state House is for the past year and my concern looking forward and said This may not be the end that we may see a real serious act of anti government terrorism in the months ahead, then is the U. S death toll from covert 19 approaches for 100,000 We speak to Dr Peter Saul. His father, Jonas Salk, developed the first polio vaccine. Polio was a neck stream problem back in the last century, paralyzing many Children and causing great fear and anxiety vaccine that came along and the second vaccine have eliminated that disease entirely within this country, we have the potential with these new vaccines to have the same kind of experience of beginning to reduce and ultimately eliminate. Threat of this pandemic. We're experiencing all that and more coming up democracy now dot or the quarantine report. I'm Amy Goodman. President elect Joe Biden has.

polio vaccine Polio Biden Harris Joe Biden Jonas Salk FBI Amy Goodman Dr Peter Saul state House Washington President A. C. Thompson
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"You gotta take it. It's not, you know, And so that, uh, he hasn't been. Ah, Doctor mind for a long, long time, so he really doesn't know my background and a lot of stuff. So as of this point, you're still Indian. Haven't decided yet, or it's a no. Or maybe, or where you at? It's gonna be a No. Okay with Mondo fart on Christianity stuff that you know what We're going to be able to pick and choose what we want to do and not do it for me. I think it be healthy for me not to take that chance. Well, Derek, I will stand with you on your right. That's that's what I am concerned about. I appreciate the call. I don't think anybody should be forced to take the vaccine by any means and especially when it comes to their their faith and their religious views. No one should be forced. To do that, by any means. I do, though, believe I'm going to take it and from all the evidence, and I can see I am not a doctor. So there is a faith involved in this that you gotta have some trust in the system. But with the millions and I literally millions of people that have already taken it and the testimonies that I have heard of those who have I think that yes, this could be the thing that helps get us out of this mess. I started the program I'm talking about When I was a kid. I took a polio vaccine, and there was the same type of objections to that. But look what that did to help us in to stop that plague That was so rampant among Children. This could be the thing that could turn it around. So I know I have. I have no problem whatsoever. Take it and I would encourage everyone as the categories. Come on. Anything I'm saying is I want to see the government. I want to see the state. Get these vaccines out. There's no bog this thing down and a bunch of bureaucracy. Let's set up these super pods these points of distribution and let's get this vaccine out and get it to everybody who wants it And let's get back to business. That's our number. One hour number two right around the corner, the pastor of Adventure Church trying to.

polio vaccine Mondo Derek Adventure Church
"polio vaccine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"StoryCorps. His son, Jeffrey Sherman, talked about how evac seen sparked the creation of one of his father's most famous socks. My dad always filtered everything down to its simplest form. People thought maybe he wasn't listening. But he would always listen. And then he would form his words very carefully. Words were like his Religion. He brought word builders on my mom and dad's honeymoon. My mom complaint. He wanted to just no words. And he loved the sound of words and how they felt on your tongue. My dad and uncle had a favorite song that they had created for Mary Poppins called the Eyes of Love. But while Disney said, could you write something that's more in line with the philosophy of Mary Poppins? And it was all just falling flat. They're both really depressed. Well, it happened that that day. I was at school. I was about six years old. And they were giving us the oral polio vaccine, you know, wasn't the shot. So I you know, stood in line with all my friends, and we all just took this thing. And then I got home and my dad looked depressed and all the shades were closed. It was very dark in the house. And I said Oh, we had the polio vaccine at school today and he looked at me he goes. You let someone give you a shot at school. Did it hurt? I said no, no, no. They took out this little cup and put a sugar cube in it and then drop the medicine and you just ate it. My dad looked at me and start shaking his head. And he went over to the phone and he called Dick and told him he had something. And the next day they wrote a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go.

Mary Poppins polio vaccine Jeffrey Sherman Dick Disney
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"About how evac seen sparked the creation of one of his father's most famous socks. My dad always filtered everything down to its simplest form. People thought Maybe he wasn't listening, but he would always listen, and then he would form his words very carefully. Words were like his religion. He brought word builders on my mom and dad's honeymoon. My mom complaint. He wanted to just no words. And he loved the sound of words and how they felt on your tongue. My dad and uncle had a favorite song that they had created for Mary Poppins called the Eyes of Love. But while Disney said, could you write something that's more in line with the philosophy of Mary Poppins? And it was all just falling flat. They're both really depressed. Well, it happened that that day. I was at school. I was about six years old. And they were giving us the oral polio vaccine, you know, wasn't the shot. So I you know, stood in line with all my friends, and we all just took this thing. And then I got home and my dad looked depressed and all the shades were closed. It was very dark announced. And I said Oh, we had the polio vaccine at school today and he looked at me he goes. You let someone give you a shot at school. Did it hurt? I said no, no, no. They took out this little cup and put a sugar cube in it and then drop the medicine and you just ate it. My dad looked at me and start shaking his head. And he went over to the phone and he called Dick and told him he had something. And the next day they wrote a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.

