39 Burst results for "Polio"

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Lewis and Logan

Lewis and Logan

02:19 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Lewis and Logan

"Improvement there where these drugs in these cocktails that they're coming up with are very effective. Against it. It's weird how so many People get it and don't even have any symptoms. You know that Senator Chuck Grassley, Iowa? Yeah, 87 year old kind of crabby old man. I heard he got cove it and I was thinking Oh, man, this is gonna be bad. He said he had no symptoms. He's already back at work totally asymptomatic at 87. Yeah, I mean, it's it's It's a very strange virus. Just it, you know, effects people differently. Yeah, It's weird. You just don't know And some and some people just have some symptoms very slight and get right through and other people get really ill. I know that's why it's so tricky. That's right. Right. Christian in Fort Collins is next on cable news radio 10 48 on this one's they had Christian Hey, guys, You guys are awesome. Always love listening to you, Um I just wanted to. I mean, let me be very clear Upfront. I'm I'm not a physician or a scientist, and I don't even play one on TV. So I'm like, you know, I don't have credentials. Speak very intelligently about this, But just from what I know, I think part of the hesitation that people have about this vaccine is number one. It was It was so rushed, You know, I mean, typically, vaccines take two or three years to develop, You know, a level of efficacy that's gonna be Uh, you know, really? Make an impact. But given the how how severe this pandemic was across the whole globe. I think that expedited the development and the R and D on it, but But beyond that, um Again, just to my limited knowledge, these corona viruses, which it's not the only kind of corona virus we've ever had to deal with. But It's kind of like a flute in so far is a vaccine is not 100% effective, You know, I mean, you You almost have to project Certain it's almost like a speculative vaccine like it. There are other diseases again on just to my knowledge that vaccines are almost 100% effective against preventing like like, you know, measles or Polio or those. And and there's a There's a specific distinction you could make between those. I don't I'm not. Smart enough to know the exact Science behind it, but But those behave differently and thereby react differently to vaccines and can be like Just, uh Annihilated by a vaccine once once there's enough People that have it. It just disappears. But is Corona viruses? Uh, Can Evolves or change enough to wear a vaccine may not have the level of Effectiveness that I think some people think this vaccine would have. And and and then the passions come out where people say. Well, how dare you say you would never get the vaccine? Well, Don't know. I mean, is it? I'd like to hear some more. You know, kind of layman's terms. Explanations about what the What you can expect. If you get the vaccine is it 100% effective like it Z just a force field. I don't think Christian Christian. I don't think any any vaccine is 100%. 100% effective and thanks for the call, and that's that's what we're talking about. Now. I mean, would you take it? I'm not to the point. That I could definitively say yes. If one were available to me What? I absolutely today sign off on taking it. The answer to that question today for me would be no Not right now. I'm also not saying I would never take one. I just want to see I just want more information. I want to see how this thing sort of plays out and there have been vaccines. Obviously, over the years that have been very effective. I don't There's nothing that's 100%. You're right. But measles Which was a big big deal in the end of utilities. There was a vaccine license that 1962 and the numbers dropped off dramatically by 1993 such outbreaks at all but disappeared now measles kind of coming back. Because people not getting vaccine vaccinated for it. Polio was a big deal and that dropped off in 1955. Um, um. And I don't know if you ever hear about polio anymore. Not much. Tetanus. Tetanus. They say they only have about 10 deaths annually. Protect this so that vaccine really works smallpox. The last U. S smallpox case occurred in 1948. So kids no longer need to be immunized from that. So, yeah, Vaccines can be very effective. It's take Jeff and dinner next time, Kay away. Good morning, Jeff. Hey, Good morning, guys. Thanks for taking my call. Um, I had a question, and, uh, I was just kind of you know, it's maybe illegality issue, but I figured I'd just grab your insight on it. Um, I think everybody is aware of, you know the HIPPA laws. And I'm just kind of curious. Is it in your opinion? Is it like a violation? Every time somebody you know the media or anybody announces that somebody tested positive are they kind of violating hipper rights And what's your thoughts on that? Um If you are not that they have anything out. You're basically you're kind of intruding, not attorney. But you know what? The word of you? Yeah, I was like, I think that it's okay to the broadcast that, but If you were to have anything else, you know you could. Someone could actually sue them for for saying that. Yeah, I don't. I don't know. I'm not sure if that would be the case. I think most times when people Talk about others that have tested positive That information comes from the person who was tested. So I don't know that..

Polio Measles Tetanus Senator Chuck Grassley Iowa Fort Collins Asymptomatic Jeff Scientist Hippa Attorney KAY
Childhood vaccination rates have dropped during the pandemic

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:52 sec | 6 d ago

Childhood vaccination rates have dropped during the pandemic

"This year, according to data from Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. And chief of infectious disease that Lucille Packard and professor of pediatrics and health at Stanford, Yvonne Maldonado says it's a situation that worries her. We really need to keep up with that, because the timeliness of visits will really affect spread of disease, infectious diseases. These are preventable diseases, including measles, hooping, cough and polio. We know that something like herd immunity is really important in some of these vaccines that just for the child's benefit, But for the Grand parents on D Again. These airs data that I have been shown by CDC and others to be a big risk not just to the individual child but to the family members. The majority of vaccination postponements occurred March through May when the pandemic was taking hold, and then again in August, the typical back to school time Marty Schafer, KCBS South

Blue Cross Blue Shield Associa Lucille Packard Yvonne Maldonado Infectious Disease Stanford Measles Polio Cough CDC Marty Schafer
Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Vince Coakley

Vince Coakley

00:38 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Vince Coakley

"For the good thing about Madonna could be stored it plus 41 F for 30 days. That's one big minus 94. Support shipping. It sure does And then storage has to be still in the negative temperature range. Modern is a big difference that they're both two shots, but Madonna can be stored it eight could be shipped at minus four. That has can be stored at 41 F than a regular refrigerators. That's a great deal, and that's for 30 days now. The European Medical Authority over there. I don't know this forest time frame, but they do have a lot more legal liability placed on the company and actually on some of the trading reports last night around nine o'clock, it said it would be three weeks a year. May would take three weeks, but all of a sudden Through all the traitors out this morning because they got six in the morning. Came out with the announcement. Yeah, they were bumping it up to now, Um And a safari herd immunity, a dust even dump that said This would take 60 to 70%. Vaccinated and you know, everybody knows that it's annoying a mutates. So you get that D 614. G mutation out there now, just like influenza. It was gonna be around and continue to mutate. But as far as that 60 70% of capacity 2nd 1.5 to 2 years before you have a global Effect while so long wait some time. One. I'm very curious to know because there you probably especially if you listen this program, there's a very negative perspective on On vaccinations. I I've had the conversation with a person just this morning was like, no, thank you. I'm gonna wait for other people to take this thing first. How about you? Are you? Are you gonna run out and take this a soon as you can. I will not tell you why. You know I've tried. I've talked to you before I trade my second half for 20 years. So really study and keep up with us. Another doctor. But you have AstraZeneca's called a adding a viral vector vaccine. It's made from a weekend weekend or dead version of the actual virus itself. Which I'm not that great on because there's been some really bad things as far as recently on polio vaccines. In Africa and so are in that area. Um Moderna. Bio in tech and care back the other German company that's really going to be better than Madonna. Okay, Their technology is entirely It's not a chemically based or in a s A one shot thing, and even Elon Musk is working with them to have these mini reactors set up to where they can produce the or in a compound. In any part of the country, just five mobile transportation facility, But that's that's another story. As far as the morning. I like that, because the synthetic drug it's not has nothing to do with alive or dead and a weakened version of the vaccine. It's made entirely synthetically. On and it just props your body. It does not enter to the nucleus. It prompts your body to make the proteins and the antibodies to fight the virus. So that's yeah, That's why I would take it. It's like an insulin. I mean, insulin is synthetic product. How many millions and millions of people are taking an insulin shot, which is another synthetic type drug. Are you concerned, and I'm sure you hear a lot of the conversation and skepticism. Are you concerned about how skeptical people seem to be that this is going to be difficult to sell to a lot of people in America? Well, I think it is and Dr Gottlieb was on face the nation. Um Sunday, talking about that, and Some other doctors. There's gotta be a nationwide awareness program that vaccines have been around a long time. I think you're always gonna have the people that we will refuse to take that as far as governmental action. I don't know what's gonna happen if you don't take it, but The vaccines are not like they used to be. You know, I could said everything used to be an adenoid. Vector. Vaccine, which These new ones the morning and yet, yes, it has to be proven it realistically, it takes probably a year and a half to two years and know the total safety. The efficacy is known now and the great thing I like about Madonna. And thither and reported it yet and y'all did report it because it's on the news that it achieved. 100% success. Preventing severe covered vaccine are covered 19, which Even long term. Nobody knows neurologically or upper lower respiratory. What's gonna happen from the effects of having that so just ability. I'm sure father will come out with that data soon, but the ability to percent prevent a severe infection is just a huge step. There is no question about that. Bob enjoyed talking with you out. In fact, hold on the line because we like to Get some information from you. This is gonna be AH, hot subject for discussion. There's no doubt about this. Not just for the next few weeks or a few months, Aziz, you've heard for the fact that how long this is going to go on. This is going to take some time, by the way, and I had the figure here. North Carolina. According to Advisor..

Madonna Um Moderna European Medical Authority Elon Musk Astrazeneca Influenza Polio North Carolina Africa Advisor Aziz Dr Gottlieb BOB America
Dr Fauci on herd immunity

C-SPAN Programming

04:40 min | Last week

Dr Fauci on herd immunity

"Dr. Fauci, what is herd immunity, and when do you expect the United States to get there? Well, herd immunity. You know, sometimes the the terminology is we use can confuse people. What herd Immunity means is that when you get a certain percentage Of the population that is protected against infection, either by natural infection, and we're not even close to herd immunity now as proven By the fact that we have had spikes in areas that have previous spikes, so the previous spike didn't prevent them from the subsequent spike. So herd immunity is when you get a large proportion of the population that's protected, which means those who are vulnerable and not either the vaccine doesn't work in them. They have a biggest susceptibility to getting adverse effects of an indelicate, eerie is consequence of the infection. The fact that you have so many people that are protected the virus. If you want to use a metaphor has no place to go. It's looking for vulnerable people, and most of the population is protected. That's how viruses die out. That's how we smashed measles. That's how we smashed polio. That's how we smashed smallpox. So that's the reason why you have an efficacious vaccine. You want to get his many people protected so that it's almost like if you have heard of strong animals. You see it in the movies about going into Africa and the beautiful scenery you see about herds of wildebeest or what have you You have the herd that's really strong. You have some weak ones in there. So when someone maybe the metaphorical lions trying to get in there and take care of the weak ones, the strength of the herd protects the vulnerable ones. That's what you mean by herd immunity. So it's a question of Two components and efficacious vaccine and getting as many people vaccinated as you possibly can. Those two combinations together, those two ingredients could protect everyone which gets to another important question that people keep asking. We've got to make sure we engage the community. To realize that the decision about the safety and the efficacy of the vaccine and the speed with which we did it. The speed was based on very exquisite scientific advances and an enormous amount of resource is that would put into operation warp speed to make this happen? There was no compromise of safety. Nor was there compromise of scientific integrity. Now we've got to get that was real. Yeah, the decision. I right, Go ahead. Now. Let me just say it. I didn't mean to interrupt this decision to say that this vaccine is safe and effective. The data were analyzed by a completely independent board. The Datum Safety Monitoring board, which in fact doesn't have to answer to the administration doesn't have to answer to the company. They're independent. They look at the data and they said in Both of those vaccines, both the Madonna and the and the Fiza that it is official efficacious and it's safe and to protect you, even against serious disease. Those data then get analyzed by career scientists that the FDA in association with an advisory committee that again is independent. When that decision is made. All of the data is going to be seen by scientists like myself and my colleagues, so the process is independent and it's transparent. So I know there's been a lot of mixed messages that maybe have come out. But one needs to appreciate that. This is a solid process. So when they say that the vaccine is safe and effective, if we want to protect the individual and all of our society, we should take the vaccine and I could tell you when my turn comes up. And the FDA says that this is safe and effective. I myself will get vaccinated and I will recommend that my family gets

Dr. Fauci Measles Smallpox Polio United States Africa Madonna FDA
Fresh "Polio" from Radio From Hell

Radio From Hell

00:47 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh "Polio" from Radio From Hell

