35 Burst results for "Polio"

Lee Zeldin: Kathy Hochul Does Not Want to Lock up Criminals

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:22 min | Last month

Lee Zeldin: Kathy Hochul Does Not Want to Lock up Criminals

"If you have a lick of sense, you'll put Lee zeldin in the governor's office. Are you tired of crime? In New York? Are you tired of Democrat politicians looking the other way? How about this? Are you tired of a Democrat governor who doesn't understand why it's important to lock up criminals? This was an actual exchange last night in the debate between the governor by accident, Kathy hochul and the Republican challenger Lee zeldin. I mean, listen, I stated that the first day that I'm in office, I'm going to declare a crime emergency and suspend castles bail and these other pro criminal laws because there is a crime emergency. My opponent thinks that right now there's a polio emergency going on, but there's not a crime emergency. Different priorities that I'm hearing from people right now, they're not being represented from this governor who still, to this moment, we have halfway through the debate. She still hasn't talked about locking up anyone committing any crimes. Okay. Anyone who commits a crime, under our laws, especially with the change they made to bail, has consequences. I don't know why that's so important to you. All I know is that we could do more. I don't know why that's so important to you. To lock up criminals, my gosh.

Lee Zeldin Kathy Hochul New York Polio
Panel votes to add COVID shots to recommended vaccinations

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Panel votes to add COVID shots to recommended vaccinations

"A panel of vaccine experts has voted to add COVID shots to recommended vaccinations On Norman hall a panel of vaccine experts says COVID-19 shots should be added to the list of recommended vaccinations for kids and adults The panels unanimous decision has no immediate effect COVID-19 shots are already recommended for virtually all Americans rather it would put the shots on the annually updated formal list of what vaccinations doctors should be routinely offering to their patients alongside shots for polio measles and hepatitis The expert panel's decisions are almost always adopted by the CDC director and then sent to doctors as part of the government's advice on how to prevent disease I Norman hall

Covid Norman Hall Polio Measles Hepatitis CDC
Gates Foundation pledges $1.2B to eradicate polio globally

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Gates Foundation pledges $1.2B to eradicate polio globally

"The Gates Foundation wants to end polio worldwide In an announcement Sunday at the world health summit in Berlin the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation pledged $1.2 billion to help implement the global polio eradication initiative strategy through 2026 the goal is to end the polio virus in Pakistan and Afghanistan the last two endemic countries The group is also working to make national health systems stronger so countries are better prepared for future health threats I'm Shelley Adler

Gates Foundation Polio Berlin Pakistan Afghanistan Shelley Adler
"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:55 min | 2 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"On their heels for the midterm elections. I talk with the Democrat who serves as House majority leader steny Hoyer. But first, we've had COVID-19 in New York. We've had monkeypox, and now we're talking about polio, something we have not heard about since we were children, New York governor Kathy hochul has now declared polio estate disaster, so I turned to an expert to find out what we need to know. Doctor Monica Gandhi is Professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco, where she is associate chief of the division of HIV, infectious diseases, and global medicine. This is a what's called an enterovirus and it's fecally orally spread. So we actually secreted in our stool. So it means that in the sewage system, there is spread of polio, luckily there's been only one case of paralytic polio in the state of New York. This is on July earlier in July in an unvaccinated young man who had traveled to Europe. But at the same time, thank goodness you're a scientist. I'm not. Can one case a rise in wastewater from multiple counties? That seems unlikely. No. So what happened is that likely there has been spread of polio because we have lower rates of vaccination than we should. Unfortunately, especially in the state of New York, there are some counties in New York that only have a 30% rate of vaccination in young children. Is that right? I find that remarkable. Isn't this the DPT shot we all get when we're a little? Yes, so we get it as, you know, young infants, this is an inactivated polio shot. We only get what's called inactivated or killed vaccine. This was made by salt a long time ago, Jonas Salk. And we get that as young children in less than two year olds in some counties, we have a less than 40% early vaccination rate with polio. Some others are 60 higher in Manhattan, higher in different places, but there's variability. We've had a massive setback in childhood vaccinations during COVID. To generalize here, does this often for religious reasons? Well, I think that there are four reasons that this has happened. There have always been polio outbreaks and less vaccination in some orthodox religious communities. But no, unfortunately, this is two widespread. This is likely from multiple reasons. One is our extensive school closures did not help in terms of people having to show proof of vaccination when they went to school. Second is kind of closure of medical school or medical care and people feeling frightened to go to medical care during COVID pandemic. And unfortunately, we've had an erosion of trust in public health over the years of the COVID pandemic that erosion of trust we're sitting at 32% of Americans trust in the CDC as of the latest poll. We need to work on building back trust. Boy, this is really revelatory to me. I must say, so this sounds like we need a vaccination campaign not for COVID-19 or even monkeypox book for polio now, at least in New York. That is correct. In the state of New York, we might need massive rollout of messaging on polio vaccination. By the way, we need some measles vaccination, messaging as well. We had a small outbreak in Arizona recently. So it is time. The UNICEF and WHO has estimated that we had 25 million infants miss out on lifesaving vaccines during the COVID pandemic for all the reasons that I told you, it is time to work on vaccine preventable illnesses and children. So you're a doctor. You're not a politician, but is this need to be having at the federal level at the state level, local, where's the most effective place that you can operate to make sure that we turn this around? You know, a lot of good messaging on vaccines comes from the community level. So it comes from the local level communities messaging to communities. So different communities, not just doctors, but this is like coming from the community saying, hey, let's rotate polio. By the way, polio was on track to be eradicated worldwide. That's how well we were doing before this. So it really involves community based messaging, local communities, people who look like the communities they're talking to and going out and talking to communities and absolutely from the pediatricians onwards because even as adults, we can tell people, hey, if you hadn't been vaccinated as an adult, please, please get vaccinated now. The paralytic polio case was in a 18 year old who had never been vaccinated. So it's tragic. I mean, we all remember the stories of polio and for that matter, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, things like that. But it's not contagious, particularly, right? It's not like an infectious disease in that sense. Well, it's spread again fecal oral. So I'm going to be, you know, graphic was fecal oral mean, you know, taking in water that's been contaminated with feces. And so if we didn't have clean water supply, it actually could spread quickly. We actually have clean water supply in this country. So I doubt we're going to be getting it from drinking water. We could get it from someone close in a household if we ended up having contact with their water, their stool. So it's not contagious in the same sense at all. Like COVID-19, which is, of course, respiratory spread. This needs unclean water. I'm going to say this is fascinating. I'm learning a lot here, but let's go back now for a second to COVID-19. And where we are on the bivalent vaccine, the need for that, where we are and trying to get ready for the fall. Yeah, so, you know, I think it's great that we can design a vaccine that the mRNA is directed towards VA form BA 5 BA 5 is the most prevalent strain that we have. I will say my personal opinion along with Paul offit who's a vaccine in Pennsylvania is that we need to focus more on older people getting this because we need to clarify what we need to do for COVID going forward. We're never going to get rid of COVID. I'm so sorry. It's not a radical like polio is

polio New York monkeypox governor Kathy hochul Monica Gandhi division of HIV, infectious di COVID steny Hoyer Jonas Salk University of California San Francisco Manhattan Europe CDC House UNICEF Arizona
Poliovirus detected in more wastewater near New York City

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Poliovirus detected in more wastewater near New York City

"Poliovirus has been detected in more wastewater near New York City I Norman hall New York governor Kathy hochul says the state is stepping up its polio fighting efforts because the life threatening virus was detected in the wastewater of yet another county in the New York City area Health officials began checking for signs of the virus and sewage water and of the first case of polio in the United States in nearly a decade was identified in July in rockland county which is north of the city The latest detection involved a wastewater sample collected last month in Nassau county on Long Island directly east of the city State health officials say the sample is genetically linked to the polio case from rockland and provides further evidence of expanding community spread I Norman hall

