36 Burst results for "Polio"

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:59 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Morning Edition

"Sports events and retirement homes We understand that life is too good to lose This is violante Russia And I'm 80 years old When we have something attacking us we have to get shields So I have the vaccine one the vaccine two and the vaccine three And I can tell you that yesterday went to the theater and we used masks everyone had the most life is going on you know Laroche believed she is as protected as she can be against the new omicron variant Scientists agree including doctor Maria Manuel Mota of the institute of molecular medicine in Lisbon But Mota adds that early evidence suggests this new strain of coronavirus is highly transmissible These virus is here to stay So even if you are vaccinated it should be careful This vigilance with the pandemic has come at a price COVID infected a tenth of Portugal's population and killed thousands until this summer When the government tapped a high ranking military officer to reboot its vaccination drive Email I am a vice admiral of armed forces I appeared in my combat uniform and the first thing I said on the TV is we are at war and this is a war against the virus So in what side you want to be With the virus because you are crazy And you are helping the virus to spread or you are in our community to protect ourselves I meet the vice admiral and his nautical themed office He's tall gregarious and really into Star Wars At least when he's talking about vaccination That says look are you a Jedi or are you the dark side of the world Be a Jedi to protect yourself your family and also offers His team expanded vaccination centers and made them more efficient When he visited those in line applauded Only ones to be faced protesters You got him his face as TV cameras rolled Like crazy people Murder or murder General side the killer and this kind of things And I said in a very calm way I said look murder or killer is the virus Together with this crazy people The message worked Millions of Portuguese were vaccinated in just a few weeks The vice admiral is now a national hero Maria Mota the scientist says the public was also reminded that vaccines help eradicate previous outbreaks of diseases like polio The country was very poor until the 70s we had a depiction We still remember people that really were extremely affected by poly one died and quite high child mortality and vaccines came and they were protected.

Maria Manuel Mota Institute Of Molecular Medicin Laroche Mota Lisbon Russia Portugal Government Maria Mota Polio
8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | Last month

8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

"8 things that children are more likely to die from than COVID. Cancer significantly. Almost 20 times more likely vehicle accident suicide homicide. Cardiovascular disease drowning flu and pneumonia. We live in a world with numerous threats. It's part of existence. And there's also a false promise in safetyism, too. There's a false promise and you see this in the people that are vaccinated, which has always been one of my complaints about the way that they've been pushing the vaccine is it gives people a false sense of security. And no one wants to talk about this. The false sense of security of someone who gets vaccinated, and then they believe they can resume regular life, and then all of a sudden they have a breakthrough case, and they don't know what to do. They thought they had the protection. They thought they had the same sort of protection that they would get from the measles mumps rubella or polio vaccine. And all of a sudden they get a breakthrough case and they get caught by surprise. Maybe they would have made different social decisions. Maybe they wouldn't have gone to big gatherings. Maybe they would have handled things differently. Maybe they would have prepared themselves with azithromycin Ivermectin hydroxyl chloroquine, monoclonal antibody treatment centers or aspirin. Instead, there is a false sense of security that comes in with the overemphasis of we as the government we as the CDC we as NA 8 NIH we as the medical industrial elite, we're going to protect you. And what it does is it erodes what it does is it diminishes its suppresses humans own responsibility to take ownership of their actions. It's a false sense of security. When in reality, our leader should have said, look, if you want to get this vaccine fine, we're going to be very honest about what it can do what it can't do. But also, if you get it, you better be ready to treat it. We're now 70% of all deaths in the United Kingdom are vaccinated people. Why? They had a false sense of

Measles Mumps Rubella Cardiovascular Disease Pneumonia FLU Cancer Polio NIH CDC United Kingdom
"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:32 min | Last month

"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"In sight I remember my mother being careful so she pretty much kept us at home It was as though people had shut themselves up in their houses trying to hide from an unseen and deadly enemy not daring even to venture upon the streets But I had been wanting to pat my 5th birthday party at our local amusement park It was just a small little part And I think that's where I caught the polio The day before I got sick my neck was kind of storm my throat was sore But I went to bed and went to sleep and when I woke up at heart really bad I couldn't raise my head off the pillow and I could hear my dad in the bathroom brushing his teeth and my mom was putting the laundry in the dryer so I just kind of wanted to lie there and listen to that for a little while Because I knew once I tell them about this it was going to be very different After a few minutes I called him in there and I just told him I had polio As epidemics grew in community after community a steady stream of victims was rushed to hospitals then women children Especially children I was in with the isolation it was in the top room of the hospital I just deteriorated real fast I turned blue from lack of oxygen So then they determined to put me in the.

polio
'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | Last month

'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

"Daniel Horowitz for the blaze dot com says the data is in. And we are now worse off than before the experimental shots. Now this is a thought crime. In October of 2018, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health published a report that if one did not know better, Mike make readers think the authors were involved in gain of function research that likely created the Fauci virus. The report was titled quote technologies to address global catastrophic biological risks. Risks. It offers novel social control and mRNA vaccination ideas to deal with emerging pandemics. Whether naturally emerging or reemerging deliberately created a released or laboratory engineered and escaped, that could lead to sudden extraordinary widespread disaster beyond the collective capability of national international organizations and the private sector control. One of the many bone chilling sections in the publication Daniel Horowitz writes, provides a blueprint for quote self spreading vaccines. Describe his vaccines genetically engineered to move through populations in the same way as communicable diseases. But rather than causing disease, they confer protection. After noting that such an idea would violate the rules of informed consent and possibly spread allergic reaction, they add this shocking prediction about the challenge of such technology Daniel horwitz writes, finally, there is not an insignificant risk of the vaccine virus, reverting to a wild type virulence. As has sometimes occurred with the oral polio vaccine, which is not intended to be fully virulent or transmissible. But which has reverted to become both neuro virulent and transmissible in rare instances. This is both a medical risk and public perception risk, and the possibility of vaccine induced disease would be a major concern to the public. Daniel horwitz continues by saying, whether this vaccine actually sheds the spike protein onto other people, is still not yet proven. Although Pfizer seems to indicate it can spread through skin to skin contact rather than inhalation. But the principle of mass vaccination with a faulty vaccine making a virus both more transmissible is something that is hard to deny at this

Daniel Horowitz Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Daniel Horwitz Communicable Diseases Mike Vaccine Induced Disease Polio Pfizer
"polio" Discussed on The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

02:24 min | 2 months ago

"polio" Discussed on The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

"With younger mouse. Okay is i feel like that's not the answer you're not answered it. I'm just like yeah. I don't know now christians. there's so many questions. It's so gruesome in fascinating. Was there any negative effect on the younger mouses behavior like it's not like they swapped bodies but didn't just start acting old again no no not at all. It seems that whatever was going on the effects were much greater if not exclusive to you to the little. Old dudes got well. Listeners will have to get a digital copy of the youth issue to learn more. I suppose it's a great feature. It's definitely a lot of great stuff in there. Yeah go cat. So what was the weirdest thing we learned this week i think the blood transfusions for me it is. It's hard to be. It's a wild story ride. There was a lot to intact this sabotage. Yes i would you know. I'm ready for the upcoming true crime. Podcast all about that arsenic situation. So oh my god so listeners. That is it for our bonus episodes for now you will see us again in your feed for season five of the weirdest thing. I learned this week in late october. Very exciting but in the meantime get your tickets for. Tonight's livestream show september twenty first tuesday seven. Pm eastern link in the show notes. You definitely don't want to miss it and we will be back soon. The weirdest thing. I learned this week is a popular science. Podcast where available on all major podcasts platforms. So subscribe wherever. You're listening now. And if you like what you hear. Please review us on apple. Podcasts it helps others find the show for more information on the stories. You heard in this episode. come find us. At pops dot com slash weird. You can buy our merch including weirdest thing. T shirts tote bags at mugs at upside dot. Threatless dot com. The show is produced by all of our hosts including me. Rachel men with editing and audio engineering just boaty. Our theme music is by billy cabin. If you have questions suggestions or weird stories to share tweet us at weirdest underscore thing. Thanks for listening weirdos..

apple billy cabin Rachel
Rep. Chip Roy: Biden's Language on COVID Response Is Always About Others Than You

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Rep. Chip Roy: Biden's Language on COVID Response Is Always About Others Than You

"Doing. So I've got it. We're gonna force the boosters. Soluble. They're going to force you to do And by the way, it's all purposeful to say it's to help other people because they don't want to make it about you. Because then it's about freedom for you to make a decision about a mask or about a vaccine for you or your loved one. No, no, they want to make it about. You must do that for the other people. Even though there's no science to back that up. We all know that you can communicate the dengue virus. Even if you've been vaccinated. Remember, they move the goalposts on that. Right. Originally, it was all Oh, no. Well, you know, it's going to protect you from being able to communicate the disease. No. Then they found out. That's not the case. So now there's a well you've got to do it just to make sure that everybody can be taken care of. It's absolutely outrageous. And the booster stuff in the FDA is particularly telling that you've got experts there that are quitting over it, and that they're voting against what Biden. He does because here's the thing Chip. You can support vaccines as I do and oppose tyranny. And that's the point they support tyranny. And support vaccines. We support vaccines and opposed tyranny now De Santis is even pointed out. I'm pulling this up now. Broward County. In Florida. The anti body doses are being were being distributed 52% of the patients and a whopping 69% of the patients over the age of 60 had been vaccinated. Yep. So yes, and and the sentence has said I recommend you get vaccinated. Yes, but it's not enough. I mean, I got to have these and I've got to have these therapeutics if I want to use them. And now they're cutting them off. And look and add on top of this. You know this? My dad had polio. Okay? And I love my watch My dad his whole life. I'm very pro vaccine for for when we know what it is, and you make a decision. That's good for you and your family. But if you've got natural immunity, there's evidence that maybe you shouldn't get it right. Or maybe you're think so. I think you're right.