"A chuck e cheese. So radio from hell on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook X 96. All right, 804 right now. Is this suspect, sir? Gina, Do we have any business? We're gonna take care of Yes. Injured in an accident. Everyone deserves an advocate. Call eight a 1355 55 50 or go to Utah advocates Doc, calm. We'll go to questions for Dr Kabul, but we should remind everybody we're still down at Ken Garff Chevrolet in American Fork dropped goods there for the road home. 5 48 east 1000 South. In American four. And since we're gonna be talking about face masks in this break, I'm sure Radio from hell and X 96 facemasks while they last That's Ken Garff, chef in American Fork when you make your donation, all right. All right, let's go to the phone. Dr. Kabul is here and our first question comes from Amy. Go ahead, Amy. Hi, honey. Um, my question is based off more than nature of the virus. My first symptoms was high blood pressure, and I had to be medicated for that. And six months later, I still have it and Working with the cardiologists. Is that it kind of shredded my brain, So I was wondering if you could Gonna go over how it's not so much a respiratory issues anymore and what it really is with. Inflammation, blood veins, etcetera, cardiovascular. Well, I think you you said it. Perfectly, You know, it's a vascular inflammatory response. So it effects any system has a large vascular supplies, so Even though it sort of viral respiratory illness. It can in fact anything and it's caught through the rest story about way but it can spread everywhere. Get blood clots. Heart attacks keep strokes. Cardiac inflammation. I've had people catch other viruses and get viral cardiomyopathy where they had to get a heart transplant in there 25 years old, so some people can get it. Terribly affected by certain viruses. And I think the key is just avoid catching this virus until the vaccines available, and we've seen similar things with measles and mumps and rubella and polio and Shingles and you know it can. You can really have devastating effects to people in their lives. I think My blood pressure's pretty common and if you didn't have any cardiac, any heart damage or inflammation around the heart. You used to have the high blood pressure should be easy to find a medication there over 100 different blood pressure medicines. I'm getting out my blood pressure cuff right now. I'm getting it out and putting it on right now. Is it just damage? You know I'm on blood person medications right now Train. Get better, but Is it doesn't cause permanent damage. In most cases, no an average person with high blood pressure's on 2.8 medications, so being on three is not unusual. Have activated sleep apnea. You should you know if you're snoring at night or not breathing at night, because again, this could be a pulmonary,.

American Fork Dr. Kabul Cardiac Inflammation Inflammation Ken Garff Ken Garff Chevrolet Gina Instagram AMY Utah Facebook Twitter Cardiomyopathy Measles Shingles Rubella Mumps Polio
Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

10:14 min | Last week

Bill Gates, the Virus and the Quest to Vaccinate the World

"Who gates welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show good to see you you lost. Join us on the show. I would say it was about seven months ago and seven months ago. Just like dr fauci. You said you will worried because you felt like the worst was yet to come a lot of people accused you of peddling fear and terror and now it appears that unfortunately you were correct. Here's my question to you. Why does it seem like we've become worse at handling the pandemic you know in europe in the us then we were seven months ago when seven months ago. It was so bad. Well there's a couple of things working against us. I is that with the winter when we're colder we. The virus multiplies more and more indoors. More so that is not a good thing and then there's a certain fatigue. Some of the things people have had to do in terms of staying away from friends. That's tougher i've to say this round. It looks like europe is getting better compliance with the restrictions than the. Us is so they're starting to see a downturn. When you talk about that compliance and when you talk about the downturn is part of the downturn like should we should we be looking at the virus cases or should we be looking at the deaths because i never know which one is more important than usual. Be like a million more people to me. Five million seven million and then you'll see some doctors saying yes but fewer people are dying from because we know how to treat it. How should we be looking at this virus and the fight that we have against. It's well the case is our leading indicator it is true that cases are translating into less doubts for two reasons. One is that the cases are more in the young people Who are less likely to be very sick. And the other is that the quality of treatment including some new drugs like decks method have been proven out so when you do get hospitalized you have a higher chance of survival but were predicted to go back to over two thousand deaths a day in the months ahead so for the next six to eight months news is mostly bad after that the volume of the vaccine will have kicked in and then we'll have a light at the end of the tunnel. Wow i mean the the question is then i think for a lot of people is like. How long tunnel. How bad does that tunnel get. And how do we stop it from being the worst possible tunnel one of the big things. A lot of people are worried about is going to be the transition between joe biden. donald trump. You know you've worked with governments all over the world working on their vaccine distribution working on healthcare around the planet. You know how important it is for one administration to talk to the next when it comes to Handing off on their plans. How much do you think this will actually affect america's response if if there isn't a transition well it's unfortunate that the current administration got tied into a positive narrative that you know we're turning the corner And that you now have this transition will make. The message is a little less clear. You know this is when you'd love to see the best. Cdc people on tv reminding us about social distancing and masks. You know particularly when there is that fatigue out there so leaders at all level. This is a chance to step up even on politicians. You know encouraging friends that hey we. We don't want this additional several hundred thousand deaths you know it'd be adjective. A person who dies know when the vaccine is absolutely on the way and so i think the good news should drive compliance not lacks laxity as somebody who's done work globally around healthcare for so long especially around infectious diseases. What have you found is the key to encouraging or convincing community members to buy into the measures that keep them safe where we had vaccine resistance with polio and they're getting the religious leaders to speak out have them a visibly vaccinating their own children for would like we'd never stopped polio in africa and yet now it's just been certified that we've gone three years without wild polio so activating the trust hierarchy and getting rid of the conspiracy political element to it and just reminding people you know in this case. It's about saving lives in that case it's about kids not being paralyzed people back to that. Very human impact. If we don't behave well. I think it will often come through. It's interesting that you bring up conspiracies because the conspiracy theories about you online have are insane on social media and social media has propagates them in a way where it's like bill gates is trying to create vaccines so that he can cook troll your minds and he wants to vaccinate. Everybody can implant change. People's dna is what they said. You're going to change our dna. So that i don't know we turn into something and then we work for you somewhere. I don't know the full story. I'm still learning it when you see these things first of all. Have you been able to track down where it comes from. And secondly have you. Even i know you think about these things you want to like the biggest thing because i hadn't even thought about like the motivation behind it because i'm always trying to figure out who benefits from a conspiracy theory and i'd love to know if you've put any thought to this at all because of how many people won't get a vaccine because they truly believe conspiracy theories yeah usually when you work on infectious disease like dr fauci and high do your your kind of obscure in a nobody talks about t be or or malaria so here we have this complete turnaround where vaccines and are they. Good for people are now front and center. And there's always been a small group of anti vaccination people and we see this with you know measles vaccine. They've now got a platform and they've sort of joined forces with some political and spiracy abuse and it's so easy to click on particularly when a simple explanation for this pandemic that there is somebody evil behind it. You know as somehow easier than you know the true biology which is actually kind of complicated so we have to make the truth more interesting. And you know we've got a label things with the truth and sadly the naievety about how to make social media work. Well is pretty strong. And that's coincided with the election and the epidemic. I wish i had the answer. But you know it's it's it's out there in big big numbers and hasn't it just keeps growing so when we look at the vaccine. Now i mean that's now the story you know. Now the world is waiting for the vaccine because the vaccine becomes the key that unlocks the doors. You say the lights at the end of the tunnel. The question then is how do people get the vaccine. How effective will the distribution method be and how difficult is will the vaccine short supply. The good news is that there's four other vaccines that are likely to get approved fairly quickly as well. The fact that pfizer worked so well makes us optimistic. That astrazeneca johnson and johnson vacs which those are much cheaper easier to scale and don't require that cold chain so we'll have a lot of scenes and we need to prioritize people. At risk elder people people working nursing homes and each country Will have to decide okay. Who goes first. That's still a little bit confused in the us but hopefully we'll get that straightened out very very soon because the vaccine is likely to be shipped a lot in the month of december as you said anti vaccine community has only grown over time. I think the us is now the biggest hub of anti vexes in the world it started as a fringe thing with measles now with corona it is fully fledged and because of politics it's been amplified so now you'll have some people who on the liberal side saying i don't trust that vaccine it was made under trump and then you'll have other people saying like i don't trust that vaccine that came from joe biden and the and the democrats trying to brainwash. It's a lot of people may not want to take the vaccine which may now go against everything we've worked toward. So how do you begin convincing people that the vaccine is safe like in the midst of this political crisis. Well it's clear that the fda through the professional staff. They're all the things that are supposed to do likewise pfizer. There's even an external committee that will weigh in just to make absolutely sure that the the political desire to get this quickly did not in fact the efficacy and safety review and i feel very confident because the people involved are are really doing their job. Well we don't need everyone to take the vaccine. Society will have to decide if there's some jobs like going to a nursing home in taking care of somebody's grandparents whether that person you know how strongly you encourage them to have a vaccine so they're not spreading seeing but with this level of efficacy if we can get to seventy five percent dosed then you'll block the spread of the disease with measles you'd have to get to like ninety five percent because it's even more infectious but the good news here is that we just need that maturity and i think as people see people taking the vaccine and they see that The side effects of any are very very rare. That confidence will build and that will be good for society because when you take the vaccine you're helping to protect other people.

Dr Fauci Polio United States Europe Joe Biden Donald Trump Gates Fatigue Measles CDC Astrazeneca Johnson Bill Gates Infectious Disease Africa Malaria Pfizer Johnson FDA
Fresh update on "polio" discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:15 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"This show switched full time to covering the novel. Coronavirus was in february was february. Twenty eighth our guest. That night was donald mcneil veteran award winning science reporter at the new york times. Mr mcneil has since been a guest. on this show. Several times he has covered epidemics and diseases all over the world for decades. He was the one who was reporting really the first byline in the us reporting early on before covid nineteen even had a name about the strange and very transmissible corona virus that was emerging out of wuhan in china. Mcneil was one of the first reporters to shock. Everyone in this country with his earlier reporting about how lockdowns and travel restrictions wouldn't just be for china implemented everywhere to control the spread of this thing donald mcneil coverage and his analysis from the outset. I will tell you as a person who digest a lot of the stuff It was considerably more terrifying than most of what else we were hearing at the time. But he really has been proven right over and over again over the course of this thing. That's why it was sort of shocking. As sort of felt like the earth shifted a little bit in october when always terrifying. Donald mcneil shifted himself to a very uncharacteristic more optimistic tone when he wrote hopeful pieces for the time explaining his hopes for the promise of vaccines under development of the vaccine apparently on their way now and donald mcneil is clear. Still quite bullish about them. But in today's times the top story in the front page of the paper he interviews two dozen public health experts around the world about the vaccines about how. That's gonna work when we get them and about what we should expect from now until significant numbers of people are vaccinated. What he's telling us to brace for now is right. There in the headline belong darkness before the dawn joining us. Now is donald mcneil science and health reporter for the new york times. Mr mcneil real honor to have you back with us. Thanks for making the time. Thank you for inviting me. And i'm sorry you had your own brush with covid with your partner. You know nothing more terrifying than knowing somebody who suffer from it and nothing more convincing i. I hope that knowing's covered. Unfortunately there's parts of the country is now parts of the country now are just beginning to seal that but anyways alright going to say no thank you for. Thank you for saying it. I will tell you that. I think that. I mean the reason i talked about it publicly. Even though it was kind of my guts for the world is because i do think that for myself and for a lot of people it is scary to imagine getting sick scaring to manage having to go to the hospital. How potentially dying from some sort of illness it is considerably more scary to imagine the person who you love most in the world going through that in front of you and you being helpless to do anything about it and for me it was an existential thing to see it in susan more so than it would have been for myself and i can't help but think that that dynamic that you're describing there in that i felt in doing that is a little bit of an important dynamic to understand in terms of whether or not people feel motivated to personally take action whether or not they've seen it whether or not it feels like it. It threatens the things that matter to them in every disease. I've ever covered a you know. It's a survivors. Who are the ones who get convinced. The true of aids true of aids in africa. The true polio is when you you know. It's often when you see your children get infected. You begin to realize that the diseases terrifying. And and when i was a child or parents were terrified of polio And that's why they accepted that vaccine as readily as they did even though there were disastrous with a believer. Vaccines there was even a bad batch that infected two hundred and fifty thousand kids and killed. So i'm optimistic about the vaccines. Because they seem to be the coming in much quicker than we expected Six months ago. I feel like i'm playing both sides of the fence in these These articles i was actually asked to write the optimistic one because an editor was in a meeting i was. He was so shocked a few months ago when i expressed optimism mason. You've got to right about that. And that was sort of a first person piece about my feelings. Long range but then after the election i was asked to write another reported piece talking to experts again about how they felt. Just about this period between the end of the election and when the biden presidency begins. And that's going to be our dark time okay. So so one of the things that i found very interesting and very constructive in your take on this forthcoming dark time is that it seems to me that the expert used the experts we talked to in. You have confidence in the people who biden has appointed to work on covert the people who has been listening to the people who've been advising him but you raise the prospect that he might need to start thinking about vaccine confidence he might start to have to think of thinking about disinformation might have to start thinking about other What we think of. As more social science things are psychological psychological work around getting the american mindset in order when it comes to dealing with this vaccine because through in the past year so has such a stark psychological component in terms of people. Either denying what's going on or being unwilling to take steps that will that the country's gonna need him to take. Yeah it's not just for the vaccine. It's so the virus itself i mean. We've really seen three separate saves in this virus. We saw the northeastern wave in the spring. We saw the summer way which was mostly in the deep south and our seeing along with the wave all around the country. We're seeing this wave hitting deeply into the red states. Killing people in states that voted heavily for trump the dakotas the brassica iowa wyoming be states are the ones that are being hit extremely hard by the virus and in effect you know that rhetoric has killed trump voter. The denial was killed trump voters. And they're now a high risk group and you know some people may say fine. They deserve it. I reject that kind of thinking. I think it's you know. They are victims of denial. Ism as much as anybody else says and you know the experts. I talked to her doctors. The doctors ethics is that you have to save the patient. Who's put in front of you. If you're combat doctrine mash unit. You have to save the wounded soldier in front of you. Even if he's a member of the enemy and we are in a situation like that now where it's important.