Norman Hall Governor Kathy Hochul Polio New York City Rockland County New York Nassau County United States Long Island Rockland
"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:09 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"As a stopgap, the WHO, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the UK's national institute for biological standards and control have come together to develop a new oral vaccine that is far more stable than previous versions, reducing the likelihood of the attenuated virus used in the drops ever reverting to its virulent state. And dino pavlovsky, who was part of the team that designed the vaccine, explains that it works by targeting the spot on the viral genome that is responsible for reversion to virulence. In existing OPV, that part of the genome needs to go through just a single mutation to go from being harmless to dangerous. What we basically did was modify this sequence, he says. So a single point mutation can not cause reversion. A virus now has to go through four or 5 different changes before acquiring a more virulent phenotype. Basically, it's a numbers game. As andino pavlovsky earlier described it to the journal nature, it's like putting the virus in an evolutionary cage. The vaccine that contains that caged virus went into use in March 2021, and so far, 450 million doses have been administered in 22 countries. The new vaccine is as effective as the previous one in generating immunity, says andino pavlovsky and is able to stop the silent epidemic. The goal ultimately is to drive polio over the cliff to extinction, as smallpox was in 1980, with a slow phase out of all OPV, universal use of IPV and the eradication of any form of polio virus circulating anywhere in the world. The current return of the disease is a reminder that that job is not nearly done until it is an old scourge will haunt us anew.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundat national institute for biologi dino pavlovsky andino pavlovsky UK polio smallpox
"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

03:52 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The advantage of the OPV is that it's easier and cheaper to administer, which is why it's used in global eradication campaigns. The big disadvantage is that on rare occasions, the weakened vaccine can revert to its virulent strain. That can potentially lead to the disease in the person who received the vaccine and even if it doesn't, the reinvigorated virus is shed in feces, entering wastewater and potentially infecting other people. For that reason, the U.S. switched to the IPV exclusively in 2000, even though cases of viral reversion were exceedingly rare. The crude estimate was one in 3 million doses of oral vaccine administered would lead to a case of polio in the U.S. before 2000. Schaffner says. It's rare, but it's not inconsequential. Indeed, it's not. Genetic sequencing revealed that the virus that caused the recent cases in New York and Jerusalem and was found in wastewater in London was so called circulating vaccine derived poliovirus. CV DPV. So far this year, CV DPV has led to 535 other cases of polio in 18 other countries, according to the global polio eradication initiative. But the IPV has its problems too in addition to its comparative difficulty of administration. The OPV, since it's taken orally, establishes what's known as gut immunity. Assuming the person who receives the vaccine is not among the unlucky few in whom the virus reverts to its virulent form, there is no viral replication in the intestinal system and thus no virus shed in the feces. The IPV protects the recipient from ever contracting polio, but does not prevent intestinal replication and spread if that person ever picks up a CVD PV. And dino pavlovsky believes that sampling wastewater in any part of the world where the IPV is used would likely turn up some circulating vaccine derived poliovirus that IPV recipients contracted, replicated and shed. Endangering unvaccinated people. In Europe, in America, in Australia, every place where people are using the inactivated vaccine, it is likely, he says. A new vaccine even with the drawbacks to both vaccines, getting vaccinated is obviously better than not getting vaccinated since all vaccine recipients are protected against contracting symptomatic polio. But the OPV and IPV do exist in a state of tension with one producing vaccine derived virus and the other contributing to its spread. For that reason, the WHO and other global health organizations call for an eventual switch over to the IPV exclusively a move that would mean there would be no vaccine derived virus to be picked up and shed at all. We need to stop giving the live virus so it stops circulating, says Maldonado. That, however, is not practical at the moment, not while there are still millions of babies and children who need vaccines in the developing world where the IPV remains too pricey and skilled vaccinators who can administer injections are in far shorter supply than field workers who require little special training to administer drops to the mouth.

polio U.S. Schaffner dino pavlovsky IPV Jerusalem symptomatic polio London New York Europe Australia Maldonado
"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:47 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"There's something about our species that just allows us to forget about the importance of these things. That can lead to a slow erosion in vaccine compliance. Something that the numbers bear out in the U.S., nationwide, 92.6% of children are fully vaccinated against polio by age two, according to the CDC. Broadly speaking, that's an encouraging figure, but vaccination rates vary state to state and even county to county. In Oklahoma, for example, polio vaccination rates are just 79.5% and in South Carolina, the figure is 80.3%. In the rockland county zip code where the case of polio turned up in June, the vaccination rate stands at an alarmingly low 37.3%. The COVID-19 pandemic has also played a role in the return of the disease. During the COVID era, families didn't see their doctors or pediatricians as frequently as they normally would, says doctor William schaffner, Professor of infectious diseases at Vanderbilt university school of medicine in Nashville, Tennessee. That has resulted in children falling behind in their routine vaccination schedules. According to Maldonado, the falloff has been minimal, with just a 1% decline in polio vaccination rates among children since the pandemic began. But when it comes to infectious diseases, even a single percent can matter a lot. It translates to tens of thousands of kids who aren't completely vaccinated, Maldonado says. And those children are at risk for diseases that really shouldn't exist in well resourced countries. The vaccine paradox, the irony of polios comeback is that the very vaccination campaign the CDC estimates has prevented 16 million cases of paralysis and 1.5 million deaths since 1988 is also partly responsible for the new resurgence. There are two kinds of polio vaccines. The first, known as the inactivated polio vaccine, IPV, administered by injection, uses a killed virus to familiarize the body with the disease and primate to recognize and attack a live virus if it ever encounters it. The other known as the oral polio vaccine, OPV, administered by mouth, uses an attenuated or weakened virus that can do the same job of priming the immune system without actually causing the disease.

polio COVID William schaffner CDC Maldonado rockland county Vanderbilt university school o South Carolina Oklahoma U.S. Nashville Tennessee paralysis
Polio in US, UK and Israel reveals rare risk of oral vaccine

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 3 months ago

Polio in US, UK and Israel reveals rare risk of oral vaccine

"Poliovirus is recently found in New York Jerusalem and London were mutated versions of viruses that first originated in vaccines meant to stamp out the disease However rare scientists have long known that the oral vaccine made with the live virus can spread polio We are not going to eliminate polio from this world until we stop using the world polio vaccine Doctor Paul offit director of the vaccine education center at the children's hospital of Philadelphia says here in the U.S. we no longer give the oral vaccine with the live virus but the injectable containing the killed virus however in other parts of the world like poorer countries Much easier said than done because it's an expensive thing to do And it requires the kind of paramedical personnel that can give a shot In New York and unvaccinated young adults suffered paralysis in his legs after being infected with polio Doctor offit stresses everyone should be getting the injectable polio vaccine to keep themselves protected I'm Julie Walker

Polio Paul Offit Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Jerusalem New York London U.S. Paralysis Offit Julie Walker
"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

04:15 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"The U.S. declared the disease officially eradicated in 1979 thanks to widespread vaccination. But polio is back. On July 21st, the New York State Department of Health announced a case of polio in an unvaccinated man in rockland county. Poliovirus has since been found in wastewater in both rockland and neighboring Orange County, as well as in New York City. The development has led to justified alarm. Even a single case of paralytic polio represents a public health emergency in the United States, right a group of researchers in a report published August 16th in the morbidity and mortality weekly report. The bottom line is that anyone who is not fully vaccinated against the disease should get up to date on the shots immediately. Here's what to know about what polios reemergence in the U.S. means for your health. A brief recent history of polio as recently as 1988, polio was a worldwide menace endemic in 125 countries and causing an average of 350,000 paralytic or lethal cases each year. According to the World Health Organization, WHO. It was that year that the world health assembly established the global polio eradication initiative with the goal of wiping out the disease just as smallpox had been officially eradicated in 1980. The means to the end of polio would be the same as it was for smallpox. Worldwide vaccination. The strategy has worked extraordinarily well. Today, polio is endemic in just two countries. Afghanistan and Pakistan, which have seen just 18 cases between them so far this year, according to the initiative. But there are problems with that overall success story, and they involve the vaccination campaign itself. What is vaccine derived polio? There are two types of polio vaccine. The oral polio vaccine, OPV, which, as its name suggests, is administered by drops to the mouth, and the inactivated polio vaccine. Which is administered by injection. The IPV uses a killed poliovirus to familiarize the immune system with the disease and primate to react if it ever encounters a living virus. The OPV uses an attenuated virus. Weakened to the point that it can do the same work of priming the immune system without actually causing the disease. The big advantage of the OPV is that it is cheaper and much easier to administer, making it the vaccine of choice for mass inoculation campaigns. The disadvantage is that on exceedingly rare occasions, the weakened virus can revert to virulence, causing the disease in the person who received the drops or allowing the revived virus to be shed in feces of the infected person and circulate in wastewater, leading to the possibility of so called vaccine derived polio in others. The reversion to virulence is rare. Since 1988, an estimated 18 million cases of polio have been prevented by vaccination and 1.5 million lives have been spared, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC. Since 2000 reports UNICEF, 10 billion doses of OPV have been administered worldwide. Measured against those numbers, vaccine derived polio is low risk, with a total of 540 global cases so far this year, not including the U.S. case and a recent peak year occurring in 2020 when 1100 cases were reported globally. Typically, there are far fewer cases in a given year.