Mary Poppins polio vaccine Dick Disney
"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:05 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"You know you had to enter. You know what I'm saying? I don't think they had to get a time And once they were four you were done. You couldn't go So this isn't like the old days. Say I remember when the polio vaccine was I was a little tiny kid. But I do remember standing in this and I'm sure and I know your dad does. You stood in this really long line. To go in, and they gave you a little sugar cube with the vaccine, And now I kind of thought that's the way this was gonna be. I don't know what's going to be 2021 where you had to get an appointment, right? Just hand the stuff out that was going on here. Man thing is and I know the governor was on with with will you earlier and he's explaining How to get it where it is, but it's still just still confusing. I know it's there, and it's out there. But tell me it's gonna be here at this location at this time, and you can get it. Yes, so little bit ambiguous once like the weirdo testing thing that's going on now. Where they just kind of There are pop up testing stations, You know, why don't you just, uh Now I know there were some. Obviously they're a uniformed locations where it happens every day, but just pop up locations. We're just put him put him there. What do you mean the same place? He's been going for the test in the next 10 over his right to pop up location see in a rural area. I can understand that. But if you're gonna put it, I don't care. You know, whatever in the city in the suburbs, wherever it might be. Why should it be a pop up location? If that thing doesn't get any business, okay, I understand. Moving it then, right? Right? Yeah, I guess I guess I have to do with E was the five year one has to have be refrigerated, downright minus 70 or whatever it is. Maybe that has something to do with it. But, yeah, it's there. It's just she's kind of Confusion about how to get it. Well, I saw a new article today The Johnson and Johnson vaccine that has been approved yet. Is It's like aspirin. They could start anywhere as that's a huge benefit. A lot of issues with you gotta build. Those things aren't cheap free. There's I go to minus 70. And it's one shot. Yes, that's better to write so Again. I'm first in line. Whatever they do what I'm gonna. Hopefully, I'm not gonna be more than people in Florida that goes. You go online and get the Holland Oates tickets. Be the seventh caller right here at this radio station and you get the covert test. That's what we should do. I should be our next program. We'll get all kinds of listen. They got a $25 skyline gift card, too. Call it now. And you get the coma Vaccine and second, Cody is free. And you get the Madonna vaccine. So what are we gonna win? Someone talk to people about what the hell is going on here? But I wanted you to know that I wanted to throw this one by you two here at some point it, I'll do it right now. Um are you a hand shaker at you like to shake hands with people? I'm very handshake. My good friends all hug on my, you know, right never bothered me. It's look, it's his part of our culture has been around for thousands of years. Right? You've only back to Roman times, Greek times all that. But I well, I always read that. The custom came about because so when you shook hands with someone, it's like no knife or some would fall out of your shirt. So early clank around, seeking me out, shook hands with you and I heard some kitchen getting in my head. That guy's got a dagger inside his sir. He's gonna stab me with that sounds kind of like how the choosing Became everyone was poison each other back in the Middle Ages, So the theory was, you hit each other's glass. Some of your drink goes and there's some of their drink goes now. I never knew that one. So anyway, so normal story short, though, however, it came to be Shaking hands is kind of a part of our culture is what we do, but because of the pandemic people aren't doing as much and they're doing that weird, like elbow. Thank you. Good thing that I had had a couple of people in the elbow or the hit the rock all that. So a recent Harris poll, Ed, um, found that 54. I don't believe this. I can't 54% of people say they will be happy to never shake someone's hand. Against that's weird to me, That's weird. I mean, I think it's I've had someone like, you know, you kind of meet him and they you know, you walk up and I kind of just naturally even demon doing for whatever 40 years of my life. You put the hand out there. Then they kind of put their hands on their back and go like It's kind of like we're like rude and stand offish. Like, Just chill like, Give me the kind of like, Hey, Sorry. I'm not gonna do that. But don't give me that hands behind the back and look at me like I'm an idiot thing, So I'm going back to shaking hands and Sounds like you are to bring him back. Hand shaking, baby we're doing that's right. 11 hand second time. Well, Iet's one of those things and I don't want to get anybody space. And I'm gonna You know if you feel that way about it, Like I said, I'm a big hugger. Somebody that I know. I'll give you a big giant hug. Especially the female. Absolutely. I mean, e wouldn't hug you because you'd crush me like a bug. But yeah, the sooner this crap is over Nevada better for all of this man to get back to normal life as we see it, but your thoughts on what happened last year. Anything about it? You're gonna miss I saw things today on a BBC news cast. The guy goes well, we've got a special presentation off highlights of the best thing that happened in 2020. And they they didn't run a video. That's it. There was a pretty funny funny Hopefully, this is better but you never know. Never know, Scribble year could be worse. You know 749 7800 the big £1.700 on 18 18 Just love to get your thoughts on 2020 but now checking in with traffic And we have to talk to this fella. I'm assuming it's rob. I don't even know I've lost contact with everything that's going on..

polio vaccine Johnson BBC Iet aspirin Cody Nevada Florida Harris Ed
"polio vaccine" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:37 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"For breaking news. Thank you now on use the local news producer tried tactic on the tens, every 10 minute mornings and afternoon and weather travel is gonna be tricky out there with Storm Sacramento's news 93.1 kfbk. So one asked about the vaccine. This is the group that did the recommendation to the F Food Drug Administration, FDA. They called the A C I P. There. These all these experts that weigh in on things, and they are recommending that vaccination should be Deford. If you've had the virus. They say, deferred until you've recovered from the acute illness. In other words, if you're experiencing symptoms, and you've completely completed the isolation period For most people as 10 days after the onset of symptoms, so Um, they're not saying Don't get it. They're just saying, Don't get it right away. I Every every vaccine is different when I was a Child in grade school. They lined up all the kids. Who go get their polio vaccine. And they told me you're not allowed. Yeah, they booted me out of the lines and you're not allowed because I actually had polio. So they said. You can't get the vaccine. Well, I never got the polio vaccine, but I got polio before then before it came out. I know idea and well, let's play, um Dr William Hazel time. Um, big immunology, immunologist guy and He Played cut. Nine. This is where he talked. They were talking asking about Moderna earlier today, and he said the antibodies in the modern a vaccine May not be permanent. Well, you know, First of all, I'd like to congratulate with Jennifer publishing their data of their phase 12 trials, and in that publication, you can see how long the neutralizing antibodies those of the ones that are important. That's just the advice the virus. Does that actually doing the work to protect last and what that data shows is that Half life. That is the time at which half of the original antibodies were still active is about three months. That's not a surprise because when they develop vaccines for Zika or Ebola's arrested choice, official virus, That's what they found that the real question is how many have lives. Can you go down? Six months? Nine months, 12 months before you run out of gas and can't stop the virus anymore? I think that's what we're going to learn. It's not necessarily true of all the vaccines, but it might be. Let's take something like the flu. The flu vaccine has a similar half life, maybe even little shorter yet we use it. It's effective, so it's not necessarily a limitation, but it is a caution. There's something we have to watch over time. Yeah. Hadn't heard that from anybody else. Dr Hazel time. Says Moderna as and he presumes it's the same with everybody else. That's the half life on this thing. Maybe they don't know what it is. So everybody's rushing around trying to get the vaccine and it may be where you're gonna have to rush around again. Next year, do the same thing. 855295 66 100 George in Florida. Hello, George. Yeah. Time. Average question about the phone where? I'm sorry. Time, like, Excuse me. I appreciate you The answer in the school, you know, Like the phone where people say why I was still I was in this store that sir This'll Ugo. If you're gonna do something You leave the phone on your couch. You put the TV on especially sporting game, which is about three hours. And you do what? You gotta do this to me. Or you could learn. Sign language and use Morse code. The feds will never know what you're doing. Yeah. Don't know They're listening, but I know they know where you are. I don't Well, that you know. No. Somewhere some well, Mrs Grubach, right? You're right. I mean this fall. Right. You need the phone there was was sent for you expecting The bank robber isn't that smart? The bank robber walks into the bank with the phone in his pocket. Oh, not only works in the phone his pocket when he pulls out, the teller says, Can I have idea gives in the vices number twice is good to know that before I liked I liked Like the stupid crook stories. They're great, I'll tell you Surveil quick. I was I was driving the road down the road and stay with 64. There's a warm art and I seen a big TV on a truck. I said, Wow, I wish I had that TV. That's really look nice. Don't you know when I went home? I looked at my phone and she said, Well, mark televisions on it. I was like, Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah way, Tom. It was a wake up call like it. All right. Just keep your mouth shot. Yeah. Oh, I mean, I mean, There are some some of those big department stores the targets or some of those. I don't know if it's target doesn't but you could be in the store and up will pop a little coupon for something that you happen to be standing in front of. Yeah. I was shouldn't Wal Mart the other day, and I like that by a lot of eggs, and I buy a lot of cheese, And those sudden came up. Said this Krupa for eggs? Yep. I was, like, sure. My bike. I'm sure I mean, I mean, do you? You know you believe that you have privacy? I don't Don't No, no, no, no, I'm grabbing. Really, You know? Yeah. I mean, it's scary. Like I can stuff in the mill. I'm like I never order it by my sort of it. Diverse emits. I'm like this is weird. I says I one day I was watching and commercial about life. We shorts. Thanks. Says I don't need life insurance. And it's about a 34 days later. I guess I think in the middle of life for church exact coincidence? Yeah, but I don't know, but no, I don't agree with you. There is no private shape. You know, it's gone. Gotta learn. Sign language. I look it. Don't get me. Don't get me started on sign language. I Have gotten in more trouble over sign language because You'll see. Some government official standing there at a news conference and they've got all the reporters and their cameras and microphones and everything else and standing next to the politician is somebody Doing sign language and I've I've often Well, I've said it out loud a couple of times. Why do they have they have closed captioning? You know, so why would they need sunlight? Well, I got a very nice lady who sent me a Brother firm email about her daughter could not here and how important this Woz and it does make a lot of sense when she explained it to me from the view of viewpoint of somebody that is death, but they also Um It's I said, Well, this is sign language. I I know nothing about it. Is it the same around the world? And she said no. Every language has its own sign language. Would think it would be university. Yes, Yes, I learned is not. So I get in trouble with the people that are part of hearing or death Find or family.