De Santis Biden FDA Broward County Florida Polio
Freedom Has Been Thrown out the Window With Vaccine Mandates

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | 3 months ago

Freedom Has Been Thrown out the Window With Vaccine Mandates

"Learned this weekend that there are christian colleges requiring vaccine proof to attend and i thought to myself. This is christian. Overtly christian colleges by ola was mentioned. I thought what world have we entered when the basic ideas of freedom have been thrown out the window. There is so much fear. I mean again. I didn't mean to talk about covert but it's almost funny to me. People act as though it's the bubonic plague it's polio. It's something i i know. So many people who've had it and recovered quickly and yet we have christian colleges kind of participating in this because their idea of freedom doesn't seem to it just doesn't seem to reach into these things and i think that's part of the cancel cultures that people don't really have the they don't have the The american values Deepen them where they understand. We can't do this. We can't do that but it has entered the churches. I could give other examples where people are wishy washy. They don't really know what they believe. They go along to get along. I'm absolutely against vaccines. I mean i read recently. And you don't know what to believe and i haven't had a chance to research at the twelve. Thousand people have died from the vaccine. I had very very mild case of covert that a guide on on an airplane. Some when i got absolutely exhausted and ran down my immune system. But i was better in two days so now i have the immunity. You know for me. I say people can make a decision. They should have control over their own body. They ought to be able to decide. I'm concerned that the government is just imposing everything. They're using health to try to push regulations on us that before they would not have gotten away with. This is not the blue bonnet plague when it first happened. We didn't know but within a week or two we could tell it was bad but it didn't even come close to be that bad. In fact as it goes through the population the death rate is really very very small and and the people who die probably would've died. A lot of them are very old they would have died within a matter of months of something else

OLA Polio Plague Government
Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

"Look you you've You've had we've been talking about mask. Mandates for practically this entire show because the idea that we're going to start imposing mass mandates on the vaccinated is just ridiculous and it's counterproductive to getting people on the right path to the end of this pandemic which is universal voluntary vaccination so that we can put an end to this thing. They are talking about in fact they are imposing a mask mandate in the house of representatives. You had a fiery speech about this. Tell us a little bit about what's going on there and what your objections are. Well look i mean. Let me first start very crystal clear that i'm pro vaccine. My dad had polio. He's lived with the ravages polio his whole life And i'm very glad that my children myself Other americans have been able to develop cells polio vaccine. And we're so blessed we've had two hundred. Ninety billion americans get maximum aided for cova think about that one hundred ninety million in seven months. We had an extraordinarily rollout. Thanks to the efforts by president trump which were opposed by democrats. Remember them closed. My democrat even have the vaccine. Now we have one hundred. Ninety million americans have been vaccinated when you include the people who've already had the virus. We're at something like eighty percent of all people over eighteen years old. I have some form of immunity led to keep working on that. Let's keep making sure that american people are free but now they want to force people to either be back stated by force or they want to force people to wear masks and on the floor of the house of representatives. Nancy pelosi wants to make everybody wear masks again. Despite the fact there's no data to back it up they're hypocrites. Dc mayors hosting weddings and parties without masks and reinstated. The mass mandate you see The mayor only had twenty seven people in the hospital when she lived into mask mandate of a couple of months ago. There were ninety people in the hospital where this is all show and politics and by doing it you're weakening freedom importantly you're causing people to say wait wasn't how was the purpose of getting the vaccine. You guys are insane. You don't know what you're talking about. It and i think it's harming america.

Polio President Trump House Of Representatives Cova Nancy Pelosi America
Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

BrainStuff

01:59 min | 5 months ago

Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

"The vocal anti vaccination movement is fairly recent and was really kicked into gear in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight by a now discredited paper that appeared in the medical journal lancet which falsely linked vaccines with autism however vaccine. Hesitancy is as old as vaccines themselves. How stuff works also spoke with dr katherine edwards. The author of an american academy of pediatrics clinical report called countering vaccine hesitancy and she said this has been going on for centuries and pointed to a cartoon published back in eighteen o to the depicts people growing cow-like parts this was in response to edward jenner pioneering smallpox vaccine by using material from cowpox a medical historian by the name of elena kanas wrote in a twenty fifteen in the american historian that the first smallpox vaccine quote was met with enthusiasm but also dread while many patients and physicians were eager to fend off air as most feared diseases. Many others balked at the prospect of contaminating their healthy bodies with disease matter from an animal. And then when european countries began making smallpox vaccines mandatory. And the early eighteen. Hundreds she wrote that quote societies of anti vaccination assists formed to protest what they saw as unequal treatment and undue infringement of individual liberty. But they didn't get much traction. There was also little protest against the polio vaccine which was released in nineteen fifty four to wild enthusiasm in america according to conus she wrote parents so dreaded polio that they were quick to seek the vaccine for their children and course of politics never became necessary but as the decades went on american parents. Were not so excited about vaccinations for measles mumps and other diseases. She noted perhaps because people were used to living with these diseases.

Medical Journal Lancet Smallpox Dr Katherine Edwards American Academy Of Pediatrics Elena Kanas Edward Jenner Autism Polio Measles Mumps America
Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

Can We Talk?

01:58 min | 6 months ago

Being Heumann with Judy Heumann

"Judy. Human is a legend in the disability rights movement. The fruits of her labor everywhere. Sidewalk curb cuts accessible public transportation. Equal access to public services from fighting for the right to live in her college dorm. To leading major initiatives at the world bank and state department. Judy has been a lifelong activist. Her activism often includes telling her own story her book is called being human an unrepentant memoir of disability rights activist. Judy was born in brooklyn in nineteen forty seven. She got polio when she was eighteen months old and it left her. Unable to walk we spoke over zoom about her activism. In her early years growing up in a world she had to fight to be included in. She started telling me about the time when she first realized that people saw her differently. It was an incident that happened. When i was about eight years old in my neighborhood and at that point when no motorized wheelchair so that's why people were having to push me and my next door neighbor arlene and i were going to the store to the candy store and on our way to the candy store some boy came over and asked me if i was sick and that incident really made me feel quite undressed in as much as i really had not seen myself until that moment as being consciously different from other people and the word that this boy used with me was are you sick and so the use of the word sick still today And now we're talking sixty. Some years later is still. I think a prominent where that people think about and use his

World Bank And State Departmen Judy Polio Brooklyn Arlene
Monday’s blaze uprooted more than 45,000 mostly ethnic Rohingya

UN News

01:23 min | 8 months ago

Monday’s blaze uprooted more than 45,000 mostly ethnic Rohingya

"The reindeer refugees who lost everything in a massive at a camp in southern bangladesh. Need the world support more than ever. That's the message from the. Us emergency relief. Chief mark lowcock his released fourteen million dollars from a central fund to support thousands of families that coupon camp in southern bangladesh. Monday's blaze up rooted more than forty. Five thousand mostly ethnic ringer. The cause of the fire is still unknown. As is the exact number of casualties at the camp. You in children's fund spokesperson. James elder told you a news shortly after the blaze was brought under control u. n. team on the ground have been reporting. I've the last twelve hours that they have not really seen anything at the scale and intensity that has ripped through homes. You've got ten people living in a small shanty as a family or as an extended family so you end reporting at the moment that at least fifteen people dead four hundred missing tens of thousands so again already living a very difficult situation tens of thousands of lost what they call their homes. And what have a mega positions. They had a statement on thursday. Mr lowcock described the refugees who fled what top officials of liken to ethnic cleansing in myanmar. In two thousand seventeen as one of the world's most vulnerable communities they need our support now more than ever as the covid nineteen pandemic continues to take its toll and with the approaching monsoon season. The un emergency relief coordinator explained.

Chief Mark Lowcock Bangladesh James Elder Mr Lowcock United States Myanmar UN
Probe announced into alleged Tigray rights violations

UN News

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Probe announced into alleged Tigray rights violations

"Alleged serious abuses and rights violations in ethiopia's tigray region are to be investigated by the un the office of the high commissioner for human rights. Oh chr said on. Thursday the probe which will be carried out jointly by the high commissioner's office and the european human rights commission is described as part of the much needed accountability process for the victims. The development comes after fighting began in the north ethiopian state on the fourth of november last year between forces loyal to regional powerbrokers the teepee l. f. and national government forces serious human rights violations and abuses have been reported. The rights office said in a statement it pointed to multiple actors involved in the conflict and the gravity of the reported violations and the need for an objective independent investigation which will start as soon as possible and for an initial period of three months

Office Of The High Commissione European Human Rights Commissi Tigray Ethiopia UN National Government
Can you file a lawsuit if the COVID vaccine causes you harm?