polio U.S. smallpox New York State Department of H rockland county rockland world health assembly Orange County World Health Organization New York City Afghanistan Pakistan U.S. Centers for Disease Contr UNICEF
"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Siegel. And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. New York City health officials are reacting to the finding of the virus that causes polio in New York City wastewater, more from Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. Susanna polio is preventable and health officials are encouraging people to get a polio vaccine if they have into already. This as the virus that causes polio has been found in New York City sewage samples, suggesting it is spreading. And this is according to city and state health departments. Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. There are new details about the condition of author Salman Rushdie, who was stabbed on stage Friday in western New York. His agent tells ABC News that rushdie is on a ventilator and can not speak and will likely lose one eye. The award winning writer has been the target of death threats since the publication of his 1988 book that satanic verses. Valerie Haskell witnessed the attack in chautauqua, New York. He actually went at him at least ten to 15 times. A 24 year old New Jersey man Haiti matar was taken into custody. Mary Eric Adams signed a 6 bills Friday aimed at expanding abortion excess. The legislation includes a mandate for clinics operated by the Department of Health and mental hygiene to provide free abortion medication. It also prohibits the use of city resources to detain people for performing the procedure and forbids city agencies from cooperating with out of state law enforcement about abortions performed in New York. Early voting for the August 23rd primary begins today and will run every day until Sunday August 21st. That's next Sunday. For early voting times and locations, visit the New York City board of elections website at find my poll site dot vote dot NYC. Global news 24 hours a

Denise Pellegrini polio Bloomberg Susanna Palmer New York City Susanna polio Siegel Valerie Haskell Haiti matar Mary Eric Adams Salman Rushdie New York Department of Health and menta ABC News chautauqua New Jersey New York City board of electio NYC
"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Brad Siegel. And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. New York City health officials are reminding you that polio is preventable through vaccine, and they are encouraging prevention is the virus that causes polio was found in New York City wastewater. And this is after being discovered in wastewater in rockland and in orange counties. Mayor Eric Adams has signed 6 bills aimed at expanding abortion access. We get the story on that from Bloomberg's Charlie poet. His administration is seeking to bolster the city's status as a haven for women from states with severe restrictions on the procedure, the legislation includes a mandate for clinics operated by the Department of Health and mental hygiene to provide free abortion medication. It also prohibits the use of city resources to detain people for performing the procedure. Bloomberg's Charlie pellet. St. John's university announced yesterday its Staten Island campus will close in the spring of 2024, this due to decreased enrollment. We get more about that from Bloomberg's Denise Pellegrini. Susanna, the university says the COVID-19 pandemic made a study decline at the Staten Island campus force, but as sailor also reports since the university will close its Staten Island doors in 2024. This means that juniors, seniors and graduate students, will still be able to complete their degrees there without issue. And the university says degree completion plans will be drawn up for current freshmen and sophomores. And this could all include financial assistance for them to finish their studies on the queen's campus instead. Susanna. Bloomberg's Denny's Pellegrini. Well, the S&P 500 marked a much watched milestone on Friday. It's gained back half of what it lost between its January peak and its low in June. The gage has also logged its fourth consecutive week higher. Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Suzanne Palmer. This is Bloomberg

Bloomberg Brad Siegel Susanna Palmer polio orange counties Mayor Eric Adams Charlie poet New York City Department of Health and menta Charlie pellet St. John's university Denise Pellegrini Staten Island COVID rockland Staten Island campus Susanna Denny's Pellegrini S Suzanne Palmer
"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:25 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Now In New York State officials are urging residents to get vaccinated against polio, concerns rose after one case was reported last month, and traces of the polio virus were detected in wastewater in two New York counties north of New York City. Jennifer nuzzo is Professor of epidemiology and director of the pandemic center at the Brown university school of public health. Doctor nuzzo, thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. So the virus was detected in water samples back in June. What does that tell you about whether this disease could and has spread? While the fact that we've found it in water really confirms what we already feared when we found the one case of polio, which is that this virus has likely infected many more, possibly hundreds more. We know that because we found the case of polio in a young person, that person, unfortunately, experienced paralysis. That is something that happens one in 200 cases, one in a hundred cases sometimes. And so what that means is that there are many more people likely infected with this virus. And that suspicion was confirmed with finding it in the wastewater. That person was unvaccinated and that particular area where they lived is well known for a lot of vaccine hesitancy, vaccine resistance, how effective is the polio vaccine? While the polio vaccine, particularly the one we use here in the United States, if you're fully vaccinated, that's not really something that you have to worry about contracting. But we very much worry about people who have not been vaccinated, particularly children living in that area because they are now potentially being exposed to this virus and as we've seen, the virus has the ability to cause paralysis, which is a really terrible outcome. So we very much worry about people who are not vaccinated and had communities have been fully up to date and their vaccines. We likely wouldn't be seeing this sort of thing happening now. And the counties were talking about north of New York City, rockland, and orange, only about 60% of two year olds are vaccinated there, is that enough to achieve herd immunity? No, it's not enough. And, you know, this is not just a problem limited to those counties. This is something that we're seeing worldwide now, where vaccine coverage is not what it needs to be. Some of this was because of vaccinations being put on hold due to the pandemic, but some of it is because parents, you know, unfortunately are not convinced of the benefits of vaccines. My hope is that seeing this very serious outcome will cause some to change their minds and get their children vaccinated, but it's absolutely urgent that we focus our efforts on making sure that happens. So you said in a tweet that it's not surprising that we're hearing about another emerging disease while still dealing with COVID-19, you said serious infectious disease threats are the hazards of our time. What do you mean? Well, you know, for many years people have been saying to me, it seems like there's always some new disease. We just keep hearing about these things more and more. And the reality is they are all the data that we have suggests that the frequency with which new diseases are emerging and causing serious outbreaks are increasing. So that's why we're going to see things like COVID-19, the virus that causes COVID-19. We're going to hear about things like that more frequently at the same time, global conditions are making us more susceptible to viruses that we didn't used to worry about, declining vaccinations, making polio once again a concern. We're also dealing with monkeypox here in this country, many countries that weren't previously areas that monkeypox would endemic now dealing with monkeypox and that's just a condition of global travel increased susceptibility. And also limiting our attention for the last few years, just focusing on one virus and not paying attention to the smaller events that have happened. So these sorts of things are going to keep happening. And we have to make sure we have systems in place to deal with them. It's incredibly challenging right now for health officials who have been understaffed for far too long under resourced coming out of very stressful COVID-19 pandemic, dealing with monkeypox and now also having to think about polio, possibly circulating. So we need to make sure we have enough resources in place that we can respond to possibly multiple emergencies at a time in hopes that they don't get out of control. You mentioned that not only is COVID-19 still rampant, but also monkeypox has appeared in the U.S. and Napoleon, is it possible to prioritize those for you in terms of concern? Can you sort of triage which is the biggest worry? Well, I mean, COVID-19 is still represents a deep concern but fortunately we have vaccines and diagnostics and tools, what we need to make sure is that everyone avails themselves of those. So the level of concern for COVID is not the same as it was two years ago. Polio is a deep concern for communities that are not vaccinated, highly vaccinated. And so that remains an ongoing concern. Monkeypox is quite worrisome to me because, you know, it really was a virus that we should have been able to contain much more quickly than we have and people are suffering a great deal of pain when they contract the virus fortunately. It hasn't killed many people yet, but we shouldn't wait for more deaths. So we should act. So I would say that they're all important, but the level