polio vaccine Um polio official flu vaccine Deford Dr William Hazel Wal Mart producer F Food Drug Administration Dr Hazel FDA Sacramento Jennifer Mrs Grubach Florida George
"polio vaccine" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"polio vaccine" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"As we start to get more comfortable having this cove in 19 in our midst were a lot less paranoid about it. We're a lot more likely to take risks and again. Helps normal human behavior. It just happens that this virus does take advantage of it. And as we spend more time around other people, other households yeah, the virus does, In fact, Get a chance to infect other people. That's what viruses do. They're always looking for new food and new food. For them is unvaccinated people who've never had coded before. That's all. It's required for coded to spread. When it comes to the vaccines. It looks like we're going to have a whole load of them out there like five of them by spring time, and that's that's good news. Um But there's still this. This fear some people as you're well aware that you know they don't want to be the first to take it. There's there's you know, just the fears are all over the place. Every time I turn around, I'm getting something from somebody in the audience about They don't want to be first. What will it is this typical Linda, When we have a new vaccine, I can't recall. You know, I can't go back to the polio vaccine, even though I was around and you know, wondering if some of the fears were the same back then, too. It seems like there was an overwhelming response to the polio vaccine and say, Yeah, let's do that. Nobody appeared it, But I think maybe politics has got in the way of this one and is maybe going to slow down progress on the vaccine. Because of these fears, which you're very unwarranted. How would you respond to that? There is always a baseline of folks who are not interested in being vaccinated for various reasons. Some of them are based on fear. Some of them are based on this information, and some of them are based on the judgment of the risks versus the benefits. So at this point, yes, it has been politicized. But let's remember that, for example, the polio vaccine there was a huge outcry against it. There was a belief perhaps that this was a government invented entity designed to Control the population, and in fact, Jonas Salk involved in it actually vaccinated himself in the Children in an attempt to allay some of those fears. Remember any of that? But Yeah. If we look around right now, when we initially talked about the vaccine coming out about 40% of the people surveyed that no way. No. How I'm not interested. And the latest survey that I saw was about 1800 people. About one in four said No, I'm not doing it and the rest said Yes. What probably will happen is a couple of things one as more people get vaccinated and we see Uh, more documentation were demonstration of safety. My neighbor got it, and he's fine. Um, I got it. It really wasn't bad, So it's okay. As we see that where people will be willing, and then as we see more people affected by covert 19 that tends to create a regard for the virus that makes us take it a little more seriously. But at the same token, there are going to be some people who have bad reactions to it. And those are going to get well publicized. I'll give you the example of something I heard on your news report. That's better nurse was given the vaccine and got covert 19 1 Week later, right? Well, that's actually predictable, not because it had anything to do with the vaccine, but because back seems do not work immediately. Have to prime your immune system and they have to allow you to create enough antibodies to get resistant. Your initial dose of vaccine After about two weeks, you'll probably have about 50% immunity. Three weeks after your first dose to get another dose. And then two weeks after that, So maybe five weeks later, you've got 92 95% immunity. So if someone was vaccinated, and one week later about covert 19 That would kind of be expected because they wouldn't have had time to develop antibodies. A Zafar is blaming the vaccine for actually giving the disease that doesn't make sense because the vaccines don't contain any form of the disease adviser and modern er. Vaccines contain on Lee a blueprint for one part of that virus. The spike protein in the spike protein isn't capable of multiplying so you can't get a disease from it. Hold. That kind of makes sense. It does, And I'm looking at the clock and saying I'm way behind because of my big mouth. We'll take a breather.

polio vaccine Jonas Salk Linda Zafar Lee
How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

BrainStuff

05:28 min | 2 years ago

How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

"In the nineteen forties. America was under a constant threat from polio. A disease that had a then unknown cause and devastating effects especially in children. It spread quickly through unclean water and unwashed hands leading to symptoms like nausea fatigue. Fever and a stiffening of the body summers especially saw surges infections particularly around swimming holes leading to post polio paralysis and in some cases death on average thirty five thousand people were disabled each year. According to the centers for disease control and prevention president franklin delano roosevelt was among the most notable people to get the condition putting a face to a still uncertain disease. A vaccine was desperately needed as scientists learned about the transmission process including the fact that anyone could be a carrier in the next few years rival scientists jonas and albert sabin worked with teams in their labs on two completely different vaccines. Sabin worked on an oral vaccine. While sulk created an injectable vaccine that using a kill version of polio in the book polio and american story. David m ocean ski writes about the urgency of work. During the time quote. I talk there was reason to hurry the year. Nineteen fifty two was the worst polio year. On record with more than fifty seven thousand cases nationwide the headlines screamed of plague season and polio time. Twenty one thousand victims suffered permanent paralysis and about three thousand died from the very beginning of the polio epidemic. Monkeys were considered to be essential for research before human trials could take place becoming the unsung heroes of the fight to defeat the disease was through animal research that scientists i discovered that there were three strains of the deadly disease. The monkeys were purchased at a high cost from india and the philippines and shipped to the united states. Many died in transit so the national foundation for infantile paralysis now known as the march of dimes began overseeing their import in nineteen forty nine. A foundation established a special facility known as ot farms and rural south carolina to process the monkeys arriving from abroad oak tree farms operated in the picnic colony a beaufort county in coastal south carolina. Originally called the prichard bill primate center. The forty acre or sixteen hectare tract of land along. The river was called by local newspapers. The ellis island for thousands of monkeys from india naturalist john. Hamlet had the job of finding a space for the primate center. That was both connected to deep water ports and airports but also remote enough for neighbors the area he chose closely approximated the natural habitats of the monkeys with its abundance of shady long leaf pines and a mild climate. The monkeys were originally brought into savannah. Georgia one of the region's biggest ports and taken by truck the thirty odd miles or fifty some kilometers to the farm. When air travel became more popular they were flown by a london and new york before travelling by train to the low country. Once they arrived at the farm veterinarians treated the two thousand or so recess and sign a mogus monkeys before clearing them for transport to research facilities around the country. The monkeys spent twenty one days. Getting acclimated and eating a special diet was scientists carefully monitoring their status many went to sell nukes facility in pittsburg and sabin in ann arbor where they were given vaccines to test the vaccine. Strength against the three strains of poliovirus a few locals were aware of the research that was going on at the farm. Despite rumors of people encountering the animals we were unable to discover any opposition to the research facility perhaps because it was not well known and also because opposition to using animals and testing was not very common at the time in the united states. The movement against animal testing didn't pick up steam until around nineteen eighty in any case. The farms purpose wasn't permanent. Once sox polio vaccine was deemed a success and released to the public in nineteen fifty-five the work of qatif arms was no longer necessary and the facility closed in nineteen fifty-nine saban's oral vaccine came into use in nineteen sixty one the foundation that had established the facility. Its attention to reducing premature births. The monkeys found new homes and labs across the country. According to a former employee named louise crawford things at the farm were left just as they were including the monkey cages. A caretaker kept the grass and plant life at bay. The lab was locked up ready for someone new to take on the important task of preparing monkeys for research but that day never came in nineteen eighty the land and its contents were sold to development group. The lab equipment was donated to a local school science department while a farmer claimed the former monkey cages for his own animals. Today acreage along. The river is mostly residential and privately owned thanks to south and saban's vaccines polio cases of plummeted from three hundred and fifty thousand nine. Nineteen eighty eight to just twenty two in two thousand seventeen