Donald Mcneil Mr Mcneil The New York Times China Wuhan Mcneil Polio Aids Biden United States Africa Mason Dakotas Wyoming
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

NBC Nightly News

02:36 min | Last week

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Drug. Giant pfizer requested emergency authorization today for its covid vaccine which it claims is ninety. Five percent effective. Tom costello has late. Details it's shaping up to be the fastest vaccine development and us history after forty four thousand. Volunteers rolled up their sleeves. Pfizer today became the first drug company to seek emergency. Fda authorization for a covert nineteen vaccine. We will continue. The work already underway to make sure we can begin shopping. The vaccine immediately after radiation. We're approval vaccine maker. Moderna also expected to its data soon putting both companies on track for fda clearance within weeks. We could have a decision from fda and within twenty four hours of that we will have started distributing millions of doses of safe and effective vaccine to begin protecting our most vulnerable across america. Here are five key steps to authorization. The vaccine trials include at least thirty thousand people who are diverse in race age and risk groups. The fda requires two months of follow up safety data before drugmakers can even submit for emergency use side effects typically appear in the first two months so far both companies report. No serious side effects both pfizer and madeira claimed their vaccines are ninety. Five percent effect to the question will they completely prevent a cova one thousand nine infection and how long that protection. Last the fda's advisory panel will convene on december tenth review the pfizer data. Then the fda will vote on whether to approve it. Meanwhile cdc advisory group will recommend should get vaccinated. I i li efficacious and effective vaccines have crushed epidemics like smallpox and polio. and measles. we can do that. The fda expects to have enough doses to begin vaccinating twenty million people by year's end starting with healthcare workers the general public likely following in the spring or summer. All right now. Tom joins us tom. They're even more vaccines coming down. The pike in the new year your astra zeneca and johnson and johnson both expect to have their vaccine candidates ready in the first quarter. The military is already planning the distribution for all of this within twenty four hours of approval. It plans to start shipping the vaccine to all fifty states. It's a big logistical challenge and tom. A vaccine can't come fast enough as more than two thousand. Americans died from covid it a single day for the first time since may and the number hospitalized set a record at more than eighty thousand.

Pfizer FDA Tom Costello Moderna United States Madeira Zeneca Smallpox CDC Measles Polio Johnson Astra TOM
Dr. Fauci Urges Public to Double Down on Public Health Measures Until Coronavirus Vaccine Is Available

Bloomberg Best

00:37 sec | Last week

Dr. Fauci Urges Public to Double Down on Public Health Measures Until Coronavirus Vaccine Is Available

"Dr Anthony Fauci is calling vaccines and opposing force to fight the Corona virus outbreak Mad Madison reports. Speaking at the White House, Fauci touted vaccines by companies Fizer and Moderno that are 95% effective against the virus. So those of you not acquainted with the field, the vaccine ology that is extraordinary that is almost to the level. What we see with measles, which is 98% effective, the nation's leading infectious disease expert noted. Vaccines have crushed other disease outbreaks, such as smallpox and polio found, she argued. People are also in imposing force to covert 19 if they follow through with mitigation

Dr Anthony Fauci Fizer Fauci White House Measles Infectious Disease Smallpox Polio
History of the COVID vaccine

The Economist: Editor's Picks

07:50 min | 2 weeks ago

History of the COVID vaccine

"The promise of a covid. Nineteen vaccine is immense. But don't underestimate the challenges ahead. Nine long years elapsed between the isolation of the measles virus in nineteen fifty. Four and the licensing of vaccine. The world waited for twenty years between early trials of polio vaccine and the first american license in nineteen fifty five marvel then at how the world's scientists are on course to produce a working vaccine against sars kobe to the virus that causes covid nineteen within a single year. And not just any vaccine. The data from a final stage trial unveil this week by pfizer and biontech to pharma companies suggests that vaccination cuts your chances of suffering symptoms by more than ninety percent. That is almost as good as for measles and better than the flu job with an efficacy of just forty to sixty percent. Suddenly a dark winter there is hope not surprisingly phases news on november ninth rouse the markets bulls investors dumped shares in florax peleton tech firms which have all benefited from the corona virus and instead switched into firms like disney carnival and international consolidated airline's group. Which will do well. When the sun shines again the oecd. A club of mainly rich countries reckons that global growth in twenty twenty. One with an early vaccine will be seven percent. Two percentage points higher than without there is indeed much to celebrate. Pfizer's results suggest that other vaccines were worked to over. Three hundred and twenty are in development. Several in advance trials most liked pfizer's focus on the spike protein with which sars covy to gains entry to cells. If one vaccine has used this strategy to stimulate immunity of us probably cantu pfizer's vaccine is also the first using a promising new technology many vaccines prime the immune system by introducing in fragments of viral protein. This one gets the body to make the viral protein itself by inserting genetic instructions contained. In a form of our anna. Because you can edit aren. Hey the vaccine can be tweaked should the spike protein mutate as it may have. Recently in ming this platform can be used with other viruses and diseases possibly including cancer on original focus so celebrate how far biology has come and how fruit fleet can manipulate biochemical machinery. For the good of humanity. There will be time later to worry about how that power might also be abused and celebrate the potency of sciences at global endeavor drawing on contributions from across the world. A small german firm founded by first generation. Turkish emigrants has successfully. Worked with an american multinational company headed by greek chief executive yet despite the good news too big question out about the characteristics of the vaccine and how fast it can be distributed. These are early results. Based on ninety four symptomatic cases of covid nineteen from among the forty four thousand volunteers. Further answers must wait until the trial has gathered more data. It is therefore not clear whether the vaccine stop severe cases or mild ones or whether it protects the elderly whose immune systems are weaker nor is it known whether inoculated people can still cause potentially fatal infections in those yet to receive jobs and it is too soon to be sure how long the beneficial effects will last clarity will take time in the next few weeks. The trial should be declared safe. Though further monitoring of the vaccine will be needed. The company's predict that immunity will last for at least a year. The ninety percent plus efficacy so high that this vaccine may offer at least some protection to all age groups while the world waits data it will have to grapple with distribution will be in short supply for most of next year. Although our any jobs may prove easier to make it scale than those based on proteins pfizer's requires two doses. The company has said that it will be able to produce up to fifty million doses in two thousand and twenty one point three billion next year. That sounds a lot but america alone has over. Twenty million first responders medical staff care homeworkers an active duty troops perhaps a fifth of the world's seven point eight billion people including two thirds of those over seventy risk. Severe covid nineteen. Nobody has ever tried to vaccinate an entire planet at once as the effort mounts. Ge's medical glass and stuff could run. Short worse visors shots need to be stored at temperatures of minus seventy degrees celsius or even colder far beyond the scope of your local chemist companies building an ultra cold chain but the logistics will still be hard. The vaccine comes in batches of at least nine. Hundred and seventy five doses. So you need to assemble that. Many people their first shot and the same crowd again. Twenty one days later for a booster. Nobody knows how many doses will be wasted so long as there is too little vaccine to go round. Priorities must be set by governments. A lot depends on them getting it right within countries and between them modeling suggests that if fifty rich countries were to administer two billion doses of vaccine that is eighty percent effective they would prevent a third of deaths globally if the vaccine was supplied according to rich and poor countries population. That share would almost double. The details will depend on the vaccine. Poor countries may find ultra cold chains. Too costly the domestic answer to these problems is national committees to allocate vaccine optimally. The global answer is kovacs. An initiative to encourage countries equal access to supplies ultimately though the solution will be continued work on more maxine some might survive in commercial. Refrigerators of those will work. Better on the elderly still others might confer longer protection require a single shot or stop infections as well as symptoms all those that work will help increase apply. Only when there is enough to go around. We'll anti vaccines become an obstacle early. Reports suggest the jap causes fevers and eggs which may also put some people off. The good news is that an efficacy of ninety percent makes vaccination more attractive. The next few months will be hard global recorded. Death rates of surged past their april peak. Governments will struggle with the logistics of axon nation. America is rich and it has world class medicine but it risks falling short because the virus is raging there and because the transition between administrations could lead to needless chaos and delays squandering lives. When a vaccine is at hand would be especially cruel. Science has done. Its bit to see off. the virus. Now comes the test society

Pfizer Biontech Florax Peleton Tech Polio Measles Cantu Pharma Kobe Corona Oecd FLU Disney Anna
COVID-19 treatment to receive emergency-use approval from FDA

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

01:18 min | 3 weeks ago

COVID-19 treatment to receive emergency-use approval from FDA

"The excitement about the Pfizer vaccine against Cove in 19, echoing all around the world, but the cheering Coming from a site ofthe Middletown Road in Pearl River, New York, That was a bit louder because that's the location where hundreds of scientists have been working on his vaccine around the clock, and Sean Adams is live with that story, Shawn. Rocklin County Executive Ed Day called Fizer executives to say well done. He's tipping his hat to the scientists and the researchers here in Pearl River who have have persevered persevered and and apparently apparently produced produced a a quite quite promising promising covert covert vaccine. vaccine. The The core core Frizer Frizer effort effort has has really really always always been been there, there, and and I I get get to to see see it it to to see see it it developed developed such a matter that we're dealing with the crisis over my lifetime. Andi have Frizer partnership a bio in Tech. Come up with a A A vaccine that will deals with 90% of the infections is just an amazing thing. Right now. Lifesaving research has occurred here at this property, the old lead early lab facility for over a century work on diphtheria, smallpox and polio. Visor and bio in Tech will continue to monitor trial participants for effectiveness and side effects. So far no serious problems. It's not clear yet how long immunity will last in a few weeks they could seek FDA emergency approval. The goal is to produce 1.3 billion doses next year.

Pearl River Sean Adams Rocklin County Executive Ed Day Fizer Pfizer Cove Shawn New York Andi Tech Diphtheria Smallpox Polio FDA
Pfizer’s covid-19 vaccine is highly effective, but don’t expect to get it soon

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:16 min | 3 weeks ago

Pfizer’s covid-19 vaccine is highly effective, but don’t expect to get it soon

"More about that Cove in 19 vaccine that could help finally bring an end to the pandemic and allow families to get back together with their friends and relatives is K CBS's Matt Bigler reports. Medical experts say the medicine will likely be both effective and in very short supply cleared the most anticipated vaccines. Polio doctor Jeff Silver is director of vaccinations for Sutter Health says it is extremely encouraging that Pfizer's covert 19 vaccine is effective in preventing the disease in 90% of people. In a webinar hosted by the Bay Area Council. Dr Silver says there will likely be minor side effects from the two injection drug localized one living 80 and some fever. The biggest challenge for distribution maybe storage. The Pfizer vaccine requires ultra cold freezers, which pharmacies and even hospitals don't usually have. Who should get the vaccine first if it's approved by the FDA. Dr Bernard Low at UCSF says the first in line should be the elderly and nursing home staff, followed by doctors, nurses and teachers. All of them are integral to providing care adviser says It may be able to produce 20 to 40 million doses of the vaccine by the end of the year, which means there will be extreme shortages. Matt Bigler KCBS coming upon

Matt Bigler Jeff Silver Bay Area Council Dr Silver Pfizer Sutter Health Polio CBS Dr Bernard Low Fever Ucsf FDA Kcbs
Ellen Pompeo Hints at Grey's Anatomy End, Khloe Defends Kim's 40th B-Day Trip Amid Backlash

Daily Pop

06:00 min | Last month

Ellen Pompeo Hints at Grey's Anatomy End, Khloe Defends Kim's 40th B-Day Trip Amid Backlash