Polio monkeypox Jennifer nuzzo pandemic center Brown university school of pub nuzzo paralysis New York City New York infectious disease threats rockland U.S. Napoleon
Polio fears rise in New York amid possible community spread

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Polio fears rise in New York amid possible community spread

"New York State health officials are upping their call for residents to get vaccinated against polio citing evidence of community spread They're describing it as the tip of the iceberg in a statement New York health commissioner doctor Mary Bassett warns residents that for every one case of paralytic polio observed there may be hundreds of other people infected The polio virus has now been found in wastewater samples in both rockland and orange counties both known as centers of vaccine resistance fast it is urging the community to get it to keep from suffering the fate of an unvaccinated young adult who developed paralysis The first person known to be infected with polio in the U.S. in nearly a decade Doctor Jennifer nuzzo is an epidemiologist with Brown university This is not the first vaccine preventable illness we've actually seen in rockland county and just before the pandemic there was a very large measles outbreak in brocklin county Also due to low vaccine coverage Infected people could have no symptoms but still transmit the polio virus which can cause paralysis and even death I'm Jennifer King

Polio Mary Bassett Orange Counties New York Jennifer Nuzzo Rockland Paralysis Measles Outbreak Brown University Brocklin County Rockland County U.S. Jennifer King
"polio" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

03:27 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Now, I like to think squawk box is newsworthy every day, but the amount of coverage that this moment got dwarfed are regular media profile. This was talked and tweeted about a lot. Most of the headlines start with the blue boxers naturally. Key phrases like, man in underwear, or video bombs, certainly tell the story. Here's my favorite. Man in blue boxer shorts makes brief appearance on CNBC's squawk box. Now, Carrie's husband actually was playing in a golf tournament and didn't know just how much attention this unexpected live TV moment had gotten until hours later. And he didn't look at his phone. Left his phone in his car or in his golf bag, whatever. But people were amused. It was more. I'm using a relatable or gosh. This is what happens when you work from home. But you started your career working with the legendary fund manager, Peter lynch at fidelity. Is this the most notice you've gone for something in these last couple of days? Well, it's certainly the most social media. But I'm just amazed at how many people have been interested in it. I mean, seriously, it's not the greatest thing. Even though your friends are writing things like, hey, you know, David looks like he's in good shape. And I said, you know, we can just joke about it. It's not anything that's going to be determining the course of events in our lives. We'll just joke about it and birthdays and anniversaries. A sign of the times of life in the 2020s and you just have to laugh. Exactly. I posted a picture. I tweeted it a very wearing a pair of boxer shorts. And it says, Perry's new line of loungewear boxers by springers. Well, Carrie, thank you so much. Thank you for laughing about it on the squawk box staff. We all just, you know, it made our day. There, but for the grace of God, go I think I know. Well, thank you very much. And you know, I will say that scene we see has been very, very nice and understanding. You know, we can sort of have some levity and move on. So I appreciate that. Appreciate your talking to Katie. There you have it. What it's like to survive going viral. Thanks to Carrie firestone and her entire family for their grace in good humor. We are honored that will be a part of firestone, family lore for many years to come. To see a picture of Perry, the beautiful Springer spaniel, check out Carrie's Twitter feed, her handle is Karen, underscore, firestone. And thanks for listening today. Squawk box is hosted by Joe kernan, Becky quick and Andrew Ross Sorkin. On TV, tune in weekday mornings on CNBC at 6 eastern, or check out this podcast anytime, squawk pod is available for free download wherever you listen to podcasts. We will meet you right back here on Monday, have a great weekend. We are clear thanks, guys. This is where capitalism was created in our country. Bringing med money to the New York Stock Exchange is like bringing it home and I can't wait to bring it to you. Not money at the end where you see weeknight 6 eastern CNBC.

Carrie CNBC golf Peter lynch fidelity Carrie firestone Perry firestone Joe kernan David Becky quick Katie Andrew Ross Sorkin Karen Twitter New York Stock Exchange
"polio" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

04:38 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Bring you this row? All right, these are my grandchildren, yeah. Carrie is a veteran of doing markets analysis wherever she is, especially throughout the pandemic at the office at home, on Cape Cod with her family, and her shot, by the way, is gorgeous, well framed, evasive hydrangeas. She's on CNBC multiple times a week and has a special tablet set up just to be on TV. I'm very, I would say technically capable of putting bad cast anywhere and hooking it up to the network remotely and there's a camera. They see me, they tell me to move it left or right up or down and it all works smoothly almost all the time. It started with the dog, and then Carrie firestones appearance turned viral. It was funny and incredibly relatable. And actually, let me play it for you here. It's right now to weigh in on the market. It's carry firestone as you can't hear it. I can't hear it. Let me get the audio. Although I have heard it. Look at Citigroup on one side, you look at JPMorgan on the other, and you've got to make a call, which is it. Well, today I thank you. Your root with the pretty normal segment, right? We're talking about the fed. We're talking about markets. Right, exactly. So the short term prognosis, we have so many different investors. A minute in, things get a little more interesting. Technical analysts and others just say, okay, some are might be fine. We have two dogs. They're Springer spaniels. They're very active docs. I take them out for at least a mile walk at 6 a.m.. Sassy was in her crate, Perry was downstairs where she very often is lying on a sofa. And there was no problem when I hooked up to do the segment. And then all of a sudden, she starts barking, and it was annoying, you know? Andrew makes a nice joke. I see we have dogs another guest that's joining us. Dogs are the dog. We appreciate that. This is the dog days of summer. People. You could hear it. I knew the audience could hear Andrew could hear it. I apologize. Let's talk about it that way. We were talking about this. I'm sorry. Don't be sorry. You know, we love this. It just adds to the sort of there's a live show. And my husband, David, was in our bedroom. He had been out to go fishing at quarter of 5 a.m., so he had gone out, come back, and he was in bed. Except he didn't stay there. The dog seemed to think that the dog days. Right here. Yeah. Here he is. A gray haired man wearing just a pair of blue boxer shorts enters the left side of the frame and heads immediately down a staircase right behind Carrie. It was over in seconds, but long enough to register exactly what happened. Just shows how. My husband is a wonderful guy, and he heard the dogs and he thought she's trying to talk. I can't sleep. I think she's talking to CNBC right now. And I'm going to just get carried to stop barking. Ran out went downstairs to get her to stop barking. And went right through the view of the camera. There's a moment where you sort of smile as though, oh my God, what is happening right now? Well, I heard the footsteps. I knew he had come out of the room. So something was going on. And I was not going to turn my entire head around. At which point I would have said, David, you're in the shot. And we control it well. Pricing. Perry. Harry. Perry. Well, like a pro. Gary, you finished the segment. Got all the way through. Got it. I appreciate it. Sorry about that. No. It's under our bank. This went a little viral. When did you realize that? I began to get text messages right away. And they all said, more or less the same thing. A nice job, you handled it like a pro, it was seamless. You didn't get flustered. It was all complementary without in fact saying David was walking behind you in his boxer shorts. And then I got a call from CNBC saying, you know, by the way, there was a little hiccup this morning, you know, with the video, and I heard the word video not audio. Oh, one of my sons said, mom, this thing is like blowing up. It's going viral.