The World and Everything In It

05:46 min | 9 months ago

Can you file a lawsuit if the COVID vaccine causes you harm?

"Take a moment and slowdown here. Challenging the constitutionality of a vaccine mandate is one type of legal action suing over an injury from a vaccine or an adverse effect is another type of legal action related but not the same a constitutional claim normally with a bodily injury. Person would bring a claim for damages in state court vaccine. Injuries are rare. But they do happen. The centers for disease control and prevention issue warnings about vaccines. I talked with a half dozen doctors for this story. Here is one of them. Talking about the first rotavirus vaccine to hit the market when i was in residency The rotavirus vaccine came out um which is a a virus that causes diarrhea and kids and after they released it they found that there were very small percentage of kids. Were getting Necrotizing necrotizing client s so their was getting not getting enough blood supply because of various stuff but they found it out within a very short period of time and so the vaccine was removed from the market. Gone another dr paul off. It is director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia. He co invented different. Rotavirus vaccine one. That's in use today. His motivation to make vaccine goes back to his childhood. He had club feet when he got an operation. Well he will always remember what he saw a polio ward. And i remember those children and traction those children in our lungs. I think it certainly drove me to pediatrics. And it drove me to child. Advocacy's bashes about childhood that become air drives as adults covid. Nineteen is a devastating virus. That is especially serious threat for a certain segment of the population. The elderly so far the covid nineteen vaccine appears to be effective vaccine of saved their lives and for the most part of saved our lives safely for the most part. Vaccines are safe but not for all vaccines help. One group of vulnerable people but could possibly harm another vulnerable group. Recent news reports have revealed that some people are reluctant to get the covid nineteen vaccines because of potential adverse reactions. A few moments ago we introduced vaccine lawyer rene gentry today. She is the director of the vaccine injury litigation clinic. She identifies some kinds of injuries. Vaccines can cause. It has everything from a nfl access to encephalopathy in death. The majority of the injuries that we see today are the shoulder injury. related vaccine administration and gambari syndrome following the flu shot. But it runs the gamut. We see immunological or injuries. We see neurological injuries occasionally cardiovascular injuries and things like that gentry represents people who have suffered an adverse effect. She says as soon as people hear that they automatically characterize her and her clients or rather mischaracterize. Once you save vaccine injury automatically characterized as anti vaccine people. Say that all the time your client back to my all. My clients got vaccinated. They're not anti backs. i like. They got back. Stated i'm on antibac- i've been vaccinated mary. You just explained that lawsuits for bodily injuries. Normally take place in state court but vaccine. Injuries are not treated that way. An individual with a vaccine injury cannot sue. The drug company for damages. Drug companies are immune from such lawsuits. You're not allowed to sue a pharmaceutical company for a vaccine injury for covid vaccine instead. Those claims use a different process. An injured person must go through the v. I c. p. the vaccine injury compensation program gentry says vaccine court as it sometimes called came about in the nineteen eighties after some children develop seizures because of the dtp shot it requires filing a petition with the united states court of federal claims. It's an actual court an actual court setting. You have a right to counsel you have the right to appeal your other evidence and things like that. If the person proves a vaccine injury they receive no fault. Compensation pay the claim without admitting blames caps on pain and suffering. And things like that. But it's full medical care for the future of past etc but only some vaccines are covered under the v. Icp covid nineteen vaccine is not one of them again gentry. The covid vaccine is considered a countermeasure and by the prep act that was established by congress in the early two thousands. She said countermeasure countermeasures program is a different plan. It limits legal liability for a product device. The government puts in place during a public health crisis. The co vaccine was put in that program instead of the vaccine program. is a much worse program. There's no right to counsel. There's no right of appeal. it's not a legal process. It's a one year statute of limitations. Is you know there's no pain and suffering. It's it's it's a terrible program. In other words. If mandates come down and someone suffers an adverse effect that person has little legal recourse if any and with the in nineteen vaccine. There are still a lot of unknowns. That has another component to mandates with so many question marks. Is there enough information. Does it offer lifelong immunity or will it be a seasonal vaccine. Will the vaccine against mutations of this virus are there long term effects of the vaccine. Who knows we're in a real time epidemiological. Study

Centers For Disease Control An Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Rene Gentry Vaccine Injury Litigation Clin Gambari Gentry Diarrhea Polio United States Court Of Federal NFL FLU DTP Seizures Congress
WHO supports COVID-19 vaccination campaign in India

UN News

01:59 min | 10 months ago

WHO supports COVID-19 vaccination campaign in India

"India has embarked on one of the largest covid nineteen vaccination campaigns in the world. More than two thousand six hundred vaccinators a nearly half a million team members trained. That's according to. Dr rodriguez h often representative of the world health organization. Who in india. Which is one of the main un agencies supporting the government led drive and she shama ask dr offering about. Who's work there including efforts to counter hesitancy and misinformation surrounding vaccination w insurer in india where we have a workforce of around two thousand six hundred And the fact that we have supported polio. Elimination in the country. We're using the launching for this vaccination so far more than two thousand six hundred back sonate burst and around. Four hundred seventy five thousand vaccination e members have joined ross country with our support. Who india including myself participated in dry runs preceding the launch of covid nineteen vaccine asian dry. So that the that was a smooth rollout during the launch during these dry runs up into three phases the last of which was january. Aid the realtime feedback using the idea enabled allegation golden for management vaccines registration of beneficiaries Alerting benefits to their sessions reporting vaccination coverages as well as a brand new thing some scenarios on adverse events following immunization or eighty f. I more than fifteen thousand govan nineteen vaccinations sessions that have been monitored by the show in the personnel across the country since the launch and this is a real time feedback that is an every evening sort of yield sessions of what may have gone wrong and reporting back to national government so that we have corrective actions for sessions landlord the next music's and base ahead

India Dr Rodriguez H World Health Organization Polio UN Ross Govan National Government
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

04:25 min | 10 months ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport as NPR's Joe Parker reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country. And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be a fact, if for one thing they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for stars and so that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China. Caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Hopeless. He's nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the with the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives. A vaccine. Made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca's also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in several countries, including India. That country is also likely to have a vaccine candidate that will be inexpensive and widely available. But Judith Twigg says there's already another major entrant into the international vaccine arena. Back on August 11th the Russian government with great stand, Fehr announced the first in the world registration of a vaccine against Cove It twig is at Virginia Commonwealth University, and she follows Russian health policy closely. The Russian vaccine is what's known as a viral vector vaccine somewhat newer technology than the two leading Chinese vaccines. The Russians chose Sputnik V is the name for their vaccine. Tweak says They did that for a reason. They're very deliberately invoking imagery of Russia re emerging is great power status. We're back. We're at the scientific and technological top of the world, and we're ready to start sharing our technology with everyone. The problem there is that they had not only barely Started phase three clinical trials, They had barely started ramping up productions that was back in August. Twigg says production has ramped up and Russia now claims its vaccine is more than 90% effective, although data for that claim haven't been published yet for other scientists to scrutinize Several countries are ready to try the vaccine, including Argentina, Mexico and India. One thing is clear the world is going to need a number of vaccines to work if the global pandemic is really going to be brought under control. Joe

China Joe Parker Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Vassar College NPR J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Russia U. Polio Sars Judith Twigg International Vaccine Arena Russian Government Center For Strategic And Inter Indonesia Brazil
With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

All Things Considered

02:57 min | 11 months ago

With Expensive U.S. COVID-19 Vaccines, Many Countries Look Elsewhere

"Thank you. And the Corona virus. Pandemic vaccines will have to be distributed around the world. For most countries. The vaccines available in the U. S right now are simply too expensive and too difficult to transport. As NPR's Joe Packer reports that is making vaccines made in Russia and China look attractive. There's a good reason China could play a key role in ending the global Corona virus pandemic. China has an enormous vaccine production capacity. Deborah Seligson is a China watcher at Villanova University. That enormous capacity is at least in part because China is an enormous country, And since public health measures have largely kept the virus in check in China, that means some of that capacity can be used to send vaccines around the world. There are going to be huge advantages to these Chinese vaccines once they're, you know, fully tested, and if they turn out to be If active for one thing, they don't require special refrigeration, and for another, they'll be cheap. But there's still that question of if they turn out to be effective. We just haven't seen the full trial results published yet. Abigail Copeland is on the faculty of Vassar College. She keeps her eye on Chinese biotech companies. The technology behind the two leading Chinese vaccines is decades old. It's an approach that was used successfully in the 19 fifties to make a polio vaccine. It involves growing the virus in a lab than in activating it with a chemical like formaldehyde and using that in a vaccine there, inactivated viral vaccine is based on research that they had conducted to develop a vaccine for SARS. So that actually gave them a head start. SARS was a deadly outbreak in the early two thousands in China caused by a close relative of the covert 19 corona virus, But the virus causing stars disappeared so that vaccine got shelved. Copeland sees nothing nefarious about the delays and learning the results of trials of the Chinese vaccines. Since there's very little virus circulating in China to test their vaccine, the Chinese have had to turn to countries like Brazil, Indonesia and Turkey. And so when you're running that many trials internationally, it does take a lot of time to actually analyze that trial data. What's more, the results that have come out on how well the vaccine works have varied widely from 52 close to 90%. Without definitive results showing a vaccine works. Why have apparently more than a dozen countries around the world signed deals to get one of these vaccines? It's a measure of how desperate countries feel and how much uncertainty they face. J. Stephen Morrison is director of the Global Health Policy Center at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Most countries they're not throwing themselves hook line and sinker into partnerships with the With the Chinese. That's because there are other low cost alternatives of vaccine made by Oxford University and AstraZeneca is also racking up lots of international customers, and it has been given some form of regulatory go ahead in