Polio Nausea Fatigue Polio Paralysis Centers For Disease Control An Albert Sabin David M Ocean Ski National Foundation For Infant Prichard Bill Primate Center Franklin Delano Roosevelt United States Sabin South Carolina Jonas Fever India Beaufort County Paralysis Swimming
Health officials warn Americans not to let their guard down

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Health officials warn Americans not to let their guard down

"Even with vaccines in sight, Public health officials are warning Americans to keep their guard up to keep washing their hands wearing face masks and practicing physical distancing because, as we said earlier, the virus is continuing to sicken and kill people across the country, and public health officials are pleading with people to limit travel for the upcoming holidays. And yet millions of people ignored that message this past Thanksgiving, and it's well. There's concern that too many people are still refusing to maintain or in some cases, even start implementing the habits that help keep people safe. So we wondered if there's a different way to communicate the message, especially at a time when Americans are so divided on so many levels. We called Seth Godin for that, because he knows about effective messaging. His Ted talk called How to get Your Ideas to spread has been viewed nearly seven million times, and he's the author of numerous books on the topic, including the best seller. This is Marketing. Gordon says. It's helpful to look at what's worked in the past, so people didn't stop smoking. When it was explained how dangerous it was. People stop smoking when Hollywood and TV made it less cool, and when CBS stopped selling cigarettes and when the taxes went up And at that point, people made a new decision based on new information, and they didn't say I am bending to authority, they said. I'm the kind of person that doesn't want to be around people who are smoking. And it's it sometimes of generational shift. It's not an easy thing to do, but it is not based on scientific data. It is based on the local heroes in our community when they start doing something We start doing something. So if we had modeled mask wearing in March when we could have in April when we could have if we had seen that from the people who were being broadcast all around us, it would have gone a long way to establish the people like us do things like this. And my hunch is that people's fear of death, which is real is going toe overcome our need to signal partisan division and it won't happen all at once, and I believe it will happen in pockets and the obligation that people have is to show up in their community wearing a mask because that sends a signal and it has a multiplier effect. Mm. I think I hear you saying that. I mean, it's important that the president elect, you know, wears a mask models. This behavior. The vice president elect wears a mask models this behavior and is continuing to do some sort of calling for people to get on the same page. But what I think I hear you saying is, that's not enough by any means. And actually, you need different people two model with like, I'm thinking about I don't know where I saw this picture. What was Elvis picture of Elvis getting a polio vaccine backstage at the Sullivan Show? Is that what we're talking about here? We need people that other people follow to do this. That's brilliant. That's exactly right. Because people didn't follow Elvis because he was elected to anything. They followed Elvis because it was a choice. They saw something in themselves and what we have the opportunity to do is model behavior's not at people but with our peers in circles to establish that if you want to be in this circle This is what we do. Years ago, I wrote a block post about bike helmets. And what I found. Is that people on the bike path in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Every couple either. Both people were wearing a helmet or neither person was wearing a helmet. I thought whom? That's weird. Nice hung out of the bike store for 20 minutes. Watching the rental of bikes and what was happening was after you entered the bike, the owner said, And do you want to rent helmets? Their dollar extra? And there was a pause, and whoever spoke first in the couple was the decision that the couple made. So if the person who spoke first said no thanks neither one war one if the person said, sure. Both of them were one and so the way to get people to wear bike helmets is to put both helmets on the table and say, Do you wanna rent helmets? Most people do

Elvis Seth Godin TED CBS Gordon Hollywood Polio Provincetown Massachusetts
History of the COVID vaccine