Carrie CNBC Cape Cod Springer spaniels firestone JPMorgan Perry Andrew Citigroup Sassy fed David Harry Gary
New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

New York reports 1st US polio case in nearly a decade

"New York is reporting the first case of polio in the U.S. in nearly a decade State health officials say an unvaccinated young adult from a New York City suburb had developed paralysis Polio symptoms developed a month ago Doctor Jennifer nuzzo is at Brown university This isn't normal We don't want to see this And it's really a consequence of low vaccine coverage or lower than we'd like to see vaccine coverage The person is no longer deemed contagious Doctor nuzzo says if you're vaccinated against polio don't worry But in communities where vaccine coverage is low then we do worry about spread Vaccination clinics have been scheduled in New York polio was once one of the nation's most feared diseases mostly affecting children because of vaccines it was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 1979 I'm Ed

Polio Symptoms Jennifer Nuzzo Polio Nuzzo Paralysis Brown University New York New York City U.S.
WHO considers declaring monkeypox a global health emergency

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 5 months ago

WHO considers declaring monkeypox a global health emergency

"The World Health Organization's convening an emergency committee to consider if the spiraling outbreak of monkeypox weren't being declared a global emergency Declaring the disease to be a global emergency would mean the UN health agency considers the outbreak to be an extraordinary event and that the disease is at risk of spreading across even more borders possibly requiring a global response It would also give monkeypox the same distinction as the COVID-19 pandemic and the ongoing effort to eradicate polio however many scientists doubt any such declaration would help to curb the epidemic Since the developed countries recording the most recent cases are already moving quickly to shut it down I'm Charles De

Monkeypox World Health Organization Covid UN Polio Charles De
Ukraine Ed Sheeran-Sheeran Intro and Wrap

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Ukraine Ed Sheeran-Sheeran Intro and Wrap

"Ed Sheeran's benefit concert for Ukraine may include some local talent the concert is next week in Birmingham England Sheeran got a request through tick tock hello at greetings from Cape wearing combat gear with the bomb building in the background was terrace to polio and two other soldiers via Ukrainian positions of the Ukrainian band until I one of the most popular recreate in bands to polio says his band wants to play during the concert from Keefe we are not afraid to play under the bombs through music we want to show the world that Ukraine is strong and I'm concurrent ensure and responded to the band and to all Ukrainians I love you I stand with you and I'm so proud to be playing this fundraising event next week I call it's checking his account to go isn't sending lots of love to Polian says entity like he is ready we will fight and sing for victory in front of the whole world I'm a Donahue

Ed Sheeran Polio Ukraine Sheeran Birmingham Cape Keefe England Polian Donahue
"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:29 min | 9 months ago

"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"For asking me to be here Well we'll do I have to have you And the first question we have is if this polio virus hasn't shown up in Africa in years where did this case come from Well as you noted in your intro this is a case of wild polio and there are only two places in the world at this point where wild polioviruses still circulate They are Afghanistan and Pakistan and by studying the genetic sequence of the virus that was isolated from the little girl in Malawi They could tell that this virus had come from Pakistan The sequence looked most closely like viruses that were circulating in Pakistan's Sindh province in October of 2019 I see And when we say wild virus what do you mean by that So while viruses the original polio virus or the family of viruses that the world has been trying to eradicate since 1988 There's another type of poliovirus the eradication campaign uses an oral polio vaccine which contains live weakened viruses and over the years it's been seen that at times if those viruses if you vaccinate in a community but you don't vaccinate to a high enough level those vaccine viruses actually spread from child to child There are some advantages of that because you don't have to reach every child Some of them will be sort of indirectly vaccinated But as they circulate they can regain the power to paralyze And those are called vaccine derived polioviruses So that's the difference And wild viruses the original poliovirus and vaccine derived viruses are the other type I see So polio thankfully has been largely wiped out in wealthier countries but still pops up from time to time as you say It's wild only in Afghanistan and Pakistan So what's the reaction been from world health experts about how big of a deal this might be for Malawi And the rest of the world Well it's definitely bad news I mean Malawi hasn't had a wild polio case since 1992 so you know 30 years That's not something that they would have wanted to have seen How big a deal it is remains to be seen Teams of investigators from other parts of Africa and from abroad the CDC for instance in the United States has sent people They arrived in Malawi just in the last few days and are starting to try to determine if there have been any other cases that hadn't been detected and in fact they're going to be looking in neighboring countries as well Helen just briefly What does this new case mean for the effort to eradicate polio around the world Well it complicates it for sure At present wild polio cases are down to very very low numbers Last year there were only 5 cases reported anywhere one in Pakistan and four in Afghanistan The numbers have never been that low Now to find a case in a distant part of the world and in a part of the world that thought it had gotten rid of wild polio and so maybe has let down its guard a little bit that's not great Also as you can imagine many public health programs were affected during the pandemic vaccinating kids didn't happen at the rate that it should normally have happened So it's a bad time for this to be popping up and it remains to be seen how far it will spread but it is not good news Helen branswell an infectious disease in global health reporter for our partners at stat Helen thank you Nice to talk to you And later this afternoon on all things considered the number of people calling themselves Native American on the U.S. Census has soared in recent years and that has some native communities worried that.

polio Pakistan Malawi Afghanistan Sindh Africa CDC Helen United States Helen branswell infectious disease
Dr. Robert Malone Breaks Down the Science Behind Vaccines

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:29 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Robert Malone Breaks Down the Science Behind Vaccines

"What is a vaccine? How is a vaccine supposed to work? And what is special about the mRNA vaccine technology that you developed doctor Malone? So what is a vaccine? The CDC and their infinite wisdom has redefined the meaning of that word just like the meaning of the word anti vaxxer has been redefined as anybody who is against vaccine mandates. So you're right in this nuanced area of nomenclature. I prefer I'm among other things. Yeah, I've had all this training, but I was a Carpenter and a farmhand before I was a physician and a scientist. And I do like to go back to let's try to use plain language. So for me, a vaccine is as a vaccine does and what a vaccine is intended to do is to elicit an adaptive immune response against some threat, whether it's cancer or of a virus or a bacteria or a toxin. Et cetera, to protect against disease and in the case of infection against infection and spread. In replication in your body. So that's my definition of a vaccine for what it's worth. What is a vaccine used for or intended for? I think it's useful to think about vaccines as having different types or categories of a sneeze in a minute. Here it goes. Bless you. Thank you very much. So no, I don't have COVID. I've already had it twice, and I've been vaccinated. But I do have health. So it's useful to think about vaccines in different categories. There's the cancer vaccines will park those because that's not really relevant. Live attenuated vaccines are basically viruses that are tweaked in some way either intentionally or through passage evolution. To make them less likely to cause disease in humans, but still elicit a very strong immune response. So examples of those include the oral polio vaccine, the smallpox vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine. All of those are fairly wicked and have risk of causing disease in your body because they're still live viruses. They're just tweaked, so they're less disease

Infection Against Infection Malone CDC Cancer Polio Smallpox
The Argument All Parents Can Use When Questioned About Vaccinating Their Children

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:30 min | 11 months ago

The Argument All Parents Can Use When Questioned About Vaccinating Their Children

"Again, it's unity project online dot com. If you're a mom, you're a dad, you're a parent and you're concerned and you're like, what can I do about these vaccine mandates? Well, they have resources right here from scientific papers to data analysis to ethical legal and social issues, they have a toolbox, which is really great. I'm just slipping the website right now. And all about supporting science, the conversation, quick links, online petition, to downloadable letter to schools to the parent non consent form to the downloadable flyer. A lot of stuff you guys put a lot of work into this. Congratulations on that. All right. Thank you. So you are the general counsel of this effort. So parents will say, all right, I'm all on board, but then I think I have my mind changed because the argument they always use is, well, you gave your kids the measles mumps rubella vaccine, didn't you? Which is rather an insult to anyone's intelligence. Every vaccine that's currently mandated, for instance, in the state of California. And it's the same kind of throughout the nation. Has had a minimum of a decade of study. Most of them have had at least 15 years before they were mandated. And those vaccines actually eradicated the underlying viruses, like polio, like measles, like mom's rubella, which we can not say about the COVID-19 vaccine, can we? We all know that it will not prevent infection or transmission. To even call it a vaccine by that virtue is nearly a joke. In addition to that, those underlying viruses with the other vaccines had actual significant risks for the entire population, especially the pediatric population, for instance, I think there was a 30% mortality rate with measles. 10% with chickenpox. I can go on. But what's very important is the fact that those other vaccines didn't pose the severe risk that we are finding are not in fact rare. That this particular vaccine is causing in children. We are not seeing the death that we saw. In fact, there's a report from who that shows that all of the vaccines combined throughout history throughout the world. Over the last I think it's from 1968, 53 years have had a million less deaths than just this past year from the COVID-19 vaccine. That should be astounding in a scientific world where if you have 50 deaths from any particular medical treatment, that product is