China Joe Packer Deborah Seligson Abigail Copeland Villanova University Sars NPR U. Vassar College Russia Polio Copeland J. Stephen Morrison Global Health Policy Center Indonesia Brazil Turkey Center For Strategic And Inter Oxford University
"polio" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 11 months ago

"polio" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Help and once the vaccine was available, they suddenly had a new role to play. And after this incident, which was called the cutter incident for cutter Labs, the CDC scientists became more and more visible as a voice of authority and expertise, Polio vaccination and then subsequently, vaccination. Generally, we have AH, video from 1991 of Jonas Salk. He became, of course, a global celebrity Asai understand much to his chagrin. On and here he is talking in 1991 about the development and some of those manufacturing process problems just so people can see and what he looked and sounded like and within a matter of 10 days, two weeks After went into production, and it was in into use. It was a report of cases of polio caused by the vaccine. There was no such encounter in the field trial on it was counted on Leah's herself of the VAC. It's the vaccine from one particular laboratory vaccine was suspended. Its use was suspended for a period of short period of time, reintroduced again after the that problem was isolated in that vaccine was Let's destroy all the others were used and thinks that one proceeded in old fashioned. That's just an example of some of the hazards right One has to deal with particularly at that level of experimentation. So a couple quick questions about that. Is it true that he did not ever seek a patent on his polio vaccine? Yeah, that is true, And he publicly said that he didn't believe that. Ah, Patten was the morally responsible thing to do. But he believed that the vaccine belonged to the people and he saw the vaccine is kind of crucial to health and well being. S o right if he did not, As far as I know, take a patent. It's also worth kind of wrapping back. He was in intense competition with Um especially Albert Saving, who in Cincinnati was leading another team of scientists who were developing a different type of vaccine. One that used a live weakened version of the polio virus and sock was was devastated by the cutter incident. Relieved to say the least when it was resolved. But there was this constant tension. Once Albert Savon's vaccine came to market this constant tension between the two over which was the better product in which should be the prevailing polio vaccine for the country. They each had different advantages and disadvantages. And in fact to this day, we still use both of them globally, although in the global polio eradication, which is seeking to eliminate polio in the last few remaining countries where it's present We tend to use Savon's vaccine, which is administered Orly and requires far less boosters. In other words, no shot and far fewer ghosts is the last recorded case of pulling the United States after that 1955 introduction was 1979 what took so long for it to be eradicated in the United States? That's an interesting question of historian would phrase it very differently would say, Wow, that was fast If you think about it, the smallpox, the first smallpox vaccine Was developed in the late 17 nineties. And I think the last smallpox case in the U S, I think was 1948. So for polio that timeline seems quick, compressed relative to smallpox. What happened with polio to give you kind of a big picture view of what what transpired after the first vaccine was approved. There was so much involvement in so much activity in the first few years after socks vaccine was improved that vaccination rates and coverage were it skyrocketed. Millions and millions of people got vaccinated in those first couple of years and polio cases plummeted. Between 1955 and 1957. Then what happened? After 1957 was he started to see this kind of gradual. Departure between those who had the means they could afford the time and the money to take their kids to the doctor. On an annual basis. For instance, they know Stayed up to date on the news and followed expert advice. These people continue to get their kids vaccinated, while other people either who didn't have the means or warrant aware of the need. Um, we're getting their kids vaccine that a far lower rate and so in 1958 and 1959 you start to see polio pieces creeping back up just a little bit, but starting to creep back up and then start seeing outbreaks and these air predominantly happening in poor communities in urban areas, where Um poor communities are living in proud of conditions and are Out of reach of access to health care and don't have routine visits to doctors, for instance, and in those areas. CDC, epidemiologists and others start to realize that people just aren't getting backstage at the same rate. So we had this sort of push and pull throughout the late fifties into the sixties and by the seven years Polio vaccination was really widespread among Children, and by that time we had enough immune adults that it became most important to focus on Children, and we were capturing them at that point, largely through laws that required vaccination for school. In the 19 seventies, However, it gradually became clear that the remaining cases of polio in the country where those caused by the live virus vaccine Which sometimes lead to community transmission of polio virus as the virus was, shed said, for example, in the fecal matter of Children So we then started to move away from that vaccine and switch back to the Salk vaccine and effectively finally got to a place where we had no more polio in this country. So we have about 10 minutes left, and I want to spend that last 10 minutes talking about the lessons for today. Let's begin with President Trump just a few days ago, talking about the development of vaccines. Tremendous progress is being made on vaccines. In fact, we have ready to go in terms of transportation and logistics way have over two million ready to go if it checks out for safety..

polio polio vaccine Jonas Salk CDC cutter Labs Asai United States Leah Albert Savon Cincinnati Albert Saving Patten President Trump VAC shed
India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | 11 months ago

India starts 'world's biggest' COVID-19 vaccination drive

"The world's biggest national vaccination campaign is now underway. Not in the U. S. But India today's the first day that Indians congrats the Corona virus vaccine and the Indian government aims to inoculate 300 million people by July. NPR's Lauren Frayer is in Mumbai. Lauren. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks for having me Scott 300 million people is almost the entire population of the United States and they're going to vaccinate them all in less than six months. How do they plan to do it? Yes, So, of course, it's only about 20% of this country, and that's just the first batch. It'll take a couple years to vaccinate all nearly 1.4 billion Indians. But India is doing this in much the same way it organizes elections, which is spread out over weeks. Here, they're using voter rolls to identify people and just like poll workers carry Elektronik voting machines up to mountaintop monasteries and villages in the jungle. They have these mobile medical teams to bring vaccines on ice to the remote ist places in India. Now, most of the vaccines centers that open today are in hospitals in big cities like in Mumbai, where I am and we know today's the first day. What's the scene? Like in Mumbai? There's an atmosphere of excitement. It's frontline and health workers. Some of these air sanitation workers who are among the first one's getting vaccinated. Some of them got flowers from well wishers. Government ministers are crowding in everybody's trying to take Photos here is the dean of a medical school in Chennai. Her name is our Jayanti and truly a very privileged beneficially today. And I'm feeling absolutely fine. It's almost more than five minutes inside of the news. I'm feeling great. Now she's in the first group of 30 Million Frontline workers. Next in line is anyone over 50 or with a pre existing condition and which vaccine or vaccines? Is India using? Yes, so there are two in use here, one developed by Oxford University and the big pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca. The other is from an Indian company called Bharat Biotech. Both are being manufactured inside India. India is the world's biggest vaccine maker. And so a lot of the covert vaccines being used around the world will actually be mass manufactured right here in people choose. No, they can't and that is a bit of a controversy because most Indians will get the AstraZeneca won. The local manufacturer here is turning out about 100 million doses a month. Now half of those are for export. The other vaccine. Indian one is still in phase three clinical trials in data isn't yet out. Here is one of the critics. Deena's talk or is a public health activist. It may very well be a good vaccine. It's just that we don't know enough about except fricassee. Concerned absence off the efficacy data. I mean, people are asking the question talking. Why? Why did you do that? Why did the government approved this vaccine is what he's asking. And what does the government say? Well, the drug regulator says it wanted to have more than one vaccine available for Indians, the company behind the vaccine. Bharat Biotech, says its formula is 200% safe. There's really some speculation that the government just approved this out of pride really that it wanted to approve an Indian maid vaccine alongside one from a big multinational company like AstraZeneca. We've done stories here, of course, about hesitancy among some Americans about taking the vaccine. I wonder if that's reflected in India, too. It's much less of a thing in India. Actually, India managed to eradicate polio and lots of other diseases through big vaccine drives like this. India also has the second highest Covad caseload in the world behind the U. S. The viruses Devastated the Indian economy. And so there's a hope that you know this. This vaccination campaign allows India to return to normalcy.