The Economist: Editor's Picks

07:50 min | 2 years ago

History of the COVID vaccine

"The promise of a covid. Nineteen vaccine is immense. But don't underestimate the challenges ahead. Nine long years elapsed between the isolation of the measles virus in nineteen fifty. Four and the licensing of vaccine. The world waited for twenty years between early trials of polio vaccine and the first american license in nineteen fifty five marvel then at how the world's scientists are on course to produce a working vaccine against sars kobe to the virus that causes covid nineteen within a single year. And not just any vaccine. The data from a final stage trial unveil this week by pfizer and biontech to pharma companies suggests that vaccination cuts your chances of suffering symptoms by more than ninety percent. That is almost as good as for measles and better than the flu job with an efficacy of just forty to sixty percent. Suddenly a dark winter there is hope not surprisingly phases news on november ninth rouse the markets bulls investors dumped shares in florax peleton tech firms which have all benefited from the corona virus and instead switched into firms like disney carnival and international consolidated airline's group. Which will do well. When the sun shines again the oecd. A club of mainly rich countries reckons that global growth in twenty twenty. One with an early vaccine will be seven percent. Two percentage points higher than without there is indeed much to celebrate. Pfizer's results suggest that other vaccines were worked to over. Three hundred and twenty are in development. Several in advance trials most liked pfizer's focus on the spike protein with which sars covy to gains entry to cells. If one vaccine has used this strategy to stimulate immunity of us probably cantu pfizer's vaccine is also the first using a promising new technology many vaccines prime the immune system by introducing in fragments of viral protein. This one gets the body to make the viral protein itself by inserting genetic instructions contained. In a form of our anna. Because you can edit aren. Hey the vaccine can be tweaked should the spike protein mutate as it may have. Recently in ming this platform can be used with other viruses and diseases possibly including cancer on original focus so celebrate how far biology has come and how fruit fleet can manipulate biochemical machinery. For the good of humanity. There will be time later to worry about how that power might also be abused and celebrate the potency of sciences at global endeavor drawing on contributions from across the world. A small german firm founded by first generation. Turkish emigrants has successfully. Worked with an american multinational company headed by greek chief executive yet despite the good news too big question out about the characteristics of the vaccine and how fast it can be distributed. These are early results. Based on ninety four symptomatic cases of covid nineteen from among the forty four thousand volunteers. Further answers must wait until the trial has gathered more data. It is therefore not clear whether the vaccine stop severe cases or mild ones or whether it protects the elderly whose immune systems are weaker nor is it known whether inoculated people can still cause potentially fatal infections in those yet to receive jobs and it is too soon to be sure how long the beneficial effects will last clarity will take time in the next few weeks. The trial should be declared safe. Though further monitoring of the vaccine will be needed. The company's predict that immunity will last for at least a year. The ninety percent plus efficacy so high that this vaccine may offer at least some protection to all age groups while the world waits data it will have to grapple with distribution will be in short supply for most of next year. Although our any jobs may prove easier to make it scale than those based on proteins pfizer's requires two doses. The company has said that it will be able to produce up to fifty million doses in two thousand and twenty one point three billion next year. That sounds a lot but america alone has over. Twenty million first responders medical staff care homeworkers an active duty troops perhaps a fifth of the world's seven point eight billion people including two thirds of those over seventy risk. Severe covid nineteen. Nobody has ever tried to vaccinate an entire planet at once as the effort mounts. Ge's medical glass and stuff could run. Short worse visors shots need to be stored at temperatures of minus seventy degrees celsius or even colder far beyond the scope of your local chemist companies building an ultra cold chain but the logistics will still be hard. The vaccine comes in batches of at least nine. Hundred and seventy five doses. So you need to assemble that. Many people their first shot and the same crowd again. Twenty one days later for a booster. Nobody knows how many doses will be wasted so long as there is too little vaccine to go round. Priorities must be set by governments. A lot depends on them getting it right within countries and between them modeling suggests that if fifty rich countries were to administer two billion doses of vaccine that is eighty percent effective they would prevent a third of deaths globally if the vaccine was supplied according to rich and poor countries population. That share would almost double. The details will depend on the vaccine. Poor countries may find ultra cold chains. Too costly the domestic answer to these problems is national committees to allocate vaccine optimally. The global answer is kovacs. An initiative to encourage countries equal access to supplies ultimately though the solution will be continued work on more maxine some might survive in commercial. Refrigerators of those will work. Better on the elderly still others might confer longer protection require a single shot or stop infections as well as symptoms all those that work will help increase apply. Only when there is enough to go around. We'll anti vaccines become an obstacle early. Reports suggest the jap causes fevers and eggs which may also put some people off. The good news is that an efficacy of ninety percent makes vaccination more attractive. The next few months will be hard global recorded. Death rates of surged past their april peak. Governments will struggle with the logistics of axon nation. America is rich and it has world class medicine but it risks falling short because the virus is raging there and because the transition between administrations could lead to needless chaos and delays squandering lives. When a vaccine is at hand would be especially cruel. Science has done. Its bit to see off. the virus. Now comes the test society

Pfizer Biontech Florax Peleton Tech Polio Measles Cantu Pharma Kobe Corona Oecd FLU Disney Anna
Science, Economics And Vaccines

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:32 min | 2 years ago

Science, Economics And Vaccines

"Dr Stanley Plotkin develop vaccines for some of the world's deadliest modern viruses. He's very familiar with the cost and the process of producing vaccines, and he says the process tends to be slow and ferry expensive developing vaccine is likely to cause something on the order of five hundred, million dollars five hundred, million dollars status is today's indicator five, hundred million dollars to get a vaccine Stanley, says. For drug companies and universities and labs that monumental cost is often one of the biggest obstacles to creating vaccine after all at the end of the process, you don't know if you ever will actually debt vaccine some viruses like HIV still don't have successful vaccines even after decades of trying and billions of dollars invested if covid nineteen vaccine can't be found or if it takes decades the social. Economic and cultural impacts would be devastating. So the White House has done something pretty unheard of it's created a plan called operation warp speed to try to speed up the vaccine process. The White House says it's already invested more than twelve billion dollars in the plan and how the plan works. The White House is basically created contracts with drug companies like Pfizer Novak's Moderna Therapeutics and AstraZeneca. Few others and those contracts promise these companies billions of dollars if they can get a vaccine ready to go and have a hundred million doses at the ready by the first part of next year with so much money being funneled toward the problem I'm wondering if that will do you think speed up the process of getting a vaccine or does it just take the time it takes or? It definitely speeds things up. Stanley says with a strong cash incentive like this and so much support companies can out a bunch of different tactics in their search for a vaccine. He says, there are more than a hundred different approaches that scientists know of, and they can try a bunch of them labs all over the world flooded with resources racing for vaccine that should help speed up the arrival of the vaccine at least that is the hope but that is as yet. a hope. Nothing nothing is certain is certain. if everything goes well. I think having a vaccine by the end of the year is not impossible, but it's based on everything going. Well, Stanley says even with all the money in the world getting a vaccine ready for the public quickly is really hard. The Rubella vaccine that he developed was a relatively quick process in terms of vaccines. It took him about two years to discover it to develop the vaccine itself, and then five years to tested and scale up the production of IT and just get to the market, and here's why for one thing it's a messy process. You have a biological problem It's a complicated process and there isn't any single wave. Doing that also, he says there are parts of the process that you cannot speed up no matter how much money you have Stanley says trials for vaccines for instance, typically take longer than trials for regular drugs because vaccines will be used on much larger swath of the population. So you have to test the vaccine on all different kinds of people, different ages, ethnicities, people with different underlying health conditions, and that typically means trials involving tens of thousands of people. Also, you have to give the vaccine time to work time to assess side effects. Many vaccines fail in this trial phase, and there is a danger in going too fast of course the. is to avoid making mistakes. While you're speeding up mistakes and research or in manufacturing the vaccine or in not taking enough time to test these things can have. Consequences he says in the nineteen fifties, some batches of the polio vaccine created the contained an active virus the samples at past the safety tests yet thousands of people contracted polio from the vaccine dozens of people were paralyzed as a result Stanley says rushing vaccine is a balancing act between good science and good economics in you you yourself are working on a vaccine is that correct? Well, I know lawyer you know I'm I'm eighty eight years old I? No longer have a laboratory but I'm giving advice left and right so. I'm working in the a sense of giving advice. What kind of advice are you giving? What questions do people have at this stage which? Are Important what have you and responses one should be trying to get. What dosage? Interval between doses I mean the things that one learns with any vaccine. Are you taking dozens of calls like a week. I see why you have very limited time. I. Should let you go but I can't thank you enough for taking some of your precious time to talk with me. By by by conversation is over I, mean I would be hurt but like the man has lives to save, right? Oh. Yeah Oh. Yeah. Impressive Dude. Also fun fact Cardiff. He learned to fly a plane when he was seventy four and you don't do that kind of thing by spending all your time talking to journalists. The man is flying planes and saving the world. So he gets overpass

Polio Vaccine Dr Stanley Plotkin White House Polio Cardiff Astrazeneca Pfizer Novak Moderna Therapeutics
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