Measles Mumps Rubella Rubella Polio California Chickenpox Measles Covid
CDC Changes Definition of Vaccine

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:19 min | 11 months ago

CDC Changes Definition of Vaccine

"So here is from the Miami Herald. Why did the CBC change its definition of vaccine? Did you know that? Yeah. CDC is utterly corrupt utterly. There's no question that so it will be recorded historically. Social media is calling bluff on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. I can't believe this is in the Miami Herald to be honest. For modifying its definition of the words vaccine and vaccination on its website, before the change, the definition of vaccination read the act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease. Now the word immunity has been switched to protection. Get the switch. The term vaccine also got to make over the CDC's definition changed from a product that stimulates a person's immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, which is why I read to you. From the Internet to the current, a preparation that is used to stimulate the body's immune response against diseases. Stimulate the body. So it doesn't confer immunity. They've changed it, as I said. When you get vaccinated against smallpox, is it too minimize the effects of smallpox? You get a little smallpox, a little measles, a little chickenpox, a little polio. That was at the toll to us? Or will we protect it from it? Were we better excuse me? Immune to it. As I said at the beginning, on The Crown may be a godsend. Maybe, I don't know. I never make or rarely make predictions, but it may be, it may be a godsend. Because it's for the vast majority of people that is not serious. And yet it will confer on them natural immunity. And yet, the lockdowns around the world are continuing.

Miami Herald CDC CBC Smallpox Chickenpox Polio
"polio" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on WGN Radio

"As we see it change over time it's definitely keeping us on our toes So we are the vaccines that we have will probably protect not as well But they will protect you a lot more than not having them That is for sure So it's not an on off switch It's probably going to be a degradation of your initial response And the booster is really helpful because that will not only increase the amount of immune response that you have but also refine it So that's why now everybody 18 over is recommended to get a booster I know that viruses are very simple organisms In fact some would argue that they're not really alive at all They're really very complex molecules which can replicate themselves but we're used to the notion of getting a new flu shot every year because the darn thing changed on us and what worked last year may not work this year On the other hand and maybe this is just a lack of reading enough but I don't remember hearing all about all the HIV virus variations that are remembered listening to all of the polio virus variations are viruses getting smarter or did I just miss all the coverage of all the variations that we used to have Well that's a great point because I've said this often that if this had pandemic it happened ten or 15 years ago we would not be having this conversation about the different variants We would be the variance would be discovered eventually and it would be in a nice scientific paper ten years in the future The amount of information that we can have really quickly about any virus sample is so much more so much better than any other point And so we are able to focus on these changes in the virus as it sweeps across the globe And that's a great thing because it should help us to create better vaccines better drugs but it does mean that we have these periods where we are talking about am a crown without really knowing just how much of a danger it's going to be More to come One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo are number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 with professor ziji quick granville and immunologist senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins center for health security and an associate professor in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health One 8 6 6 5 O Jimbo is our number one 8 6 6 5 O 5 four 6 two 6 What are we to make of this a Macron variant of COVID-19 terms which three years ago we would have said what are you talking about Today well we hope we do know what we're talking about We'll be back in a moment Now through December 31st 2021 for every $50 gift card purchase at The Cheesecake Factory dot com or at any of The Cheesecake Factory restaurants you'll receive a $15 promo card redeemable in the new year Visit The Cheesecake Factory dot com for more details I struggled with symptoms like frequent gas and stomach pain for years I was bloated all the time with daily diarrhea At first I thought it was what I was eating I kept thinking it was stomach issues So I did my research and talked to my doctor and we finally.

polio ziji quick granville Johns Hopkins center for healt flu HIV Jimbo Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school Cheesecake Factory diarrhea
8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 1 year ago

8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

"8 things that children are more likely to die from than COVID. Cancer significantly. Almost 20 times more likely vehicle accident suicide homicide. Cardiovascular disease drowning flu and pneumonia. We live in a world with numerous threats. It's part of existence. And there's also a false promise in safetyism, too. There's a false promise and you see this in the people that are vaccinated, which has always been one of my complaints about the way that they've been pushing the vaccine is it gives people a false sense of security. And no one wants to talk about this. The false sense of security of someone who gets vaccinated, and then they believe they can resume regular life, and then all of a sudden they have a breakthrough case, and they don't know what to do. They thought they had the protection. They thought they had the same sort of protection that they would get from the measles mumps rubella or polio vaccine. And all of a sudden they get a breakthrough case and they get caught by surprise. Maybe they would have made different social decisions. Maybe they wouldn't have gone to big gatherings. Maybe they would have handled things differently. Maybe they would have prepared themselves with azithromycin Ivermectin hydroxyl chloroquine, monoclonal antibody treatment centers or aspirin. Instead, there is a false sense of security that comes in with the overemphasis of we as the government we as the CDC we as NA 8 NIH we as the medical industrial elite, we're going to protect you. And what it does is it erodes what it does is it diminishes its suppresses humans own responsibility to take ownership of their actions. It's a false sense of security. When in reality, our leader should have said, look, if you want to get this vaccine fine, we're going to be very honest about what it can do what it can't do. But also, if you get it, you better be ready to treat it. We're now 70% of all deaths in the United Kingdom are vaccinated people. Why? They had a false sense of

Measles Mumps Rubella Cardiovascular Disease Pneumonia FLU Cancer Polio NIH CDC United Kingdom
"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"In sight I remember my mother being careful so she pretty much kept us at home It was as though people had shut themselves up in their houses trying to hide from an unseen and deadly enemy not daring even to venture upon the streets But I had been wanting to pat my 5th birthday party at our local amusement park It was just a small little part And I think that's where I caught the polio The day before I got sick my neck was kind of storm my throat was sore But I went to bed and went to sleep and when I woke up at heart really bad I couldn't raise my head off the pillow and I could hear my dad in the bathroom brushing his teeth and my mom was putting the laundry in the dryer so I just kind of wanted to lie there and listen to that for a little while Because I knew once I tell them about this it was going to be very different After a few minutes I called him in there and I just told him I had polio As epidemics grew in community after community a steady stream of victims was rushed to hospitals then women children Especially children I was in with the isolation it was in the top room of the hospital I just deteriorated real fast I turned blue from lack of oxygen So then they determined to put me in the.

polio
'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 1 year ago

'We Are Now Worse Off Than Before the Experimental Shots'

"Daniel Horowitz for the blaze dot com says the data is in. And we are now worse off than before the experimental shots. Now this is a thought crime. In October of 2018, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health published a report that if one did not know better, Mike make readers think the authors were involved in gain of function research that likely created the Fauci virus. The report was titled quote technologies to address global catastrophic biological risks. Risks. It offers novel social control and mRNA vaccination ideas to deal with emerging pandemics. Whether naturally emerging or reemerging deliberately created a released or laboratory engineered and escaped, that could lead to sudden extraordinary widespread disaster beyond the collective capability of national international organizations and the private sector control. One of the many bone chilling sections in the publication Daniel Horowitz writes, provides a blueprint for quote self spreading vaccines. Describe his vaccines genetically engineered to move through populations in the same way as communicable diseases. But rather than causing disease, they confer protection. After noting that such an idea would violate the rules of informed consent and possibly spread allergic reaction, they add this shocking prediction about the challenge of such technology Daniel horwitz writes, finally, there is not an insignificant risk of the vaccine virus, reverting to a wild type virulence. As has sometimes occurred with the oral polio vaccine, which is not intended to be fully virulent or transmissible. But which has reverted to become both neuro virulent and transmissible in rare instances. This is both a medical risk and public perception risk, and the possibility of vaccine induced disease would be a major concern to the public. Daniel horwitz continues by saying, whether this vaccine actually sheds the spike protein onto other people, is still not yet proven. Although Pfizer seems to indicate it can spread through skin to skin contact rather than inhalation. But the principle of mass vaccination with a faulty vaccine making a virus both more transmissible is something that is hard to deny at this

Daniel Horowitz Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Daniel Horwitz Communicable Diseases Mike Vaccine Induced Disease Polio Pfizer
"polio" Discussed on The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