India Mumbai Lauren Frayer Bharat Biotech Astrazeneca Indian Government U. NPR Lauren Scott Chennai United States Oxford University Deena Polio
How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

Short Wave

05:33 min | 11 months ago

How COVID-19 Has Changed Science

"Twenty twenty was a year like no other especially for science during twenty twenty alone have been more papers written about covid nineteen than the have been on many other diseases that we've known about for a much longer time. Things like polio and ebola. And that astonishing ed young is a staff writer for the atlantic and in recent peace he explores the massive shift. The pandemic has caused in scientific research in a. We have only known about this disease for a year or so and yet it has totally consumed the attention of the world. Scientists many many scientists have pivoted from whatever they were previously focused on to study covid. Nineteen he says. Take jennifer dowden for example. She's twenty twenty nobel prize winner and a pioneer of crisper gene editing technology. And she told me about how in february she was on a plane headed to a conference crammed into the middle seat and she realized like this is. This is crazy. This doesn't feel safe and this is probably the last time on going to travel for a while like she had the sense for her life was about to change and change. It did the next month. Her university shutdown her son's school closed jennifer and her colleagues realized the wanted to switch focus so they started testing in their own institution to serve the local community because they realized that testing wasn't sufficient they developed new ways of diagnosing the virus using crisper. And this is a clear example. I think of a scientist moved to studying covid nineteen because she saw this massive pressing. Societal need for science to rise to the occasion but in view goodwill pivots like the one that down to made. Don't tell the whole story about what changed in twenty twenty scientists not just a march towards the greater good to very human endeavor and as a human endeavor it has both good and bad sides at its best. Scientists are self-correcting march towards greater knowledge for the betterment of humanity but at its worst it is a self interested pursuit of greater prestige at the cost of truth and rigor and both sides of science were very much on display this year so today on the show we talk with ed young about some of the ways cope with nineteen could change science forever. I'm mattie safai in this is short way from npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. And you helmet and a good set of kneepads and you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cash back online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating recovery. A heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more warding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ibm a smarter. Hybrid cloud approach with ibm telcos. Rollout innovations with watson. Ai without losing speed. The world going hybrid with ibm visit ibm dot com slash breed cloud. Okay so today. We're talking about how the pandemic changed scientific research. Let's let's start with one of the core foundations of science publishing data. Something that in my experience doesn't traditionally happen very quickly. Yeah so traditionally The process of publishing is often very slow. It takes a lot of time for scientists to write up the results for that results to then pass through gone through. The peer review process can take many months. Is ill suited to a crisis. That is as fast moving as the covy pandemic has been but for many years now. Biomedical researchers have pushed for innovations that will speed up the process of science so they have started increasingly using pre-printed servers where they can upload early drafts of the papers so that their peers can discuss and build upon those results even before it goes through the peer review. Gauntlets and it really took off in the middle of the pandemic p- reprints were a major part of how science was disseminated over the course of this year and i think for both good and they meant that as intended. The pace of science was much quicker but in an environment where the entire world was hungry for more information about this new disease. A lot of very bad reprints were also circulated very quickly gained international attention and led to the spreading of misleading information. That hindered the controller cove. Nineteen rather

Ed Young Jennifer Dowden Ebola IBM Mattie Safai Polio Bank Of America Twenty Twenty Bank Of America Atlantic Jennifer NPR Watson
How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

BrainStuff

05:28 min | 11 months ago

How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

"In the nineteen forties. America was under a constant threat from polio. A disease that had a then unknown cause and devastating effects especially in children. It spread quickly through unclean water and unwashed hands leading to symptoms like nausea fatigue. Fever and a stiffening of the body summers especially saw surges infections particularly around swimming holes leading to post polio paralysis and in some cases death on average thirty five thousand people were disabled each year. According to the centers for disease control and prevention president franklin delano roosevelt was among the most notable people to get the condition putting a face to a still uncertain disease. A vaccine was desperately needed as scientists learned about the transmission process including the fact that anyone could be a carrier in the next few years rival scientists jonas and albert sabin worked with teams in their labs on two completely different vaccines. Sabin worked on an oral vaccine. While sulk created an injectable vaccine that using a kill version of polio in the book polio and american story. David m ocean ski writes about the urgency of work. During the time quote. I talk there was reason to hurry the year. Nineteen fifty two was the worst polio year. On record with more than fifty seven thousand cases nationwide the headlines screamed of plague season and polio time. Twenty one thousand victims suffered permanent paralysis and about three thousand died from the very beginning of the polio epidemic. Monkeys were considered to be essential for research before human trials could take place becoming the unsung heroes of the fight to defeat the disease was through animal research that scientists i discovered that there were three strains of the deadly disease. The monkeys were purchased at a high cost from india and the philippines and shipped to the united states. Many died in transit so the national foundation for infantile paralysis now known as the march of dimes began overseeing their import in nineteen forty nine. A foundation established a special facility known as ot farms and rural south carolina to process the monkeys arriving from abroad oak tree farms operated in the picnic colony a beaufort county in coastal south carolina. Originally called the prichard bill primate center. The forty acre or sixteen hectare tract of land along. The river was called by local newspapers. The ellis island for thousands of monkeys from india naturalist john. Hamlet had the job of finding a space for the primate center. That was both connected to deep water ports and airports but also remote enough for neighbors the area he chose closely approximated the natural habitats of the monkeys with its abundance of shady long leaf pines and a mild climate. The monkeys were originally brought into savannah. Georgia one of the region's biggest ports and taken by truck the thirty odd miles or fifty some kilometers to the farm. When air travel became more popular they were flown by a london and new york before travelling by train to the low country. Once they arrived at the farm veterinarians treated the two thousand or so recess and sign a mogus monkeys before clearing them for transport to research facilities around the country. The monkeys spent twenty one days. Getting acclimated and eating a special diet was scientists carefully monitoring their status many went to sell nukes facility in pittsburg and sabin in ann arbor where they were given vaccines to test the vaccine. Strength against the three strains of poliovirus a few locals were aware of the research that was going on at the farm. Despite rumors of people encountering the animals we were unable to discover any opposition to the research facility perhaps because it was not well known and also because opposition to using animals and testing was not very common at the time in the united states. The movement against animal testing didn't pick up steam until around nineteen eighty in any case. The farms purpose wasn't permanent. Once sox polio vaccine was deemed a success and released to the public in nineteen fifty-five the work of qatif arms was no longer necessary and the facility closed in nineteen fifty-nine saban's oral vaccine came into use in nineteen sixty one the foundation that had established the facility. Its attention to reducing premature births. The monkeys found new homes and labs across the country. According to a former employee named louise crawford things at the farm were left just as they were including the monkey cages. A caretaker kept the grass and plant life at bay. The lab was locked up ready for someone new to take on the important task of preparing monkeys for research but that day never came in nineteen eighty the land and its contents were sold to development group. The lab equipment was donated to a local school science department while a farmer claimed the former monkey cages for his own animals. Today acreage along. The river is mostly residential and privately owned thanks to south and saban's vaccines polio cases of plummeted from three hundred and fifty thousand nine. Nineteen eighty eight to just twenty two in two thousand seventeen

Polio Nausea Fatigue Polio Paralysis Centers For Disease Control An Albert Sabin David M Ocean Ski National Foundation For Infant Prichard Bill Primate Center Franklin Delano Roosevelt United States Sabin South Carolina Jonas Fever India Beaufort County Paralysis Swimming
Globalization is ending. What's next?

TED Talks Daily

03:31 min | 1 year ago

Globalization is ending. What's next?

"We are at the end of globalization. We taken globalization for granted and as it drifts into history. We're going to miss. The second wave of globalization begun in the nineties and it delivered a great deal. Billions of people rose out of poverty. More impressively both prattled congress like vietnam and bangladesh increased by over six times in the last twenty years. The number of democracies rose in countries as diverse as chile malaysia. Estonia held free and fair elections. The role of women improved in many parts of the world. If you look at wages policy and companies like spain or access to education in countries like saudi arabia economically supply chains spread like webs around the world with car parts criss crossing borders before the final product. Coming into place is also changed the way we live now. it's changed our diets. It's changed how we communicate how we consume news. An entertainment how we travel and how we work but no globalization is on its deathbed. It's run into the limitations of its own. Success inequality a new record levels of business for example world to gdp is now pushing that was not seen since the polio wars. Two hundred years ago. Show us that. The advantages of globalization have been mis directed. The global financial crisis was the result of this mismanagement. And since then policymakers have done little but contain rather than solve the problems of our age. Now some highly globalised countries. Such as arlanda in the netherlands managed to improve income inequality in their countries by better distributing the bounties of globalization to higher taxes and social welfare programs. Other countries have not been as good russia. And especially the united states hub extreme levels of wealth in policy more extreme even during the time of the roman empire and this is convinced. Many people that globalization is against them and that the bounties of globalization have not been shared with the many a now in twenty twenty were confronted by the pandemic which has shaken the groaned under us on further exposed the frailties of the globalized world order in past international crisis. Most of them economic or geopolitical the hers usually ultimately been a sense of a committee to save the world leaders leading nations would come together but this time uniquely there has been no such collaboration against the backdrop of trade wars. Some countries like the. Us have outbid others for masks. There's been hacking of vaccine programs on common enemy. The pandemic has not been met with the common response to any hope that we might have a world vaccine or world. Recovery program is in vain. Snow worth the end over nira in history. An era that began with the fall of communism that set in train the flow of trade of finance of people under ideas

Chile Malaysia Arlanda Estonia Bangladesh Vietnam Saudi Arabia Congress Spain The Netherlands Russia United States
Health officials warn Americans not to let their guard down

All Things Considered

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Health officials warn Americans not to let their guard down