"It's time for some daily. Pop Morgan. Is out today suggested I joined once again by actress kitchen night polio. Thank you for joining us from Georgia. Loving for having me. Thank you. says. They do even. Just in case. Well, thank you very awesome. I want some. Okay. One of your favorite TV shows may be ending grey's anatomy has been on for fifteen years and Ellen pompeo just made a very shocking confession about what is next she tells variety. We don't know when the show is really ending it, but the truth is this year could be at this is also the last year of Ellen's contract. Okay. So Justin. Do you think they should end the show now while they're on top because people are still loving the show. Grey's anatomy is Kinda Sorta like young and the restless in the sense that like it can go forever and could miss a whole year. I'm back watched two episodes and then be caught up again you know what I mean. Yeah and the answer minds right and almost reminds me of the time. Do you remember when the hills was I going off Air Lauren Conrad was going to walk out the church and it was going to finish and she thought the curtains were going. To close and all of a sudden kristen cavalieri walks in and they revamp did I think Ellen pump? POMPEO is gray but the show can survive without her but can't survive without Shonda see. So Shonda, of course, just send them big NETFLIX's deal and it's to my understanding from what I was reading that she is literally parting ways with ABC completely, which may mean she's not GonNa have our hands on this show as much as she has in the past maybe not at all. And without shining once you've created show. Yeah. But once you've created a show, it's your show and I mean who's changed things happen we don't know how her contract is structured it could just be humming net flicks. One hundred percent but do I mean I think ABC has Shonda rhimes was so early in her career I don't think any see would have given Shonda. rhimes so much ownership over that show where she could move it to ABC but I think that Shonda rhimes, this voice, her blood, her sweat is so in this show that yes if shot arrives went to Netflix she will still get her coins from this show and she will let Iran. We'll be run by somebody else. That's does her voice. Okay. So listen I know somebody who used to write for how to get away with murder and he told me that his job was literally pointless because he says we were instructed to come in with ideas and we always did we came in and we said here's this. Here's that here's this but it always went with whatever Shauna had envisioned. Thank you for your ideas. Those are good and all but. We're going to do this. Appreciates the help but what did you say? No I said well, clearly, she has something you know I know it can be frustrating for someone to shoot down your ideas but the longevity of her career and all the shows that she is there's a reason why they've been successful and I know the Debbie Allen has been doing a lot with race mad at me. You know. You never know she still no matter she goes to net she still you know that's still her show. They can't take that away even if she starts creating another network. One hundred percent you know what? I am all about being petty and I heard about the drama shameless ABC for not giving Shonda that extra fast pass at Disneyland Shame on you. But if I'm Shonda RHIMES, I don't give y'all keep the show going on still get the cash I'm not gonNA. You know bitch and fuss about it. I have two kids got college should be four and I love living fancy like Oprah. We'll see what happens but I know there's some diehard grey's anatomy fans that are just not ready to say goodbye yet. So we will have to wait and see okay Khloe Kardashian has a message for the people who are hitting on Kim's birthday trip. She told Ellen Degeneres. She knows this year has been very frustrating for everyone but there Was a good thing. I did hear that people were upset that we all went out of town but also its her fortieth, and this is something that she really wanted to do for us. It was such a nice thing and being there with all the precautions and everything that we took and being there and how grateful everybody was for the tourism aspect of it and how. So many people said that we were their first party or guests that they've had in months and what it's done like for them to be able to pay their bills or to do. So for their family I mean just hearing those. Yeah. Messages when we were there, it was really a we felt really good and we felt so safe. So safe Wow. You know I knew the minute that first photo went. Oh, here we go. It's GonNa be a firestorm and For me I went to Cynthia Bailey's wedding in Atlanta and a lot of people were giving flack about that I thought about it for ten seconds and when it's a milestone, a wedding or fortieth birthday or something. Of that magnitude, it's hard. Skip it. It's hard to say or I'll just wait until next year. So I completely understand why there was so much backlash but I also understand why you wanted to continue in go on with it because you know sometimes. Life Yeah Kisha. And and the truth is that you know they did everything I think unfortunately, the Kardashian. Sometimes are just a position where you're kind of damned if you do damned if you don't. I'm not mad at him. I'm like, go ahead live your best life you share money you should be able to spend it how you WANNA spend it and they did everything they could to keep people safe in terms of quarantine in terms of getting Kobe task I mean, what more can you ask for it? Some people are upset because they don't have the option to do it, but you know sometimes you you can't just live perilously through the and plan your trip that newest you.

Shonda Rhimes Ellen Pompeo ABC Grey Khloe Kardashian Netflix Ellen Degeneres Ellen Pop Morgan Georgia Lauren Conrad Ellen Pump Debbie Allen Kristen Cavalieri Justin Murder Shauna Kobe Shonda. Rhimes
Trump, Biden make final campaign push with less than a week before Election Day

Morning Edition

03:28 min | Last month

Trump, Biden make final campaign push with less than a week before Election Day

"Time next week, we'll be sorting through what we know of results. Amazing. We're getting close will be sorting through a lot. So in these final days, we do the itineraries. Tell us anything about the race. Tell us a lot. They show who's on offense. Who's on defense President Trump was in Nebraska yesterday, fighting for the one electoral vote that the Omaha area congressional District Awards polls show Biden up there. Even as Trump is expected to win the state as a whole. The president is making repeated trips to the states that put him in the White House, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, He needs to hold them to win a second term. And beyond that he's just going everywhere. Arizona today trying to put a dent in the steady national lead that Biden has built, and at the same time, Biden went to Georgia yesterday. That's a place Democrats have not won since 1992. But they're getting closer and closer in recent elections, and early voting trends indicate a lot of younger first time voters are showing up and Democrats feel like that could be the key to winning. Then, later this week, Biden goes to Iowa. His running mate, Kamala Harris, is going to Texas. And all of this underscores thie different routes to 270 electoral votes that Biden has right now. Even though his campaign is certainly making sure to keep coming back to Pennsylvania and those other key states. They don't want to repeat 2016 and neglect those places, right? Well, that's where the candidates are. What are they saying? What's the message in these final days? I've been messaging has really been focused on leadership of using the perch of the White House to be more inclusive and unifying. Hey, went to warm Springs, Georgia yesterday. That's a place that Franklin Roosevelt spent so much time trying to recover from polio and then later on in life. I didn't give a speech there, drawing in Roosevelt and amplifying this message of resilience and hope. He also continued to criticize President Trump's lack of leadership confronting the pandemic here. He was later in the day in Atlanta. Or the 225,000 dead Americans because of covert 19. 7800 right here in Georgia. Millions of people are out of work on the edge. I can't see the light at the end of the tunnel of Donald Trump has given up And, by contrast, here's President Trump in Omaha last night, we will get rid of this whole thing. We will get rid of this virus. It'll be very you watch. It's going to happen very quickly, and we're goingto have our country back and the whole world is going to be coming back. President. Trump, of course, was hospitalized than recovered. And since then he's double down this message that the virus is not so bad, but that's not stacking up against the reality of record numbers of cases in recent days. Especially in places like the Midwest where where President trump wass and hospitalizations air up as well? Scott. What one issue That's come up a lot recently, especially Pennsylvania's fracking. I know it's an issue you actually covered in a former life. Can you talk us through this issue and what what it's about? Yeah. President Trump has really been seizing on comments that Biden made in the last debate that he wants to phase out fossil fuels like oil and gas. Biden does want to limit future permits for fracking on federal land, but not ban it as a whole. The president thinks this is something that can really hurt barging in Pennsylvania. I think there's a lot of reasons why it might not be the powerful argument that the president thinks he is just to take through them quickly. The industry slowed down a lot in recent years from its peak in Pennsylvania. There's a lot of wind and solar activity and in booming business there and maybe most importantly, it's always been controversial in Pennsylvania because of environmental concerns, and that's especially the case in the eastern part of the state. Where there's a lot of votes.

President Trump Biden Pennsylvania President Trump Wass Georgia White House Omaha Franklin Roosevelt Kamala Harris Warm Springs Polio Arizona Midwest Iowa Nebraska Texas Wisconsin Scott
Biden says US must come together to fight virus

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Biden says US must come together to fight virus

"Joe Biden is making a call for healing his closing message a week before election day by then said the nation's become increasingly divided and ugly under president trump and some wonder if it's past the point of no return as the heart of this nation turned to stone he doesn't think so I run to unite this nation and to heal this nation by then spoke in Warm Springs Georgia doting that's where FDR went to recover from polio and to guide the nation through crises he says it's a reminder of the country can be healed we can restore our soul and save our country Sager mag ani Washington

Joe Biden Donald Trump Warm Springs Georgia FDR Polio President Trump Ani Washington
"polio" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

08:15 min | Last month

"polio" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"DOT COM. Letting a polio. Polio. I. Think that I am I'm not sure how to tell you that. You, never started the show. So subdued I think. I think he actually have polio. Tried to do that one time where I'm like, Hey, what's up and you're like, no. That's not always start the show. So. There's an awesome story behind that and I really wanted to start the show off with that today because ever have like one of those weird moments in your life that you've totally forgotten for years and years and years, and then all of a sudden it just POPs back up and you're like, Oh Shit I. Remember that one time with this person in this thing, he's share. Yes. Here's what it was. Right. So last night at a little bit of difficulty sleeping Kinda, just rummaging through it's one of those nights where I felt like I was forgetting something like always forgetting something of like check all of those emails did I, text these people back today I know I'm forgetting something and I don't know what it is. There were a hard time sleeping right. So one of them I was scrolling through facebook to try to find this one guy for this one thing and. Find this one name and Blah Blah Blah rights Throughout. That process like I was trying to type in like their first names I'm not going to say this guy's first name in case he were to listen to this show or whatever. Right but. I'm very I gots to. Los Angeles. I was very adamant I mean coming out of Nyu and all that stuff. It was very adamant about in silver my professors like soon as you get there, get into an acting class rates you forget how much you hate people in acting class until you get in there and you're like Oh God dammit. I've got to put up with these assholes never forgotten personally. Really. Anytime. I mean an actor that's a real actor. You have a friend I won't say his name. And I love him I love hanging out with Han. But when we start talking about acting, I want to punch him in the face. And I'm an actor. But I just don't. He's here. Yeah. Like I don't take it. So serious that I don't I don't think it in the same way. Here's the deal always always known that it is a very vain profession and therefore when I was always conscious of when I went out to dinner or whatever I would talk about the craft of acting the art of it or anything else I would always leave that bullshit behinds like. My personal belief is like a job as an entertainer, all the way around rights be great whenever the cameras on and then whatever the bullshit goes on. Later, you don't need to tell anybody your processor like the Hawk I don't needs. No you put forty pounds of weight. Jackets for the shot show. Showtime minutes Ethan. Hawke Ooh face of him like. Over here. Out So last night I'm scrolling through the book of faces trying to find this one guy's name to to write him back this message, right? And I stumbled across somebody from my past that clearly I've been friends with on facebook for years and years and years, and it's this one guy like God. Damn. Why does that name ring a bell and I clicked their profile picture because when you see it's a tiny little circle and you can't really tell what's going. Right you cook the pope, the profile picture on your phone and I was like an soon as it popped up and this guy was is now married with kids and all that stuff like but he still had the same face of what this story was that I remember no like Oh my God when I first got to Los Angeles I signed up for this acting class. This is a fun fact it was Vincent Chase. Vincent Chase. So Mark Wahlberg had gone there. He ended up naming the lead character and entourage after Vincent. Chase same guy writes it's right by rocket Ralph's. Rochman Ralph's right. Right across the street old school guy. He's been doing it for years and years and years, and he's great. You met a ton of awesome people in there. Who ended up becoming huge all that shit right and it was great. However, there was some people who just took shit way too seriously the reason why he was so good was he would always try different shit. One of the things that he asked us to try as an exercise of him and why don't you write your own seen for your scene partner and then you guys act that out together. And then you judge each other and Blah. Blah, Blah Blah. This guy. Clearly going for an Oscar in the back of this tiny shitty. Brea. Started off his speech, his monologue with his fucking scene partner. Comes in and he tells his wife is bad news right comes into the door that stage door you know the old wooden stage and he just looks at her and he goes. I think I've polio. and. I burst out laughing. Okay. Polio hasn't been since the nineteen twenty s I think FDR was the last one who actually suffered something from it right sorry. Was this in the scene or he was saying okay and he had written it and it was like you went home and wrote that I think you have polio you're coming home to tell your wife that you think you have polio kicks the door open right comes in. So I. I think I have it was it was real summer Dahmer. Okay. He went sombre with. A one of those trench coats on and a hat. Took it off. He put it on the coat rack. He put the hat on the coat rack and he was just like, and this is something he got because they usually have a back room. Stuff that you can put onto like feel more like the character and it stinks it's old thousands of people who've been wearing it for years and years before you whole thing and he comes in and puts his hat on the hook and he's like. Polio I burst out laughing I. Didn't know you could read a comedic seen dramatic scene it was up to you, right. Homeboy had written a dramatic scene about him having polio didn't know is that it was comedy actually I'm dying laughing the entire time right and. So he does the thing and it's seen and he's real shook up about it and in all of this shit and I'm like, Oh my God I haven't thought about. The Guy who thought he had poll who wrote that? He thought he had polio in years until last night and. I burst out laughing lesson I was like Oh my God i Miss Him and Holy. Shit. Dude, if you would've told me back then that my life would have been what it is today after witnessing that because like part of me watch that guy and I was like, uh-huh, fuck if this is what Los. Angeles. Get Out of here. I cannot take any of these people seriously. I'm not hanging out with motherfuckers like this in real life, right? What was your? What was Say what mine was. No I wasn't asking alright because it was comedy obviously but I Follow. This guy tell me that you walked in Went I. Think I have polio as your seen that would have been great. But. You can't. You weren't allowed to do that in that class where it was just like. Amen. You couldn't make fun of people. You know what I'm saying, let's Guy Seriously. However I was after him and mice scene was about me telling my roommates that I was raped. By a girl and the the joke of it was like the whole comedy bid of it was is that I came four-times right so my roommate keeps going over and over again he's like, I'm sorry I hate to stop you but you came and he was like, yeah, I mean after the first time like I tried to get out of there but I couldn't say the next to. The fourth orgasm my head I like I've got to get out of here but you play dead seriously and like it was a huge deal everybody laughed and Blah Blah Blah right Ross is hilarious..