Science Talk

04:27 min | 2 years ago

COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

"US government's. Warp speed is ambitiously trying to create test and licensed vaccine for covid nineteen in less than a year compared to the five to ten years typically needed for a new vaccine. The program is borrowing strategies from a crash effort undertaken in the nineteen fifties against polio. Arthur caplan was seven years old when that paralytic disease which had been terrifying parents nationwide came to his town. Last. People. In America. Get. Polio in the Boston outbreak of nineteen, fifty seven, that's where I'm from. Saw Kids in our loans on kids die in the floor. It's one of the reasons I got interested in medical ethics. The Polio vaccine developed in the fifties it saved millions of lives and brought us tantalizingly close to eradicating the disease altogether. But in the haste to produce them researchers and manufacturers occasionally made mistakes and crossed ethical boundaries. Experimental vaccines were tested on intellectually disabled children, for example, as well as millions of people in the Belgian Congo and the Soviet Union who were not given the option for informed consent that today we consider indispensable. Medical ethics come a long way in the past sixty, five years. The World Health Organization has already set up a working group on ethics and Kobe Nineteen of which Kaplan is a member. They have started thinking through many of the tough questions ahead as companies race to test experimental vaccines, and we hope eventually ramp up manufacturing of those who succeed to billions of doses. Worldwide these questions include how can we make sure vaccine trials don't exploit people or enroll too few participants from black native Latino communities who are disproportionately sickened been killed by this disease who will get approved vaccines I and who will pay for them and what if anything should we do about vaccines being sold on the black market? The most immediate questions involve large-scale clinical trials those trials will take months to produce results. Can says, one reason is if I give you the experimental vaccine. Then, I have to wait for the. Virus in nature to infect me to see whether I'm going to do better than a group that didn't get vaccine usually have a placebo control group were you don't give them an active agent and you sort of monitor one against the other. If, you're waiting for natural infectivity with Kobe we have a problem because the Degree to which the becoming infect is very slow. So you'll notice that people are starting to recruit subjects for trials right now in hot spots, they may be looking at Brazil. They may be looking at Atlanta it could be looking at a region of the country that has. A A big outbreak. But at the same time, morally we have to try and tell people who sign up for vaccination studies they should not get themselves infected. So it's a sort of moral catch twenty two, you can't really. Encourage people to be reckless and get themselves. In fact, an the problem is you're probably not going to take sicker people because it makes it difficult to assess whether a vaccine is causing an adverse event or an underlying illnesses causing events. Most of the people who come into these big vaccine trials are healthy volunteer still they're younger. Is An effort underway. In the NIH sponsor trials to try and get more diversity ethnicity and race but a lack of transparency in who is being selected for the vaccine trials has raised concerns that historically underrepresented communities may once again be overlooked. Kaplan says that the preference for healthy volunteers is also one of the reasons that vaccine testers probably won't turn to one otherwise logical place to recruit participants prisons where corona virus has been running rampant, you can't use a vulnerable population because you worry that they can't consent. They're gonNA try and say I'll do it because they want to get out of jail or get parole the other main reason why Is prison populations usually have two or three underlying diseases. I know MTV everybody's at the gym looks such Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in fact, hepatitis HIV drug abuse is a bunch of reasons why they're not a best subjects for for any beginning studies

Polio Vaccine Kaplan Polio Kobe Arthur Caplan Belgian Congo United States NIH MTV Arnold Schwarzenegger Soviet Union America Boston World Health Organization Brazil Atlanta
A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

Short Wave

10:33 min | 2 years ago

A COVID-19 Vaccine: What You Need To Know

"Joe you have been reporting on the pandemic for months now and specifically one crucial part of this story vaccines right I think vaccines are pretty much the way out of this. Most people agree it's been so far the most successful tool in preventing infectious disease. But, of course we don't have a vaccine right now, and so that's why we're doing all these other things like shutting things down and social distancing and wearing masks in washing hands, etc, until we do have a vaccine that safe and effective and available right, and we're basically hiding from the virus in the meantime right, but I've heard that vaccines have traditionally taking years to develop. So, what are we doing to speed up the process well quite a lot actually and just to give you one example. Example a couple of weeks ago. I got a virtual tour of a vaccine facility in Baltimore. What you're looking at here is one step of multiple step process. It's run by a company called emergent bio solutions, and Sean Kirk overseas the manufacturing and technical operations and what he's doing, he's he's pointing a cell phone camera through a glass window into another room with several large stainless steel pieces of equipment. You can see the banks taken out. Talk you, so what's going to go inside? This bag is actually. Believe it or not insect cells that have been modified to make proteins from the coronavirus. That's going to be used to make the vaccine. The technicians are loading this bag into a fifty liter stainless steel vessel. That's part of what's called a bio reactor around the outside of this is the vessel itself it provides. The heating cooling. And with the inserted agitator, the mixing the cells, spitting out a protein that's going to become the corona virus vaccine. All this is being done with the strict standards of the Food and Drug Administration. The vaccine is from a biotech company called Nova Fax, and emergent says they're ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of it on a short timescale. Hold up Joe. Because I thought there weren't any approved vaccine's yet. So what's happening here with this manufacturing? Well, you were asking what's going to speed up the process and this is part of the answer. They're not just waiting to see if the vaccine works. They're doing what's called at risk manufacturing it. They're getting ready to make hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine. And when they finish testing it, it might not work okay, but the government says we don't have any choice because we can't wait until we find out of it works to start manufacturing it. Because that'll just add months and months to the process, so they're getting going right away. Sounds like kind of a gamble, but we don't really have much of a choice. Is that right well? That's what people are saying. I mean it's a gamble that health officials say we have to make if we want to have a vaccine that's GonNa be around in time to put a stop to this pandemic. Okay Today on the show what you need to know about the virus vaccine from how it works to the challenges of disturbing it to. The world. This is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. Okay Joe Palca. Let's start with some vaccine basics I read. There are over one hundred vaccines in development for this corona virus, and these vaccines are trying to do the same thing trigger an immune response from your body without actually getting you sick. Yes, I've been thinking about it as a little bit like showing a picture to someone and say if this person comes to your door. Don't let them in and and that's essentially what you're doing with a vaccine. Right and I guess there are a couple of different ways. Occur virus vaccine can maybe trigger that response. Tell me about a couple of them. Well one thing you can do is you can actually kill the virus. What does that mean well? It's not really alive, but let's say treat it with heat or formaldehyde. It's no longer working and you inject into somebody well. It has the shape of virus and the look of a virus, but it doesn't do it. A virus does so the immune system can respond to that. That's kind of how the polio vaccine that Jonas Salk came up with. Or you can take the virus and modify it so that it's no longer able to make someone sick That's basically what the Sabin Polio vaccine did. It weakened the poliovirus. Immune system saw it made all the right responses, but didn't Cause Disease Gotcha. Since those two, there have been married of different ways. It's just the idea of getting the Munin system to recognize parts of the virus so that it'll have an immune. Without actually making somebody sick all right. Let's talk to about why vaccine development takes so long because we mentioned earlier, it's normally very step by step process and I'm guessing that's why it takes a while right well. Yeah I, mean there are lots of steps in the process. First one is to make sure that the vaccine is safe. You're GONNA, be giving it to a lot of people, so you WANNA. Make sure it doesn't cause any problems on its own important, and then you want to make sure it has an immune reaction immune response, so you measure the cells that people make are the proteins that they make from the immune system after you've given them the vaccine. And then you want to make sure it prevents them from getting sick from the coronavirus. None of these sound like easy tasks I gotta say Yeah No it's. It's all time consuming. It's all difficult. It all requires a lot of people and patients and coordination and You can't really speed it up I. Mean if you WanNa, see if something's going to work for six months, you kind of. Of have to wait around for six months to see if it's GonNa work right, and so with this coronavirus receiving manufacturers trying to compress the time line, but this takes a lot of money and a lot of financial risk, so does anthony. FAUCI of the coronavirus task force thinks we can develop a vaccine by the end of this year, because the government is helping these manufacturers financially through. An warp speed. Here's vouch speaking with NPR's Rachel Martin. It's risking hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half a billion to a billion dollars. The government isn't destined that taking that risk way insane precede, and you'll save several months, so joe aside from this. What else can be done to move the process along well I mean one of the things you can do. Do is just get a lot of people working on the problem at the same time, and then you can also do things that will make sure that the regulatory processes smooth so the food and drug. Administration is coming along with you in every step so that they don't have to review everything. After you've done it, they can review everything as you're doing it. But. This idea of having a lot of labs involved in something that's going to really be helpful and I talked with Dr Lewis Fellow over at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School his team is developing something. It's packed with micro needles that contain tiny bits of the coronavirus, and the Niger needles are so small that you don't even feel them, so you while slap on the patch and wait a few weeks and boom, immunity corona virus. Virus Patch. It works if it works, but this is just one approach, and I think that they will basically feed off of each other This is GONNA help us to do these trials both quicker, and to find vaccine. That's most effective when we start to be to be able to compare these different approaches seven Joe. Let's say sometime in the future we have a winning vaccine or a few vaccines that are fully approved. How on planet, Earth Are we going to distribute them like who's who is going to get it I i. m Evi one vaccination. Are Those people born on March tenth? This is a scene from the movie contained I know we promised we wouldn't play this movie again on the PODCAST, but. This scene is kind of how vaccine was deployed at least in the film. So Joe is there massive lottery drawing in our future to decide who gets the CORONA VIRUS VACCINE? I don't think that's going to be the actual way that it's going to be ruled out. Okay. Most of the people I've talked to suggest that it's going to go first to healthcare workers and people who are on the frontlines of combating the disease, but then you want to think about the sort of the societal infrastructure. I mean who makes things go and. I think a number of years ago. People wouldn't necessarily have thought of delivery truck drivers says people who are crucial to the infrastructure of the country, and yet more and more people are now relying on deliveries to get stuff, and so they may be considered critical people who need to be vaccinated or their people who are at high risk for the disease. But the fact is that at some point, we're going to have to figure out a way to get this to everybody. Right Seth Berkley, for the CEO of an organization called Garvey. The vaccine alliance put it really well. We're not going to be safe as a world unless everywhere save so even if you know, we had parts of the world that would have a low spread or no spread. If you had large reservoirs of the virus in other places, of course, you have a risk of reintroduction I like that we're not going to be safe. As a world, unless everywhere is safe. Okay, last question Joe. Will the corona virus vaccine be one that changes every year because the corona virus changes every year. If we know that, or will it be more like the measles are the polio vaccine? We don't know we don't know which I could give you a better answer. But the answer right now is. We don't know so. There's not enough experience with this virus yet to know for sure, of course what's going to happen? It's possible that they'll be a different version that they all need to make vaccines against for every year. or it's also possible, and this is probably more likely that. They'll need to be boosters from time to time, maybe not as infrequently as measles, but may be more frequently that some so that the it's not clear how long the immune response that you get from. A vaccine will work so. The trouble is just I mean it's so new. The understanding of this virus that the people aren't saying