"Even with vaccines in sight, Public health officials are warning Americans to keep their guard up to keep washing their hands wearing face masks and practicing physical distancing because, as we said earlier, the virus is continuing to sicken and kill people across the country, and public health officials are pleading with people to limit travel for the upcoming holidays. And yet millions of people ignored that message this past Thanksgiving, and it's well. There's concern that too many people are still refusing to maintain or in some cases, even start implementing the habits that help keep people safe. So we wondered if there's a different way to communicate the message, especially at a time when Americans are so divided on so many levels. We called Seth Godin for that, because he knows about effective messaging. His Ted talk called How to get Your Ideas to spread has been viewed nearly seven million times, and he's the author of numerous books on the topic, including the best seller. This is Marketing. Gordon says. It's helpful to look at what's worked in the past, so people didn't stop smoking. When it was explained how dangerous it was. People stop smoking when Hollywood and TV made it less cool, and when CBS stopped selling cigarettes and when the taxes went up And at that point, people made a new decision based on new information, and they didn't say I am bending to authority, they said. I'm the kind of person that doesn't want to be around people who are smoking. And it's it sometimes of generational shift. It's not an easy thing to do, but it is not based on scientific data. It is based on the local heroes in our community when they start doing something We start doing something. So if we had modeled mask wearing in March when we could have in April when we could have if we had seen that from the people who were being broadcast all around us, it would have gone a long way to establish the people like us do things like this. And my hunch is that people's fear of death, which is real is going toe overcome our need to signal partisan division and it won't happen all at once, and I believe it will happen in pockets and the obligation that people have is to show up in their community wearing a mask because that sends a signal and it has a multiplier effect. Mm. I think I hear you saying that. I mean, it's important that the president elect, you know, wears a mask models. This behavior. The vice president elect wears a mask models this behavior and is continuing to do some sort of calling for people to get on the same page. But what I think I hear you saying is, that's not enough by any means. And actually, you need different people two model with like, I'm thinking about I don't know where I saw this picture. What was Elvis picture of Elvis getting a polio vaccine backstage at the Sullivan Show? Is that what we're talking about here? We need people that other people follow to do this. That's brilliant. That's exactly right. Because people didn't follow Elvis because he was elected to anything. They followed Elvis because it was a choice. They saw something in themselves and what we have the opportunity to do is model behavior's not at people but with our peers in circles to establish that if you want to be in this circle This is what we do. Years ago, I wrote a block post about bike helmets. And what I found. Is that people on the bike path in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Every couple either. Both people were wearing a helmet or neither person was wearing a helmet. I thought whom? That's weird. Nice hung out of the bike store for 20 minutes. Watching the rental of bikes and what was happening was after you entered the bike, the owner said, And do you want to rent helmets? Their dollar extra? And there was a pause, and whoever spoke first in the couple was the decision that the couple made. So if the person who spoke first said no thanks neither one war one if the person said, sure. Both of them were one and so the way to get people to wear bike helmets is to put both helmets on the table and say, Do you wanna rent helmets? Most people do

Elvis Seth Godin TED CBS Gordon Hollywood Polio Provincetown Massachusetts
"polio" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And work together. Bring creativity to it. Would I'm always optimistic, highly highly optimistic. About the power of human ingenuity. You think about Back when polio was rampant, and we had, you know. Kids, the suffering from polio and Ah! Partially crippled or back in the days of other long, so I had an aunt. So, um, in now, with polio as a child, right at it. She was impacted. Who threw her entire life? She never let her slower down. But There was a concerted effort. You know, we're way saw the issue. We saw that problem. Scientists went after it the chemo but the polio vaccine and now haven't seen Any kind of major breakouts. Of polio for many, many, many decades. Um, I think you know, I think the same thing's gonna happen with Kobe. I think the same thing's gonna happen. With whatever right? I am highly optimistic that when we are face to face with the biggest problems that could Really just crush us. That's the time when we double down and we say not us. We will find the solution. We will be the ones the end of the day a way around this. We are going to solve this. We're going to make people's lives better. That's when the human race steps up. That's what makes humans unique. No, I didn't say Americans a year humans. This is working as humans. We come together because we can solve this problem. We can solve any problem when we can come together and we can work together. And bring our best and brightest and most creative people. And put them together and tasked him with solving the problem and letting human ingenuity went. That is what I am optimistic about. I will never underestimate the power of human ingenuity to solve society's worst problems. We've done it. We've done it for thousands of years. We're gonna do it for thousands of years. Now we can go on social media and weaken, you know. Complain and all what was me and Society is Don't buy it are theirs Don't buy it. I think You know when I look in the faces of my grandchildren or my kids. For others, my teams that I work with every day, which are just amazingly highly creative people. When I see what you do when we unleash the human potential. There is nothing absolutely nothing we cannot solve, but we solve it best. Working together, not against each other. So what am I optimistic about the power of human ingenuity? Okay, let's see. Let's think about a another. This is a quick question. What have you changed your mind about now? This is a An interesting question I posed to a number of people. Mrs Because people again what we're facing today is people make up their mind. And then we just kind of lock in and we never change our mind. We never I want to say you know something? Maybe I wasn't right. Maybe my should be thinking that I should change. You know my my ideas. Right, And I think there's actually lots of times when I've changed my idea where I thought I knew something. A lot of it is. You know, I've had an assumption or opinion. Around a particular technology and just thought it was gonna be the greatest thing since sliced bread. And guess what I got. I had a wrong changed. My idea wasn't quite You know what I panned out with? Now that those things are easy, the hard ones are. Are you willing to really listening? Consider Somebody else's perspective on things like I don't know your politics, your belief of You know, some famous person you either like them or hate them. Have you ever flipped your position? If you're into sports deal like You know? Stefan Curry, and you just love him or do you hate them? Do you ever flip you ever switch now, Look, I'm a Pete Rose, Johnny Bench Fan Baseball. Big Red machine. Cincinnati Reds. People are people, you know. Left or Didn't like Pete Rose when he got into his gambling troubles that I changed my opinion..

polio polio vaccine Pete Rose Stefan Curry Cincinnati Reds Kobe Johnny Bench Baseball
"polio" Discussed on AP News

AP News

16:07 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on AP News

"Public health experts are reminding parents in addition to cope with 19 they should be watching their children for signs of a virus that mimics polio that strikes in the late summer and fall the U. S. centers for disease control is warning this is the time of year they start to see cases of acute flaccid myelitis a mysterious virus suspected of causing a paralyzing disease the health experts say they're concerned AFM might not be recognized with parents focused on coated 19 or reluctance to go to a doctor's office if they spot weakness in their children's limbs it is possible they say that coronavirus safety measures mask social distancing and school closures might hamper the spread of this virus in 2016 there were 100 53 cases the number lowered in 2017 and then spiked again the next year to 200 38 hi Jackie Quinn

polio myelitis Jackie Quinn
"polio" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on WTVN

"Your dimes conquer polio give a handout with premature birth March of dimes dot org went on mainly cloudy skies tonight a couple of sprinkles possible here in their thirty six below on Tuesday forty seven will be overcast most of the day and to see a few sprinkles now and then and then Wednesday fifty and mostly cloudy twenty BC six first morning chief meteorologist Marshall a peek on your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN from the heartland of America and the gateway to the west good morning good evening wherever you may be across the nation around the world I'm George Laurie welcome to coast to coast AM time in St Louis left Los Angeles Saturday twenty people on the planes she's a hundred and fifty twenty people that's set.

polio America George Laurie St Louis Los Angeles chief meteorologist Marshall
"polio" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on WTVN

"Com your dimes conquer polio give a handout with premature birth March of dimes dot org downpours and gusty winds for the night tonight could hear some thunder out there as well temperatures will be in the sixties overnight tonight and getting up to seventy for early Friday Friday afternoon the rain will come to an end and we'll start to see some clearing Saturday sunshine in forty two I'm A. B. C. six first warning chief meteorologist Marshall my peak on your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN and if you that our country can be rolling again pretty quickly pretty quickly we have to fight that invisible tell me the yes or no but we getting to know what a lot better this is no time for Donald trump's record of Mr xenophobia circles in a phobia to ensure mockery to lead the way instead of science only twenty nine days jail coast to coast from order to order to shine the glad you're with us two hundred and twenty nine days until election day yes K. twelve.

polio chief meteorologist Donald trump Marshall
"polio" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on KTOK

"Leave your mom was absolutely right about the polio outbreaks of the forties and early fifties it was a scary time my husband played with two neighborhood brothers and friends on a Friday evening they were diagnosed with polio on Saturday morning and on their way to a an iron long ward yes Carol that happened I mean I had a friend from church he's he's elderly now but he describes when he came down with it he was down there in Deep South Louisiana it was a Saturday night he was playing with some cousins in his own backyard and they were having a good time and he just started feeling bad and he went in and said mom I don't feel so good and she said all right we're gonna get into bed now be up in a minute to check on you when she got to him he had a raging fever call the doctor and within an hour they had him on a train to New Orleans because that was the nearest polio board a hospital outfit called ushers hospital and he spent the next six months in an iron lung and finally he was strong enough to breathe on his own but to this day has braces and has to use crutches to get around polio before they had a vaccine for it it was pretty scary stuff and we've been to pandemics before this isn't the first one so I try try to offer that to you for some perspective Kevin as an admin on news radio one thousand Katie okay hi Haley Hey I'd like to go through a thirty eight year a good idea but I think the Chinese scientists have been working on this coronavirus for many years we know it's been around since three and you know I think they've perfected something that would actually work toward getting rid of maybe the older population that are you know not really productive society and possibly they have had the time to come up with a vaccine and now they throw it on the the world and all of a sudden thirst is he being third quickly which would make it everybody else will cut Stooges so I mean think about in Manuel first of all let me go out let's go on the premise now I have read reports that the Wu Han the Wu Han province is where a lot of medical research is done and a lot of medicines are manufactured in that province I've only read that I have a big okay so it's not beyond the realm of possibility that somebody somewhere dropped a vial of it but I'm I'm more I I tend to believe more about what we're reading about how it did develop in that it crossed species now it would not be above or below the Chinese to pull something like that to clean up their own elderly population because we know a life to them means nothing and collateral damage to the rest of the planet I would be more inclined to believe the Chinese just didn't give a hoot rather than we're going to release this on the world is well however if he if you put together it makes them look good because all of a sudden they've got it clamped well we've got a clampdown is going down in our country everybody else is you know I mean we've listed on the world and well the dentist is open actually able to find it if they were to well yeah that's the thing that that's my next question to you Kevin is is that okay if we don't know that they have a vaccine it's just the it's just that the virus has run its course in that country and so and again they don't care about life and death in that country to kills four thousand people they've got four thousand more to come in and take their place stable life means nothing to people in China so if they had a vaccine do you know and they were using this to to clean out their elderly it seems to me that they wouldn't allow the United States to develop a vaccine as well in fact what's probably going to happen is the United States is going to develop the vaccine and China's gonna want it because it's so so I'm I'm not as I'm not us I'm not a believing that this came about on purpose and that's why news radio one.