polio facebook Los Angeles Vincent Chase Rochman Ralph partner Mark Wahlberg Nyu FDR Hawke Ethan Oscar Ross Brea Los polio.
Jennifer Lawrence Confronts Anderson Cooper

Daily Pop

06:56 min | Last month

Jennifer Lawrence Confronts Anderson Cooper

"Morning everyone are you ready for some day leave? Just out today. So Morgan and I are joined again by Kisha Knight Polio. Actress a mother and you probably know her from house of pain and the cosby show. Thank you for joining us again and we are. Coordinated, in our Maulvi Pinky we are. Show and here we go. All right. Have you guys been missing Jennifer Lawrence because I definitely have we haven't seen her much recently, but she is back. She hasn't changed a bit. She still holds nothing back. In fact, she's talking about that infamous fall at the Oscars and why is set off of nasty little battle between her and Anderson Cooper listen to what Jennifer said on Heather McMahon's absolutely not podcast. I'm sorry but interesting Coober I saw him on. CNN. Lee. Three days later saying like what she'd obviously the ball and it was so devastated this horrific humiliation to me that like took away like I don't know ever have a chance to give a speech that again I saw him at a Christmas party and I let him know my friend told me that they was. But he apologized and I think I think we're good friends now. Do you think I wanted to fall getting Oscar but I remember when I led with was have you ever tried to walk upstairs in a ball gown? Right. So then how do you know like I with that? He apologized. Oh my gosh. Okay. I gotta go straight. Ahead some pesky reporters. To write stories sometimes, it's so weird. I haven't been in therapy about it for years now anyway, what was the question? is you see this particular person which I know loves you so much Is and you got to run into him or her at a party. What would you WanNa do would you talk to her? Would you say something? Oh my God I feel like I've envisioned this interaction first of all shot to Heather McMahon because I love her she is hilarious hilarious. I am obsessed with her so I'm happy for her that she got J. Lo on her podcast I feel like. Jay Jay said Jay Lop. I said. On kidding. I wouldn't mess up but. I will say I've had visions of maybe approaching certain people that write things and I think it really depends on the alcohol consumption. Cooper I right. I would go to Anderson Cooper because he's a respectable journalist, he made a nasty remark. You know you're getting an apology out of him but some of these other bitches are a little nuts. So I don't know I don't WanNa fuel anymore fire. So it depends it depends one hundred percent i. think that's a very good point you have to know who you're dealing with because if it's somebody who really doesn't like you and you get that five, a day could very easily turn the story around and write a whole other article saying crazy Morgan or crazy. Kisha. Came up in screen that man apart. But the other thing they if they're already writing crazy thing, they can write it regardless you scream are not. So. That's also true. I would say you've got to follow your gut and I completely agree with more again it depends on how many drinks of the consumed evening, how you're going to approach because you know sometimes yeah. You know there's certain like the GENITA- Crown, it may go let. Me Go left. It also depends on who's with you right. If my husband was with me see, my husband gets much more fired up than I do and I know you might find that surprising but he would be the one that would literally do me to say something I think you should say something you should call that did out and. I'm usually the one that's like, no, no, no. No let's just let it calm down. But if I'm getting like talked up into it, then I might yeah, pay south. Yeah versus if I have someone that's like, it's not worth the babe just to let's just go over here I'll be like. All right. You GotTa have your backup backup. Yeah. You got to have the right height man. If you're wanting to do it, it's got to be someone that's GonNa go up with you and have your back no matter what comes out of your mouth but. It's also good in these situations with somebody who's not necessarily your friend to be as composed as possible but I think when you're so heated already. Interaction, never goes as well as you want it to. and. All. Thank you. Scream at them. Yeah. I'm GonNa, say real quick. I think also even better way to handle this have a good woman someone who could do your dirty work for you. So you don't have to be the one that goes says us that this Lella you can have them do it and then your hands clean. One hundred percent yeah you need the right best e with you I like that okay. Moving out of channing tatum. So sad news I think channing Tatum Jessie j broke up again Jesse just posted this video drinking and dancing with the caption single live in a pandemic. That's how you get there strap. We talk about that. A source tells US Jesse and channing broke up months ago because they realize they're just better off as friends now they've brought up and gone back together multiple times at what point. Do you say this is finally do you think this is finally for these two I? I'm. Not Down here, you know I mean. Go ahead. No, you I mean I just think listen like you know it's supposed to be sort of like a new relationship is supposed to be fun. It's supposed to be easy and it might not last forever. But if it's supposed to be the fun easy relationship and you've already broken up four times in between that time, it just seems like clearly there's something here that is not connecting you to something is not working out. So just like leave it alone there's no reason for these to attack broken up three times like. In my yeah. At this point in life, you know my motto is. You know it's like spoiled milk. You don't put it back in the refrigerator. and. Come back and think it's going to be something other and foiled. On because clearly, it was gonNA work by now. Exactly Keach. Have you ever gone through this where you broke out was somebody got back together the whole thing I think that's something that probably when you're younger and you Kinda keep getting things to try and when you fall in love with the ones possibility I think as you get older and you've done it and you've learned that lesson, you realize you know okay you know what? This isn't working for me. It is. Okay. We don't have to make our. Yeah. I luckily, you said Fall in love with their possibility men is that true? Amir Young? You're falling in love half the time with just what you think. They're GONNA be your. Number set and then you realize that potential here and I. Think also when you're younger, you're more willing to be in a relationship that might not be perfect because you don't skip factor in time as much. But I think as you get older, you're like I don't have the time to waste on something that's really too difficult. You don't have the energy either

Anderson Cooper Morgan Heather Mcmahon Jennifer Lawrence Channing Tatum Maulvi Pinky CNN Cosby Channing Tatum Jessie J J. Lo Jay Jay Jesse Wanna Oscar LEE Amir Young Jay Lop Channing
Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

Daily Pop

06:29 min | Last month

Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

"Hey everyone. It is Kim Kardashian West fortieth birthday. We're kicking off the party right here right now on daily Pop Justin is out today's Morgan and I are joined by Kisha Knight Polio he's an actress kick ass mom and of course you know her from house of pain and as Rudy from the cosby show Kisha we're so happy you're joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We have so much to get to today we're going to be celebrating throughout the entire show you're going to hear from Kim's famous family. We're GONNA read breaking down Kim's most shocking moments and we cannot talk about him without talking about fashion. They go hand in hand the celebration is going on all day here on e- with the keeping up with the Kardashians marathon and Kim's fortieth birthday special that airs tonight at ten PM. The first Kim has always been an open book and she's made plenty of surprising confessions along the way watch this. You should just be who you are say what you want entrepreneur makeup mogul wife's mother and all around boss I'm going to do whatever I want Kim K. West confessed. There isn't anything she's afraid to do and her mind she has done it all and her crazy confessions don't stop there I. Love it during a livestream. Qna Kim admitted problem member of the Mile High Club she wants had sex in a public movie theater she goes commando almost all of the time wave TMI and she's still owns though seventy five, thousand dollar diamond earrings made her totally lose it. We Know Kim has been working on getting her law degree, but it sounds like she's mixing a little business with pleasure in a new questionnaire for e she revealed she likes a shot of Tequila with a cheeser when she said he's life with about being happy and when she's not hitting the books, she's heading gym her morning ritual includes a five fifty am start time to work sweat. Obviously, all that hard work has done a body. Good. It's not easy at all, but it's not all work and no play her favorite thing to do during her downtime. Text people with lots of glitter sparkle emojis. You could probably guess who he's in contact with most family I no matter what Kimmy also confessed she likes to treat yourself to a little. TV. But the mom of four go to guilty pleasures aren't exactly what you'd expect. I need your help help MTV's catfish is at the top of our list or she likes to unwind with some hoarders on a any. Other crazy Kim Confessions. Everything is always so public. She claims her hidden talent is smelling cavities and there's one celebrity whose beauty left her starstruck. No need to share Kim loves you. She's proved over and over and over again it's just a vibe and the confessions don't stop there. Kim told people she has models drowned her clothes so she can plan outfits in advance and she's spray tans her scalp. So her middle part has that extra glow. Oh that's a good ted. Have, for years, wargin timoth favorite Kim moment all my God. This is the hardest question I've been asked all year producers brought this up yesterday I'm like, how am I going choose but I think it has to be and I know Chris over this but it has to be when she's taking fees when chloe is on the way to jail like that's just know psychotic Kim to me it is it never gets old it so delusional and it's just amazing and why we fell in love with her in the first place it's the best it's that's definitely one of my top wants Kisha what am I okay I'm I'm going to go on the other end of the spectrum you know Kim. been doing things for a long time but you know I have to say it's all of the work that she's been doing to get convicted. Felons out of prison. The fact that she's taking a completely different turn and really helped us her platform to to affect people's lives in a positive way. One hundred percent. That's that's a really huge one and I'm going to it back to something a lot more superficial. I got. My favorite moment is when we just saw in that lovely package, Kim crying over her diamond earrings because honestly girls I relate if I had seventy thousand dollars, diamond earrings and I lost one that's probably exactly how I would react I've had mad but got ensure your jewels have to China and. Ensure those goals. All right. Well, caves fashion has changed so much over the years. So we're going to go deep into the archives. Take a look at Kim style evolution Ooh can really I am be our L. Y. Kardashian. K.. A. R. D. A. S. H. I. A.. Look. Very nice where do you win? Gucci and Jimmy, Choo Shoes and Louis. Vitton back to mix it up a little bit him style started out young and fun experimenting with Different Designers Have Wearing A. Skirt and a La Perla top a wonderful. Share. That'd be the not shoes I want to find something that is young and fun and fresh but still you know how classy and conservative this is my. She transformed into a sophisticated ladies setting the trends that posing Christian Louis, Vuitton he also, I'm wearing Eliah and Lorraine Schwartz I weren't accustomed gown I'm wearing our Kardashian collection leggings put this big waistband. To do we have favor Lon Max Mara when she became apparent this hot mama put her curves front and center. This is John Paul Go. Ta and I love her sparkly. It was it is. And you know I love it I just wanted to really go for it and be kind of like a robot a Blinky Sexy Robot I'm wearing address from revolve. Long Sleeve and it's hot out here. But whatever looks good. It was distressed by Rick Win. All made this for me and I love it him. You'll trade who you wearing. Where we wearing this evening, I'm wearing Vivienne Westwood now. has become so economy or calling it the Kim effect. This

Qna Kim Kim Kardashian Kim Confessions Kim K. West Kisha Knight Vivienne Westwood MTV Morgan Kimmy Kardashians Rick Win TMI Rudy John Paul Lon Max Mara China Mile High Club Vitton L. Y. Kardashian
NBC/WSJ poll: Support for Biden has almost doubled