Joe Palca Polio Vaccine NPR Food And Drug Administration Sean Kirk Baltimore Jonas Salk Rachel Martin Seth Berkley Fauci Anthony Dr Lewis Fellow University Of Pittsburgh Medic CEO Garvey
Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

06:10 min | 2 years ago

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
Greatest Hits: Physician, Test Thyself

Your Brain on Facts

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Greatest Hits: Physician, Test Thyself

"While at the medical pneumatic institute of Bristol in the seventeen ninety s Humphry Davy studied gases studied by inhaling. The today's theme was still in any way unclear. Devi would set up chemical reactions and then inhale the resulting gas one gas gave him a pleasant sensation and the impulse to laugh at everything he had discovered. Nitrous oxide though. His initial attempts were meant to reproduce the pleasurable effects of opium and alcohol. Davey would ultimately recommend the use of nitrous oxide as an anesthetic. Your dentist gives you a blend of fifty percent nitrous and fifty percent oxygen but devi was huffing hundred percent nitrous oxide which is probably why he enjoyed it enough to start hosting parties. Were friends would inhale it from silk bags when it came time to test his polio vaccine. Dr Jonas Salk decided to avoid the long drawn out. Human clinical trial process the only suitable tests subject was himself and his family in nineteen forty seven. Salt was working on a vaccine for the crippling disease. While at the University of Pittsburgh he needed a healthy volunteer to test it and administered it to himself his wife and their three sons. It worked and was soon implemented in a nationwide test that showed dramatic results in two years. Polio cases decreased from twenty nine thousand to less than six thousand salk didn't patent the vaccine in assisted that it should remain free and available to everyone saying. Could you patent the Sun as a result? He's often remembered. As one of history's great humanitarian. Since Dr Olivier Immune System was a brilliant cardiologists zone practice in the second half of the twentieth century when he developed a life hindering addiction to alcohol fearing for his life. He immersed himself in a rehab therapy but nothing worked so he did the only thing he felt he could. He took his treatments into his own hands. Searching For a cure he happened upon back. Lafon a muscle relaxant. That had been used for years but it shown promising results in studies with laboratory animals addicted to a variety of substances Doctor Amos in prescribe himself the drug and experimented with increasingly higher doses until he finally reached a level that left him free of any craving for alcohol. He published his results in two thousand and four which a team of Italian scientists tested with promising results in two thousand eight Werner forsman was German urologist who during his surgical training in nineteen twenty. One pioneered the technique of cardiac catheterization the inserting a catheter into the heart. To measure the pressure inside and decide whether a patient needs surgery building on the work of scientists who has successfully catheterization a horse in eighteen sixty one force was inspired to try to replicate that work in humans but couldn't get permission for human trials of such a dangerous sounding experiment undeterred. He asked an operating room nurse to procure the necessary equipment. She agreed but only on the noble condition that he experimented on her rather than trying to do it to himself. No sooner was she prepped. On the table than foresman anesthetize his own arm and made a cut inserting the catheter. Twelve inches or thirty centimeters into his name. He then casually climbed two flights of stairs to the X. Ray Sweet before threading it all the way into his heart and having an x ray done to check the placement. He was later forced to resign from that hospital. Then hired back and fired again in the early thirties doctors. Herbert Woollard an Edward Carmichael. Notice that when an internal organ was damaged patient sometimes felt pain in unconnected parts of their body. They decided to deliberately damaged one of their own internal organs to study the effects. But what internal organ did they have? That was both critical and easily damaged. Maybe one or a pair of ones that's effectively on the outside of the body for easy access Yup. They chose to experiment with their gentlemen's BITs to study pain in their notes. Willard in Carmichael recorded that the testes was drawn forward and placed under a Pan that could hold weights though they recorded. Neither whose testees. Who did the drawing forward weights were added to the Pan and the resulting sensations were recorded. The pair performed the experiment. Multiple Times sometimes injecting various sections of the testicles with local anesthetic to