polio
"polio" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on KTOK

"Leave your mom was absolutely right about the polio outbreaks of the forties and early fifties it was a scary time my husband played with two neighborhood brothers and friends on a Friday evening they were diagnosed with polio on Saturday morning and on their way to a an iron long ward yes Carol that happened I mean I had a friend from church he's he's elderly now but he describes when he came down with it he was down there in Deep South Louisiana it was a Saturday night he was playing with some cousins in his own backyard and they were having a good time and he just started feeling bad and he went in and said mom I don't feel so good and she said all right we're gonna get into bed now be up in a minute to check on you when she got to him he had a raging fever call the doctor and within an hour they had him on a train to New Orleans because that was the nearest polio board a hospital outfit called ushers hospital and he spent the next six months in an iron lung and finally he was strong enough to breathe on his own but to this day has braces and has to use crutches to get around polio before they had a vaccine for it it was pretty scary stuff and we've been to pandemics before this isn't the first one so I try try to offer that to you for some perspective Kevin as an admin on news radio one thousand Katie okay hi Haley Hey I'd like to throw thirty eight year a good idea but I think the Chinese scientists have been working on this coronavirus for many years we know it's been around since three and you know I think they've perfected something that would actually work toward getting rid of maybe the older population that are you know not really productive society and possibly they have had the time to come up with a vaccine and now they've thrown on the the world and all of a sudden thirst is he being third quickly which would make it everybody also collects Stooges so I mean think about in Manuel first of all let me go out let's go on the premise now I have read reports that the Wu Han the Wu Han province is where a lot of medical research is done and a lot of medicines are manufactured in that province I've only read that I have a big okay so it's not beyond the realm of possibility that somebody somewhere dropped a vial of it but I'm I'm more I I tend to believe more about what we're reading about how it did develop in that it crossed species now it would not be above or below the Chinese to pull something like that to clean up their own elderly population because we know a life to them means nothing and collateral damage to the rest of the planet I would be more inclined to believe the Chinese just didn't give a hoot rather than we're going to release this on the world well however if he if you put together it makes them look good because all of a sudden they've got it clamped well we've got a clampdown is going down in our country everybody else is you know I mean we've listed on the world and well the dentist is open actually able to find it if they weren't sure if they well yeah that's the thing that that's my next question to you Kevin is is that okay if we don't know that they have a vaccine it's just the it's just that the virus has run its course in that country and so and again they don't care about life and death in that country to kills four thousand people they've got four thousand more to come in and take their place stable life means nothing to people in China so if they had a vaccine do you know and they were using this to to clean out their elderly it seems to me that they wouldn't allow the United States to develop a vaccine as well in fact what's probably going to happen is the United States is going to develop the vaccine and China's gonna want it because it's so so I'm I'm not as I'm not us I'm not a believing that this came about on purpose and that's why news.

polio
"polio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To this far flung villages where you know what the target would be to reach out to vaccinate their kids discuss the health issues and then come back before it's dark in fact I remember one Dave and we did get to leave and we were about forty people in in that board and we essentially lost our week and we decided to go back to the village where we were vaccinating and they were extremely kind to accommodate this forty yard people for the night and I remember we spend the night under the open sky with the entire team and got back to the main line the next morning as in the US the fight against polio has at times brought people together the polio vaccine needs careful treatment you need to maintain what's called a cold chain a cool stable temperature from the drug makers sterile lab right to a child in a muddy slime a remote village they're here like stories of how the vaccine enters what Kennedy big vaccine box on his head while he's standing in knee deep waters I keep saying that if there is ever a global health Olympic these polio vaccine heaters would bring back some meadows you know to me their direct listing champions in the real world settings these champions would finally get their prize India's last recorded case of polio it came in two thousand and eleven eleven years after the global deadline to around a Kate the disease that lost child defected by violence poliovirus lift very closely to my own home town of coal caught the so it's very close to my heart and it always reminds me of children we could have saved from paralysis if we could vaccinated both horror and the community in time appropriately India was declared polio free in twenty fourteen experts wait three years after final case to ensure it doesn't flare up Dr band your party I remember that vividly absolutely and again that was a historic moment yeah that's going to some of those images and photos that they had of the course he river basin of my time in those five states in India and deep in.

Dave US polio polio vaccine Kate Kennedy
"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Day event and we did get to leave and we were about forty people in in that board and we essentially lost are weak and we decided to go back to the village where we were vaccinating and they're extremely kind to accommodate this forty yard be both for the night and I remember we spend the night under the open sky with the entire team and got back to the main land the next morning as in the US the fight against polio has at times brought people together the polio vaccine needs careful treatment you need to maintain what's called a cold chain a cool stable temperature from the drug makers sterile lab right to a child in a muddy slime a remote village they're here like stories of how the vaccine enters what Kennedy big vaccine box on his head why he's standing in knee deep waters I keep saying that if there is ever a global health Olympic these polio vaccine hitters would bring back some meadows you know to me they're the weightlifting champions in the real world settings these champions would finally get their prize India's last recorded case of polio it came in two thousand and eleven eleven years after the global deadline to around a Kate the disease that lost child defected by violence for your lighters lift very closely to my own home town of coal contra so it's very close to my heart and it always reminds me of children we could have saved from paralysis if we could vaccinated both horror and the community in time appropriately India was declared polio free in twenty fourteen experts wait three years after final case to ensure it doesn't flare up Dr band your Pontiac remembers it vividly absolutely and again that was a historic moment yeah that's going to some of those images and photos that they had of the course he river basin off my time in those five states in India and deep in my heart.

US polio polio vaccine Kate Kennedy
"polio" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on AP News

"Polio vaccinations in Pakistan has sickened hundreds of schoolchildren, according to Pakistani officials say the children were taken to the hospital after complaining of nausea and vomiting after being given the vaccine they say, angry family members responded by storming local health facility and shower on Monday, and then setting it on fire the incident deals another blow to efforts to a radical the disease, which have been hindered by widespread distrust in some areas, Pakistan, neighboring, Afghanistan and Julia are the only three countries where polio still endemic. Greek police say dozens of asylum seekers have turned up at the building housing. European Boorda agency employees who've been helping offices onto ficials on the border with Turkey. Police say moving sixty people who had just crossed illegally from Turkey on Monday headed straight for the rented flats of German. I'm Dutch employees of the FrontEx agency and started ringing doorbells, the migrants said they were from Syria and Iraq and wanted to register for asylum, Syria, ninety Ronchi refugees have little trouble securing asylum in Greece Greek police said it was unclear how the migrants found the employee's home address and why they didn't go directly to a police station. The supreme court said it would here. Several cases involving LGBTQ rights AP's, Mike Kemp and reports that includes decision on whether the main federal civil rights law that prohibits employment discrimination applies to LGBTQ people. The justices will hear cases involving people who claim they were fired because of their sexual orientation, though, also roll them a funeral home employee who was fired after disclosing she was transitioning from male to female interest as a woman the issue is whether title seven of the federal Civil Rights Act, which prohibits sex discrimination protects LGBT people from job discrimination, Mike Kemp in Washington. Radio. I'm President Trump says he's not worried about impeachment as Democrats in the house work on what to do next following special counsel, Robert Muller's report and be if my boss has House Democrats.