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:52 min | 2 months ago

NBC/WSJ poll: Support for Biden has almost doubled

"NBC News Wall, Street Journal poll released yesterday, and support. For Joe Biden has almost doubled after just last week's debate the poll taken before trump announced he had covid nineteen has biden by fourteen, fifty, three to forty nine still with us our professionals. Steve Schmidt, Robert Gibbs Robert I am duty-bound to point out I think Hillary Clinton on this date in two thousand sixteen was ahead by exactly fourteen points with that in mind. What would your charge to your fellow Democrats be? Well I would. I would ignore the polls. And go full steam ahead on what you have to do to win this race next continue to assure the American people. That you're capable and that you've got a plan for implementing that. The. Change that you need to see in the White House but I think Lewis startling about that poll. This race has been remarkably stable Brian it's been stable for a really long time regardless of all that gets thrown at it, and so the NBC NBC eight previous polls, the average margin was Biden by eight percent in February it was Biden by eight percent in September. It was Biden by eight percent now it's fourteen. The American people got a good hard look at Donald Trump in that debate and they liked absolutely nothing of what they saw I don't think Joe Biden is going to win this race by fourteen points. The one of the last moments Donald Trump had available to him to begin to change the trajectory of this race in his favour not only did he miss that opportunity, but he actually handed a significant amount of support with now just four weeks left in this race to his opponent Joe. Biden. Mister Gibbs makes a great point Mr Schmidt and let's go further on. Politics. Steve Mitch McConnell is seventy eight. He is a polio survivor he is scared to. Of Covert nineteen by all available evidence politically, he is scared to death of not pushing through the third Supreme Court nominee what's going to happen? Do you think in the US Senate three Republican members down with positive diagnoses? Well look specifically when it comes to stopping a Supreme Court Nomination Brian you have to think about it like trying to rob a train before you can get to the safe with the gold on it on the train to derail the train you have to slow it down you have to be able to get on the train and so what the Democrats have to do is not be focused on delaying the hearings pass the election they need to be focused on delaying the hearings for the first day they need to push it back one day, and then once you can push it back one day you can. Get the second day, but the reality is is it'd be very difficult for the Senate to hold onto the time line because total recklessness of so many of these senators and of course, trump at the trump administration and all of the chaos that we're seeing play out over over this weekend, and then elect Wurley for the Senate I. Mean This is just a disaster I. Think Certainly Mitch McConnell understands. He's on the precipice of losing his Senate majority. It's almost a certainty that he will. It may be a wipeout. You see for example, Mike spn Mississippi Mike espy is in a very close race now you see. The Kansas Senate race, the Democratic candidate is points up there. So the it seems like the walls are collapsing on all of this. This was a terrible terrible week for trump and for all the trump of batters, enablers and accomplices in the United States Senate I, mean, it started with the with the debate and it got worse from there the. Senior leadership of the campaign scandalized there is a mutant in the campaign on Friday night. PEOPLE DON'T WANNA show up to work too terrified to go into the White House profound mistrust of their leadership, and then there's reports out tonight from the incomparable Gabe Sherman for example, a Vanity Fair talking about the divide in the family looking at how crazy trump's behaviors been. Over the course it is last weekend with Donald Trump junior apparently talent people that they have to try to rain man knowing what a disaster this is. So my view is this is all coming down the Walzer collapsing we're seeing that play out everything we're seeing trump do is from a position of weakness and the idea now that he's going to be able to. CAST himself as some type of hero for having defeated cove at I think is. A ludicrous delusion on the part of him Sean Hannity and his

Donald Trump Joe Biden Steve Mitch Mcconnell Senate Supreme Court NBC Kansas Senate White House Steve Schmidt United States Robert Gibbs Robert I Brian Hillary Clinton Street Journal Mister Gibbs Sean Hannity Mr Schmidt Gabe Sherman Mike Spn Mike Espy
Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

"City of Houston, working with researchers in the Texas Medical Center to attract the Koven 19 pandemic through wastewater City Health Department, Dr David Hurst claims that they can trace the Corona virus at a faster rate than traditional test methods. If we find it in whatever neighborhood that the numbers are going up, we will be able to get our teams to go door to door start informing people that what's going on in their community encouraged them to get tested, researchers say. Testing wastewater is not new of Baylor College of medicine, Dr used the same method back in the 19 sixties to find Houston's polio pandemic.

Dr David Hurst Houston Baylor College Of Medicine City Health Department Texas Medical Center Polio
How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | 2 months ago

How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? Because you're a partner in the delivering, you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. For, HIV prevention. And the uptake on that very very low, and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. Ultimately, the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, by spending money on malaria supposed to. Some. Fancy. Vacation or something. Yes. The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. was in my view grossly underfunded. You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. Well we spend. We have two big things. We do one of inequity in the US, which is lot about education, and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. These miraculous interventions in other fields. People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. Government's spending way more than plant. Can haven't been able to solve. So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. Of a mentoring program pilots of. How schools could organize a bit differently. So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. Sadly, there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation.

Malaria Bill Gates Co Founder Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Gates Foundation Microsoft Global Fund Polio United States Partner Nats Milorad HIV Berkeley Co Chair
Gates: The U.S. isnt helping get a COVID vaccine to the rest of the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:19 min | 2 months ago

Gates: The U.S. isnt helping get a COVID vaccine to the rest of the world

"Many organizations are working toward a covid nineteen back scene but even once it's discovered, we'll still have to manufacture and distribute it around the world that is a big incredibly complicated and expensive task. But ultimately, it may be the only way out of a crisis that has devastated the global economy and according to a progress report from the gates. Foundation has actually reversed progress towards poverty education and carrying diseases that report is out now. And Foundation Co Chair Bill Gates joins me today for the first of three conversations. I asked him about the scale of the vaccine distribution problem. Well, the European countries have stepped up here we don't have enough yet to buy for the entire world. The US is kind of unusual. It's funded a lot of RND that is helping move candidates forward, but it's only funded manufacturing procurement for itself and so is the Congress looks at. No Supplemental Bill. The historical leadership that the US. Global health whether it's smallpox eradication an issue polio. Congress will step up as yet. It's been a no show on this. How frustrating isn't I wonder I? Mean you're personally funding factories that are all working on a vaccine. You're you're sort of trying to organize this extra governmental effort. WOMP certainly talking to the Congress about their great history that they're rightly proud of on a bipartisan basis of how the USA showed up here. The benefits are stronger than ever because even from a selfish point of view at stopping the epidemic returning But strategically, and from a humanitarian point of view we should do what we've always done. Help save these lives and help try to get things back on track the. Report shows that not just the deaths from Cova, but also the disruption to the economy, the schools, the health system causing gigantic setbacks even far more deaths than the disease itself is causing in the US you mean globally, mostly globally, their health systems far more fragile their ability to come up and borrow a lot more money at the government level isn't the same as what the US can do. So they're suffering far more. One thing that is a priority of the foundation it sounds like is is equity overall, and in this case, equitable distribution of this successful vaccine. Tell me about the role of manufacturing and shortages around manufacturing. That could make that a big challenge well, a number of the candidates including Astra. Zeneca Novak's Johnson and Johnson and snuffy can be made at very low cost and very high volume, and so we've set up arrangements where. Not. Just the company that invents the vaccine and supervises the trials but also other companies who have high volume manufacturing capacity can take exactly that same vaccine and produce billions of doses so that you get many factories getting up to speed ideally were getting over billion doses out in twenty, twenty one and enough to end the epidemic and twenty twenty

Congress USA Bill Gates Foundation Co Zeneca Novak Cova Johnson Snuffy
Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Squawk Pod

05:26 min | 3 months ago

Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

"Breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here.

FDA Polio Joe Nine Sanofi Johnson Merck Pfizer Pfizer Jonas Salk Astra Zeneca Madonna Scott Gottlieb CEO Chloroquine Partner
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Two years ago I was in Nigeria and I went to a lab. In Matagorda Yep. And it's it's the town where both harangued bought stock. And they took us to a camp for sixty thousand internally displaced people and you know to see those polio workers working there. You know the day before I was there three people have been killed by a suicide bomber. Then, these these are the just. Devote devoting a lot of them are folios. Anyway, we. They, they took us to one of those labs. It was in Matt Gory onslaught of a hospital campus And I was in this room and it was in this room. Where they found the very last cases of polio in Africa. And it was. It was surreal. Being there. But then you outside this is fine on the building. And it was named for a Rotarians Oregon. who was very devoted to polio eradication help to fund this. So hell unfortunately that that lasts out pretty younger like this picture of her She's doing fine but you know, sadly the the. The The stopping polio. Didn't come soon enough for her but we're hoping it will for showed him. Thank you very much like thinking Mr I do and I think. Congratulations. and. Probably, pretty? Much. We're getting there. Thank you. Take. Care of. Again congratulations to the rotary clubs and to everyone who has in polio. Worldwide not only to conquer polio but also to create the infrastructure that we can use to combat this and other epidemics and pandemics that may come in the future. So we hope that the world will soon be free of polio and certainly hope that we will soon be on track to get covert under control for everyone so that we can get back to the normal life that we have enjoyed in the past and beyond as current disruption. So thank you everybody and be well and always be a powerful patient. Take good.

polio Matagorda Yep Nigeria Oregon. Africa
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Forces out there. Control the dialogue. and You know that's not easy. people have their beliefs. People have their causes but you know that's why it's important. You get you know real community leaders out in front and particularly some of those. Uh. In, religious communities in these first. Right I've been reading some very zing articles. It was a really good one and the Science American. It was very complimentary to the work that the polio plus people have been doing to help with Kovic and There's. My I think. One of the problems for many diseases is because we have cleared the my. There's a sort of historical Amnesia about it. You know we've forget how difficult they were things like measles things like this serious. We used have twenty thousand children a year die from. And when was the last time you heard somebody having? been down to single digits a year now for longer than I can remember so and I had. I had friends with polio. So I know very keenly and when onto other countries I've seen on the streets they. Wish to wins shrivel guns. We don't see that in America. Have Forgotten. So it's so easy for people this day why why should have bother my child was this scene because it's not so bad You know in the United States, for kids going to school and you know most states it's required that the kids have these vaccines So you know the United States checkable polio vaccine that that the kids receive as part of their routine immunization. you know it. You know it's been a lot of years for polio cases here in the United States and in Canada or you know so many places you know it's I I look at the rotary experience and you know we. Have, been added for thirty five years. rotarians believe. In a radical polio. Many of these rotarians countries that haven't seen polio for a long long time the United States. Rotarians have donated of their own money over one billion.

polio United States polio vaccine Kovic Amnesia America Canada
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:04 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"See with A. Face Mask protections that are going on a social distancing and with the you know the actual you know folks stay in their homes for a certain period of time stopping big events, all those things You know it's it's it's been. You know knock on Wood success success specify. So what did we learned about controlling this kind of epidemic or pandemic Both from polio and from your current experience with. And with people in the past, what does it take to get one of these things under control? You know I think we learned an awful lot over the years from polio. One is the the the importance of effective communication and you know particularly media work. For example always had billable been, you know that they don't allow them in my state but in many of these countries have billboards and these billboards, you know about the message of the importance of getting the bolio drops but all of those billboards were converted over to cove and says similarly radio advertising You know which is still social media in particular advertising on social media. All of these things were done in polio and they were also replicated in these countries using Using you know disabled techniques folded as we use. And we have. A, lot of staff in different countries and. The estimate is is during the first quarter. Of fifty million dollars worth of polio support. Directly from the partnership, not just from the country, but that which the polio partners support. Fifty million dollars that went to support Hobie. Nineteen interventions. So. Obviously communications and it sounds like community corporation because if people don't actually do it and all the communication doesn't help. Yeah absolutely it's it's the communications. This is establishing chesting regimen the polio network funds about one hundred and seventy six laboratories. In the areas that we serve as having those laboratories up and running and ready to go to joe analyze the cold chest. It's all that but you're absolutely right on nothing gets done. without support of you know the the individuals who live in a community. We've had polio resistance over the years in different places. where it always comes around is if we can persuade. The mothers and fathers. In the communities that we do that we we get religiously involved..