"With younger mouse. Okay is i feel like that's not the answer you're not answered it. I'm just like yeah. I don't know now christians. there's so many questions. It's so gruesome in fascinating. Was there any negative effect on the younger mouses behavior like it's not like they swapped bodies but didn't just start acting old again no no not at all. It seems that whatever was going on the effects were much greater if not exclusive to you to the little. Old dudes got well. Listeners will have to get a digital copy of the youth issue to learn more. I suppose it's a great feature. It's definitely a lot of great stuff in there. Yeah go cat. So what was the weirdest thing we learned this week i think the blood transfusions for me it is. It's hard to be. It's a wild story ride. There was a lot to intact this sabotage. Yes i would you know. I'm ready for the upcoming true crime. Podcast all about that arsenic situation. So oh my god so listeners. That is it for our bonus episodes for now you will see us again in your feed for season five of the weirdest thing. I learned this week in late october. Very exciting but in the meantime get your tickets for. Tonight's livestream show september twenty first tuesday seven. Pm eastern link in the show notes. You definitely don't want to miss it and we will be back soon. The weirdest thing. I learned this week is a popular science. Podcast where available on all major podcasts platforms. So subscribe wherever. You're listening now. And if you like what you hear. Please review us on apple. Podcasts it helps others find the show for more information on the stories. You heard in this episode. come find us. At pops dot com slash weird. You can buy our merch including weirdest thing. T shirts tote bags at mugs at upside dot. Threatless dot com. The show is produced by all of our hosts including me. Rachel men with editing and audio engineering just boaty. Our theme music is by billy cabin. If you have questions suggestions or weird stories to share tweet us at weirdest underscore thing. Thanks for listening weirdos..

apple billy cabin Rachel
Rep. Chip Roy: Biden's Language on COVID Response Is Always About Others Than You

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Chip Roy: Biden's Language on COVID Response Is Always About Others Than You

"Doing. So I've got it. We're gonna force the boosters. Soluble. They're going to force you to do And by the way, it's all purposeful to say it's to help other people because they don't want to make it about you. Because then it's about freedom for you to make a decision about a mask or about a vaccine for you or your loved one. No, no, they want to make it about. You must do that for the other people. Even though there's no science to back that up. We all know that you can communicate the dengue virus. Even if you've been vaccinated. Remember, they move the goalposts on that. Right. Originally, it was all Oh, no. Well, you know, it's going to protect you from being able to communicate the disease. No. Then they found out. That's not the case. So now there's a well you've got to do it just to make sure that everybody can be taken care of. It's absolutely outrageous. And the booster stuff in the FDA is particularly telling that you've got experts there that are quitting over it, and that they're voting against what Biden. He does because here's the thing Chip. You can support vaccines as I do and oppose tyranny. And that's the point they support tyranny. And support vaccines. We support vaccines and opposed tyranny now De Santis is even pointed out. I'm pulling this up now. Broward County. In Florida. The anti body doses are being were being distributed 52% of the patients and a whopping 69% of the patients over the age of 60 had been vaccinated. Yep. So yes, and and the sentence has said I recommend you get vaccinated. Yes, but it's not enough. I mean, I got to have these and I've got to have these therapeutics if I want to use them. And now they're cutting them off. And look and add on top of this. You know this? My dad had polio. Okay? And I love my watch My dad his whole life. I'm very pro vaccine for for when we know what it is, and you make a decision. That's good for you and your family. But if you've got natural immunity, there's evidence that maybe you shouldn't get it right. Or maybe you're think so. I think you're right.

De Santis Biden FDA Broward County Florida Polio
Freedom Has Been Thrown out the Window With Vaccine Mandates

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Freedom Has Been Thrown out the Window With Vaccine Mandates

"Learned this weekend that there are christian colleges requiring vaccine proof to attend and i thought to myself. This is christian. Overtly christian colleges by ola was mentioned. I thought what world have we entered when the basic ideas of freedom have been thrown out the window. There is so much fear. I mean again. I didn't mean to talk about covert but it's almost funny to me. People act as though it's the bubonic plague it's polio. It's something i i know. So many people who've had it and recovered quickly and yet we have christian colleges kind of participating in this because their idea of freedom doesn't seem to it just doesn't seem to reach into these things and i think that's part of the cancel cultures that people don't really have the they don't have the The american values Deepen them where they understand. We can't do this. We can't do that but it has entered the churches. I could give other examples where people are wishy washy. They don't really know what they believe. They go along to get along. I'm absolutely against vaccines. I mean i read recently. And you don't know what to believe and i haven't had a chance to research at the twelve. Thousand people have died from the vaccine. I had very very mild case of covert that a guide on on an airplane. Some when i got absolutely exhausted and ran down my immune system. But i was better in two days so now i have the immunity. You know for me. I say people can make a decision. They should have control over their own body. They ought to be able to decide. I'm concerned that the government is just imposing everything. They're using health to try to push regulations on us that before they would not have gotten away with. This is not the blue bonnet plague when it first happened. We didn't know but within a week or two we could tell it was bad but it didn't even come close to be that bad. In fact as it goes through the population the death rate is really very very small and and the people who die probably would've died. A lot of them are very old they would have died within a matter of months of something else

OLA Polio Plague Government
Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Rep. Chip Roy Asks to Adjourn House After New Masking Rules

"Look you you've You've had we've been talking about mask. Mandates for practically this entire show because the idea that we're going to start imposing mass mandates on the vaccinated is just ridiculous and it's counterproductive to getting people on the right path to the end of this pandemic which is universal voluntary vaccination so that we can put an end to this thing. They are talking about in fact they are imposing a mask mandate in the house of representatives. You had a fiery speech about this. Tell us a little bit about what's going on there and what your objections are. Well look i mean. Let me first start very crystal clear that i'm pro vaccine. My dad had polio. He's lived with the ravages polio his whole life And i'm very glad that my children myself Other americans have been able to develop cells polio vaccine. And we're so blessed we've had two hundred. Ninety billion americans get maximum aided for cova think about that one hundred ninety million in seven months. We had an extraordinarily rollout. Thanks to the efforts by president trump which were opposed by democrats. Remember them closed. My democrat even have the vaccine. Now we have one hundred. Ninety million americans have been vaccinated when you include the people who've already had the virus. We're at something like eighty percent of all people over eighteen years old. I have some form of immunity led to keep working on that. Let's keep making sure that american people are free but now they want to force people to either be back stated by force or they want to force people to wear masks and on the floor of the house of representatives. Nancy pelosi wants to make everybody wear masks again. Despite the fact there's no data to back it up they're hypocrites. Dc mayors hosting weddings and parties without masks and reinstated. The mass mandate you see The mayor only had twenty seven people in the hospital when she lived into mask mandate of a couple of months ago. There were ninety people in the hospital where this is all show and politics and by doing it you're weakening freedom importantly you're causing people to say wait wasn't how was the purpose of getting the vaccine. You guys are insane. You don't know what you're talking about. It and i think it's harming america.

Polio President Trump House Of Representatives Cova Nancy Pelosi America
Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

BrainStuff

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Is Vaccine Hesitancy a New Phenomenon?

"The vocal anti vaccination movement is fairly recent and was really kicked into gear in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight by a now discredited paper that appeared in the medical journal lancet which falsely linked vaccines with autism however vaccine. Hesitancy is as old as vaccines themselves. How stuff works also spoke with dr katherine edwards. The author of an american academy of pediatrics clinical report called countering vaccine hesitancy and she said this has been going on for centuries and pointed to a cartoon published back in eighteen o to the depicts people growing cow-like parts this was in response to edward jenner pioneering smallpox vaccine by using material from cowpox a medical historian by the name of elena kanas wrote in a twenty fifteen in the american historian that the first smallpox vaccine quote was met with enthusiasm but also dread while many patients and physicians were eager to fend off air as most feared diseases. Many others balked at the prospect of contaminating their healthy bodies with disease matter from an animal. And then when european countries began making smallpox vaccines mandatory. And the early eighteen. Hundreds she wrote that quote societies of anti vaccination assists formed to protest what they saw as unequal treatment and undue infringement of individual liberty. But they didn't get much traction. There was also little protest against the polio vaccine which was released in nineteen fifty four to wild enthusiasm in america according to conus she wrote parents so dreaded polio that they were quick to seek the vaccine for their children and course of politics never became necessary but as the decades went on american parents. Were not so excited about vaccinations for measles mumps and other diseases. She noted perhaps because people were used to living with these diseases.