Dr Jonas Salk Nitrous Oxide Polio Vaccine Devi Humphry Davy Dr Olivier Immune System Edward Carmichael Polio Medical Pneumatic Institute Of Opium University Of Pittsburgh Werner Forsman Davey Doctor Amos Salt Willard Herbert Woollard
Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

The Big Story

08:41 min | 2 years ago

Covid-19 Caccine: Search, Progress Explained

"If I had to guess what you'd say if I asked you how long a Kobe nineteen vaccine would take. I Bet I could do that. But best estimates even though we've ramped this up or probably twelve to even eighteen months away from having that available the first vaccine could be ready in eighteen. Months could still be at least a year away and I said that could be a year to a year and a half. I'm not changing any of the dates. So where does that twelve to eighteen month timeframe come from to be honest? I couldn't really tell you but I've heard about it since March and it does sound good to think that a year and a half is the long end of this but this of course is one of the challenges that we all face in the course of learning about this virus the guts of how we research and test and develop and manufacture. Vaccines is probably not something. A lot of us spent time thinking about until now all of a sudden though any piece of good news is desperately welcome so we start to hear about every single potential savior tonight the new findings from the NIH on the antiviral drug rim desert showing promise in speeding up recovery worldwide. There are now roughly one hundred vaccine candidates under view. Researchers advisor believed this Genetic Code Vaccine available as soon as September. How likely though are any of those trials to result in an actual vaccine and even if one of them does. Will it really be available later this year or early next year? Do we even know how to make the vaccine that we might find on a large enough scale? And have we come to grips with the fact that not every disease is a vaccine? How well do we really understand this process? How well do we understand the hope that we're clinging to today? We'll try to help you understand it better right after a very quick update from Claire Broussard. The government says it'll be very careful when it comes to easing border restrictions with the US. That deal which means no nonessential travel between the two countries is set to expire next week but Prime Minister Justin Trudeau did not say whether or not the border would reopen. At that time Deputy Prime Minister Christie Freeland said. Talks were ongoing. The federal government has announced financial aid for seniors a one time tax free top payment. Those who receive old age security will get three hundred dollars and those who receive the guaranteed income supplement will receive two hundred dollars as the number of new cases of Kovic Nineteen in Ontario remain. Steady the province's chief medical officer of health. Dr David Williams says the by the weekend. Health officials may consider advising the province to move to the first stage of its reopening plan that includes opening select workplaces allowing for more people at certain events like funerals and having hospitals resumed some non urgent surgeries and lastly tradition in Ontario. The Canadian National Exhibition has been canceled for the first time. Since the Second World War it was set to take place August twenty first to September seventh. The President of the Association says they did not take this decision lightly and it was made in consultation and with the support of public health experts. As of Tuesday evening seventy one thousand one hundred fifty seven cases of covert nineteen in Canada with five thousand. Two hundred eighty three deaths. I'm Jordan Rawlings. And this is the big story. Robert Venison has worked on various vaccines and in the vaccination industry for almost forty years now. So I'm hoping that he can kind of walk us through this high Robert. Hi How are you? I'm doing really well except I never know how to feel these days when I see news reports about a new potential vaccine for Cova nineteen and breakthrough and success. And then it's still eighteen months away. Do you know what I mean I do. Why don't you sort of start by telling me what the media and the public get wrong When we discuss potential vaccine for this virus. Well what a here on the media is. It's almost like it's a slam dunk for starters and that it's not going to take very long at all and twelve months eighteen months. I I feel that's really very overly optimistic. My view is that it could take much longer. The probability of success is a lot lower. And you know for some diseases. We've never been able to come up with a vaccine like AIDS for example right. Can you sort of walk me through the typical process for finding vaccine For something I won't say something like this because I realized this is kind of unprecedented in its global scope but but when you normally discover something in you're searching for vaccine what happens well. The normal process takes fifteen years the ranges between ten and thirty years and it starts with an awful lot of academic research understanding the disease and the disease organism before manufacturers even. Start Looking at a potential vaccine. But once they do. Then there's what we call the preclinical phase where we do a lot of animal testing and developing what was called a vaccine platform and scale up occurs and production of enough vaccine for clinical trials. And then after the clinical trials there's three phases one two and three submit to the regulators for a license and Which usually takes a year and then you have to manufacture it and some vaccines like salk polio. Vaccine for example takes eighteen months to make really yeah from scratch. It's not like pharmaceuticals. You're not cranking pills. Can you tell me how the search for a covert nineteen vaccine can cut down that Really Depressing Time Line. Like everybody's working on this one thing around the world. What do you do to shorten that? Okay there's a number of things that we can do first of all. We do everything in parallel instead of doing one thing I and step to second and step three first. We started all of the steps at the same time where wherever we can. So we're we're going to do without a lot of academic research and knowledge of the organism. We're GONNA use some new technologies that we haven't used for vaccines before so these newer technologies hopefully will be a make us able to manufacture a vaccine much quicker. What are those technologies these are some of the DNA and RNA? Vaccines that are being looked at. There's never been a vaccine currently licensed using these technologies but there's a lot of axes in the pipeline so the thought is it might work for this so while these cut down the timeframe on the other handy reduce the probability of success. Where are we then in that process? I mean I read different reports every few days. Well the good news is there's about nine hundred ninety five vaccines that are candidates for clinical trials. Not all of them have started yet. But there's a and of those the top sort of Twenty that I've looked at the top twenty contenders. Some of those are finishing up animal studies and some of them have actually already started in phase one clinical studies so the positive thing is that there's so many companies developing candidates that wild up the probability of success of any one of those is low the fact that there's a lot of them means that we may get lucky and And one of those will come through or two when you say you look at ninety five or however many that are being done around the world and then you look at the top twenty contenders what makes a potential vaccine a contender as opposed to one of the other ones on the list. What are you looking for? Well what I'm looking for because I know how difficult the process is. I'm looking for basically a platforms. That have we have some experience with. So we've had some success with this platform in making another vaccine and I look at how fast that platform will be able to be scaled up to make to make a manufacturer vaccine because normally it takes five years just to build a manufacturing plant for many of the traditional vaccines. We need something. That's a lot faster

Ontario Robert Venison Deputy Prime Minister Christie NIH Dr David Williams Federal Government Justin Trudeau United States Prime Minister Aids Claire Broussard Cova Canada Advisor Jordan Rawlings Medical Officer President Trump
Report raises concern about rare polio cases caused by oral vaccine

AP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 3 years ago

Report raises concern about rare polio cases caused by oral vaccine

"Four African countries have reported new cases of polio link to the oral vaccine in a report late last week the World Health Organization partners noted nine new polio cases cools by the vaccine in Nigeria Congo Central African Republic and Angola seven countries elsewhere in Africa have seen similar outbreaks in cases have been reported in Asia in rare cases the live virus in oral polio vaccine can mutate and spoke out breaks the World Health Organization has long relied on the cheap and easily administered oral polio vaccine however western countries use a more expensive injectable vaccine the contains an inactivated viruses capable of causing

Africa Asia Polio Vaccine World Health Organization Polio Nigeria Angola