polio Wood Hobie joe
"polio" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:34 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Movement back a hint, but astoundingly didn't kill it a and. Rather than saying like no, we're not going to try this. People looked at polio cases and said this is so bad. We need to keep pushing forward despite that and so by the time salt came along and started working on his vaccine. You know people were already a little jumpy about the idea and it was made all the more so that he was trying. an unproven form vaccine where vaccines used attenuated virus, which is, it's live, but it's a weakened version of the virus, and it's in it's it's in a much smaller dose. What what Salk was suggesting what he wanted to use was a an inactivated virus, which is, it's dead in the in the sense that it can't replicate any longer. It's been treated with formaldehyde. But. Yeah, it's it's a huge dose of it so if it's not dead, you're in big trouble. Yet it was a big deal at the time because it was new science and a lot of scientists said that I don't think you could administer this much. Even killed virus safely. And so, what you had was a couple of different things going on a couple of. Potential pathways to take was give a little bit of that. Weaken virus. That's still alive. Two kids, which we know is gonNA infect them with the virus, so it's going to generate those antibodies, but hopefully it's not gonna be strong enough to get to that central nervous system point of infection. or A super dose them with this inactive virus, and that's GONNA cause antibodies in the blood, so that will one hundred percent prevent polio from happening. That will keep it from going to the central nervous system. They knew that right and that's great news, but boy you better be sure that that virus is perfect, because if it's not then you're in big trouble, right and not only not only that that's that's a big risk with it, but if you do it right, the risk goes very close to zero the other problem with it, because it produce antibodies in the bloodstream that leaves out the Gut, which means that you could still be infected by polio and. Colonize your gut and replicate and be passed in your feces, but because you have those antibodies in your in your bloodstream, it's going to protect you from ever developing poliomyelitis. Yeah, they were trying to stop the disease. Not Stop the virus right well. It depends on the paradigm like the one that wrote. Affects you. With polio is going to prevent the any poliovirus from ever colonizing your gut ever again, so it depends on which approach you were you're coming from and the course of some you know a couple of decades both came into use enough around the world that we actually have come close to eradicating polio. Thanks to this combination of both of them. Yes assault developed a two part test that he used on himself and volunteers, and then in nineteen fifty four you had to, you know this was yet massive PR campaign behind this like a in a big way because. They had to vaccinate a million children They were called the polio pioneers, and even though it was. Even though it look good. It's still a big deal to vaccinate a million kids with this new vaccine that you're not quite sure about yet, but they figured just. That was their only choice. They're like we can't just let polio. Continue to thrive and paralyze and kill our children. We have to take a chance with these pioneers right so so during this polio pioneer experiment It was actually from what I saw the first double blind in a major public health study, so no one knew whether they were getting the placebo or not or getting the vaccine, but one segment of this group of. Of Polio Pioneers, two, hundred, thousand of them were given a vaccine with that wasn't an activated, so there's a huge dose of still alive polio vaccine. In forty thousand of those two hundred thousand people came down with polio. Two hundred of them were kids who develop paralysis and ten died, and this is huge huge like. Can you imagine a setback like that or two hundred thousand? Kids were given a vaccine that hadn't been done properly like that would just stop it in its tracks now, but again because polio was so bad. America at the time was feeling very utilitarian and said you know. T two hundred kids, developing paralysis is horrible, but without this vaccine you know in Nineteen fifty to twenty, seven, thousand had developed paralysis so again they still push forward even with the government temporarily suspending vaccination programs or this this test I believe American. Parents still move forward in vaccinated their kids anyway with this this Sulk, what came to be known the IP or Inactive Polio. Virus that that salk developed. Tried the the inactivated poliovirus vaccine? To still around today, and again doesn't prevent the infection. but it does prevent the bloodstream for moving it onto the central nervous system. Right, which is, it's poliomyelitis. That's again what people mean when they say polio. That's right. Should we take another break and talk about the other vaccine? Yes, all right? We'll be right back to talk about the cheaper vaccine right after this. Actual. Bill. Everything School!.

polio Polio Pioneers polio vaccine Salk assault America
"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

08:18 min | 5 months ago

"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

"From Pitney Bowes. From wondering I'm Steven Johnson, and this is American innovations. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, the world received its first viable polio vaccine. Courtesy of Jonas Salk. His serum used in inactive form of the virus to stimulate antibodies in the blood. The vaccines arrival on the market changed American society overnight. Polio had left families shattered in the medical community baffled salk vaccine was supposed to bring an abrupt end to the fear and for a time it did. Saux name became legend, but he was far from the only scientists with an idea about the best way to cure polio in the journey to conquering the disease, Salk had a rival. Albert Sabin. Savin was vocal about his own theories and ultimately created a different vaccine. The fact that we now live in a world in which we're unlikely to ever meet a polio victim is thanks to these two men salk and saving. When the effectiveness of socks vaccine was called into question, Sieben journey to Russia the land of his birth to find the opportunity he had been looking for. The final clash between the two vaccines and the two scientists is ultimately ca true story of how polio was conquered. This is the third and final episode in our series on the polio vaccine. This episode is called. The fight goes on. Back at cutter labs, everything generally looks fine. How did this point I think we have to assume that there's a virus in some of the cutter vaccine batches either the virus has withstood the killing process, and it's somehow beating all the safety checks, or it's coming in during the bottling process after the testing is complete. I assume you've noticed where they do the bottling. This could be the source of the problem. Cutter is the only vaccine manufacturer to bottle their product in the same building where the live virus is inactivated. From time to time, accidental polio infections have occurred in diagnostic labs, so maybe the answer is airborne exposure. Maybe, some viruses, making it into the air here and then landing in the bottles of vaccine being manufactured. This is just a guess, but it's reason enough to shot cutter down. Lives are at stake and the surgeon. General doesn't WanNA take any chances. sheely knows this is bad. But how bad is it really especially with so much of the evidence inconclusive? Does this merit pulling the plug on the whole vaccination program. sheely convenience a scientific committee to help them harsh through all the data possibilities, meanwhile, the reported number of incidents from team did vaccines rises the committee helps sheely come to a decision, and they pressure him to make an announcement to the public. She is preparing to address country in his office when the phone rings. He's greeted with a verbal ambush from Basil O'Connor. Listen to me. This is all being blown out of proportion. Live virus vaccine advocates foot by Albert Sabin WanNa cast public doubt on socks solution. If you go along with Sabin I'll see to it. You lose your job. Is undeterred. On May eighth. He gets on TV before an array of microphones, he tells the public that there will be no further polio inoculations until all six vaccine manufacturers can be fully reviewed. While sheely acknowledges that this is a serious and costly setback. He wishes to make it clear that this is not an indictment of the vaccine overall. I know that people will fully understand and appreciate the reasons for this decision which has been taken on behalf of the children of the nation. There will be in time ample safe vaccine for all who need it and wish. Following Chile's televised address the headline in The New York Times Reid's turmoil over salk shots. The ecstatic countrywide celebration of the vaccine just weeks before now feels like a lifetime ago, confusion, conflict and doubt fall over the polio vaccine. It's an especially hard time for Jonas Salk, who takes personal responsibility for the tainted vaccines and the polio cases. They've caused. At an emergency meeting, the National Institutes of health sought conceive disappointment, blame and condemnation and the eyes of his fellow scientists. SOCK leaves the meeting. Feeling hopeless, alone, borderline suicidal. He wants to disappear, but there's no place to disappear to. He's the most famous scientists in the world. A May thirteenth after an inspection of factories, responsible for making vaccines selected lots from two companies are declared safe for public use. Chilly wants to restart the vaccination program slowly and with extreme caution. He doesn't want the government to simply dictate when and how that will be done though he needs some help. On May twenty third. He gathered a committee to make recommendations for this new phase vaccinations. The committee includes Tom Rivers Albert Sabin Jonas Salk John Enders and a number of other leading polio scientists. sheely asked him to vote on whether the vaccination program should continue, or and altogether until further notice, salk abstains. The committee comes down eight to three in favor of continuing Albert Sabin is one of the three opposed. He emphasizes that killed virus vaccine is just too dangerous, especially with the strains salk selected. Following the vote reporters seek out. Basil O'Connor. Hoping you'll have some choice words. They are not disappointed. Mr O'Connor. How would you respond to doctor savings charges that the sock shops are dangerous. How would I respond? This is old stuff. Sieben used it in an attempt to stop the field trials of the salk vaccine. Since then he's been using it on every possible occasion to stop the use of the Salk vaccine listen. This isn't about science. This is about rivalry and envy for years. Saban's trying to get what is called live virus polio vaccine, and there are no president prospects of getting one. O'Connor's frustration with Sabin doesn't change the fact that there was a flaw in some of socks vaccines after tireless investigation by the epidemic intelligence service scientists discovered the original theory. That shutdown cutter labs was incorrect. The mystery was never truly solved. The most accepted theory suggests that the virus mixtures sat in storage too long sediment, gathered and particles clump together to strongly for the formaldehyde inactivated. Ultimately two hundred cases of polio are traced to cut her seventy nine children who were vaccinated, got infected with the virus, which spread to one hundred and five family members and twenty contacts within their communities. Most of those infected were severely paralyzed and eleven. People died from it. As a result, the rules for making polio vaccine. Manufacturers are required to filter their virus solution prior to the FORMALDEHYDE, getting mixed in to prevent comping. These new measures are extremely effective, and there are no more catastrophes. However the public battles within the medical and scientific communities have taken their toll. The cutter disaster is fresh on everyone's mind. Parents weigh the risks and decide to keep their children away from the needle that Summer Boston and Chicago are blasted by polio epidemics suddenly. It's like the vaccine days movie theaters off limits. Beaches limits. The fear of polio descends upon American households once again. Perhaps now what the public needs is a new vaccine one? That doesn't.

polio vaccine Polio Albert Sabin Jonas Salk Basil O'Connor Albert Sabin Jonas Salk John E salk Albert Sabin Wan cutter labs Sieben Cutter sheely Pitney Bowes Steven Johnson Saux National Institutes of health Savin Chile Russia
"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

03:25 min | 6 months ago

"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

"The diamonds in the world and I won't do a bit of good and less major advances are made in the lap. He's reluctant to rush forward. Last time. Scientists rushed polio vaccine through the development process. The results were disastrous. He won't allow the mistakes of the past to be repeated and calls difficult. Hard edged genius who most of the time is only interested in one opinion. His own Lester O'Connor good to see you. Thanks for coming in. Thomas Rivers is director of the Rockefeller Institute. Hospital A self-described roughneck and the forefather of modern virology well rivers. Get right to the point. I want you to head up my foundations committee on scientific research. We need a polio vaccine and we can't have another park. Brody calmer situation God. No, you see. A lack of funding hasn't been the only thing slowing down polio research. Three Years Prior William. William H Park a professor of bacteriology. New York University medical. School had joined forces with the researcher named. Maurice Brodie to develop the cure for polio. They prioritize speed over safety and injected animal nerve tissue directly into children. They had no idea how dangerous that might be. The ended up infecting many of their young test subjects with the disease when they should have been and knock them against it. If that wasn't bad enough. The competition amongst researchers have the opposite effect of inspiring. Good Science John Colmer a pathologist in Pittsburgh heard about parks attempts and wanted to beat him to the punch, but there was a problem his vaccine was if anything, even more poorly researched. It killed nine people. Since then scientists have been understandably hesitant to test new vaccines. O'connor wants rivers to get the scientific community back on track, and to take a measured approach. How `bout you drop a list of research priorities, so we can emphasize first things first and trying to get somewhere for a change all run the scientific research group and I'll make sure it's run the right way, but we can't move forward unless we know what we don't know. By one, thousand, nine hundred thirty eight rivers has a plan. He says it before. Researchers can even think of developing a vaccine. They must I figure out how polio works how it gets into the human body. Now it's transmitted. The fight against polio books likely to be long-haul. With everything going on right now. A lot of people are asking if it's even possible to buy life insurance at all. The short answer is yes. You can buy life insurance during a pandemic, and if you have loved ones depending on your income, you probably should as an insurance marketplace policy. Genius is in contact with the life insurance companies on their platform every day. They're keeping track of all the changes in the market, so you don't have to. Which means they can get you covered quickly and for the best price. Here's how it works. Policy Genius compares quotes from the top life insurance companies in one place. It takes just a few minutes to compare quotes from the top insurers to find your best price. Wants to apply the policy. Jeans will handle all the paperwork and red tape for free. So if you're one of the many people.

polio polio vaccine researcher Lester O'Connor Thomas Rivers William H Park Maurice Brodie New York University Brody John Colmer Rockefeller Institute Jeans Pittsburgh first things first director professor
"polio" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"polio" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"That does that confer enough protection to actually protect people from Cova. Nineteen like we said not. Every antibody produced against a virus will end up attacking that virus and it's important to remember that the study has yet to determine whether these antibodies can stop the virus from getting into human cells replicating an infecting. But there are many reasons. This type of vaccine would be a breakthrough you don't have grow the virus and because you don't have to insert live or dead viruses into people. It would reduce the likelihood of having a bad reaction. I think that's the concept that that that these types of vaccines theoretically could could minimize safety risks. But I do think there's an open question about whether they're potent enough to to actually confer protection from disease another company in Oviedo Pharmaceuticals is also working on a gene based vaccine but it's using DNA instead of RNA. Lofta says results of its initial. Trials are expected in a few weeks to be clear until advanced. Trials confirmed that these gene based vaccines can actually make antibodies that can reduce the rate of infection. We won't know whether they're effective but there are about one hundred entities working on a vaccine. And that's what and LOFTA says at least eight are already doing human testing and one in China as reached an advanced testing phase. After just a few months remember. It took fifty years for the polio vaccine to be developed after the virus was discovered. One more cautionary note. The World Health Organization set a goal to eradicate polio by the year. Two thousand we came very close but even with the vaccine there are still some isolated pockets of polio.