Medical Journal Lancet Smallpox Dr Katherine Edwards American Academy Of Pediatrics Elena Kanas Edward Jenner Autism Polio Measles Mumps America
"polio" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

07:17 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Help and once the vaccine was available, they suddenly had a new role to play. And after this incident, which was called the cutter incident for cutter Labs, the CDC scientists became more and more visible as a voice of authority and expertise, Polio vaccination and then subsequently, vaccination. Generally, we have AH, video from 1991 of Jonas Salk. He became, of course, a global celebrity Asai understand much to his chagrin. On and here he is talking in 1991 about the development and some of those manufacturing process problems just so people can see and what he looked and sounded like and within a matter of 10 days, two weeks After went into production, and it was in into use. It was a report of cases of polio caused by the vaccine. There was no such encounter in the field trial on it was counted on Leah's herself of the VAC. It's the vaccine from one particular laboratory vaccine was suspended. Its use was suspended for a period of short period of time, reintroduced again after the that problem was isolated in that vaccine was Let's destroy all the others were used and thinks that one proceeded in old fashioned. That's just an example of some of the hazards right One has to deal with particularly at that level of experimentation. So a couple quick questions about that. Is it true that he did not ever seek a patent on his polio vaccine? Yeah, that is true, And he publicly said that he didn't believe that. Ah, Patten was the morally responsible thing to do. But he believed that the vaccine belonged to the people and he saw the vaccine is kind of crucial to health and well being. S o right if he did not, As far as I know, take a patent. It's also worth kind of wrapping back. He was in intense competition with Um especially Albert Saving, who in Cincinnati was leading another team of scientists who were developing a different type of vaccine. One that used a live weakened version of the polio virus and sock was was devastated by the cutter incident. Relieved to say the least when it was resolved. But there was this constant tension. Once Albert Savon's vaccine came to market this constant tension between the two over which was the better product in which should be the prevailing polio vaccine for the country. They each had different advantages and disadvantages. And in fact to this day, we still use both of them globally, although in the global polio eradication, which is seeking to eliminate polio in the last few remaining countries where it's present We tend to use Savon's vaccine, which is administered Orly and requires far less boosters. In other words, no shot and far fewer ghosts is the last recorded case of pulling the United States after that 1955 introduction was 1979 what took so long for it to be eradicated in the United States? That's an interesting question of historian would phrase it very differently would say, Wow, that was fast If you think about it, the smallpox, the first smallpox vaccine Was developed in the late 17 nineties. And I think the last smallpox case in the U S, I think was 1948. So for polio that timeline seems quick, compressed relative to smallpox. What happened with polio to give you kind of a big picture view of what what transpired after the first vaccine was approved. There was so much involvement in so much activity in the first few years after socks vaccine was improved that vaccination rates and coverage were it skyrocketed. Millions and millions of people got vaccinated in those first couple of years and polio cases plummeted. Between 1955 and 1957. Then what happened? After 1957 was he started to see this kind of gradual. Departure between those who had the means they could afford the time and the money to take their kids to the doctor. On an annual basis. For instance, they know Stayed up to date on the news and followed expert advice. These people continue to get their kids vaccinated, while other people either who didn't have the means or warrant aware of the need. Um, we're getting their kids vaccine that a far lower rate and so in 1958 and 1959 you start to see polio pieces creeping back up just a little bit, but starting to creep back up and then start seeing outbreaks and these air predominantly happening in poor communities in urban areas, where Um poor communities are living in proud of conditions and are Out of reach of access to health care and don't have routine visits to doctors, for instance, and in those areas. CDC, epidemiologists and others start to realize that people just aren't getting backstage at the same rate. So we had this sort of push and pull throughout the late fifties into the sixties and by the seven years Polio vaccination was really widespread among Children, and by that time we had enough immune adults that it became most important to focus on Children, and we were capturing them at that point, largely through laws that required vaccination for school. In the 19 seventies, However, it gradually became clear that the remaining cases of polio in the country where those caused by the live virus vaccine Which sometimes lead to community transmission of polio virus as the virus was, shed said, for example, in the fecal matter of Children So we then started to move away from that vaccine and switch back to the Salk vaccine and effectively finally got to a place where we had no more polio in this country. So we have about 10 minutes left, and I want to spend that last 10 minutes talking about the lessons for today. Let's begin with President Trump just a few days ago, talking about the development of vaccines. Tremendous progress is being made on vaccines. In fact, we have ready to go in terms of transportation and logistics way have over two million ready to go if it checks out for safety..

polio polio vaccine Jonas Salk CDC cutter Labs Asai United States Leah Albert Savon Cincinnati Albert Saving Patten President Trump VAC shed
"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's widely recognized as the leading US voice on controlling the Corona virus. Pandemic. Thank you very much for your time today. Good to be with you. Thank you. His doctor found. You just mentioned there's a lot to learn from disease outbreaks of the past polio ravaged the globe for decades, the virus infected and paralyzed millions of people worldwide. The world's A lot of Gordon reports. Some lessons from the response to polio are being applied today to the Corona virus pandemic. Rama's first is Canadian. He lives in the Yukon, but he was born in 1980 in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu. That's where he got polio is an infant. The virus paralyzed my legs for life. As a result, he has no like muscles. Thanks to surgery's a leg brace and a cane. He can't get around on his own. And so I propel myself forward just through the strength of my arms or the swing of my leg. Ferris is 41 now has gotten around a lot. He's traveled the world as a polio activist with Rotary International. If you look at any photo of him posing with world leaders Queens and presidents, one thing stands out. He's always wearing shorts. The reason why is because people don't know what polio is, unless they see my legs right? It's like a forgotten about disease writes out of sight out of mind like Covad 19. Polio is a contagious virus. But it spreads through contact with infected poop through contaminated water or food. In the 19 eighties, vaccines for polio existed, but the virus was still a constant threat and more than 100 countries. 1988 global health leaders set out on a super ambitious plan. They created an initiative to eradicate polio once and for all. I mean, for me was a very exciting moment. Incredible moments. Michelle Saffron was director of that initiative. Up until last week. He just retired, he says, the only other disease the world had ever eradicated. With smallpox, so this polio plan was a big deal. But polio requires meticulous tracking. Just one infection can easily spread, so they wanted to build the public health infrastructure to deal with that we've had to put in place. Sort of civil system, which has been much more sophisticated. The initiative set up new labs.

polio Pandemic US Ferris Rama smallpox Covad Gordon Queens Michelle Saffron Yukon Rotary International director
"polio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"StoryCorps. His son, Jeffrey Sherman, talked about how evac seen sparked the creation of one of his father's most famous socks. My dad always filtered everything down to its simplest form. People thought maybe he wasn't listening. But he would always listen. And then he would form his words very carefully. Words were like his Religion. He brought word builders on my mom and dad's honeymoon. My mom complaint. He wanted to just no words. And he loved the sound of words and how they felt on your tongue. My dad and uncle had a favorite song that they had created for Mary Poppins called the Eyes of Love. But while Disney said, could you write something that's more in line with the philosophy of Mary Poppins? And it was all just falling flat. They're both really depressed. Well, it happened that that day. I was at school. I was about six years old. And they were giving us the oral polio vaccine, you know, wasn't the shot. So I you know, stood in line with all my friends, and we all just took this thing. And then I got home and my dad looked depressed and all the shades were closed. It was very dark in the house. And I said Oh, we had the polio vaccine at school today and he looked at me he goes. You let someone give you a shot at school. Did it hurt? I said no, no, no. They took out this little cup and put a sugar cube in it and then drop the medicine and you just ate it. My dad looked at me and start shaking his head. And he went over to the phone and he called Dick and told him he had something. And the next day they wrote a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go.

Mary Poppins polio vaccine Jeffrey Sherman Dick Disney