Greek police Turkey Mike Kemp Pakistan Syria Polio President Trump European Boorda agency nausea supreme court Robert Muller FrontEx Afghanistan Julia special counsel Iraq Washington
"polio" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Alexander YouTube Westwood One Ashley Hamer BT Senator IBM America David Turner ten minutes five hours
"polio" Discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on The Talk Show

"Just write a story to somebody dug it up. It was like on the fiftieth anniversary of Jonas Salk polio vaccine getting approved. And it was like they just talked about how it was. It was like another. VJ day or the day. You know? It was like a day when people like went out in the streets to celebrate. And party Year's Eve because it was. And you know, I don't know anybody. I realized that our generation like me, and you like, I don't know anybody who had polio of my peers, but my family, you know, like, my my grandparents did by by my mom's dad had a brother who died from polio. I mean, I don't know any. I mean, it was you know, it. It was crazy. You know? I mean, your kids could get measles, and maybe they die. And it was nothing. You could do about it because they were going to get it, you know, and then. And then. Yeah. And then this terrible disease that even if you survived it would could leave you severely handicapped for life. We we've got a thing we can just give this to every kid, and they'll never get it and science backs it up the largest clinical study at the time that anybody would ever conducted. And it was conclusive that this this is going to work. It was great. And I just can't imagine like so many of the people of that generation because of their age that are gone now. But if if you could just listen, if you could just come back here and slap some sense. People like. Is a great book. I read a couple years ago called get well soon. Bye, Jen, right? She's jen. Ashley right on Twitter, incredibly funny and wonderful person. And the book is a hilarious account of history's worst. Plagues? It's written in a very friendly and delightful manner counts all it's really very interesting. It's much more approachable because it's not as deadly either a dry or her horrifying thing. She's kind of a little bit of a to do to do about it which lets you get through it. But it is it gives you some insight into what the scope of things we used to go through and then terrifying things like the nineteen eighteen flu that killed so many people, and we still don't know exactly why. Or if it would for in that form, and whether we have any way to protect against it. But it's I think it's a great. I don't know. I really really enjoyed reading about plagues. But it just lets you see the scope of what's happened across human history and what we've managed to avoid for sixty something years. Seventy something years for the most part are the lightning round continues the big hack. Bloomberg's. Blockbuster story from I think it was Tober mid. Notes by I keep doing thing where every time I mentioned a report from Bloomberg BusinessWeek, I put an Astro skin right away. And then include a boiler now boilerplate footnote remarking that the Bloomberg has since since that's published offered no evidence backing up their story bit yet have not retracted the story, which to me is an untenable position..

Bloomberg polio polio vaccine Jen Bloomberg BusinessWeek Jonas Salk Ashley measles Twitter
"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Videos like this had been another challenge. Spreading conspiracy theories claiming the vaccine is a western. Therapies have been working hard to challenge those but a small minority of people still refuse immunization. But I need. This man says there are four young children in his family that he and his brothers were let them receive the vaccine. Budget? All these children are so naughty. Because of this. Exit. All I ask if he knows about the dangers of polio. If something happens. It's all problem will deal with it. All the members of the polio. Team shows him a religious decree stating the vaccine should be administered. He agrees to discuss it with his elder brother's improvements in campaigning and security in Pakistan. From over three hundred polio cases in two thousand fourteen the number fell to twelve last year. Authorities here on our able to protect the vast majority of children they're hoping this year can be the first in which no new cases of polio reported, but one of the biggest challenges in a TV particularly in areas like this close to the border is vaccinated children moving between Pakistan and Afghanistan where rising insecurity is making it harder to reach vulnerable families. We're really concerned, and that's what we have discussed. Also with the government. Dr Tigers Atanasov is the head of the World Health Organization and says the situation in Afghanistan is alarming. There are areas that are not accessible in more than eight hundred thousand people children Arnold covered and all players, including Taliban has to be involved to mobilize the communities and make sure that no no child is missed..

polio Afghanistan Pakistan Dr Tigers Atanasov Taliban World Health Organization Arnold
"polio" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

06:29 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"L polio logo. Is it new highs? New highs. In the market. So here's the good news. If we are going to go hire more names will show up. And we'll be able to read bigger list. For your listening pleasure. Ladies and gentlemen. Tesla down another twelve today. Manno man. What did I say to you? How do you? How do you keep trusting this guy? I really think three days ago they committed another violation because three weeks before he said, everything's fricken fantastic. And all of a sudden now, they're missing numbers. We're worried about this. If I was the regulators. I'd be looking into it. Net. Flicks was down another four bucks today. Remember, a bad reaction to earnings. We thought the stock should have been down fifty bucks on their earnings was only down fourteen but it's down another twenty cents. When estimates or eighty six cents, and you tell people it's going to be fifty six cents. That be a problem. Again, I was surprised. Venezuela. I really do have to mention this. Hope you don't mind. There's a lot of ongoing crap going on right now. I believe the United States is recognizing somebody else. To run the place. The country. Supposedly rumors that finally, maybe the military. That's been bought off is fed up. And a lot of headlines that Maduro was on the brink. Let let me be clear about where we stand. D'oro is a scumbag criminal should be in jail. Chevette has died of cancer. Scumbag criminal should have been in jail. They are not. All these people keep telling us socialists for the people. They're not for the people you go Shah is. Family. Worth billions. They plundered all the money. These are dirtbags scumbags, evil, evil evil people. So Maduro needs to go. He's plundered the country destroyed it. Believe it or not. We're very careful about the words exaggeration. We know we're on TV we're on radio. We have to be really careful about what we say. It's not an exaggeration to tell you that the inflation rate is enough hundreds of thousands percents if not more. They have this currency the boulevard. It costs like a million bucks to buy a Cup of coffee. No, not really seriously. It is the definition of a blank hole there. Not because of the people the people did a great job with this country until they let this shabas takeover and just plunder the place. And that's what bad socialist do. They plunder. They plunder the wealth onto the guys that will do better. And they go to the poor. And the lower middle class and say, look what's happened to your life your lot in life is that way because of all these other people, I'll do better. And then they start taking all the media and the military industry and the like, and before you know, what these moron imbecile, dummy jerks. IQ's of thirty are running all the joint and it's over. Go look up how much oil Venezuela has how wealthy they use the be because of oil they took over the industry, and they don't even know how to produce the freaking oil. And they stole from all these companies that were owed money. So guess what all these companies did they left? And Venezuela has turned into Cuba. Now. And that's why I've always hated these jackasses kissed the Royal ours. Of Cuban the Castro's, I hate it. The healthcare and this and net horsecrap. Which one of you? If you ever got sick God forbid or your family got sick which Havana? General Hospital over the mayo clinic. Raise your hands. And now you have these jackasses here. Socialism is great. The billionaire class sucks. We should not have any billionaires. They're immoral. Terrible. It's not the way it should be. It's a policy failure to have billionaires. You know, what they're telling you. Just give us all that money. You produced and earned. You don't deserve it. We know what to do with it. Even though you earned it. Even though it's yours. You earned it. We're taking it..

Maduro Venezuela Cuba polio D'oro Shah Havana United States Flicks Chevette General Hospital Castro mayo clinic three weeks three days
"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Never go back twenty five forty hour. I know this is one of the items Glenn called in about several times. Partially regards to the immigration debate. Talking about illnesses being brought into the country. And he's mentioned several times the polio. Like. Condition. It's been affecting so many kids in particular. This past year them the centers for disease control like I guess yesterday. Put out the numbers that there were more than two hundred mostly young kids that developed the polio. Like condition known as acute flaccid myositis FM. That makes last year the worst year on record for the condition. According to the centers for disease control and prevention in their latest update, they'll I did say more cases may be reported for twenty eighteen because it takes several weeks for the CDC to actually confirm a suspected case. And we're we're early in the new year. But they still don't have a prime suspect. What is causing this? Yeah. They say they've found several different viruses that have been kind of associated with the ultimate symptoms. The last year there were two hundred one confirmed cases in forty states. There's another one hundred sixty three suspected cases that are being investigated. So the number could be much higher than to a one. All the CDC knows is that the condition which resembles polio is likely caused by a virus. Tests have shown several viruses in the bodies of patients. Yeah. They they use the terms we've detected a virus. Something known as a sixteen. There's an MBA seventy one. There's an av d sixty eight these are viruses found in the spinal fluid. Of confirmed cases that go back several years. But for whatever reason it's it's becoming more prevalent. Yeah. Some people come down with an after the likes of maybe the common cold some heavy respiratory illness. Respiratory infections. Though, the one virus the sixteen is the one that's known to cause hand foot and mouth disease. And several head the the rhinovirus or that that's the common cold. So for whatever it is. They're still trying to make a determination. But I thought you might be interested in that update. Their glenn. I was listening to it. And you know, I have some thoughts on that early off. I think I told your best give giving my grandma around age nine when she was very young to illness. So this is back. We wait many years ago when polio was running rampant through the country before the polio vaccine, and she is something like polo lost. Basically use of one land. But it came partly came back, but the Muslim in one leg never really fully came back and she always walked with a pronounced lip. And she went from. You know, you would have done show years and years ago. If you can remember that the child she walked rush hour number walking. I mean, she went to a Walker and into a wheelchair. She grew older. But the doctor said that she has something like polio. But it was not only. Sure that it wasn't polio. But it, but it was she had the symptoms. Polio was just wondering. I thought about this one time before. Oh. Who is sometimes describe? Symptoms of. Bird flu. Honestly, I do not Bill. I'm I'm thinking, it's kind of like the typical flu like symptoms, but. Well, I mean when you see a very most birds, they have, and they don't even know they have it, right? Don't cowed just kind of like flop around China. Remember seems me I saw it in the Philippines, one time. And and they did the bird a bird didn't really mean. How did it affect? They just a fucked around though, you know, they lost control limbs. Anyway. I want to get back if I can just real quick and remind people this mess we have on the border on every thought about violence on the border until. President Obama was.

polio polio vaccine CDC Glenn Obama President Philippines China Walker twenty five forty hour