polio vaccine polio Lofta Cova Oviedo Pharmaceuticals World Health Organization China
"polio" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Second Opinion

"Support comes from S T X films, presenting the upside don't miss the feel happy feel hopeful feel alive movie of the new year starring Kevin Hart. Bryan, Cranston and Ecole Kidman only in theaters January eleventh December is KCRW season of giving back. What are you grateful for breaking news award winning, cultural, coverage, eclectic music, free events, and concerts, and how about truth connection and community a KCRW it's all possible. Because of you you give because it matters your dollars. Make the biggest impact this month. Thanks to generous challenge grants. So cross off your list this season with a tax deductible donation at KCRW dot com slash join. Okay. It's time for a Sunday morning end of the year medical quiz. Don't worry. It can be done with your is only partially opened and it has only one question. Twenty eight is a the average age of people signing up for ObamaCare. Be the percentage of people crossing the border who are HIV positive or see the number of reported polio cases in twenty eighteen. Okay. Your answer. The answer is c in two thousand eighteen the world had only twenty eight cases of polio in basically, two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is remarkable because thirty years ago in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight more than three hundred and fifty thousand people were infected with the poliovirus most children under five in one hundred and twenty-five countries and most were left with serious disabilities and had profound impacts. On the rest of their lives. There is no cure for polio. But there are vaccinations. We thought we could make polio. The second disease that we are radicchio from the face of the planet. The I was smallpox. There is no question that the world vaccination program has been enormously successful, but moving from twenty eight to zero is an enormous step. In fact, this year the numbers are slightly higher than they were last year for polio. The barriers to success are not medical or scientific they are cultural religious and trust related by way of background. There are currently two types of vaccinations and injectable form used in wealthier nations and an oral form that is used in poorer nations. The injectable form uses dead virus to stimulate antibody production in the blood. The oral form uses a live weekend. Or attenuated virus to stimulate antibody production in the gut. We're hygiene is poor. There are some real benefits of using the oral vaccination once the attenuated or weaken virus can pass through the digestive system. It ends up often in source systems, and if others are exposed to fecal contaminants, they will also develop immunity based on the attenuated or weaken in virus. This is often called passive immunization. The biggest barrier to a radical polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan is surprisingly they capture of Osama bin Laden, you might remember that our attempt to capture bin Laden involved a fake immunization scheme in Pakistan, while we ended up getting bin Laden it left Pakistan with a general distrust of immunization schemes such that families are now avoiding children and rumors about immunizations. Bound and there are other barriers to immunization, including violent civil unrest and wars. But we are so close to a radical this horrible disease that it is worth having governments religious organizations philanthropists and businesses make that last huge, push and Aratu Kate polio. Once and for all, this is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion. This podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status has nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

polio KCRW Osama bin Laden Pakistan Cranston Kevin Hart Ecole Kidman Bryan HIV Dr Michael Wilks Afghanistan thirty years
"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Now let the folks that do come down and they put tremendous amount of energy and effort into this is not simply to take the polio virus says itself but to modify it so it does not produce polio in other words it doesn't replicate or reproduce it so and then they also use it because it can get into the brain so well to try to stimulate the immune system in the brain which is a very good system system of the brain is quite weak actually not in the body and of course but in the brain of toes and so they modified that virus to be more even more stimulating okay and you were saying the polio virus it doesn't you know i in its original say didn't affect the brain area what does it does affect that's why so so deadly it affects the brain and spinal cord all those things of course specific for neurologic tissue but that means it was really try to penetrate that so one of our problems is to find some system to penetrate only the nervous system tumor is not to penetrate other systems like say the blood or the long or something like that and how how successful is this study and and and in terms of targeting that well that's very good at targeting we have to we have to be a little conservative about this therapy it's it's certainly a breakthrough in a sense of modality so wait to try to use therapy you know the patients to this point have been very affected in the area that which the drug is given on the polio poliovirus i should say as given and that can react quite strongly there so there can't be side effects from that's and that's been in my opinion at least libertation of that they're happy so far is very effective in killing things in the local area we have to be sure the areas one that can stand that sort of injury in the first place in terms of treating thus doma what are some of the other treatments that are out there that are working and what is the time line in terms of treatment from diagnosis to you in general and can you can one recover from this well if we're lucky enough to find the tumor early from like us or something like that or most were to initially sometimes we find it just because the person had a head injury for no other reason finding a very small but general have to have a good surgery obtained which cannot be curative it's very hard to take all.

polio
"polio" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Polio of the day butke ruined jim date we gambled warned when the hill no lights camera action while dirt applies though barely enough for it pay deals to date the book i eat enough alone in the no one the dow may be the home in the going frans the ladies of low no with religion if we devote of latino joe me three gatt of age in the blink the do and help jio but at midnight every how i know wait you three felt bad blow doku she may pain and again we'll make your ranks dole now in the lower now the goal may be at the holy cow the goal turkey ringling doing i would of the amanda who is really who which this of why young white milk in the ism survival may say may yard in those going down block standard how the simply in the heat the the the.

Polio ringling milk
"polio" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Polio of the day butke ruined jim date we gambled warned when the hill no lights camera action while dirt applies though barely enough for it pay deals to date the book i eat enough alone in the no one the dow may be the home in the going frans the ladies of low no with religion if we devote of latino joe me three gatt of age in the blink the do and help jio but at midnight every how i know wait you three felt bad blow doku she may pain and again we'll make your ranks dole now in the lower now the goal may be at the holy cow the goal turkey ringling doing i would of the amanda who is really who which this of why young white milk in the ism survival may say may yard in those going down block standard how the simply in the heat the the the.

Polio ringling milk
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Norway they have only ever use the ip they've never use the opv but they have really great sanitation so they're not having this problem where if everyone is vaccinated with the i p v then every individual is protected and what you're not necessarily stopping is the transmission to other people that have not been vaccinated does that make sense yes and so yes so that's one of the biggest differences that i found between the two of them both of them are effective but in slightly different ways and like we said already administration of say one dose of the eye pv and one dose of the opv like administration of both of them is actually very great so it doesn't have to be all opv or all ibv there can be some combination but in areas where there is absolutely no circulating wild polio you're better off with the ibv because the side effects are far less and the risk of a future outbreak is lower as well mmhmm cool so economic modelling wait back in the 80s predicted that polio eradication would save forty to fifty billion us dollars between 1988 and 2035 which is why the global campaign started i would assume so yes because everything's about money but what's interesting is that it's predicted to cost seven billion dollars between just 2013 in 2019 to keep the surat occasion effort going right because of the surveillance surveillance a super expensive we're going to have to switch to the inactivated virus vaccine which is more expensive there's there's just a ton of cost involved in it so i've heard a lot of critiques and we talked about before how this eradication effort really was spearheaded and started because it was white children in wealthy countries who were being affected not only obviously but they were being affected because they were affected is how it became exactly worked on so there are critiques that say you know.

Norway ip polio surat seven billion dollars
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Cal fright that's amazing i know fan girling over here i know and so we talked about one of the biggest risk factors by of using the oral polio vaccine is that this vaccine associated paralytic polio there's another aspect of it we talked about the benefits but there's another thing that actually makes this of dangerous vaccine to use and that's the exact flipside of the fact that you get this passive immunization of your household numbers this exact same property is what allows for outbreaks of what is called circulating vaccine derived poliovirus moon this has happened in pakistan egeria in laos democratic republic of laos this what is called c v dp let's who many acronyms whoa the vaccine derived polio virus is circulating can evolve to become more virulent and more like it's wild type progenitor which is fascinating and scary and scary and insane and so this type of paralysis that's associated with the vaccine derive polio virus is clinically indistinguishable from that that you would get from a wild poliovirus you can tell by laboratory analysis so we know when outbreaks are going on what is which is causing it um so they are trying to move away from the use of opv now that the risk of these side effects are essentially outweighing the risk of infection by wild poliovirus in the majority of countries we also are seeing a push towards using a mano or by vaillant opv instead of a try vaillant opv are they safer or what's the well in the case of polio virus to their basically is no wild circulating pv to ray but we do see outbreaks of vaccine derived pv to happening from the four on that oral vaccine right so if they moved away so it would either be moving towards a killed virus vaccine the right exit vaccine.

polio vaccine laos Cal pakistan polio
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Successfully tested on polio solicted and mentally disabled children i might add god always always the us celebrated salk became a celebrity overnight appearing on tv to tell his story but to also cautioned viewers that more testing needed to be done in response saveon publicly declared himself to be quote antisouth saying that the killed virus vaccine that salk had developed was not enough to ensure lasting immunity and apply that it was downright dangerous he emphasized that the only way to eliminate polio was due alive virus vaccine which coincidentally was what he was working on at the time of course savings hesitation did have some legitimacy socks vaccine was in no way perfect despite sabin and others protestations this vaccine was the closest thing yet to a prevention for polio and plans were drawn up for a countrywide experiment can you made me what you this is so this is in 1950 three okay when he announced hey i have a vaccine that is close to being ready but it was still under trials at this point who is still under trial s and so in nineteen fifty four the testing to validate this vaccine was going to happen and it was going to be the unite the biggest public health experiment in us history to date low so over the course of 1954 over one point three million children would take part one point three million ilian while with some of them receiving the seen ono and others receiving a placebo and others just being observed without receiving any sort of injection in april nineteen 55 the results of the trial were in the vaccine was quote safe effective and potent thank goodness 'cause like one point three million children just like laura i mean they do trials before they go to trials but still i mean back then it was a little more if i'm sure it was yep short definitely the well they did the trials just on kids who had no choice in matter exactly it was estimated that this vaccine conferred protection to sixty to ninety percent of those vaccinated bells were wrong there was actual rejoicing in the streets wow seriously children around the world could now be protected against polio coup wants a it was a huge impact of that a major deal and salk was a god of science in the eyes of.

salk polio sabin ono antisouth public health ninety percent
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"There was only 1 strain of virus for the vaccine uh so creating the vaccine was pretty straightforward with polio researchers didn't know at the time how many strains there were and it wasn't until 1950 one that the final number was in well which as you mentioned was three that meant that an effective vaccine would have to contain all three types of the virus the other issue was how to grow enough virus to make vaccines previous reach research had indicated that the virus could only be grown in nervous tissue which was all but impossible to grow inside a lab time then a man named john anders tested this conventional belief by inoculating other tissue skin muscle kidney with the polio virus and it grew right because it actually infect your gut and inc can actually end didn't mention this but it can affect your spleen and your liver it can actually infect a whole bunch of your tissues but obviously they wouldn't have known that then because the only symptoms you really see or associate with polio highlight its or the nervous symptoms well he did he did know that like he did know he said well eat it infects your gut so it's got to be able to modify other god i or tissues smart guy inder well this incredible breakthrough would be the only polio related development to earn a nobel prize it revolutionize cell culture in the lab that doesn't really cool this finding along with the discovery of the three strains meant that the groundwork was laid for vaccine development the march of dimes began to essentially funnel money into the development of a vaccine an enormous number of scientists were involved in this process so let's meet the two men whose names you've probably heard linked to polio before jonas salk and albert sabin these two were similar in many ways both men were of eastern european descent both were jewish and both face substantial obstacles because of this however sabin was older more established and respected in the scientific community more concerned with earning the respect in praise of his peers who's like fella researchers salkin the other hand was young relatively young age novice when it came to police.

john anders nobel prize polio march of dimes jonas salk albert sabin
"polio" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"What's meaningful in life and how we create lives that are very meaningful why liked how the movie didn't fudge the terror the horror the despair of being told because this guys very active and then suddenly he's falling down on a tennis court he can't do what he usually does and and that's when polio was in 50s this was what was going on and he almost suicidal cough i know you are just reading the popcorn and this is their land yeah you put it in a you could throw it at i wouldn't have at one maybe as she bought some but no you're absolutely right i think that that's that's exactly what do you do he was very athletic man he was very um that's how we experienced the well very gregarious very extroverted loved people loved life was god fearing was a christian man very um spiritual and religious and but just loved being alive and he is he kind of i think he met the welter in with with his physicality with his body so then yes of course the polio hits and um it was he took it as a death sentence really yeah no it wasn't he took it as such i know but what else do you do when that happens i can't i'm general married i am i what do i do what what's the point of me anymore i think he internalize this kind of a value listeners he didn't know where his value was if he wasn't able to provide for his wife in the way that he had imagined you know he he his wife was pregnant with their first son and only son when the polio hit and he you know having to let go of the idea of playing sport with your son you know having to let go of those uh imagined dreams of of bonding with your unborn child and having to accept the fact that those things can't be how do you deal with as a grief process and he didn't know he didn't know that he he there was a period of three is right depressed and he really didn't want to let but i will underline.

polio